Science.gov

Sample records for cylindrical geometry space-dependent

  1. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  2. Dynamics of tilted cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sadiq, Sobia

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of tilted cylindrical model with imperfect matter distribution. We formulate the field equations and develop relations between tilted and non-tilted variables. We evaluate kinematical as well as dynamical quantities and discuss the inhomogeneity factor. We also obtain the Raychaudhuri equation to study evolution of expansion scalar. The solutions of field equations are also investigated for static cylinder under isotropy and conformally flat condition. Finally, we analyze some thermoinertial aspects of the system.

  3. Damage experiments in cylindrical geometry update

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Anne; Holtkamp, David; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    Using a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Previous experiments provided data about failure initiation in aluminum in a cylindrical geometry and the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime. The current series of experiments studied the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. Results from the current experiments will be presented.

  4. Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-09-21

    Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

  5. Non-modal analysis of the diocotron instability: Cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Lee, Hae June; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2013-04-15

    The temporal evolution of the linear diocotron instability of the cylindrical annular plasma column is investigated by employing the extension of the shearing modes methodology to the cylindrical geometry. It was obtained that the spatial time-dependent distortion of the electron density initial perturbations by shear flows leads to the non-modal evolution of the potential, which was referred to as the manifestation of the continuous spectrum. The evolution process leads toward the convergence to the phase-locking configuration of the mutually growing normal modes.

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments in a cylindrically convergent geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, B.; Weir, S.

    1995-08-25

    Due to the sensitivity of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities to initial conditions and due to the difficulty of forming well controlled cylindrical or spherical fluid interfaces, Rayleigh-Taylor experiments are often performed with simple, planar interfaces. Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena of practical interest, however, (e.g., underwater explosions, supernova core collapses, and inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions) are typically associated with cylindrical or spherical interfaces in which convergent flow effects have an important influence on the dynamics of instability growth. Recently, Meshkov et.al. have developed a novel technique for studying Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in a cylindrically convergent geometry. Their experiments utilized low-strength gelatin rings which are imploded by a detonating gas mixture of oxygen and acetylene. Since the gelatin itself has sufficient strength to resist significant deformation by gravity, no membranes are needed to define the ring shape. This experimental technique is attractive because it offers a high degree of control over the interfacial geometry and over the material`s strength and rigidity, which can be varied by adjusting the gelatin concentration. Finally, since both the gelatin and the explosive product gases are transparent, optical diagnostics can be used.

  7. Finite and infinite wavelength elastocapillary instabilities with cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John; Xuan, Chen

    In an elastic cylinder with shear modulus μ, radius R0 and surface tension γ we can define an emergent elastocapillary length l = γ / μ . When this length becomes comparable to R0 the cylinder becomes undergoes a Rayleigh-Plateaux type instability, but surprisingly, with infinite wavelength λ rather than with wavelength λ ~R0 ~ l . Here we take advantage of this infinite wavelength behaviour to construct a simple 1-D model of the elastocapillary instability in a cylindrical gel which permits a high-amplitude fully non-linear treatment. In particular, we show that the instability is sub-critical and entirely dependent on the elastic cylinder being subject to tension. We also discuss elastocapillary instabilities in a range of other cylindrical geometries, such a cylindrical cavities through a bulk elastic solid, or a solid cylinder embedded in a bulk elastic solid, and show that in these cases instability has finite wavelength. Thus infinite wavelength behaviour is a curiosity of elastic cylinders rather than the generic behaviour or elasto-capiliarity. Also Fudan University Shanghai.

  8. Reversed Field Pinch Dynamics in Toroidal and Cylindrical Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jorge A.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of the curvature of the imposed magnetic field on Reversed Field Pinch dynamics is investigated by comparing the flow of a magnetofluid in a torus with aspect ratio 1.83, with the flow in a periodic cylinder. It is found that an axisymmetric toroidal mode is always present in the toroidal, but absent in the cylindrical configuration. In particular, in contrast to the cylinder, the toroidal case presents a double poloidal recirculation cell with a shear localized at the plasma edge. Quasi-single-helicity states are found to be more persistent in toroidal than in periodic cylinder geometry. This work was supported by the contract SiCoMHD (ANR-Blanc 2011-045), computing time was supplied by IDRIS, project 22206.

  9. High-m kink/tearing modes in cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Hastie, R. J.; Pusztai, I.; Catto, P. J.; Barnes, M.

    2014-12-01

    The global ideal kink equation, for cylindrical geometry and zero beta, is simplified in the high poloidal mode number limit and used to determine the tearing stability parameter, Δ‧. In the presence of a steep monotonic current gradient, Δ‧ becomes a function of a parameter, σ0, characterising the ratio of the maximum current gradient to magnetic shear and xs, characterising the separation of the resonant surface from the maximum of the current gradient. In equilibria containing a current ‘spike’, so that there is a non-monotonic current profile, Δ‧ also depends on two parameters: κ, related to the ratio of the curvature of the current density at its maximum to the magnetic shear and xs, which now represents the separation of the resonance from the point of maximum current density. The relation of our results to earlier studies of tearing modes and to recent gyrokinetic calculations of current driven instabilities, is discussed, together with potential implications for the stability of the tokamak pedestal.

  10. Selective decay in a long cylindrical geometry in SSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, T.; Brown, M.; Dandurand, D.; Zhang, X.

    2010-11-01

    A helical, minimum-energy relaxed plasma state has been observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough (L/R = 13) so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v >=50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1--2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data is favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibits broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement to the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇xB = λB. Merging experiments are planned and additional data will be presented if available.

  11. The Athena Astrophysical MHD Code in Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, M. A.; Ostriker, E. C.

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a method for implementing cylindrical coordinates in the Athena MHD code (Skinner & Ostriker 2010). The extension has been designed to alter the existing Cartesian-coordinates code (Stone et al. 2008) as minimally and transparently as possible. The numerical equations in cylindrical coordinates are formulated to maintain consistency with constrained transport, a central feature of the Athena algorithm, while making use of previously implemented code modules such as the eigensystems and Riemann solvers. Angular-momentum transport, which is critical in astrophysical disk systems dominated by rotation, is treated carefully. We describe modifications for cylindrical coordinates of the higher-order spatial reconstruction and characteristic evolution steps as well as the finite-volume and constrained transport updates. Finally, we have developed a test suite of standard and novel problems in one-, two-, and three-dimensions designed to validate our algorithms and implementation and to be of use to other code developers. The code is suitable for use in a wide variety of astrophysical applications and is freely available for download on the web.

  12. THE ATHENA ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS CODE IN CYLINDRICAL GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Ostriker, Eve C. E-mail: ostriker@astro.umd.ed

    2010-05-15

    A method for implementing cylindrical coordinates in the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code is described. The extension follows the approach of Athena's original developers and has been designed to alter the existing Cartesian-coordinates code as minimally and transparently as possible. The numerical equations in cylindrical coordinates are formulated to maintain consistency with constrained transport (CT), a central feature of the Athena algorithm, while making use of previously implemented code modules such as the Riemann solvers. Angular momentum transport, which is critical in astrophysical disk systems dominated by rotation, is treated carefully. We describe modifications for cylindrical coordinates of the higher-order spatial reconstruction and characteristic evolution steps as well as the finite-volume and CT updates. Finally, we present a test suite of standard and novel problems in one, two, and three dimensions designed to validate our algorithms and implementation and to be of use to other code developers. The code is suitable for use in a wide variety of astrophysical applications and is freely available for download on the Web.

  13. Initial cooperative decay rate and cooperative Lamb shift of resonant atoms in an infinite cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2011-08-15

    We obtain in both the scalar and vector photon models the analytical expressions for the initial cooperative decay rate and the cooperative Lamb shift for an ensemble of resonant atoms distributed uniformly in an infinite cylindrical geometry for the case that the initial state of the system is prepared in a phased state modulated in the direction of the cylindrical axis. We find that qualitatively the scalar and vector theories give different results.

  14. Derivation of Geometry Factors for Internal Gamma Dose Calculations for a Cylindrical Radioactive Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Brent J.; Husain, Aamir

    2002-12-15

    A general methodology was developed to estimate geometry factors for internal gamma dose rate calculations within a cylindrical radioactive waste container. In particular, an average geometry factor is needed to calculate the average energy deposition rate within the container for determination of the internal gas generation rate. Such a calculation is required in order to assess the potential for radioactive waste packages to radiolytically generate combustible gases.This work therefore provides a method for estimating the point and average geometry factors for internal dose assessment for a cylindrical geometry. This analysis is compared to other results where it is shown that the classical work of Hine and Brownell do not correspond to the average geometry factors for a cylindrical body but rather to values at the center of its top or bottom end. The current treatment was further developed into a prototype computer code (PC-CAGE) that calculates the geometry factors numerically for a cylindrical body of any size and material, accounting both for gamma absorption and buildup effects.

  15. Non-modal analysis of the diocotron instability for cylindrical geometry with conducting boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Seok Kim, Jin; Jo, Younghyun; June Lee, Hae; Mikhailenko, V. S.

    2014-05-15

    The temporal evolution of the linear diocotron instability of a cylindrical annular plasma column surrounded by a conducting boundary has been investigated by using the methodology of the cylindrical shearing modes. The linear solution of the initial and boundary-value problems is obtained which is valid for any time at which linear effects dominate. The solution reveals that the initial perturbations of the electron density pass through the stage of the non-modal evolution when the perturbation experiences spatio-temporal distortion pertinent to the considered geometry of the electron column. The result is confirmed by a two-dimensional cylindrical particle-in-cell simulation.

  16. Stationary premixed flames in spherical and cylindrical geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, P. D.; Whaling, K. N.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Gatto, J. L.; Pisowiscz, V. L.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary source-free spherical flames ('flame balls') in premixed combustible gases were studied by employing low-gravity (micro-g) environments in a drop tower and an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories to diminish the impact of buoyancy-induced convective flow. Flame balls were found in all mixture families tested when: (1) the Lewis number Le of the deficient reactant was sufficiently low; and (2) the compositions were sufficiently close to the flammability limits. Probably as a consequence of the reduction in buoyant convection, the flammability limits at micro-g were significantly more dilute than those at Earth gravity; for example, 3.35% H2 vs 4.0% H2 in lean H2-air mixtures. By comparison with analytical and computational models, it is inferred that the phenomenon is probably related to diffusive-thermal effects in low-Le mixtures in conjunction with flame-front curvature and radiative heat losses from the combustion products. The chemical reaction mechanism appears to play no qualitative role. In the aircraft experiments, the gravity levels (approximately equal 10(exp -2)g(sub 0)) were found to cause noticeable motion of flame balls due to buoyancy, which in turn influenced the behavior of flame balls. At these g levels, a new type of transient, nearly cylindrical flame structure, termed 'flame strings,' was observed.

  17. Onset of buoyancy-driven convection in Cartesian and cylindrical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myint, Philip C.; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-04-01

    We perform a linear stability analysis to examine the onset of buoyancy-driven convection relevant to subsurface carbon dioxide sequestration in confined, porous Cartesian and cylindrical domains. Our work amends the analysis in an earlier study on cylindrical geometries. We consider Cartesian geometries where the aspect ratio between the two horizontal dimensions is not necessarily equal to one. Two key elements of the stability analysis are: (1) the critical time and (2) the critical wavenumber. Lateral boundaries have a much greater influence on the critical wavenumber than on the critical time. The confinement due to these boundaries impedes the onset of convection to the extent that convection cannot even occur in domains that are smaller than a certain size. Large aspect ratios can significantly reduce boundary effects. Patterns of the earliest-growing perturbation mode in the horizontal plane reveal many interesting dynamics which have not been examined in previous stability analyses. We illustrate several differences between patterns in Cartesian geometries and patterns in cylindrical geometries. Based on observations from earlier papers, we hypothesize that the contrasts between the Cartesian and cylindrical patterns may lead to significantly different behavior in the two geometries after the onset of convection. Our results may guide future numerical studies that can investigate this hypothesis and may help with understanding the onset of buoyancy-driven convection in real systems where lateral boundary effects are significant.

  18. Multigroup Neutron/Gamma-Ray Direct Integration Transport Code System for Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Geometry.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1980-10-15

    Version 00 PALLAS-2DCY-FX is a code for direct integration of the transport equation in two-dimensional (r,z) geometry. It solves the energy and angular-dependent Boltzmann transport equation with general anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry. Its principal applications are to neutron or gamma-ray transport problems in the forward mode. The code is particularly designed for and suited to the solution of deep penetration radiation transport problems with an external (fixed) source.

  19. Simulations of plasma dynamo in cylindrical and spherical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Forest, Cary; Schnack, Dalton; Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2010-11-01

    We have performed the numerical investigation of plasma flow and possibility of dynamo effect in Madison Plasma Couette Experiment (MPCX) and Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX), which are being installed at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. Using the extended MHD code, NIMROD, we have studied several types of plasma flows appropriate for dynamo excitation. Calculations are done for isothermal compressible plasma model including two-fluid effects (Hall term), which is beyond the standard incompressible MHD picture. It is found that for magnetic Reynolds numbers exceeding the critical one the counter-rotating Von Karman flow (in cylinder) and Dudley- James flow (in sphere) result in self-generation of magnetic field. Depending on geometry and plasma parameters this field can either saturate at certain amplitude corresponding to a new stable equilibrium (laminar dynamo) or lead to turbulent dynamo. It is shown that plasma compressibility results in increase of the critical magnetic Reynolds number while two- fluid effects change the level of saturated dynamo field. The work is supported by NSF.

  20. Transient and asymptotic dispersion in confined sphere packings with cylindrical and non-cylindrical conduit geometries.

    PubMed

    Khirevich, Siarhei; Höltzel, Alexandra; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2011-06-28

    We study the time and length scales of hydrodynamic dispersion in confined monodisperse sphere packings as a function of the conduit geometry. By a modified Jodrey-Tory algorithm, we generated packings at a bed porosity (interstitial void fraction) of ε=0.40 in conduits with circular, rectangular, or semicircular cross section of area 100πd(p)(2) (where d(p) is the sphere diameter) and dimensions of about 20d(p) (cylinder diameter) by 6553.6d(p) (length), 25d(p) by 12.5d(p) (rectangle sides) by 8192d(p) or 14.1d(p) (radius of semicircle) by 8192d(p), respectively. The fluid-flow velocity field in the generated packings was calculated by the lattice Boltzmann method for Péclet numbers of up to 500, and convective-diffusive mass transport of 4×10(6) inert tracers was modelled with a random-walk particle-tracking technique. We present lateral porosity and velocity distributions for all packings and monitor the time evolution of longitudinal dispersion up to the asymptotic (long-time) limit. The characteristic length scales for asymptotic behaviour are explained from the symmetry of each conduit's velocity field. Finally, we quantify the influence of the confinement and of a specific conduit geometry on the velocity dependence of the asymptotic dispersion coefficients. PMID:21576163

  1. A quadrupole ion trap with cylindrical geometry operated in the mass-selective instability mode.

    PubMed

    Wells, J M; Badman, E R; Cooks, R G

    1998-02-01

    A cylindrical geometry ion trap is used to record mass spectra in the mass-selective instability mode. The geometry of the cylindrical ion trap has been optimized to maximize the quadrupole field component relative to the higher-order field content through field calculations using the Poisson/Superfish code and through experimental variation of the electrode structure. The results correspond well with predictions of the calculations. The trap has been used to record mass spectra with better than unit mass resolution, high sensitivity, and a mass/charge range of ∼600 Th. Multistage (MS(3)) experiments have been performed, and the Mathieu stability region has been experimentally mapped. The performance of this device compares satisfactorily with that of the hyperbolic ion trap. PMID:21644742

  2. Multi-Group Reductions of LTE Air Plasma Radiative Transfer in Cylindrical Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, James; Magin, Thierry Edouard Bertran; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2013-01-01

    Air plasma radiation in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) within cylindrical geometries is studied with an application towards modeling the radiative transfer inside arc-constrictors, a central component of constricted-arc arc jets. A detailed database of spectral absorption coefficients for LTE air is formulated using the NEQAIR code developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The database stores calculated absorption coefficients for 1,051,755 wavelengths between 0.04 µm and 200 µm over a wide temperature (500K to 15 000K) and pressure (0.1 atm to 10.0 atm) range. The multi-group method for spectral reduction is studied by generating a range of reductions including pure binning and banding reductions from the detailed absorption coefficient database. The accuracy of each reduction is compared to line-by-line calculations for cylindrical temperature profiles resembling typical profiles found in arc-constrictors. It is found that a reduction of only 1000 groups is sufficient to accurately model the LTE air radiation over a large temperature and pressure range. In addition to the reduction comparison, the cylindrical-slab formulation is compared with the finite-volume method for the numerical integration of the radiative flux inside cylinders with varying length. It is determined that cylindrical-slabs can be used to accurately model most arc-constrictors due to their high length to radius ratios.

  3. A parallelized multidomain compact solver for incompressible turbulent flows in cylindrical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguic, Romain; Viazzo, Stéphane; Poncet, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    We present an efficient parallelized multidomain algorithm for solving the 3D Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical geometries. The numerical method is based on fourth-order compact schemes in the two non-homogeneous directions and Fourier series expansion in the azimuthal direction. The temporal scheme is a second-order semi-implicit projection scheme leading to the solution of five Helmholtz/Poisson equations. To handle the singularity appearing at the axis in cylindrical coordinates, while being able to have a thinner or conversely a coarser mesh in this zone, parity conditions are imposed at r = 0 for each flow variable and azimuthal Fourier mode. To simulate flows in irregularly shaped cylindrical geometries and benefit from a hybrid OpenMP/MPI parallelization, an accurate perfectly free-divergence multidomain method based on the influence matrix technique is proposed. First, the accuracy of the present solver is checked by comparison with analytical solutions and the scalability is then evaluated. Simulations using the present code are then compared to reliable experimental and numerical results of the literature showing good quantitative agreements in the cases of the axisymmetric and 3D unsteady vortex breakdowns in a cylinder and turbulent pipe flow. Finally to show the capability of the algorithm to deal with more complex flows relevant of turbomachineries, the turbulent flow inside a simplified stage of High-Pressure compressor is considered.

  4. Geometry optimization for the cylindrical ion trap: field calculations, simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangxiang; Cooks, R. Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2005-03-01

    Optimization of ion trap geometries for best analytical performance was studied in the specific case of the cylindrical ion trap (CIT). An optimization procedure was developed based on field calculations and simulations of ion motion. The electric field inside the CIT was calculated by using the Poisson/Superfish software package and geometrical effects, specifically the half thickness of the ring electrode (zb), the spacing (ds) between the ring electrode and the end-cap electrode, and the end-cap hole radius (rH), were systematically investigated. Appropriate compensation for higher-order field components, namely octapolar and dodecapolar fields, was achieved by refining the CIT geometry and improved mass resolution in scans using boundary and resonance ejection. Resolution for different CIT geometries was measured in both simulations and experiments and was evaluated from the separation between the major isotope peaks of 1,3-dichlorobenzene at m/z 146 and 148. Optimization of the CIT electric field via simple geometry changes involved exploration of several geometries and simulations using the ion trap simulation program (ITSIM) were used to confirm the results for each geometry and to predict experimental performance. Experiments are reported that confirm the enhanced performance achieved using the CITs optimized using the procedure developed in this study.

  5. The influence of triggers geometry upon the stiffness of cylindrical thin walled tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soica, Adrian; Radu, Gheorghe N.

    2014-06-01

    Today's automobile manufacturers are increasingly using lightweight materials to reduce weight; these include plastics, composites, aluminium, magnesium alloys, and also new types of high strength steels. Many of these materials have limited strength or ductility, therefore in many cases the rupture being serious consequences during crashes, underscore Picketta et al. in their studies. Automotive structures must deform plastically in a short period of time, a few milliseconds, to absorb the crash energy in a controllable manner. It must be light and enable economically mass-production [1]. FE models rapidly gained acceptance among engineers. Many other factors facilitated the development of vehicle models by shell finite elements since most of the geometry of the structural surfaces was already on computer graphic files. Kee Poong Kim and Hoon Huh emphasize that the crashworthiness of each vehicle part needs to be evaluated at the initial stage of design for good performance of an assembled vehicle. As the dynamic behaviour of structural members is different from the static one, the crashworthiness of the vehicle structures has to be assessed by impact analysis. The paper analyzes the influence of trigger geometry upon the compression of thin-walled cylindrical tubes. Simulations performed on a simple model showed the dependence between triggers area and deformation times as well as the maximum deformations obtained for various speeds at which the simulations ware carried out. Likewise, the geometry of trigger leads to different results.

  6. STABILITY OF A CYLINDRICAL SOLUTE-SOLVENT INTERFACE: EFFECT OF GEOMETRY, ELECTROSTATICS, AND HYDRODYNAMICS*

    PubMed Central

    LI, BO; SUN, HUI; ZHOU, SHENGGAO

    2015-01-01

    The solute-solvent interface that separates biological molecules from their surrounding aqueous solvent characterizes the conformation and dynamics of such molecules. In this work, we construct a solvent fluid dielectric boundary model for the solvation of charged molecules and apply it to study the stability of a model cylindrical solute-solvent interface. The motion of the solute-solvent interface is defined to be the same as that of solvent fluid at the interface. The solvent fluid is assumed to be incompressible and is described by the Stokes equation. The solute is modeled simply by the ideal-gas law. All the viscous force, hydrostatic pressure, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction, surface tension, and electrostatic force are balanced at the solute-solvent interface. We model the electrostatics by Poisson’s equation in which the solute-solvent interface is treated as a dielectric boundary that separates the low-dielectric solute from the high-dielectric solvent. For a cylindrical geometry, we find multiple cylindrically shaped equilibrium interfaces that describe polymodal (e.g., dry and wet) states of hydration of an underlying molecular system. These steady-state solutions exhibit bifurcation behavior with respect to the charge density. For their linearized systems, we use the projection method to solve the fluid equation and find the dispersion relation. Our asymptotic analysis shows that, for large wavenumbers, the decay rate is proportional to wavenumber with the proportionality half of the ratio of surface tension to solvent viscosity, indicating that the solvent viscosity does affect the stability of a solute-solvent interface. Consequences of our analysis in the context of biomolecular interactions are discussed. PMID:26877555

  7. RECENT RESULTS OF RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS AND TURBULENCE EXPERIMENTS IN CYLINDRICAL GEOMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    Magelssen G. R.; Scott, J. M.; Batha, S. H.; Holmes, R. L.; Lanier, N. E.; Tubbs, D. L.; Elliott, N. E.; Dunne, A. M.; Rothman, S.; Parker, K. W.; Youngs, D.

    2001-01-01

    Cylindrical implosion experiments at the University of Rochester laser facility, OMEGA, were performed to study radiation hydrodynamics and compressible turbulence in convergent geometry. Laser beams were used to directly drive a cylinder with either a gold (AU) or dichloropolystyrene (C6H8CL2) marker layer placed between a solid CH ablator and a foam cushion. When the cylinder is imploded the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and convergence cause the marker layer to increase in thickness. Marker thickness measurements were made by x-ray backlighting along the cylinder axis. Experimental results of the effect of surface roughness will be presented. Computational results with an AMR code are in good agreement with the experimental results from targets with the roughest surface. Computational results suggest that marker layer 'end effects' and bowing increase the effective thickness of the marker layer at lower levels of roughness.

  8. Electron Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re., Betancourt-Riera; Ri., Betancourt-Riera; M. Nieto Jalil, J.; Riera, R.

    2015-11-01

    We study the electron states and the differential cross section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry. The electron Raman scattering developed here can be used to provide direct information about the electron band structures of these confinement systems. We assume that the system grows in a GaAs/Al0.35Ga0.65As matrix. The system is modeled by considering T = 0 K and also a single parabolic conduction band, which is split into a sub-band system due to the confinement. The emission spectra are discussed for different scattering configurations, and the selection rules for the processes are also studied. Singularities in the spectra are found and interpreted.

  9. Geoid anomalies and dynamic topography from convection in cylindrical geometry - Applications to mantle plumes on earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Hager, Bradford H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of evidence suggests that at least some hotspots are formed by quasi-cylindrical mantle plumes upwelling from deep in the mantle. Such plumes are modeled in cylindrical, axisymmetric geometry with depth-dependent, Newtonian viscosity. Cylindrical and sheet-like, Cartesian upwellings have significantly different geoid and topography signatures. However, Rayleigh number-Nusselt number systematics in the two geometries are quite similar. The geoid anomaly and topographic uplift over a plume are insensitive to the viscosity of the surface layer, provided that it is at least 1000 times the interior viscosity. Increasing the Rayleigh number or including a low-viscosity asthenosphere decreases the geoid anomaly and the topographic uplift associated with an upwelling plume.

  10. Task order #24 update: exploration of damage mechanisms in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2011-01-14

    A typical method of failure for ductile materials is spallation damage, which is caused by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids due to the presence of high tensile stress in the material. Spallation damage models, such as TEPLA, are currently implemented in hydrodynamic computer codes used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Parameters for such constitutive models are derived from data sets obtained primarily from gas gun and shock-driven experiments, which are designed to allow one-dimensional analysis of the evolution of the failure characteristics. However, in a non-planar geometry, advanced failure models predict failure to be a multi-dimensional process. Additionally, a limited amount of data exists for the process of void nucleation, growth and coalescence. Another lightly researched area is the state of the material in the event that the spallation layer is recollected and voids are closed. The experiments described here are being conducted as part of a Campaign-l effort to provide data addressing these issues. The Russian Damage Experimental Series is designed to provide fundamental non-planar (cylindrical) spallation damage data, including early time processes (void nucleation, growth and coalescence) and late time processes (recollection of the spallation layer). Previous experiments produced data addressing some of the early time processes. This presentation will be provided to LANL and VNIIEF colleagues as a means of assessing the status of Task Order No.24 at the current time.

  11. A plastic miniature x-ray emission spectrometer based on the cylindrical von Hamos geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattern, B. A.; Seidler, G. T.; Haave, M.; Pacold, J. I.; Gordon, R. A.; Planillo, J.; Quintana, J.; Rusthoven, B.

    2012-02-01

    We present a short working distance miniature x-ray emission spectrometer (miniXES) based on the cylindrical von Hamos geometry. We describe the general design principles for the spectrometer and detail a specific implementation that covers Kβ and valence level emission from Fe. Large spatial and angular access to the sample region provides compatibility with environmental chambers, microprobe, and pump/probe measurements. The primary spectrometer structure and optic is plastic, printed using a 3-dimensional rapid-prototype machine. The spectrometer is inexpensive to construct and is portable; it can be quickly set up at any focused beamline with a tunable narrow bandwidth monochromator. The sample clearance is over 27 mm, providing compatibility with a variety of environment chambers. An overview is also given of the calibration and data processing procedures, which are implemented by a multiplatform user-friendly software package. Finally, representative measurements are presented. Background levels are below the level of the Kβ2, 5 valence emission, the weakest diagram line in the system, and photometric analysis of count rates finds that the instrument is performing at the theoretical limit.

  12. Zakharov-Kuznestov-Burger Equation for Ion-Acoustic Waves in Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pankaj Kumar; Ghosh, Uday Narayan; Chaterjee, Prasanta

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinear wave structures of ion acoustic waves in magnetized plasma comprising ions, non-extensive distributed electrons and kinematic viscosity are investigated through dynamical study. In a bounded cylindrical geometry Zakharov-Kuznestov-Burger (ZKB) equation is derived, for the first time, using reductive perturbation technic. System of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations is derived from ZKB equation and is solved numerically using fourth order Runge-kutta method. Equilibrium points are obtained and the features are studied dynamically in the neighbourhood of these points. With the variation of the non-extensive parameter and the kinematic viscosity parameter some important features in the nonlinear waves like oscillatory shocks to steady state propagation and vis-a-vis steady state propagation to oscillatory shocks emerge. When the values of the non-extensive parameter decrease, the phase portrait of the system shows that the change from stable spiral to stable closed and stable to unstable equilibrium happens . When the effect of dissipative term i.e. kinematic viscosity is considered some other significant features also evolve .The reduction of the value of kinematic viscosity results the change in nature of the waves from oscillatory shocks to periodic one.

  13. Radiocolloid migration through backfill-surrounding porous media in semi-infinite cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.S.; Lee, K.J.; Hwang, Y.S.

    1995-12-01

    Numerical simulation of radionuclide migration as a form of colloid in two dimentional cylindrical geometry were conducted. Due to the relatively strong filtration phenomena in backfill material of waste repository, colloid concentrations decay out very rapidly along the geosphere. Inside the backfill material, diffusional transport of radiocolloid is known to be relatively dominant than that of advection. The flow conditions of the waste repository groundwater can be represented with a dimensionless Peclet number. If the Peclet number is lower than 2, which means diffusion is dominant transport mechanism, general Finite Difference Method (FDM) cannot predict the migration behavior of the colloid exactly due to the numerical error. Instead, so called Central Difference Method (CDM) is applicable for the low Peclet number problems. outside the backfill media, where advection is the controlling transport process with Peclet number being greater than 2, the upwind numerical scheme would be a powerful tool. Most of the experiments simulating the radionuclide migration were conducted at high flow conditions, and the theoretical modelling about the experiments typically neglected the role of the diffusion in filtration mechanism. In this paper the two-dimensional CDM scheme and CDM-upwind scheme are developed to describe radio-colloid migration in two-dimensional porous media using potential flow theorem. Then the mass fluxes at a given position inside the backfill are predicted.

  14. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-15

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D{sub 2}O and solid D{sub 2} (sD{sub 2}). The D{sub 2}O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD{sub 2} as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ − z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD{sub 2}. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD{sub 2} volume) equal to 6.79 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} and 2.20 ×10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}s{sup −1}, respectively.

  15. A study of scaling and geometry effects on the forces between cuboidal and cylindrical magnets using analytical force solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Janhavi S.; Arnold, David P.

    2008-05-01

    Kelvin's formula is used to calculate forces acting on a permanent magnet in the presence of an external magnetic field from a second permanent magnet. This approach is used to derive explicit analytical solutions for the axial and lateral forces between cuboidal and cylindrical permanent magnets as functions of magnet dimensions and separation. While exact solutions can be found for cuboidal magnets, a hypergeometric expansion is used to approximate the elliptic integrals in solving for the fields and forces for the cylindrical magnets. The resulting equations are applied over a range of magnet sizes and geometries to explore scaling laws and other geometrical effects. It is shown that cuboidal magnets provide larger forces than equivalently sized cylindrical magnets. Also, the aspect ratio of the magnets significantly affects the forces. These results are intended to benefit the design and optimization of sensors, actuators and systems that rely on magnetic forces, particularly at the microscale.

  16. A miniaturised, nested-cylindrical electrostatic analyser geometry for dual electron and ion, multi-energy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedington, Robert; Kataria, Dhiren; Smith, Alan

    2015-09-01

    The CATS (Cylindrical And Tiny Spectrometer) electrostatic optics geometry features multiple nested cylindrical analysers to simultaneously measure multiple energies of electron and multiple energies of ion in a configuration that is targeted at miniaturisation and MEMS fabrication. In the prototyped model, two configurations of cylindrical analyser were used, featuring terminating side-plates that caused particle trajectories to either converge (C type) or diverge (D type) in the axial direction. Simulations show how these different electrode configurations affect the particle focussing and instrument parameters; C-type providing greater throughputs but D-type providing higher resolving powers. The simulations were additionally used to investigate unexpected plate spacing variations in the as-built model, revealing that the k-factors are most sensitive to the width of the inter-electrode spacing at its narrowest point.

  17. Flows and torques in Brownian ferrofluids subjected to rotating uniform magnetic fields in a cylindrical and annular geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Diaz, I.; Cortes, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Cedeño-Mattei, Y.; Perales-Perez, O.

    2014-01-15

    Ferrofluid flow in cylindrical and annular geometries under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field was studied experimentally using aqueous ferrofluids consisting of low concentrations (<0.01 v/v) of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with Brownian relaxation to test the ferrohydrodynamic equations, elucidate the existence of couple stresses, and determine the value of the spin viscosity in these fluids. An ultrasound technique was used to measure bulk velocity profiles in the spin-up (cylindrical) and annular geometries, varying the intensity and frequency of the rotating magnetic field generated by a two pole stator winding. Additionally, torque measurements in the cylindrical geometry were made. Results show rigid-body like velocity profiles in the bulk, and no dependence on the axial direction. Experimental velocity profiles were in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the spin diffusion theory, with a value of the spin viscosity of ∼10{sup −8} kg m/s, two orders of magnitude larger than the value estimated earlier for iron oxide based ferrofluids, and 12 orders of magnitude larger than estimated using dimensional arguments valid in the infinite dilution limit. These results provide further evidence of the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and their role in driving the spin-up flow phenomenon.

  18. Experimental observation of linear and nonlinear ion acoustic phenomena in a cylindrical geometry. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romesser, T. E.

    1974-01-01

    Ion acoustic phenomena are studied in a cylindrical geometry for two distinct cases. A large amplitude compressive pulse is seen to evolve into solitons. The evolution of these solitons and their dependence on initial conditions show a similarity to previous work on one dimensional solitons. Dimensionless scaling arguments are used to distinguish the two cases. In the presence of a steady state uniform cylindrical beam, approximated by a ring in V sub r, V sub phi, an ion-ion beam instability is observed. This instability exists for a limited range of beam velocities and shows a marked similarity to the strictly one dimensional ion-ion beam instability. Solution of the appropriate dispersion relation shows agreement with the observed phenomenon.

  19. Asymptotic expansions of solutions of the heat conduction equation in internally bounded cylindrical geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, R.H.; Sakakura, A.Y.

    1956-01-01

    The formal solutions of problems involving transient heat conduction in infinite internally bounded cylindrical solids may be obtained by the Laplace transform method. Asymptotic series representing the solutions for large values of time are given in terms of functions related to the derivatives of the reciprocal gamma function. The results are applied to the case of the internally bounded infinite cylindrical medium with, (a) the boundary held at constant temperature; (b) with constant heat flow over the boundary; and (c) with the "radiation" boundary condition. A problem in the flow of gas through a porous medium is considered in detail.

  20. A Piecewise Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Transport Equation in 2D Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Chang, J H

    2008-10-01

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional cylindrical (RZ) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. This discretization is a discontinuous finite element method that utilizes the piecewise linear basis functions developed by Stone and Adams. We describe an asymptotic analysis that shows this method to be accurate for many problems in the thick diffusion limit on arbitrary polygons, allowing this method to be applied to radiative transfer problems with these types of meshes. We also present numerical results for multiple problems on quadrilateral grids and compare these results to the well-known bi-linear discontinuous finite element method.

  1. CSDUST3 - A radiation transport code for a dusty medium with 1-D planar, spherical or cylindrical geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Michael P.; Leung, Chun Ming; Spagna, George F., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The program solves the radiation transport problem in a dusty medium with one-dimensional planar, spherical or cylindrical geometry. It determines self-consistently the effects of multiple scattering, absorption, and re-emission of photons on the temperature of dust grains and the characteristics of the internal radiation field. The program can treat radiation field anisotropy, linear anisotropic scattering, and multi-grain components. The program output consists of the dust-temperature distribution, flux spectrum, surface brightness at each frequency and the observed intensities (involving a convolution with a telescope beam pattern).

  2. Potentialities of a new bimodal Xray/fluorescence tomograph within a cylindrical geometry for pre-clinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Anne; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Coutard, Jean-Guillaume; Hervé, Lionel; Brambilla, Marco; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-01

    An instrument dedicated to the co-registration of optical and X-ray measurements is presented: specific acquisition protocol and reconstruction software have been developed for carrying out fluorescence diffuse optical tomography in a cylindrical geometry consistent with XCT. Actual animal geometry provided by the X-ray tomography is used to give animal boundaries to the diffuse optical tomography reconstruction algorithm. To evaluate performances of this new optical imaging system, experiments have been conducted on phantoms, mice with fluorescent capillaries, and finally on mice bearing tumors. The fluorescence reconstructions are shown to be geometrically consistent with X-ray ones. We determined that the sensibility limit of the system to detect fluorescence signal over intrinsic ones is 2 pmol for lungs area and 5 pmol for the abdomen area.

  3. Extension of the Test-Area methodology for calculating solid-fluid interfacial tensions in cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Felipe J.; Mendiboure, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    We extend the well-known Test-Area methodology of Gloor et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 134703 (2005)], 10.1063/1.2038827, originally proposed to evaluate the surface tension of planar fluid-fluid interfaces along a computer simulation in the canonical ensemble, to deal with the solid-fluid interfacial tension of systems adsorbed on cylindrical pores. The common method used to evaluate the solid-fluid interfacial tension invokes the mechanical relation in terms of the tangential and normal components of the pressure tensor relative to the interface. Unfortunately, this procedure is difficult to implement in the case of cylindrical geometry, and particularly complex in case of nonspherical molecules. Following the original work of Gloor et al., we perform free-energy perturbations due to virtual changes in the solid-fluid surface. In this particular case, the radius and length of the cylindrical pore are varied to ensure constant-volume virtual changes of the solid-fluid surface area along the simulation. We apply the modified methodology for determining the interfacial tension of a system of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules adsorbed inside cylindrical pores that interact with fluid molecules through the generalized 10-4-3 Steele potential recently proposed by Siderius and Gelb [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 084703 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3626804. We analyze the effect of pore diameter, density of adsorbed molecules, and fluid-fluid cutoff distance of the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential on the solid-fluid interfacial tension. This extension, as the original Test-Area formulation, offers clear advantages over the classical mechanical route of computational efficiency, easy of implementation, and generality.

  4. Self-organization of helically forced MHD flow in confined cylindrical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Malcolm; Leroy, Matthieu; Morales, Jorge; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of a magnetically forced conducting fluid in confined geometries is studied. A pseudospectral method with volume penalisation is used to solve the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. A helical magnetic field is imposed via boundary conditions, which generates a response in the velocity field for large enough magnitudes. Different helical structures are observed in the flow depending on the magnitude and direction of the forcing and the cross-sectional geometry of the fluid domain. A computational technique for finding a solenoidal vector field which can be used in complex geometries is also proposed.

  5. Numerical Study of Electrolytic Flow Instabilities Driven by an Azimuthal Lorentz Force in a Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Barrera, James; Pérez-Espinoza, José Enrique; Ortíz, Alejandro; Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    We present numerical simulations of the flow produced by an azimuthal Lorentz force in an electromagnetic stirrer. The stirrer consists of a cylindrical cavity with two copper concentric cylindrical electrodes, filled with an electrolytic solution. Underneath the cavity, a permanent magnet creates an almost uniform magnetic field, perpendicular to the circular section of the stirrer. An electric potential difference between the electrodes produces a radial D.C. current that passes through the fluid and interacts with the axial magnetic field, generating an azimuthal Lorentz force that drives the fluid. Experiments have shown the appearance of a flow instability that gives rise to a varying number of anticyclonic vortices for given values of the current intensity and fluid layer thickness. The MHD governing equations are expressed in terms of the velocity, pressure and electric potential. Numerical simulations are carried out using a hybrid Finite volume-Fourier method to ensure periodicity in the azimuthal direction. Numerical results show the formation of different modes of perturbation in the velocity field, which give rise to a varying number of traveling vortical structures. Work supported by CONACYT, Mexico under Project 131399. JPB acknowledges a Grant from CONACYT.

  6. Numerical study of laminar plasma dynamo in cylindrical and spherical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Bayliss, Adam; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Forest, Cary; Schnack, Dalton

    2009-05-01

    We have performed the numerical investigation of possibility of laminar dynamo in two new experiments, Plasma Couette and Plasma Dynamo, which have been designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The plasma is confined by a strong multipole magnetic field localized at the boundary of cylindrical (Plasma Couette) or spherical (Plasma Dynamo) chamber. Electrodes positioned between the magnet rings can be biased with arbitrary potentials so that Lorenz force ExB drives any given toroidal velocity profile at the surface. Using the extended MHD code, NIMROD, we have modeled several types of plasma flows appropriate for dynamo excitation. It is found that for high magnetic Reynolds numbers the counter-rotating von Karman flow (in cylinder) and Dudley-James flow (in sphere) can lead to self-generation of non-axisymmetric magnetic field. This field saturates at certain amplitude corresponding to a new stable equilibrium. The structure of this equilibrium is considered.

  7. Study of neoclassical tearing modes based on a reduced MHD model in cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Wakatani, M.

    2005-02-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are examined with a reduced MHD model including the bootstrap current as a simple model, JBS vprop - dP/dr, in cylindrical tokamaks. It is found that linear instabilities due to the perturbation of bootstrap current appear for large JBS cases with large parallel thermal diffusivity, χpar, under small perpendicular thermal diffusivity, χbottom, in the pressure evolution equation. Here, other dissipations such as resistivity and viscosity are also finite. Although the linear growth rate of this unstable mode is small, the growth of magnetic energy of this unstable mode is usually accelerated after the saturation of kinetic energy. Its nonlinear behaviour shown by the evolution of magnetic islands is consistent with the standard nonlinear NTM theory.

  8. Annular and Cylindrical Phased Array Geometries for Transrectal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) using PZT and Piezocomposite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seip, Ralf; Chen, Wohsing; Carlson, Roy; Frizzell, Leon; Warren, Gary; Smith, Nadine; Saleh, Khaldon; Gerber, Gene; Shung, Kirk; Guo, Hongkai; Sanghvi, Narendra T.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents engineering progress and the latest in-vitro and in-vivo results obtained with a 4.0 MHz, 20 element, PZT annular transrectal HIFU array and several 4.0 MHz, 211 element, PZT and piezocomposite cylindrical transrectal HIFU arrays for the treatment of prostate cancer. The geometries of both arrays were designed and analyzed to steer the HIFU beams to the desired sites in the prostate volume using multi-channel electronic drivers, with the intent to increase treatment efficiency and reliability for the next generation of HIFU systems. The annular array is able to focus in depth from 25 mm to 50 mm, generate total acoustic powers in excess of 60W, and has been integrated into a modified Sonablate®500 HIFU system capable of controlling such an applicator through custom treatment planning and execution software. Both PZT- and piezocomposite cylindrical arrays were constructed and their characteristics were compared for the transrectal applications. These arrays have been installed into appropriate transducer housings, and have undergone characterization tests to determine their total acoustic power output, focusing range (in depth and laterally), focus quality, efficiency, and comparison tests to determine the material and technology of choice (PZT or piezocomposite) for intra-cavity HIFU applications. Array descriptions, characterization results, in-vitro and in-vivo results, and an overview of their intended use through the application software is shown.

  9. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    SciTech Connect

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As a result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  10. Kinetic water-bag model of global collisional drift waves and ion temperature gradient instabilities in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gravier, E.; Plaut, E.

    2013-04-15

    Collisional drift waves and ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities are studied using a linear water-bag kinetic model [P. Morel et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 112109 (2007)]. An efficient spectral method, already validated in the case of drift waves instabilities [E. Gravier et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 67, 7 (2013)], allows a fast solving of the global linear problem in cylindrical geometry. The comparison between the linear ITG instability properties thus computed and the ones given by the COLUMBIA experiment [R. G. Greaves et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 34, 1253 (1992)] shows a qualitative agreement. Moreover, the transition between collisional drift waves and ITG instabilities is studied theoretically as a function of the ion temperature profile.

  11. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As amore » result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.« less

  12. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ˜600 kA with ˜200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. This technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  13. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents.

    PubMed

    Yager-Elorriaga, D A; Steiner, A M; Patel, S G; Jordan, N M; Lau, Y Y; Gilgenbach, R M

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ∼600 kA with ∼200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. This technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines. PMID:26628134

  14. New Geometry of Worm Face Gear Drives with Conical and Cylindrical Worms: Generation, Simulation of Meshing, and Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Nava, Alessandro; Fan, Qi; Fuentes, Alfonso

    2002-01-01

    New geometry of face worm gear drives with conical and cylindrical worms is proposed. The generation of the face worm-gear is based on application of a tilted head-cutter (grinding tool) instead of application of a hob applied at present. The generation of a conjugated worm is based on application of a tilted head-cutter (grinding tool) as well. The bearing contact of the gear drive is localized and is oriented longitudinally. A predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors for reduction of noise and vibration is provided. The stress analysis of the gear drive is performed using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. The contacting model is automatically generated. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical examples.

  15. Thermal contact resistance for a CU/G-10CR interface in a cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.E.; Niemann, R.C.; Nicol, T.H.

