Science.gov

Sample records for cyprinid herpes virus-3

  1. Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HSV) in those who have genital sores or encephalitis and in newborns suspected of having neonatal herpes, ... DNA testing is ordered when a person has encephalitis that the doctor suspects may be caused by ...

  2. Herpes - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Genital herpes - resources; Resources - genital herpes ... The following organizations are good resources for information on genital herpes : March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/pregnancy/complications-herpes National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease -- ...

  3. Genital herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... herpes cannot be cured. Antiviral medicines (such as acyclovir or valcyclovir) may be prescribed. These medicines help ... infecting the baby. Side effects are rare with acyclovir and valcyclovir. Follow your health care provider's advice ...

  4. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surefire way to prevent genital herpes is abstinence . Teens who do have sex must properly use a latex condom every time they have any form of sexual intercourse (vaginal, oral, or anal sex). Girls receiving oral sex should have their ...

  5. Herpes Zoster Oticus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Herpes Zoster Oticus Information Page Synonym(s): Ramsay Hunt Syndrome II ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Herpes Zoster Oticus? Herpes zoster oticus, also called Ramsay Hunt ...

  6. Meet the Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the characteristics of "herps" (amphibians and reptiles). Contains teaching activities dealing with ancient herps, learning stations that encourage sensory experiences with herps, and games, puzzles, and a dramatic play about herps. Includes reproducible handouts designed to be used with the activities, as well as a quiz. (TW)

  7. Herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) or ‘shingles’ is a painful vesicular rash resulting from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus that also causes chickenpox. The incidence of HZ infection (HZI) increases with age and the degree of immunosuppresssion. Post herpetic neuralgia, the most common complication of HZ, occurs after the zoster rash has resolved. Conventional therapies include antivirals, corticosteroids and analgesics, both oral and topical. Here we report a case of HZ in an 80-year-old woman involving maxillary nerve and the article also reviews various treatment modalities available for the management of HZI. PMID:23771975

  8. Phylogenetic relationships of Iberian cyprinids: systematic and biogeographical implications.

    PubMed Central

    Zardoya, R; Doadrio, I

    1998-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among all Iberian endemic cyprinids were inferred using the complete nucleotide sequence of the cytochrome b gene. The inferred molecular phylogeny included representatives from Central European, Asian and North African species, and is highly congruent with previous phylogenies based on osteological characters. Iberian cyprinids were grouped into only five, very speciose lineages (with the exception of the monotypic Anaecypris): Barbus, Luciobarbus, Chondrostoma, Leuciscus and Anaecypris. The existence of such a relatively small number of Iberian cyprinid lineages can be explained by the historical isolation of the Iberian Peninsula. North African and Asian barbels are the sister group of Iberian Luciobarbus, supporting a south-eastern route of colonization of the Iberian Peninsula for this subgenus. With leuciscins, Anaecypris hispanica was considered a relict species as it could not be related to any other Iberian cyprinid. The phylogenetic relationships among the main lineages of Iberian cyprinids based on cytochrome b sequence data supported the traditional division of the Cyprinidae into two subfamilies: Cyprininae and Leuciscinae. PMID:9718739

  9. Food Poisonings by Ingestion of Cyprinid Fish

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Manabu; Noguchi, Tamao

    2014-01-01

    Raw or dried gallbladders of cyprinid fish have long been ingested as a traditional medicine in the Asian countries, particularly in China, for ameliorating visual acuity, rheumatism, and general health; however, sporadic poisoning incidences have occurred after their ingestion. The poisoning causes complex symptoms in patients, including acute renal failure, liver dysfunction, paralysis, and convulsions of limbs. The causative substance for the poisoning was isolated, and its basic properties were examined. The purified toxin revealed a minimum lethal dose of 2.6 mg/20 g in mouse, when injected intraperitoneally. The main symptoms were paralysis and convulsions of the hind legs, along with other neurological signs. Liver biopsy of the euthanized mice clearly exhibited hepatocytes necrosis and infiltration of neutrophils and lymphocytes, suggesting the acute dysfunction of the liver. Blood tests disclosed the characteristics of acute renal failure and liver injury. Infrared (IR) spectrometry, fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry, and 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis indicated, a molecular formula of C27H48O8S, containing a sulfate ester group for the toxin. Thus, we concluded that the structure of carp toxin to be 5?-cyprinol sulfate (5?-cholestane-3?, 7?, 12?, 26, 27-pentol 26-sulfate). This indicated that carp toxin is a nephro- and hepato- toxin, which could be the responsible toxin for carp bile poisoning in humans. PMID:24476713

  10. Pregnancy and herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lethargy Low body temperature (hypothermia) Poor feeding Seizures Shock Skin lesions, fluid-filled blisters Herpes that is ... for the effects of herpes infection, such as shock or seizures. Because these babies are very ill, ...

  11. Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... defenses and make it easier to get HIV infection. A recent study found that people with HSV had three times ... significant reduction in HIV viral load. However, another study found that treating genital herpes did not prevent new HIV infections. People with both HIV and HSV also need ...

  12. Shingles (Herpes Zoster)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Shingles Home About Shingles Overview Signs & Symptoms Transmission Complications ...

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... involve the brain and its lining to cause encephalitis and meningitis. In the newborn, herpes viruses cause ... or even death. Herpes simplex viruses also cause encephalitis, an infection of the brain. Children with encephalitis ...

  14. DNA methyltransferase induced by frog virus 3.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, D B; Goorha, R; Granoff, A

    1984-01-01

    Over 20% of the cytosine bases in frog virus 3 DNA are methylated at the 5-carbon position. To determine whether this high degree of methylation is the result of a virus-specific enzyme, we examined the kinetics of induction and the substrate specificity of a DNA methyltransferase from frog virus 3-infected fathead minnow cells. A novel DNA methyltransferase activity appeared in the cytoplasm of infected cells at 3 h postinfection. This activity was induced in the absence of viral DNA replication and was therefore probably an early viral enzyme. In contrast to the methyltransferase activity extracted from uninfected cell nuclei, the cytoplasmic enzyme showed a strong template preference for double-stranded over single-stranded and for unmethylated over hemimethylated DNA. The dinucleotide sequence dCpdG was a necessary and sufficient exogenous substrate for methylation in vitro. A mutant of frog virus 3, isolated as resistant to 5-azacytidine and having unmethylated virion DNA, did not induce cytoplasmic DNA methyltransferase, leading to the conclusion that this activity is coded for by the virus. Images PMID:6690723

  15. Hands-on Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity to help primary, intermediate, and advanced students learn about and compare the general characteristics of reptiles and amphibians. Suggests "herp stations" to provide experiences. Details materials, background and procedures necessary for using this activity. (CW)

  16. Validation of Daily Growth Increment Formation in the Otoliths of Juvenile Cyprinid Fishes from the Brazos River, Texas

    E-print Network

    Wilde, Gene

    Validation of Daily Growth Increment Formation in the Otoliths of Juvenile Cyprinid Fishes from attempts to assess the validity of age estimates, particularly those based on otolith microstructure. We assessed the periodicity of growth increment formation in the otoliths of three species of cyprinid from

  17. Herpes zoster vaccine in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia deteriorate the quality of life because of severe pain and complications, and cause considerable social and economic burden of disease. In 2012, herpes zoster vaccine was released in Korea. The efficacy of herpes zoster vaccine is known to be 51.3-66.5% among the aged over 60 and 69.8-72.4% among adults between 50 and 59. It is also known that preventive efficacy is maintained for at least 5 years. Although there can be local reactions such as redness, pain and swelling at the site of injection and systemic reaction such as headache and eruption after herpes zoster vaccination, most of the adverse reactions are minor and disappear within days by themselves. As it is a live vaccine, persons with severe immune-suppression and pregnant women should not be vaccinated with the vaccine. Currently, Korean Society of Infectious Diseases recommended for the aged over 60 to be vaccinated with herpes zoster vaccine by subcutaneous route. In this article, clinical aspects and burden of disease of herpes zoster, efficacy and effects of herpes zoster vaccine, and herpes zoster vaccine recommendation by Korean Society of Infectious Diseases are discussed. PMID:23858399

  18. [Herpes zoster in hematology patients].

    PubMed

    Turkot, L A; Donets', I A; Kmita, V V

    1993-01-01

    A clinical course of herpes zoster in hematological patients (chronic lympholeukosis, lymphogranulomatosis, acute leucosis, myeloma disease, chronic agranulocytosis) is presented. These patients exhibited a more severe course of herpes zoster that is caused by immunodeficiency state. It is judicious to treat the patients with reaferon. PMID:8191711

  19. Vision in two cyprinid fish: implications for collective behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bret A.; Tyrrell, Luke P.; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Many species of fish rely on their visual systems to interact with conspecifics and these interactions can lead to collective behavior. Individual-based models have been used to predict collective interactions; however, these models generally make simplistic assumptions about the sensory systems that are applied without proper empirical testing to different species. This could limit our ability to predict (and test empirically) collective behavior in species with very different sensory requirements. In this study, we characterized components of the visual system in two species of cyprinid fish known to engage in visually dependent collective interactions (zebrafish Danio rerio and golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas) and derived quantitative predictions about the positioning of individuals within schools. We found that both species had relatively narrow binocular and blind fields and wide visual coverage. However, golden shiners had more visual coverage in the vertical plane (binocular field extending behind the head) and higher visual acuity than zebrafish. The centers of acute vision (areae) of both species projected in the fronto-dorsal region of the visual field, but those of the zebrafish projected more dorsally than those of the golden shiner. Based on this visual sensory information, we predicted that: (a) predator detection time could be increased by >1,000% in zebrafish and >100% in golden shiners with an increase in nearest neighbor distance, (b) zebrafish schools would have a higher roughness value (surface area/volume ratio) than those of golden shiners, (c) and that nearest neighbor distance would vary from 8 to 20 cm to visually resolve conspecific striping patterns in both species. Overall, considering between-species differences in the sensory system of species exhibiting collective behavior could change the predictions about the positioning of individuals in the group as well as the shape of the school, which can have implications for group cohesion. We suggest that more effort should be invested in assessing the role of the sensory system in shaping local interactions driving collective behavior. PMID:26290783

  20. Interdemic variation in haematocrit and lactate dehydrogenase in the African cyprinid Barbus

    E-print Network

    Fussman, Gregor

    in these traits correlates with the environmental dissolved oxygen concentrations. A related objective. neumayeri vary according to the dissolved oxygen concentrations measured in the field. When compared cyprinid Barbus neumayeri from Rwembaita Swamp (low-oxygen) and Njuguta River (high-oxygen) in the Kibale

  1. Genital herpes: a review.

    PubMed

    Beauman, John G

    2005-10-15

    Genital herpes simplex virus infection is a recurrent, lifelong disease with no cure. The strongest predictor for infection is a person's number of lifetime sex partners. The natural history includes first-episode mucocutaneous infection, establishment of latency in the dorsal root ganglion, and subsequent reactivation. Most infections are transmitted via asymptomatic viral shedding. Classic outbreaks consist of a skin prodrome and possible constitutional symptoms such as headache, fever, and inguinal lymphadenopathy. As the infection progresses, papules, vesicles on an erythematous base, and erosions appear over hours to days. These lesions usually crust, re-epithelialize, and heal without scarring. First-episode infections are more extensive: primary lesions last two to six weeks versus approximately one week for lesions in recurrent disease. Atypical manifestations are common. Infected persons experience a median of four recurrences per year after their first episode, but rates vary greatly. Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 recurs six times more frequently than type 1. Viral culture is preferred over polymerase chain reaction testing for diagnosis. Serologic testing can be useful in persons with a questionable history. Effective oral antiviral medications are available for initial, episodic, and suppressive therapy but are not a cure. There is some evidence that alternative therapies such as L-lysine, zinc, and some herbal preparations may offer some benefit. Counseling patients about the risk of transmission is crucial and helps prevent the spread of disease and neonatal complications. PMID:16273819

  2. The Significance of Herpes Simplex for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensor, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    Herpes simplex is a common recurrent viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. The two closely related but distinct viruses that cause herpes simplex infections are herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2). HSV-1 is commonly associated with infections around the oral mucosa and is the cause of herpes labialis, often referred…

  3. Reading Recovery Following Herpes Encephalitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, C. D.; Peters, Phyllis

    1979-01-01

    The article presents the medical, psychological, and reading diagnoses of a 24-year-old man with herpes encephalitis, an acute neurological disease. Test results are reported and the client's response to learning disability remedial techniques are reviewed. (SBH)

  4. Melissa Kaplan's Herp Care Collection

    E-print Network

    Denardo, Dale

    Melissa Kaplan's Herp Care Collection Last updated August 17, 2002 The Use of Hormone Antagonists, a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, intracoelomically into leopard geckos, Eublepharis macularius. All females further follicular growth or ovulation. Eight of nine tamoxifen females successfully reproduced

  5. Oyster herpes-type virus.

    PubMed

    Farley, C A; Banfield, W G; Kasnic, G; Foster, W S

    1972-11-17

    A herpes-type virus infection, the first to be found in an invertebrate animal, is reported in the oyster Crassostrea virginica. Intranuclear herpes-type viral inclusions were more prevalent in the oyster at elevated water temperatures of 28 degrees to 30 degrees C than at normal ambient temperatures of 18 degrees to 20 degrees C. The inclusions were associated with a lethal disease at the elevated temperatures. PMID:5082840

  6. Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Hans J.; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.; Bester, Rachelle; Chooi, Kar Mun; Cohen, Daniel; Dolja, Valerian V.; Fuchs, Marc F.; Golino, Deborah A.; Jooste, Anna E. C.; Martelli, Giovanni P.; Naidu, Rayapati A.; Rowhani, Adib; Saldarelli, Pasquale; Burger, Johan T.