    1996-07-01

    A major component of a high-T[sub c] superconductor current lead designed to provide current to low-T[sub c] superconductor magnets is the heat intercept connection, which is a cylindrical structure consisting of an inner Cu disk, a thin-walled G-10CR composite tube, and an outer Cu ring, assembled by a thermal interference fit. It was determined in a previous study that the thermal contact resistance (R[sub c]) between the composite tube and the two Cu pieces contributed a substantial portion of the total thermal resistance between the inner and outer Cu pieces. This report emphasizes the analysis of the data for the third and final design of the heat intercept connection. In particular, it is found that R[sub c] decreases dramatically with increasing heat flux, a result consistent with earlier studies of composite cylinders. However, for the present data, the thermal contact conductance [=1/R{sub c}]varies with the calculated contact pressure with a power-law exponent of approximately 10, as compared to a theoretical value near 1. In addition, the presence of He or N[sub 2] gas substantially reduces R [sub c] even though the contacting surfaces are coated with a thermal grease.

  16. Experimental investigation of the shock wave in a fast discharge with cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Antsiferov, P. S.; Dorokhin, L. A.

    2013-08-15

    The work is devoted to the registration and the study of the properties of cylindrical shock waves generated in the fast discharge (dI/dt ∼ 10{sup 12} A/s) inside the ceramic tube (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) filled by argon at pressures of 100 and 300 Pa. The shock wave appears at the inner wall of the insulator and moves to the discharge axis with a velocity of about (3−4) × 10{sup 6} cm/s with subsequent cumulation. The plasma behind the front is heated enough to produce radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region, which makes it possible to study its structure by means of a pinhole camera with a microchannel plate detector. The time resolution of the registration system was 10 ns. The analysis of VUV spectra of the plasma shows that the electron temperature behind the shock wave front is about several eV; after the moment of cumulation, its temperature increases to 20–30 eV.

  17. Proton radiography of laser-driven imploding target in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, L.; Batani, D.; Vauzour, B.; Nicolai, Ph.; Santos, J. J.; Regan, C.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Hulin, S.; Morace, A.; Perez, F.; Baton, S.; Lancaster, K.; Galimberti, M.; Heathcote, R.; Tolley, M.; Spindloe, Ch.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2011-01-15

    An experiment was done at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Vulcan laser petawatt laser) to study fast electron propagation in cylindrically compressed targets, a subject of interest for fast ignition. This was performed in the framework of the experimental road map of HiPER (the European high power laser energy research facility project). In the experiment, protons accelerated by a picosecond-laser pulse were used to radiograph a 220 {mu}m diameter cylinder (20 {mu}m wall, filled with low density foam), imploded with {approx}200 J of green laser light in four symmetrically incident beams of pulse length 1 ns. Point projection proton backlighting was used to get the compression history and the stagnation time. Results are also compared to those from hard x-ray radiography. Detailed comparison with two-dimensional numerical hydrosimulations has been done using a Monte Carlo code adapted to describe multiple scattering and plasma effects. Finally we develop a simple analytical model to estimate the performance of proton radiography for given implosion conditions.

  18. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, J. T.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of the jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. The emergence of NO(x) regulations for stationary gas turbines and the anticipation of aero-engine regulations requires an improved understanding of jet mixing as new combustor concepts are introduced. For example, the success of the staged combustor to reduce the emission of NO(x) is almost entirely dependent upon the rapid and complete dilution of the rich zone products within the mixing section. It is these mixing challenges to which the present study is directed. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of a conventional design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice length-to- width ratio, and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that the best mixing orifice geometry tested involves eight orifices with a long-to-short side aspect ratio of 3.5 at a twenty-three degree inclination from the center-line of the mixing section.

  19. Optimization of orifice geometry for cross-flow mixing in a cylindrical duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowa, W. A.; Kroll, J. T.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of an advanced design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio (long-to-short dimension), and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that mixture uniformity is a non-linear function of the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio, and the orifice angle. Optimum mixing occurs when the asymptotic mean jet trajectories are in the range of 0.35 less than r/R less than 0.5 (where r = 0 is at the mixer wall) at z/R = 1.0. At the optimum number of orifices, the difference between shallow-angled slots with large aspect ratios and round holes is minimal and either approach will lead to good mixing performance. At the optimum number of orifices, it appears possible to have two local optimums where one corresponds to an aspect ratio of 1.0 and the other to a high aspect ratio.

  20. Geometry effects on cooling in a standing wave cylindrical thermoacousic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Ghazali, Ahmad Dairobi; Ali, Irwan Shah; Rahman, Muhammad Aminullah A.

    2012-06-01

    Numerous reports have established the refrigeration applications of thermoacoustic cooling without compressors and refrigerants. Significant cooling effects can be obtained in a thermoacoustic resonator fitted with a heat exchanging stack and operated at resonance frequency. Past studies, however, have hardly referred to the fundamental relationship between resonant frequency and the resonator geometry. This paper reports the thermoacoustic cooling effects at resonance obtained by changing the diameter of the resonator while holding the length constant and vice versa. Experiments were completed at atmospheric pressure with air as the working fluid using a number of pvc tubes having parallel plate stack from Mylar. The temperature difference measured across the stack showed that a volume increase in the working fluid in general increases the temperature gradient for the quarter-and half-wavelength resonators. Doubling the diameter from 30 mm to 60 mm produced the highest temperature difference due to the greater number of stack plates resulting in a higher overall thermoacaoustic cooling. Increasing the resonator length only produced a small increase in temperature gradient since the resonant frequency at operation is only slightly changed. Investigation on the aspect ratio exhibits no influence on the temperature difference across the stack. This study have shown that the resonator length and diameter do affect the temperature difference across the thermoacoustic stack, and further research should be done to consider the contribution of the stack mass on the overall desired thermoacoustic cooling.

  1. A cell-centered Lagrangian finite volume approach for computing elasto-plastic response of solids in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Shashkov, Mikhail J.; Burton, Donald E.

    2013-03-01

    A finite volume cell-centered Lagrangian formulation is presented for solving large deformation problems in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries. Since solid materials can sustain significant shear deformation, evolution equations for stress and strain fields are solved in addition to mass, momentum and energy conservation laws. The total strain-rate realized in the material is split into an elastic and plastic response. The elastic and plastic components in turn are modeled using hypo-elastic theory. In accordance with the hypo-elastic model, a predictor-corrector algorithm is employed for evolving the deviatoric component of the stress tensor. A trial elastic deviatoric stress state is obtained by integrating a rate equation, cast in the form of an objective (Jaumann) derivative, based on Hooke's law. The dilatational response of the material is modeled using an equation of state of the Mie-Grüneisen form. The plastic deformation is accounted for via an iterative radial return algorithm constructed from the J2 von Mises yield condition. Several benchmark example problems with non-linear strain hardening and thermal softening yield models are presented. Extensive comparisons with representative Eulerian and Lagrangian hydrocodes in addition to analytical and experimental results are made to validate the current approach.

  2. Cylindrical wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Lemos, Jose P. S.

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the existence of static, cylindrically symmetric wormholes does not require violation of the weak or null energy conditions near the throat, and cylindrically symmetric wormhole geometries can appear with less exotic sources than wormholes whose throats have a spherical topology. Examples of exact wormhole solutions are given with scalar, spinor and electromagnetic fields as sources, and these fields are not necessarily phantom. In particular, there are wormhole solutions for a massless, minimally coupled scalar field in the presence of a negative cosmological constant, and for an azimuthal Maxwell electromagnetic field. All these solutions are not asymptotically flat. A no-go theorem is proved, according to which a flat (or string) asymptotic behavior on both sides of a cylindrical wormhole throat is impossible if the energy density of matter is everywhere nonnegative.

  3. Towards the textile transistor: Assembly and characterization of an organic field effect transistor with a cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccioni, Maurizio; Orgiu, Emanuele; Cosseddu, Piero; Locci, Simone; Bonfiglio, Annalisa

    2006-10-01

    Cylindrical organic field effect transistors have been obtained starting from a metallic fiber used in textile processes. The metal core of the yarn, covered with a thin polyimide layer, is the gate of the structure. A top-contact device can be obtained by depositing a layer of organic semiconductor followed by the deposition of source and drain top contacts, made by metals or conductive polymers, deposited by evaporation or soft lithography. Thanks to the flexibility of the structure and the low cost of technologies, this device is a meaningful step towards innovative applications of textile electronics.

  4. Optical profilometer using laser based conical triangulation for inspection of inner geometry of corroded pipes in cylindrical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschinelli, Pedro D. V.; Melo, João. Ricardo C.; Albertazzi, Armando; Santos, João. M. C.; Camerini, Claudio S.

    2013-04-01

    An axis-symmetrical optical laser triangulation system was developed by the authors to measure the inner geometry of long pipes used in the oil industry. It has a special optical configuration able to acquire shape information of the inner geometry of a section of a pipe from a single image frame. A collimated laser beam is pointed to the tip of a 45° conical mirror. The laser light is reflected in such a way that a radial light sheet is formed and intercepts the inner geometry and forms a bright laser line on a section of the inspected pipe. A camera acquires the image of the laser line through a wide angle lens. An odometer-based triggering system is used to shot the camera to acquire a set of equally spaced images at high speed while the device is moved along the pipe's axis. Image processing is done in real-time (between images acquisitions) thanks to the use of parallel computing technology. The measured geometry is analyzed to identify corrosion damages. The measured geometry and results are graphically presented using virtual reality techniques and devices as 3D glasses and head-mounted displays. The paper describes the measurement principles, calibration strategies, laboratory evaluation of the developed device, as well as, a practical example of a corroded pipe used in an industrial gas production plant.

  5. Criticality experiments with mixed plutonium and uranium nitrate solution at a plutonium fraction of 0.5 in slab and cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.C.

    1986-12-01

    A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having Pu/(Pu + U) ratios of approximately 0.5. These experiments were a part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of, and data from, the experiments are included in this report. The experiments were performed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in cylindrical and slab geometries and included measurements with a water reflector, a concrete reflector, and without an added reflector. The concentration was varied from 112 to 332 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was 52% for all experiments.

  6. Criticality Experiments with Mixed Plutonium and Uranium Nitrate Solution at a Plutonium Fraction of 0.5 in Annular Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, RC

    1988-04-01

    A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having Pu/(Pu + U) ratios of approximately 0.5. These experiments were a part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of, and data from, the experiments are included in this report. The experiments were performed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in annular cylindrical geometry. The measurements were made with a water reflector. The central region included a concrete annular cylinder containing B{sub 4}C. Interior to the concrete insert was a stainless steel bottle containing plutonium-uranium solution. The concentration of the solution in the annular region was varied from 116 to 433 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was 52% for all experiments.

  7. Symmetry Group Analysis of Self-focusing in a Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation in Cylindrical Geometry With Saturating Nonlinearity of a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantu, Subbarao; Ramanathan, Uma

    2000-04-01

    The nonlinear Schrodinger equation with saturating nonlinearity like the ponderomotive nonlinearity in a plasma is analysed with the help of Symmetry Group Analysis. The symmetry group of the equation is deduced and a fiber-preserving subgroup of linear transformations are identified that leave such a nonlinear Schrodinger equation invariant. The MACSYMA-based Lie algebra of the symmetry group is realized to the extent possible. The theory results in an ordinary differential equation apart from a dictated beam profile. The resulting ordinary differential equation for self-focusing is compared with similar equations obtained from other existing theories of self-focusing in cylindrical geometry like the moments theory, the variational theory and the modified paraxial theory based on harmonic-oscillator modes. New types of solutions are identified and the limitations of the different methods are indicated.Acknowledgements: Financial assistance of CSIR(India)(Research Project,03(0815)/97/ EMR-II) for this work is acknowledged.

  8. The effect of geometry and operation conditions on the performance of a gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with new structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qing; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Bo; Chen, Jiangping

    2013-07-01

    The hydrodynamic flow behavior, effects of geometry and working conditions of a gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with a new structure are investigated by computational fluid dynamic and experiment. Gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separator is widely used in oil industry, refrigeration system because of its simple structure, high separating efficiency, little maintenance and no moving parts nor internal devices. In this work, a gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with new structure used before evaporator in refrigeration system can remove the vapor from the mixture and make evaporator compact by improving its heat exchange efficiency with the lower inlet quality. It also decreases evaporator pressure drop and reduces compressor work. The two pipes are placed symmetrically which makes each of them can be treated as inlet. It means when the fluids flow reverse, the separator performance will not be influence. Four samples with different geometry parameters are tested by experiment with different inlet quality (0.18-0.33), inlet mass flow rate (65-100kg/h). Compared with the experimental data, CFD simulation results show a good agreement. Eulerian multiphase model and Reynolds Stress Turbulence model are applied in the CFD simulation and obtained the inner flow field such as phase path lines, tangential velocity profiles and pressure and volume of fraction distribution contours. The separator body diameter (24, 36, 48mm) and inlet diameter (3.84, 4.8, 5.76mm) decide the maximum tangential velocity which results in the centrifugal force. The tangential velocity profiles are simulated and compared among different models. The higher tangential velocity makes higher quality of gas outlet but high pressure drop at the same time. Decreasing the inlet diameter increases quality of gas outlet pipe and pressure drop. High gas outlet quality is cost at high pressure drop. Increasing of separator diameter makes gas outlet quality increase first and then decrease but

  9. Convergence of shock waves generated by underwater electrical explosion of cylindrical wire arrays between different boundary geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Yanuka, D.; Zinowits, H. E.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Kozlov, M.

    2015-10-15

    The results of experiments and numerical simulations of a shock wave propagating between either conical or parabolic bounding walls are presented. The shock wave was generated by a microsecond timescale underwater electrical explosion of a cylindrical wire array supplied by a current pulse having an amplitude of ∼230 kA and a rise time of ∼1 μs. It is shown that with the same energy density deposition into the exploding wire array, the shock wave converges faster between parabolic walls, and as a result, the pressure in the vicinity of convergence is ∼2.3 times higher than in the case of conical walls. The results obtained are compared to those of earlier experiments [Antonov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 124104 (2013)] with explosions of spherical wire arrays. It is shown that at a distance of ∼400 μm from the implosion origin the pressure obtained in the current experiments is higher than for the case of spherical wire arrays.

  10. Convergence of shock waves generated by underwater electrical explosion of cylindrical wire arrays between different boundary geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanuka, D.; Kozlov, M.; Zinowits, H. E.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-10-01

    The results of experiments and numerical simulations of a shock wave propagating between either conical or parabolic bounding walls are presented. The shock wave was generated by a microsecond timescale underwater electrical explosion of a cylindrical wire array supplied by a current pulse having an amplitude of ˜230 kA and a rise time of ˜1 μs. It is shown that with the same energy density deposition into the exploding wire array, the shock wave converges faster between parabolic walls, and as a result, the pressure in the vicinity of convergence is ˜2.3 times higher than in the case of conical walls. The results obtained are compared to those of earlier experiments [Antonov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 124104 (2013)] with explosions of spherical wire arrays. It is shown that at a distance of ˜400 μm from the implosion origin the pressure obtained in the current experiments is higher than for the case of spherical wire arrays.

  11. Conformal approach to cylindrical DLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, A.; Caglioti, E.; Loreto, V.; Pietronero, L.

    2006-09-01

    We extend the conformal mapping approach elaborated for the radial diffusion limited aggregation model (DLA) to cylindrical geometry. We introduce in particular a complex function which allows a cylindrical cluster to be grown using as an intermediate step a radial aggregate. The aggregate grown exhibits the same self-affine features as the original cylindrical DLA. The specific choice of the transformation allows us to study the relationship between the radial and the cylindrical geometry. In particular the cylindrical aggregate can be seen as a radial aggregate with particles of size increasing with the radius. On the other hand, the radial aggregate can be seen as a cylindrical aggregate with particles of size decreasing with the height. This framework, which shifts the point of view from the geometry to the size of the particles, can open the way to more quantitative studies on the relationship between radial and cylindrical DLA.

  12. Light collectors in cylindrical geometry

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for collecting electromagnetic energy developed by an energy source of finite dimension and of finite distance from the collection device. It includes an energy absorber positioned between two side walls which reflects substantially all incident energy received from the energy source onto the energy absorber.

  13. Cylindrically symmetric wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhfittig, Peter K.F.

    2005-05-15

    This paper discusses traversable wormholes that differ slightly but significantly from those of the Morris-Thorne type under the assumption of cylindrical symmetry. The throat is a piecewise smooth cylindrical surface resulting in a shape function that is not differentiable at some value. It is proposed that the regular derivative be replaced by a one-sided derivative at this value. The resulting wormhole geometry satisfies the weak energy condition.

  14. Criticality Experiments with Mixed Plutonium and Uranium Nitrate Solution at a Plutonium Fraction of 0.4 in Slab and Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, RC

    1988-04-01

    A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having Pu/(Pu + U) ratios of approximately 0.4. These experiments were a part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of, and data from, the experiments are included in this report. The experiments were performed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in cylinqrical and slab geometries and included measurements with a water reflector, a concrete reflector, and without an added reflector. The concentration was varied from 105 to 436 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was 0.4 for all experiments.

  15. Cylindrical Scanner

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to sendmore » data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.« less

  16. Cylindrical Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Thomas E.

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to send data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.

  17. Loads for pulsed power cylindrical implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.E.; Armijo, E.V.; Barthell, B.L.; Bartos, J.J.; Bush, H.; Foreman, L.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Gobby, P.L.; Gomez, V.M.; Gurule, V.A.

    1994-07-01

    Pulse power can be used to generate high energy density conditions in convergent hollow cylindrical geometry through the use of appropriate electrode configuration and cylindrical loads. Cylindrically symmetric experiments are conducted with the Pegasus-H inductive store, capacitor energized pulse power facility at Los Alamos using both precision machined cylindrical liner loads and low mass vapor deposited cylindrical foil loads. The liner experiments investigate solid density hydrodynamic topics. Foil loads vaporize from Joule heating to generate an imploding cylindrical plasma which can be used to simulate some fluxes associated with fusion energy processes. Similar experiments are conducted with {open_quotes}Procyon{close_quotes} inductive store pulse power assemblies energized by explosively driven magnetic flux compression.

  18. Input space-dependent controller for multi-hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liang; Laflamme, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Semi-active and active structural control systems are advanced mechanical devices and systems capable of high damping performance, ideal for mitigation of multi-hazards. The implementation of these devices within structural systems is still in its infancy, because of the complexity in designing a robust closed-loop control system that can ensure reliable and high mitigation performance. Particular challenges in designing a controller for multi-hazard mitigation include: 1) very large uncertainties on dynamic parameters and unknown excitations; 2) limited measurements with probabilities of sensor failure; 3) immediate performance requirements; and 4) unavailable sets of input-output during design. To facilitate the implementation of structural control systems, a new type of controllers with high adaptive capabilities is proposed. It is based on real-time identification of an embedding that represents the essential dynamics found in the input space, or in the sensors measurements. This type of controller is termed input-space dependent controllers (ISDC). In this paper, the principle of ISDC is presented, their stability and performance derived analytically for the case of harmonic inputs, and their performance demonstrated in the case of different types of hazards. Results show the promise of this new type of controller at mitigating multi-hazards by 1) relying on local and limited sensors only; 2) not requiring prior evaluation or training; and 3) adapting to systems non-stationarities.

  19. Evolution of space dependent growth in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Natalya D; Jeffery, William R

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between growth rate and environmental space is an unresolved issue in teleosts. While it is known from aquaculture studies that stocking density has a negative relationship to growth, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, primarily because the growth rate of populations rather than individual fish were the subject of all previous studies. Here we investigate this problem in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which consists of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and several blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. Surface fish and cavefish are distinguished by living in spatially contrasting environments and therefore are excellent models to study the effects of environmental size on growth. Multiple controlled growth experiments with individual fish raised in confined or unconfined spaces showed that environmental size has a major impact on growth rate in surface fish, a trait we have termed space dependent growth (SDG). In contrast, SDG has regressed to different degrees in the Pachón and Tinaja populations of cavefish. Mating experiments between surface and Pachón cavefish show that SDG is inherited as a dominant trait and is controlled by multiple genetic factors. Despite its regression in blind cavefish, SDG is not affected when sighted surface fish are raised in darkness, indicating that vision is not required to perceive and react to environmental space. Analysis of plasma cortisol levels showed that an elevation above basal levels occurred soon after surface fish were exposed to confined space. This initial cortisol peak was absent in Pachón cavefish, suggesting that the effects of confined space on growth may be mediated partly through a stress response. We conclude that Astyanax reacts to confined spaces by exhibiting SDG, which has a genetic component and shows evolutionary regression during adaptation of cavefish to confined environments. PMID:22870223

  20. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  1. Multi-stable cylindrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrera, Alberto; Lachenal, Xavier; Daynes, Stephen; Weaver, Paul M.; Chenchiah, Isaac V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a cylindrical lattice structure that mimics the behaviour of the virus bacteriophage T4 in having two (or more) stable states which differ in their radii and length. While the virus achieves bistability through molecular mechanisms we use composite materials to exploit the interplay between pre-stress, material properties and structural geometry. We demonstrate (computationally) that multi-stability is a robust phenomenon. We also show (analytically) that it is possible to choose the design variables so that the energy is independent of the radius, thus resulting in every state of the structure being stable.

  2. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  3. Investigation of the asymmetric aerodynamic characteristics of cylindrical bodies of revolution with variations in nose geometry and rotational orientation at angles of attack to 58 degrees and Mach numbers to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, R. L.; Keener, E. R.; Chapman, G. T.; Claser, G.

    1979-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted to investigate the side forces and yawing moments that can occur at high angles of attack and zero sideslip for cylindrical bodies of revolution. Two bodies having several tangent ogive forebodies with fineness ratios of 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 were tested. The forebodies with fineness ratios of 2.5 and 3.5 had several bluntnesses. The cylindrical afterbodies had fineness ratios of 7 and 13. The model components - tip, forebody, and afterbody - were tested in various rotational positions about their axes of symmetry. Most of the tests were conducted at a Mach number of 0.25, a Reynolds number of 0.32 x 10 to the 6th power, and with the afterbody that had a fineness ratio of 7 and with selected forebodies. The effect of Mach number was determined with the afterbody that had a fineness ratio of 13 and with selected forebodies at mach numbers from 0.25 to 2 at Reynolds number = 0.32 X 10 to the 6th power. Maximum angle of attack was 58 deg.

  4. Complete parametrization of the plasma-sheath transition and I-V curves for a cylindrical or spherical Langmuir probe according to the features of the probe, simultaneously including geometry, ionization and collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Crespo, R.

    2015-08-01

    This paper solves and analyses the complete characterization of the plasma-sheath transition and the characteristic I-V curves of an active and collisional plasma close to a cylindrical or spherical wall considering a wide range of the parameter which describe the model to be useful for experimental measures. Despite the difficulty of including the three possible pre-sheath mechanisms, this characterization is obtained from a self-consistent model using three easily measurable parameters, namely the electric potential of the wall, the positive ion current collected by the wall, and the radius of the wall. These parameters are easy to measure and facilitate the diagnosis of plasmas from an experimental point of view.

  5. Current pulse effects on cylindrical damage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M; Rousculp, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    A series of joint experiments between LANL and VNIIEF use a VNIIEF-designed helical generator to provide currents for driving a LANL-designed cylindrical spallation experimental load. Under proper driving conditions, a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material. In addition, the damaged material is able to come to a complete stop due to its strength, avoiding application of further forces. Thus far, experiments have provided data about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and behavior of material recollected after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will focus on the effects of tailoring the driving current pulse to obtain the desired data.

  6. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  7. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  8. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  9. High convergence implosion symmetry in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P A; Bradley, D K; Hammel, B A; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J

    1999-09-01

    High convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions will require control of time-integrated drive asymmetries to 1% levels for ignition to succeed on the NIF. We review how core imaging provides such asymmetry measurement accuracy for the lowest order asymmetry modes, and describe recent improvements in imaging techniques that should allow detection of higher order asymmetry modes. We also present a simple analytic model explaining how the sensitivity of symmetry control to beam pointing scales as we progress from single ring per side Nova cylindrical hohlraum illumination geometries to NIF-like multiple rings per side Omega hohlraum illumination geometries and ultimately to NIF-scale hohlraums.

  10. Hexatic undulations in curved geometries.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Peter; Nelson, David R

    2003-03-01

    We discuss the influence of two-dimensional hexatic order on capillary waves and undulation modes in spherical and cylindrical geometries. In planar geometries, extended bond-orientational order has only a minor effect on the fluctuations of liquid surfaces or lipid bilayers. However, in curved geometries, the long-wavelength spectrum of these ripples is altered. We calculate this frequency shift and discuss applications to spherical vesicles, liquid metal droplets, bubbles and cylindrical jets coated with surface-active molecules, and to multielectron bubbles in liquid helium at low temperatures. Hexatic order also leads to a shift in the threshold for the fission instability of charged droplets and bubbles, and for the Plateau-Rayleigh instability of liquid jets. PMID:12689068

  11. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  12. Examining Cylindrical Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dustin L.

    2009-01-01

    The author describes an activity where prospective mathematics teachers made hypotheses about the dimensions of a fair cylindrical die and conducted experiments with different cylinders. He also provides a model that estimates the probability that a cylinder would land on the lateral surface, depending on the height and diameter of the cylinder.…

  13. Development of the Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining Process.

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    Results of applying the wire Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) process to generate precise cylindrical forms on hard, difficult-to-machine materials are presented. A precise, flexible, and corrosion-resistant underwater rotary spindle was designed and added to a conventional two-axis wire EDM machine to enable the generation of free-form cylindrical geometries. A detailed spindle error analysis identifies the major source of error at different frequency. The mathematical model for the material removal of cylindrical wire EDM process is derived. Experiments were conducted to explore the maximum material removal rate for cylindrical and 2D wire EDM of carbide and brass work-materials. Compared to the 2D wire EDM, higher maximum material removal rates may be achieved in the cylindrical wire EDM. This study also investigates the surface integrity and roundness of parts created by the cylindrical wire EDM process. For carbide parts, an arithmetic average surface roughness and roundness as low as 0.68 and 1.7 {micro}m, respectively, can be achieved. Surfaces of the cylindrical EDM parts were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to identify the craters, sub-surface recast layers and heat-affected zones under various process parameters. This study has demonstrated that the cylindrical wire EDM process parameters can be adjusted to achieve either high material removal rate or good surface integrity.

  14. Cylindrically symmetric electrohydrodynamic patterning.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Paru; Pease, Leonard F; Chen, Lei; Chou, Stephen Y; Russel, William B

    2004-10-01

    Cylindrically symmetric structures such as concentric rings and rosettes arise out of thin polymeric films subjected to strong electric fields. Experiments that formed concentric rings and theory capable of explaining these and other cylindrical structures are presented. These rings represent an additional member of a class of structures, including pillars and holes, formed by electrohydrodynamic patterning of thin films, occasionally referred to as lithographically induced self-assembly. Fabrication of a set of concentric rings begins by spin coating a thin poly(methyl methacrylate) film onto a silicon wafer. A mask is superimposed parallel to the film leaving a similarly thin air gap. Electric fields, acting in opposition to surface tension, destabilize the free interface when raised above the glass transition temperature. Central pillars nucleate under small cylindrical protrusions patterned on the mask. Rings then emerge sequentially, with larger systems having as many as 10 fully formed rings. Ring-to-ring spacings and annular widths, typically on the order of a micron, are approximately constant within a concentric cluster. The formation rate is proportional to the viscosity and, consequently, has the expected Williams-Landel-Ferry dependence on temperature. In light of these developments we have undertaken a linear stability analysis in cylindrical coordinates to describe these rings and ringlike structures. The salient feature of this analysis is the use of perturbations that incorporate their radial dependence in terms of Bessel functions as opposed to the traditional sinusoids of Cartesian coordinates. The theory predicts approximately constant ring-to-ring spacings, constant annular widths, and growth rates that agree with experiment. A secondary instability is observed at higher temperatures, which causes the rings to segment into arcs or pillar arrays. The cylindrical theory may be generalized to describe hexagonal pillar/hole packing, gratings, and

  15. Quantum Cylindrical Waves and Parametrized Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadarajan, Madhavan

    In this article, we review some illustrative results in the study of two related toy models for quantum gravity, namely cylindrical waves (which are cylindrically symmetric gravitational fields)and parametrized field theory (which is just free scalar field theory on a flat space-time in generally covariant disguise). In the former, we focus on the phenomenon of unexpected large quantum gravity effects in regions of weak classical gravitational fields and on an analysis of causality in a quantum geometry. In the latter, we focus on Dirac quantization, argue that this is related to the unitary implementability of free scalar field evolution along curved foliations of the flat space-time and review the relevant results for unitary implementability.

  16. Cylindrically polarized nondiffracting optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornigotti, Marco; Conti, Claudio; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We extend the concept of radially and azimuthally polarized optical beams to the polychromatic domain by introducing cylindrically polarized nondiffracting optical pulses. In particular, we discuss in detail the case of cylindrically polarized X-waves, both in the paraxial and nonparaxial regime. The explicit expressions for the electric and magnetic fields of cylindrically polarized X-waves are also reported.

  17. Static cylindrically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjällborg, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    We prove the existence of static solutions to the cylindrically symmetric Einstein Vlasov system, and we show that the matter cylinder has finite extension in two of the three spatial dimensions. The same results are also proved for a quite general class of equations of state for perfect fluids coupled to the Einstein equations, extending the class of equations of state considered by Bicak et al (2004 Class. Quantum Grav.21 1583). We also obtain this result for the Vlasov Poisson system.

  18. Weakly nonlinear incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at cylindrically convergent interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. F.; He, X. T.; Wu, J. F.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ye, W. H.

    2013-04-15

    A weakly nonlinear (WN) model has been developed for the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in cylindrical geometry. The transition from linear to nonlinear growth is analytically investigated via a third-order solutions for the cylindrical RTI initiated by a single-mode velocity perturbation. The third-order solutions can depict the early stage of the interface asymmetry due to the bubble-spike formation, as well as the saturation of the linear (exponential) growth of the fundamental mode. The WN results in planar RTI [Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 112706 (2012)] are recovered in the limit of high-mode number perturbations. The difference between the WN growth of the RTI in cylindrical geometry and in planar geometry is discussed. It is found that the interface of the inward (outward) development spike/bubble is extruded (stretched) by the additional inertial force in cylindrical geometry compared with that in planar geometry. For interfaces with small density ratios, the inward growth bubble can grow fast than the outward growth spike in cylindrical RTI. Moreover, a reduced formula is proposed to describe the WN growth of the RTI in cylindrical geometry with an acceptable precision, especially for small-amplitude perturbations. Using the reduced formula, the nonlinear saturation amplitude of the fundamental mode and the phases of the Fourier harmonics are studied. Thus, it should be included in applications where converging geometry effects play an important role, such as the supernova explosions and inertial confinement fusion implosions.

  19. Drag coefficient and settling velocity for particles of cylindrical shape

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    Solid particles of cylindrical shape play a significant role in many separations processes. Explicit equations for the drag coefficient and the terminal velocity of free-falling cylindrical particles have been developed in this work. The developed equations are based on available experimental data for falling cylindrical particles in all flow regimes. The aspect ratio (i.e., length-over-diameter ratio) has been used to account for the particle shape. Comparisons with correlations proposed by other researchers using different parameters to account for the geometry are presented. Good agreement is found for small aspect ratios, and increasing differences appear when the aspect ratio increases. The aspect ratio of cylindrical particles satisfactorily accounts for the geometrical influence on fluid flow of settling particles.

  20. Cylindrical effects in weakly nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wan-Hai; Ma, Wen-Fang; Wang, Xu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at the interface between two variable density fluids in the cylindrical geometry is explicitly investigated by the formal perturbation method up to the second order. Two styles of RTI, convergent (i.e., gravity pointing inward) and divergent (i.e., gravity pointing outwards) configurations, compared with RTI in Cartesian geometry, are taken into account. Our explicit results show that the interface function in the cylindrical geometry consists of two parts: oscillatory part similar to the result of the Cartesian geometry, and non-oscillatory one contributing nothing to the result of the Cartesian geometry. The velocity resulting only from the non-oscillatory term is followed with interest in this paper. It is found that both the convergent and the divergent configurations have the same zeroth-order velocity, whose magnitude increases with the Atwood number, while decreases with the initial radius of the interface or mode number. The occurrence of non-oscillation terms is an essential character of the RTI in the cylindrical geometry different from Cartesian one. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 10835003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274026), the Scientific Research Foundation of Mianyang Normal University, China (Grant Nos. QD2014A009 and 2014A02), and the National High-Tech ICF Committee.

  1. Double focusing ion mass spectrometer of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    A mass spectrometer consisting of an electric sector followed by a magnetic sector is described. The geometry is a cylindrically symmetric generalization of the Mattauch-Herzog spectrometer (1934). With its large annular entrance aperture and a position-sensitive detector, the instrument provides a large geometric factor and 100-percent duty factor, making it appropriate for spacecraft experiments.

  2. Spherical and cylindrical imploding and exploding shock waves in plasma system dominated by pair production

    SciTech Connect

    ul Haq, Muhammad Noaman; Saeed, R.; Shah, Asif

    2010-08-15

    The propagation of ion acoustic shock waves in cylindrical and spherical geometries has been investigated. The plasma system consists of cold ions, Boltzmannian electrons and positrons. Spherical, cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equations have been derived by reductive perturbation technique and their shock behavior is studied by employing finite difference method. Our main emphasis is on the behavior of shock as it moves toward and away from center of spherical and cylindrical geometries. It is noticed, that the shock wave strength and steepness accrues with time as it moves toward the center and shock enervates as it moves away from center. The strength of shock in spherical geometry is found to dominate over shock strength in cylindrical geometry. Positron concentration, kinematic viscosity are also found to have significant effect on the shock structure and propagation. The results may have relevance in the inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

  3. Ultrasound Imaging Using Diffraction Tomography in a Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Littrup, P

    2002-01-24

    Tomographic images of tissue phantoms and a sample of breast tissue have been produced from an acoustic synthetic array system for frequencies near 500 kHz. The images for sound speed and attenuation show millimeter resolution and demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining high-resolution tomographic images with frequencies that can deeply penetrate tissue. The image reconstruction method is based on the Born approximation to acoustic scattering and is a simplified version of a method previously used by Andre (Andre, et. al., Int. J. Imaging Systems and Technology, Vol 8, No. 1, 1997) for a circular acoustic array system. The images have comparable resolution to conventional ultrasound images at much higher frequencies (3-5 MHz) but with lower speckle noise. This shows the potential of low frequency, deeply penetrating, ultrasound for high-resolution quantitative imaging.

  4. Coatings for Energy Efficient Lamps with Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancourt, James; Martin, Robert

    1986-09-01

    During the past several years, a high level of activity has been directed toward developing more efficient lighting products to meet consumer demand in the face of energy scarcity and its high cost. Without major redesign of lamps, manufacturers have been able to achieve modest gains of 5 to 10 percent in incandescent lamp efficacy by optimizing standard features such as filament design, gas fill, etc. What was desired for incandescent lamps was a major jump in efficacy of 30% or more. Much encouraging work, notably by Philips in the Netherlands, has already been accomplished in the laboratory using thin film reflectors to recycle the wasted infrared radiation from incandescent lamps. Indium tin oxide (ITO) films, which are transparent in the visible and reflect well at wavelengths greater than 2 micrometers, is a most attractive material for its simplicity and apparent high performance. It °has a serious drawback, however, in its inability to reflect adequately when its temperature exceeds 800 C. A separate outer jacket surrounding the lamp itself is required in order to keep the ITO coating cool and thereby take advantage of its properties. The use of this extra component makes this solution to the energy problem more expensive and complex. In the United States, the Duratest Corporation has developed a sophisticated silver coating which is deposited inside domestic type A-line lamps. About six years ago, the General Electric Co., a major U.S. lamp manufacturer, approached 0.C.L.I. and requested assistance in improving the quartz-halogen lamp. The G.E.-0.C.L.I. method that was developed for improving the efficacy of an incandescent lamp product consists of coating quartz-halogen lamps with infrared reflectors. These reflectors are interference reflector stacks made of refractory metal oxides using conventional thermal evaporation technology. These products have been available commercially for about three years.

  5. Measurement of cylindrical parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Paul Douglas, Jr.

    The form of cylindrical parts has been traditionally evaluated using stylus-based mechanical instruments. The Tropel Corporation has developed a grazing incidence interferometer (GII) for the measurement of cylindrical parts. The repeatability of this instrument due to various instrument uncertainties was measured. Differing instrument configurations that produce the same systematic error were determined to produce a zonal calibration method for determining systematic error over the full range of the instrument, given knowledge of the error in a single zone. The effect of the aperture stop on the response of the imaging system to axially sinusoidal artifacts was simulated. Diamond-turned axially sinusoidal artifacts, with amplitude of order1 um and spatial wavelength of order10 mm, were measured to test the axial response of the interferometer. The modulation transfer function of the instrument's imaging system, measured using a knife edge test, predicts the response observed with the sinusoidal artifacts. A diffraction analysis predicts that the measured axial form is modified by a second order envelope function with phase that varies with the relative position of the imaging system focal plane and part position. A compensation method is proposed for this effect. A comparison of roundness measurements by both a traditional stylus-based instrument and the GII was performed demonstrating that the roundness measurements of the two instruments are equivalent when the measurements are properly corrected for the differing effects of surface finish.

  6. Cylindrical laser welder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, T. E.; Roberts, T. G.

    1986-05-01

    Brass retainer rings are currently fastened to artillery shells by spinning each shell at a high rate and then jamming the ring on it so that it is fastened or welded by friction between the two objects. This is an energy-inefficient process which heats and weakens more material than is desirable. The shell spinning at a high rate is also potentially dangerous. A laser welder is provided that generates output energy focused on a circular or cylindrical shape for simultaneously welding around a 360 degs circumference without unnecessarily heating large amounts of material. The welder may be used to fasten cylindrical shaped objects, gears and shafts together, which is difficult to do by conventional means. The welder may also be used to fasten one cylinder to another. To accomplish the welding, a laser has an unstable optical cavity arranged with its feedback mirror centered to generate a circular output beam having an obscuration in the center. A circularly-symmetric, off-axis concave mirror focuses the output beam onto the objects being fastened and away from the center line or axis of the circular beam.

  7. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  8. Cylindrical bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1981-01-01

    Program CYBEAN computes behavior of rolling-element bearings including effects of bearing geometry, shaft misalinement, and temperature. Accurate assessment is possible for various outer-ring and housing configurations. CYBEAN is structured for coordinated execution of modules that perform specific analytical tasks. It is written in FORTRAN IV for use on the UNIVAC 1100/40 computer.

  9. Parametric Investigations of Miniaturized Cylindrical and Annular Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-16

    A cylindrical geometry Hall thruster may overcome certain physical and technological limitations in scaling down of Hall thrusters to miniature sizes. The absence of the inner wall and use of the cusp magnetic field can potentially reduce heating of the thruster parts and erosion of the channel. A 2.6 cm miniaturized Hall thruster of a flexible design was built and successfully operated in the power range of 50-300 W. Comparison of preliminary results obtained for cylindrical and annular thruster configurations is presented.

  10. 2DEG on a cylindrical shell with a screw dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueiras, Cleverson; Silva, Edilberto O.

    2015-09-01

    A two dimensional electron gas on a cylindrical surface with a screw dislocation is considered. More precisely, we investigate how both the geometry and the deformed potential due to a lattice distortion affect the Landau levels of such system. The case showing the deformed potential can be thought in the context of 3D common semiconductors where the electrons are confined on a cylindrical shell. We will show that important quantitative differences exist due to this lattice distortion. For instance, the effective cyclotron frequency is diminished by the deformed potential, which in turn enhances the Hall conductivity.

  11. Incorrectness of the usual gyrokinetic treatment in cylindrically symmetric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Linsker, R.

    1980-07-01

    It is shown that the usual gyrokinetic theory does not consistently retain all terms of leading order in the expansion parameter epsilon = gyroradius/equilibrium scale length. This is illustrated for cylindrically symmetric systems by comparing the perturbed distribution function calculated by the gyrokinetic method with that obtained by explicitly integrating the Vlasov equation over the unperturbed orbit. The integral equation used in some recent treatments of drift waves in sheared-slab geometry is shown to be incorrect. The correct calculation of the ion density perturbation for a collisionless ..beta.. = 0 plasma with cylindrical symmetry is presented.

  12. Propagation and Separation of Charged Colloids by Cylindrical Passivated Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bikos, Dimitri; Mason, Thomas G

    2016-07-01

    We explore the electrophoretic propagation of charged colloidal objects, monodisperse anionically stabilized polystyrene spheres, in large-pore agarose gels that have been passivated using polyethylene glycol (PEG) when a radial electric field is applied in a cylindrical geometry. By contrast to standard Cartesian gel-electrophoresis geometries, in a cylindrical geometry, charged particles that start at a ring well near the central axis propagate outward more rapidly initially and then slow down as they move further away from the axis. By building a full-ring cylindrical gel electrophoresis chamber and taking movies of scattered light from propagating nanospheres undergoing electrophoresis, we experimentally demonstrate that the ring-like front of monodisperse nanospheres propagates stably in PEG-passivated agarose gels and that the measured ring radius as a function of time agrees with a simple model that incorporates the electric field of a cylindrical geometry. Moreover, we show that this cylindrical geometry offers a potential advantage when performing electrophoretic separations of objects that have widely different sizes: smaller objects can still be retained in a cylindrical gel that has a limited size over long electrophoretic run times required for separating larger objects. PMID:27109865

  13. Geometric Hall Effect of ^{23}Na Condensate in a Time- and Space-Dependent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gong-Ping; Yang, Ling-Ling; Chang, Gao-Zhan; Wu, Zhe

    2016-04-01

    We simulate numerically the dynamics of ^{23}Na condensate in a time- and space-dependent magnetic field with a variational approach. It is shown to be an efficient method to describe the complex dynamics of the system, which may excite the breather mode, the scissor mode, and the dipole mode simultaneously. Our results agree with the experimental observations of Choi et al. (Phys Rev Lett 111:245301, 2013). We reproduce qualitatively the geometric Hall effect and resonance behavior. We also find that the condensate shows a scissor-mode-like motion, which may play the shearing force to deform the condensate and consequently leads to the dynamical nucleation of quantized vortices.

  14. New optical cylindrical microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gun'ko, Yurii K.; Balakrishnan, Sivakumar; McCarthy, Joseph E.; Rakovich, Yuri P.; Donegan, John F.; Perova, Tatiana S.; Melnikov, Vasily

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we describe a novel technique for the fabrication of aluminosilicate microfibres and microtubes which are shown to act as optical cylindrical microresonators. The alumosilicate microfibres and microtubes were fabricated by using vacuum-assisted wetting and filtration of silica gel through a microchannel glass matrix. The microfibres and microtubes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging confocal microscopy. In the emission spectra of the micro-resonators we find very narrow periodic peaks corresponding to the whispering gallery modes of two orthogonal polarizations with quality factors up to 3200. A strong enhancement in photoluminescence decay rates at high excitation power demonstrates the occurrence of amplified spontaneous emission from a single microtube. These microtubes show a large evanescent field extending many microns beyond the tube radius. Potential applications for these novel microresonators will be in the area of optical microsensors for a single molecule detection of biological and chemical species, including anti-terrorism and defense sectors.

  15. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  16. Particle-counting statistics of time- and space-dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braungardt, Sibylle; Rodríguez, Mirta; Glauber, Roy J.; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    The counting statistics give insight into the properties of quantum states of light and other quantum states of matter such as ultracold atoms or electrons. The theoretical description of photon counting was derived in the 1960s and was extended to massive particles more recently. Typically, the interaction between each particle and the detector is assumed to be limited to short time intervals, and the probability of counting particles in one interval is independent of the measurements in previous intervals. There has been some effort to describe particle counting as a continuous measurement, where the detector and the field to be counted interact continuously. However, the formalism based on continuous measurements does not provide a formula applicable to general time- and space-dependent fields. In our work, we derive a fully time- and space-dependent description of the counting process for linear quantum many-body systems, taking into account the back-action of the detector on the field. We apply our formalism to an expanding Bose-Einstein condensate of ultracold atoms, and show that it describes the process correctly, whereas the standard approach gives unphysical results in some limits. The example illustrates that, in certain situations, the back-action of the detector cannot be neglected and has to be included in the description.