    2013-01-01

    Grapevine leafroll disease (GLD) is one of the most important grapevine viral diseases affecting grapevines worldwide. The impact on vine health, crop yield, and quality is difficult to assess due to a high number of variables, but significant economic losses are consistently reported over the lifespan of a vineyard if intervention strategies are not implemented. Several viruses from the family Closteroviridae are associated with GLD. However, Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3), the type species for the genus Ampelovirus, is regarded as the most important causative agent. Here we provide a general overview on various aspects of GLRaV-3, with an emphasis on the latest advances in the characterization of the genome. The full genome of several isolates have recently been sequenced and annotated, revealing the existence of several genetic variants. The classification of these variants, based on their genome sequence, will be discussed and a guideline is presented to facilitate future comparative studies. The characterization of sgRNAs produced during the infection cycle of GLRaV-3 has given some insight into the replication strategy and the putative functionality of the ORFs. The latest nucleotide sequence based molecular diagnostic techniques were shown to be more sensitive than conventional serological assays and although ELISA is not as sensitive it remains valuable for high-throughput screening and complementary to molecular diagnostics. The application of next-generation sequencing is proving to be a valuable tool to study the complexity of viral infection as well as plant pathogen interaction. Next-generation sequencing data can provide information regarding disease complexes, variants of viral species, and abundance of particular viruses. This information can be used to develop more accurate diagnostic assays. Reliable virus screening in support of robust grapevine certification programs remains the cornerstone of GLD management. PMID:23596440

  7. Selective Herbivory by an Invasive Cyprinid, the Rudd Scardinius erythrophthalmus

    SciTech Connect

    Kapuscinski, Kevin L; John, Farrell M; Stehman, Stephen V; Boyer, Gregory L; Fernando, Danilo D; Teece, Mark A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    1. Herbivory by non-native animals is a problem of growing concern globally, especially for ecosystems where significant native herbivores did not previously exist or have been replaced by non-natives. The rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus) is an omnivorous cyprinid that has a nearly global longitudinal distribution due to human translocations, yet it is unknown whether the rudd feeds selectively among aquatic macrophyte species common to North American waters. 2. We tested a null hypothesis of non-selective feeding by rudds using five species of aquatic macrophytes: Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea canadensis, Najas flexilis, Stuckenia pectinata, and Vallisneria americana. Four rudds were placed in 15 different 890-L tanks and presented with known quantities of each macrophyte species (each tank serving as a block in a randomized complete block design). Each macrophyte bundle was weighed on six dates during a 13 d experiment. Differences in mean percent weight remaining among macrophyte species were tested using repeated measures analysis of variance. We also quantified differences among chemical attributes of the five macrophyte species and qualitatively determined if selective feeding by rudds was related to dry matter content (DMC), percent C by dry weight (%C), percent N by dry weight (%N), and the concentrations of total soluble proteins, two organic acids (aconitic and oxalic acid), total soluble phenolic compounds (<1,000 Da), nine soluble phenolic metabolites, and total phenolic compounds. 3. Selective feeding by rudds was evident, with the order of macrophyte removal (from highest to lowest) being: N. flexilis > E. canadensis > S. pectinata > V. americana > C. demersum. Selection was positively related to %C and atomic C:N, but not DMC, %N, or concentration of total soluble proteins, contrary to the expectation that rudds would select the most nutritious plants available. The concentration of aconitic acid was greatest in N. flexilis, a preferred macrophyte, contrary to the expectation that this compound provides resistance to herbivory. The concentration of oxalic acid, which negatively affects palatability, was highest in C. demersum, the least preferred macrophyte. Selection was also positively related to the concentration of total soluble phenolic compounds; however, examination of the influence of specific phenolic metabolites provided further insights. Concentrations of caffeic acid, trans-caftaric acid, and quercetin were positively related to macrophyte preference by rudds, whereas concentrations of cis-4-O- and trans-4-O-ferulic acid glucoside were negatively related. Patterns between the concentrations of p-coumaric acid, rosmarinic acid, and macrophyte preference by rudds were less obvious. 4. Our results suggest that selective feeding by rudds has the potential to alter macrophyte assemblages and jeopardize habitat restoration projects seeking to establish a diverse plant assemblage. Studies of selective herbivory by various aquatic taxa have provided evidence that selection is simultaneously influenced by multiple plant characteristics, including nutritional quality, morphology, rigidity, and chemical defenses. Future research designed to elucidate the mechanisms by which specific chemical attributes of macrophytes influence selective herbivory by rudds and other taxa will help provide an understanding of how herbivores have changed macrophyte assemblages and make predictions about how macrophyte assemblages will be altered following biological invasions.

  8. Psychosocial Treatment for Recurrent Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, David J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assigned 21 individuals with recurrent genital herpes to psychosocial intervention, social support, or waiting-list control conditions. Those receiving psychosocial intervention (herpes simplex virus information, relaxation training, stress management instructions, and an imagery technique) reported significantly greater reductions in herpes

  9. Morphometric and Histological Changes in Cyprinid Loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, in the Early Growth Period

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyoung Kyun; Lim, Sang Gu; Kang, Jung Ha; Choi, Jae Wook; Gil, Hyun Woo; Cho, Sung Hwoan; Lim, Sun-Young; Park, In-Seok

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we measured the morphometric and histological changes in the cyprinid loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, during the early period of growth. Eyes, yolk length, yolk height, and yolk volume of the larva decreased for 16 days post hatching (DPH) (P<0.05). During 60 DPH (P>0.05), the most anterior extension of the head × the posterior end of the supraoccipital, the most anterior extension of the head × the origin of the dorsal fin, the most anterior extension of the head × the origin of the pectoral fin, the posterior end of the supraoccipital × the origin of the pelvic fin, and the origin of the dorsal fin × the ventral origin of the caudal fin gradually decreased, whereas the most anterior extension of the head × the dorsal origin of the caudal fin, the origin of the dorsal fin × the origin of the anal fin, the origin of the dorsal fin × the origin of the pectoral fin, and the insertion of the dorsal fin × the origin of the pelvic fin gradually increased (P<0.05). In the cyprinid loach, the retina is composed of six layers: the epithelial layer, ganglion cell layer, inner nuclear layer, inner plexiform layer, outer limiting membrane, and rod and cone layer (RCL). After hatching, part of the RCL gradually increased in density. The kidney and midgut epithelium were already formed in the cyprinid loach just after hatching and grew gradually in subsequent days. PMID:25949133

  10. Let's Hear It for Herps!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Let's Hear It for the Herps!" Contents are organized into the following…

  11. Herpes: Removing Fact from Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Elbert D.

    1984-01-01

    Factual information dealing with the virus herpes is provided in hopes of allaying the public fears that have recently appeared because of misinformation presented by the media. Symptoms, types, and new developments in treatment are explored. Recommendations for obtaining additional information are offered. (DF)

  12. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 ...3305 Herpes simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification . Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices that consist of...

  13. Host specificity and colony impacts of Solenopsis invicta virus 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thorough understanding of host specificity is essential before pathogens can be used as biopesticides or self-sustaining biocontrol agents. In order to define the host range of the recently discovered Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3), we exposed colonies of 19 species of ants in 14 different g...

  14. Isolation of Frog Virus 3 from Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus)

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    Isolation of Frog Virus 3 from Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) Suggests an Interclass Host #12;· Pallid Sturgeon Conservation within the Missouri River Basin ­ History of the decline · Significance & Future Directions Topics Covered #12;Decline of Pallid Sturgeon within the Missouri River Basin

  15. Natural remedies for Herpes simplex.

    PubMed

    Gaby, Alan R

    2006-06-01

    Herpes simplex is a common viral infection of the skin or mucous membranes. The lesions caused by this infection are often painful, burning, or pruritic, and tend to recur in most patients. Short-term treatment with acyclovir can accelerate the healing of an acute outbreak, and continuous acyclovir therapy is often prescribed for people with frequent recurrences. While this drug can reduce the recurrence rate by 60-90 percent, it can also cause a wide array of side effects, including renal failure, hepatitis, and anaphylaxis. Safe and effective alternatives are therefore needed. There is evidence that certain dietary modifications and natural substances may be useful for treating active Herpes simplex lesions or preventing recurrences. Treatments discussed include lysine, vitamin C, zinc, vitamin E, adenosine monophosphate, and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis). PMID:16813459

  16. Polyneuritis cranialis following herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishna, H; Malakondaiah, T; Reddy, I C; Saheb, D M

    2000-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a common clinical condition involving cranial nerves. We encountered 3 cases in which multiple cranial nerves were involved besides the commoner ones. All the three cases were treated with acyclovir and oral steroids. Recovery of motor function was only partial in all three cases when reviewed 2 months after discharge. The clinical details and a brief review of literature are presented. PMID:20877098

  17. Rational development of an attenuated recombinant cyprinid herpesvirus 3 vaccine using prokaryotic mutagenesis and in vivo bioluminescent imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is causing severe economic losses worldwide in the carp industry, and a safe and efficacious attenuated vaccine compatible with mass vaccination is needed. We produced single deleted recombinants using prokaryotic mutagenesis. When producing a recombinant lacking open...

  18. Autism and Herpes Simplex Encephalitis. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents two case studies of children who developed herpes virus infection in the intrauterine or early postnatal period and presented with features of autism around two years of age. Other research suggesting a link between herpes and autism is reviewed. (DB)

  19. Experiential Interventions for Clients with Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1999-01-01

    Explores potential benefits of incorporating concepts and interventions from experimental therapy to help clients with psychosocial difficulties in learning to live with genital herpes. Recommends experimental counseling of two-chair dialog, empty chair, and metaphor for helping clients with emotional sequelae of genital herpes. Presents case…

  20. Herpes in Dyadic Relationships: Patterns and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drob, Sanford; Bernard, Harold S.

    1985-01-01

    Explores how dyadic relationships can be affected when one partner suffers from genital herpes. Six patterns are described: When One Partner Does Not Know, The Compromise Relationship, The Enraged Partner, The Mark of Guilt, Problems in Risk Management, and Herpes Used as Weapon. Treatment strategies for dealing with patterns are offered.…

  1. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices... herpes simplex virus in serum. Additionally, some of the assays consist of herpes simplex virus...

  2. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement. PMID:26154662

  3. [Update on Herpes Simplex Encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), which is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), is a severe neuro-infectious disease characterized by high mortality and morbidity. We reviewed the pathomechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of HSE based on recent progress in the field. The highlighted mechanism of HSE in this review is immune-mediated tissue damage caused by host immunity. Major symptoms of HSE include psychiatric alteration, Klüver-Bucy syndrome, and amnesia, caused by frequent involvement of the limbic system. An important differential diagnosis of HSE is autoimmune limbic encephalitis, including anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis, and anti-voltage-gated K+ channel encephalitis. HSE is definitely diagnosed based on the detection of HSV-DNA by polymerase chain reaction and/or the detection of HSV-IgG antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Repeated CSF examinations are required for the accurate diagnosis of HSE. Acyclovir (ACV) plays a central role in the treatment of HSE, and its early initiation is essential for good outcome in patients with HSE. Acute administration of corticosteroids for HSE is controversial; a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of add-on corticosteroids to ACV is ongoing. PMID:26160820

  4. Severe complications of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    The usual presentation of herpes zoster is as a self-limiting vesicular rash, often accompanied by post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), its most common complication. However, herpes zoster can give rise to other complications, many of which have unusual presentations and serious sequelae. The incidence and burden of many of these less common complications are poorly understood. Ocular complications of ophthalmic zoster are relatively frequent but, with early antiviral therapy, need not be sight-threatening. Delayed contralateral hemiparesis is a rare complication of ophthalmic zoster that may present as stroke, temporally remote from the zoster episode. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) involving the facial nerve; facial paralysis, ear pain and vesicles in the ear are diagnostic. Facial paralysis in the absence of vesicles may indicate zoster sine herpete, which can be mistaken for Bell's palsy. Herpetic facial palsies may respond to combination therapy with an antiviral plus steroid, but further research is needed to determine the benefit of such treatments. PMID:17939894

  5. Update on herpes zoster vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Marla; Kvern, Brent; Watson, Peter; Guenther, Lyn; McElhaney, Janet; McGeer, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To answer frequently asked questions surrounding the use of the new herpes zoster (HZ) vaccine. Sources of information Published results of clinical trials and other studies, recommendations from the Canadian National Advisory Committee on Immunization, and the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; data were also obtained from the vaccine’s Health Canada–approved product monograph. Main message Herpes zoster results from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus; postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is its most common and serious complication. The incidence of PHN after HZ is directly related to age, with 50% of affected individuals older than 60 years experiencing persistent and unrelieved pain. The live virus HZ vaccine reduces the incidence of HZ by about 50% and the occurrence of PHN by two-thirds, with vaccinated individuals experiencing attenuated or shortened symptoms. The vaccine is contraindicated in many immunocompromised patients and might not be effective in patients taking antiviral medications active against the HZ virus. Physicians should be aware of the different recommendations for these groups. Conclusion The HZ vaccine is a safe and effective preventive measure for reducing the overall burden and severity of HZ in older adults. The vaccine appears to be cost-effective when administered to adults aged 60 years and older. PMID:21998225

  6. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3: an interesting virus for applied and fundamental research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), a member of the family Alloherpesviridae is the causative agent of a lethal, highly contagious and notifiable disease in common and koi carp. The economic importance of common and koi carp industries together with the rapid spread of CyHV-3 worldwide, explain why this virus became soon after its isolation in the 1990s a subject of applied research. In addition to its economic importance, an increasing number of fundamental studies demonstrated that CyHV-3 is an original and interesting subject for fundamental research. In this review, we summarized recent advances in CyHV-3 research with a special interest for studies related to host-virus interactions. PMID:24073814

  7. Vibrio vulnificus necrotizing fasciitis preceding herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kelli Y.; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2013-01-01

    A 74-year-old white man presented with unilateral radicular pain extending across the left side of his chest and back. A diagnosis of postherpetic neuralgia, a sequela of herpes zoster, was made. Herpes zoster represents a reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that lies dormant in patients with past chickenpox. Risk factors for the disease include advanced age, stress, immunodeficiency, and immunosuppression. Treatment of herpes zoster entails traditional antiviral medications, while prevention may be achieved with a new prophylactic vaccine. PMID:23382617

  8. Barcoding and Border Biosecurity: Identifying Cyprinid Fishes in the Aquarium Trade

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Rupert A.; Armstrong, Karen F.; Meier, Rudolf; Yi, Youguang; Brown, Samuel D. J.; Cruickshank, Robert H.; Keeling, Suzanne; Johnston, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Background Poorly regulated international trade in ornamental fishes poses risks to both biodiversity and economic activity via invasive alien species and exotic pathogens. Border security officials need robust tools to confirm identifications, often requiring hard-to-obtain taxonomic literature and expertise. DNA barcoding offers a potentially attractive tool for quarantine inspection, but has yet to be scrutinised for aquarium fishes. Here, we present a barcoding approach for ornamental cyprinid fishes by: (1) expanding current barcode reference libraries; (2) assessing barcode congruence with morphological identifications under numerous scenarios (e.g. inclusion of GenBank data, presence of singleton species, choice of analytical method); and (3) providing supplementary information to identify difficult species. Methodology/Principal Findings We sampled 172 ornamental cyprinid fish species from the international trade, and provide data for 91 species currently unrepresented in reference libraries (GenBank/Bold). DNA barcodes were found to be highly congruent with our morphological assignments, achieving success rates of 90–99%, depending on the method used (neighbour-joining monophyly, bootstrap, nearest neighbour, GMYC, percent threshold). Inclusion of data from GenBank (additional 157 spp.) resulted in a more comprehensive library, but at a cost to success rate due to the increased number of singleton species. In addition to DNA barcodes, our study also provides supporting data in the form of specimen images, morphological characters, taxonomic bibliography, preserved vouchers, and nuclear rhodopsin sequences. Using this nuclear rhodopsin data we also uncovered evidence of interspecific hybridisation, and highlighted unrecognised diversity within popular aquarium species, including the endangered Indian barb Puntius denisonii. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that DNA barcoding provides a highly effective biosecurity tool for rapidly identifying ornamental fishes. In cases where DNA barcodes are unable to offer an identification, we improve on previous studies by consolidating supplementary information from multiple data sources, and empower biosecurity agencies to confidently identify high-risk fishes in the aquarium trade. PMID:22276096

  9. Proteins solubilized from frog virus 3 particles: effect on transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Aubertin, A M; Travo, C; Kirn, A

    1976-01-01

    The treatment of KB cells with viral proteins solubilized from frog virus 3 particles (SVE) induced a rapid shutoff of host RNA synthesis. The RNA polymerase activities of SVE-treated cells were drastically depressed, corresonding, at least for RNA polymerase B, to a decrease in the number of enzyme molecules. In vitro, SVE had no direct effect on RNA polymerases but was capable of binding with calf thymus DNA to form an SVE-DNA complex modifying the template capacity. The effect of SVE on a transcription system consisting of cell lysates would suggest that cytoplasmic factors are necessary for expression of the inhibitory capacity of SVE. PMID:1255875

  10. Herpes Simplex: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatment of both types of herpes simplex include: Acyclovir Famciclovir Valacyclovir Taken daily, these medicines can lessen ... illness or weak immune system. If you have cancer or HIV/AIDS, or you had an organ ...

  11. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) in Infants and Babies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... being passed from mother to baby at the time of delivery. The highest risk of passing herpes to a ... are present in the genital area at the time of delivery. Neonatal herpes (within the first month of life) ...

  12. Characteristics of cyprinid herpesvirus 3 in different phases of infection: implications for disease transmission and control.

    PubMed

    Sunarto, Agus; McColl, Kenneth A; Crane, Mark St J; Schat, Karel A; Slobedman, Barry; Barnes, Andrew C; Walker, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD) is an emerging and highly contagious viral disease of koi and common carp (Cyprinus carpio), causing mass mortalities and huge economic losses to the carp aquaculture industry. The disease has spread rapidly to 28 countries worldwide. However, mechanisms of koi herpesvirus (species Cyprinid herpesvirus 3; CyHV-3) transmission remain unclear. A potential experimental model of CyHV-3 infection in carp was used to characterise CyHV-3 in different phases of infection and to demonstrate that CyHV-3 persists in survivor fish and has the capacity to reactivate and transmit the disease to healthy fish. During acute infection, which occurred when fish were maintained at 22°C, viral genes were abundantly expressed and infectious virus was produced in association with tissue damage, clinical disease and mortality. In fish maintained at a lower temperature (11°C), viral DNA was present but viral gene expression was absent or greatly restricted, infectious virus was not recovered and there was no evidence of disease. Productive replication was re-initiated following an increase in water temperature to 22°C, resulting in 45% mortality. Shedding of reactivated virus killed 75% of cohabitating naïve fish, suggesting a potential risk for disease transmission. PMID:24704574

  13. Pathogenesis of acute and chronic diseases caused by cyprinid herpesvirus-3.

    PubMed

    Miwa, S; Kiryu, I; Yuasa, K; Ito, T; Kaneko, T

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) was studied using different lineages of carp/koi. After exposure to the virus, infected cells were first found in the skin by histopathology and by in situ hybridization. The epidermis of the skin was most severely damaged and often sloughed off in the fish sampled on days 5 through 8, and the fish that were highly sensitive to the virus died within 8 or 10 days after infection. Serum osmolality of the infected fish, particularly just before death, was significantly lower, suggesting that the osmotic shock consequent on the damage to the skin was the direct cause of the acute deaths. On the other hand, clinical and histopathological observations indicate that the carp of a less sensitive lineage most probably died of viral encephalitis around 3 weeks after infection. For these fish, the largest number of infected cells was found in the central nervous system (CNS) sampled on day 12. A substantial amount of viral genome was found in the CNS of carp surviving more than 1 year after the infection. Thus, the CNS is probably a major target for CyHV-3, and the virus can persistently infect the CNS, presumably establishing latency. PMID:25073413

  14. Herpes Zoster-Induced Ogilvie's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Irfan; Majid, Zain; Rind, Waqas; Zia, Aisha; Riaz, Haris; Raza, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Ogilvie's syndrome due to herpes zoster infection is a rare manifestation of VZV reactivation. The onset of rash of herpes zoster and the symptoms of intestinal obstruction can occur at different time intervals posing a significant diagnostic challenge resulting in avoidable surgical interventions. Herein, we describe a case of 35-year-old male who presented with 6-day history of constipation and colicky abdominal pain along with an exquisitely tender and vesicular skin eruption involving the T8–T11 dermatome. Abdominal X-ray and ultrasound revealed generalized gaseous distention of the large intestine with air up to the rectum consistent with paralytic ileus. Colonoscopy did not show any obstructing lesion. A diagnosis of Ogilvie's syndrome associated with herpes zoster was made. He was conservatively managed with nasogastric decompression, IV fluids, and acyclovir. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was later discharged. PMID:26664758

  15. Preventing herpes simplex virus in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are very common worldwide. Approximately 22% of pregnant women are infected genitally with HSV, and most of them are unaware of this. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is HSV disease in the newborn. Although neonatal HSV infections remain uncommon, due to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with the infection, HSV infection in the newborn is often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. This review summarizes the epidemiology and management of neonatal HSV infections and discusses strategies to prevent HSV infection in the newborn. PMID:25459782

  16. Herpes genitalis and the philosopher's stance.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Kilian

    2014-12-01

    For many people, living with genital herpes generates not just episodic physical discomfort but recurrent emotional distress, centred on concerns about how to live and love safely without passing infection to others. This article considers the evidence on herpes transmission, levels of sexual risk, when the law has intervened and to what extent health professionals should advise with respect to these issues. It proposes a mechanism by which moral philosophy might provide a rational basis on which to counsel concerning sexual behaviour. PMID:24429670

  17. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    E-print Network

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    vaccines that stimulate the ocular mucosal immune system,”immune correlates can segregate by vaccine type in a murine herpes model system,”immune system [64]. Immunization of pregnant women with many other viral vaccines

  18. Can Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Cause Aphasia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.

    2003-01-01

    Aphasia implies the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage. The key to understanding the nature of aphasic symptoms is the neuro-anatomical site of brain damage, and not the causative agent. However, because "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis infection usually affects the frontal and temporal lobes, subcortical structures and…

  19. Herpes Simplex Virus DNAemia Preceding Neonatal Disease.

    PubMed

    Cantey, Joseph B; Klein, Alan M; Sánchez, Pablo J

    2015-05-01

    Polymerase chain reaction testing of blood for herpes simplex virus (HSV) is recommended for newborns delivered to mothers with active genital HSV lesions at delivery. We report an infant who had a positive blood HSV polymerase chain reaction test before the onset of clinical signs of HSV disease. PMID:25720363

  20. Disseminated Herpes Simplex Virus with Fulminant Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rimawi, Bassam H.; Meserve, Joseph; Rimawi, Ramzy H.; Min, Zaw; Gnann, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a rare cause of acute fulminant liver failure. We hereby present a case series of three patients with acute disseminated HSV with necrotizing hepatitis successfully treated with a week course of acyclovir. Early empiric administration of acyclovir therapy while awaiting confirmatory tests is critical in this potentially lethal disease. PMID:26290760

  1. Skin mucus of Cyprinus carpio inhibits cyprinid herpesvirus 3 binding to epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is the aetiological agent of a mortal and highly contagious disease in common and koi carp. The skin is the major portal of entry of CyHV-3 in carp after immersion in water containing the virus. In the present study, we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the effect of skin mucus removal and skin epidermis lesion on CyHV-3 entry. Physical treatments inducing removal of the mucus up to complete erosion of the epidermis were applied on a defined area of carp skin just before inoculation by immersion in infectious water. CyHV-3 entry in carp was drastically enhanced on the area of the skin where the mucus was removed with or without associated epidermal lesion. To investigate whether skin mucus inhibits CyHV-3 binding to epidermal cells, tail fins with an intact mucus layer or without mucus were inoculated ex vivo. While electron microscopy examination revealed numerous viral particles bound on the fins inoculated after mucus removal, no particle could be detected after infection of mucus-covered fins. Finally, anti-CyHV-3 neutralising activity of mucus extract was tested in vitro. Incubation of CyHV-3 with mucus extract reduced its infectivity in a dose dependent manner. The present study demonstrates that skin mucus removal and epidermal lesions enhance CyHV-3 entry in carp. It highlights the role of fish skin mucus as an innate immune protection against viral epidermal entry. PMID:21816061

  2. Distribution and abundance of Opisthorchis viverrini metacercariae in cyprinid fish in Northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pinlaor, Somchai; Onsurathum, Sudarat; Boonmars, Thidarut; Pinlaor, Porntip; Hongsrichan, Nuttanan; Chaidee, Apisit; Haonon, Ornuma; Limviroj, Wutipong; Tesana, Smarn; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