  17. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities and Mixing in Stratified Cylindrical Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2004-04-15

    We study the linear stability of an arbitrary number N of cylindrical concentric shells undergoing a radial implosion or explosion.We derive the evolution equation for the perturbation {eta}{sub i} at interface i; it is coupled to the two adjacent interfaces via {eta}{sub i{+-}1}. For N=2, where there is only one interface, we verify Bell's conjecture as to the form of the evolution equation for arbitrary {rho}{sub 1} and {rho}{sub 2}, the fluid densities on either side of the interface. We obtain several analytic solutions for the N=2 and 3 cases. We discuss freeze-out, a phenomenon that can occur in all three geometries (planar, cylindrical, or spherical), and ''critical modes'' that are stable for any implosion or explosion history and occur only in cylindrical or spherical geometries. We present numerical simulations of possible gelatin-ring experiments illustrating perturbation feedthrough from one interface to another. We also develop a simple model for the evolution of turbulent mix in cylindrical geometry and define a geometrical factor G as the ratio h{sub cylindrical}/h{sub planar} between cylindrical and planar mixing layers. We find that G is a decreasing function of R/R{sub o}, implying that in our model h{sub cylindrical} evolves faster (slower) than h{sub planar} during an implosion (explosion).

  19. Cylindrical Projection of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This computer generated map of Jupiter was made from 10 color images of Jupiter taken Feb. 1, 1979, by Voyager 1, during a single, 10 hour rotation of the planet. Computers at Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Image Processing Lab then turned the photos into this cylindrical projection. Such a projection is invaluable as an instantaneous view of the entire planet. Along the northern edge of the north equatorial belt (NEB) are four dark brown, oblong regions believed by some scientists to be openings in the more colorful upper cloud decks, allowing the darker clouds beneath to be seen. The broad equatorial zone (EZ) is dominated by a series of plumes, possibly regions of intense convective activity, encircling the entire planet. In the southern hemisphere the Great Red Spot is located at about 75 degrees longitude. South of the Great Red Spot in the south temperate zone (STeZ) three large white ovals, seen from Earth-based observatories for the past few decades, are located at 5 degrees, 85 degrees and 170 degrees longitude. Resolution in this map is 375 miles (600 kilometers). Since Jupiter's atmospheric features drift around the planet, longitude is based on the orientation of the planet's magnetic field. Symbols at right edge of photo denote major atmospheric features (dark belts and light zones): NTeZ - north temperate zone; NTrZ - north tropical zone; NEB - north equatorial belt; EZ - equatorial zone; SEB - south equatorial belt; STrZ - south tropical zone; and STeZ - south temperate zone. Voyager belt; EZ - equatorial zone; SEB - south tropical zone; Voyager is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  20. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fi

    2007-07-24

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation. __________________________________________________

  1. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2007-11-27

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation.

  2. Thermal stress in high temperature cylindrical fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1988-01-01

    Uninsulated structures fabricated from carbon or silicon-based materials, which are allowed to become hot during flight, are attractive for the design of some components of hypersonic vehicles. They have the potential to reduce weight and increase vehicle efficiency. Because of manufacturing contraints, these structures will consist of parts which must be fastened together. The thermal expansion mismatch between conventional metal fasteners and carbon or silicon-based structural materials may make it difficult to design a structural joint which is tight over the operational temperature range without exceeding allowable stress limits. In this study, algebraic, closed-form solutions for calculating the thermal stresses resulting from radial thermal expansion mismatch around a cylindrical fastener are developed. These solutions permit a designer to quickly evaluate many combinations of materials for the fastener and the structure. Using the algebraic equations developed, material properties and joint geometry were varied to determine their effect on thermal stresses. Finite element analyses were used to verify that the closed-form solutions derived give the correct thermal stress distribution around a cylindrical fastener and to investigate the effect of some of the simplifying assumptions made in developing the closed-form solutions for thermal stresses.

  3. Evaluation of direct-exchange areas for a cylindrical enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Sika, J. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on a method for calculating the radiative heat transfer direct-exchange areas for surface-to-surface, volume-to-surface, and volume-to-volume pairs of zones in axisymmetric cylindrical geometries. With this method the calculation of the direct-exchange areas can be transformed from the original four-, five-, and sixfold integrals in the defining relations to just single and/or double integrals. Gray gas with absorption coefficient K is assumed.

  4. Technical Note: Algebraic iterative image reconstruction using a cylindrical image grid for tetrahedron beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joshua; Ionascu, Dan; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To accelerate iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithms using a cylindrical image grid. Methods: Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is designed to overcome the scatter and detector problems of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithms have been shown to mitigate approximate reconstruction artifacts that appear at large cone angles, but clinical implementation is limited by their high computational cost. In this study, a cylindrical voxelization method on a cylindrical grid is developed in order to take advantage of the symmetries of the cylindrical geometry. The cylindrical geometry is a natural fit for the circular scanning trajectory employed in volumetric CT methods such as CBCT and TBCT. This method was implemented in combination with the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). Both two- and three-dimensional numerical phantoms as well as a patient CT image were utilized to generate the projection sets used for reconstruction. The reconstructed images were compared to the original phantoms using a set of three figures of merit (FOM). Results: The cylindrical voxelization on a cylindrical reconstruction grid was successfully implemented in combination with the SART reconstruction algorithm. The FOM results showed that the cylindrical reconstructions were able to maintain the accuracy of the Cartesian reconstructions. In three dimensions, the cylindrical method provided better accuracy than the Cartesian methods. At the same time, the cylindrical method was able to provide a speedup factor of approximately 40 while also reducing the system matrix storage size by 2 orders of magnitude. Conclusions: TBCT image reconstruction using a cylindrical image grid was able to provide a significant improvement in the reconstruction time and a more compact system matrix for storage on the hard drive and in memory while maintaining the image quality provided by the Cartesian voxelization on a

  5. Dark Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.

    Extra-dimensional theories contain additional degrees of freedom related to the geometry of the extra space which can be interpreted as new particles. Such theories allow to reformulate most of the fundamental problems of physics from a completely different point of view. In this essay, we concentrate on the brane fluctuations which are present in brane-worlds, and how such oscillations of the own space-time geometry along curved extra dimensions can help to resolve the Universe missing mass problem. The energy scales involved in these models are low compared to the Planck scale, and this means that some of the brane fluctuations distinctive signals could be detected in future colliders and in direct or indirect dark matter searches.

  6. Concentration profiles in drying cylindrical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaputa, Klaus; Brenn, Günter; Meile, Walter

    2008-12-01

    We analyze theoretically the drying of cylindrical filaments. For modelling the mass transfer on the gas side of the liquid-gas interface of the shrinking circular cylindrical filament, we apply the model of Abramzon and Sirignano, which was originally developed for spherical geometry. As a consequence of mass transfer at constant Sherwood number, we obtain a d2-law for the shrinkage of the cylinder as in the case of the spherical geometry, which expresses that the cross-sectional area of the cylinder shrinks at a constant rate with time. For this situation, the diffusion equation for the liquid phase mixture components becomes separable upon transformation into similarity coordinates and is solved analytically to obtain the concentration profiles inside the filament as functions of time. The dependency of the profiles on the radial coordinate is determined by a series of Kummer’s functions. Applying this result, we study the evolution of the concentration profiles in the liquid phase with time as dependent on a parameter given as the ratio of rate of shrinkage of the cross-sectional area of the cylinder to liquid-phase diffusion coefficient, which was identified as relevant for the shape of the concentration profiles formed in the liquid during the drying process. As an example, we present computed results for the constant evaporation rate regime in the dry-spinning process of a polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA)-water system. Comparison of our analytical results with full numerical solutions of the diffusion equation from the literature, achieved with concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient, reveals very good agreement.

  7. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2002-01-01

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  8. Cylindrical and spherical electron acoustic solitary waves with nonextensive hot electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2011-08-15

    Nonlinear propagation of cylindrical and spherical electron-acoustic solitons in an unmagnetized plasma consisting cold electron fluid, hot electrons obeying a nonextensive distribution and stationary ions, are investigated. For this purpose, the standard reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de-Vries equation, which governs the dynamics of electron-acoustic solitons. The effects of nonplanar geometry and nonextensive hot electrons on the behavior of cylindrical and spherical electron acoustic solitons are also studied by numerical simulations.

  9. Cylindrical and Spherical Positron-Acoustic Shock Waves in Nonthermal Electron-Positron-Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    The nonlinear propagation of cylindrical and spherical positron-acoustic shock waves (PASWs) in an unmagnetized four-component plasma (containing nonthermal distributed hot positrons and electrons, cold mobile viscous positron fluid, and immobile positive ions) is investigated theoretically. The modified Burgers equation is derived by employing the reductive perturbation method. Analytically, the effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, nonthermality of electrons and hot positrons, relative number density and temperature ratios, and cold mobile positron kinematic viscosity on the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, width, phase speed, etc.) of PASWs are briefly addressed. It is examined that the PASWs in nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry significantly differ from those in planar geometry. The relevance of our results may be useful in understanding the basic characteristics of PASWs in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  10. Cylindrical Implosion Experiments using Laser Direct Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubbs, David

    1998-11-01

    Development of high-gain targets for the National Ignition Facility relies considerably on computational modeling, and it is important that our codes are validated against relevant experimental data in convergent geometry.(W. J. Krauser et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2084 (1996); D. C. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1953 (1998)) In collaboration with the University of Rochester, we have begun a campaign of hydrodynamic instability experiments in cylindrical geometry using direct drive,(D. L. Tubbs et al., submitted to Laser and Particle Beams (1998); C. W. Barnes et al., submitted to Rev. Sci. Instrm. (1998)) building on our success in indirect drive.( W. W. Hsing et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1832 (1997); W. W. Hsing and N. M. Hoffman, Phys. Rev. Lett., 3876 (1997)) Cylindrical targets facilitate direct diagnostic access to the convergent, hydrodynamic flow. The energy advantage of direct drive and its excellent target-illumination symmetry (achieved at OMEGA through use of Distributed Phase Plates and SSD) permit more energetic implosions, larger target scale (hence greater diagnostic resolution), longer acceleration timescales, and higher convergence than were possible using indirect drive. We estimate that specific laser energy delivered to the target for direct drive at OMEGA is roughly 4 times that achieved for indirect drive at Nova. Our first experiments (January 1998) yield excellent data for the first highly symmetrical direct-drive implosions, with which we benchmark zeroth-order hydrodynamic simulations. Two-dimensional (2-D) LASNEX calculations, using as-shot laser power histories and no further physics adjustments, match measured target-implosion data within theoretical and experimental errors. In addition, 2-D LASNEX simulations of single-mode (m=28, azimuthally symmetric) perturbation growth agree well with data obtained during our first week of experiments. For 1.5-micron initial perturbation amplitude, we observe Rayleigh-Taylor growth factors of order 10

  11. Advanced nodal neutron diffusion method with space-dependent cross sections: ILLICO-VX

    SciTech Connect

    Rajic, H.L.; Ougouag, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced transverse integrated nodal methods for neutron diffusion developed since the 1970s require that node- or assembly-homogenized cross sections be known. The underlying structural heterogeneity can be accurately accounted for in homogenization procedures by the use of heterogeneity or discontinuity factors. Other (milder) types of heterogeneity, burnup-induced or due to thermal-hydraulic feedback, can be resolved by explicitly accounting for the spatial variations of material properties. This can be done during the nodal computations via nonlinear iterations. The new method has been implemented in the code ILLICO-VX (ILLICO variable cross-section method). Numerous numerical tests were performed. As expected, the convergence rate of ILLICO-VX is lower than that of ILLICO, requiring approx. 30% more outer iterations per k/sub eff/ computation. The methodology has also been implemented as the NOMAD-VX option of the NOMAD, multicycle, multigroup, two- and three-dimensional nodal diffusion depletion code. The burnup-induced heterogeneities (space dependence of cross sections) are calculated during the burnup steps.

  12. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  13. JKR adhesion in cylindrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Narayan; Farris, T. N.; Chandrasekar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Planar JKR adhesive solutions use the half-plane assumption and do not permit calculation of indenter approach or visualization of adhesive force-displacement curves unless the contact is periodic. By considering a conforming cylindrical contact and using an arc crack analogy, we obtain closed-form indenter approach and load-contact size relations for a planar adhesive problem. The contact pressure distribution is also obtained in closed-form. The solutions reduce to known cases in both the adhesion-free and small-contact solution ( Barquins, 1988) limits. The cylindrical system shows two distinct regimes of adhesive behavior; in particular, contact sizes exceeding the critical (maximum) size seen in adhesionless contacts are possible. The effects of contact confinement on adhesive behavior are investigated. Some special cases are considered, including contact with an initial neat-fit and the detachment of a rubbery cylinder from a rigid cradle. A comparison of the cylindrical solution with the half-plane adhesive solution is carried out, and it indicates that the latter typically underestimates the adherence force. The cylindrical adhesive system is novel in that it possesses stable contact states that may not be attained even on applying an infinite load in the absence of adhesion.

  14. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  15. Vibration of perforated cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousseau, Peter L.

    For a credible design of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target chamber, the vibration characteristics of the chamber must be completely understood. Target chambers are usually cylindrical or spherical in shape and contain hundreds of perforations (called ports) to allow access to the inside of the chamber. The fusion reaction within the chamber creates a uniform impulsive loading, which the chamber walls must be designed to contain. Also prior to an implosion, a delicate alignment process of the drivers and diagnostics takes place. The vibration of the chamber from rotating machinery, e.g., vacuum pumps, and ambient sources must be completely understood and accounted for during these alignment procedures. This dissertation examines the vibration characteristics of perforated cylindrical shells. Because the target chambers' thickness-to-radius ratio is small, such chambers can be modeled as thin shells. Included in the text is a literature review of perforated plates and shells and examples of the use of perforated structures in constructed and proposed ICF target chambers. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of perforated and unperforated cylindrical shells are studied analytically, numerically (via finite elements) and experimentally. Conclusions and comparisons between the different solution methods are made for both the perforated and unperforated cases. In addition, the dynamic response of perforated cylindrical shells to an axisymmetric impulsive loading has been identified. A demonstration showing how the convolution integral can be used to determine the response of a cylinder to a non-impulsive loading is presented.

  16. Cylindrical magnets and ideal solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, Norman; Olbert, Stanislaw

    2010-03-01

    Both wire-wound solenoids and cylindrical magnets can be approximated as ideal azimuthally symmetric solenoids. We present an exact solution for the magnetic field of an ideal solenoid in an easy to use form. The field is expressed in terms of a single function that can be rapidly computed by means of a compact efficient algorithm, which can be coded as an add-in function to a spreadsheet, making field calculations accessible to introductory students. These expressions are not only accurate but are also as fast as most approximate expressions. We demonstrate their utility by simulating the dropping of a cylindrical magnet through a nonmagnetic conducting tube and comparing the calculation with data obtained from experiments suitable for an undergraduate laboratory.

  17. GRIPPING DEVICE FOR CYLINDRICAL OBJECTS

    DOEpatents

    Pilger, J.P.

    1964-01-21

    A gripping device is designed for fragile cylindrical objects such as for drawing thin-walled tubes. The gripping is done by multiple jaw members held in position by two sets of slots, one defined by keystone-shaped extensions of the outer shell of the device and the other in a movable sleeve held slidably by the extensions. Forward movement oi the sleeve advances the jaws, thereby exerting a controlled, radial pressure on the object being gripped. (AEC)

  18. Cylindrical solutions in mimetic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Kairat; Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Raza, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to investigate cylindrical solutions in mimetic gravity. The explicit forms of the metric of this theory, namely mimetic-Kasner (say) have been obtained. In this study we have noticed that the Kasner's family of exact solutions needs to be reconsidered under this type of modified gravity. A no-go theorem is proposed for the exact solutions in the presence of a cosmological constant.

  19. Cylindrical solutions in braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Khoeini-Moghaddam, S.; Nouri-Zonoz, M.

    2005-09-15

    In this article we investigate exact cylindrically symmetric solutions to the modified Einstein field equations in the braneworld gravity scenarios. It is shown that for the special choice of the equation of state 2U+P=0 for the dark energy and dark pressure, the solutions found could be considered formally as solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in 4-D general relativity.

  20. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  1. Jet mixing in a reacting cylindrical crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  2. Capillary effects on floating cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harish N.; Homsy, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we develop a systematic perturbation procedure in the small parameter, B1/2, where B is the Bond number, to study capillary effects on small cylindrical particles at interfaces. Such a framework allows us to address many problems involving particles on flat and curved interfaces. In particular, we address four specific problems: (i) capillary attraction between cylinders on flat interface, in which we recover the classical approximate result of Nicolson ["The interaction between floating particles," Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 45, 288-295 (1949), 10.1017/S0305004100024841], thus putting it on a rational basis; (ii) capillary attraction and aggregation for an infinite array of cylinders arranged on a periodic lattice, where we show that the resulting Gibbs elasticity obtained for an array can be significantly larger than the two cylinder case; (iii) capillary force on a cylinder floating on an arbitrary curved interface, where we show that in the absence of gravity, the cylinder experiences a lateral force which is proportional to the gradient of curvature; and (iv) capillary attraction between two cylinders floating on an arbitrary curved interface. The present perturbation procedure does not require any restrictions on the nature of curvature of the background interface and can be extended to other geometries.

  3. Sound transmission into a laminated composite cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the transmission of an oblique plane sound wave into a laminated composite circular cylindrical shell. Numerical results are obtained for geometry typical of a narrow-bodied jet transport. Results indicate that from the viewpoint of noise attenuation on laminated composite shell does not appear to offer any significant advantage over an aluminum shell. However, the transmission loss of a laminated composite shell is sensitive to the orientation of the fibers and this suggests the possibility of using a laminated composite shell to tailor the noise attenuation characteristics to meet a specific need.

  4. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in cylindrical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter cylindrical tanks in weightlessness. A convex hemispherically ended tank and two Centaur liquid-hydrogen-tank models were used for the study. Four distinct liquid flow patterns were observed to be a function of the tank geometry, the liquid-jet velocity, the volume of liquid in the tank, and the location of the tube from which the liquid jet exited.

  5. Spectrum of resistive MHD modes in cylindrical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, C.M.; Grimm, R.C.

    1983-07-01

    A numerical study of the normal modes of a compressible resistive MHD fluid in cylindrical geometry is presented. Resistivity resolves the shear Alfven and slow magnetosonic continua of ideal MHD into discrete spectra and gives rise to heavily damped modes whose frequencies lie on specific lines in the complex plane. Fast magnetosonic waves are less affected but are also damped. Overstable modes arise from the shear Alfven spectrum. The stabilizing effect of favorable average curvature is shown. Eigenfunctions illustrating the nature of typical normal modes are displayed.

  6. Parallel algorithms for 2-D cylindrical transport equations of Eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Yang, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, aimed at the neutron transport equations of eigenvalue problem under 2-D cylindrical geometry on unstructured grid, the discrete scheme of Sn discrete ordinate and discontinuous finite is built, and the parallel computation for the scheme is realized on MPI systems. Numerical experiments indicate that the designed parallel algorithm can reach perfect speedup, it has good practicality and scalability. (authors)

  7. Supercooling Water in Cylindrical Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, J. J. Milón; Braga, S. L.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental apparatus was developed to investigate the supercooling phenomenon of water inside cylindrical capsules used for a cold storage process. The coolant is a water-alcohol mixture controlled by a constant temperature bath (CTB). Temperatures varying with time are measured inside and outside the capsule. Cylinders with an internal diameter and thickness of 45 and 1.5 mm, respectively, were made from four different materials: acrylic, PVC, brass, and aluminum. The supercooling period of the water and the nucleation temperature were investigated for different coolant temperatures. The supercooling and nucleation probabilities are shown as a function of the coolant temperature for the four different materials.

  8. Planar and cylindrical active microwave temperature imaging: numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Rius, J M; Pichot, C; Jofre, L; Bolomey, J C; Joachimowicz, N; Broquetas, A; Ferrando, M

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study at 2.45 GHz concerning both measurement and reconstruction parameters for planar and cylindrical configurations is presented. For the sake of comparison, a numerical model consisting of two nonconcentric cylinders is considered and reconstructed using both geometries from simulated experimental data. The scattered fields and reconstructed images permit extraction of very useful information about dynamic range, sensitivity, resolution, and quantitative image accuracy for the choice of the configuration in a particular application. Both geometries can measure forward and backward scattered fields. The backscattering measurement improves the image resolution and reconstruction in lossy mediums, but, on the other hand, has several dynamic range difficulties. This tradeoff between forward only and forward-backward field measurement is analyzed. As differential temperature imaging is a weakly scattering problem, Born approximation algorithms can be used. The simplicity of Born reconstruction algorithms and the use of FFT make them very attractive for real-time biomedical imaging systems. PMID:18222887

  9. Inflation of stressed cylindrical tubes: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiming; Wang, Shibin; Li, Linan; Ji, Hongwei; Wang, Zhiyong; Cai, Songbao

    2014-06-01

    The inflation of an initially stressed cylindrical shell provides a good illustration of the phenomenon of the initiation and propagation of an instability, which shares the same mathematical and mechanical features with a variety of other strain localization phenomena in engineering structures and materials. The high speed CCD camera and digital image processing system were used to measure the 3D shape of the inflated cylindrical tube. The localized bulge of a cylindrical tube with closed ends forms when the internal pressure reaches a critical value Pcr. As more air is filled into the tube, the pressure drops but the radius at the centre of the bulge will increase until it reaches a maximum value rmax. With continued inflation, the pressure stays at a constant value Pp. The purpose of this study is to investigate the critical and propagation pressures in the tubes and the profile outside when the shells under axial tension and internal pressure were inflating. We focus on the influence of the axial tension on the critical pressure. In this paper the problem is explored through experimental efforts. A series of experiments were conducted on commercially available natural rubber latex tubes involving different geometries and initial axial tensions, which were regarded as isotropic, homogeneous, incompressible and hyper-elastic materials.

  10. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  11. Propagation Mechanism of Cylindrical Cellular Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen-Hu; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jian-Guo

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of cylindrical cellular detonation with different instabilities. The numerical results show that with decreasing initial temperature, detonation becomes more unstable and the cells of the cylindrical detonation tend to be irregular. For stable detonation, a divergence of cylindrical detonation cells is formed eventually due to detonation instability resulting from a curved detonation front. For mildly unstable detonation, local overdriven detonation occurs. The detonation cell diverges and its size decreases. For highly unstable detonation, locally driven detonation is more obvious and the front is highly wrinkled. As a result, the diverging cylindrical detonation cell becomes highly irregular.

  12. Numerical study of cathode emission constraints on cylindrical self-field MPD thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    A stability equation relating thruster discharge current, argon propellant mass flow rate, and electrode geometry has been solved for a variety of cylindrical self-field MPD thruster configurations and discharge currents. Realistic values for cathode emission current densities were used to provide additional constraints on the thruster geometries. A two-dimensional MPD code was employed to provide better estimates of the maximum achievable specific impulse, thrust, and flow efficiency for cases of interest. The model results indicate that long life, cylindrical self-field MPD thrusters operated with argon propellant may not be able to provide specific impulse values in excess of 2100s. Alternate electrode geometries, applied magnetic fields, and/or low molecular weight propellants may be necessary to achieve higher values of specific impulse.

  13. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Conductive Cylindrical Rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Fangwei; Bowler, J. R.

    2007-03-01

    Transient eddy current test systems have been developed for the inspection of aircraft structures and for oil and gas pipelines. This work is supported by theoretical developments in which transient fields and time domain signals are determined for the geometry of interest. However most of the models to date have been aimed at structures that are planar, relatively little attention being paid to the corresponding problems in cylindrical geometries. In order to rectify this deficiency, we have examined theoretically the transient probe signal response due to a cylindrical conductive rod excited by an encircling coil. The transient fields can be calculated from a Fourier transform of the frequency domain solutions for infinite rods or tubes but, as with planar structures, we have found that it is better to use series solutions in the time domain since these provide more accurate and flexible representations of transient fields. Two types of series are used; one which converges faster at short times and one which converges faster at longer times. Calculations using these series show that they are in mutual agreement and agree with results computed using the fast Fourier transform.

  14. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  15. Dynamic Geometry on WWW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Gilles

    The first section of this paper on World Wide Web applications related to dynamic geometry addresses dynamic geometry and teaching, including the relationship between dynamic geometry and direct manipulation, key features of dynamic geometry environments, the importance of direct engagement of the learner using construction software for…

  16. Fabrication and characterization of joined silicon carbide cylindrical components for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, H. E.; Deck, C. P.; Gutierrez, O.; Jacobsen, G. M.; Back, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    The use of silicon carbide (SiC) composites as structural materials in nuclear applications necessitates the development of a viable joining method. One critical application for nuclear-grade joining is the sealing of fuel within a cylindrical cladding. This paper demonstrates cylindrical joint feasibility using a low activation nuclear-grade joint material comprised entirely of β-SiC. While many papers have considered joining material, this paper takes into consideration the joint geometry and component form factor, as well as the material performance. Work focused specifically on characterizing the strength and permeability performance of joints between cylindrical SiC-SiC composites and monolithic SiC endplugs. The effects of environment and neutron irradiation were not evaluated in this study. Joint test specimens of different geometries were evaluated in their as-fabricated state, as well as after being subjected to thermal cycling and partial mechanical loading. A butted scarf geometry supplied the best combination of high strength and low permeability. A leak rate performance of 2 × 10-9 mbar l s-1 was maintained after thermal cycling and partial mechanical loading and sustained applied force of 3.4 kN, or an apparent strength of 77 MPa. This work shows that a cylindrical SiC-SiC composite tube sealed with a butted scarf endplug provides out-of-pile strength and permeability performance that meets light water reactor design requirements.

  17. Velocity Inversion In Cylindrical Couette Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongari, Nishanth; Barber, Robert W.; Emerson, David R.; Zhang, Yonghao; Reese, Jason M.

    2012-05-01

    We investigate a power-law probability distribution function to describe the mean free path of rarefied gas molecules in non-planar geometries. A new curvature-dependent model is derived by taking into account the boundary-limiting effects on the molecular mean free path for surfaces with both convex and concave curvatures. In comparison to a planar wall, we find that the mean free path for a convex surface is higher at the wall and exhibits a sharper gradient within the Knudsen layer. In contrast, a concave wall exhibits a lower mean free path near the surface and the gradients in the Knudsen layer are shallower. The Navier-Stokes constitutive relations and velocity-slip boundary conditions are modified based on a power-law scaling to describe the mean free path, in accordance with the kinetic theory of gases, i.e. transport properties can be described in terms of the mean free path. Velocity profiles for isothermal cylindrical Couette flow are obtained using the power-law model. We demonstrate that our model is more accurate than the classical slip solution, especially in the transition regime, and we are able to capture important non-linear trends associated with the non-equilibrium physics of the Knudsen layer. In addition, we establish a new criterion for the critical accommodation coefficient that leads to the non-intuitive phenomena of velocity-inversion. Our results are compared with conventional hydrodynamic models and direct simulation Monte Carlo data. The power-law model predicts that the critical accommodation coefficient is significantly lower than that calculated using the classical slip solution and is in good agreement with available DSMC data. Our proposed constitutive scaling for non-planar surfaces is based on simple physical arguments and can be readily implemented in conventional fluid dynamics codes for arbitrary geometric configurations.

  18. Source Listings for Computer Code SPIRALI Incompressible, Turbulent Spiral Grooved Cylindrical and Face Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walowit, Jed A.; Shapiro, Wibur

    2005-01-01

    This is the source listing of the computer code SPIRALI which predicts the performance characteristics of incompressible cylindrical and face seals with or without the inclusion of spiral grooves. Performance characteristics include load capacity (for face seals), leakage flow, power requirements and dynamic characteristics in the form of stiffness, damping and apparent mass coefficients in 4 degrees of freedom for cylindrical seals and 3 degrees of freedom for face seals. These performance characteristics are computed as functions of seal and groove geometry, load or film thickness, running and disturbance speeds, fluid viscosity, and boundary pressures.

  19. High speed cylindrical roller bearing analysis, SKF computer program CYBEAN. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1978-01-01

    The CYBEAN (Cylindrical Bearing Analysis) was created to detail radially loaded, aligned and misaligned cylindrical roller bearing performance under a variety of operating conditions. Emphasis was placed on detailing the effects of high speed, preload and system thermal coupling. Roller tilt, skew, radial, circumferential and axial displacement as well as flange contact were considered. Variable housing and flexible out-of-round outer ring geometries, and both steady state and time transient temperature calculations were enabled. The complete range of elastohydrodynamic contact considerations, employing full and partial film conditions were treated in the computation of raceway and flange contacts. Input and output architectures containing guidelines for use and a sample execution are detailed.

  20. The space-dependent model and output characteristics of intra-cavity pumped dual-wavelength lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin-Qi; Dong, Yuan; Zhang, Feng-Dong; Yu, Yong-Ji; Jin, Guang-Yong; Liu, Li-Da

    2016-01-01

    The intra-cavity pumping scheme which is used to simultaneously generate dual-wavelength lasers was proposed and published by us and the space-independent model of quasi-three-level and four-level intra-cavity pumped dual-wavelength lasers was constructed based on this scheme. In this paper, to make the previous study more rigorous, the space-dependent model is adopted. As an example, the output characteristics of 946 nm and 1064 nm dual-wavelength lasers under the conditions of different output mirror transmittances are numerically simulated by using the derived formula and the results are nearly identical to what was previously reported.

  1. Observations of ion-acoustic cylindrical solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Romesser, T.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental observations of cylindrical solitons in a collisionless plasma are presented. The data obtained show that cylindrical solitonlike objects exist and that their properties are consistent with those of one- and three-dimensional solitons. It is found that compressive density perturbations evolve into solitons. The number of the solitons is determined by the width and amplitude of the applied pulse.

  2. Learning Geometry through Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsythe, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates effective teaching and learning of geometrical concepts using dynamic geometry software (DGS). Based from her students' reactions to her project, the author found that her students' understanding of the concepts was better than if they had learned geometry through paper-based tasks. However, mixing computer…

  3. Growing Yeast into Cylindrical Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Vulin, Clément; Di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Lindner, Ariel B.; Daerr, Adrian; Murray, Andrew; Hersen, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms often form complex multicellular assemblies such as biofilms and colonies. Understanding the interplay between assembly expansion, metabolic yield, and nutrient diffusion within a freely growing colony remains a challenge. Most available data on microorganisms are from planktonic cultures, due to the lack of experimental tools to control the growth of multicellular assemblies. Here, we propose a method to constrain the growth of yeast colonies into simple geometric shapes such as cylinders. To this end, we designed a simple, versatile culture system to control the location of nutrient delivery below a growing colony. Under such culture conditions, yeast colonies grow vertically and only at the locations where nutrients are delivered. Colonies increase in height at a steady growth rate that is inversely proportional to the cylinder radius. We show that the vertical growth rate of cylindrical colonies is not defined by the single-cell division rate, but rather by the colony metabolic yield. This contrasts with cells in liquid culture, in which the single-cell division rate is the only parameter that defines the population growth rate. This method also provides a direct, simple method to estimate the metabolic yield of a colony. Our study further demonstrates the importance of the shape of colonies on setting their expansion. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for elaborate studies of the population dynamics, evolution, and ecology of microbial colonies in complex landscapes. PMID:24853750

  4. Filling of charged cylindrical capillaries.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Chanda, Sourayon; Eijkel, J C T; Tas, N R; Chakraborty, Suman; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2014-10-01

    We provide an analytical model to describe the filling dynamics of horizontal cylindrical capillaries having charged walls. The presence of surface charge leads to two distinct effects: It leads to a retarding electrical force on the liquid column and also causes a reduced viscous drag force because of decreased velocity gradients at the wall. Both these effects essentially stem from the spontaneous formation of an electric double layer (EDL) and the resulting streaming potential caused by the net capillary-flow-driven advection of ionic species within the EDL. Our results demonstrate that filling of charged capillaries also exhibits the well-known linear and Washburn regimes witnessed for uncharged capillaries, although the filling rate is always lower than that of the uncharged capillary. We attribute this to a competitive success of the lowering of the driving forces (because of electroviscous effects), in comparison to the effect of weaker drag forces. We further reveal that the time at which the transition between the linear and the Washburn regime occurs may become significantly altered with the introduction of surface charges, thereby altering the resultant capillary dynamics in a rather intricate manner. PMID:25375597

  5. Intrinsic cylindrical and spherical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, I. K.

    2008-02-01

    Intrinsic waveforms associated with cylindrical and spherical Bessel functions are obtained by eliminating the factors responsible for the inverse radius and inverse square radius laws of wave power per unit area of wavefront. The resulting expressions are Riccati-Bessel functions for both cases and these can be written in terms of amplitude and phase functions of order v and wave variable z. When z is real, it is shown that a spatial phase angle of the intrinsic wave can be defined and this, together with its amplitude function, is systematically investigated for a range of fixed orders and varying z. The derivatives of Riccati-Bessel functions are also examined. All the component functions exhibit different behaviour in the near field depending on the order being less than, equal to or greater than 1/2. Plots of the phase angle can be used to display the locations of the zeros of the general Riccati-Bessel functions and lead to new relations concerning the ordering of the real zeros of Bessel functions and the occurrence of multiple zeros when the argument of the Bessel function is fixed.

  6. Generation of scalable terahertz radiation from cylindrically focused two-color laser pulses in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuk, D.; Yoo, Y. J.; Rosenthal, E. W.; Jhajj, N.; Milchberg, H. M.; Kim, K. Y.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate scalable terahertz (THz) generation by focusing terawatt, two-color laser pulses in air with a cylindrical lens. This focusing geometry creates a two-dimensional air plasma sheet, which yields two diverging THz lobe profiles in the far field. This setup can avoid plasma-induced laser defocusing and subsequent THz saturation, previously observed with spherical lens focusing of high-power laser pulses. By expanding the plasma source into a two-dimensional sheet, cylindrical focusing can lead to scalable THz generation. This scheme provides an energy conversion efficiency of 7 × 10-4, ˜7 times better than spherical lens focusing. The diverging THz lobes are refocused with a combination of cylindrical and parabolic mirrors to produce strong THz fields (>21 MV/cm) at the focal point.

  7. Substrate heating rates for planar and cylindrical-post magnetron sputtering sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J. A.; Lamb, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented for the substrate heating energy/atom required in the planar magnetron sputtering of Al, Cr, Ni, Cu, Mo, In, Ta, W, and Pt in Ar, as well as Al and Cr in O2. Data are also obtained for cylindrical magnetron sputtering of Nb, Ag, Ta, W, and Pb-Sn in Ar, and Mo sputtered in Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Planar and cylindrical magnetron heating rates were comparable. Special experiments were conducted to examine the contributions to substrate heating of plasma species and ion neutralization and reflection at the cathode; the results obtained indicate that charged plasma species do not significantly contribute to the heating, but that neutralized and reflected ions play a significant role in the planar as well as cylindrical cases despite the differences in cathode geometry.

  8. On sound transmission into a stiffened cylindrical shell with rings and stringers treated as discrete elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the transmission of an oblique plane sound wave into a finite cylindrical shell stiffened by stringers and ring frames. The rings and stringers are modeled as discrete structural elements. The numerical case studied was typical of a narrow-bodied jet transport fuselage. The numerical results show that the ring-frequency dip in the transmission loss curve that is present for a monocoque shell is still present in the case of a stiffened shell. The ring frequency effect is a result of the cylindrical geometry of the shell. Below the ring frequency, stiffening does not appear to have any significant effect on transmission loss, but above the ring frequency, stiffeners can enhance the transmission loss of a cylindrical shell.

  9. Plastic Limit Load Analysis of Cylindrical Pressure Vessels with Different Nozzle Inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Anupam; Raval, Harit Kishorchandra; Gandhi, Anish; Pawar, Dipak Bapu

    2016-04-01

    Sudden change in geometry of pressure vessel due to nozzle cutout, leads to local stress concentration and deformation, decreasing its strength. Elastic plastic analysis of cylindrical pressure vessels with different inclination angles of nozzle is important to estimate plastic limit load. In the present study, cylindrical pressure vessels with combined inclination of nozzles (i.e. in longitudinal and radial plane) are considered for elastic plastic limit load analysis. Three dimensional static nonlinear finite element analyses of cylindrical pressure vessels with nozzle are performed for incremental pressure loading. The von Mises stress distribution on pressure vessel shows higher stress zones at shell-nozzle junction. Approximate plastic limit load is obtained by twice elastic slope method. Variation in limit pressure with different combined inclination angle of nozzle is analyzed and found to be distinct in nature. Reported results can be helpful in optimizing pressure vessel design.

  10. Efficient method for analyzing multiple circular cylindrical nanoparticles on a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2016-05-01

    Due to the existing nanofabrication techniques, many metallic or dielectric nanoparticles are cylindrical objects with top and bottom surfaces parallel to a substrate and side boundaries perpendicular to the substrate. In this paper, we develop a relatively simple and efficient semi-analytic method for analyzing the scattering of light by a set of circular cylindrical objects (of finite height) on a layered background. The method relies on expanding the field in one-dimensional modes in layered regions where the material properties change with one spatial variable only, to establish a linear system on the boundaries separating the layered regions. Although the ‘expansion coefficients’ are two-dimensional (2D) functions, they satisfy scalar 2D Helmholtz equations which have analytic solutions due to the special geometry. The method is used to analyze dielectric and metallic circular cylindrical nanoparticles on a substrate or in free space.

  11. Users' Manual for Computer Code SPIRALI Incompressible, Turbulent Spiral Grooved Cylindrical and Face Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walowit, Jed A.; Shapiro, Wilbur

    2005-01-01

    The SPIRALI code predicts the performance characteristics of incompressible cylindrical and face seals with or without the inclusion of spiral grooves. Performance characteristics include load capacity (for face seals), leakage flow, power requirements and dynamic characteristics in the form of stiffness, damping and apparent mass coefficients in 4 degrees of freedom for cylindrical seals and 3 degrees of freedom for face seals. These performance characteristics are computed as functions of seal and groove geometry, load or film thickness, running and disturbance speeds, fluid viscosity, and boundary pressures. A derivation of the equations governing the performance of turbulent, incompressible, spiral groove cylindrical and face seals along with a description of their solution is given. The computer codes are described, including an input description, sample cases, and comparisons with results of other codes.

  12. Combinatorial Geometry Printer Plotting.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1987-01-05

    Picture generates plots of two-dimensional slices through the three-dimensional geometry described by the combinatorial geometry (CG) package used in such codes as MORSE and QAD-CG. These plots are printed on a standard line printer.

  13. General 2 charge geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Marika

    2006-03-01

    Two charge BPS horizon free supergravity geometries are important in proposals for understanding black hole microstates. In this paper we construct a new class of geometries in the NS1-P system, corresponding to solitonic strings carrying fermionic as well as bosonic condensates. Such geometries are required to account for the full microscopic entropy of the NS1-P system. We then briefly discuss the properties of the corresponding geometries in the dual D1-D5 system.

  14. Surface thermodynamics of planar, cylindrical, and spherical vapour-liquid interfaces of water.

    PubMed

    Lau, Gabriel V; Ford, Ian J; Hunt, Patricia A; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George

    2015-03-21

    The test-area (TA) perturbation approach has been gaining popularity as a methodology for the direct computation of the interfacial tension in molecular simulation. Though originally implemented for planar interfaces, the TA approach has also been used to analyze the interfacial properties of curved liquid interfaces. Here, we provide an interpretation of the TA method taking the view that it corresponds to the change in free energy under a transformation of the spatial metric for an affine distortion. By expressing the change in configurational energy of a molecular configuration as a Taylor expansion in the distortion parameter, compact relations are derived for the interfacial tension and its energetic and entropic components for three different geometries: planar, cylindrical, and spherical fluid interfaces. While the tensions of the planar and cylindrical geometries are characterized by first-order changes in the energy, that of the spherical interface depends on second-order contributions. We show that a greater statistical uncertainty is to be expected when calculating the thermodynamic properties of a spherical interface than for the planar and cylindrical cases, and the evaluation of the separate entropic and energetic contributions poses a greater computational challenge than the tension itself. The methodology is employed to determine the vapour-liquid interfacial tension of TIP4P/2005 water at 293 K by molecular dynamics simulation for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. A weak peak in the curvature dependence of the tension is observed in the case of cylindrical threads of condensed liquid at a radius of about 8 Å, below which the tension is found to decrease again. In the case of spherical drops, a marked decrease in the tension from the planar limit is found for radii below ∼ 15 Å; there is no indication of a maximum in the tension with increasing curvature. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension tends towards the planar limit for large

  15. Surface thermodynamics of planar, cylindrical, and spherical vapour-liquid interfaces of water

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J.; Hunt, Patricia A.

    2015-03-21

    The test-area (TA) perturbation approach has been gaining popularity as a methodology for the direct computation of the interfacial tension in molecular simulation. Though originally implemented for planar interfaces, the TA approach has also been used to analyze the interfacial properties of curved liquid interfaces. Here, we provide an interpretation of the TA method taking the view that it corresponds to the change in free energy under a transformation of the spatial metric for an affine distortion. By expressing the change in configurational energy of a molecular configuration as a Taylor expansion in the distortion parameter, compact relations are derived for the interfacial tension and its energetic and entropic components for three different geometries: planar, cylindrical, and spherical fluid interfaces. While the tensions of the planar and cylindrical geometries are characterized by first-order changes in the energy, that of the spherical interface depends on second-order contributions. We show that a greater statistical uncertainty is to be expected when calculating the thermodynamic properties of a spherical interface than for the planar and cylindrical cases, and the evaluation of the separate entropic and energetic contributions poses a greater computational challenge than the tension itself. The methodology is employed to determine the vapour-liquid interfacial tension of TIP4P/2005 water at 293 K by molecular dynamics simulation for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. A weak peak in the curvature dependence of the tension is observed in the case of cylindrical threads of condensed liquid at a radius of about 8 Å, below which the tension is found to decrease again. In the case of spherical drops, a marked decrease in the tension from the planar limit is found for radii below ∼ 15 Å; there is no indication of a maximum in the tension with increasing curvature. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension tends towards the planar limit for large

  16. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  17. Nondestructive Strain Tensor Scanning within Samples of Cylindrical Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lienert, U.; Almer, J.; Haeffner, D.; Gao, Y.; Carter, W.

    2004-05-12

    The radial (i.e., depth below the surface) dependence of the residual strain tensor within shot-peened samples of cylindrical geometry is measured nondestructively using high-energy synchrotron radiation (80 keV). Transmission geometry is employed in combination with a triangulation slit and area detector. Thus, a radial gauge length is defined directly by the beam size rather than cumulatively as in conventional reflection geometry. A narrow incident beam of 30 micrometer diameter is used, and we demonstrate that macroscopic grain averaging is achieved even in the bulk, where the grain size is large, by oscillating the samples in two dimensions. Therefore, the samples are rotated with high frequency around the cylinder axis and translated with low frequency parallel to the axis. We argue that the combination of a narrow incident beam, a two-dimensional sample oscillation, and area detector provides a versatile technique to overcome insufficient grain averaging as the gauge volumes can be flexibly chosen by the combined translation and/or rotation oscillations. The methodology is discussed and experimental results are presented for a shot-peened steel sample. The achieved radial resolution is 30 micrometers, and the radial dependences of five strain tensor components are measured.