    2013-12-01

    To increase public health awareness for prevention of opisthorchiasis caused by eating raw freshwater fish, the distribution and abundance of Opisthorchis viverrini metacercariae (OV MC) was investigated in freshwater fish obtained from 20 provinces in northeastern Thailand between April 2011 and February 2012. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 12,890 fish consisting of 13 species randomly caught from 26 rivers, 10 dams, and 38 ponds/lakes. Fish, were collected in each of the rainy and winter seasons from each province. Fish were identified, counted, weighed, and digested using pepsin-HCl. Samples were examined for OV MC by a sedimentation method, and metacercariae were identified under a stereomicroscope. OV MC were found in 6 species of fish; i.e., Cyclocheilichthys armatus, Puntius orphoides, Hampala dispar, Henicorhynchus siamensis, Osteochilus hasselti, and Puntioplites proctozysron from localities in 13 provinces. Among the sites where OV MC-infected fish were found, 70.0% were dams, 23.7% were ponds/lakes, and 7.7% were rivers. The mean intensity of OV MC ranged from 0.01 to 6.5 cysts per fish (or 1.3-287.5 cysts per kg of fish). A high mean intensity of OV MC per fish (>3 cysts) was found in 5 provinces: Amnat Charoen (6.5 cysts), Nakhon Phanom (4.3), Mukdahan (4.1), Khon Kaen, (3.5) and Si Sa Ket (3.4). In conclusion, OV MC are prevalent in natural cyprinid fish, with the infection rate varying according to fish species and habitats. PMID:24516277

  3. Expression of immunogenic structural proteins of cyprinid herpesvirus 3 in vitro assessed using immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Sean J; Thompson, Kim D; Bron, James E; Bergmann, Sven M; Jung, Tae S; Aoki, Takashi; Muir, K Fiona; Dauber, Malte; Reiche, Sven; Chee, Diana; Chong, Shin M; Chen, Jing; Adams, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), also called koi herpesvirus (KHV), is the aetiological agent of a fatal disease in carp and koi (Cyprinus carpio L.), referred to as koi herpesvirus disease. The virus contains at least 40 structural proteins, of which few have been characterised with respect to their immunogenicity. Indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFAs) using two epitope-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were used to examine the expression kinetics of two potentially immunogenic and diagnostically relevant viral antigens, an envelope glycoprotein and a capsid-associated protein. The rate of expression of these antigens was determined following a time-course of infection in two CyHV-3 susceptible cell lines. The results were quantified using an IFA, performed in microtitre plates, and image analysis was used to analyse confocal micrographs, enabling measurement of differential virus-associated fluorescence and nucleus-associated fluorescence from stacks of captured scans. An 8-tenfold increase in capsid-associated protein expression was observed during the first 5 days post-infection compared to a ?2-fold increase in glycoprotein expression. A dominant protein of ~100 kDa reacted with the capsid-associated MAb (20F10) in western blot analysis. This band was also recognised by sera obtained from carp infected with CyHV-3, indicating that this capsid-associated protein is produced in abundance during infection in vitro and is immunogenic to carp. Mass spectrometry carried out on this protein identified it as a previously uncharacterised product of open reading frame 84. This abundantly expressed and immunogenic capsid-associated antigen may be a useful candidate for KHV serological diagnostics. PMID:26742989

  4. Does interspecies hybridization affect the host specificity of parasites in cyprinid fish?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Host specificity varies among parasite species. Some parasites are strictly host-specific, others show a specificity for congeneric or non-congeneric phylogenetically related host species, whilst some others are non-specific (generalists). Two cyprinids, Cyprinus carpio and Carassius gibelio, plus their respective hybrids were investigated for metazoan parasites. The aim of this study was to analyze whether interspecies hybridization affects host specificity. The different degrees of host specificity within a phylogenetic framework were taken into consideration (i.e. strict specialist, intermediate specialist, and intermediate generalist). Methods Fish were collected during harvesting the pond and identified using meristic traits and molecular markers. Metazoan parasite species were collected. Host specificity of parasites was determined using the following classification: strict specialist, intermediate specialist, intermediate generalist and generalist. Parasite species richness was compared between parental species and their hybrids. The effect of host species on abundance of parasites differing in host specificity was tested. Results Hybrids harbored more different parasite species but their total parasite abundance was lower in comparison with parental species. Interspecies hybridization affected the host specificity of ecto- and endoparasites. Parasite species exhibiting different degrees of host specificity for C. carpio and C. gibelio were also present in hybrids. The abundance of strict specialists of C. carpio was significantly higher in parental species than in hybrids. Intermediate generalists parasitizing C. carpio and C. gibelio as two phylogenetically closely related host species preferentially infected C. gibelio when compared to C. carpio, based on prevalence and maximum intensity of infection. Hybrids were less infected by intermediate generalists when compared to C. gibelio. Conclusions This finding does not support strict co-adaptation between host and parasite genotypes resulting in narrow host specificity, and showed that hybrid genotypes are susceptible to parasites exhibiting host specificity. The immune mechanisms specific to parental species might represent potential mechanisms explaining the low abundance of parasites in C. gibelio x C. carpio hybrids. PMID:23587287

  5. Biomarker responses in cyprinids of the middle stretch of the River Po, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Vigano, L.; Arillo, A.; Melodia, F.; Arlati, P.; Monti, C.

    1998-03-01

    Fish belonging to three species of cyprinids, that is, barbel (Barbus plebejus), chub (Leuciscus cephalus), and Italian nase (Chondrostoma soeetta), were collected from two sites of the River Po, located upstream and downstream from the confluence of one of its middle-reach polluted tributaries, the River Lambro. The two groups of individuals caught for each species were analyzed and compared for several microsomal and cytosolic biochemical markers. The enzymatic activities assayed in fish liver included ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), aminopyrine-N-demethylase (APDM), uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, the contents of reduced glutathione and nonprotein thiols were measured. Despite some differences among species, all microsomal activities (EROD, APDM, UDPGT) were found to be significantly induced in fish living downstream the River Lambro. With the exception of a higher GST enzyme activity of barbel from the downstream reach, no significant modification was evident in any of the tested cytosolic biomarkers. Results showed that barbel and nase better discriminated the two reaches of the River Po. In general, the alterations observed in feral fish are consistent with the results found in previous studies conducted with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under both laboratory and field conditions in the same middle reach of the River Po. All of the data indicate that the downstream tract of the main river is exposed to the load of pollutants transported by the River Lambro, including known inducers such as polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The latter were analyzed in sediments sampled at the two sites of fish collection, and the downstream sediment showed the highest concentrations of PAHs, although their levels are comparable to those present in moderately polluted locations. Regardless of the site of exposure, barbel seem to be characterized by more efficient antioxidant defenses.

  6. 75 FR 59670 - Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ...of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological Assay Device AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assay device type, which is classified as class...with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent assays) used to identify herpes simplex...

  7. 76 FR 48715 - Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological Assay Device AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assay device type, which is classified as class...with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent assays) used to identify herpes simplex...

  8. Quantitative analysis of triphasic (H3) horizontal cell-cone connectivity in the cyprinid fish (roach) retina.

    PubMed

    Djamgoz, M B; Greenstreet, E H

    1996-12-01

    Although horizontal cells encode chromatic information by means of a variety of spectrally opponent light-evoked response patterns, their synaptic connections with the different spectral classes of cone are not completely understood. In the cyprinid fish retina, where a hierarchical set of interactions between horizontal cells and cone types has been proposed, a particular type of horizontal cell generates light-evoked triphasic (red-hyperpolarizing/green depolarizing/blue-hyperpolarizing) responses. In the present study, we have studied the cone connectivity of these cells by intracellular recording and staining in the roach retina. The horizontal cells were first identified electrophysiologically using spectral stimuli, and then stained intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase. Light microscopy revealed that the cells had consistent H3-like morphologies. At an ultrastructural level, these horizontal cells were deduced to contact selectively blue-sensitive cones. Within the cone pedicles, the majority (approximately 80%) of the contacts were "central" to synaptic ribbons. Some 50% of the "lateral" processes were large and engulfed cone cytoplasm. Spinules were present within the contacted pedicles but not upon the dendrites of the stained horizontal cells, although previous work had suggested that horseradish peroxidase would not interfere with spinule dynamics. The results are discussed in terms of existing modes of horizontal cell-cone connectivity in cyprinid fish retinae. PMID:9068853

  9. Pharmacologic management of herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Mamdani, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    Herpes zoster is an infection caused by reactivation of dormant varicella-zoster virus. The acute course of herpes zoster is generally benign; however, some patients will experience postherpetic neuralgia characterized by severe, relentless, and at times disabling pain that is often refractory to treatment. While herpes zoster responds to acyclovir, cost-benefit considerations limit the drug's usefulness to only a select group. Postherpetic neuralgia requires a holistic approach, including pharmacologic therapy using several different classes of drugs. PMID:7907508

  10. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed. PMID:23320014

  11. Improving immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines for genital herpes containing herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Shaw, Carolyn; Friedman, Harvey

    2014-12-01

    No vaccines are approved for prevention or treatment of genital herpes. The focus of genital herpes vaccine trials has been on prevention using herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2) alone or combined with glycoprotein B. These prevention trials did not achieve their primary end points. However, subset analyses reported some positive outcomes in each study. The most recent trial was the Herpevac Trial for Women that used gD2 with monophosphoryl lipid A and alum as adjuvants in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 seronegative women. Unexpectedly, the vaccine prevented genital disease by HSV-1 but not HSV-2. Currently, HSV-1 causes more first episodes of genital herpes than HSV-2, highlighting the importance of protecting against HSV-1. The scientific community is conflicted between abandoning vaccine efforts that include gD2 and building upon the partial successes of previous trials. We favor building upon success and present approaches to improve outcomes of gD2-based subunit antigen vaccines. PMID:25138572

  12. Mucosal herpes immunity and immunopathology to ocular and genital herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Benmohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed. PMID:23320014

  13. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305 Herpes simplex virus serological assays. (a)...

  14. Identification and Characterization of Cyprinid Herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) Encoded MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Owen H.; Henshilwood, Kathy; Way, Keith; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Stone, David M.; Walls, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Some viruses encode their own miRNAs and these are increasingly being recognized as important modulators of viral and host gene expression. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is a highly pathogenic agent that causes acute mass mortalities in carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio) and koi (Cyprinus carpio koi) worldwide. Here, bioinformatic analyses of the CyHV-3 genome suggested the presence of non-conserved precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA) genes. Deep sequencing of small RNA fractions prepared from in vitro CyHV-3 infections led to the identification of potential miRNAs and miRNA–offset RNAs (moRNAs) derived from some bioinformatically predicted pre-miRNAs. DNA microarray hybridization analysis, Northern blotting and stem-loop RT-qPCR were then used to definitively confirm that CyHV-3 expresses two pre-miRNAs during infection in vitro. The evidence also suggested the presence of an additional four high-probability and two putative viral pre-miRNAs. MiRNAs from the two confirmed pre-miRNAs were also detected in gill tissue from CyHV-3-infected carp. We also present evidence that one confirmed miRNA can regulate the expression of a putative CyHV-3-encoded dUTPase. Candidate homologues of some CyHV-3 pre-miRNAs were identified in CyHV-1 and CyHV-2. This is the first report of miRNA and moRNA genes encoded by members of the Alloherpesviridae family, a group distantly related to the Herpesviridae family. The discovery of these novel CyHV-3 genes may help further our understanding of the biology of this economically important virus and their encoded miRNAs may have potential as biomarkers for the diagnosis of latent CyHV-3. PMID:25928140

  15. Herpes zoster oticus: A rare clinical entity

    PubMed Central

    Gondivkar, Shailesh; Parikh, Viren; Parikh, Rima

    2010-01-01

    Herpes zoster oticus also known as Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare complication of herpes zoster in which reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus infection in the geniculate ganglion causes otalgia, auricular vesicles, and peripheral facial paralysis. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is rare in children and affects both sexes equally. Incidence and clinical severity increases when host immunity is compromised. Because these symptoms do not always present at the onset, this syndrome can be misdiagnosed. Although secondary to Bell's palsy in terms of the cause of acute atraumatic peripheral facial paralysis, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, with incidence ranged from 0.3 to 18%, has a worse prognosis. Herpes zoster oticus accounts for about 12% cases of facial palsy, which is usually unilateral and complete and full recovery occurs in only about 20% of untreated patients. The most advisable method to treat Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the combination therapy with acyclovir and prednisone but still not promising, and several prerequisites are required for better results. We present a case of 32-year-old man suffering from Ramsay Hunt syndrome with grade V facial palsy treated effectively with rehabilitation program, after the termination of the combination therapy of acyclovir and prednisone. PMID:22114399

  16. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goaster, Jacqueline Le; Bourée, Patrice; Ifergan, Charles; Tangy, Frederic; Olivier, René; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab) levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels. PMID:26078744

  17. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this tool to play your goals. Hot Topics Stress & Coping Center Writing a Paper Abusive Relationships Dynamic Stretching A Guy's Guide to Body Image Can You Get Genital Herpes From a Cold Sore? KidsHealth > Teens > Q&A > Birth Control, Pregnancy & STDs > Can You Get Genital Herpes ...

  18. Bilateral Symmetrical Herpes Zoster in an Immunocompetent 15-Year-Old Adolescent Boy

    PubMed Central

    Barankin, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is uncommon in immunocompetent children. The bilateral symmetrical occurrence of herpes zoster lesions is extremely rare. We report a 15-year-old immunocompetent Chinese adolescent boy who developed bilateral symmetrical herpes zoster lesions. To our knowledge, the occurrence of bilateral symmetrical herpes zoster lesions in an immunocompetent individual has not been reported in the pediatric literature. PMID:25692062

  19. Herpes labialis among dental healthcare providers in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Azodo, C. C.; Umoh, A. O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The epidemiology of herpes labialis has been relatively neglected. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of self-reported herpes labialis among Nigerian dental health providers. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study of final year dental students and dentists undergoing postgraduate training at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria was conducted in June, 2014. The demographic information, lifetime and period (previous year) experience of the herpes labialis, perceived triggers and action taken during the last episode were obtained using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: The annual prevalence of herpes labialis was 7.4% while the lifetime prevalence was 22.1%. The lifetime prevalence was significantly associated with marital status, professional status and family history of herpes labialis. However, in binary regression, it was only marital status and family history of herpes labialis that emerged as the determinants of this lifetime prevalence. The most common trigger factors reported by the participants for the last episode of herpes labialis were fever, malaria, fatigue and stress. The actions taken by participants for the last episode of herpes labialis were using drugs without prescription (14.3%), application of lubricant (23.8%), nothing (57.1%) and could not remember (4.8%). Conclusion: Data from this study revealed that one out of fourteen and one out of five every studied dental healthcare providers had experienced herpes labialis in the last 12 months and their lifetime respectively. The reduction of fever inducing infections, stress and fatigue which were major triggers will help decrease herpes labialis among this studied group. PMID:26392726

  20. Herpes Zoster (Shingles) and Postherpetic Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Priya; Drage, Lisa A.; Martin, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ), commonly called shingles, is a distinctive syndrome caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV). This reactivation occurs when immunity to VZV declines because of aging or immunosuppression. Herpes zoster can occur at any age but most commonly affects the elderly population. Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), defined as pain persisting more than 3 months after the rash has healed, is a debilitating and difficult to manage consequence of HZ. The diagnosis of HZ is usually made clinically on the basis of the characteristic appearance of the rash. Early recognition and treatment can reduce acute symptoms and may also reduce PHN. A live, attenuated vaccine aimed at boosting immunity to VZV and reducing the risk of HZ is now available and is recommended for adults older than 60 years. The vaccine has been shown to reduce significantly the incidence of both HZ and PHN. The vaccine is well tolerated, with minor local injection site reactions being the most common adverse event. This review focuses on the clinical manifestations and treatment of HZ and PHN, as well as the appropriate use of the HZ vaccine. PMID:19252116

  1. Hiccups, eructation, and other uncommon prodromal manifestations of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Alexander L; Muhn, Channy Y; Billick, Robin C

    2003-12-01

    Although the most frequent presentation of herpes zoster involves sensory neurons, motor and autonomic symptomatology is also known to occur in this disease. An unusual symptom of hiccups is described here. Other infrequent manifestations of this common illness, including the Ramsay Hunt syndrome, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, urinary and fecal retention, sexual dysfunction, and zoster sine herpete, are reviewed. Greater awareness of unusual presentations of herpes zoster is necessary for proper diagnosis and timely management of complications that may otherwise lead to disability and serious long-term sequelae. PMID:14639397

  2. Recurrent herpes and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Brousse, Georges; Geneste, Julie; Schmitt, Audrey; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Schmidt, Jeannot

    2007-12-01

    A 33-year-old male presented with recurrent outbreaks of perioral herpes of disfiguring nature that remained unresolved following therapy. The first perioral outbreak occurred following a road accident. The psychiatric interview conducted with the patient suggested post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) secondary to the accident. Venlafaxine 50 mg/day was initiated and led to resolution of the PTSD symptoms within 8 weeks. The patient did not experience any further herpes outbreaks for about 10 months. Control of stress disorders in recurrent herpes is discussed from a therapeutic perspective. PMID:18371290

  3. PARAINFLUENZA VIRUS-3 PULMONARY LESIONS ARE NOT ENHANCED BY BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parainfluenza virus-3 (PI-3) is a common respiratory pathogen of cattle and sheep. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a common bovine pathogen that may enhance respiratory disease. Two groups of neonatal lambs were inoculated intranasally and intratracheally with PI-3/BVDV or PI-3 alone. Both...

  4. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: Further host-specificity tests with native Solenopsis ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thorough understanding of host specificity is essential before pathogens can be used as biopesticides or self-sustaining biocontrol agents. In order to better define the host range of the recently discovered Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3), we collected and exposed colonies of two native fire...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY...membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal herpes virus infections range from a mild...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY...membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal herpes virus infections range from a mild...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY...membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal herpes virus infections range from a mild...

  8. Herpes zoster vaccine for the elderly: boosting immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Joel V; Chen, Wilbur H

    2010-01-01

    Herpes zoster, also known as shingles, is a disease that results from the reactivation of a latent infection of the varicella zoster virus, which is usually encountered during early childhood. Aging is associated with an increased risk for herpes zoster and its complications. Boosting immunological memory is the key strategy for keeping the latent varicella zoster virus infection under control. A live attenuated virus vaccine is safe, effective and approved for use among healthy elderly adults aged 60 years or older. However, significant problems remain in the prevention of herpes zoster with the current vaccine. Future studies for improved vaccines and studies into the epidemiology of herpes zoster are required in order to address this significant public health burden. PMID:20607105

  9. AIDS and Herpes Carry Weighty Policy Implications for Your Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Kathleen

    1985-01-01

    Few schools have policies to deal specifically with herpes and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses some schools and states that have developed such policies and includes a source list for more information. (MD)

  10. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal. PMID:26185119

  11. Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) hypsibarbi n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) from the freshwater cyprinid fish Hypsibarbus wetmorei (Smith) in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Pachanawan, Adithepchaikarn; Kamchoo, Kanda

    2013-04-01

    A new nematode species, Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) hypsibarbi n. sp. (Rhabdochonidae), is described from the intestine of the freshwater cyprinid fish Hypsibarbus wetmorei (Smith) in the Mekong River, Nakhon Phanom Province, northeast Thailand. It is mainly characterized by medium-sized, bifurcate deirids, the presence of 14 anterior prostomal teeth and distinct basal teeth, length ratio of the muscular and glandular portions of esophagus (1:6-9), length of the left spicule (669-774 ?m), absence of a dorsal barb on the right spicule, length ratio of spicules (1:4.9-6.0), arrangement of genital papillae, and smooth eggs without filaments or swellings. In addition, specifically unidentified fourth-stage larvae of Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) sp., morphologically similar to R. hypsibarbi, were recorded from the red-tailed tinfoil Barbonymus altus (Günther) (Cyprinidae) in the Mekong River, Nakhon Phanom Province, northeast Thailand. Rhabdochona hypsibarbi is the fourth nominal species of Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916 reported from fishes in Thailand and the second species of the nominotypical subgenus found in this country. PMID:23045998

  12. 75 FR 59611 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ...Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY...herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assays by removing the reference to HSV serological assays other than type 1 and type 2. This...

  13. Comparative mapping for bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis) against model and non-model fishes provides insights into the genomic evolution of cyprinids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chuankun; Tong, Jingou; Yu, Xiaomu; Guo, Wenjie

    2015-08-01

    Comparative mapping provides an efficient method to connect genomes of non-model and model fishes. In this study, we used flanking sequences of the 659 microsatellites on a genetic map of bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis) to comprehensively study syntenic relationships between bighead carp and nine model and non-model fishes. Of the five model and two food fishes with whole genome data, Cyprinus carpio showed the highest rate of positive BLAST hits (95.3 %) with bighead carp map, followed by Danio rerio (70.9 %), Oreochromis niloticus (21.7 %), Tetraodon nigroviridis (6.4 %), Gasterosteus aculeatus (5.2 %), Oryzias latipes (4.7 %) and Fugu rubripes (3.5 %). Chromosomal syntenic analyses showed that inversion was the basic chromosomal rearrangement during genomic evolution of cyprinids, and the extent of inversions and translocations was found to be positively correlated with evolutionary relationships among fishes studied. Among the five investigated cyprinids, linkage groups (LGs) of bighead carp, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Ctenopharyngodon idella exhibited a one-to-one relationship. Besides, LG 9 of bighead carp and homologous LGs of silver carp and grass carp all corresponded to the chromosomes 10 and 22 of zebrafish, suggesting that chromosomal fission may have occurred in the ancestor of zebrafish. On the other hand, LGs of bighead carp and common carp showed an approximate one-to-two relationship with extensive translocations, confirming the occurrence of a 4th whole genome duplication in common carp. This study provides insights into the understanding of genome evolution among cyprinids and would aid in transferring positional and functional information of genes from model fish like zebrafish to non-model fish like bighead carp. PMID:25627158

  14. Latent Herpes Viruses Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2008-01-01

    Space flight has many adverse effects on human physiology. Changes in multiple systems, including the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems have occurred (12, 32, 38, 39). Alterations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (12), nutritional needs (31), renal stone formation (40), and microbial flora (2) have also been reported. Evidence suggests that the magnitude of some changes may increase with time in space. A variety of changes in immunity have been reported during both short (.16 days) and long (>30 days) space missions. However, it is difficult to determine the medical significance of these immunological changes in astronauts. Astronauts are in excellent health and in superb physical condition. Illnesses in astronauts during space flight are not common, are generally mild, and rarely affect mission objectives. In an attempt to clarify this issue, we identified the latent herpes viruses as medically important indicators of the effects of space flight on immunity. This chapter demonstrates that space flight leads to asymptomatic reactivation of latent herpes viruses, and proposes that this results from marked changes in neuroendocrine function and immunity caused by the inherent stressfullness of human space flight. Astronauts experience uniquely stressful environments during space flight. Potential stressors include confinement in an unfamiliar, crowded environment, isolation, separation from family, anxiety, fear, sleep deprivation, psychosocial issues, physical exertion, noise, variable acceleration forces, increased radiation, and others. Many of these are intermittent and variable in duration and intensity, but variable gravity forces (including transitions from launch acceleration to microgravity and from microgravity to planetary gravity) and variable radiation levels are part of each mission and contribute to a stressful environment that cannot be duplicated on Earth. Radiation outside the Earth's magnetosphere is particularly worrisome because it includes ionizing radiation from cosmic galactic radiation. Increased stress levels appear even before flight, presumably from the rigors of preflight training and the anticipation of the mission (12, 32, 38, 39). Space flight causes significant changes in human immune function (32), but the means by which these changes come about have been difficult to discern. Consistent indicators of stress associated with space flight include increased production of stress hormones, and changes in cells of the immune system. These changes include elevated white blood cell (WBC) and neutrophil counts at landing (15, 16, 35, 37). Activation of generalized stress responses before, during, and after space flight probably affects the function of the immune system. Space flight has been shown to decrease many aspects of immune function, including natural killer (NK) cell activity, interferon production, the blastogenic response of leukocytes to mitogens, cell-mediated immunity, neutrophil function and monocyte function (5, 16, 18, 21, 35-37).