  18. Fisher's theorems for multivariable, time- and space-dependent systems, with applications in population genetics and chemical kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Vlad, Marcel O.; Szedlacsek, Stefan E.; Pourmand, Nader; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Oefner, Peter; Ross, John

    2005-01-01

    We study different physical, chemical, or biological processes involving replication, transformation, and disappearance processes, as well as transport processes, and assume that the time and space dependence of the species densities are known. We derive two types of Fisher equations. The first type relates the average value of the time derivative of the relative time-specific rates of growth of the different species to the variance of the relative, time-specific rates of growth. A second type relates the average value of the gradient or the divergence of the relative, space-specific rates of growth to the space correlation matrix of the relative, space-specific rates of growth. These Fisher equations are exact results, which are independent of the detailed kinetics of the process: they are valid whether the evolution equations are linear or nonlinear, local or nonlocal in space and/or time and can be applied for the study of a large class of physical, chemical, and biological systems described in terms of time- and/or space-dependent density fields. We examine the implications of our generalized Fisher relations in population genetics, biochemistry, and chemical kinetics (reaction–diffusion systems). We show that there is a connection between the enhanced (hydrodynamic) transport of mutations induced by population growth and space-specific rate vectors: the velocity of enhanced transport is proportional to the product of the diffusion coefficient of the species and the space rate vector; this relation is similar to a fluctuation–dissipation relation in statistical mechanics. PMID:15994224

  19. Three-step cylindrical seal for high-performance turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1987-01-01

    A three-step cylindrical seal configuration representing the seal for a high performance turbopump (e.g., the space shuttle main engine fuel pump) was tested under static (nonrotating) conditions. The test data included critical mass flux and pressure profiles over a wide range of inlet temperatures and pressures for fluid nitrogen and fluid hydrogen with the seal in concentric and fully eccentric positions. The critical mass flux (leakage rate) was 70% that of an equivalent straight cylindrical seal with a correspondingly higher pressure drop based on the same flow areas of 0.3569 sq cm but 85% that of the straight seal based on the third-step flow area of 0.3044 sq cm. The mass flow rates for the three step cylindrical seal in the fully eccentric and concentric positions were essentially the same, and the trends in flow coefficient followed those of a simple axisymmetric inlet configuration. However, for inlet stagnation temperatures less than the thermodynamic critical temperature the pressure profiles exhibited a flat region throughout the third step of the seal, with the pressure magnitude dependent on the inlet stagnation temperature. Such profiles represent an extreme positive direct stiffness. These conditions engendered a crossover in the pressure profile upstream of the postulated choke that resulted in a local negative stiffness. Flat and crossover profiles resulting from choking within the seal are practically unknown to the seal designer. However, they are of critical importance to turbomachine stability and must be integrated into any dynamic analysis of a seal of this configuration. In addition, choking is highly dependent on geometry, inlet-to-backpressure ratio, and inlet temperature and can occur within the seal even though the backpressure is above the critical pressure.

  20. Three-step cylindrical seal for high-performance turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1987-06-01

    A three-step cylindrical seal configuration representing the seal for a high performance turbopump (e.g., the space shuttle main engine fuel pump) was tested under static (nonrotating) conditions. The test data included critical mass flux and pressure profiles over a wide range of inlet temperatures and pressures for fluid nitrogen and fluid hydrogen with the seal in concentric and fully eccentric positions. The critical mass flux (leakage rate) was 70% that of an equivalent straight cylindrical seal with a correspondingly higher pressure drop based on the same flow areas of 0.3569 sq cm but 85% that of the straight seal based on the third-step flow area of 0.3044 sq cm. The mass flow rates for the three step cylindrical seal in the fully eccentric and concentric positions were essentially the same, and the trends in flow coefficient followed those of a simple axisymmetric inlet configuration. However, for inlet stagnation temperatures less than the thermodynamic critical temperature the pressure profiles exhibited a flat region throughout the third step of the seal, with the pressure magnitude dependent on the inlet stagnation temperature. Such profiles represent an extreme positive direct stiffness. These conditions engendered a crossover in the pressure profile upstream of the postulated choke that resulted in a local negative stiffness. Flat and crossover profiles resulting from choking within the seal are practically unknown to the seal designer. However, they are of critical importance to turbomachine stability and must be integrated into any dynamic analysis of a seal of this configuration. In addition, choking is highly dependent on geometry, inlet-to-backpressure ratio, and inlet temperature and can occur within the seal even though the backpressure is above the critical pressure.

  1. View factors of cylindrical spiral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Vladimir A.; Solovjov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    Analytical expressions are presented for the view factors (radiative configuration factors) associated with the flat right cylindrical spiral surface. Such cylindrical spiral systems are widely applied as electrical resistance heating elements for lighting devices, electronic radio tubes, high-speed gas flow heaters, and other appliances used for scientific, industrial and domestic purposes. Derivation of the view factors is based on the invariant principles and the results presented in Lebedev (2000, 2003,1988) [1-3].

  2. Linac mechanic QA using a cylindrical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Li, Harold; Low, Daniel A.

    2008-09-01

    Precise mechanical operation of a linear accelerator (linac) is critical for accurate radiation therapy dose delivery. Quantitative procedures for linac mechanical quality assurance (QA) used in the standard of care are time consuming and therefore conducted on a relatively infrequent basis. We present a method for evaluating the mechanical performance of a linac based on a series of projection portal images of a prototype cylindrical phantom with embedded radiopaque fiducial markers. The marker autodetection process included modeling imager response to the radiation beam where the projected cylinder attenuation yielded a non-uniform image background. The linac mechanical characteristics were estimated based on nonlinear multi-objective optimization of the projected marker locations. The estimated geometry parameters for the tested commercial model were gantry angle deviation 0.075 ± 0.076° (1 SD), gantry sag 0.026 ± 0.02°, source-to-axis distance SAD 998.3 ± 1.7 mm, source-to-detector distance SDD 1493 ± 5.0 mm, couch vertical motion 0.6 ± 0.45 mm, couch rotation 0.154 ± 0.1° and average linac rotation center (1.02, -0.27, -0.37) ± (0.36,0.333,1.20) mm relative to the laser intersection. The imager shift was [-0.44, 2.6] ± [0.20, 1.1] mm and the imager orientation was in-plane rotation 0.05 ± 0.03°, roll -0.14 ± 0.09° and pitch -0.9 ± 0.604°. The performance of this procedure concerning marker detection and optimization was examined by comparing the detected set of marker coordinates to its back-calculated counterpart for three subgroups of markers: central, wall and intermediate relative to the center of the phantom. The maximum difference was less than 0.25 mm with a mean of 0.146 mm and a standard deviation of 0.07 mm. The clinical use of this automated procedure will allow more efficient, more thorough, and more frequent mechanical linac QA.

  3. Linac mechanic QA using a cylindrical phantom.

    PubMed

    Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Li, Harold; Low, Daniel A

    2008-09-21

    Precise mechanical operation of a linear accelerator (linac) is critical for accurate radiation therapy dose delivery. Quantitative procedures for linac mechanical quality assurance (QA) used in the standard of care are time consuming and therefore conducted on a relatively infrequent basis. We present a method for evaluating the mechanical performance of a linac based on a series of projection portal images of a prototype cylindrical phantom with embedded radiopaque fiducial markers. The marker autodetection process included modeling imager response to the radiation beam where the projected cylinder attenuation yielded a non-uniform image background. The linac mechanical characteristics were estimated based on nonlinear multi-objective optimization of the projected marker locations. The estimated geometry parameters for the tested commercial model were gantry angle deviation 0.075 +/- 0.076 degrees (1 SD), gantry sag 0.026 +/- 0.02 degrees , source-to-axis distance SAD 998.3 +/- 1.7 mm, source-to-detector distance SDD 1493 +/- 5.0 mm, couch vertical motion 0.6 +/- 0.45 mm, couch rotation 0.154 +/- 0.1 degrees and average linac rotation center (1.02, -0.27, -0.37) +/- (0.36,0.333,1.20) mm relative to the laser intersection. The imager shift was [-0.44, 2.6] +/- [0.20, 1.1] mm and the imager orientation was in-plane rotation 0.05 +/- 0.03 degrees , roll -0.14 +/- 0.09 degrees and pitch -0.9 +/- 0.604 degrees . The performance of this procedure concerning marker detection and optimization was examined by comparing the detected set of marker coordinates to its back-calculated counterpart for three subgroups of markers: central, wall and intermediate relative to the center of the phantom. The maximum difference was less than 0.25 mm with a mean of 0.146 mm and a standard deviation of 0.07 mm. The clinical use of this automated procedure will allow more efficient, more thorough, and more frequent mechanical linac QA. PMID:18723927

  4. A cylindrical SPECT camera with de-centralized readout scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habte, F.; Stenström, P.; Rillbert, A.; Bousselham, A.; Bohm, C.; Larsson, S. A.

    2001-09-01

    An optimized brain single photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT) camera is being designed at Stockholm University and Karolinska Hospital. The design goal is to achieve high sensitivity, high-count rate and high spatial resolution. The sensitivity is achieved by using a cylindrical crystal, which gives a closed geometry with large solid angles. A de-centralized readout scheme where only a local environment around the light excitation is readout supports high-count rates. The high resolution is achieved by using an optimized crystal configuration. A 12 mm crystal plus 12 mm light guide combination gave an intrinsic spatial resolution better than 3.5 mm (140 keV) in a prototype system. Simulations show that a modified configuration can improve this value. A cylindrical configuration with a rotating collimator significantly simplifies the mechanical design of the gantry. The data acquisition and control system uses early digitization and subsequent digital signal processing to extract timing and amplitude information, and monitors the position of the collimator. The readout system consists of 12 or more modules each based on programmable logic and a digital signal processor. The modules send data to a PC file server-reconstruction engine via a Firewire (IEEE-1394) network.

  5. Simulating flow and segregation of cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongzhi; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and accurate simulation of cylindrical particles using discrete element method (DEM) is a challenge. Typical approaches to simulating cylindrical particle systems are based on the glued spheres method, which has low accuracy, or real shape models, which have high computational cost. In this work we utilize super-ellipsoids, which belong to super-quadrics, to model cylindrical particles in DEM simulations. Simulations of a single cylinder impacting a flat wall indicate that super-ellipsoids provide the same accuracy as real shape models and much better accuracy than the glued sphere method. Simulations of super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles in rotating tumblers result in nearly the same angle of repose as experiments and real shape simulations, demonstrating the accuracy of super-ellipsoid DEM simulations for multi-particle systems. The segregation of bidisperse cylindrical particles differing in length in a bounded heap was simulated by super-ellipsoid DEM, and the results are similar to the experiment. In spite of these advantages of using super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles, simulations of filling a box with particles indicate that the simulation times for super-ellipsoid cylinders is about an order of magnitude longer than that for the same number of spherical particles.

  6. Parameterized Finite Element Modeling and Buckling Analysis of Six Typical Composite Grid Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Changliang; Wang, Junbiao; Liu, Chuang

    2014-10-01

    Six typical composite grid cylindrical shells are constructed by superimposing three basic types of ribs. Then buckling behavior and structural efficiency of these shells are analyzed under axial compression, pure bending, torsion and transverse bending by finite element (FE) models. The FE models are created by a parametrical FE modeling approach that defines FE models with original natural twisted geometry and orients cross-sections of beam elements exactly. And the approach is parameterized and coded by Patran Command Language (PCL). The demonstrations of FE modeling indicate the program enables efficient generation of FE models and facilitates parametric studies and design of grid shells. Using the program, the effects of helical angles on the buckling behavior of six typical grid cylindrical shells are determined. The results of these studies indicate that the triangle grid and rotated triangle grid cylindrical shell are more efficient than others under axial compression and pure bending, whereas under torsion and transverse bending, the hexagon grid cylindrical shell is most efficient. Additionally, buckling mode shapes are compared and provide an understanding of composite grid cylindrical shells that is useful in preliminary design of such structures.

  7. Ductile fracture of cylindrical vessels containing a large flaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Irwin, G. R.; Ratwani, M.

    1976-01-01

    The fracture process in pressurized cylindrical vessels containing a relatively large flaw is considered. The flaw is assumed to be a part-through or through meridional crack. The flaw geometry, the yield behavior of the material, and the internal pressure are assumed to be such that in the neighborhood of the flaw the cylinder wall undergoes large-scale plastic deformations. Thus, the problem falls outside the range of applicability of conventional brittle fracture theories. To study the problem, plasticity considerations are introduced into the shell theory through the assumptions of fully-yielded net ligaments using a plastic strip model. Then a ductile fracture criterion is developed which is based on the concept of net ligament plastic instability. A limited verification is attempted by comparing the theoretical predictions with some existing experimental results.

  8. Nonlinear saturation amplitude of cylindrical Rayleigh—Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wan-Hai; Yu, Chang-Ping; Ye, Wen-Hua; Wang, Li-Feng

    2014-09-01

    The nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) of the fundamental mode in the classical Rayleigh—Taylor instability with a cylindrical geometry for an arbitrary Atwood number is analytically investigated by considering the nonlinear corrections up to the third order. The analytic results indicate that the effects of the initial radius of the interface (r0) and the Atwood number (A) play an important role in the NSA of the fundamental mode. The NSA of the fundamental mode first increases gently and then decreases quickly with increasing A. For a given A, the smaller the r0/λ (λ is the perturbation wavelength), the larger the NSA of the fundamental mode. When r0/λ is large enough (r0 ≫ λ), the NSA of the fundamental mode is reduced to the prediction in the previous literatures within the framework of the third-order perturbation theory.

  9. Shear stabilization of the capillary breakup of a cylindrical interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Mathew J.; Steen, Paul H.

    1989-01-01

    A cylindrical interface containing a viscous liquid set into axial motion is subject to a capillary and to a surface-wave instability. Clues from previous studies suggest that, even though both mechanisms separately are destabilizing, under certain circumstances their mutual interaction can lead to a stable interface; shear can stabilize capillary breakup. Here, an axial flow through an annular cross section bounded on the inside by a rigid rod and on the outside by a deformable interface is considered. The competition between the two mechanisms is studied through the temporal growth of infinitesimal axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances. This examination of temporal stability shows that, indeed, for geometries corresponding to thin annular layers both instabilities can be completely suppressed (disturbances of all wavelengths decay).

  10. Rigid-drift magnetohydrodynamic equilibria for cylindrical screw pinches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L.

    1979-01-01

    The rigid-drift equations of MHD equilibria in cylindrical geometry are solved analytically in terms of an infinite series of hypergeometric functions for the case where the pressure is proportional to the square of number density and the current density is arbitrarily pitched. Solutions are obtained for a pure Z pinch, a pure theta pinch, and a general screw pinch. It is found that the shapes of the pressure and magnetic-field profiles are completely determined by the model once two parameters are specified: the local plasma beta on the axis and a quantity related to the pitch of the current density. A set of profiles that resemble those observed experimentally in reversed-field pinches is presented. The results also indicate that hollow pressure profiles and reversed Bz profiles can occur either simultaneously or independently and that the pressure always falls to zero at a finite value of the radius.

  11. Magnetic stress anisotropy field in plated cylindrical Permalloy films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, O. S.

    1971-01-01

    An analysis is made of the magnetic stress anisotropy field (Hks) arising from internal and external stress sources in plated-wire memory elements. The analysis takes into consideration circumferential composition variation and cylindrical geometry of the Permalloy film. Expressions are derived relating Hks to uniaxial film stress, average composition, and amplitude of composition variation. A result of particular importance is that even for average zeromagnetostrictive composition (ZMC) films, Hks may still make an appreciable contribution to the total anisotropy field if the composition is not uniform. Calculated Hks characteristics are shown to correlate with anisotropy field changes observed in annealing experiments. Examples are given to show the importance of composition uniformity in determining the stability of the anisotropy field. The utility of the analysis is extended by the inclusion of data expressing the inverse relation between anisotropy field and easy-axis dispersion in the film.

  12. Au cylindrical nanocup: A geometrically, tunable optical nanoresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovylina, M.; Alayo, N.; Conde-Rubio, A.; Borrisé, X.; Hibbard, G.; Labarta, A.; Batlle, X.; Pérez-Murano, F.

    2015-07-01

    The optical response of Au cylindrical metallic nanostructures (nanocups) with very thin walls is studied by means of finite difference time domain simulations. The simulations predict that, by changing the geometry of the nanocups, they behave as tunable optical nanoresonators with strong near-field enhancement. This opens up the possibility to use them simultaneously as container and field enhancer. Nanocups have been produced by an on-purpose designed fabrication route that combines nanoimprint lithography, definition of an intermediate hard mask, and metal lift-off. The fabrication route offers a manifold of supplementary advantages: thorough control of geometrical parameters; versatility of compositional design, including multishell nanocups; precise positioning of nanocups over the substrate; and low-cost and fast manufacturing of large areas of desirable density without loss of resolution, all processes being compatible with high throughput, low cost production, thus enabling future commercial applications.

  13. Scaling Instability in Buckling of Axially Compressed Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovsky, Yury; Harutyunyan, Davit

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we continue the development of mathematically rigorous theory of "near-flip" buckling of slender bodies of arbitrary geometry, based on hyperelasticity. In order to showcase the capabilities of this theory, we apply it to buckling of axially compressed circular cylindrical shells. The theory confirms the classical formula for the buckling load, whereby the perfect structure buckles at the stress that scales as the first power of shell's thickness. However, in the case of imperfections of load, the theory predicts scaling instability of the buckling stress. Depending on the type of load imperfections, buckling may occur at stresses that scale as thickness to the power 1.5 or 1.25, corresponding to the lower and upper ends, respectively, of the historically accumulated experimental data.

  14. Cylindrical microlasers and light emitting devices from conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, S.V.; Fujii, A.; Chinn, D.; Vardeny, Z.V.; Yoshino, K.; Gregory, R.V.

    1998-06-01

    Substantially improved, photopumped polymer lasers are demonstrated using microrings and microdisks of various diameters D ranging from 5 to 200 {mu}m. Various cavity-dependent laser modes were observed, which for D{lt}10{mu}m were dominated by a single longitudinal mode with linewidth of less than 1 {Angstrom}. These microlasers were also characterized by Q of order 5000, low threshold excitation energy of order 100 pJ/pulse for pulse duration ranging from 100 ps to sub-{mu}s, and an abrupt increase in the emission directionality and polarization degree. Light emitting diodes with cylindrical geometry, fully compatible with these microlasers are also demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Intensity and absorbed-power distribution in a cylindrical solar-pumped dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The internal intensity and absorbed-power distribution of a simplified hypothetical dye laser of cylindrical geometry is calculated. Total absorbed power is also calculated and compared with laboratory measurements of lasing-threshold energy deposition in a dye cell to determine the suitability of solar radiation as a pump source or, alternatively, what modifications, if any, are necessary to the hypothetical system for solar pumping.

  16. Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom

    2008-09-07

    Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

  17. Numerical study of cathode emission constraints on cylindrical, self-field MPD thruster performance

    SciTech Connect

    LaPointe, M.R. )

    1993-01-20

    A stability equation relating thruster discharge current, argon propellant mass flow rate, and electrode geometry has been solved for a variety of cylindrical self-field MPD thruster configurations and discharge currents code was employed to provide better estimates of the maximum achievable specific impulse, thrust, and flow efficiency for cases of interest. The model results indicate that long life, cyclindrical self-field MPD thrusters operated with argon propellant may not be able to provide specific impulse values in excess of 2100 s. Alternate electrode geometries, applied magnetic fields, and/or low molecular weight propellants may be necessary to achieve higher values of specific impulse.

  18. The Dizzying Depths of the Cylindrical Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.; Hill, S. Eric

    2005-02-01

    A typical introduction to geometrical optics treats plane and spherical mirrors. At first glance, it may be surprising that texts seldom mention the cylindrical mirror, except for the occasional reference to use in fun houses and to viewing anamorphic art.1,2 However, even a cursory treatment reveals its complexity. Holzberlein used an extended object to qualitatively illustrate that images are produced both before and behind a concave cylindrical mirror.3 He also speculated on how this extreme astigmatism results in an observer's dizziness. By considering a simple point object, we make a more detailed analysis of the cylindrical mirror and the dizziness it induces. First, we illustrate how rays from a point object reflect to form not one point image but two line images. Next, we describe how an observer perceives a likeness of the object. Finally, we suggest how confusing depth cues induce dizziness. Although we focus on the concave cylindrical mirror, the discussion is easy to generalize to the convex cylindrical mirror.

  19. Investigation of Surface Phenomena in Shocked Tin in Converging Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, Christopher L.; Oro, David Michael; Margolin, Len G.; Griego, Jeffrey Randall; Reinovsky, Robert Emil; Turchi, Peter John

    2015-08-06

    There is great interest in the behavior of the free surface of tin under shock loading. While it is known that meso-scale surface imperfections can seed the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) for a surface that is melted on release, much less is known about a tin surface that is solid, but plastically deforming. Here material properties such as shear and yield strength come into play especially in converging geometry. Previous experiments have been driven by direct contact HE. Usually a thin, flat target coupon is fielded with various single-mode, sinusoidal, machined, profiles on the free surface. The free surface is adjacent to either vacuum or an inert receiver gas. Most of these previous driver/target configurations have been nominal planer geometry. With modern HE it has been straightforward to shock tin into melt on release. However it has been challenging to achieve a low enough pressure for solid state on release. Here we propose to extend the existing base of knowledge to include the behavior of the free surface of tin in cylindrical converging geometry. By shock loading a cylindrical tin shell with a magnetically driven cylindrical liner impactor, the free surface evolution can be diagnosed with proton radiography. With the PHELIX capacitor bank, the drive can easily be varied to span the pressure range to achieve solid, mixed, and liquid states on release.

  20. The Beauty of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a geometry project that used the beauty of stained-glass-window designs to teach middle school students about geometric figures and concepts. Three honors prealgebra teachers and a middle school mathematics gifted intervention specialist created a geometry project that covered the curriculum and also assessed students'…

  1. Geometry of multihadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  2. Want to Play Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Matthew L.; Bomer, Megan A.; Powell, Nancy Norem

    2009-01-01

    Students enter the geometry classroom with a strong concept of fairness and a sense of what it means to "play by the rules," yet many students have difficulty understanding the postulates, or rules, of geometry and their implications. Although they may never have articulated the properties of an axiomatic system, they have gained a practical…

  3. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability and compares it to…

  4. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  5. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.; Reichert, P.

    1992-01-14

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. 11 figs.

  6. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.; Reichert, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing.

  7. MANCINTAP: Time and space dependent neutron activation tool algorithm improvement and analysis of a PWR nozzle gallery

    SciTech Connect

    Frambati, S.; Firpo, G.; Frignani, M.

    2012-07-01

    MANCINTAP [1], a fully automated tool for determining the activation patterns in complex 4D scenarios and evaluating the distribution of the ensuing radiation fields, has been improved. The constraint of forcing the user to define a single global mesh in order to approximate the whole problem, a limitation which prevented an accurate description of detail-rich geometries, has been overcome. The algorithm was improved and many limitations were relaxed. MANCINTAP is now capable of handling many different geometry elements in a given area at once, even if they have very different geometries and characteristic dimensions, thus allowing a vastly more complete and detailed analysis. Different meshes can be superimposed to the 3D geometry, allowing for an appropriate, dedicated treatment of all the relevant features of the problem, and the results are automatically combined in order to provide a global perspective. These new capabilities were accurately tested by applying the tool to the study of time-dependent radiation levels during shutdown in the upper reactor cavity and nozzle gallery regions of a 2-loop PWR reactor. (authors)

  8. Roller bearing geometry design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Pinkston, B. H. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is extended and applied to the design of cylindrical roller bearings. The kinematic stabilization mechanism puts a reverse skew into the rolling elements by changing the roller taper. Twelve basic bearing modification designs are identified amd modeled. Four have single transverse convex curvature in their rollers while eight have rollers which have compound transverse curvature made up of a central cylindrical band surrounded by symmetric bands with slope and transverse curvature. The bearing designs are modeled for restoring torque per unit axial displacement, contact stress capacity, and contact area including dynamic loading, misalignment sensitivity and roller proportion. Design programs are available which size the single transverse curvature roller designs for a series of roller slopes and load separations and which design the compound roller bearings for a series of slopes and transverse radii of curvature. The compound rollers are proportioned to have equal contact stresses and minimum size. Design examples are also given.

  9. Light scattering from cylindrical structures on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Taubenblatt, M A

    1990-03-01

    Light scattering from a dielectric cylindrical structure on a surface by a plane wave with field vector along the cylinder axis is calculated with a modification of the coupled-dipole method. The interaction matrix is calculated with the use of both the direct contribution of a polarization current filament and its reflection from the surface. The reflected cylindrical waves are computed with the use of the Sommerfeld-type integral expression. Light scattering from structures of arbitrary cross section and the size of the order of a wavelength can be quickly determined with this method. PMID:19759774

  10. Self-referenced interferometer for cylindrical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Holá, Miroslava; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lazar, Josef

    2015-11-20

    We present a new interferometric method for shape measurement of hollow cylindrical tubes. We propose a simple and robust self-referenced interferometer where the reference and object waves are represented by the central and peripheral parts, respectively, of the conical wave generated by a single axicon lens. The interferogram detected by a digital camera is characterized by a closed-fringe pattern with a circular carrier. The interference phase is demodulated using spatial synchronous detection. The capabilities of the interferometer are experimentally tested for various hollow cylindrical tubes with lengths up to 600 mm. PMID:26836560

  11. Second order symmetry-preserving conservative Lagrangian scheme for compressible Euler equations in two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Juan; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2014-09-01

    In applications such as astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion, there are many three-dimensional cylindrical-symmetric multi-material problems which are usually simulated by Lagrangian schemes in the two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates. For this type of simulation, a critical issue for the schemes is to keep spherical symmetry in the cylindrical coordinate system if the original physical problem has this symmetry. In the past decades, several Lagrangian schemes with such symmetry property have been developed, but all of them are only first order accurate. In this paper, we develop a second order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving compressible Euler equations in cylindrical coordinates, based on the control volume discretizations, which is designed to have uniformly second order accuracy and capability to preserve one-dimensional spherical symmetry in a two-dimensional cylindrical geometry when computed on an equal-angle-zoned initial grid. The scheme maintains several good properties such as conservation for mass, momentum and total energy, and the geometric conservation law. Several two-dimensional numerical examples in cylindrical coordinates are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the scheme in terms of accuracy, symmetry, non-oscillation and robustness. The advantage of higher order accuracy is demonstrated in these examples.

  12. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instability: Theory and simulation in planar and cylindrical pulsed power targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Matthew R.

    Cylindrical liner implosions in the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept are susceptible to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT). The danger of MRT enters in two phases, (1) during the main implosion, the outer surface of the liner is MRT unstable, and (2) during the short time period when the liner decelerates onto hot fuel, the inner surface becomes unstable. Growth of MRT on the outer surface may also feedthrough, which may seed the inner surface leading to high MRT growth in the second phase. If MRT growth becomes large enough, confinement of the fuel is lost. To characterize MRT we solve the linearized, ideal MHD equations in both planar and cylindrical geometries, including the presence of an axial magnetic field and the effects of sausage and kink modes (present in cylindrical coordinates only). In general, the total instability growth rates in cylindrical geometry are found to be larger than those in planar geometry. MRT and feedthrough is shown to be suppressed by strong magnetic field line bending (tension). However, for the same amount of field line bending, feedthrough is the most stabilized. Application of the planar and the cylindrical model to results from the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Analytic MRT growth rates for a typical magnetized MagLIF-like implosion show the kink mode to be the fastest growing early and very late in the liner implosion (during deceleration). 1D HYDRA MHD simulations are used to generate realistic, evolving profiles (in density, pressure, and magnetic field) during the implosion from which instantaneous growth rates can be computed exactly, using either the planar or cylindrical analytic formulae developed in this thesis. Sophisticated 2D HYDRA MHD simulations were also performed to compare with the analytic theory and experimental results. In 2D, highly compressed axial magnetic fields can reduce the growth of perturbations at the fuel/liner interface during the implosion

  13. Optical methods for cylindrical rough surface testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Quintian, F.; Rebollo, Maria A.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.; Raffo, C. A.

    1999-07-01

    This work studies theoretically the scattering of light from cylindrical rough surfaces. It is shown, for the conical diffraction configuration, that the mean intensity on an observation plane perpendicular to the cylinder longitudinal axis, is related to the statistical parameters that characterize the surface: the roughness (sigma) and the correlation length T.

  14. Distributed neural signals on parabolic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    Parabolic cylindrical shells are commonly used as key components in communication antennas, space telescopes, solar collectors, etc. This study focuses on distributed modal neural sensing signals on a flexible simply-supported parabolic cylindrical shell panel. The parabolic cylindrical shell is fully laminated with a piezoelectric layer on its outer surface and the piezoelectric layer is segmented into infinitesimal elements (neurons) to investigate the microscopic distributed neural sensing signals. Since the dominant vibration component of the shell is usually the transverse oscillation, a new transverse mode shape function is defined. Two shell cases, i.e., the ratio of the meridian height to the half span distance of a parabola at 1:4 (shallow) and 1:1 (deep), are studied to reveal the curvature effect to the neural sensing signals. Studies suggest that the membrane signal component dominates for lower natural modes and the bending signal component dominates for higher natural modes. The meridional membrane and bending signal components are mostly concentrated on the high-curvature areas, while the longitudinal bending component is mostly concentrated on the relatively flat areas. The concentration behavior becomes more prominent as the parabolic cylindrical shell deepens, primarily resulting from the enhanced membrane effect due to the increased curvature.

  15. Conformal cylindrically symmetric spacetimes in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkog˜lu, Murat Metehan; Dog˜ru, Melis Ulu

    2015-11-01

    We investigate cylindrically symmetric spacetimes in the context of f(R) gravity. We firstly attain conformal symmetry of the cylindrically symmetric spacetime. We obtain solutions to use features of the conformal symmetry, field equations and their solutions for cylindrically symmetric spacetime filled with various cosmic matters such as vacuum state, perfect fluid, anisotropic fluid, massive scalar field and their combinations. With the vacuum state solutions, we show that source of the spacetime curvature is considered as Casimir effect. Casimir force for given spacetime is found using Wald’s axiomatic analysis. We expose that the Casimir force for Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacuum states could have attractive, repulsive and ineffective features. In the perfect fluid state, we show that matter form of the perfect fluid in given spacetime must only be dark energy. Also, we offer that potential of massive and massless scalar field are developed as an exact solution from the modified field equations. All solutions of field equations for vacuum case, perfect fluid and scalar field give a special f(R) function convenient to Λ-CDM model. In addition to these solutions, we introduce conformal cylindrical symmetric solutions in the cases of different f(R) models. Finally, geometrical and physical results of the solutions are discussed.

  16. Light Transmission Through Reflecting Cylindrical Tubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, D. K.; Potts, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which a point source of light, when viewed through a cylindrical tube having reflecting inner walls, appears as a series of sharply defined rings, due to the multiple reflections from the inner walls of the tube. ( GA)

  17. Cylindrical Induction Melter Modicon Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, G.E.

    1998-04-01

    In the last several years an extensive R{ampersand}D program has been underway to develop a vitrification system to stabilize Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm) inventories at SRS. This report documents the Modicon control system designed for the 3 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM).

  18. Tamm plasmon polaritons in multilayered cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, C. E.; Anufriev, R.; Iorsh, I.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Abram, R. A.; Brand, S.

    2012-12-01

    It is shown that cylindrical Bragg reflector structures with either a metal core, a metal cladding, or both can support Tamm plasmon polaritons (TPPs) that can propagate axially along the interface between the metallic layer and the adjacent dielectric. A transfer matrix formalism for cylindrical multilayered structures is used in association with cavity phase matching considerations to design structures that support Tamm plasmon polaritons at specified frequencies, and to explore the field distributions and the dispersion relations of the excitations. The cylindrical TPPs can exist in both the TE and TM polarizations for the special cases of modes with either azimuthal isotropy or zero axial propagation constant and also as hybrid cylindrical modes when neither of those conditions applies. In the cases considered the TPPs have low effective masses and low group velocities. Also, when there is both metallic core and cladding, near degenerate modes localized at each metallic interface can couple to produce symmetric and antisymmetric combinations whose frequency difference is in the terahertz regime.

  19. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  20. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  1. Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connes, Alain

    2006-11-01

    In this very short essay we shall describe a "spectral" point of view on geometry which allows to start taking into account the lessons from both renormalization and of general relativity. We shall first do that for renormalization and explain in rough outline the content of our recent collaborations with Dirk Kreimer and Matilde Marcolli leading to the universal Galois symmetry of renormalizable quantum field theories provided by the renormalization group in its cosmic Galois group incarnation. As far as general relativity is concerned, since the functional integral cannot be treated in the traditional perturbative manner, it relies heavily as a "sum over geometries" on the chosen paradigm of geometric space. This will give us the occasion to discuss, in the light of noncommutative geometry, the issue of "observables" in gravity and our joint work with Ali Chamseddine on the spectral action, with a first attempt to write down a functional integral on the space of noncommutative geometries.

  2. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  3. Detonation diffraction through different geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin, Rémy; Zitoun, Ratiba; Khasainov, Boris; Desbordes, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    We performed the study of the diffraction of a self-sustained detonation from a cylindrical tube (of inner diameter d) through different geometric configurations in order to characterise the transmission processes and to quantify the transmission criteria to the reception chamber. For the diffraction from a tube to the open space the transmission criteria is expressed by d c = k c · λ (with λ the detonation cell size and k c depending on the mixture and on the operture configuration, classically 13 for alkane mixtures with oxygen). The studied geometries are: (a) a sharp increase of diameter ( D/ d > 1) with and without a central obstacle in the diffracting section, (b) a conical divergent with a central obstacle in the diffracting section and (c) an inversed intermediate one end closed tube insuring a double reflection before a final diffraction between the initiator tube and the reception chamber. The results for case A show that the reinitiation process depends on the ratio d/ λ. For ratios below k c the re-ignition takes place at the receptor tube wall and at a fixed distance from the step, i.e. closely after the diffracted shock reflection shows a Mach stem configuration. For ratios below a limit ratio k lim (which depends on D/ d) the re-ignition distance increases with the decrease of d/λ. For both case A and B the introduction of a central obstacle (of blockage ratio BR = 0.5) at the exit of the initiator tube decreases the critical transmission ratio k c by 50%. The results in configuration C show that the re-ignition process depends both on d/ λ and the geometric conditions. Optimal configuration is found that provides the transmission through the two successive reflections (from d = 26 mm to D ch = 200 mm) at as small d/ λ as 2.2 whatever the intermediate diameter D is. This configuration provides a significant improvement in the detonation transmission conditions.

  4. Experimental and theoretical studies of cylindrical Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Artem; Raitses, Yegeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2007-05-15

    The Hall thruster is a mature electric propulsion device that holds considerable promise in terms of the propellant saving potential. The annular design of the conventional Hall thruster, however, does not naturally scale to low power. The efficiency tends to be lower and the lifetime issues are more aggravated. Cylindrical geometry Hall thrusters have lower surface-to-volume ratio than conventional thrusters and, thus, seem to be more promising for scaling down. The cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) is fundamentally different from the conventional design in the way the electrons are confined and the ion space charge is neutralized. The performances of both the large (9-cm channel diameter, 600-1000 W) and miniaturized (2.6-cm channel diameter, 50-300 W) CHTs are comparable with those of the state-of-the-art conventional (annular) design Hall thrusters of similar sizes. A comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the CHT physics has been conducted, addressing the questions of electron cross-field transport, propellant ionization, plasma-wall interaction, and formation of the electron distribution function. Probe measurements in the harsh plasma environment of the microthruster were performed. Several interesting effects, such as the unusually high ionization efficiency and enhanced electron transport, were observed. Kinetic simulations suggest the existence of the strong fluctuation-enhanced electron diffusion and predict the non-Maxwellian shape of the electron distribution function. Through the acquired understanding of the new physics, ways for further optimization of this means for low-power space propulsion are suggested. Substantial flexibility in the magnetic field configuration of the CHT is the key tool in achieving the high-efficiency operation.

  5. Common Geometry Module

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  6. CMS Geometry Through 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, I.; Brownson, E.; Eulisse, G.; Jones, C. D.; Lange, D. J.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.

    2014-06-01

    CMS faces real challenges with upgrade of the CMS detector through 2020 and beyond. One of the challenges, from the software point of view, is managing upgrade simulations with the same software release as the 2013 scenario. We present the CMS geometry description software model, its integration with the CMS event setup and core software. The CMS geometry configuration and selection is implemented in Python. The tools collect the Python configuration fragments into a script used in CMS workflow. This flexible and automated geometry configuration allows choosing either transient or persistent version of the same scenario and specific version of the same scenario. We describe how the geometries are integrated and validated, and how we define and handle different geometry scenarios in simulation and reconstruction. We discuss how to transparently manage multiple incompatible geometries in the same software release. Several examples are shown based on current implementation assuring consistent choice of scenario conditions. The consequences and implications for multiple/different code algorithms are discussed.

  7. Effects of Filler Concentration and Geometry on Performance of Cylindrical Injection Molded Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing interest in using fillers in plastic products to displace petroleum components, reduce cost, and improve mechanical properties. Many studies have examined the use of materials such as clay, talc, paper, wood flour, lignin, flax, and bamboo, to name just a few. For successful utili...

  8. Observation of a free-Shercliff-layer instability in cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Roach, Austin H; Spence, Erik J; Gissinger, Christophe; Edlund, Eric M; Sloboda, Peter; Goodman, Jeremy; Ji, Hantao

    2012-04-13

    We report on observations of a free-Shercliff-layer instability in a Taylor-Couette experiment using a liquid metal over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, Re∼10(3)-10(6). The free Shercliff layer is formed by imposing a sufficiently strong axial magnetic field across a pair of differentially rotating axial end cap rings. This layer is destabilized by a hydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability, characterized by velocity fluctuations in the r-θ plane. The instability appears with an Elsasser number above unity, and saturates with an azimuthal mode number m which increases with the Elsasser number. Measurements of the structure agree well with 2D global linear mode analyses and 3D global nonlinear simulations. These observations have implications for a range of rotating MHD systems in which similar shear layers may be produced. PMID:22587259

  9. Impact of a shearless flow and cylindricity on interchange instability in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, E.S.

    2005-05-15

    The stability of magnetically confined plasmas is sometimes examined using the so-called 'slab' model, where the toroidal geometry of the problem is approximated locally by the Cartesian one. In the present paper, a (more accurate) cylindrical approximation is considered and shown to yield results which are qualitatively different from those of the slab model. In particular, if the slab model is applied to the outboard region of the tokamak (where the gradient of the plasma's density and that of the magnetic field are of the same sign), disturbances remain unstable at all times. In the cylindrical model, on the other hand, the ExB flow carries disturbances around the cylinder and they alternate between the unstable and stable regions. Naturally, this reduces the growth rate of instability and makes it dependent on the angular velocity of the flow.

  10. Magnetic properties of multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles with alternating magnetic wire and tube segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Aravena, D.; Corona, R. M.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic properties in multisegmented cylindrical nanostructures comprised of nanowire and nanotube segments are investigated numerically as a function of their geometry. In this work we report systematic changes in the coercivity and remanence in these systems. Besides, we have found the ideal conditions for a magnetic configuration with two antiparallel domains that could be used to help to stabilize magnetic nanoparticles inside ferromagnetic multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles. This magnetic behavior is due to the fact that the tube segment reverses its magnetization before the wire segment, allowing the control of the magnetic domain walls motion between two segments. In this way, these magnetic nanoobjects can be an alternative to store information or even perform logic functions.

  11. Fidelity of a Finite Element Model for Longitudinal Wave Propagation in Thick Cylindrical Wave Guides

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, A.D.

    2000-09-01

    The ability to model wave propagation in circular cylindrical bars of finite length numerically or analytically has many applications. In this thesis the capability of an explicit finite element method to model longitudinal waves in cylindrical rods with circular cross-sections is explored. Dispersion curves for the first four modes are compared to the analytical solution to determine the accuracy of various element sizes and time steps. Values for the time step and element size are determined that retain accuracy while minimizing computational time. The modeling parameters are validated by calculating a signal propagated with a broadband input force. Limitations on the applicability are considered along with modeling parameters that should be applicable to more general geometries.

  12. Elastic-plastic fracture of cylindrical shells containing a part-through circumferential crack

    SciTech Connect

    Ezzat, H.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-11-01

    The problem of fatigue crack propagation and ductile fracture of a cylindrical shell containing a macroscopic circumferential flaw is considered. The main interest in the study is in applications to line pipes and other cylindrical containers under secondary axial stresses in addition to the primary stresses coming from the internal pressure. The stress intensity factor for the part-through crack used in analyzing and correlating the fatigue crack propagation rate is obtained by using a line spring model in conjunction with Reissner's shell theory. To analyze the ductile fracture instability and to correlate the experimental and theoretical results, the crack mouth opening displacement is used as the parameter. The limited data on fatigue crack propagation give the expected result, namely that the crack propagation rate in pipes may be predicted from the fatigue results performed on simpler geometries provided the stress intensity factors in pipes are calculated with sufficient accuracy. 14 references.

  13. A cylindrical-section ultrasound phased-array applicator for hyperthermia cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ebbini, E S; Umemura, S I; Ibbini, M; Cain, C A

    1988-01-01

    A phased-array applicator geometry for deep localized hyperthermia is presented. The array consists of rectangular transducer elements forming a section of a cylinder that conforms to the body portals in the abdominal and pelvic regions. Focusing and scanning properties of the cylindrical-section array are investigated in homogeneous lossy media using appropriate computer simulations. The characteristic focus of this array is shown to be spatially limited in both transverse and longitudinal directions with intensity gain values suitable for deep hyperthermia applications. The ability of the cylindrical-section phased array to generate multiple foci using the field conjugation method is examined. The effect of the grating lobes on the power deposition pattern of the scanned field is shown to be minimal. Steady-state temperature distributions are simulated using a three-dimensional thermal model of the normal tissue layers surrounding a tumor of typical volume. The advantages and the limitations of this array configuration are discussed. PMID:18290188

  14. Effects of Shell-Buckling Knockdown Factors in Large Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Shell-buckling knockdown factors (SBKF) have been used in large cylindrical shell structures to account for uncertainty in buckling loads. As the diameter of the cylinder increases, achieving the manufacturing tolerances becomes increasingly more difficult. Knockdown factors account for manufacturing imperfections in the shell geometry by decreasing the allowable buckling load of the cylinder. In this paper, large-diameter (33 ft) cylinders are investigated by using various SBKF's. An investigation that is based on finite-element analysis (FEA) is used to develop design sensitivity relationships. Different manufacturing imperfections are modeled into a perfect cylinder to investigate the effects of these imperfections on buckling. The analysis results may be applicable to large- diameter rockets, cylindrical tower structures, bulk storage tanks, and silos.

  15. Jet mixing and emission characteristics of transverse jets in annular and cylindrical confined crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, D. B.; Smith, C. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Three dimensional turbulent reacting CFD analyses were performed on transverse jets injected into annular and cylindrical (can) confined crossflows. The goal was to identify and assess mixing differences between annular and can geometries. The approach taken was to optimize both annular and can configurations by systematically varying orifice spacing until lowest emissions were achieved, and then compare the results. Numerical test conditions consisted of a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 3.2 and a jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio (J) of 30. The computational results showed that the optimized geometries had similar emission levels at the exit of the mixing section although the annular configuration did mix-out faster. For lowest emissions, the density correlation parameter (C = (S/H) square root of J) was 2.35 for the annular geometry and 3.5 for the can geometry. For the annular geometry, the constant was about twice the value seen for jet mixing at low mass-flow ratios (i.e., MR less than 0.5). For the can geometry, the constant was about 1 1/2 times the value seen for low mass-flow ratios.

  16. Ablation Front Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Experiments in Spherically Convergent Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Cherfils, C.; Colvin, J.; Divol, L.; Galmiche, D.; Haan, S.; Marinak, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Richard, A.L.; Wallace, R.

    1999-11-03

    Experiments were performed on the Nova laser, using indirectly driven capsules mounted in cylindrical gold hohlraums, to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor growth at the ablation front by time-resolved radiography. Modulations were preformed on the surface of Ge-doped plastic capsules. With initial modulations of 4 {micro}m, growth factors of about 6 in optical depth were seen, in agreement with simulations using the radiation hydrocode FCI2. With initial modulations of 1 {micro}m, growth factors of about 100-150 in optical depth were seen. The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at the ablation front in an inertial confinement fusion capsule has been the subject of considerable investigation. Much of this research has been concentrated on planar experiments, in which RT growth is inferred from radiography. The evolution is somewhat different in a converging geometry; the spatial wavelength decreases (affecting the onset of nonlinear saturation), and the shell thickens and compresses rather than decompressing as in a planar geometry. In a cylindrically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius, while in spherically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius squared. Experiments were performed on the Nova and Omega lasers in cylindrical geometry (using both direct and indirect drive) and have been performed in spherical geometry using direct drive.

  17. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  18. Nonaxisymmetric radiative transfer in cylindrical enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Moder, J.P.; Lee, H.S.; Chai, J.C.; Parthasarathy, G.; Patankar, S.V.