  15. TLR3 deficiency in herpes simplex encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hye Kyung; Seppänen, Mikko; Hautala, Timo; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Itan, Yuval; Lafaille, Fabien G.; Dell, William; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Byun, Minji; Pauwels, Elodie; Rönnelid, Ylva; Cai, Xin; Boucherit, Soraya; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Paetau, Anders; Lebon, Pierre; Rozenberg, Flore; Tardieu, Marc; Abel, Laurent; Yildiran, Alisan; Vergison, Anne; Roivainen, Reina; Etzioni, Amos; Tienari, Pentti J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the proportion of children with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) displaying TLR3 deficiency, the extent of TLR3 allelic heterogeneity, and the specific clinical features of TLR3 deficiency. Methods: We determined the sequence of all exons of TLR3 in 110 of the 120 patients with HSE enrolled in our study who do not carry any of the previously described HSE-predisposing mutations of TLR3 pathway genes (TLR3, UNC93B1, TRIF, TRAF3, and TBK1). All the new mutant TLR3 alleles detected were characterized experimentally in-depth to establish the causal relationship between the genotype and phenotype. Results: In addition to the 3 previously reported TLR3-deficient patients from the same cohort, 6 other children or young adults with HSE carry 1 of 5 unique or extremely rare (minor allele frequency <0.001) missense TLR3 alleles. Two alleles (M374T, D592N) heterozygous in 3 patients are not deleterious in vitro. The other 3 are deleterious via different mechanisms: G743D+R811I and L360P heterozygous in 2 patients are loss-of-function due to low levels of expression and lack of cleavage, respectively, and R867Q homozygous in 1 patient is hypomorphic. The 3 patients' fibroblasts display impaired TLR3 responses and enhanced herpes simplex virus 1 susceptibility. Overall, TLR3 deficiency is therefore found in 6 (5%) of the 120 patients studied. There is high allelic heterogeneity, with 3 forms of autosomal dominant partial defect by negative dominance or haploinsufficiency, and 2 forms of autosomal recessive defect with complete or partial deficiency. Finally, 4 (66%) of the 6 TLR3-deficient patients had at least 1 late relapse of HSE, whereas relapse occurred in only 12 (10%) of the total cohort of 120 patients. Conclusions: Childhood-onset HSE is due to TLR3 deficiency in a traceable fraction of patients, in particular the ones with HSE recurrence. Mutations in TLR3 and TLR3 pathway genes should be searched and experimentally studied in children with HSE, and patients with proven TLR3 deficiency should be followed carefully. PMID:25339207

  16. Rational Development of an Attenuated Recombinant Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3 Vaccine Using Prokaryotic Mutagenesis and In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Boutier, Maxime; Ronsmans, Maygane; Ouyang, Ping; Fournier, Guillaume; Reschner, Anca; Rakus, Krzysztof; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Farnir, Frédéric; Bayrou, Calixte; Lieffrig, François; Li, Hong; Desmecht, Daniel; Davison, Andrew J.; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is causing severe economic losses worldwide in common and koi carp industries, and a safe and efficacious attenuated vaccine compatible with mass vaccination is needed. We produced single deleted recombinants using prokaryotic mutagenesis. When producing a recombinant lacking open reading frame 134 (ORF134), we unexpectedly obtained a clone with additional deletion of ORF56 and ORF57. This triple deleted recombinant replicated efficiently in vitro and expressed an in vivo safety/efficacy profile compatible with use as an attenuated vaccine. To determine the role of the double ORF56-57 deletion in the phenotype and to improve further the quality of the vaccine candidate, a series of deleted recombinants was produced and tested in vivo. These experiments led to the selection of a double deleted recombinant lacking ORF56 and ORF57 as a vaccine candidate. The safety and efficacy of this strain were studied using an in vivo bioluminescent imaging system (IVIS), qPCR, and histopathological examination, which demonstrated that it enters fish via skin infection similar to the wild type strain. However, compared to the parental wild type strain, the vaccine candidate replicated at lower levels and spread less efficiently to secondary sites of infection. Transmission experiments allowing water contamination with or without additional physical contact between fish demonstrated that the vaccine candidate has a reduced ability to spread from vaccinated fish to naïve sentinel cohabitants. Finally, IVIS analyses demonstrated that the vaccine candidate induces a protective mucosal immune response at the portal of entry. Thus, the present study is the first to report the rational development of a recombinant attenuated vaccine against CyHV-3 for mass vaccination of carp. We also demonstrated the relevance of the CyHV-3 carp model for studying alloherpesvirus transmission and mucosal immunity in teleost skin. PMID:25700279

  17. A new fish-based multi-metric assessment index for cyprinid streams in the Iranian Caspian Sea Basin

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Hossein; Schinegger, Rafaela; Melcher, Andreas; Moder, Karl; Mielach, Carina; Schmutz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A major issue for water resource management is the assessment of environmental degradation of lotic ecosystems. The overall aim of this study is to develop a multi-metric fish index for the cyprinid streams of the Caspian Sea Basin (MMICS) in Iran. As species diversity and composition as well as population structure in the studied streams are different to other regions, there is a substantial need to develop a new fish index. We sampled fish and environmental data of 102 sites in medium sized streams. We analysed human pressures at different spatial scales and determined applicable fish metrics showing a response to human pressures. In total, five structural and functional types of metrics (i.e. biodiversity, habitat, reproduction, trophic level and water quality sensitivity) were considered. In addition, we used 29 criteria describing major anthropogenic human pressures at sampling sites and generated a regional pressure index (RPI) that accounted for potential effects of multiple human pressures. For the MMICS development, we first defined reference sites (least disturbed) and secondly quantified differences of fish metrics between reference and impaired sites. We used a Generalised Linear Model (GLM) to describe metric responses to natural environmental differences in least disturbed conditions. By including impaired sites, the residual distributions of these models described the response range of each metric to human pressures, independently of natural environmental influence. Finally, seven fish metrics showed the best ability to discriminate between impaired and reference sites. The multi-metric fish index performed well in discriminating human pressure classes, giving a significant negative linear response to a gradient of the RPI. These methods can be used for further development of a standardised monitoring tool to assess the ecological status and trends in biological condition for streams of the whole country, considering its complex and diverse geology and climate. PMID:25960581

  18. Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) enters the food web of the River Po and is metabolically debrominated in resident cyprinid fishes.

    PubMed

    Viganò, Luigi; Roscioli, Claudio; Guzzella, Licia

    2011-11-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), the primary constituent of a widely used flame retardant formulation, is present at relatively high levels in sediments and macroinvertebrates of the River Po. Since it was demonstrated that BDE-209 can be biotransformed to smaller and more toxic polybrominated dipheyl ethers (PBDEs), the main objective of this study was to assess whether the large quantities of BDE-209 present in the River Po are bioavailable to the higher levels of the food web and are biotransformed in feral fishes. To this aim, 23 cyprinids, mainly common carp, were analysed for the hepatic contents of PBDEs. Contrary to sediments and invertebrates of the same area, no fish sample contained detectable levels of BDE-209. All fishes contained typical PBDE representatives, e.g. BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-153 and BDE-154, but more importantly they contained three congeners, i.e. BDE-179, BDE-188 and BDE-202, which are not present in any technical formulations and are known products of BDE-209 debromination in fish. The age of carps had no effects on the bioaccumulation of PBDEs. Conversely, the contents of PCBs, which also were determined in the same fish samples, showed a positive correlation with age. Both groups of chemicals displayed a tendency to a higher contamination in male fish. This study shows that BDE-209 enters the food web of the River Po contributing to the load of lower brominated PBDEs and thus to the load of chemical stressors threatening the aquatic life of the major Italian watercourse. PMID:21925710

  19. Exposing native cyprinid (Barbus plebejus) juveniles to river sediments leads to gonadal alterations, genotoxic effects and thyroid disruption.

    PubMed

    Viganò, Luigi; De Flora, Silvio; Gobbi, Marco; Guiso, Giovanna; Izzotti, Alberto; Mandich, Alberta; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Roscioli, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Juveniles (50 days post hatch) of a native cyprinid fish (Barbus plebejus) were exposed for 7 months to sediments from the River Lambro, a polluted tributary impairing the quality of the River Po for tens of kilometers from their confluence. Sediments were collected upstream of the city of Milan and downstream at the closure of the drainage basin of the River Lambro. Chemical analyses revealed the presence of a complex mixture of bioavailable endocrine-active chemicals, with higher exposure levels in the downstream section of the tributary. Mainly characterized by brominated flame retardants, alkylphenols, polychlorinated biphenyls, and minor co-occurring personal care products and natural hormones, the sediment contamination induced reproductive disorders, as well as other forms of endocrine disruption and toxicity. In particular, exposed male barbel exhibited higher biliary PAH-like metabolites, overexpression of the cyp1a gene, vitellogenin production in all specimens, the presence of oocytes (up to 22% intersex), degenerative alterations in their testis, liver fat vacuolization, a marked depression of total thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) plasma levels, and genotoxic damages determined as hepatic DNA adducts. These results clearly demonstrate that Lambro sediments alone are responsible for recognizable changes in the structure and function of the reproductive and, in general, the endocrine system of a native fish species. In the real environment, exposure to waterborne and food-web sources of chemicals are responsible for additional toxic loads, and the present findings thus provide evidence for a causal role of this tributary in the severe decline observed in barbel in recent decades and raise concern that the fish community of the River Po is exposed to endocrine-mediated health effects along tens of kilometres of its course. PMID:26580918

  20. Experimental investigation of herpes simplex virus latency.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, E K; Bloom, D C

    1997-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of herpes simplex virus infection generally involve a mild and localized primary infection followed by asymptomatic (latent) infection interrupted sporadically by periods of recrudescence (reactivation) where virus replication and associated cytopathologic findings are manifest at the site of initial infection. During the latent phase of infection, viral genomes, but not infectious virus itself, can be detected in sensory and autonomic neurons. The process of latent infection and reactivation has been subject to continuing investigation in animal models and, more recently, in cultured cells. The initiation and maintenance of latent infection in neurons are apparently passive phenomena in that no virus gene products need be expressed or are required. Despite this, a single latency-associated transcript (LAT) encoded by DNA encompassing about 6% of the viral genome is expressed during latent infection in a minority of neurons containing viral DNA. This transcript is spliced, and the intron derived from this splicing is stably maintained in the nucleus of neurons expressing it. Reactivation, which can be induced by stress and assayed in several animal models, is facilitated by the expression of LAT. Although the mechanism of action of LAT-mediated facilitation of reactivation is not clear, all available evidence argues against its involving the expression of a protein. Rather, the most consistent models of action involve LAT expression playing a cis-acting role in a very early stage of the reactivation process. PMID:9227860

  1. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: epidemiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent viruses capable of establishing lifelong infection. Genital herpes in women of childbearing age represents a major risk for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HSV infection, with primary and first-episode genital HSV infections posing the highest risk. The advent of antiviral therapy with parenteral acyclovir has led to significant improvement in neonatal HSV disease mortality. Further studies are needed to improve the clinician's ability to identify infants at increased risk for HSV infection and prevent MTCT, and to develop novel antiviral agents with increased efficacy in infants with HSV infection. PMID:25677996

  2. Herpes zoster induced acute urinary retention in the immunocompetent female

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone, John; Suraparaju, Lokesh; Shah, Nimish

    2009-01-01

    We present a rare case of acute urinary retention complicated by constipation secondary to a unilateral herpes zoster reactivation in the S2-4 dermatomes of an immunocompetent female. Diagnosis was confirmed by clinical examination, negative cystoscopy and positive viral polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for herpes zoster virus. The patient was commenced on a course of oral acyclovir, the bowel symptoms resolved, and the patient was discharged with a urinary catheter in situ for an outpatient trial without catheter for 2 weeks to be followed by a course of intermittent self catheterisation pending resolution of symptoms. PMID:21686803

  3. Zebrafish: Modeling for Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Thessicar Evadney; Jones, Kevin S.; Dale, Rodney M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Abstract For many years, zebrafish have been the prototypical model for studies in developmental biology. In recent years, zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system to study infectious diseases, including viral infections. Experiments conducted with herpes simplex virus type-1 in adult zebrafish or in embryo models are encouraging as they establish proof of concept with viral-host tropism and possible screening of antiviral compounds. In addition, the presence of human homologs of viral entry receptors in zebrafish such as 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate, nectins, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14-like receptor bring strong rationale for virologists to test their in vivo significance in viral entry in a zebrafish model and compare the structure–function basis of virus zebrafish receptor interaction for viral entry. On the other end, a zebrafish model is already being used for studying inflammation and angiogenesis, with or without genetic manipulations, and therefore can be exploited to study viral infection-associated pathologies. The major advantage with zebrafish is low cost, easy breeding and maintenance, rapid lifecycle, and a transparent nature, which allows visualizing dissemination of fluorescently labeled virus infection in real time either at a localized region or the whole body. Further, the availability of multiple transgenic lines that express fluorescently tagged immune cells for in vivo imaging of virus infected animals is extremely attractive. In addition, a fully developed immune system and potential for receptor-specific knockouts further advocate the use of zebrafish as a new tool to study viral infections. In this review, we focus on expanding the potential of zebrafish model system in understanding human infectious diseases and future benefits. PMID:24266790

  4. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  5. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305...

  9. Human Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Confiscated Gorilla

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Gardner-Roberts, David; Kinani, Jean-Felix; Spelman, Lucy; Barry, Peter A.; Cranfield, Michael R.; Lowenstine, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, we detected human herpes simplex virus type 1, which caused stomatitis, in a juvenile confiscated eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) that had a high degree of direct contact with human caretakers. Our findings confirm that pathogens can transfer between nonhuman primate hosts and humans. PMID:25341185

  10. Herpes Zoster with disseminated lesions. What is it?

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Gupta, S; Thomas, M; Mahendra, A; Jindal, N; Bhaskar, G; Aggarwal, M

    2013-03-15

    Herpes Zoster (HZ) is a Cutaneous Viral infection caused by Varicella zoster virus (VZV). Lesions of HZ are usually limited to one dermatome only but sometimes, there can be dissemination of lesions. The present case describes the role of proper examination of HZ case, which presents with disseminated lesions. PMID:23599827

  11. The mortality of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Cantey, Joseph B; Sánchez, Pablo J

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study characterized the clinical course of 13 neonates who died with herpes simplex virus infection from 2001 to 2011, representing a 26% case-fatality rate. Fatal disease developed at ? 48 hours of age in one-third of infants, was mostly disseminated disease, and occurred despite early administration of high-dose acyclovir therapy. PMID:25868428

  12. The "Other" Venereal Diseases: Herpes Simplex, Trichomoniasis and Candidiasis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNab, Warren L.

    1979-01-01

    Although the term venereal disease has been synonymous with gonorrhea and syphilis, the Center for Disease Control now states that the number of new cases of herpes simplex, trichomoniasis, and candidiasis is rapidly approaching the number of cases of syphilis and gonorrhea. (MM)

  13. Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Antibodies in Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodu, Brad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of 125 sophomore preclinical dental students found that these young professionals, because of having a low prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, are at risk for acquiring a primary HSV infection when treating HSV positive patients and should take precautions to avoid virus transmission. (MSE)

  14. Herpes simplex virus 2 ICP0 mutant viruses are avirulent and immunogenic: implications for a genital herpes vaccine.

    PubMed

    Halford, William P; Püschel, Ringo; Rakowski, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0(-) mutants are interferon-sensitive, avirulent, and elicit protective immunity against HSV-1 (Virol J, 2006, 3:44). If an ICP0(-) mutant of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) exhibited similar properties, such a virus might be used to vaccinate against genital herpes. The current study was initiated to explore this possibility. Several HSV-2 ICP0(-) mutant viruses were constructed and evaluated in terms of three parameters: i. interferon-sensitivity; ii. virulence in mice; and iii. capacity to elicit protective immunity against HSV-2. One ICP0(-) mutant virus in particular, HSV-2 0DeltaNLS, achieved an optimal balance between avirulence and immunogenicity. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS was interferon-sensitive in cultured cells. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS replicated to low levels in the eyes of inoculated mice, but was rapidly repressed by an innate, Stat 1-dependent host immune response. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS failed to spread from sites of inoculation, and hence produced only inapparent infections. Mice inoculated with HSV-2 0DeltaNLS consistently mounted an HSV-specific IgG antibody response, and were consistently protected against lethal challenge with wild-type HSV-2. Based on their avirulence and immunogenicity, we propose that HSV-2 ICP0(-) mutant viruses merit consideration for their potential to prevent the spread of HSV-2 and genital herpes. PMID:20808928

  15. [Battle with herpes for 37 years].

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) remains latent in the human trigeminal ganglion after primarily infecting the cornea and conjunctiva. Mental stress, heat stimulation, ultraviolet ray and immunosuppression are among the reactivating factors of HSV-1, which can lead to epithelial herpetic keratitis, stromal herpetic keratitis, and other complications. I have been working with HSV-1 for a long time, concentrating especially on its latency and reactivation. I would like to introduce some of the recent research results. 1. Herpetic keratitis cases at the Department of Ophthalmology, Kinki University. There were 129 eyes of 128 patients who visited the Cornea Service in our university hospitals at Osayasayama, Sakai and Nara over 13 years and were diagnosed with herpetic keratitis and followed up for at least one year. They were investigated as to the type of herpetic keratitis at the initial visit and its recurrence. Initial types of herpetic keratitis and number of eyes of each type were: Epithelial type, 65 eyes (50%); Stromal type, 30 eyes (23%); Combined epithelial and stromal types, 18 eyes (14%). Recurrence was seen in 47% of the total 129 eyes. Recurrent cases of the epithelial type were mostly epithelial type. Frequently recurrent cases of the stromal type presented with repeated epithelial, stromal, and combined types. 2. Effects of antiherpetics on mouse epithelial herpetic keratitis. Acyclovir (ACV) eye ointment is usually prescribed for several weeks to treat human epithelial herpetic keratitis. Our question is: Is this long administration really necessary? To find the answer to this question, we investigated time-dependent effects of antiherpetics on mouse epithelial herpetic keratitis. Mouse corneas were infected with HSV-1 and either ACV eye ointment, oral valaciclovir (VACV) or oral famciclovir (FCV) was administered. No virus was detected in the tear fluid examined by viral culture 4 days after start of ACV eye ointment or oral VACV and 6 days after start of oral FCV. Real-time PCR revealed significant decrease of HSV DNA copy number in the eyeball or trigeminal ganglion compared to saline instillation 4 and 6 days after start. These results suggest that antivirals for 5 days could sufficiently decrease the HSV amount in the ocular surface and eyeball. 3. Corneal latency. In order to prove latency of HSV in the human cornea, virological and molecular biological techniques were used to ensure the following 3 prerequisites. 1) Positive HSV DNA in the human cornea. 2) Negative homogenate, positive explant. 3) Only latency-associated transcript (LAT) detected and transcriptional products of other virus genes (?, ?, ?) not detected in the cornea. As a result, all the 3 prerequisites have been satisfied in the 3 corneas that had a past history of herpetic keratitis. This result suggests that HSV could remain latent in the human cornea. 4. Detection of HSV-1, HHV-6, and HHV-7 DNA in the anterior segment and aqueous humor using multiplex real-time PCR. Multiplex real-time PCR was applied for the first time ever in opththalmology to human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) and 7(HHV-7). Samples taken from tear fluid before and 3 days after phacoemulsification and aspiration (PEA) or penetrating keratoplasty (PKP), and aqueous humor aspirated during PEA were used. The results of multiplex real-time PCR showed HSV-1, HHV-6 and HHV-7 DNA present in tear fluid both before and after PEA or PKP. 5. Gene expression when reactivation is suppressed. Nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) has recently been reported to be involved in reactivation of HSV-1. IkappaB kinase-? (IKK2) inhibitors, which inhibit the activity of NF-?B, were used to examine gene expression during HSV reactivation in a mouse model. Significant decrease of HSV DNA copy number was observed at the trigeminal ganglion with real-time PCR in a group which was given IKK2 inhibitors intraperitoneally. Microarray method demonstrated 2-fold or more increased expression of 1812 probe. By Pathway analysis, eased immunosuppressive effects were observed in the group which was given I

  16. Two species of Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916 (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) parasitising cyprinid fishes in Iraq, with a redescription of R. tigridis Rahemo, 1978 (emend.).

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Saraiva, Aurélia; Abdullah, Shamall M A; Bilal, Samir J; Rahemo, Zohair I F

    2009-10-01

    Two species of Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916 (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) were recorded from cyprinid fishes in the basin of the River Tigris, northern Iraq: adults of R. (R.) tigridis Rahemo, 1978 (emend.) from Capoeta trutta (Heckel) and Cyprinion macrostomum Heckel and fourth-stage larvae of R. (Globochona) sp. from C. macrostomum, Barbus barbulus Heckel and Barbus kersin Heckel. Light and scanning electron microscopical studies of this material made possible a detailed redescription of R. tigridis, which is characterised by 14 anterior prostomal teeth and filamented eggs. It differs from the most similar species, R. fortunatowi Dinnik, 1933, mainly in the presence of large deirids close to the prostom. R. grandipapillata Rahemo & Kasim, 1979 is considered a junior synonym of R. tigridis. Fourth-stage larvae of Rhabdochona (G.) sp., characterised by eight anterior prostomal teeth and the presence of caudal processes on the tail tip, represent the first record of a Rhabdochona species of the subgenus Globochona Moravec, 1972 in Iraq. PMID:19731096

  17. Temperature-sensitive mutants of frog virus 3: biochemical and genetic characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Chinchar, V G; Granoff, A

    1986-01-01

    Nineteen frog virus 3 temperature-sensitive mutants were isolated after mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine and assayed for viral DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, as well as assembly site formation at permissive (25 degrees C) and nonpermissive (30 degrees C) temperatures. In addition, mutants were characterized for complementation by both quantitative and qualitative assays. Based on the genetic and biochemical data, the 19 mutants, along with 9 mutants isolated earlier, were ordered into four phenotypic classes which define defects in virion morphogenesis (class I), late mRNA synthesis (class II), viral assembly site formation (class III), and viral DNA synthesis (class IV). In addition, we used two-factor crosses to order 11 mutants, comprising 7 complementation groups, onto a linkage map spanning 77 recombination units. Images PMID:3951023

  18. Disseminated Cutaneous Herpes Zoster in a Patient with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh M

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a clinical manifestation which results from reactivation of latent VZV (Varicella zoster virus) present in the sensory root ganglia. Disseminated herpes zoster has been reported in immune-compromised patients such as patient on cancer chemotherapy, HIV (Human immune deficiency virus) infection, systemic corticosteroid therapy. However, we report a case of disseminated herpes zoster infection in an uncontrolled diabetic patient. A brief review of literature on this topic has been bestowed. PMID:26393187

  19. Herp depletion protects from protein aggregation by up-regulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Clara; Gatica, Damian; Paredes, Felipe; Bravo, Roberto; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pedrozo, Zully; Rodriguez, Andrea E; Toro, Barbra; Chiong, Mario; Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Hetz, Claudio; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    Herp is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducible protein that participates in the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. However, the contribution of Herp to other protein degradation pathways like autophagy and its connection to other types of stress responses remain unknown. Here we report that Herp regulates autophagy to clear poly-ubiquitin (poly-Ub) protein aggregates. Proteasome inhibition and glucose starvation (GS) led to a high level of poly-Ub protein aggregation that was drastically reduced by stably knocking down Herp (shHerp cells). The enhanced removal of poly-Ub inclusions protected cells from death caused by glucose starvation. Under basal conditions and increasingly after stress, higher LC3-II levels and GFP-LC3 puncta were observed in shHerp cells compared to control cells. Herp knockout cells displayed basal up-regulation of two essential autophagy regulators-Atg5 and Beclin-1, leading to increased autophagic flux. Beclin-1 up-regulation was due to a reduction in Hrd1 dependent proteasomal degradation, and not at transcriptional level. The consequent higher autophagic flux was necessary for the clearance of aggregates and for cell survival. We conclude that Herp operates as a relevant factor in the defense against glucose starvation by modulating autophagy levels. These data may have important implications due to the known up-regulation of Herp in pathological states such as brain and heart ischemia, both conditions associated to acute nutritional stress. PMID:24120520

  20. Therapy for genital herpes in immunocompromised patients: a national survey. The Herpes Simplex Advisory Panel.

    PubMed Central

    Scoular, A; Barton, S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the extent of aciclovir refractory herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in HIV coinfected patients in the United Kingdom and survey clinicians on their approaches to its management. DESIGN: Questionnaire survey of representative sample of one third of United Kingdom HIV physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Use of antiviral therapies for genital HSV infections in HIV positive patients, reported frequency of aciclovir refractory HSV infection, its therapy, and access to antiviral susceptibility testing facilities. RESULTS: 53 responses were obtained (response rate 61%), representing a sample size of 23% of United Kingdom HIV physicians. Use of non-standard antiviral regimens for HSV infections in HIV coinfected patients was widely practised, irrespective of the clinical characteristics of the HSV infection. Aciclovir refractory HSV infection has been observed by 37 (70%) respondents. Although foscarnet was the most frequently used therapy, used by 27/37 (73%) respondents, in only seven of these 27 (19%) was it a first line treatment for aciclovir refractory cases, frequently being used at a late stage in the clinical course. Antiviral susceptibility testing facilities were available to 46 (87%) clinicians. No respondents reported any evidence of transmission of aciclovir resistant strains. CONCLUSIONS: HIV coinfection has a stronger influence on therapeutic choice than clinical immunosuppression or severity of herpetic infection. Aciclovir treatment failure is commoner than hitherto recognised. There is a need for wider awareness of use of foscarnet at an earlier stage in management of refractory HSV infection. Images PMID:9534751

  1. A rare cause of dysphagia: herpes simplex esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bee; Caddy, Grant

    2007-05-21

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is well documented in immunosuppressed patients. However, it is rare in the immunocompetent host. We present a case of HSE in a 21 year-old healthy lady who was admitted to our unit with dysphagia, odynophagia and chest pain. Clinical examination revealed mild epigastric tenderness and admission bloods including full blood picture, electrolytes and inflammatory markers were normal. She underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) which revealed severe exudative, well-circumscribed ulcerations in her distal esophagus. Biopsies confirmed severe esophagitis with acute ulceration and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1. Subsequent assessment failed to identify an immune disorder. HSE should be suspected when faced with characteristic endoscopic findings, even if the patient is immunocompetent. When the diagnosis of HSE is confirmed, an immune deficiency should be sought. PMID:17569149

  2. Management and prevention of herpes zoster: A Canadian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Guy; Jovey, Roman; Elliott, Catherine T; Patrick, David M

    2010-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus reactivation leads to herpes zoster – the main complication of which is postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Rapid antiviral therapy initiated within 72 h of rash onset has been shown to accelerate rash healing, reduce the duration of acute pain and, to some extent, attenuate the development and duration of PHN. Other adjunctive therapies such as analgesics, antidepressants and some anticonvulsants are frequently required in the management of severe PHN. A live, attenuated zoster vaccine has been recently shown to significantly decrease herpes zoster incidence, PHN and the overall burden of illness when administered to adults older than 60 years of age. This new prophylactic modality has been reported to be cost-effective in the Canadian context, especially in the 60- to 75-year-old age group. PMID:21358885

  3. Successful transmission of Solenopsis invicta virus 3 to Solenopsis invicta fire ant colonies in oil, sugar, and cricket bait formulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tests were conducted to evaluate whether Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) could be delivered in various bait formulations to fire ant colonies and measure the corresponding colony health changes associated with virus infection in Solenopsis invicta. Three bait formulations (10% sugar solution, c...