    1996-12-31

    A finite-volume method for radiative transfer in cylindrical enclosures is presented. Angular redistribution terms in the equation of transfer are avoided by defining radiation directions in terms of angular coordinates measured with respect to Cartesian base vectors; this definition of radiation directions can result in control angles which overlap control-volume faces, depending on the type of spatial and angular grids used in the azimuthal direction. A simple treatment for such control-angle overlaps is presented which is also applicable to nonorthogonal curvilinear spatial-coordinates. A comparison of the present procedure with other similar methods is given. Solutions are presented for axisymmetric transfer through a cylinder and nonaxisymmetric transfer through two- and three-dimensional annular sectors. Results show that the procedure produces reasonable solutions for transparent and participating media in axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric cylindrical enclosures.

  19. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress. PMID:25658139

  20. Jamming of Cylindrical Grains in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Spier, Gregory; Barr, Nicholas; Steel, Fiona

    2012-02-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. These cylindrical grains resemble antacid tablets, poker chips, or coins since their height is less than their diameter. Grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Within this channel, grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by the grain dimensions and channel size. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  1. Multiple Bifurcations of a Cylindrical Dynamical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ning; Cao, Qingjie

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on multiple bifurcations of a cylindrical dynamical system, which is evolved from a rotating pendulum with SD oscillator. The rotating pendulum system exhibits the coupling dynamics property of the bistable state and conventional pendulum with the ho- moclinic orbits of the first and second type. A double Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, two saddle-node bifurcations of periodic orbits and a pair of homoclinic bifurcations are detected by using analytical analysis and nu- merical calculation. It is found that the homoclinic orbits of the second type can bifurcate into a pair of rotational limit cycles, coexisting with the oscillating limit cycle. Additionally, the results obtained herein, are helpful to explore different types of limit cycles and the complex dynamic bifurcation of cylindrical dynamical system.

  2. Omnidirectional, circularly polarized, cylindrical microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, Philip H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A microstrip cylindrical antenna comprised of two concentric subelements on a ground cylinder, a vertically polarized (E-field parallel to the axis of the antenna cylinder) subelement on the inside and a horizontally polarized (E-field perpendicular to the axis) subelement on the outside. The vertical subelement is a wraparound microstrip radiator. A Y-shaped microstrip patch configuration is used for the horizontally polarized radiator that is wrapped 1.5 times to provide radiating edges on opposite sides of the cylindrical antenna for improved azimuthal pattern uniformity. When these subelements are so fed that their far fields are equal in amplitude and phased 90.degree. from each other, a circularly polarized EM wave results. By stacking a plurality of like antenna elements on the ground cylinder, a linear phased array antenna is provided that can be beam steered to the desired elevation angle.

  3. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  4. Cylindrically converging blast waves in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    1981-07-01

    Cylindrically converging shock waves are produced by utilizing the detonation of cylindrical explosive shells. The production and the propagation of shock waves are observed by framing and streak camera photographs, and the trajectory of shock propagations is determined by using an electrical ionization probing system. The effect of the quantity of explosives on the stability, or the axial symmetry, of shock fronts and on the strength of shocks produced is investigated. It has been shown that, for practical purposes, the approximation of shock trajectories by Guderley's formulas would be sufficiently acceptable in an unexpectedly wide region near the implosion center, and that the axial symmetry of the shock front is improved by increasing the quantity of explosives, and thus, strong shocks are produced by merely increasing the quantity of explosives. The reflected diverging shock seems to be very stable. Piezoelectric elements have also been used to detect reflected diverging waves.

  5. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  6. Machining Thin-Walled Cylindrical Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbak, Joe; Spagnolo, Jim; Kraus, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical walls only few thousandths of inch thick machined accurately and without tears or punctures with aid of beryllium copper mandrel. Chilled so it contracts, then inserted in cylinder. As comes to room temperature, mandrel expands and fits snugly inside cylinder. Will not allow part to slide and provides solid backup to prevent deflection when part machined by grinding wheel. When machining finished, cylinder-and-mandrel assembly inserted in dry ice, mandrel contracts and removed from part.

  7. Domain wall dynamics in cylindrical nanomagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Soumik; Singh, Amrita; Ghosh, Arindam

    2011-06-01

    The stochasticity associated with domain wall nucleation and propagation in a cylinderical nanowire has been studied using time resolved resistance measurement in presence of magnetic field. We have shown that the propagation stochasticity of domain wall in a cylindrical nanowire is reflected in the magnetic field dependent velocity distribution whereas the stochasticity involved in the domain wall nucleation can be effectively tuned by varying the angle between the direction of applied magnetic field and the long axis of the cylinder.

  8. Moiré effect in cylindrical objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saveljev, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    The moiré effect in single-walled cylindrical objects (gridshells) is investigated. The surface of such an object is a rolled-up periodic grating (mesh). Analytical formulae are obtained for the period of the moiré patterns, which depends particularly on the direction of the wavevector of the grating. The experiments confirm the theory. The results can be applied to nanoparticles and to three-dimensional autostereoscopic displays.

  9. Numerical dynamo action in cylindrical containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nore, Caroline; Castanon Quiroz, Daniel; Guermond, Jean-Luc; Léorat, Jacques; Luddens, Francky

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present results from numerical simulations of dynamo action in relation with two magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) experiments using liquid sodium in cylindrical containers. The first one is the von Kármán sodium (VKS) experiment from Cadarache (France), the second one is a precession-driven dynamo experiment from the DREsden sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies (DRESDYN). Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014) - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  10. Electronic quantum confinement in cylindrical potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, Arkadiy S.; Msezane, Alfred Z.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H and its radius R0 have been considered; when the cylinder length H significantly exceeds its radius R0 and when the cylinder radius is much greater than its length. The cylindrical quantum confinement effects on the momentum distribution of electrons in these potential wells have been analyzed. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  11. Cylindrical multilayer metal-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasin, M. E.; Il'inskaya, N. D.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Kaliteevskaya, N. A.; Lazarenko, A. A.; Mazlin, V. A.; Brunkov, P. N.; Pavlov, S. I.; Kaliteevski, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    A method of creating a cylindrical structures consisting of thin metallic layer and dielectric multilayer Bragg reflector is described. Formation of the structures is observed experimentally as a result of separation and twisting away from the substrate a thin layer of gold coated with a multilayer SiO2/TiO2 Bragg reflector. It is suggested that such structures may be of interest for the creation of novel optoelectronic devices.

  12. A printed circuit cylindrical array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ashok K.; Powell, Walter E.

    1986-11-01

    The design and performance of a Ku-band cylindrical antenna are described. The antenna is designed to provide a 360-deg azimuth coverage with 20-dB sidelobes and an operating bandwidth of 1 GHz (16.0-17.0 GHz). The antenna consists of 16 facets of 2 x 4 dipole arrays. The 360-deg coverage is obtained with a switch matrix network. The antenna elements and the feeding switch matrix network are printed on a single printed circuit board.

  13. Mach disc formation in cylindrical recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; McQueen, R.G.; Marsh, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Cylindrical recovery systems have been used to shock-load polymers to pressures exceeding 50 GPa. In order to determine the pressures generated in these recovery systems the formation of the Mach disc on axis and its approach to steady state was monitored. The relation of the Mach disc diameter to the lateral dimension of the high explosive used to compress the polymer samples was also investigated.

  14. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  15. Cylindrically distributing optical fiber tip for uniform laser illumination of hollow organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Burke, T.; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Hill, P. D.; Essenpreis, Matthias; Mills, Timothy N.

    1993-05-01

    To predict the outcome of laser therapy it is important to possess, among other things, an accurate knowledge of the intensity and distribution of the laser light incident on the tissue. For irradiation of the internal surfaces of hollow organs, modified fiber tips can be used to shape the light distribution to best suit the treatment geometry. There exist bulb-tipped optical fibers emitting a uniform isotropic distribution of light suitable for the treatment of organs which approximate a spherical geometry--the bladder, for example. For the treatment of organs approximating a cylindrical geometry--e.g. the oesophagus--an optical fiber tip which emits a uniform cylindrical distribution of light is required. We report on the design, development and testing of such a device, the CLD fiber tip. The device was made from a solid polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rod, 27 mm in length and 4 mm in diameter. One end was shaped and 'silvered' to form a mirror which reflected the light emitted from the delivery fiber positioned at the other end of the rod. The shape of the mirror was such that the light fell with uniform intensity on the circumferential surface of the rod. This surface was coated with BaSO4 reflectance paint to couple the light out of the rod and onto the surface of the tissue.

  16. FOUR PI CALIBRATION AND MODELING OF A BARE GERMANIUM DETECTOR IN A CYLINDRICAL FIELD SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Young, J.

    2011-04-29

    In reference 1 the authors described {gamma}-ray holdup assay of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument where they utilized two axial symmetric cylindrical shell acquisitions and two disk source acquisitions to determine Am-241 and Np-237 contamination. The measured contents of the two species were determined using a general detector efficiency calibration taken from a 12-inch point source.2 The authors corrected the raw spectra for container absorption as well as for geometry corrections to transform the calibration curve to the applicable axial symmetric cylindrical source - and disk source - of contamination. The authors derived the geometry corrections with exact calculus that are shown in equations (1) and (2) of our Experimental section. A cylindrical shell (oven source) acquisition configuration is described in reference 3, where the authors disclosed this configuration to gain improved sensitivity for holdup measure of U-235 in a ten-chamber oven. The oven was a piece of process equipment used in the Savannah River Plant M-Area Uranium Fuel Fabrication plant for which a U-235 holdup measurement was necessary for its decontamination and decommissioning in 2003.4 In reference 4 the authors calibrated a bare NaI detector for these U-235 holdup measurements. In references 5 and 6 the authors calibrated a bare HpGe detector in a cylindrical shell configuration for improved sensitivity measurements of U-235 in other M-Area process equipment. Sensitivity was vastly improved compared to a close field view of the sample, with detection efficiency of greater than 1% for the 185.7-keV {gamma}-ray from U-235. In none of references 3 - 7 did the authors resolve the exact calculus descriptions of the acquisition configurations. Only the empirical efficiency for detection of the 185.7-keV photon from U-235 decay was obtained. Not until the 2010 paper of reference 1 did the authors derive a good theoretical description of the flux of photons onto the front face of a detector

  17. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  18. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  19. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  20. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  1. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  2. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  3. Fractal geometry of music.

    PubMed Central

    Hsü, K J; Hsü, A J

    1990-01-01

    Music critics have compared Bach's music to the precision of mathematics. What "mathematics" and what "precision" are the questions for a curious scientist. The purpose of this short note is to suggest that the mathematics is, at least in part, Mandelbrot's fractal geometry and the precision is the deviation from a log-log linear plot. PMID:11607061

  4. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  5. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS…

  6. Geometry of spinor regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.; Lounesto, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Kustaanheimo theory of spinor regularization is given a new formulation in terms of geometric algebra. The Kustaanheimo-Stiefel matrix and its subsidiary condition are put in a spinor form directly related to the geometry of the orbit in physical space. A physically significant alternative to the KS subsidiary condition is discussed. Derivations are carried out without using coordinates.

  7. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  8. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  9. Acoustic resonance in MEMS scale cylindrical tubes with side branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, John F.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Marcus, Logan S.

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-million (ppm) or parts-per-billion (ppb) level for gaseous samples. PAS also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) design. One of the central issues related to sensor miniaturization is optimization of the photoacoustic cell geometry, especially in relationship to high acoustical amplification and reduced system noise. Previous work relied on a multiphysics approach to analyze the resonance structures of the MEMS scale photo acoustic cell. This technique was unable to provide an accurate model of the acoustic structure. In this paper we describe a method that relies on techniques developed from musical instrument theory and electronic transmission line matrix methods to describe cylindrical acoustic resonant cells with side branches of various configurations. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the ease and accuracy of this method. All experimental results were within 2% of those predicted by this theory.

  10. Forced-convection peak heat flux on cylindrical heaters in water and refrigerant 113

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, T. H.; Andracchio, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted of the peak heat flux on cylindrical heaters in a fluid flowing perpendicular to the major axis of the heater. The test fluids were water and Refrigerant 113. Heaters of 0.049 to 0.181 cm diameter were tested over a fluid velocity range of 10.1 to 81.1 cm/sec. The experimental results were observed to fall within two regions based on the vapor removal geometry: jets or sheets. Mathematical models for each region successfully correlated the data for both fluids.

  11. Design and performance of a multi-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Brawley, E.L.; Duggin, B.W.; Cnare, E.C.; Rovang, D.C.; Widner, M.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A multi-stage, cylindrical reconnection launcher is being tested to demonstrate electrically-contactless, induction-launch technology for solenoidal coil geometry. A 6-stage launcher system is being developed to accelerate a 5 kg mass from rest to 300 m/s with a stored energy of {ge}200 kJ per coil stage. This launcher will provide data fro model verification and the engineering basis for proceeding with larger multistage systems. This paper describes the design of the multi-stage, discrete-coil launcher. Integration of coils, projectile, power systems, and real-time fire control are discussed. Results of multi-stage firings are presented.

  12. Incident beam polarization for laser Doppler velocimetry employing a sapphire cylindrical window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, J. A.; Schock, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    For laser Doppler velocimetry studies employing sapphire windows as optical access ports, the birefringency of sapphire produces an extra beam intersection volume which serves to effectively smear the acquired velocity flow field data. It is shown that for a cylindrical window geometry, the extra beam intersection volume may be eliminated with minimal decrease in the fringe visibility of the remaining intersection volume by suitably orienting the polarizations of the initial laser beams. For horizontally incident beams, these polarizations were measured at three intersection locations within the cylinder. It was found that the measured polarization angles agreed with the theoretical predictions.

  13. Multigroup Complex Geometry Neutron Diffusion Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-12-18

    Version 01 SNAP-3D is based on SNAP2 and is a one- two- or three-dimensional multigroup diffusion code system. It is primarily intended for neutron diffusion calculations, but it can also carry out gamma-ray calculations if the diffusion approximation is accurate enough. It is suitable for fast and thermal reactor core calculations and for shield calculations. SNAP-3D can solve the multi-group neutron diffusion equations using finite difference methods in (x,y,z), (r,theta,z), (TRI,z), (HEX,z) or (spherical) coordinates.more » The one-dimensional slab and cylindrical geometries and the two-dimensional (x,y), (r,z), (r,theta), (HEX) and (TRI) are all treated as simple special cases of three-dimensional geometries. Numerous reflective and periodic symmetry options are available and may be used to reduce the number of mesh points necessary to represent the system. Extrapolation lengths can be specified at internal and external boundaries. The problem classes are: 1) eigenvalue search for critical k-effective, 2) eigenvalue search for critical buckling, 3) eigenvalue search for critical time-constant, 4) fixed source problems in which the sources are functions of regions, 5) fixed source problems in which the sources are provided, on disc, for every mesh point and group.« less

  14. Magnetic geometry, plasma profiles, and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J. W.

    2006-07-15

    The history of the stability of short wavelength modes, such as MHD instabilities and drift waves, has been a long and tortuous one as increasingly realistic representations of the equilibrium magnetic geometry have been introduced. Early work began with simple slab or cylindrical models where plasma profiles and magnetic shear were seen to play key roles. Then the effects of toroidal geometry, in particular the constraints imposed by periodicity in the presence of magnetic shear, provided a challenge for theory, which was met by the ballooning transformation. More recently the limitations on the conventional ballooning theory arising from effects such as toroidal rotation shear, low magnetic shear, and the presence of the plasma edge have been recognized. These have led in turn to modifications and extensions of this theory. These developments have produced a continuously changing view of the stability of the 'universal' drift wave, for example. After a survey of this background, we describe more recent work of relevance to currently important topics, such as transport barriers characterized by the presence of strong rotation shear and low magnetic shear and the edge localized modes that occur in H-mode.

  15. An introduction to Minkowski geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental ideas of Minkowski geometries are presented. Learning about Minkowski geometries can sharpen our students' understanding of concepts such as distance measurement. Many of its ideas are important and accessible to undergraduate students. Following a brief overview, distance and orthogonality in Minkowski geometries are thoroughly discussed and many illustrative examples and applications are supplied. Suggestions for further study of these geometries are given. Indeed, Minkowski geometries are an excellent source of topics for undergraduate research and independent study.

  16. Cylindrical and Spherical Electron-Acoustic Shock Waves in Electron-Positron-Ion Plasmas with Nonextensive Electrons and Positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafat, A.; M. M., Rahman; M. S., Alam; A. A., Mamun

    2015-02-01

    Electron-acoustic shock waves (EASWs) in an unmagnetized four-component plasma (containing hot electrons and positrons following the q-nonextensive distribution, cold mobile viscous electron fluid, and immobile positive ions) are studied in nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry. With the help of the reductive perturbation method, the modified Burgers equation is derived. Analytically, the effects of nonplanar geometry, nonextensivity, relative number density and temperature ratios, and cold electron kinematic viscosity on the basic properties (viz. amplitude, width, speed, etc.) of EASWs are discussed. It is examined that the EASWs in nonplanar geometry significantly differ from those in planar geometry. The results of this investigation can be helpful in understanding the nonlinear features of EASWs in various astrophysical plasmas.

  17. Cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger equation versus cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, Renato; De Nicola, Sergio; Grecu, Dan; Visinescu, Anca; Shukla, Padma K.

    2008-10-15

    A correspondence between the family of cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger (cNLS) equations and the one of cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (cKdV) equations is constructed. It associates non stationary solutions of the first family with the ones of the second family. This is done by using a correspondence, recently found, between the families of generalized NLS equation and generalized KdV equation, and their solutions in the form of travelling waves, respectively. In particular, non-stationary soliton-like solutions of the cNLS equation can be associated with non-stationary soliton-like solutions of cKdV equation.

  18. Motion parallax in immersive cylindrical display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliard, N.; Reymond, G.; Kemeny, A.; Berthoz, A.

    2012-03-01

    Motion parallax is a crucial visual cue produced by translations of the observer for the perception of depth and selfmotion. Therefore, tracking the observer viewpoint has become inevitable in immersive virtual (VR) reality systems (cylindrical screens, CAVE, head mounted displays) used e.g. in automotive industry (style reviews, architecture design, ergonomics studies) or in scientific studies of visual perception. The perception of a stable and rigid world requires that this visual cue be coherent with other extra-retinal (e.g. vestibular, kinesthetic) cues signaling ego-motion. Although world stability is never questioned in real world, rendering head coupled viewpoint in VR can lead to the perception of an illusory perception of unstable environments, unless a non-unity scale factor is applied on recorded head movements. Besides, cylindrical screens are usually used with static observers due to image distortions when rendering image for viewpoints different from a sweet spot. We developed a technique to compensate in real-time these non-linear visual distortions, in an industrial VR setup, based on a cylindrical screen projection system. Additionally, to evaluate the amount of discrepancies tolerated without perceptual distortions between visual and extraretinal cues, a "motion parallax gain" between the velocity of the observer's head and that of the virtual camera was introduced in this system. The influence of this artificial gain was measured on the gait stability of free-standing participants. Results indicate that, below unity, gains significantly alter postural control. Conversely, the influence of higher gains remains limited, suggesting a certain tolerance of observers to these conditions. Parallax gain amplification is therefore proposed as a possible solution to provide a wider exploration of space to users of immersive virtual reality systems.

  19. Radiation of sound from unflanged cylindrical ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartharan, S. L.; Bayliss, A.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of sound radiated from unflanged cylindrical ducts are presented. The numerical simulation models the problem of an aero-engine inlet. The time dependent linearized Euler equations are solved from a state of rest until a harmonic solution is attained. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme is used and solutions are obtained from a fully vectorized Cyber-203 computer program. Cases of both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Spin modes model the sound generated by a turbofan engine. Boundary conditions for both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Solutions obtained are compared with experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center.

  20. Enhanced Performance of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses, A. Smirnov, and N.J. Fisch

    2007-05-14

    The cylindrical thruster differs significantly in its underlying physical mechanisms from the conventional annular Hall thruster. It features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel, and performance comparable with the state-of-the-art conventional Hall thrusters. Very significant plume narrowing, accompanied by the increase of the energetic ion fraction and improvement of ion focusing, led to 50%–60% increase of the thruster anode efficiency. These improvements were achieved by overrunning the discharge current in the magnetized thruster plasma.

  1. Enhanced performance of cylindrical Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Smirnov, A.; Fisch, N. J.

    2007-05-28

    The cylindrical thruster differs significantly in its underlying physical mechanisms from the conventional annular Hall thruster. It features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel, and performance comparable with the state-of-the-art conventional Hall thrusters. Very significant plume narrowing, accompanied by the increase of the energetic ion fraction and improvement of ion focusing, led to 50%-60% increase of the thruster anode efficiency. These improvements were achieved by overrunning the discharge current in the magnetized thruster plasma.

  2. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2011-09-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  3. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2012-03-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  4. Physics and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souriau, Jean-Marie

    1983-01-01

    Differential geometry, the contemporary heir of the infinitesimal calculus of the 17th century, appears today as the most appropriate language for the description of physical reality. This holds at every level: The concept of “connexion,” for instance, is used in the construction of models of the universe as well as in the description of the interior of the proton. Nothing is apparently more contrary to the wisdom of physicists; all the same, “it works.” The pages that follow show the conceptual role played by this geometry in some examples—without entering into technical details. In order to achieve this, we shall often have to abandon the complete mathematical rigor and even full definitions; however, we shall be able to give a precise description of the connection of ideas thanks to some elements of group theory.

  5. Puzzle geometry and rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    We describe a new and robust method to prove rigidity results in complex dynamics. The new ingredient is the geometry of the critical puzzle pieces: under control of geometry and ``complex bounds'', two generalized polynomial-like maps which admit a topological conjugacy, quasiconformal outside the filled-in Julia set, are indeed quasiconformally conjugate. The proof uses a new abstract removability-type result for quasiconformal maps, following ideas of Heinonen and Koskela and of Kallunki and Koskela, optimized for applications in complex dynamics. We prove, as the first application of this new method, that, for even criticalities distinct from two, the period two cycle of the Fibonacci renormalization operator is hyperbolic with 1 -dimensional unstable manifold.

  6. Failures of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, John

    2015-01-01

    Information H is a unique relationship between probabilities, based on the property of independence which is central to scientific methodology. Information Geometry makes the tempting but fallacious assumption that a local metric (conventionally based on information) can be used to endow the space of probability distributions with a preferred global Riemannian metric. No such global metric can conform to H, which is "from-to" asymmetric whereas geometrical length is by definition symmetric. Accordingly, any Riemannian metric will contradict the required structure of the very distributions which are supposedly being triangulated. It follows that probabilities do not form a metric space. We give counter-examples in which alternative formulations of information, and the use of information geometry, lead to unacceptable results.

  7. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  8. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  9. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  10. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems. PMID:25985280

  11. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  12. Natural and mixed convection in the cylindrical pool of TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R.; Tiselj, I.; Matkovič, M.

    2016-05-01

    Temperature fields within the pool of the JSI TRIGA MARK II nuclear research reactor were measured to collect data for validation of the thermal hydraulics computational model of the reactor tank. In this context temperature of the coolant was measured simultaneously at sixty different positions within the pool during steady state operation and two transients. The obtained data revealed local peculiarities of the cooling water dynamics inside the pool and were used to estimate the coolant bulk velocity above the reactor core. Mixed natural and forced convection in the pool were simulated with a Computational Fluid Dynamics code. A relatively simple CFD model based on Unsteady RANS turbulence model was found to be sufficient for accurate prediction of the temperature fields in the pool during the reactor operation. Our results show that the simple geometry of the TRIGA pool reactor makes it a suitable candidate for a simple natural circulation benchmark in cylindrical geometry.

  13. Coupling 2-D cylindrical and 3-D x-y-z transport computations

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shumays, I.K.; Yehnert, C.E.; Pitcairn, T.N.

    1998-06-30

    This paper describes a new two-dimensional (2-D) cylindrical geometry to three-dimensional (3-D) rectangular x-y-z splice option for multi-dimensional discrete ordinates solutions to the neutron (photon) transport equation. Of particular interest are the simple transformations developed and applied in order to carry out the required spatial and angular interpolations. The spatial interpolations are linear and equivalent to those applied elsewhere. The angular interpolations are based on a high order spherical harmonics representation of the angular flux. Advantages of the current angular interpolations over previous work are discussed. An application to an intricate streaming problem is provided to demonstrate the advantages of the new method for efficient and accurate prediction of particle behavior in complex geometries.

  14. Flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, M.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers. The computations are performed using an elliptic solver incorporates the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. Heat production by combustion is simulated by adding heat generation source terms in the energy equation. And it is assumed that heat generation occurs only a section of the furnace. A number of different inlet conditions with different geometries are considered, and the changes of flow structure, temperature distribution, convective heat flux rate are presented and compared. The results show that, in general, heat transfer in the reversed flow combustion chamber can be improved by properly chosen geometry for the required output.

  15. Microwave frequency electromagnetic coupling to a thin membrane as one end of a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Alessandro; Martinez, Luis; Speer, Jerry; Sharping, Jay; Chiao, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate coupling of an 11.1 GHz radio frequency (RF) TE011 cylindrical cavity mode to the mechanical motion of a silicon nitride (Si3N4) membrane. The membrane is driven into motion through radiation pressure forces arising from the transverse magnetic field present at the membrane boundary. We use a cylindrical aluminum cavity where one end consists of a 500-nm thick Si3N4 membrane that has been sputtered with 300 nm of niobium (Nb). Cavity frequency tuning is controlled via an aluminum plunger attached to a micrometer at the other end of the cavity. The membrane is driven into motion by modulating the amplitude of the RF signal at the membrane's resonant frequency in the KHz range. The membrane's displacement is measured by means of a Michelson interferometer. We compare results from experimental runs utilizing both square and circular membrane geometries. This experiment shows that the TE011 mode gives rise to radiation pressure on the ends of a cylindrical cavity and demonstrates the feasibility of future work using high Q superconducting RF cavities to realize a dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) due to the membrane's motion at GHz frequencies.

  16. Numerical simulation of cylindrical, self-field MPD thrusters with multiple propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1994-03-01

    A two-dimensional, two-temperature, single fluid MHD code was used to predict the performance of cylindrical, self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters operated with argon, lithium, and hydrogen propellants. A thruster stability equation was determined relating maximum stable J(sup 2)/m values to cylindrical thruster geometry and propellant species. The maximum value of J(sup 2)/m was found to scale as the inverse of the propellant molecular weight to the 0.57 power, in rough agreement with limited experimental data which scales as the inverse square root of the propellant molecular weight. A general equation which relates total thrust to electromagnetic thrust, propellant molecular weight, and J(sup 2)/m was determined using reported thrust values for argon and hydrogen and calculated thrust values for lithium. In addition to argon, lithium, and hydrogen, the equation accurately predicted thrust for ammonia at sufficiently high J(sup 2)/m values. A simple algorithm is suggested to aid in the preliminary design of cylindrical, self-field MPD thrusters. A brief example is presented to illustrate the use of the algorithm in the design of a low power MPD thruster.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Cylindrical, Self-field MPD Thrusters with Multiple Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional, two-temperature, single fluid MHD code was used to predict the performance of cylindrical, self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters operated with argon, lithium, and hydrogen propellants. A thruster stability equation was determined relating maximum stable J(sup 2)/m values to cylindrical thruster geometry and propellant species. The maximum value of J(sup 2)/m was found to scale as the inverse of the propellant molecular weight to the 0.57 power, in rough agreement with limited experimental data which scales as the inverse square root of the propellant molecular weight. A general equation which relates total thrust to electromagnetic thrust, propellant molecular weight, and J(sup 2)/m was determined using reported thrust values for argon and hydrogen and calculated thrust values for lithium. In addition to argon, lithium, and hydrogen, the equation accurately predicted thrust for ammonia at sufficiently high J(sup 2)/m values. A simple algorithm is suggested to aid in the preliminary design of cylindrical, self-field MPD thrusters. A brief example is presented to illustrate the use of the algorithm in the design of a low power MPD thruster.

  18. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C Q

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson's ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering. PMID:27624892

  19. Generalization of the optical theorem for monochromatic electromagnetic beams of arbitrary wavefront in cylindrical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-11-01

    The optical theorem constitutes of the fundamental theorems in optical, acoustical, quantum, and gravitational wave scattering, which relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function of plane waves. In this analysis, a generalized formalism is presented for beams of arbitrary character in cylindrical coordinates without restriction to the plane wave case of the angles of incidence and scattering. Based on the partial-wave series expansion method of cylindrical multipole, analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption, scattering cross-sections and efficiency factors are derived for an object of arbitrary shape. An "interference scattering" term arises in the cross-section (or efficiency), which describes the mutual interference between the diffracted or specularly reflected waves. Examples for plane waves and 2D scalar quasi-Gaussian focused beams are also considered, which illustrate the theory. The generalized optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates can be applied to evaluate the extinction efficiency from any object of arbitrary geometry placed on or off the axis of the incident beam. Applications in the context of wave scattering theory by a single particle or multiple particles would benefit from the results of the present study, in addition to other phenomena such as the radiation force and torque.

  20. Design Considerations of Polishing Lap for Computer-Controlled Cylindrical Polishing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The future X-ray observatory missions, such as International X-ray Observatory, require grazing incidence replicated optics of extremely large collecting area (3 m2) in combination with angular resolution of less than 5 arcsec half-power diameter. The resolution of a mirror shell depends ultimately on the quality of the cylindrical mandrels from which they are being replicated. Mid-spatial-frequency axial figure error is a dominant contributor in the error budget of the mandrel. This paper presents our efforts to develop a deterministic cylindrical polishing process in order to keep the mid-spatial-frequency axial figure errors to a minimum. Simulation studies have been performed to optimize the operational parameters as well as the polishing lap configuration. Furthermore, depending upon the surface error profile, a model for localized polishing based on dwell time approach is developed. Using the inputs from the mathematical model, a mandrel, having conical approximated Wolter-1 geometry, has been polished on a newly developed computer-controlled cylindrical polishing machine. We report our first experimental results and discuss plans for further improvements in the polishing process.

  1. Particle scavenging in a cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field using levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrell, Tyler; Saylor, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    A cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field was generated in a tube containing a flow of particles and fog. Both the particles and fog drops were concentrated in the nodes of the standing wave field where they combined and then grew large enough to fall out of the system. In this way particles were scavenged from the system, cleaning the air. While this approach has been attempted using a standing wave field established between disc-shaped transducers, a cylindrical resonator has not been used for this purpose heretofore. The resonator was constructed by bolting three Langevin transducers to an aluminum tube. The benefit of the cylindrical geometry is that the acoustic energy is focused. Furthermore, the residence time of the particle in the field can be increased by increasing the length of the resonator. An additional benefit of this approach is that tubes located downstream of the resonator were acoustically excited, acting as passive resonators that enhanced the scavenging process. The performance of this system on scavenging particles is presented as a function of particle diameter and volumetric flow rate. It is noted that, when operated without particles, the setup can be used to remove drops and shows promise for liquid aerosol retention from systems where these losses can be financially disadvantageous and/or hazardous.

  2. Ultrasonic Concentration in a Line-Driven Cylindrical Tube

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Goddard

    2004-12-15

    The fractionation of particles from their suspending fluid or noninvasive micromanipulation of particles in suspension has many applications ranging from the recovery of valuable reagents from process flows to the fabrication of microelectromechanical devices. Techniques based on size, density, solubility, or electromagnetic properties exist for fulfilling these needs, but many particles have traits that preclude their use such as small size, neutral buoyancy, or uniform electromagnetic characteristics. While separation by those techniques may not be possible, often compressibility differences exist between the particle and fluid that would allow fractionation by acoustic forces. The potential of acoustic separation is known, but due to inherent difficulties in achieving and maintaining accurate alignment of the transduction system, it is rarely utilized. The objective of this project is to investigate the use of structural excitation as a potentially efficient concentration/fractionation method for particles in suspension. It is demonstrated that structural excitation of a cylindrically symmetric cavity, such as a tube, allows non-invasive, fast, and low power concentration of particles suspended in a fluid. The inherent symmetry of the system eliminates the need for careful alignment inherent in current acoustic concentration devices. Structural excitation distributes the acoustic field throughout the volume of the cavity, which also significantly reduces temperature gradients and acoustic streaming in the fluid; cavitation is no longer an issue. The lowest-order coupled modes of a long cylindrical glass tube and fluid-filled cavity, driven by a line contact, are tuned, via material properties and aspect ratio, to achieve a coupled dipolar vibration of the system, shown to generate efficient concentration of particles to the central axis of the tube. A two dimensional elastodynamic model of the system was developed and subsequently utilized to optimize particle

  3. Observing of tree trunks and other cylindrical objects using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezova, Jana; Lambot, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Trees are a part of our everyday life, hence it is important to prevent their collapse to protect people and urban infrastructures. It is also important to characterize tree wood properties for usages in construction. In order to investigate internal parts of tree trunks non-invasively, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), or in this case, ultra-wideband microwave radar as a general tool, appears to be a very promising technology. Nevertheless, tree trunk tomography using microwave radar is a complicated task due to the circular shape of the trunk and the very complex (heterogeneous and anisotropic) internal structures of the trunk. Microwave sensing of tree trunks is also complicated due to the electromagnetic properties of living wood, which strongly depend on water content, density and temperature of wood. The objective of this study is to describe tree trunk radar cross sections including specific features originating from the particular circumferential data acquisition geometry. In that respect, three experiments were performed: (1) numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain software, namely, gprMax 2D, (2) measurements on a simplified laboratory trunk model including plastic and cardboard pipes, sand and air, and (3) measurements over a real tree trunk. The analysis was further deepened by considering: (1) common zero-offset reflection imaging, (2) imaging with a planar perfect electrical conductor (PEC) at the opposite side of the trunk, and (3) imaging with a PEC arc at the opposite side of the trunk. Furthermore, the shape of the reflection curve of a cylindrical target was analytically derived based on the straight-ray propagation approximation. Subsequently, the total internal reflection (TIR) phenomenon occurring in cylindrical objects was observed and analytically described. Both the straight-ray reflection curve and TIR were well observed on the simulated and laboratory radar data. A comparison between all experiments and radar

  4. The AGCE related studies of baroclinic flows in spherical geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyun, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Steady state, axisymmetric motions of a Boussineaq fluid continued in rotating spherical anmulus are considered. The motions are driven by latitudinally varying temperature gradient at the shells. Linearized formulations for a narrow gap are derived and the flow field is divided into the Ekman layers and the geostrophic interior. The Ekman layer flows are consistent with the known results for cylindrical geometries. Within the framework of rather restrictive assumptions, the interior flows are solved by a series of associated Legendre polynomials. The solutions show qualitative features valid at midlatitudes.

  5. Optical inspection system for cylindrical objects

    DOEpatents

    Brenden, Byron B.; Peters, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    In the inspection of cylindrical objects, particularly O-rings, the object is translated through a field of view and a linear light trace is projected on its surface. An image of the light trace is projected on a mask, which has a size and shape corresponding to the size and shape which the image would have if the surface of the object were perfect. If there is a defect, light will pass the mask and be sensed by a detector positioned behind the mask. Preferably, two masks and associated detectors are used, one mask being convex to pass light when the light trace falls on a projection from the surface and the other concave, to pass light when the light trace falls on a depression in the surface. The light trace may be either dynamic, formed by a scanned laser beam, or static, formed by such a beam focussed by a cylindrical lens. Means are provided to automatically keep the illuminating receiving systems properly aligned.

  6. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwille, John A.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Data fusion for cylindrical form measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pei; Jusko, Otto; Tutsch, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    For high-precision form measurements of cylindrical workpieces form profiles such as roundness and straightness profiles are independently acquired via a bird-cage strategy. The 3D point cloud reconstructed by fusing these intersected profiles is meaningful in dimension and form assessment for cylinder, since enhanced accuracy can be achieved by fusion results. Moreover, it plays an important role as the input to other calculations. However, these data cannot be accurately aligned in form reconstruction, due to random absolute offsets in profiles and a lack of absolute positions. Therefore, we propose an approach to data fusion of these profiles to reconstruct cylindrical form. The uncertainties of the fused profile are evaluated, taking an individual contribution of a single profile and a global contribution of all profiles into account. The associated uncertainties are propagated using the Monte Carlo method. Experimental study results indicate that the data fusion procedure improves the accuracy of available datasets. After fusion, all available data points are capable of being used in the form assessment.

  8. Electron Confinement in Cylindrical Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, A. S.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    We show that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the remaining three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model of the potential well. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries are considered and the corresponding wave functions are calculated. The behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well is analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states are calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H to its radius R0 are considered; when H significantly exceeds R0 and when R0 is much greater than H. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested as well where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Work supported by the Uzbek Foundation (ASB) and by the U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research (AZM).

  9. Statistics properties of a cylindrical vector partially coherent beam.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yiming; Cai, Yangjian; Zhao, Chengliang; Yao, Min

    2011-03-28

    Cylindrical vector partially coherent beam is introduced as a natural extension of cylindrical vector coherent beam based on the unified theory of coherence and polarization. Analytical propagation formula for the cross-spectral density matrix of a cylindrical vector partially coherent beam passing through paraxial ABCD optical system is derived based on the generalized Collins integral formula. As an application example, the statistics properties, such as the average intensity, spreading and the degree of polarization, of a cylindrical vector partially coherent beam propagating in free space are studied in detail. It is found that the statistics properties of a cylindrical vector partially coherent beam are much different from a cylindrical vector coherent beam. Our results may find applications in connection with laser beam shaping and optical trapping. PMID:21451623

  10. Note: Electrochemical etching of cylindrical nanoprobes using a vibrating electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yufeng; Zeng, Yongbin Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2015-07-15

    An electrochemical etching process using a vibrating electrolyte of potassium hydroxide to prepare tungsten cylindrical nanotips is developed. The vibrating electrolyte eases the effects of a diffusion layer and extends the etching area, which aid in the production of cylindrical nanotips. Larger amplitudes and a vibration frequency of 35 Hz are recommended for producing cylindrical nanotips. Nanotips with a tip radius of approximately 43 nm and a conical angle of arctan 0.0216 are obtained.

  11. Static, cylindrically symmetric strings in general relativity with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, B.

    1986-07-01

    The static, cylindrically symmetric solutions to Einstein's equations with a cosmological term describing cosmic strings are determined. The discussion depends on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  12. Numerical simulation of geometric scale effects in cylindrical self-field MPD thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, M.

    1992-08-01

    A 2-D, two-temperature, single fluid magnetohydrodynamic code which incorporates classical plasma transport coefficients and Hall effects was developed to predict steady-state, self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance. The governing equations and numerical methods of solution are outlined and discussed. Experimental comparisons are used to validate model predictions. The model accurately predicts thrust and reproduces trends in the discharge voltage for discharge currents below experimentally measured onset values. However, because the model does not include electrode effects, the calculated voltage drops are significantly lower than experimentally measured values. Predictions of thrust and flow efficiency are made for a matrix of fifteen cylindrical thruster geometries, assuming a fully ionized argon propellant. A maximum predicted specific impulse of 1680 s is obtained for a thruster with an anode radius of 2.5 cm, a cathode radius of 0.5 cm, and equal electrode lengths of 2.5 cm. A scaling relation is developed to predict, within limits, the onset of cylindrical, self-field thruster instability as a function of geometry and operating condition.

  13. Numerical simulation of geometric scale effects in cylindrical self-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, M.

    1992-01-01

    A 2-D, two-temperature, single fluid magnetohydrodynamic code which incorporates classical plasma transport coefficients and Hall effects was developed to predict steady-state, self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance. The governing equations and numerical methods of solution are outlined and discussed. Experimental comparisons are used to validate model predictions. The model accurately predicts thrust and reproduces trends in the discharge voltage for discharge currents below experimentally measured onset values. However, because the model does not include electrode effects, the calculated voltage drops are significantly lower than experimentally measured values. Predictions of thrust and flow efficiency are made for a matrix of fifteen cylindrical thruster geometries, assuming a fully ionized argon propellant. A maximum predicted specific impulse of 1680 s is obtained for a thruster with an anode radius of 2.5 cm, a cathode radius of 0.5 cm, and equal electrode lengths of 2.5 cm. A scaling relation is developed to predict, within limits, the onset of cylindrical, self-field thruster instability as a function of geometry and operating condition.

  14. Microwave assisted magnetization reversal in cylindrical antidot arrays with in-plane and perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumak, Mehmet; Ture, Kerim; Aktas, Gulen; Vega, Victor; Prida, Victor; Garcia, Carlos

    2012-02-01

    Porous anodic alumina is a particularly attractive self-ordered system used as template to fabricate nanostructures. The anodic film contains a self-ordered hexagonal array of parallel pores with tunable pore size and interpore distance, and whose pore locations can be templated. Deposition of magnetic films onto porous alumina leads to the formation of porous magnetic films, whose properties differ significantly from those of unpatterned films. The study of antidot arrays has both technological and fundamental importance. Although porous alumina films are typically synthesized in a planar geometry, in this work we deposited NiFe and Ti/CoCrPt magnetic films with in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy onto cylindrical-geometry porous anodic alumina substrates to achieve cylindrical antidot arrays. The effect of both, the magnitude of the AC current and the circular magnetic field on the magnetization reversal has been studied for in-plane and perpendicular anisotropies. The level of reduction in the switching field was found to be dependent on the power, the frequency of the microwave pulses and the circular applied magnetic field. Such a reduction is associate with the competition between pumping and damping processes.

  15. Cylindrical and spherical space equivalents to the plane wave expansion technique of Maxwell's wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Robert C.; Alzahrani, Mohammed A.; Jafari, Seyed Hamed

    2015-02-01

    The plane wave expansion (PWM) technique applied to Maxwell's wave equations provides researchers with a supply of information regarding the optical properties of dielectric structures. The technique is well suited for structures that display a linear periodicity. When the focus is directed towards optical resonators and structures that lack linear periodicity the eigen-process can easily exceed computational resources and time constraints. In the case of dielectric structures which display cylindrical or spherical symmetry, a coordinate system specific set of basis functions have been employed to cast Maxwell's wave equations into an eigen-matrix formulation from which the resonator states associated with the dielectric profile can be obtained. As for PWM, the inverse of the dielectric and field components are expanded in the basis functions (Fourier-Fourier-Bessel, FFB, in cylindrical and Fourier- Bessel-Legendre, BLF, in spherical) and orthogonality is employed to form the matrix expressions. The theoretical development details will be presented indicating how certain mathematical complications in the process have been overcome and how the eigen-matrix can be tuned to a specific mode type. The similarities and differences in PWM, FFB and BLF are presented. In the case of structures possessing axial cylindrical symmetry, the inclusion of the z axis component of propagation constant makes the technique applicable to photonic crystal fibers and other waveguide structures. Computational results will be presented for a number of different dielectric geometries including Bragg ring resonators, cylindrical space slot channel waveguides and bottle resonators. Steps to further enhance the computation process will be reported.

  16. Graded geometry and Poisson reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, A. S.; Zambon, M.

    2009-02-02

    The main result extends the Marsden-Ratiu reduction theorem in Poisson geometry, and is proven by means of graded geometry. In this note we provide the background material about graded geometry necessary for the proof. Further, we provide an alternative algebraic proof for the main result.

  17. Geometry Career Unit: Junior High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Daniel

    The guide, the product of an exemplary career education program for junior high school students, was developed to show how geometry can be applied to real-life career-oriented areas and to bring a practical approach to the teaching of geometry. It is designed to show how some of the theorems or postulates in geometry are used in different careers.…

  18. Geometry: Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    Behavioral objectives, each accompanied by six sample test items, for secondary school geometry are presented. Objectives were determined by surveying the most widely used secondary school geometry textbooks, and cover 14 major categories of geometry, with sections on set theory and introductory trigonometry. Answers are provided. Categories…

  19. Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, J. N. (Compiler); Fulton, R. E. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques in computer-aided geometry modeling and their application are addressed. Mathematical modeling, solid geometry models, management of geometric data, development of geometry standards, and interactive and graphic procedures are discussed. The applications include aeronautical and aerospace structures design, fluid flow modeling, and gas turbine design.

  20. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2006-05-01

    Quantum information theory is at the frontiers of physics, mathematics and information science, offering a variety of solutions that are impossible using classical theory. This book provides an introduction to the key concepts used in processing quantum information and reveals that quantum mechanics is a generalisation of classical probability theory. After a gentle introduction to the necessary mathematics the authors describe the geometry of quantum state spaces. Focusing on finite dimensional Hilbert spaces, they discuss the statistical distance measures and entropies used in quantum theory. The final part of the book is devoted to quantum entanglement - a non-intuitive phenomenon discovered by Schrödinger, which has become a key resource for quantum computation. This richly-illustrated book is useful to a broad audience of graduates and researchers interested in quantum information theory. Exercises follow each chapter, with hints and answers supplied. The first book to focus on the geometry of quantum states Stresses the similarities and differences between classical and quantum theory Uses a non-technical style and numerous figures to make the book accessible to non-specialists

  1. Shielded resistive electromagnets of arbitrary surface geometry using the boundary element method and a minimum energy constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Chad T.; Haw, Dustin W.; Handler, William B.; Chronik, Blaine A.

    2013-09-01

    Eddy currents are generated in MR by the use of rapidly switched electromagnets, resulting in time varying and spatially varying magnetic fields that must be either minimized or corrected. This problem is further complicated when non-cylindrical insert magnets are used for specialized applications. Interruption of the coupling between an insert coil and the MR system is typically accomplished using active magnetic shielding. A new method of actively shielding insert gradient and shim coils of any surface geometry by use of the boundary element method for coil design with a minimum energy constraint is presented. This method was applied to shield x- and z-gradient coils for two separate cases: a traditional cylindrical primary gradient with cylindrical shield and, to demonstrate its versatility in surface geometry, the same cylindrical primary gradients with a rectangular box-shaped shield. For the cylindrical case this method produced shields that agreed with analytic solutions. For the second case, the rectangular box-shaped shields demonstrated very good shielding characteristics despite having a different geometry than the primary coils.

  2. Unzipping of carbon nanotubes is geometry-dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhigong; Mu, Xin; Luo, Tengfei; Xu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) unzipping is a facile and efficient technique to produce narrow graphene nanoribbons. The diameter and chirality of CNTs control the geometry of the unzipped nanoribbons. In this work, we analyze the energetics of oxidation- and hydrogenation-induced unzipping processes. Empirical reactive potential-based energy calculations show that there is a geometry-dependent energy barrier for oxidation-induced unzipping, which is absent in the exothermal hydrogenation process. These results are discussed by considering the unzipping process as crack nucleation and propagation processes in a pre-stressed cylindrical shell. Fitting our simulation data through the theoretical model provides a quantitative way to estimate the key parameters in CNT unzipping that can be used to optimize the experimental procedure.

  3. Unzipping of carbon nanotubes is geometry-dependent.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhigong; Mu, Xin; Luo, Tengfei; Xu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) unzipping is a facile and efficient technique to produce narrow graphene nanoribbons. The diameter and chirality of CNTs control the geometry of the unzipped nanoribbons. In this work, we analyze the energetics of oxidation- and hydrogenation-induced unzipping processes. Empirical reactive potential-based energy calculations show that there is a geometry-dependent energy barrier for oxidation-induced unzipping, which is absent in the exothermal hydrogenation process. These results are discussed by considering the unzipping process as crack nucleation and propagation processes in a pre-stressed cylindrical shell. Fitting our simulation data through the theoretical model provides a quantitative way to estimate the key parameters in CNT unzipping that can be used to optimize the experimental procedure. PMID:26597779

  4. Electrochemical cell having cylindrical electrode elements

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    A secondary, high temperature electrochemical cell especially adapted for lithium alloy negative electrodes, transition metal chalcogenide positive electrodes and alkali metal halide or alkaline earth metal halide electrolyte is disclosed. The cell is held within an elongated cylindrical container in which one of the active materials is filled around the outside surfaces of a plurality of perforate tubular current collectors along the length of the container. Each of the current collector tubes contain a concentric tubular layer of electrically insulative ceramic as an interelectrode separator. The active material of opposite polarity in elongated pin shape is positioned longitudinally within the separator layer. A second electrically conductive tube with perforate walls can be swagged or otherwise bonded to the outer surface of the pin as a current collector and the electrically insulative ceramic layer can be coated or otherwise layered onto the outer surface of this second current collector. Alternatively, the central pin electrode can include an axial core as a current collector.

  5. Premixed flames in closed cylindrical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzener, Philippe; Matalon, Moshe

    2001-09-01

    We consider the propagation of a premixed flame, as a two-dimensional sheet separating unburned gas from burned products, in a closed cylindrical tube. A nonlinear evolution equation, that describes the motion of the flame front as a function of its mean position, is derived. The equation contains a destabilizing term that results from the gas motion induced by thermal expansion and has a memory term associated with vorticity generation. Numerical solutions of this equation indicate that, when diffusion is stabilizing, the flame evolves into a non-planar form whose shape, and its associated symmetry properties, are determined by the Markstein parameter, and by the initial data. In particular, we observe the development of convex axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric flames, tulip flames and cellular flames.

  6. Naked singularity resolution in cylindrical collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Yasunari; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, we study the gravitational collapse of null dust in cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The naked singularity necessarily forms at the symmetry axis. We consider the situation in which null dust is emitted again from the naked singularity formed by the collapsed null dust and investigate the backreaction by this emission for the naked singularity. We show a very peculiar but physically important case in which the same amount of null dust as that of the collapsed one is emitted from the naked singularity as soon as the ingoing null dust hits the symmetry axis and forms the naked singularity. In this case, although this naked singularity satisfies the strong curvature condition by Krolak (limiting focusing condition), geodesics which hit the singularity can be extended uniquely across the singularity. Therefore, we may say that the collapsing null dust passes through the singularity formed by itself and then leaves for infinity. Finally, the singularity completely disappears and the flat spacetime remains.

  7. Cylindrical spreading due to downwind refraction.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2016-04-01

    Downwind propagation is analyzed for a low level jet (LLJ). The LLJ is characterized by a wind speed maximum (at least 10-20 m/s with peak speeds up to 30 m/s) a few hundred meters above the ground. Close to an elevated point source, such as a wind turbine or an aircraft, spherical spreading results in a 6 dB decrease in sound level per doubling of the distance. Wind turbine noise measurements show that at a transition distance, the downwind propagation changes the spherical spreading into a cylindrical spreading with a 3 dB decrease. It is shown how the transition distance and sound intensity depend on the LLJ parameters. The pivotal phenomenon is the non-coherent superposition of ground reflected rays in the turbulent atmosphere. PMID:27106309

  8. Dispersive cylindrical cloaks under nonmonochromatic illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Kallos, Efthymios; Hao, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Transformation-based cylindrical cloaks and concentrators are illuminated with nonmonochromatic waves and unusual effects are observed with interesting potential applications. The transient responses of the devices are studied numerically with the finite-difference time-domain method and the results are verified with analytical formulas. We compute the effective bandwidth of several cloaking schemes as well as the effect of losses on the performance of the structures. We also find that narrowband behavior, frequency shift effects, time delays, and spatial disturbances of the incoming waves are dominant due to the inherently dispersive nature of the devices. These effects are important and should be taken into account when designing metamaterial-based devices.

  9. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  10. Cathode effects in cylindrical Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E. M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-11-15

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  11. Plasmonic oligomers in cylindrical vector light beams

    PubMed Central

    Hentschel, Mario; Dorfmüller, Jens; Jäger, Sebastian; Kern, Andreas M; Braun, Kai; Zhang, Dai; Meixner, Alfred J

    2013-01-01

    Summary We investigate the excitation as well as propagation of magnetic modes in plasmonic nanostructures. Such structures are particularly suited for excitation with cylindrical vector beams. We study magneto-inductive coupling between adjacent nanostructures. We utilize high-resolution lithographic techniques for the preparation of complex nanostructures consisting of gold as well as aluminium. These structures are subsequently characterized by linear optical spectroscopy. The well characterized and designed structures are afterwards studied in depth by exciting them with radial and azimuthally polarized light and simultaneously measuring their plasmonic near-field behavior. Additionally, we attempt to model and simulate our results, a project which has, to the best of our knowledge, not been attempted so far. PMID:23400561

  12. Method for making generally cylindrical underground openings

    DOEpatents

    Routh, J.W.

    1983-05-26

    A rapid, economical and safe method for making a generally cylindrical underground opening such as a shaft or a tunnel is described. A borehole is formed along the approximate center line of where it is desired to make the underground opening. The borehole is loaded with an explodable material and the explodable material is detonated. An enlarged cavity is formed by the explosive action of the detonated explodable material forcing outward and compacting the original walls of the borehole. The enlarged cavity may be increased in size by loading it with a second explodable material, and detonating the second explodable material. The process may be repeated as required until the desired underground opening is made. The explodable material used in the method may be free-flowing, and it may be contained in a pipe.

  13. Ion orbits in a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Longo, Savino; Capitelli, Mario

    2006-04-15

    It has been suggested that in weakly collisional sheaths, potential wells and barriers could appear due to ion-neutral momentum and charge transfer collisions. These can cause the presence of repulsed and trapped ions in the region surrounding a negatively biased Langmuir probe, invalidating the commonly used orbital-motion-limited theory of ion current. This is still an open question concerning also the charging and shielding of dust grains, and at present, no fully self-consistent treatment exists. For this reason, a particle-in-cell/test-particle Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamics of an argon plasma in the region surrounding an attracting cylindrical probe at medium gas pressure has been developed. The results of the present simulation for different probe potentials and discharge pressures demonstrate the complex structure of electric potential around the probe and the failure of collisionless theories.

  14. Potential flow inside an evaporating cylindrical line.

    PubMed

    Petsi, A J; Burganos, V N

    2005-10-01

    An analytical solution to the problem of potential flow inside an evaporating line is obtained. The line is shaped as a half-cylinder lying on a substrate, and evaporates with either pinned or depinned contact lines. The solution is provided through the technique of separation of variables in the velocity potential and stream function formulations. Based on the flow field calculations, it is estimated that the coffee-stain phenomenon should be expected even for uniform evaporation flux throughout the cylindrical surface, provided that the contact lines remain anchored. A simple expression for the velocity potential is also suggested, which reproduces the local velocity vector with excellent accuracy. The vertically averaged velocity is calculated also for other contact line values, revealing for any value an outward liquid flow for pinned lines as opposed to inward flow for depinned lines. PMID:16383581

  15. SPSM and its application in cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wu; Zhou, Su-Lian; Peng, Hui

    2008-03-01

    In naval architectures, the structure of prismatic shell is used widely. But there is no suitable method to analyze this kind of structure. Stiffened prismatic shell method (SPSM) presented in this paper, is one of the harmonic semi-analytic methods. Theoretically, strong stiffened structure can be analyzed economically and accurately. SPSM is based on the analytical solution of the governing differential equations for orthotropic cylindrical shells. In these differential equations, the torsional stiffness, bending stiffness and the exact position of each stiffener are taken into account with the Heaviside singular function. An algorithm is introduced, in which the actions of stiffeners on shells are replaced by external loads at each stiffener position. Stiffened shells can be computed as non-stiffened shells. Eventually, the displacement solution of the equations is acquired by the introduction of Green function. The stresses in a corrugated transverse bulkhead without pier base of an oil tanker are computed by using SPSM.

  16. Forward model of thermally-induced acoustic signal specific to intralumenal detection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sovanlal; Bunting, Charles F.; Piao, Daqing

    2011-03-01

    This work investigates a forward model associated with intra-lumenal detection of acoustic signal originated from transient thermal-expansion of the tissue. The work is specific to intra-lumenal thermo-acoustic tomography (TAT) which detects the contrast of tissue dielectric properties with ultrasonic resolution, but it is also extendable to intralumenal photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) which detects the contrast of light absorption properties of tissue with ultrasound resolution. Exact closed-form frequency-domain or time-domain forward model of thermally-induced acoustic signal have been studied rigorously for planar geometry and two other geometries, including cylindrical and spherical geometries both of which is specific to external-imaging, i.e. breast or brain imaging using an externally-deployed applicator. This work extends the existing studies to the specific geometry of internal or intra-lumenal imaging, i.e., prostate imaging by an endo-rectally deployed applicator. In this intra-lumenal imaging geometry, both the source that excites the transient thermal-expansion of the tissue and the acoustic transducer that acquires the thermally-induced acoustic signal are assumed enclosed by the tissue and on the surface of a long cylindrical applicator. The Green's function of the frequency-domain thermo-acoustic equation in spherical coordinates is expanded to cylindrical coordinates associated with intra-lumenal geometry. Inverse Fourier transform is then applied to obtain a time-domain solution of the thermo-acoustic pressure wave for intra-lumenal geometry. Further employment of the boundary condition to the "convex" applicator-tissue interface would render an exact forward solution toward accurate reconstruction for intra-lumenal thermally-induced acoustic imaging.

  17. Optically defined mechanical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barasheed, Abeer Z.; Müller, Tina; Sankey, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    In the field of optomechanics, radiation forces have provided a particularly high level of control over the frequency and dissipation of mechanical elements. Here we propose a class of optomechanical systems in which light exerts a similarly profound influence over two other fundamental parameters: geometry and mass. By applying an optical trap to one lattice site of an extended phononic crystal, we show it is possible to create a tunable, localized mechanical mode. Owing to light's simultaneous and constructive coupling with the structure's continuum of modes, we estimate that a trap power at the level of a single intracavity photon should be capable of producing a significant effect within a realistic, chip-scale device.

  18. Critique of information geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Skilling, John

    2014-12-05

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  19. Geometry from Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss how geometrical and topological aspects of certain 1/2-BPS type IIB geometries are captured by their dual operators in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory. The type IIB solutions are characterized by arbitrary droplet pictures in a plane and we consider, in particular, axially symmetric droplets. The 1-loop anomalous dimension of the dual gauge theory operators probed with single traces is described by some bosonic lattice Hamiltonians. These Hamiltonians are shown to encode the topology of the droplets. In appropriate BMN limits, the Hamiltonians spectrum reproduces the spectrum of near-BPS string excitations propagating along each of the individual edges of the droplet. We also study semiclassical regimes for the Hamiltonians. For droplets having disconnected constituents, the Hamiltonian admits different complimentary semiclassical descriptions, each one replicating the semiclassical description for closed strings extending in each of the constituents.

  20. Geometry from Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2008-07-28

    We discuss how geometrical and topological aspects of certain (1/2)-BPS type IIB geometries are captured by their dual operators in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory. The type IIB solutions are characterized by arbitrary droplet pictures in a plane and we consider, in particular, axially symmetric droplets. The 1-loop anomalous dimension of the dual gauge theory operators probed with single traces is described by some bosonic lattice Hamiltonians. These Hamiltonians are shown to encode the topology of the droplets. In appropriate BMN limits, the Hamiltonians spectrum reproduces the spectrum of near-BPS string excitations propagating along each of the individual edges of the droplet. We also study semiclassical regimes for the Hamiltonians. For droplets having disconnected constituents, the Hamiltonian admits different complimentary semiclassical descriptions, each one replicating the semiclassical description for closed strings extending in each of the constituents.

  1. Critique of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, John

    2014-12-01

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  2. MHD Stability Trends from Perturbed Equilibria: Possible Limitations with Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Turnbull, A. D.; Cowley, S.

    2003-10-01

    The effects of equilibrium changes on ideal MHD properties are usually studied using numerical parameter scans. Previously, we introduced a new technique to explore these dependencies: changes in the potential energy δ W due to equilibrium changes are found with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than an eigenvalue-solver code. Validation of the approach in toroidal geometry attempted to use GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and DIII-D shot 87009. The approach should succeed with the global modes of 87009; however, ˜ 0.1% changes to qo predicted δ W rapidly increasing. Perturbing β of other toroidal equilibria resulted in similar behavior. We first review results for a cylindrical equilibrium and for 87009. Between the cylindrical case and 87009 lie several other equilibria, which should produce intermediate results. We examine several of these intermediate equilibria, starting with the cylindrical case and changing aspect ratio, shape and profiles until ending at 87009.

  3. Properties of cylindrical and spherical heavy ion-acoustic solitary and shock structures in a multispecies plasma with superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, M. G.; Rahman, M. M.; Hossen, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical investigation on heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) solitary and shock structures has been accomplished in an unmagnetized multispecies plasma consisting of inertialess kappa-distributed superthermal electrons, Boltzmann light ions, and adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ions. Using the reductive perturbation technique, the nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) Kortewg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations have been derived. The solitary and shock wave solutions of the KdV and Burgers equations, respectively, have been numerically analyzed. The effects of superthermality of electrons, adiabaticity of heavy ions, and nonplanar geometry, which noticeably modify the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, phase speed, etc.) of small but finite amplitude HIA solitary and shock structures, have been carefully investigated. The HIA solitary and shock structures in nonplanar geometry have been found to distinctly differ from those in planar geometry. Novel features of our present attempt may contribute to the physics of nonlinear electrostatic perturbation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  4. ESTIMATION OF RADIOLYTIC GAS GENERATION RATE FOR CYLINDRICAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES - APPLICATION TO SPENT ION EXCHANGE RESIN CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, A.; Lewis, Brent J.

    2003-02-27

    Radioactive waste packages containing water and/or organic substances have the potential to radiolytically generate hydrogen and other combustible gases. Typically, the radiolytic gas generation rate is estimated from the energy deposition rate and the radiolytic gas yield. Estimation of the energy deposition rate must take into account the contributions from all radionuclides. While the contributions from non-gamma emitting radionuclides are relatively easy to estimate, an average geometry factor must be computed to determine the contribution from gamma emitters. Hitherto, no satisfactory method existed for estimating the geometry factors for a cylindrical package. In the present study, a formulation was developed taking into account the effect of photon buildup. A prototype code, called PC-CAGE, was developed to numerically solve the integrals involved. Based on the selected dimensions for a cylinder, the specified waste material, the photon energy of interest and a value for either the absorption or attenuation coefficient, the code outputs values for point and average geometry factors. These can then be used to estimate the internal dose rate to the material in the cylinder and hence to calculate the radiolytic gas generation rate. Besides the ability to estimate the rates of radiolytic gas generation, PC-CAGE can also estimate the dose received by the container material. This is based on values for the point geometry factors at the surface of the cylinder. PC-CAGE was used to calculate geometry factors for a number of cylindrical geometries. Estimates for the absorbed dose rate in container material were also obtained. The results for Ontario Power Generation's 3 m3 resin containers indicate that about 80% of the source gamma energy is deposited internally. In general, the fraction of gamma energy deposited internally depends on the dimensions of the cylinder, the material within it and the photon energy; the fraction deposited increases with increasing

  5. Effects of flow geometry on blood viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Thurston, George B; Henderson, Nancy M

    2006-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood are dominated by microstructures formed by red cells. The microstructures are of several types such as irregular aggregates, rouleaux, and layers of aligned cells. The dynamic deformability of the red cells, aggregation tendency, cell concentration, size of confining vessel and rate of flow are determining factors in the microstructure. Viscoelastic properties, viscosity and elasticity, relate to energy loss and storage in flowing blood while relaxation time and Weissenberg number play a role in assessing the importance of the elasticity relative to the viscosity. These effects are shown herein for flow in a large straight cylindrical tube, a small tube, and a porous medium. These cases approximate the geometries of the arterial system: large vessels, small vessels and vessels with many branches and bifurcations. In each case the viscosity, elasticity, relaxation time and Weissenberg number for normal human blood as well as blood with enhanced cell aggregation tendency and diminished cell deformability are given. In the smaller spaces of the microtubes and porous media, the diminished viscosity shows the possible influence of the Fåhraeus-Lindqvist effect and at high shear rates, the viscoelasticity of blood shows dilatancy. This is true for normal, aggregation enhanced and hardened cells. PMID:17148856

  6. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  7. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  8. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  9. Rotating cylindrical wormholes and energy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Krechet, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    We seek wormholes among rotating cylindrically symmetric configurations in general relativity. Exact wormhole solutions are presented with such sources of gravity as a massless scalar field, a cosmological constant, and a scalar field with an exponential potential. However, none of these solutions are asymptotically flat, which excludes the existence of wormhole entrances as local objects in our Universe. To overcome this difficulty, we try to build configurations with flat asymptotic regions using the cut-and-paste procedure: on both sides of the throat, a wormhole solution is matched to a properly chosen region of flat space-time at some surfaces Σ- and Σ+. It is shown, however, that if the source of gravity in the throat region is a scalar field with an arbitrary potential, then one or both thin shells appearing on Σ- and Σ+ inevitably violate the null energy condition. Thus, although rotating wormhole solutions are easily found without exotic matter, such matter is still necessary for obtaining asymptotic flatness.

  10. Buckling analysis of cylindrical shells with cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Limam, A.; Jullien, J.F.; Ouayou, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    In many areas of aeronautical nuclear and civil engineering practice, large thin-walled structural panels are increasingly becoming characteristic architectural features. Indeed, nuclear reactor vessels and cryogenic tanks of a launcher, for instance, are made up of several thin-walled panels welded together. Instability and buckling phenomenon present over-riding constraints on the design process. In addition, the presence of joints which are very often the origin of surface fissures poses increasing dangers on the overall stability of these structures. This research deals with the analysis of the effects of cracks on the behavior of cylindrical shells subject to external pressure. The study was divided into two major parts. In the first part, experiments were carried out with shells without cracks, in order to obtain reference data. A numerical study of various models explains the experimental results and shows the combined effect of the geometric imperfections and boundary conditions on the critical load. The second part focused on several experimental tests and numerical simulations on shells with in- depth fissures as a function of their population, orientation, length and position with respect to the welds or joints. The agreement between numerical and experimental results confirms the new possibility to design with the aid of the finite element program under the condition that the calculations are carried out by means of an appropriate numerical method.

  11. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  12. Force balances in systems of cylindrical polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Brenner, S L; McQuarrie, D A

    1973-04-01

    A detailed analysis is made of the model system of two parallel cylindrical polyelectrolytes which contain ionizable groups on their surfaces and are immersed in an ionic bathing medium. The interaction between the cylinders is examined by considering the interplay between repulsive electrostatic forces and attractive forces of electrodynamic origin. The repulsive force arises from the screened coulomb interaction between the surface charge distributions on the cylinders and has been treated by developing a solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The boundary condition at the cylinder surfaces is determined as a self-consistent functional of the potential, with the input consisting of the density of ionizable groups and their dissociation constants. It is suggested that a reasonably accurate representation for the form of the attractive force can be obtained by performing a pairwise summation of the individual interatomic forces. A quantitative estimate is obtained using a Hamaker constant chosen on the basis of rigorous calculations on simpler systems. It is found that a balance exists between these repulsive and attractive forces at separations in good agreement with those observed in arrays of tobacco mosaic virus and in the A band myosin lattice in striated muscle. The behavior of the balance point as a function of the pH and ionic strength of the bathing medium closely parallels that seen experimentally. PMID:4696760

  13. Cylindrical converging shock initiation of reactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Charles M.; Horie, Yasuyuki; Lindsay, Christopher Michael; Butler, George C.; Lambert, David; Welle, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Recent research has been conducted that builds on the Forbes et al. (1997) study of inducing a rapid solid state reaction in a highly porous core using a converging cylindrical shock driven by a high explosive. The high explosive annular charge used in this research to compress the center reactive core was comparable to PBXN-110. Some modifications were made on the physical configuration of the test item for scale-up and ease of production. The reactive materials (I2O5/Al and I2O5/Al/Teflon) were hand mixed and packed to a tap density of about 32 percent. Data provided by a Cordon 114 high speed framing camera and a Photon Doppler Velocimetry instrument provided exit gas expansion, core particle and cylinder wall velocities. Analysis indicates that the case expansion velocity differs according to the core formulation and behaved similar to the baseline high explosive core with the exit gas of the reactive materials producing comparable velocities. Results from CTH hydrocode used to model the test item compares favorably to the experimental results.

  14. Cylindrical optic figuring dwell time optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2000-11-01

    The Constellation-X, grazing incidence, x-ray telescope may be fabricated from replicated segments. A series of mandrels will serve as the 'masters' in the replication processes. Diamond turning (milling) followed by abrasive figuring followed by a super polishing are the steps currently envisioned in making just one (of many) mandrel. The abrasive figuring of a mandrel is accomplished by moving a grinding tool along a helical path on this almost cylindrical surface. The measurement of the surface is, however, performed along 'axial' scan lines which intercept this helical path. This approach to figuring and measuring permits a relatively simple scheme to be implemented for the determination of the optimal dwell times of the figuring tool. These optimal dwell times are determined by a deconvolution which approaches the problem in a linear programming context and uses the Simplex Method. The approach maximizes the amount of material removed at any point subject to inequality constraints. The effects of using these 'optimum' dwell times is to significantly improve the tools effectiveness at removing the higher spatial frequencies while staying (strictly) within the bounds and constraints imposed by the hardware. In addition, the ringing at the edges of the optic, frequently present in deconvolution problems, is completely eliminated.

  15. Cylindrical Hall Thrusters with Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Merino, Enrique; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-10-18

    The use of permanent magnets instead of electromagnet coils for low power Hall thrusters can offer a significant reduction of both the total electric power consumption and the thruster mass. Two permanent magnet versions of the miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) of different overall dimensions were operated in the power range of 50W-300 W. The discharge and plasma plume measurements revealed that the CHT thrusters with permanent magnets and electromagnet coils operate rather differently. In particular, the angular ion current density distribution from the permanent magnet thrusters has an unusual halo shape, with a majority of high energy ions flowing at large angles with respect to the thruster centerline. Differences in the magnetic field topology outside the thruster channel and in the vicinity of the channel exit are likely responsible for the differences in the plume characteristics measured for the CHTs with electromagnets and permanent magnets. It is shown that the presence of the reversing-direction or cusp-type magnetic field configuration inside the thruster channel without a strong axial magnetic field outside the thruster channel does not lead to the halo plasma plume from the CHT. __________________________________________________

  16. Enhanced boiling heat transfer from micro-porous cylindrical surfaces in saturated FC-87 and R-123

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.Y.; You, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    The present research is an experimental study of pool boiling heat transfer from cylindrical heater surfaces immersed in saturated FC-87 and R-123. The baseline heater surfaces tested are plain, integral-fin with 709 fins/m, and commercial enhanced (High-Flux and Turbo-B). In addition, a highly effective micro-scale enhancement coating is applied to the plain and integral-fin surfaces to augment nucleate boiling heat transfer. Experiments are performed to understand the effects of surface micro-and macro- geometries on boiling heat transfer. The boiling performance of the micro-porous-enhanced plain and integral-fin surfaces are compared with the High-Flux and the Turbo-B surfaces. At high heat-flux conditions, the breakdown of the bulk liquid feed mechanism reduces boiling enhancement from the cylindrical surfaces.

  17. A hybrid Rayleigh-Taylor-current-driven coupled instability in a magnetohydrodynamically collimated cylindrical plasma with lateral gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    We present an MHD theory of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the surface of a magnetically confined cylindrical plasma flux rope in a lateral external gravity field. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is found to couple to the classic current-driven instability, resulting in a new type of hybrid instability that cannot be described by either of the two instabilities alone. The lateral gravity breaks the axisymmetry of the system and couples all azimuthal modes together. The coupled instability, produced by combination of helical magnetic field, curvature of the cylindrical geometry, and lateral gravity, is fundamentally different from the classic magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring at a two-dimensional planar interface. The theory successfully explains the lateral Rayleigh-Taylor instability observed in the Caltech plasma jet experiment [Moser and Bellan, Nature 482, 379 (2012)]. Potential applications of the theory include magnetic controlled fusion, solar emerging flux, solar prominences, coronal mass ejections, and other space and astrophysical plasma processes.

  18. (3 + 1)-dimensional cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equation for nonextensive dust acoustic waves: Symbolic computation and exact solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Shimin; Wang Hongli; Mei Liquan

    2012-06-15

    By combining the effects of bounded cylindrical geometry, azimuthal and axial perturbations, the nonlinear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of negatively charged dust grains, nonextensive ions, and nonextensive electrons are studied in this paper. Using the reductive perturbation method, a (3 + 1)-dimensional variable-coefficient cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the nonlinear propagation of DAWs is derived. Via the homogeneous balance principle, improved F-expansion technique and symbolic computation, the exact traveling and solitary wave solutions of the KdV equation are presented in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Moreover, the effects of the plasma parameters on the solitary wave structures are discussed in detail. The obtained results could help in providing a good fit between theoretical analysis and real applications in space physics and future laboratory plasma experiments where long-range interactions are present.

  19. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bourasseau, E.; Ghoufi, A.

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  20. Information geometry of Bayesian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzoe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A survey of geometry of Bayesian statistics is given. From the viewpoint of differential geometry, a prior distribution in Bayesian statistics is regarded as a volume element on a statistical model. In this paper, properties of Bayesian estimators are studied by applying equiaffine structures of statistical manifolds. In addition, geometry of anomalous statistics is also studied. Deformed expectations and deformed independeces are important in anomalous statistics. After summarizing geometry of such deformed structues, a generalization of maximum likelihood method is given. A suitable weight on a parameter space is important in Bayesian statistics, whereas a suitable weight on a sample space is important in anomalous statistics.

  1. Failure Waves in Cylindrical Glass Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazamias, James U.; Bless, Stephan J.; Marder, Michael P.

    1997-07-01

    Failure waves, a propagating front separating virgin and comminuted material, have been receiving a fair amount of attention the last couple of years. While most scientists have been looking at failure waves in plate impact geometries, we have conducted a series of experiments on Pyrex bars. In this paper, we present two types of photographic data from a series of tests. A streak camera was used to determine velocities of the failure front as a function of impact stress. A polaroid camera and a flash lamp provide detailed pictures of the actual event. Attempts were made to observe failure waves in amorphous quartz and acrylic.

  2. Limit of concentration for cylindrical concentrators under extended light sources.

    PubMed

    Miñano, J C; Luque, A

    1983-08-15

    Cylindrical concentrators illuminated by an extended source with an arbitrary distribution of radiance are analyzed taking into account basic properties derived from the Fermat principle and not from the specific concentrator shape. The upper limit of concentration achievable with this type of concentrator is obtained and it is found to be lower than that of general (3-D) concentrators. Cylindrical compound parabolic concentrators are analyzed in the light of this theory, and it is shown that they achieve the highest optical concentration possible for a cylindrical concentrator. PMID:18196152

  3. The geometry effect on energy transfer rate in a coupled-quantum-wires structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafee, Vahdat

    2016-03-01

    The geometry effect on energy transfer rate in a coupled cylindrical quantum wires system is investigated. The corrected random phase approximation by the zero-temperature static Hubbard correction is employed to calculate dielectric function of the system. The geometry effect on energy transfer rate is studied for statically and dynamically screened electron-electron interaction. Both the linear and nonlinear regimes correspond respectively to weak and strong external field are considered. The calculations show that increasing wire radius increases energy transfer rate in both the static and dynamic screening approximations for electron-electron interactions. Moreover, the same trend is predicted by the calculations for both the linear and nonlinear regimes.

  4. Rayleigh-Bénard convection at high Prandtl numbers in circular and square geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Stephen R.; Fonda, Enrico; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    Experiments using water and simulations have shown that flow structures and turbulent fluctuations in Rayleigh-Bénard convection are affected by the shape of the container. We study the effect of the geometry in both square and cylindrical test cells of aspect ratio of order unity in high Prandtl fluids (up to 104). Flow visualization using a photochromic dye seeded throughout the fluid allows us to uninvasively study the evolution of the large scale structures. We discuss the observations in the two geometries and compare them with previous observations at low Prandtl numbers.

  5. Chemistry as a diagnostic of prestellar core geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritsis, A.; Tassis, K.; Willacy, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new method for assessing the intrinsic 3D shape of prestellar cores from molecular column densities. We have employed hydrodynamic simulations of contracting, isothermal cores considering three intrinsic geometries: spherical, cylindrical/filamentary and disc-like. We have coupled our hydrodynamic simulations with non-equilibrium chemistry. We find that (a) when cores are observed very elongated (i.e. for aspect ratios ≤0.15) the intrinsic 3D geometry can be probed by their 2D molecular emission maps, since these exhibit significant qualitative morphological differences between cylindrical and disc-like cores. Specifically, if a disc-like core is observed as a filamentary object in dust emission, then it will be observed as two parallel filaments in N2H+; (b) for cores with higher aspect ratios (i.e. 0.15-0.9) we define a metric Δ that quantifies whether a molecular column density profile is centrally peaked, depressed or flat. We have identified one molecule (CN) for which Δ as a function of the aspect ratio probes the 3D geometry of the core; and (c) for cores with almost circular projections (i.e. for aspect ratios ˜1), we have identified three molecules (OH, CO and H2CO) that can be used to probe the intrinsic 3D shape by close inspection of their molecular column density radial profiles. We alter the temperature and the cosmic ray ionization rate and demonstrate that our method is robust against the choice of parameters.

  6. Linear simulations of the cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, A.; Gao, S.; Samtaney, R.; Wheatley, V.

    2016-03-01

    Numerical simulations and analysis indicate that the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is suppressed in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in Cartesian slab geometry. Motivated by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion and suppression by means of a magnetic field, we investigate the RMI via linear MHD simulations in cylindrical geometry. The physical setup is that of a Chisnell-type converging shock interacting with a density interface with either axial or azimuthal (2D) perturbations. The linear stability is examined in the context of an initial value problem (with a time-varying base state) wherein the linearized ideal MHD equations are solved with an upwind numerical method. Linear simulations in the absence of a magnetic field indicate that RMI growth rate during the early time period is similar to that observed in Cartesian geometry. However, this RMI phase is short-lived and followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability phase with an accompanied exponential increase in the perturbation amplitude. We examine several strengths of the magnetic field (characterized by β = /2 p Br 2 ) and observe a significant suppression of the instability for β ≤ 4. The suppression of the instability is attributed to the transport of vorticity away from the interface by Alfvén fronts.

  7. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced.

  8. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced. PMID:25679634

  9. Effect of cylindrical confinement on the determination of laminar flame speeds using outwardly propagating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Michael P.; Chen, Zheng; Ju, Yiguang; Dryer, Frederick L.

    2009-04-15

    The effect of nonspherical (i.e. cylindrical) bomb geometry on the evolution of outwardly propagating flames and the determination of laminar flame speeds using the conventional constant-pressure technique is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cylindrical chamber boundary modifies the propagation rate through the interaction of the wall with the flow induced by thermal expansion across the flame (even with constant pressure), which leads to significant distortion of the flame surface for large flame radii. These departures from the unconfined case, especially the resulting nonzero burned gas velocities, can lead to significant errors in flame speeds calculated using the conventional assumptions, especially for large flame radii. For example, at a flame radius of 0.5 times the wall radius, the flame speed calculated neglecting confinement effects can be low by {proportional_to}15% (even with constant pressure). A methodology to estimate the effect of nonzero burned gas velocities on the measured flame speed in cylindrical chambers is presented. Modeling and experiments indicate that the effect of confinement can be neglected for flame radii less than 0.3 times the wall radius while still achieving acceptable accuracy (within 3%). The methodology is applied to correct the flame speed for nonzero burned gas speeds, in order to extend the range of flame radii useful for flame speed measurements. Under the proposed scaling, the burned gas speed can be well approximated as a function of only flame radius for a given chamber geometry - i.e. the correction function need only be determined once for an apparatus and then it can be used for any mixture. Results indicate that the flow correction can be used to extract flame speeds for flame radii up to 0.5 times the wall radius with somewhat larger, yet still acceptable uncertainties for the cases studied. Flow-corrected burning velocities are measured for hydrogen and syngas mixtures at atmospheric and

  10. GPS: Geometry, Probability, and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Mike

    2012-01-01

    It might be said that for most occupations there is now less of a need for mathematics than there was say fifty years ago. But, the author argues, geometry, probability, and statistics constitute essential knowledge for everyone. Maybe not the geometry of Euclid, but certainly geometrical ways of thinking that might enable us to describe the world…

  11. Achievement in Writing Geometry Proofs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senk, Sharon L.

    In 1981 a nationwide assessment of achievement in writing geometry proofs was conducted by the Cognitive Development and Achievement in Secondary School Geometry project. Over 1,500 students in 11 schools in 5 states participated. This paper describes the sample, instruments, grading procedures, and selected results. Results include: (1) at the…

  12. Investigation of HE driven cylindrical liner

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Tai-Ho

    1995-03-01

    We developed a technique that can compress most materials to densities much higher than their original values and shock them hard enough to undergo phase changes to various partially ionized states. The process involves using high explosives to drive a thin cylindrical liner so that it will progressively implode and converge along the axis at very high velocity. The device is simple yet versatile. Its configuration is ideally suited as a compact laboratory for the investigation of the behavior of dense media under extreme conditions. Code simulations show that liners made from most metals can be successfully imploded to converge on axis, producing over 10 MB pressure. For example, a 2D hydrocode calculation predicts that in a simple configuration where a hollow core PBX-9501 explosive cylinder is corner initiated to drive a thin seamless 304 SS tubing, the final convergence velocity can exceed 1 cm/[Ls to produce a 15 MB pressure at impact as the density increases to 19.5 g/cc. The temperature from shock heating rises rapidly above 8 eV, and the result is a combination of radiation and plasma emissions. We have carried out several experiments with a wide array of diagnostics to investigate the implosion dynamics and final state interaction phenomena, and the results are compared with the code predictions. Radiographs of the liner implosion strongly indicate that the hydrodynamic processes are well behaved and calculable. Temperature measurement from the optical radiation is generally consistent with the code prediction. The velocity of the plasma front is measured by using optical pins and fast framing photography, and is found to lie between 11--17 cm/{mu}s. Fast framing photographs were taken with the aid of self luminous light to observe the evacuated chamber inside the imploding liner. The experimental results and their comparison with the calculation are discussed.

  13. Limits of downstream hydraulic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2004-10-01

    Adjustments to flow width, depth, and velocity in response to changes in discharge are commonly characterized by using downstream hydraulic geometry relationships. The spatial limits of these relationships within a drainage basin have not been systematically quantified. Where the erosional resistance of the channel substrate is sufficiently large, hydraulic driving forces presumably will be unable to adjust channel form. Data sets from 10 mountain rivers in the United States, Panama, Nepal, and New Zealand are used in this study to explore the limits of downstream hydraulic geometry relationships. Where the ratio of stream power to sediment size (Ω/D84) exceeds 10,000 kg/s3, downstream hydraulic geometry is well developed; where the ratio falls below 10,000 kg/s3, downstream hydraulic geometry relationships are poorly developed. These limitations on downstream hydraulic geometry have important implications for channel engineering and simulations of landscape change.

  14. Lobachevsky's Geometry and Research of Geometry of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylevskaya, L. I.

    2008-10-01

    For the first time N. I. Lobachevsky gave a talk on the new geometry in 1826; three years after he had published a work "On the fundamentals of geometry", containing all fundamental theorems and methods of non-Euclidean geometry. A small part of the article was devoted to the study of geometry of the Universe. The interpretation of geometrical concepts in pure empirical way was typical for mathematicians at the beginning of the XIX century; in this connection it was important for scientists to find application of his geometry. Having the purpose to determine experimentally the properties of real physical Space, Lobachevsky decided to calculate the sum of angles in a huge triangle with two vertexes in opposite points of the terrestrial orbit and the third -- on the remote star. Investigating the possibilities of solution of the set task, Lobachevsky faced the difficulties of theoretical, technical and methodological character. More detailed research of different aspects of the problem led Lobachevsky to the comprehension of impossibility to obtain the values required for the goal achievement, and he called his geometry an imaginary geometry.

  15. 108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground flue that leads to stack. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Speckle size of light scattered from slightly rough cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlasso, Ricardo G.; Quintian, Fernando Perez; Rebollo, Maria A.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.; Brea, Luis Miguel Sanchez; Martinez, Eusebio Bernabeu

    2002-04-01

    This research is an extension of the optical method of quality control presented in a previous paper [Appl. Opt. 39, 5811 (2000)] to the case of slightly rough cylindrical surfaces. Applying the Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theory yields an analytical expression of the autocorrelation function of the intensity scattered from slightly rough cylindrical surfaces. This function, which is related to speckle size and shape, is shown to depend on the surface correlation length, unlike for plane surfaces for which the speckle depends on the illuminated area only. The theoretical expression is compared with that for the speckle produced by the light scattered from a cylindrical bearing and from various high-quality wires, showing that the method allows the correlation lengths of high-quality cylindrical surfaces to be determined.

  17. Effects of vortex generator on cylindrical protrusion aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignesh Ram, P. S.; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2016-02-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of vortex generator on a small cylindrical protrusion at Mach number 2.0. The experiments were performed using the supersonic blow down wind tunnel on different heights of cylindrical protrusion with vortex generator placed ahead of them. The upstream and downstream flow around the cylindrical protrusion is influenced by vortex generator as is observed using both visualization and pressure measurement techniques. Numerical studies using three dimensional steady implicit formulations with standard k-ω turbulence model was performed. Results obtained through the present computation are compared with the experimental results at Mach 2.0. Good agreements between computation and experimental results have been achieved. The results indicate that the aerodynamic drag acting on cylindrical protrusion can be reduced by adopting vortex generator.

  18. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, James A.; Kopp, Manfred K.

    1981-01-01

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (<60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10.sup.5 counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  19. Numerical analysis of cocurrent conical and cylindrical axial cyclone separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, M. A. M.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Lemma, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial concurrent liquid-liquid separator is seen as an alternative unit to the traditional tangential counter current cyclone due to lower droplet break ups, turbulence and pressure drop. This paper presents the numerical analysis of a new conical axial cocurrent design along with a comparison to the cylindrical axial cocurrent type. The simulation was carried out using CFD technique in ANSYS-FLUENT software. The simulation results were validated by comparison with experimental data from literature, and mesh independency and quality were performed. The analysis indicates that the conical version achieves better separation performance compared to the cylindrical type. Simulation results indicate tangential velocity with 8% higher and axial velocity with 80% lower recirculation compared to the cylindrical type. Also, the flow visualization counters shows smaller recirculation region relative to the cylindrical unit. The proposed conical design seems more efficient and suits the crude/water separation in O&G industry.

  20. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, J.A.; Kopp, M.K.

    1980-05-23

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (< 60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10/sup 5/ counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  1. 109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical object in foreground is part of ventilating system. February 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  2. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lihong; Lim, C. W.; Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing

    2016-06-01

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media.

  3. Effect of SAR on human head modeling inside cylindrical enclosures.

    PubMed

    Mary, T Anita Jones; Ravichandran, C S

    2013-09-01

    This study intends to discuss enclosed a realistic approach to determine and analyze the effects of radio frequency on human exposure inside a cylindrical enclosure. A scenario in which a mobile phone with inverted-F antenna (IFA) operating in the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) band (900 MHz) is used inside a cylindrical enclosure. Metallic enclosures are known to have resonance and reflection effects, thereby increasing electric field strength and hence resulting in a change of the human exposure to electromagnetic absorptions. So, this study examines and compares the levels of absorption in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) values under various conditions. In this study, a human phantom with dielectric properties is designed and its interaction is studied with IFA inside fully enclosed cylindrical enclosures. The results show that SAR values are increased inside cylindrical enclosures compared with those in free space. The method of computation uses method of moments. Simulations are done in FEKO software. PMID:23323517

  4. Cylindrical Cardboard Model for a Rotating System in Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noerdlinger, Peter D.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a cylindrical cardboard model that helps students at the graduate or undergraduate level to visualize the nature of simultaneity and the propagation of light in a rotating coordinate system. (HM)

  5. Computer-Controlled Cylindrical Polishing Process for Large X-Ray Mirror Mandrels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-energy grazing incidence shell optics for hard-x-ray telescopes. The resolution of a mirror shells depends on the quality of cylindrical mandrel from which they are being replicated. Mid-spatial-frequency axial figure error is a dominant contributor in the error budget of the mandrel. This paper presents our efforts to develop a deterministic cylindrical polishing process in order to keep the mid-spatial-frequency axial figure errors to a minimum. Simulation software is developed to model the residual surface figure errors of a mandrel due to the polishing process parameters and the tools used, as well as to compute the optical performance of the optics. The study carried out using the developed software was focused on establishing a relationship between the polishing process parameters and the mid-spatial-frequency error generation. The process parameters modeled are the speeds of the lap and the mandrel, the tool s influence function, the contour path (dwell) of the tools, their shape and the distribution of the tools on the polishing lap. Using the inputs from the mathematical model, a mandrel having conical approximated Wolter-1 geometry, has been polished on a newly developed computer-controlled cylindrical polishing machine. The preliminary results of a series of polishing experiments demonstrate a qualitative agreement with the developed model. We report our first experimental results and discuss plans for further improvements in the polishing process. The ability to simulate the polishing process is critical to optimize the polishing process, improve the mandrel quality and significantly reduce the cost of mandrel production

  6. Distributed bragg reflector resonators with cylindrical symmetry and extremely high Q-factors.

    PubMed

    Tobar, Michael E; le Floch, Jean-Michel; Cros, Dominique; Hartnett, John G

    2005-01-01

    A simple non-Maxwellian method is presented that allows the approximate solution of all the dimensions of a multilayered dielectric TE0qp mode cylindrical resonant cavity that constitutes a distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) resonator. The analysis considers an arbitrary number of alternating dielectric and free-space layers of cylindrical geometry enclosed by a metal cylinder. The layers may be arranged along the axial direction, the radial direction, or both. Given only the aspect ratio of the cavity, the desired frequency and the dielectric constants of the material layers, the relevant dimensions are determined from only a set of simultaneous equations, and iterative techniques are not required. The formulas were verified using rigorous method of lines (MoL) calculations and previously published experimental work. We show that the simple approximation gives dimensions close to the values of the optimum Bragg reflection condition determined by the rigorous analysis. The resulting solution is more compact with a higher Q-factor when compared to other reported cylindrical DBR structures. This is because it properly takes into account the effect of the aspect ratio on the Bragg antiresonance condition along the z-axis of the resonator. Previous analyses assumed the propagation in the z-direction was independent of the aspect ratio, and the layers of the Bragg reflector were a quarter of a wavelength thick along the z-direction. When the aspect ratio is properly taken into account, we show that the thickness of the Bragg reflectors are equivalent to the thickness of plane wave Bragg reflectors (or quarter wavelength plates). Thus it turns out that the sizes of the reflectors are related to the free-space propagation constant rather than the propagation constant in the z-direction. PMID:15742559

  7. On burner-stabilized cylindrical premixed flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, James A.; Zhu, Delin; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical program on cylindrical and spherical premixed flames in microgravity has been initiated. We are especially interested in: (1) assessing heat loss versus flow divergence as the dominant stabilization mechanism; (2) understanding the effects of flame curvature on the burning intensity; and (3) determining the laminar burning velocity by using this configuration. In the present study we have performed analytical, computational, and mu g-experimental investigations of the cylindrical flame. The results are presented.

  8. Cylindrical bubbles and blobs from a Class II Hydrophobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paul; Pham, Michael; Blalock, Brad

    2012-02-01

    Cerato ulmin is a class II hydrophobin. In aqueous suspensions, it easily forms cylindrical air bubbles and cylindrical oil blobs. The conditions for formation of these unusual structures will be discussed, along with scattering and microscopic investigations of their remarkable stability. Possible applications in diverse fields including polymer synthesis and oil spill remediation will be considered. Acknowledgment is made to Dr. Wayne C. Richards of the Canadian Forest Service for the gift of Cerato ulmin.

  9. On cylindrically converging shock waves shaped by obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, V; Henshaw, W D; Appelo, D

    2007-07-16

    Motivated by recent experiments, numerical simulations were performed of cylindrically converging shock waves. The converging shocks impinged upon a set of zero to sixteen regularly space obstacles. For more than two obstacles the resulting diffracted shock fronts formed polygonal shaped patterns near the point of focus. The maximum pressure and temperature as a function of number of obstacles were studied. The self-similar behavior of cylindrical, triangular and square-shaped shocks were also investigated.

  10. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed; Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed; Abrari, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m(-1) and 111 kV m(-1) in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form. PMID:26388374

  11. Finite Larmor Radius approximation for waves propagation in cylindrical plasma configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeotti, Laura; Ceccherini, Francesco; Brambilla, Marco; Barnes, Daniel C.; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    We present an analytical derivation in cylindrical geometry of the Finite Larmor Radius approximation for the wave equations in the cyclotron frequency range and show a set of numerical results obtained with a new extended version of the code FELICE, which allows for arbitrary profiles of field, densities and temperatures. Obtaining a cylindrical FLR approximation is of great relevance for studying the wave propagation in plasma configurations like FRC's and theta-pinches in particular. The generic configuration we consider can be divided in the radial direction in two regions, i.e, a ``plasma region'' and a ``vacuum region''. In the former the wave propagation is computed numerically from the FRL approximation found, in the latter instead a general analytical solution has been calculated and implemented in the code. A detailed description on how to ensure both the overall causality of the propagation process and the correct matching conditions for the antenna surface and the vacuum/plasma surface is shown as well.

  12. Improved semi-analytic algorithms for finding the flux from a cylindrical source

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, O.J.

    1992-12-31

    Hand calculation methods for radiation shielding problems continue to be useful for scoping studies, for checking the results from sophisticated computer simulations and in teaching shielding personnel. This paper presents two algorithms which give improved results for hand calculations of the flux at a lateral detector point from a cylindrical source with an intervening slab shield parallel to the cylinder axis. The first algorithm improves the accuracy of the approximate flux flux formula of Ono and Tsuro so that results are always conservative and within a factor of two. The second algorithm uses the first algorithm and the principle of superposition of sources to give a new approximate method for finding the flux at a detector point outside the axial and radial extensions of a cylindrical source. A table of error ratios for this algorithm versus an exact calculation for a wide range of geometry parameters is also given. There is no other hand calculation method for the geometric configuration of the second algorithm available in the literature.

  13. Optical theorem for two-dimensional (2D) scalar monochromatic acoustical beams in cylindrical coordinates.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2015-09-01

    The optical theorem for plane waves is recognized as one of the fundamental theorems in optical, acoustical and quantum wave scattering theory as it relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. Here, the optical theorem is extended and generalized in a cylindrical coordinates system for the case of 2D beams of arbitrary character as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. The case of scalar monochromatic acoustical wavefronts is considered, and generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption and scattering cross-sections are derived and extended in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term describing the interaction between the diffracted Franz waves with the resonance elastic waves. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates is applicable to any object of arbitrary geometry in 2D located arbitrarily in the beam's path. Related investigations in optics, acoustics and quantum mechanics will benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by a cloud of particles, as well as the resulting radiation force and torque. PMID:25773968

  14. A Circular-cylindrical Flux-rope Analytical Model for Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Linton, M. G.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Vourlidas, A.; Savani, N. P.; Szabo, A.; Farrugia, C.; Yu, W.

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. When these structures are observed embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature, they are called Magnetic Clouds (MCs). Our model extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of MC geometrical information and orientation. The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3D MHD simulations. Here, we evaluate its performance in the reconstruction of MCs in in situ observations. Four Earth-directed ICME events, observed by the Wind spacecraft, are used to validate the technique. The events are selected from the ICME Wind list with the magnetic obstacle boundaries chosen consistently with the magnetic field and plasma in situ observations and with a new parameter (EPP, the Electron Pitch angle distribution Parameter) which quantifies the bidirectionally of the plasma electrons. The goodness of the fit is evaluated with a single correlation parameter to enable comparative analysis of the events. In general, at first glance, the model fits the selected events very well. However, a detailed analysis of events with signatures of significant compression indicates the need to explore geometries other than the circular-cylindrical. An extension of our current modeling framework to account for such non-circular CMEs will be presented in a forthcoming publication.

  15. Circular-cylindrical flux-rope analytical model for Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Linton, Mark; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Savani, Neel P.; Szabo, Adam; Farrugia, Charlie; Yu, Wenyuan

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. When these structures are observed embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature, they are called Magnetic Clouds ( MCs). The model extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. (2000) by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of MC geometrical information and orientation.The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3D MHD simulations. Here, we evaluate its performance in the reconstruction of MCs in in-situ observations. Four Earth directed ICME events, observed by the Wind spacecraft, are used to validate the technique. The events are selected from the ICME Wind list with the magnetic obstacle boundaries chosen consistently with the magnetic fi eld and plasma in situ observations and with a new parameter (EPP, Electron Pitch angle distribution Parameter) which quantifies the bidirectionally of theplasma electrons. The goodness of the fit is evaluated with a single correlation parameter to enable comparative analysis of the events. In general, at first glance, the model fits the selected events very well. However, a detailed analysis of events with signatures of significant compression indicates the need to explore geometries other than the circular-cylindrical.

  16. Cylindrically converging radiative shocks in noble gases driven by the MAGPIE pulsed-power device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, Guy; Lebedev, S.; Harvey-Thompson, Adam; Swadling, G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Bennet, M.; Hall, G.; Pickworth, L.; de Grouchy, P.; Bland, S.; Niasse, N.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J.; Espinosa, G.

    2013-10-01

    Experimental data from gas-filled cylindrical liner z-pinch experiments are presented. The current discharge from the MAGPIE pulsed-power device at Imperial College London (1.4 MA,240 ns) is applied to a thin walled (80 μm) Al tube with a static gas-fill inside (initial gas density 10-5 g/cc). The system is used to drive cylindrically converging strong shock waves (Us = 20 km/s) into different gases. Axial diagnostics include interferometry, optical streak photography and time gated, spatially resolved optical spectroscopy. The experimental geometry is nominally uniform along the diagnostic line of sight and in addition the shock waves show a high degree of azimuthal symmetry. This allows determination of the radial dependence of axially averaged plasma parameters (ne,Te) . The spectroscopy diagnostic is used to determine the temperature profile across the shock (in the precursor and post-shock regions) in different noble gases. Comparisons are made between experimental temperature and electron density profiles and the 1D radiation-MHD code HELIOS-CR. In addition, varying degrees of shock stability are seen in different noble gases. These observations will be briefly compared to cooling function calculations and analytical stability models.

  17. High speed cylindrical roller bearing analysis. SKF computer program CYBEAN. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyba, G. J.; Kleckner, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    CYBEAN (CYlindrical BEaring ANalysis) was created to detail radially loaded, aligned and misaligned cylindrical roller bearing performance under a variety of operating conditions. Emphasis was placed on detailing the effects of high speed, preload and system thermal coupling. Roller tilt, skew, radial, circumferential and axial displacement as well as flange contact were considered. Variable housing and flexible out-of-round outer ring geometries, and both steady state and time transient temperature calculations were enabled. The complete range of elastohydrodynamic contact considerations, employing full and partial film conditions were treated in the computation of raceway and flange contacts. The practical and correct implementation of CYBEAN is discussed. The capability to execute the program at four different levels of complexity was included. In addition, the program was updated to properly direct roller-to-raceway contact load vectors automatically in those cases where roller or ring profiles have small radii of curvature. Input and output architectures containing guidelines for use and two sample executions are detailed.

  18. Flow through a cylindrical pipe with a periodic array of fractal orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Melick, P. A. J.; Geurts, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    We apply direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations to predict flow through a cylindrical pipe in which a periodic array of orifice plates with a fractal perimeter is mounted. The flow is simulated using a volume penalization immersed boundary method with which the geometric complexity of the orifice plate is represented. Adding a periodic array of orifice plates to a cylindrical pipe is shown to increase the mixing efficiency of the flow in the laminar regime. The average stretching rate is shown to increase by a factor of up to 5, comparing pipe flow without orifice plates to flow passing through an orifice plate derived from the Koch snowflake fractal. The dispersion rate is shown to increase by a factor of up to 4. In laminar flow, the viscous forces are most important close to the walls, causing orifice geometries with the largest perimeter to exhibit the largest axial velocities near the centerline of the pipe and the largest pressure drop to maintain the prescribed volumetric flow rate. The immersed boundary method is also applied to turbulent flow through a ‘fractal-orifices pipe’ at Re = 4300. It is shown that the pressure drop that is required to maintain the specified volumetric flow rate decreases by about 15% on comparing orifice plates with a circular opening to orifice plates with more complex shapes that contain several corners such as triangles, squares, stars and the Koch snowflake.

  19. Exact solutions for the vibration of circumferentially stepped orthotropic circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Ahmed Mousa

    2011-11-01

    The combination of Flügge's shell theory, the transfer matrix approach and the Romberg integration method are used to investigate the free vibration behaviour of stepped orthotropic cylindrical shells. The hoop step on the shell surface is described by a reduced thickness over part of its circumference. Modal displacements of the shell can be described by trigonometric functions and Fourier's approach is used to separate the variables. The vibration equations of the shell are reduced to eight first-order differential equations in the circumferential coordinate, and by using the transfer matrix of the shell, these equations can be written in a matrix differential equation. The transfer matrix is derived from the non-linear differential equations of the cylindrical shells by introducing the trigonometric functions in the longitudinal direction and applying the numerical integration in the circumferential direction. The proposed model is used to get the vibration frequencies and the corresponding mode shapes for symmetrical and antisymmetrical type-modes. Computed results indicate the sensitivity of the frequency parameters and the bending deformations to the geometry of stepped shell, and also to the axial and circumferential rigidities of the shell.

  20. Tailoring the nucleation of domain walls along multi-segmented cylindrical nanoelements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. F.; Bahiana, M.; Allende, S.; Altbir, D.; Görlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetization reversal of three-segment cylindrical nanoelements comprising alternating nanowire and nanotube sections is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Such nanoelements may feature a three-state behaviour with an intermediate plateau in the hysteresis curve due to a metastable pinning of the domain walls (DWs) at the wire-tube interfaces. It turns out that vortex as well as transverse DWs contribute to the magnetization reversal. By varying the geometric parameters, the sequence, or the material of the elements the nucleation location of DWs, as well as their nucleation field, can be tailored. Especially interesting is the novel possibility to drive DWs coherently in the same or in opposite directions by changing the geometry of the hybrid nanoelement. This important feature provides additional flexibility to the construction of logical devices based on DW movement. Another prominent outcome is that DWs can be nucleated near the centre of the element and then traverse to the outer tips of the cylindrical structure when the applied field is increased, which also opens the possibility to use these three-segment nanoelements for the field-induced delivery of DWs as substitutes for large nucleation pads.

  1. Enhanced thermal stability of functionally graded sandwich cylindrical shells by shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, H.; Akbarzadeh, A. H.; Chen, Z. T.; Aghdam, M. M.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper deals with the nonlinear thermal instability of geometrically imperfect sandwich cylindrical shells under uniform heating. The sandwich shells are made of a shape memory alloy (SMA)-fiber-reinforced composite and functionally graded (FG) face sheets (FG/SMA/FG). The Brinson phenomenological model is used to express the constitutive characteristics of SMA fibers. The governing equations are established within the framework of the third-order shear deformation shell theory by taking into account the von Karman geometrical nonlinearity and initial imperfection. The material properties of constituents are assumed to be temperature dependent. The Galerkin technique is utilized to derive expressions of the bifurcation points and bifurcation paths of the sandwich cylindrical shells. Using the developed closed-form solutions, extensive numerical results are presented to provide an insight into the influence of the SMA fiber volume fraction, SMA pre-strain, core thickness, non-homogeneity index, geometrical imperfection, geometry parameters of sandwich shells and temperature dependency of materials on the stability of shells. The results reveal that proper application of SMA fibers postpones the thermal bifurcation point and dramatically decreases thermal post-buckling deflection. Moreover, the induced tensile recovery stress of SMA fibers could also stabilize the geometrically imperfect shells during the inverse martensite phase transformation.

  2. Fluid damping of cylindrical liquid storage tanks.

    PubMed

    Habenberger, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed in order to calculate the damping effects of viscous fluids in liquid storage tanks subjected to earthquakes. The potential equation of an ideal fluid can satisfy only the boundary conditions normal to the surface of the liquid. To satisfy also the tangential interaction conditions between liquid and tank wall and tank bottom, the potential flow is superimposed by a one-dimensional shear flow. The shear flow in this boundary layer yields to a decrease of the mechanical energy of the shell-liquid-system. A damping factor is derived from the mean value of the energy dissipation in time. Depending on shell geometry and fluid viscosity, modal damping ratios are calculated for the convective component. PMID:26405635

  3. Interpenetration, deflection, and stagnation of cylindrically convergent magnetized supersonic tungsten plasma flows.

    PubMed

    Swadling, G F; Lebedev, S V; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Rozmus, W; Burdiak, G C; Suttle, L; Patankar, S; Smith, R A; Bennett, M; Hall, G N; Suzuki-Vidal, F; Yuan, J

    2014-07-18

    The interpenetration and interaction of supersonic, magnetized tungsten plasma flows has been directly observed via spatially and temporally resolved measurements of the Thomson scattering ion feature. A novel scattering geometry allows independent measurements of the axial and radial velocity components of the ions. The plasma flows are produced via the pulsed power driven ablation of fine tungsten wires in a cylindrical wire array z pinch. Fits of the data reveal the variations in radial velocity, axial velocity, and temperature of the ion streams as they interpenetrate and interact. A previously unobserved increase in axial velocity is measured near the array axis. This may be the result of v[over →]×B[over →] bending of the ion streams by a toroidal magnetic field, advected to and accumulated about the axis by the streams. PMID:25083650

  4. Method for reinforcing threads in multilayer composite tubes and cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Romanoski, G.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1996-04-01

    Multilayer techniques such as: tape wrapping, braiding, and filament winding represent versatile and economical routes for fabricating composite tubes and cylindrical structures. However, multilayer architectures lack the radial reinforcement required to retain threads when the desired means of connection or closure is a threaded joint. This issue was addressed in the development of a filament wound, carbon-carbon composite impact shell for the NASA radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The problem of poor thread shear strength was solved by incorporating a number of radial elements of triangular geometry around the circumference of the thread for the full length of thread engagement. The radial elements significantly increased the shear strength of the threaded joint by transmitting the applied force to the balance of composite structure. This approach is also applicable to ceramic composites.

  5. Wind Tunnel Test Results for Gas Flows Inside Axisymmetric Cavities on Cylindric Bodies with Nose Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvets, A. L.; Gilinsky, M.; Blankson, I. M.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental test results of air flow inside and at the cylindrical cavity located on axisymmetric body are presented. These tests were conducted in the wind tunnel A-7 of Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University. Pressure distribution along the cavities and optical measurements were obtained. Dependence of these characteristics of length of a cavity in the range: L/D = 0.5 - 14 and free stream Mach in the range: M(sub infinity) = 0.6 - 3.0 was determined. Flow structure inside the cavity, cause of flow regime change, separation zones geometry and others were studied. In particular, the flow modes of with open and closed separation zones are determined.

  6. Measurement and characterization of cylindrical surfaces by deflectometry applied to ballistic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantin, A. V.; Veiga, C.; Albertazzi, A.

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes an optical device that uses a new configuration of a technique known as deflectometry applied to ballistic identification. The main novelty is characterized by the use of a 45° conical mirror to measure the near cylindrical surface of the bullet. deflectometry is an optical technique sensitive to variations in topography and unevenness of a surface. This technique allows to identify and to measure the geometry of objects based on the distortions observed in a sequence of image patterns reflected on the surface of interest. The measurement by deflectometry is very sensitive to the surface local gradients and curvatures. In this paper it is applied to forensic ballistic in order to verify if a given bullet could be fired by a suspect weapon. Comparisons between images of bullets fired by the same weapon were made.

  7. Spectral Features in Laser Driven Proton Acceleration from Cylindrical Solid-density Hydrogen Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Chandra; Gauthier, Maxence; Mishra, Rohini; Kim, Jongjin; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Williams, Jackson; Ruby, John; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art E.; Kerr, Shaun; Tsui, Ying Y.; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Aurand, Bastian; Willi, Oswald; Roedel, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The generation of monoenergetic proton beams by ultrashort high-intensity laser-plasma interactions is of great interest for applications such as stopping power measurements, fast ignition laser confinement fusion, and ion beam therapy. In general, the commonly used mechanism of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) does not provide the required energy spread or maximum proton energy. Here we study alternative acceleration mechanisms, which have been identified in particle in cell (PIC) simulations, to overcome the limitations of TNSA. Using the Titan laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we investigate proton acceleration from wire targets and a cryogenic solid-density hydrogen jet. Due to the cylindrical geometry, TNSA is suppressed allowing other accelerations mechanisms to become observable. Quasi-monoenergetic features in laser-forward direction are observed in the proton spectrum indicating radiation-pressure-driven acceleration mechanisms. Our experimental results are accompanied by supporting PIC simulations.

  8. Numerical simulation of geometric scale effects in cylindrical self-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, M.

    1992-01-01

    A 2D, two-temperature, single fluid MHD code which incorporates classical plasma transport coefficients and Hall effects has been developed to predict steady-state, self-field MPD thruster performance. The governing equations and numerical methods of solution are outlined and discussed. Experimental comparisons are used to validate model predictions. The model accurately predicts thrust and reproduces trends in the discharge voltage for discharge currents below experimentally measured onset values. However, because the model does not include electrode effects the calculated voltage drops are significantly lower than experimentally measured values. Predictions of thrust and flow efficiency are made for a matrix of fifteen cylindrical thruster geometries assuming a fully ionized argon propellant.

  9. Wightman function and scalar Casimir densities for a wedge with two cylindrical boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Saharian, A.A. Tarloyan, A.S.

    2008-07-15

    Wightman function, the vacuum expectation values of the field square and the energy-momentum tensor are investigated for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter inside a wedge with two coaxial cylindrical boundaries. It is assumed that the field obeys Dirichlet boundary condition on bounding surfaces. The application of a variant of the generalized Abel-Plana formula enables to extract from the expectation values the contribution corresponding to the geometry of a wedge with a single shell and to present the interference part in terms of exponentially convergent integrals. The local properties of the vacuum are investigated in various asymptotic regions of the parameters. The vacuum forces acting on the boundaries are presented as the sum of self-action and interaction terms. It is shown that the interaction forces between the separate parts of the boundary are always attractive. The generalization to the case of a scalar field with Neumann boundary condition is discussed.

  10. Simplified calculation of solar flux distribution on the side wall of cylindrical cavity solar receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, P.; Wu, Y. C.; Roschke, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    A simple solar flux calculation algorithm for a cylindrical cavity type solar receiver has been developed and implemented on an IBM PC-AT. Using cone optics, the contour error method is utilized to handle the slope error of a paraboloidal concentrator. The flux distribution on the side wall is calculated by integration of the energy incident from cones emanating from all the differential elements on the concentrator. The calculations are done for any set of dimensions and properties of the receiver and the concentrator, and account for any spillover on the aperture plate. The results of this algorithm compared excellently with those predicted by more complicated programs. Because of the utilization of axial symmetry and overall simplification, it is extremely fast. It can be esily extended to other axisymmetric receiver geometries.

  11. The influence of horizontal boundaries on Ekman circulation and angular momentum transport in a cylindrical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obabko, Aleksandr V.; Cattaneo, Fausto; F Fischer, Paul

    2008-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of circular Couette flow in axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional geometry of a cylindrical annulus inspired by Princeton magnetorotational instability (MRI) liquid gallium experiment. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with the spectral element code Nek5000 incorporating realistic horizontal boundary conditions of differentially rotating rings. We investigate the effect of changing rotation rates (Reynolds number) and of the horizontal boundary conditions on flow structure, Ekman circulation and associated transport of angular momentum through the onset of unsteadiness and three-dimensionality. A mechanism for the explanation of the dependence of the Ekman flows and circulation on horizontal boundary conditions is proposed. First International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' held on 18-26 August 2007 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy.

  12. Superradiance from a cylindrically shaped cloud of N two-level atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Manassah, Jamal T.

    2010-11-15

    Using the eigenmodes of the scalar-photon kernel of interacting N two-level atoms in a cylindrical configuration, I obtain the time dependence of the superradiant emission for this geometry in two cases of interest. In particular, I consider first the case when one or two eigenmodes dominate the system's dynamics for an inverted system which has been initially prepared in an isotropic state and show that for certain values of the radius of the cylinder (r=m{lambda},m integer) one obtains temporal modulation in the state function. In the second case of interest, I show that the angular distribution of the state function of a system initially prepared in a phased state appears to be chaotic; however, I show that this behavior is due to the high multiplicity of modes having close values for their amplification coefficients.

  13. A simplified method of elastic-stability analysis for thin cylindrical shells I : Donnell's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batdorf, S B

    1947-01-01

    The equation for the equilibrium of cylindrical shells introduced by Donnell in NACA Technical Report no. 479 to find the critical stresses of cylinders in torsion is applied to find critical stresses for cylinders with simply supported edges under other loading conditions. It is shown that by this method solutions may be obtained very easily and the results in each case may be expressed in terms of two nondimensional parameters, one dependent on the critical stress and the other essentially determined by the geometry of the cylinder. The influence of boundary conditions related to edge displacements in the shell median surface is discussed. The accuracy of the solutions found is established by comparing them with previous theoretical solutions and with test results. The solutions to a number of problems concerned with the buckling of cylinders with simply supported edges on the basis of a unified viewpoint are presented in a convenient form for practical use. (author)

  14. Asymmetric Bulkheads for Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B.

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetric bulkheads are proposed for the ends of vertically oriented cylindrical pressure vessels. These bulkheads, which would feature both convex and concave contours, would offer advantages over purely convex, purely concave, and flat bulkheads (see figure). Intended originally to be applied to large tanks that hold propellant liquids for launching spacecraft, the asymmetric-bulkhead concept may also be attractive for terrestrial pressure vessels for which there are requirements to maximize volumetric and mass efficiencies. A description of the relative advantages and disadvantages of prior symmetric bulkhead configurations is prerequisite to understanding the advantages of the proposed asymmetric configuration: In order to obtain adequate strength, flat bulkheads must be made thicker, relative to concave and convex bulkheads; the difference in thickness is such that, other things being equal, pressure vessels with flat bulkheads must be made heavier than ones with concave or convex bulkheads. Convex bulkhead designs increase overall tank lengths, thereby necessitating additional supporting structure for keeping tanks vertical. Concave bulkhead configurations increase tank lengths and detract from volumetric efficiency, even though they do not necessitate additional supporting structure. The shape of a bulkhead affects the proportion of residual fluid in a tank that is, the portion of fluid that unavoidably remains in the tank during outflow and hence cannot be used. In this regard, a flat bulkhead is disadvantageous in two respects: (1) It lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet and (2) a vortex that forms at the outlet during outflow prevents a relatively large amount of fluid from leaving the tank. A concave bulkhead also lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet. Like purely concave and purely convex bulkhead configurations, the proposed asymmetric bulkhead configurations would be more mass-efficient than is the flat

  15. Photoelastic investigations of stress concentration in perforated cylindrical shells with internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dranchenko, B.N.; Portnov, B.B.; Seleznev, A.V.; Danilova, T.N.; Komarova, S.N.; Ponomareva, V.K.

    1994-06-01

    Cylindrical shells with regular perforation are widely used in power generating equipment and in particular in collectors 1 of the circuit of steam generators of power generating installations with water-water reactors (WWPR) The state of stress of collectors is determined by a broad spectrum of technological and operational loads, it is therefore difficult to analyze it theoretically. The aim of the present work is the experimental investigation of stresses in the cylindrical shells of collectors subjected to internal pressure, the generalization and systematization of empirical data in the form of engineering formulas and nomographs. The investigations were carried out with photoelastic three-dimensional models with the use of {open_quotes}freezing{close_quotes}. The basic characteristics of the state of stress of perforated shells (in particular those used in calculations of the strength and life of collectors) are the values of the stress intensity factor K and of the stress intensification factor {gamma}{sub {bar {sigma}}}{sub me} of the mean integral stress level in the neck between neighboring holes. The presented data make it possible to establish quantitatively the regularities of change of K and {gamma}{sub {bar {sigma}}}{sub me} in dependence on the geometry of the perforated shells. These data were systematized according to a special program of multifactor regression analysis. It follows from the presented formulas and nomographs in particular that in the ranges of the geometry of the perforated shells K may change from 2.5 to 4.0, and {gamma}{sub {bar {sigma}}}{sub me} from 1.1 to 2.3. Therefore varied geometric parameters have a substantial effect on the load intensity of perforated shells, and that once again confirms how topical it is to obtain new experimental data, to generalize and systematize them.

  16. SIMPLIFIED CALCULATION OF SOLAR FLUX ON THE SIDE WALL OF CYLINDRICAL CAVITY SOLAR RECEIVERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, P.

    1994-01-01

    The Simplified Calculation of Solar Flux Distribution on the Side Wall of Cylindrical Cavity Solar Receivers program employs a simple solar flux calculation algorithm for a cylindrical cavity type solar receiver. Applications of this program include the study of solar energy, heat transfer, and space power-solar dynamics engineering. The aperture plate of the receiver is assumed to be located in the focal plane of a paraboloidal concentrator, and the geometry is assumed to be axisymmetric. The concentrator slope error is assumed to be the only surface error; it is assumed that there are no pointing or misalignment errors. Using cone optics, the contour error method is utilized to handle the slope error of the concentrator. The flux distribution on the side wall is calculated by integration of the energy incident from cones emanating from all the differential elements on the concentrator. The calculations are done for any set of dimensions and properties of the receiver and the concentrator, and account for any spillover on the aperture plate. The results of this algorithm compared excellently with those predicted by more complicated programs. Because of the utilization of axial symmetry and overall simplification, it is extremely fast. It can be easily extended to other axi-symmetric receiver geometries. The program was written in Fortran 77, compiled using a Ryan McFarland compiler, and run on an IBM PC-AT with a math coprocessor. It requires 60K of memory and has been implemented under MS-DOS 3.2.1. The program was developed in 1988.

  17. Quantum Consequences of Parameterizing Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanas, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    The marriage between geometrization and quantization is not successful, so far. It is well known that quantization of gravity , using known quantization schemes, is not satisfactory. It may be of interest to look for another approach to this problem. Recently, it is shown that geometries with torsion admit quantum paths. Such geometries should be parameterizied in order to preserve the quantum properties appeared in the paths. The present work explores the consequences of parameterizing such geometry. It is shown that quantum properties, appeared in the path equations, are transferred to other geometric entities.

  18. Distance geometry and geometric algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dress, Andreas W. M.; Havel, Timothy F.

    1993-10-01

    As part of his program to unify linear algebra and geometry using the language of Clifford algebra, David Hestenes has constructed a (well-known) isomorphism between the conformal group and the orthogonal group of a space two dimensions higher, thus obtaining homogeneous coordinates for conformal geometry.(1) In this paper we show that this construction is the Clifford algebra analogue of a hyperbolic model of Euclidean geometry that has actually been known since Bolyai, Lobachevsky, and Gauss, and we explore its wider invariant theoretic implications. In particular, we show that the Euclidean distance function has a very simple representation in this model, as demonstrated by J. J. Seidel.(18)

  19. INTERCOMPARISON OF PERFORMANCE OF RF COIL GEOMETRIES FOR HIGH FIELD MOUSE CARDIAC MRI

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Angeli, S.; Gkagkarellis, S.; Cofer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-turn spiral surface coils are constructed in flat and cylindrical arrangements and used for high field (7.1 T) mouse cardiac MRI. Their electrical and imaging performances, based on experimental measurements, simulations, and MRI experiments in free space, and under phantom, and animal loading conditions, are compared with a commercially available birdcage coil. Results show that the four-turn cylindrical spiral coil exhibits improved relative SNR (rSNR) performance to the flat coil counterpart, and compares fairly well with a commercially available birdcage coil. Phantom experiments indicate a 50% improvement in the SNR for penetration depths ≤ 6.1 mm from the coil surface compared to the birdcage coil, and an increased penetration depth at the half-maximum field response of 8 mm in the 4-spiral cylindrical coil case, in contrast to 2.9 mm in the flat 4-turn spiral case. Quantitative comparison of the performance of the two spiral coil geometries in anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal regions of the murine heart yield maximum mean percentage rSNR increases of the order of 27–167% in vivo post-mortem (cylindrical compared to flat coil). The commercially available birdcage outperforms the cylindrical spiral coil in rSNR by a factor of 3–5 times. The comprehensive approach and methodology adopted to accurately design, simulate, implement, and test radiofrequency coils of any geometry and type, under any loading conditions, can be generalized for any application of high field mouse cardiac MRI. PMID:23204945

  20. Scattering of cylindrical electric field waves from an elliptical dielectric cylindrical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanik, E. A.

    1982-12-01

    This thesis examines the scattering of cylindrical waves by large dielectric scatterers of elliptic cross section. The solution method was the method of moments using a Galerkin approach. Sinusoidal basis and testing functions were used resulting in a higher convergence rate. The higher rate of convergence made it possible for the program to run on the Aeronautical Systems Division's CYBER computers without any special storage methods. This report includes discussion on moment methods, solution of integral equations, and the relationship between the electric field and the source region or self cell singularity. Since the program produced unacceptable run times, no results are contained herein. The importance of this work is the evaluation of the practicality of moment methods using standard techniques. The long run times for a mid-sized scatterer demonstrate the impracticality of moment methods for dielectrics using standard techniques.

  1. The Dilemma of Descriptive Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boleslavski, Moshe

    1977-01-01

    Proposes that engineering students undergo a preparatory summer school training program in fundamentals of engineering drawing, descriptive geometry, and mathematics prior to being admitted to regular engineering studies. (SL)

  2. Emergent geometry from quantized spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hyun Seok; Sivakumar, M.

    2010-08-15

    We examine the picture of emergent geometry arising from a mass-deformed matrix model. Because of the mass deformation, a vacuum geometry turns out to be a constant curvature spacetime such as d-dimensional sphere and (anti-)de Sitter spaces. We show that the mass-deformed matrix model giving rise to the constant curvature spacetime can be derived from the d-dimensional Snyder algebra. The emergent geometry beautifully confirms all the rationale inferred from the algebraic point of view that the d-dimensional Snyder algebra is equivalent to the Lorentz algebra in (d+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. For example, a vacuum geometry of the mass-deformed matrix model is completely described by a G-invariant metric of coset manifolds G/H defined by the Snyder algebra. We also discuss a nonlinear deformation of the Snyder algebra.

  3. The Speed of Axial Propagation of a Cylindrical Bubble Through a Cylindrical Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Inspired by the rapid elongation of air columns injected into vortices by dolphins, we present an exact inviscid solution for the axial speed (assumed steady) of propagation of the tip of a semi-infinite cylindrical bubble along the axis of a cylindrical vortex. The bubble is assumed to be held at constant pressure by being connected to a reservoir, the lungs of the dolphin, say. For a given bubble pressure, there is a modest critical rotation rate above which steadily propagating bubbles exist. For a bubble at ambient pressure, the propagation speed of the bubble (relative to axial velocity within the vortex) varies between 0.5 and 0.6 of the maximum rotational speed of the vortex. Surprisingly, the bubble tip can propagate (almost as rapidly) even when the pressure minimum in the vortex core is greater than the bubble pressure; in this case, solutions exhibit a dimple on the nose of the bubble. A situation important for incipient vortex cavitation, and one which dolphins also demonstrate, is elongation of a free bubble, i.e., one whose internal pressure may vary. Under the assumption that the acceleration term is small (checked a posteriori), the steady solution is applied at each instant during the elongation. Three types of behavior are then possible depending on physical parameters and initial conditions: (A) Unabated elongation with slowly increasing bubble pressure, and nearly constant volume. Volume begins to decrease in the late stages. (B1) Elongation with decreasing bubble pressure. A limit point of the steady solution is encountered at a finite bubble length. (B2) Unabated elongation with decreasing bubble pressure and indefinite creation of volume. This is made possible by the existence of propagating solutions at bubble pressures below the minimum vortex pressure. As the bubble stretches, its radius initially decreases but then becomes constant; this is also observed in experiments on incipient vortex cavitation.

  4. The Los Alamos National Laboratory source geometry experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, B.W.; Pearson, D.C.; Edwards, C.L.; Baker, D.F.

    1995-09-01

    The Source Geometry Experiment was successfully conducted over the time period 17 April to 7 May 95. Recording in the mine was conducted 24 April to 4 May 95. Five single sources were instrumented that included four cylindrical charges at different burdens (distance from the free face) and a pseudo-spherical charge. Nine production shots conducted during the two week visit to the mine were also recorded. Included in these production shots were a number of explosions designed to primarily bulk (no cast) the overburden and a number which cast material into the mine pit. Instrumentation was divided into six primary types: (1) Near-source accelerometers were deployed at distances of approximately 20 to 300 m [14, three-component 25 g/volt accelerometers and 16, three-component 1 g/volt accelerometers]; (2) Linear array of velocity gauges to quantify wave propagation effects [4-11 three component strong motion velocity gauges]; (3)Far-field velocity gages deployed in an azimuthal array around the mine at ranges from 500 to 2500 m [8, three component velocity gauges]; (4) High speed film and multiple camera video designed to quantify the two and three dimensional affects around the explosions [2 high speed cameras and 3 Hi-8 video cameras]; (5) Velocity of detonation and detonation time measurements of selected explosions [2 VODR systems]; and (6) Pre and post shot laser survey. Any one shot had as many as 154 channels of data. Although the complete data set is still being assembled, quality checked and analyzed, it appears that nearly 2,000 channels of data were successfully recovered during the experiment. Preliminary analysis of the data illustrates the: (1) Significant spall accompanied both the cylindrical and spherical single sources; (2) Similarity of waveforms from the cylindrical and spherical single sources; (3) Strong variations in the body and surface wave generation from the nine production shot.

  5. Interaction of morphogens with geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    2005-09-01

    Morphogen patterns are viewed as being affected by epithelial sheet geometry in early development. As the total area of the (closed) sheet changes, the changing geometry acts back in turn to change the morphogen pattern. A number of constraints are given on the functional form of the Gauss and Mean curvatures, considered as functions of the morphogen concentrations and their derivatives. It is shown that the constraints are sufficient to motivate a convincing dependence of the two curvatures on the morphogen concentrations.

  6. The Common Geometry Module (CGM).

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy James

    2004-12-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and on top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also includes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.

  7. Geometry of the human erythrocyte. I. Effect of albumin on cell geometry.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, A W

    1975-01-01

    The effects of albumin on the geometry of human erythrocytes have been studied. Individual red cells, hanging on edge from coverslips were photographed. Enlarged cell profiles were digitized using a Gradicon digitizer (Instronics Ltd., Stittsville, Ontario). Geometric parameters including diameter, area, volume, minimum cylindrical diameter, sphericity index, swelling index, maximum and minimum cell thickness, were calculated for each cell using a CDC 6400 computer. Maximum effect of human serum albumin was reached at about 1 g/liter. Studies of cell populations showed decreases in mean cell diameter of up to 6%, area 6%, and volume 15%, varying from sample to sample. The thickness of the rim was increased while that at the dimple was decreased. Studies of single cells showed that area and volume changes do not occur equally in all cells. Cells with lower sphericity indices showed larger effects. In the presence of albumin, up to 50% of the cells assumed cup-shapes (stomatocytes). These cells had smaller volumes but the same area as biconcave cells. Mechanical agitation could reversibly induce biconcave cells to assume cup shapes without area or volume changes. Experiments with de-fatted human albumins showed that the presence of bound fatty acids in varying concentrations does not alter the observed effects. Bovine serum albumin has similar effects on human erythrocytes as human serum albumin. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 PMID:1122337

  8. Influence of the Geometry on Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, L.; Tosi, N.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling of geodynamic processes like mantle or core convection has strongly improved over the last two decades thanks to the steady development of numerical codes that tend to incorporate a more and more realistic physics. High-performance parallel computations allow the simulation of complex problems, such as the self-consistent generation of tectonic plates or the formation of planetary magnetic fields. However, the need to perform broad explorations of the parameter space and the large computational demands imposed by the non-linear, multi-scale nature of convection require several simplifications, in the domain geometry as well as in the physical complexity of the problem. A straightforward approach to limit the computational complexity of the simulations is to decrease the total number of degrees of freedom of the problem by reducing either the number of dimensions or the size of the model domain. On the one hand, for a given resolution, a 3D spherical shell clearly needs a much larger number of grid points than a 2D cylindrical shell or a 2D Cartesian box. At the resolutions typically employed to solve mantle convection problems, this difference amounts to at least a factor of a few hundreds. On the other hand, for certain problems, only a relatively small part of the mantle may be of interest, as in the case of the modelling of subduction [1], mid-ocean ridges or transform faults [2]. We adapted the code GAIA [3] to solve the Stokes problem in several different geometries (Cartesian box, cylindrical, spherical and regional-spherical) and dimensions (2D and 3D) and started a benchmark along the lines of [4] to assess the loss of accuracy when using reduced domains instead of a 3D spherical shell [5]. In general, upwellings in Cartesian geometry are rather flat, whereas the spherical geometry changes their shape to more mushroom-like structures. Furthermore, the number of plumes, which is representative of the characteristic wavelength of convection, varies

  9. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. II. Semi-infinite cylindrical approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Berkel, M. van; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Zwart, H. J.; Inagaki, S.; Baar, M. R. de

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a number of new explicit approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in a cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The approximations are based upon the heat equation in a semi-infinite cylindrical domain. The approximations are based upon continued fractions, asymptotic expansions, and multiple harmonics. The relative error for the different derived approximations is presented for different values of frequency, transport coefficients, and dimensionless radius. Moreover, it is shown how combinations of different explicit formulas can yield good approximations over a wide parameter space for different cases, such as no convection and damping, only damping, and both convection and damping. This paper is the second part (Part II) of a series of three papers. In Part I, the semi-infinite slab approximations have been treated. In Part III, cylindrical approximations are treated for heat waves traveling towards the center of the plasma.

  10. The geometry of folds in granitoid rocks of northeastern Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willem Langenberg, C.; Ramsden, John

    1980-06-01

    Granitoid rocks which predominate in the Precambrian shield of northeastern Alberta show large-scale fold structures. A numerical procedure has been used to obtain modal foliation orientations. This procedure results in the smoothing of folded surfaces that show roughness on a detailed scale. Statistical tests are used to divide the study areas into cylindrical domains. Structural sections can be obtained for each domain, and horizontal and vertical sections are used to construct block diagrams. The projections are performed numerically and plotted by computer. This method permits blocks to be viewed from every possible angle. Both perspective and orthographic projections can be produced. The geometries of a dome in the Tulip Lake area and a synform in the Hooker Lake area have been obtained. The domal structure is compared with polyphase deformational interference patterns and with experimental diapiric structures obtained in a centrifuge system. The synform in the Hooker Lake area may be genetically related to the doming in the Tulip Lake area.

  11. Optical testing of cylindrical surfaces with computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Pei-ji

    2013-08-01

    Increasing demands for highly accurate cylinders require more high-precision testing techniques. The existing methods of testing cylindrical surfaces can not ensure the highly-accuracy, efficiency, convenience and the overall cost. In order to acquire highly accurate cylindrical surfaces conveniently at a low cost, a new Fizeau interferometric optical testing utilizing CGH which is fabricated onto a wedge-shaped substrate is designed. In this test, a slit filter is placed in the center of the cylindrical curvature to filter out the undesired diffraction orders which occur when the beam hits the CGH. Meanwhile, the front side of the wedge-shaped substrate is as the reference flat, and the CGH is written onto the inclined surface, so that the real fringe pattern can not be affected by its reflected beam. Moreover, the design of cylindrical surfaces under test tilting and off-center relative to the diffraction surface of the CGH results that the required rays for interference can be obtained effectively from the pinhole filter in the interferometer. Furthermore, high-accuracy CGH in this test can be processed by conventional microlithography equipments. Corresponding to a cylindrical surface with 60mm in diameter and f-number of 1/7, the test has been successfully designed and optimized in Zemax whose testing accuracy is prior to 0.0019λ. Better interference pattern can be obtained because all the other disturbing rays image outside of aperture in a radius of 2mm. Experiment shows the method is efficient and predominant.

  12. Novel spherical hohlraum with cylindrical laser entrance holes and shields

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Ke; Zheng, Wudi

    2014-09-15

    Our recent works [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014); K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 052704 (2014)] have shown that the octahedral spherical hohlraums are superior to the cylindrical hohlraums in both higher symmetry during the capsule implosion and lower backscatter without supplementary technology. However, both the coupling efficiency from the drive laser energy to the capsule and the capsule symmetry decrease remarkably when larger laser entrance holes (LEHs) are used. In addition, the laser beams injected at angles > 45° transport close to the hohlraum wall, thus the wall blowoff causes the LEH to close faster and results in strong laser plasma interactions inside the spherical hohlraums. In this letter, we propose a novel octahedral hohlraum with LEH shields and cylindrical LEHs to alleviate these problems. From our theoretical study, with the LEH shields, the laser coupling efficiency is significantly increased and the capsule symmetry is remarkably improved in the spherical hohlraums. The cylindrical LEHs take advantage of the cylindrical hohlraum near the LEH and mitigate the influence of the blowoff on laser transport inside a spherical hohlraum. The cylindrical LEHs can also be applied to the rugby and elliptical hohlraums.

  13. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 10⁵ (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  14. Elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xiong, Qiulin; Li, Xiaopeng; Ma, Junxian

    2015-08-10

    We researched an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide and evaluated its mode characteristics using the finite element method software COMSOL. The waveguide consists of three parts: an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire, a silver film layer, and a silica covering layer between them. All of the components are surrounded by air. After optimizing the geometrical parameters of the waveguide, we can achieve the waveguide's strong field confinement (ranging from λ2/270 to λ2/27) and long propagation distances (119-485 μm). In order to further understand the impact of the waveguide's architecture on its performance, we also studied the ridge hybrid waveguide. The results show that the ridge waveguide has moderate local field confinement ranging from λ2/190 to λ2/20 and its maximum propagation distance is about 340 μm. We compared the elliptic cylindrical and ridge nanowire hybrid waveguides with the cylindrical hybrid waveguide that we studied before. The elliptic cylindrical waveguide achieves a better trade-off between reasonable mode confinement and maximum propagation length in the three waveguides. The researched hybrid surface plasmon polaritons waveguides are useful to construct devices such as a directional coupler and may find potential applications in photonic integrated circuits or other novel SPP devices. PMID:26368373

  15. Radiation and scattering from printed antennas on cylindrically conformal platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Bindiganavale, Sunil

    1994-01-01

    The goal was to develop suitable methods and software for the analysis of antennas on cylindrical coated and uncoated platforms. Specifically, the finite element boundary integral and finite element ABC methods were employed successfully and associated software were developed for the analysis and design of wraparound and discrete cavity-backed arrays situated on cylindrical platforms. This work led to the successful implementation of analysis software for such antennas. Developments which played a role in this respect are the efficient implementation of the 3D Green's function for a metallic cylinder, the incorporation of the fast Fourier transform in computing the matrix-vector products executed in the solver of the finite element-boundary integral system, and the development of a new absorbing boundary condition for terminating the finite element mesh on cylindrical surfaces.

  16. Optimization of electrodynamic acceleration regimes for cylindrical conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalikhman, S. A.

    1985-11-01

    At the present time electromagnetic accelerators which use the action of an impulsive electromagnetic field on a current-carrying conductor appear to be promising devices for the study of high-speed collisions. In the regime using separate sources for the accelerating magnetic field and the current in the conductor being accelerated it is possible to bring cylindrical conductors up to velocities exceeding 12 km/sec [1]. Acceleration regimes have been calculated previously [2] assuming independence of the current density in the conductor from the accelerating magnetic field. However, as analysis of transient electromagnetic processes occurring in the interaction of an impulsive electromagnetic field with a cylindrical conductor shows [3], the maximum current density, limited by heating conditions, depends significantly on the induction of the accelerating magnetic field. In the present study we will analyze regimes for electrodynamic acceleration of cylindrical conductors with consideration of diffusion of both the intrinsic and the external impulsive magnetic field within the conductor.

  17. Determination of thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies being cooled

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.

    1996-09-01

    This paper deals with the development of an analytical model for determining the thermal diffusivities of the individual solid cylindrical bodies subjected to cooling is presented. Applications of this model were made using the experimental center temperature data obtained from the cylindrical products (e.g., cucumber and grape) during air cooling at the flow velocity of 2 m/s. As an experimental result, the thermal diffusivities of products were found to be 1.45{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for cucumber and 1.68{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for grape. It can be concluded that the present model is capable of determining the thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies during cooling in a simple and effective form.

  18. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Zhou, Zhongyu; Zhang, Chunbo; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2015-09-01

    The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG) is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5-6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  19. Resonance in cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound microstrip structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Sami M.; Kong, Jin AU; Habashy, Tarek M.; Kiang, Jean-Fu

    1989-01-01

    A rigorous analysis of the resonance frequency problem of both the cylindrical-rectangular and the wraparound microstrip structure is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of a set of vector integral equations. Using Galerkin's method to solve the integral equations, the complex resonance frequencies are studied with sinusoidal basis functions which incorporate the edge singularity. The complex resonance frequencies are computed using a perturbation approach. Modes suitable for resonator or antenna applications are investigated. The edge singularity of the patch current is shown to have no significant effect on the accuracy of the results. It is shown that the HE10 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches are more appropriate for resonator applications. The HE01 and TE01 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches, respectively, are efficient radiating modes.

  20. Rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering: Simulation of the reactive process

    SciTech Connect

    Depla, D.; Mahieu, S.; Van Aeken, K.; Leroy, W. P.; Haemers, J.; De Gryse, R.; Li, X. Y.; Bogaerts, A.

    2010-06-15

    A rotating cylindrical magnetron consists of a cylindrical tube, functioning as the cathode, which rotates around a stationary magnet assembly. In stationary mode, the cylindrical magnetron behaves similar to a planar magnetron with respect to the influence of reactive gas addition to the plasma. However, the transition from metallic mode to poisoned mode and vice versa depends on the rotation speed. An existing model has been modified to simulate the influence of target rotation on the well known hysteresis behavior during reactive magnetron sputtering. The model shows that the existing poisoning mechanisms, i.e., chemisorption, direct reactive ion implantation and knock on implantation, are insufficient to describe the poisoning behavior of the rotating target. A better description of the process is only possible by including the deposition of sputtered material on the target.

  1. WADM and radiation MHD simulations of compact multi-planar and cylindrical wire arrays at 1 MA currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaulov, A. A.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Williamson, K. M.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G. C.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Ouart, N. D.; Weller, M. E.

    2009-09-01

    The radiative performance of Z-pinches created by the imploding wire array loads is defined by the ablation and implosion dynamics of these loads. Both these processes can be effectively modeled by the Wire Ablation Dynamics Model (WADM), which extends the formalism exploited earlier for the cylindrical wire arrays to the loads of arbitrary geometries. The WADM calculates the ablation rates for each array wire and provides the important dynamic parameters, such as the specific mass and velocity of the imploding plasma, which can be used to estimate the shapes of the x-ray pre-pulse and, partially, the main x-ray burst. The applications of the WADM also extend to combined material wire array loads. The ablation and implosion dynamics of novel Prism Planar Wire Array (PPWA) and combined material (Mo/Al/Mo) Triple Planar Wire Array (TPWA) loads are discussed in detail. The combined WADM and radiation MHD simulation is applied to model the radiative performance of the precursor plasma column, created by the imploding stainless steel compact cylindrical wire array. As the radiation effects intensify with the mass accumulation at the array center, the simulation reveals the transformation of quasi-uniform precursor column into a heterogeneous plasma structure with strong density and temperature gradients. We find that radiative performance of the precursor plasma is greatly affected by the load geometry as well as by the wire material.

  2. Symmetry Group Formulation for Self-focusing of a Cylindrical Laser Beam in a Plasma with Nonlinearity Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantu, Subbarao; Uma, R.

    2000-10-01

    The nonlinear Schrodinger equation in cylindrical geometry with saturating nonlinearity like the ponderomotive or relativistic nonlinearity in a plasma is analysed with the help of Symmetry Group Analysis. The symmetry group of the equation is deduced and a fiber-preserving subgroup of linear transformations are identified that leave such a nonlinear Schrodinger equation invariant. The MACSYMA-based Lie algebra of the symmetry group is realized to the extent possible. The theory results in an ordinary differential equation apart from a dictated beam profile. The resulting ordinary differential equation for self-focusing is compared with similar equations obtained from other existing theories of self-focusing in cylindrical geometry like the modified paraxial theory based on harmonic-oscillator basis, the moments theory and the variational theory . New types of solutions are identified and the limitations of the different methods are indicated.Acknowledgements: Financial assistance of CSIR(India)(Research Project,03(0815)/97/ EMR-II) for this work is acknowledged.

  3. Ion velocity distributions in the presence of cylindrically symmetric electric field perturbations: the collision-free case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, John Zhen Guo; Ma, John Zhen Guo; St-Maurice, Jean-Pierre

    Because of the strong ambient magnetic field, particularly at ionospheric altitudes, the auroral regions are flush with cylindrical structures covering an impressive range of scales which include lower hybrid cavities on decameter scales, auroral rays on km scales and vortices on tens to hundreds of km scales. In addition, a plethora of in-situ magnetic field and electric field observations and groundbased radar observations strongly suggests that very large parallel current densities are triggered in the upper ionosphere. These observations and just simple geometric considerations have motivated us to study the ion velocity distributions that would accompany strong perpendicular electric fields in a cylindrically symmetric geometry. The applications of the work have to do with the transport coefficients in such regions as well as with local instrumental observations of distribution functions with particle detectors. We have evolved a kinetic theoretical framework in which we have obtained analytical solutions for a number of important limits. We have also developed a semi-numerical method by which to obtain the ion velocity distribution under more general conditions for which analytical solutions are not possible. Our presentation will focus strongly on collision-free results, which stem from the following assumptions: (1) a perpendicular electric field is introduced initially on a time scale that is fast compared to the local ion gyrofrequency (but slow compared to electron plasma and gyrofrequencies); (2) the ion collision frequency is much smaller than the ion gyrofrequency, so that we can calculate meaningful collisionfree solutions. We will present analytical solutions for the distribution functions and their velocity moments inside regions for which the electric field can be assumed to increase linearly with distance from the axis of the cylindrical region, this for a number of initial cylindrically symmetric density distributions. We will also present our

  4. Nonlinear Local Bending Response and Bulging Factors for Longitudinal and Circumferential Cracks in Pressurized Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a geometrically nonlinear finite element parametric study to determine curvature correction factors or bulging factors that account for increased stresses due to curvature for longitudinal and circumferential cracks in unstiffened pressurized cylindrical shells are presented. Geometric parameters varied in the study include the shell radius, the shell wall thickness, and the crack length. The major results are presented in the form of contour plots of the bulging factor as a function of two nondimensional parameters: the shell curvature parameter, lambda, which is a function of the shell geometry, Poisson's ratio, and the crack length; and a loading parameter, eta, which is a function of the shell geometry, material properties, and the applied internal pressure. These plots identify the ranges of the shell curvature and loading parameters for which the effects of geometric nonlinearity are significant. Simple empirical expressions for the bulging factor are then derived from the numerical results and shown to predict accurately the nonlinear response of shells with longitudinal and circumferential cracks. The numerical results are also compared with analytical solutions based on linear shallow shell theory for thin shells, and with some other semi-empirical solutions from the literature, and limitations on the use of these other expressions are suggested.

  5. Radiative Heat Transfer in Finite Cylindrical Enclosures with Nonhomogeneous Participating Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Pei-Feng; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a numerical solution for radiative heat transfer in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous participating media are presented. The geometry of interest is a finite axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure. The integral formulation for radiative transport is solved by the YIX method. A three-dimensional solution scheme is applied to two-dimensional axisymmetric geometry to simplify kernel calculations and to avoid difficulties associated with treating boundary conditions. As part of the effort to improve modeling capabilities for turbulent jet diffusion flames, predicted distributions for flame temperature and soot volume fraction are used to calculate radiative heat transfer from soot particles in such flames. It is shown that the nonhomogeneity of radiative property has very significant effects. The peak value of the divergence of radiative heat flux could be underestimated by 2 factor of 7 if a mean homogeneous radiative property is used. Since recent studies have shown that scattering by soot agglomerates is significant in flames, the effect of magnitude of scattering is also investigated and found to be nonnegligible.

  6. Indoor Light Performance of Coil Type Cylindrical Dye Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Gaurav; Ogomi, Yuhei; Pandey, Shyam S; Ma, Tingli; Hayase, Shuzi

    2016-04-01

    A very good performance under low/diffused light intensities is one of the application areas in which dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) can be utilized effectively compared to their inorganic silicon solar cell counterparts. In this article, we have investigated the 1 SUN and low intensity fluorescent light performance of Titanium (Ti)-coil based cylindrical DSSC (C-DSSC) using ruthenium based N719 dye and organic dyes such as D205 and Y123. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic results were analyzed for variable solar cell performances. Reflecting mirror with parabolic geometry as concentrator was also utilized to tap diffused light for indoor applications. Fluorescent light at relatively lower illumination intensities (0.2 mW/cm2 to 0.5 mW/cm2) were used for the investigation of TCO-less C-DSSC performance with and without reflector geometry. Furthermore, the DSSC performances were analyzed and compared with the commercially available amorphous silicon based solar cell for indoor applications. PMID:27451601

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Liquid He-4 near the Superfluid Transition in Restricted Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuanming

    2003-01-01

    We present measurements of the thermal conductivity near the superfluid transition of He-4 in confined geometries. The confinements we have studied include: cylindrical geometries with radii L=.5 and 1.0 microns, and parallel plates with 5 micron spacing. For L=1.0 microns, measurements at six pressures were conducted, whereas only SVP measurements have been done for other geometries. For the 1-D confinement in cylinders, the data are consistent with a universal scaling for all pressures at and above T(sub lambda). There are indications of breakdown of scaling and universality below T(sub lambda). For the 2-D confinement between parallel plates, the preliminary results indicate that the thermal conductivity is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Further analyses are needed to compare the 2-D results with those in bulk and 1-D confinement.

  8. Electro- and magnetostatics of topological insulators as modeled by planar, spherical, and cylindrical θ boundaries: Green's function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Ruiz, A.; Cambiaso, M.; Urrutia, L. F.

    2016-02-01

    The Green's function method is used to analyze the boundary effects produced by a Chern-Simons extension to electrodynamics. We consider the electromagnetic field coupled to a θ term that is piecewise constant in different regions of space, separated by a common interface Σ , the θ boundary, model which we will refer to as θ electrodynamics. This model provides a correct low-energy effective action for describing topological insulators. Features arising due to the presence of the boundary, such as magnetoelectric effects, are already known in Chern-Simons extended electrodynamics, and solutions for some experimental setups have been found with a specific configuration of sources. In this work we construct the static Green's function in θ electrodynamics for different geometrical configurations of the θ boundary, namely, planar, spherical and cylindrical θ -interfaces. Also, we adapt the standard Green's theorem to include the effects of the θ boundary. These are the most important results of our work, since they allow one to obtain the corresponding static electric and magnetic fields for arbitrary sources and arbitrary boundary conditions in the given geometries. Also, the method provides a well-defined starting point for either analytical or numerical approximations in the cases where the exact analytical calculations are not possible. Explicit solutions for simple cases in each of the aforementioned geometries for θ boundaries are provided. On the one hand, the adapted Green's theorem is illustrated by studying the problem of a pointlike electric charge interacting with a planar topological insulator with prescribed boundary conditions. On the other hand, we calculate the electric and magnetic static fields produced by the following sources: (i) a pointlike electric charge near a spherical θ boundary, (ii) an infinitely straight current-carrying wire near a cylindrical θ boundary and (iii) an infinitely straight uniformly charged wire near a

  9. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. III. Cylindrical approximations for heat waves traveling inwards

    SciTech Connect

    Berkel, M. van; Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Zwart, H. J.; Inagaki, S.; Baar, M. R. de

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a number of new explicit approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The approximations are based on the heat equation in cylindrical geometry using the symmetry (Neumann) boundary condition at the plasma center. This means that the approximations derived here should be used only to estimate transport coefficients between the plasma center and the off-axis perturbative source. If the effect of cylindrical geometry is small, it is also possible to use semi-infinite domain approximations presented in Part I and Part II of this series. A number of new approximations are derived in this part, Part III, based upon continued fractions of the modified Bessel function of the first kind and the confluent hypergeometric function of the first kind. These approximations together with the approximations based on semi-infinite domains are compared for heat waves traveling towards the center. The relative error for the different derived approximations is presented for different values of the frequency, transport coefficients, and dimensionless radius. Moreover, it is shown how combinations of different explicit formulas can be used to estimate the transport coefficients over a large parameter range for cases without convection and damping, cases with damping only, and cases with convection and damping. The relative error between the approximation and its underlying model is below 2% for the case, where only diffusivity and damping are considered. If also convectivity is considered, the diffusivity can be estimated well in a large region, but there is also a large region in which no suitable approximation is found. This paper is the third part (Part III) of a series of three papers. In Part I, the semi-infinite slab approximations have been treated. In Part II

  10. Acoustic scattering response of hierarchic honeycomb structures for cylindrical and spherical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Arun

    Sandwich panels with honeycomb core are often employed in structures for improved mechanical properties with lightweight. Honeycombs are defined by non-overlapping and periodic unit cells. Most research conducted on these sandwich panels focuses on stiffness and strength properties. The acoustic aspect of these panels has been focused on sound transmission loss. For acoustics, previous studies used effective honeycomb orthotropic elastic moduli based on Cartesian unit cell geometry to model the core as a homogeneous structure. While efficient, this modeling approach loses accuracy at higher frequencies. Furthermore, when used for curved panels, the effective moduli are only approximate. In this work, mechanical and acoustic characteristics of cylindrical and spherical honeycomb panels are studied using finite element analysis. The unit cell geometry core is oriented both radially and in the transverse direction. The models are analyzed for sound scattering measured by target strength with interactions between structure and the acoustic medium through coupling between the domains. Both air and water are compared for the acoustic region. Different honeycomb core geometries varying in the hexagon arrangement, number of unit cells and level of hierarchy are studied. The structures developed are constrained to have the same total mass allowing for comparisons based on only changes in stiffness properties. The effect of face sheet thickness on the mechanical and acoustic properties of the curved sandwich structures is also studied. The vibration and acoustic scattering behavior of these structures have been investigated for natural frequencies between 1-1000 Hz to predict and understand the different responses near and at resonances. The target strength response of the structures has been studied in the near field at both front and back of the structures. The effect of acoustic coupling is observed clearly on varying the outer domains properties between air and water. It

  11. CORRIGENDUM: A study of scaling and geometry effects on the forces between cuboidal and cylindrical magnets using analytical force solutions A study of scaling and geometry effects on the forces between cuboidal and cylindrical magnets using analytical force solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Janhavi S.; Arnold, David P.

    2009-05-01

    The first term in equation (17) should have 2 in the denominator instead of a. The correct equation should read \\begin{leqnarray} \\fl F_0=2\\pi \\mu _0M_0^2 \\Bigg(\\frac{a^2t}{2\\sqrt {a^2+4t^2} }+\\frac{3a^6t}{64(a^2+4t^2)^{{5}/{2}}}\

  12. Cylindrical diffuser axial detection profile is dependent on fiber design

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The axial emission and detection profiles of 1- and 2-cm cylindrical diffusing fibers based on concentration gradients of scatterers were measured. Based on these measurements, we describe a method for determination of the scatterer concentration gradient within the diffusers. Using a Monte Carlo model incorporating these concentrations, detection was simulated and found to agree with measurements. The measured and simulated detection profiles for these diffusers were found to be drastically different from those previously measured in an alternative diffuser design incorporating an end reflector. When using cylindrical diffusers as detection fibers, it is, therefore, important to understand the design of the fiber and characterize the detection behavior. PMID:25839428

  13. Stabilization Mechanisms and Burning Rates of Cylindrical Burner Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, J. A.; Law, C. K.; Zhu, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    A study is conducted of the structure and response of curved (but unstretched), cylindrically-symmetric 1D premixed flames from a cylindrical porous burner. The study has employed (1) activation-energy asymptotics with one-step reaction constant and constant properties; (2) a numerical computation which encompassed detailed chemistry and transport behavior, and (3) drop-tower microgravity tests. Attention was given to the relative importance of heat loss vs. flow divergence as the dominant mechanism for flame stabilization; the results show that, with increasing flow discharge rate, the dominant flame stabilization mechanism changes from heat loss to flow divergence.

  14. Postbuckling analysis of composite laminated cylindrical panels under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, J. H.; Hong, C. S.

    1993-08-01

    The nonlinear finite element method is used to analyze the postbuckling behavior of composite laminated cylindrical panels with various stacking sequences under compression. The analysis is based on the updated Lagrangian formulation, an eight-node degenerated shell element, and an improved load-increment method based on the arc-length scheme. Results reveal that the postbuckling loads carrying capacities of laminated cylindrical panels under compression are largely dependent on the bending stiffness component. Not only the buckling loads but also the postbuckling load-carrying capacities should be considered in designing the structure.

  15. Aerodynamic sound generation induced by flow over small, cylindrical cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on the production of high intensity tones by small cylindrical cavities in a flat surface. The application of such a mechanism is to the acoustic coding of moving objects containing drilled holes. The sound intensity and frequency have been determined as functions of flow velocity, diameter and depth of the cavities. As a practical matter, it is possible to produce a whistle producing 106 dB at 30.5 cm distance from a cylindrical hole of 0.5 cm diameter and 1.2 cm deep with an airflow of 60 m/s past the hole.

  16. Analytic descriptions of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A simple but highly efficient approach for dealing with the problem of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagation in a nonlinear medium is proposed based on an exact solution proposed recently. We derive an analytical explicit formula, which exhibiting rich interesting nonlinear effects, to describe the propagation of any amount of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium. The results obtained by using the present method are accurately concordant with the results of using traditional coupled-wave equations. As an example of application, we discuss how a third wave affects the sum- and difference-frequency generation of two waves propagation in the nonlinear medium. PMID:26073066

  17. Azimuthally-dependent Finite Element Solution to the Cylindrical Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osegueda, R.; Pierluissi, J.; Gil, L.; Revilla, A.; Villalva, G.; Dick, G.; Wang, D. SantiagoR.

    1994-01-01

    The cylindrical cavity resonator loaded with an anisotropic dielectric is analyzed as a two-dimensional problem using a finite element approach that assumes sinusoidal dependence in azimuth. This methodology allows the first finite element treatment of the technically important case of a resonator containing a sapphire element with a cylindrically aligned c axis. Second order trial functions together with quadrilateral elements are adopted in the calculations. The method was validated through comparisons with the analytical solutions for the hollow metal cavity and a coaxial cavity, as well as through measurements on a shielded sapphire resonator.

  18. Trapping of Microparticles in Cylindrical Standing Wave Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeongwon; Hwang, Haerang; Bae, Young Min; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyeol

    2013-07-01

    In this study, in order to determine the positions where microparticles are trapped in a cylindrical standing wave field, we derived equations giving the radiation force and potential energy distribution. Then, the trapped pattern and its variation with time in a hollow cylindrical transducer were simulated. The simulation results showed that polystyrene particles moved to and aggregated near positions corresponding to pressure nodes, which were estimated from the derived equations. These were confirmed by measurement. In addition, it was demonstrated that biological particles of the green algae chlorella show similar trapping phenomena to polystyrene particles.

  19. Experiments on cylindrically converging blast waves in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hideo; Nakamura, Yuichi

    1980-06-01

    Cylindrically converging blast waves have been produced in normal atmospheric conditions by the detonation of the explosives, pentaerythritoltetranitrate, (PETN), over cylindrical surfaces. The shocks generated in this way are so strong that the fronts propagating through the air become luminous of themselves. The production and the propagation of the shocks have been monitored with a framing camera and a streak camera, and the time-space relations of the shock propagations have been determined using an electrical ionization probing system. The results have shown that the trajectory of the shock fronts near the axis of the cylinder can be approximately represented by the Guderley's formula.

  20. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Hall, T.E.; Severtsen, R.H.

    1999-01-12

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system is disclosed including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image. 13 figs.

  1. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.

    1999-01-01

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image.

  2. Earthquake cycles in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanet, Pierre; Bhat, Harsha; Madariaga, Raul

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of earthquake cycles, from a modelling perspective, comes mainly from theoretical, and numerical, work on a single straight fault. However, natural fault systems are geometrically complex. Modelling complex fault geometry (bends, kinks and multiple faults) is in itself a challenge as it is computationally intensive. To overcome this difficulty, we appeal to the Fast Multipole Method which was developed in the context of modelling N-body problems. This method is then used to model the quasi-dynamic response of multiple faults, with complex geometries, that are governed by rate and state friction laws. Our preliminary findings tell us that when stress interaction between faults, due to complex geometry, is accounted then even strongly rate-weakening faults (a-b)<0 show a complex spectrum of slow slip and dynamic ruptures.

  3. Quantum geometry and gravitational entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joan; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Czech, Bart Iomiej; Larjo, Klaus; Marolf, Donald; Simon, Joan

    2007-05-29

    Most quantum states have wavefunctions that are widely spread over the accessible Hilbert space and hence do not have a good description in terms of a single classical geometry. In order to understand when geometric descriptions are possible, we exploit the AdS/CFT correspondence in the half-BPS sector of asymptotically AdS_5 x S5 universes. In this sector we devise a"coarse-grained metric operator" whose eigenstates are well described by a single spacetime topology and geometry. We show that such half-BPS universes have a non-vanishing entropy if and only if the metric is singular, and that the entropy arises from coarse-graining the geometry. Finally, we use our entropy formula to find the most entropic spacetimes with fixed asymptotic moments beyond the global charges.

  4. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  5. Individualized Geometry: A Geometry Unit for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geissler, Dennis; Larson, Richard

    This geometry unit for the intermediate grades is based on the Holt Mathematics Series (levels 3-6), using the concepts of Individually Guided Education (IGE). It is divided into seven levels, one for grade 3 and two each for grades 4-6. Each is designed for both individual and group learning. A vocabulary list is used as a key for activities; a…

  6. Geometry of generalized depolarizing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Christian K.

    2009-10-15

    A generalized depolarizing channel acts on an N-dimensional quantum system to compress the 'Bloch ball' in N{sup 2}-1 directions; it has a corresponding compression vector. We investigate the geometry of these compression vectors and prove a conjecture of Dixit and Sudarshan [Phys. Rev. A 78, 032308 (2008)], namely, that when N=2{sup d} (i.e., the system consists of d qubits), and we work in the Pauli basis then the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex. We extend this result by investigating the geometry in other bases; in particular we find precisely when the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex.

  7. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, Uday

    2003-07-10

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated.

  8. Fabric geometry distortion during composites processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Julie

    1994-01-01

    Waviness and tow misalignment are often cited as possible causes of data scatter and lower compression stiffness and strength in textile composites. Strength differences of as much as 40 percent have been seen in composites that appear to have the same basic material and structural properties -- i.e., yarn orientation, yarn size, interlacing geometry. Fabric geometry distortion has been suggested as a possible reason for this discrepancy, but little quantitative data or substantial evidence exists. The focus of this research is to contribute to the present understanding of the causes and effects of geometric distortion in textile composites. The initial part of the study was an attempt to gather qualitative information on a variety of textile structures. Existing and new samples confirmed that structures with a significant direction presence would be more susceptible to distortion due to the compaction process. Thus, uniweaves (fiber vol frac: 54-72 percent) biaxial braids (vf: 34-58 percent) demonstrated very little fabric geometry distortion. In stitched panels, only slight buckling of z-direction stitches was observed, primarily near the surface. In contrast, for structures with high compaction ratios -- e.g., large cylindrical yarns (2.5:1) orpowder towpreg (4:1) -- there were visible distortions where previously smooth and periodic undulations were transformed to abrupt changes in direction. A controlled study of the effect of forming pressure on distortion was conducted on type 162 glass plain weave fabrics. Panels (6 x 6 in) were produced via a resin infusion type setup, but with an EPON 815 epoxy resin. Pressures ranging from hand layup to 200 psi were used (vf: 34-54 percent). Photomicrographs indicated that at pressures up to 50 psi, large changes in thickness were due primarily to resin squeeze out. At higher pressures, when intimate contact was made between the layers, there was some tow flattening and in-plane shifting to optimize nesting. However

  9. The Effects of Specimen Geometry and Size on the Dynamic Failure of Aluminum Alloy 2219-T8 Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolling, Denzell Tamarcus

    A significant amount of research has been devoted to the characterization of new engineering materials. Searching for new alloys which may improve weight, ultimate strength, or fatigue life are just a few of the reasons why researchers study different materials. In support of that mission this study focuses on the effects of specimen geometry and size on the dynamic failure of AA2219 aluminum alloy subjected to impact loading. Using the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system different geometric samples including cubic, rectangular, cylindrical, and frustum samples are loaded at different strain rates ranging from 1000s-1 to 6000s-1. The deformation properties, including the potential for the formation of adiabatic shear bands, of the different geometries are compared. Overall the cubic geometry achieves the highest critical strain and the maximum stress values at low strain rates and the rectangular geometry has the highest critical strain and the maximum stress at high strain rates. The frustum geometry type consistently achieves the lowest the maximum stress value compared to the other geometries under equal strain rates. All sample types clearly indicated susceptibility to strain localization at different locations within the sample geometry. Micrograph analysis indicated that adiabatic shear band geometry was influenced by sample geometry, and that specimens with a circular cross section are more susceptible to shear band formation than specimens with a rectangular cross section.

  10. Forward and backward motion of artificial helical swimmers in cylindrical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acemoglu, Alperen; Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2013-11-01

    Motion of micro swimmers in confined geometries such as channels is important due to its relevance in in vivo medical applications such as minimally invasive surgery and drug delivery. Here, swimmers with diameters 0.8 mm and lengths 2 to 3 mm are produced with a 3D printer and cylindrical Nd2Fe14B magnets are placed inside the bodies. Rotating external magnetic field is used for the actuation of artificial swimmers. Different body and tail geometries are produced and experiments are conducted with a glycerol filled circular channel. Result demonstrate that decreasing channel diameter directly affects the forward motion of the swimmer due to the increasing drag. It is observed that step-out frequency, which defines maximum frequency at which the swimmer can establish a synchronous rotation with the external magnetic field, depends on the geometry of the swimmer and the channel diameter. There are significant differences between low and high frequency motion and forward and backward swimming. Longer tails enable higher forward velocities in high frequencies than backward ones, whereas forward and backward velocities are approximately the same at low frequencies. Furthermore backward motion is more stable than the forward one; at high frequencies, swimmers travel almost at the center of the channel for backward motion, and follow a helical trajectory near the wall during the forward motion. According to simulation results there is a flow which is induced by the rotation of the swimmer rotation that affects the swimmer's trajectory. We acknowledge the support from TUBITAK (Techonological & Research Council of Turkey) under the grant no: 111M376.

  11. Development of a Nodal Method for the Solution of the Neutron Diffusion Equation in General Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Terry, William Knox

    2002-04-01

    The usual strategy for solving the neutron diffusion equation in two or three dimensions by nodal methods is to reduce the multidimensional partial differential equation to a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in the separate spatial coordinates. This reduction is accomplished by “transverse integration” of the equation.1 For example, in three-dimensional Cartesian coordinates, the three-dimensional equation is first integrated over x and y to obtain an ODE in z, then over x and z to obtain an ODE in y, and finally over y and z to obtain an ODE in x. Then the ODEs are solved to obtain onedimensional solutions for the neutron fluxes averaged over the other two dimensions. These solutions are found in regions (“nodes”) small enough for the material properties and cross sections in them to be adequately represented by average values. Because the solution in each node is an exact analytical solution, the nodes can be much larger than the mesh elements used in finite-difference solutions. Then the solutions in the different nodes are coupled by applying interface conditions, ultimately fixing the solutions to the external boundary conditions.

  12. Effect of nozzle geometry on the performance of laser ablative propulsion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Jiao, Long; Tang, Zhiping; Hu, Xiaojun; Peng, Jie

    2016-05-01

    The performance of "ablation mode" laser propulsion thrusters can be improved obviously by nozzle constraint. The nozzle geometry of "ablation mode" laser propulsion thrusters has been studied experimentally with CO2 lasers. Experimental results indicate that the propulsion performance of cylindrical nozzle thrusters is better than expansionary nozzle thrusters at the same lengths. The cylindrical nozzle thrusters were optimized by different laser energies. The results show that two important factors, the length-to-diameter ratio α and the thruster diameter to laser-spot diameter ratio β, affect the propulsion performance of the thruster obviously. The momentum coupling coefficient C m increases with the increase of α, while C m increases at first and then decreases with the increase of β.

  13. LOGO Based Instruction in Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mian Muhammad

    The objective of this pretest-posttest Quasi-Experimental Design study was to determine the effects of LOGO Based Instruction (LBI) compared to instruction by teacher lecture and pencil-and-paper activities on: (1) students' understanding of the concepts of point, ray, line, and line segment; (2) students' attitudes toward learning geometry,…

  14. Exploring Bundling Theory with Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The author shows how instructors might successfully introduce students in principles and intermediate microeconomic theory classes to the topic of bundling (i.e., the selling of two or more goods as a package, rather than separately). It is surprising how much students can learn using only the tools of high school geometry. To be specific, one can…

  15. Computer Environments for Learning Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Battista, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research describing computer functions of construction-oriented computer environments and evaluates their contributions to students' learning of geometry. Topics discussed include constructing geometric concepts; the use of LOGO in elementary school mathematics; software that focuses on geometric construction; and implications for the…

  16. Dislocation dynamics in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, D.; Devincre, B.; Kubin, L.

    1999-05-01

    A simulation of dislocation dynamics has been used to calculate the critical stress for a threading dislocation moving in a confined geometry. The optimum conditions for conducting simulations in systems of various sizes, down to the nanometer range, are defined. The results are critically compared with the available theoretical and numerical estimates for the problem of dislocation motion in capped layers.

  17. Improving Student Reasoning in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Bobson; Bukalov, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    In their years of teaching geometry, Wong and Bukalov realized that the greatest challenge has been getting students to improve their reasoning. Many students have difficulty writing formal proofs--a task that requires a good deal of reasoning. Wong and Bukalov reasoned that the solution was to divide the lessons into parallel tasks, allowing…

  18. Foucault pendulum through basic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bergmann, Jens; von Bergmann, HsingChi

    2007-10-01

    We provide a thorough explanation of the Foucault pendulum that utilizes its underlying geometry on a level suitable for science students not necessarily familiar with calculus. We also explain how the geometrically understood Foucault pendulum can serve as a prototype for more advanced phenomena in physics known as Berry's phase or geometric phases.

  19. A Microcomputer Descriptive Geometry Tutorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zongyi, Zuo

    1990-01-01

    A software package which can aid descriptive geometry instruction is described. Included are the features of the software and the software configuration. This software has been honored as the best and most advanced software of its kind in the People's Republic of China. (KR)

  20. Exploring Fractal Geometry with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1999-01-01

    Heightens the awareness of elementary school teachers, teacher educators, and teacher-education researchers of possible applications of fractal geometry with children and, subsequently, initiates discussion about the appropriateness of including this new mathematics in the elementary curriculum. Presents activities for exploring children's…

  1. Logo Activities in Elementary Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libeskind, Shlomo; And Others

    These activities were designed for use at the University of Montana, where they were tested for four quarters in a mathematics for elementary teachers course on informal geometry. They are for use with Apple II-Plus computers with 64K memory or Apple IIe computers and MIT Logo. (Modifications are necessary if the activities are to be used with…

  2. Towards a Navajo Indian Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, Rik; And Others

    This book examines the Navajo system of spatial knowledge and describes a culture-based curriculum for the development of an intuitive geometry based on the child's experience of the physical world. Aspects of the Navajo cosmology relevant to spatial knowledge are discussed: the structure of the world; the dynamic nature of the universe;…

  3. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  4. Spectral geometry of symplectic spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2015-10-01

    Symplectic spinors form an infinite-rank vector bundle. Dirac operators on this bundle were constructed recently by Habermann, K. ["The Dirac operator on symplectic spinors," Ann. Global Anal. Geom. 13, 155-168 (1995)]. Here we study the spectral geometry aspects of these operators. In particular, we define the associated distance function and compute the heat trace asymptotics.

  5. Teaching Geometry According to Euclid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartshorne, Robin

    2000-01-01

    This essay contains some reflections and questions arising from encounters with the text of Euclid's Elements. The reflections arise out of the teaching of a course in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry to undergraduates. It is concluded that teachers of such courses should read Euclid and ask questions, then teach a course on Euclid and later…

  6. Noncommutative geometry inspired entropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Akhshabi, Siamak

    2011-06-01

    Recently Verlinde proposed that gravity can be described as an emergent phenomena arising from changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. By using noncommutative geometry as a way to describe the microscopic microstructure of quantum spacetime, we derive modified Friedmann equation in this setup and study the entropic force modifications to the inflationary dynamics of early universe.

  7. Van Hiele Guidelines for Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Geoff; Holliday, Jack

    1992-01-01

    Describes five skills underpinning the understanding of geometry for primary and lower secondary mathematics students. Skill categories identified include (1) visual; (2) verbal; (3) drawing; (4) logical; and (5) application. Gives examples of skills appropriate for Van Hiele levels 1-3. (MDH)

  8. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  9. The basics of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caticha, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    To what extent can we distinguish one probability distribution from another? Are there quantitative measures of distinguishability? The goal of this tutorial is to approach such questions by introducing the notion of the "distance" between two probability distributions and exploring some basic ideas of such an "information geometry".

  10. Computations of Viscous Flows in Complex Geometries Using Multiblock Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Ameri, Ali A.

    1995-01-01

    Generating high quality, structured, continuous, body-fitted grid systems (multiblock grid systems) for complicated geometries has long been a most labor-intensive and frustrating part of simulating flows in complicated geometries. Recently, new methodologies and software have emerged that greatly reduce the human effort required to generate high quality multiblock grid systems for complicated geometries. These methods and software require minimal input form the user-typically, only information about the topology of the block structure and number of grid points. This paper demonstrates the use of the new breed of multiblock grid systems in simulations of internal flows in complicated geometries. The geometry used in this study is a duct with a sudden expansion, a partition, and an array of cylindrical pins. This geometry has many of the features typical of internal coolant passages in turbine blades. The grid system used in this study was generated using a commercially available grid generator. The simulations were done using a recently developed flow solver, TRAF3D.MB, that was specially designed to use multiblock grid systems.

  11. Exact Faraday rotation in the cylindrical Einstein-Maxwell waves

    SciTech Connect

    Arafah, M.R.; Fakioglu, S.; Halilsoy, M. )

    1990-07-15

    We obtain the exact behavior of the cross-polarized cylindrical Einstein-Maxwell waves that generalizes the well-known Einstein-Rosen waves. In the presence of the second mode of polarization the outgoing waves interact with the incoming ones to exhibit an analogous effect of the Faraday rotation.

  12. A circumferential crack in a cylindrical shell under tension.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan-Fama, M. E.; Sanders, J. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A closed cylindrical shell under uniform internal pressure has a slit around a portion of its circumference. Linear shallow shell theory predicts inverse square-root-type singularities in certain of the stresses at the crack tips. This paper reports the computed strength of these singularities for different values of a dimensionless parameter based on crack length, shell radius and shell thickness.

  13. Cylindrical surface profile and diameter measuring tool and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, James R. (Inventor); Kissel, Ralph R. (Inventor); Smith, Earnest C. (Inventor); Oliver, Charles E. (Inventor); Redmon, John W., Sr. (Inventor); Wallace, Charles C. (Inventor); Swanson, Charles P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A tool is shown having a cross beam assembly made of beams joined by a center box structure. The assembly is adapted to be mounted by brackets to the outer end of a cylindrical case. The center box structure has a vertical shaft rotatably mounted therein and extending beneath the assembly. Secured to the vertical shaft is a radius arm which is adapted to rotate with the shaft. On the longer end of the radius arm is a measuring tip which contacts the cylindrical surface to be measured and which provides an electric signal representing the radius of the cylindrical surface from the center of rotation of the radius arm. An electric servomotor rotates the vertical shaft and an electronic resolver provides an electric signal representing the angle of rotation of the shaft. The electric signals are provided to a computer station which has software for its computer to calculate and print out the continuous circumference profile of the cylindrical surface, and give its true diameter and the deviations from the ideal circle.

  14. Buckling of angle-ply laminated circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirano, Y.

    1979-01-01

    This note presents closed-form solutions for axisymmetrical and axially unsymmetrical buckling of angle-ply laminated circular cylindrical shells under axial compression. The axisymmetrical and axially unsymmetrical buckling stress are found to be different from each other, and the best lamination angles which give the highest buckling stress are obtained.

  15. Radiation of electromagnetic waves by cylindrical ring antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovka, F. F.; Pantov, V. S.

    1991-05-01

    The radiation characteristics of cylindrical ring antennas are studied theoretically and experimentally. The internal and external boundary value problems of electrodynamics are solved using the variational method of partial regions and the Fourier transformation method, respectively. The adequacy of the theoretical model is demonstrated experimentally.

  16. Analysis of cylindrical Langmuir probe using experiment and different theories

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouba, M. A.; Galaly, A. R.; Rashed, U. M.

    2013-03-15

    Cylindrical probe data have been analyzed using different theories in order to determine some plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron and ion densities). Langmuir probe data are obtained in a cylindrical DC glow discharge in the positive column plasma at argon gas pressures varied from 0.5 to 6 Torr and at constant discharge current equal to 10 mA. The electron density has calculated from the electron current at the space potential and from Orbital Motion Limited (OML) collisionless theory. Ion density has obtained from the OML analysis of the ion saturation currents. In addition, the electron temperature has measured by three different methods using probe and electrons currents. The electron temperature T{sub e}, plasma density n{sub e}, and space potential V{sub s}, have been obtained from the measured single cylindrical probe I-V characteristic curves. The radial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density along the glow discharge are measured and discussed. Using the collisionless theories by Langmuir cylindrical probe and up to several Torr argon gas pressures the differences between the values of electron temperature and electron and ion densities stay within reasonable error limits.

  17. Calibrated cylindrical Mach probe in a plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Dandurand, D.; Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Lukin, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    A simple cylindrical Mach probe is described along with an independent calibration procedure in a magnetized plasma wind tunnel. A particle orbit calculation corroborates our model. The probe operates in the weakly magnetized regime in which probe dimension and ion orbit are of the same scale. Analytical and simulation models are favorably compared with experimental calibration.

  18. Screen of cylindrical lenses produces stereoscopic television pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nork, C. L.

    1966-01-01

    Stereoscopic television pictures are produced by placing a colorless, transparent screen of adjacent parallel cylindrical lenses before a raster from two synchronized TV cameras. Alternate frames from alternate cameras are displayed. The viewers sensory perception fuses the two images into one three-dimensional picture.

  19. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2006-05-01

    The wideband microwave or millimeter-wave cylindrical imaging technique has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for several applications including concealed weapon detection and automated body measurement for apparel fitting. This technique forms a fully-focused, diffraction-limited, three-dimensional image of the person or imaging target by scanning an inward-directed vertical array around the person or imaging target. The array is switched electronically to sequence across the array at high-speed, so that a full 360 degree mechanical scan over the cylindrical aperture can occur in 2-10 seconds. Wideband, coherent reflection data from each antenna position are recorded in a computer and subsequently reconstructed using an FFT-based image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. The cylindrical scanning configuration is designed to optimize the illumination of the target and minimize non-returns due to specular reflection of the illumination away from the array. In this paper, simulated modeling data are used to explore imaging issues that affect the cylindrical imaging technique. Physical optics scattering simulations are used to model realistic returns from curved surfaces to determine the extent to which specular reflection affects the signal return and subsequent image reconstruction from these surfaces. This is a particularly important issue for the body measurement application. Also, an artifact in the imaging technique, referred to as "circular convolution aliasing" is discussed including methods to reduce or eliminate it. Numerous simulated and laboratory measured imaging results are presented.

  20. Electron beam current in high power cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Menon, R.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Singh, S. K.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-01-15

    Intense electron beam generation studies were carried out in high power cylindrical diode to investigate the effect of the accelerating gap and diode voltage on the electron beam current. The diode voltage has been varied from 130 to 356 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 87 to 391 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam current in the cylindrical diode has been compared with the Langmuir-Blodgett law. It was found that the diode current can be explained by a model of anode and cathode plasma expanding toward each other. However, the diode voltage and current do not follow the bipolar space-charge limited flow model. It was also found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 4.2 cm/mus for 1.7 cm anode-cathode gap and the plasma velocity decreases for smaller gaps. The electrode plasma expansion velocity of the cylindrical diode is much smaller as compared with the planar diode for the same accelerating gap and diode voltage. Therefore, much higher voltage can be obtained for the cylindrical diodes as compared with the planar diodes for the same accelerating gap.