  4. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: mapping of structural proteins, ribosomal frameshifting, and similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and kelp fly virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF) of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the stru...

  5. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Suazo, Paula A.; Ibañez, Francisco J.; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R.; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; González, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency. PMID:25918478

  6. Herpes simplex virus: isolation, cytopathological characterization and antiviral sensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa, Carlos; Hattori, Lilian Yumi; Galhardi, Ligia Carla Faccin; Lopes, Nayara; Bomfim, Wesley Andrade; de Cândido, Ligyana Korki; de Azevedo, Elbens Marcos Minoreli; Gon, Airton dos Santos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is an endemic disease and it is estimated that 6095% of the adult population are infected with symptoms that are usually self-limiting, though they can be serious, extensive and prolonged in immunocompromised individuals, highlighted by the emergence of drug-resistant strains. The study of the wild-type HSV strains based on the cytopathogenic features and its antiviral sensitivity are important in the establishment of an antivirogram for controlling the infection. OBJECTIVE This study sought to isolate and examine the cytopathological characteristics of circulating strains of the Herpes simplex virus, from clinical specimens and their sensitivity to commercially available antiherpesvirus drugs, acyclovir, phosphonophormic acid and trifluridine. METHODS Herpes simplex virus isolation, cytopathological features and antiviral sensitivity assays were performed in cell culture by tissue culture infectious dose or plaque forming unit assay. RESULTS From twenty-two clinical specimens, we isolated and adapted nine strains. Overall, the cytopathic effect was detected 24 h post-infection (p.i.) and the presence of syncytia was remarkable 48 h p.i., observed after cell staining. Out of eight isolates, four developed plaques of varying sizes. All the isolates were sensitive to acyclovir, phosphonophormic and trifluridine, with the percentage of virus inhibition (%VI) ranging from 49.7-100%. CONCLUSIONS The methodology for HSV isolation and characterization is a straightforward approach, but the drug sensitivity test, regarded as being of great practical importance, needs to be better understood. PMID:24937819

  7. Reactivation of herpes simplex virus-1 following epilepsy surgery?

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro; Crippa, Ana; Cruz, Cristina; de Paola, Luciano; de Souza, Luciana Paula; Noronha, Lucia; Torres, Luis Fernando Bleggi; Koneski, Julio A.S.; Pessa, Luis Felipe Cavalli; Nogueira, Meri Bordignon; Raboni, Sonia Mara; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo; Vidal, Luine Rosele

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study reports a case of encephalitis due to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), following surgical manipulation of the site of a primary infection. Methods Herpes simplex virus-1 infection was confirmed by CSF PCR and DNA sequencing. Results The patient was an 11-year-old girl who required temporal lobe surgery for epilepsy. She had meningoencephalitis due to HSV at the age of 20 months, and she was treated with acyclovir. Three years later, the patient developed uncontrolled seizures that became more frequent and changed in character at 11 years of age. On the 12th postoperative day, she developed fever and seizures, and she was diagnosed with HSV-1 by positive CSF PCR. She was treated with acyclovir (30 mg/kg/day for 21 days). In this report, we describe the patient and review the relevant literature. Conclusion The authors stress the potential risk of reactivation of HSV encephalitis after intracranial surgery. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis must be considered in neurosurgical patients who develop postoperative seizures and fever. PMID:26543809

  8. [Neuropathic pain due to herpes zoster infection with atypical localization].

    PubMed

    Sa??r, Özlem; Özaslan, Sabri; Meriç, Yücel; Arslan, ?smail; Köro?lu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Acute herpes zoster infection appears in the situation of depression of immune system and reactivation of varicella zoster virus which causes small pox. Pain and maculopapular lesion accompany clinical symptoms. Various pharmacological and invasive methods can be used for treatment. Efficient therapy is important for prevention of postherpetic neuralgia and cure of acute pain and dermatological lesions. A 55 years old, 160 cm height and 65 kg weight female patient with complaints of severe pain, sensation of burning, tingling at the right hand and forearm was admitted to our pain department. The patient who was diagnosed as cervical hernia at an other medical center had a normal physical servical spine examination. Patient history and physical examination findings with acute herpes zoster infection was considered. Right stellate ganglion blockade for diagnosis and treatment was performed because of regressed and atypically located lesions and a visual analog scale score of 10. VAS score decreased 50% at 9th min after block, VAS score at 2nd hour was 2. Antiviral, gabapentin, and tricyclic antidepressant treatment was started after stellat ganglion blockade and patient was discharged. After 3 months complaints dissapeared and drug doses were discreased and stopped. In conclusion we think that stellate ganglion blockade can be useful in diagnosis, acute pain control, improving patient comfort and compatibility to drug therapy in atypically located herpes zoster. PMID:24264553

  9. [Preventing papillomavirus infectious and herpes zoster: new vaccines].

    PubMed

    Silbermann, Benjamin; Launay, Odile

    2007-04-01

    Two new vaccines have been recently licensed : a quadrivalent vaccine against Human papillomavirus infections (HPV) 6, 11, 16 and 18, recommended to children from 9 years old and to young adults under the age of 26 years, and a vaccine against herpes zoster for adults from 60 years old onwards. A bivalent vaccine against HPV 16 and 18 will be shortly available. HPV vaccines are composed of the L1 structural proteins of 2 or 4 HPV genotypes, produced by genetic engineering and self-assembled. These inert vaccines are devoid of genetic materials and mimic the viral particle (virus-like particle, VLP). They allow, as suggested by the 4.5 to 5 years follow-up, to prevent HPV infections and the onset of pre-cancerous lesions associated with genotypes contained within the vaccine. They represent a major overhang in the vaccinology field, and, as anti-hepatitis B vaccine, will probably be effective in cancer prevention. Their use must be associated with the continued detection of cervix cancer by smears and also with the prevention of other sexually transmitted diseases. The herpes zoster vaccine is a living attenuated vaccine produced from the OKA/Merck strain already used in the vaccine against varicella. Its safety is good among persons 50 years old and over and its efficiency on lowering herpes zoster incidence, on the burden of illness and on post-herpetic neuralgia has been demonstrated in persons over 60 years old. PMID:17433234

  10. Serologic Screening for Herpes Simplex Virus among University Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Hayley; Nanda, Joy P.; Joffe, Alain; Roberts, Jessica; Rompalo, Anne; Melendez, Johan; Zenilman, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the feasibility of conducting serologic testing for the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) among university students and assessed the psychosocial impact of an HSV-2 diagnosis. Methods: The authors recruited a convenience sample of 100 students (aged 18-39 years) without a history of genital herpes from 1 university…

  11. Characterization of Frog Virus 3 knockout mutants lacking putative virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Andino, Francisco De Jesús; Grayfer, Leon; Chen, Guangchun; Gregory Chinchar, V; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Robert, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    To identify ranavirus virulence genes, we engineered Frog Virus 3 (FV3) knockout (KO) mutants defective for a putative viral caspase activation and recruitment domain-containing (CARD) protein (?64R-FV3) and a ?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase homolog (?52L-FV3). Compared to wild type (WT) FV3, infection of Xenopus tadpoles with ?64R- or ?52L-FV3 resulted in significantly lower levels of mortality and viral replication. We further characterized these and two earlier KO mutants lacking the immediate-early18kDa protein (FV3-?18K) or the truncated viral homolog of eIF-2? (FV3-?vIF-2?). All KO mutants replicated as well as WT-FV3 in non-amphibian cell lines, whereas in Xenopus A6 kidney cells replication of ?vCARD-, ?v?HSD- and ?vIF-2?-FV3 was markedly reduced. Furthermore, ?64R- and ?vIF-2?-FV3 were more sensitive to interferon than WT and ?18-FV3. Notably, ?64R-, ?18K- and ?vIF-2?- but not ?52L-FV3 triggered more apoptosis than WT FV3. These data suggest that vCARD (64R) and v?-HSD (52L) genes contribute to viral pathogenesis. PMID:26264970

  12. Evolutionary Origins of Human Herpes Simplex Viruses 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Joel O.; Smith, Martin D.; Smith, Davey M.; Scheffler, Konrad; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.

    2014-01-01

    Herpesviruses have been infecting and codiverging with their vertebrate hosts for hundreds of millions of years. The primate simplex viruses exemplify this pattern of virus–host codivergence, at a minimum, as far back as the most recent common ancestor of New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes. Humans are the only primate species known to be infected with two distinct herpes simplex viruses: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Human herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous, with over two-thirds of the human population infected by at least one virus. Here, we investigated whether the additional human simplex virus is the result of ancient viral lineage duplication or cross-species transmission. We found that standard phylogenetic models of nucleotide substitution are inadequate for distinguishing among these competing hypotheses; the extent of synonymous substitutions causes a substantial underestimation of the lengths of some of the branches in the phylogeny, consistent with observations in other viruses (e.g., avian influenza, Ebola, and coronaviruses). To more accurately estimate ancient viral divergence times, we applied a branch-site random effects likelihood model of molecular evolution that allows the strength of natural selection to vary across both the viral phylogeny and the gene alignment. This selection-informed model favored a scenario in which HSV-1 is the result of ancient codivergence and HSV-2 arose from a cross-species transmission event from the ancestor of modern chimpanzees to an extinct Homo precursor of modern humans, around 1.6 Ma. These results provide a new framework for understanding human herpes simplex virus evolution and demonstrate the importance of using selection-informed models of sequence evolution when investigating viral origin hypotheses. PMID:24916030

  13. Anti-herpes virus activity of aporphine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Montanha, J A; Amoros, M; Boustie, J; Girre, L

    1995-10-01

    We evaluated, in cell cultures, the action of a series of 19 aporphine alkaloids against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). On the basis of viral titre reduction, six alkaloids were found to be active. The mode of action of the three most potent inhibitors, oliverine HCl, pachystaudine, and oxostephanine, was studied. These compounds did not have any virucidal or prophylactic effect but they were shown to interfere with the viral replicative cycle. Although DNA synthesis was reduced, their exact target remains to be elucidated. In the discussion, some structure-activity relationships are considered. PMID:7480202

  14. Isolation of pigeon herpes encephalomyelitis virus in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, M A; el-Sisi, M A; Ismail, O E; Afaleque, A I

    1985-07-01

    A virus was isolated from the brains of pigeons suffering from nervous disorders in different localities of the Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The new isolate caused a high morbidity, ranging from 33% to 50%, and a mortality rate which reached 40%. The virus produced pinpoint greyish pock lesions on the chorioallantoic membrane of embryonated hens' eggs and induced syncytial formation followed by rounding and lysis of the cells in chicken embryo fibroblast cultures. Virus infectivity was significantly reduced following treatment by 20% ether or chloroform. The isolated virus was identified as pigeon herpes encephalomyelitis virus by serum-neutralization, agar gel diffusion and fluorescent antibody staining techniques. PMID:2994283

  15. Dose response of red imported fire ant colonies to Solenopsis invicta virus 3.

    PubMed

    Valles, Steven M; Porter, Sanford D

    2015-10-01

    Baiting tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of increasing Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) dose on fire ant colonies. Actively growing early-stage fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren) laboratory colonies were pulse-exposed for 24 hours to six concentrations of SINV-3 (10(1), 10(3), 10(5), 10(7), 10(9) genome equivalents/?l) in 1 ml of a 10 % sucrose bait and monitored regularly for two months. SINV-3 concentration had a significant effect on colony health. Brood rating (proportion of brood to worker ants) began to depart from the control group at 19 days for the 10(9) concentration and 26 days for the 10(7) concentration. At 60 days, brood rating was significantly lower among colonies treated with 10(9), 10(7), and 10(5) SINV-3 concentrations. The intermediate concentration, 10(5), appeared to cause a chronic, low-level infection with one colony (n = 9) supporting virus replication. Newly synthesized virus was not detected in any fire ant colonies treated at the 10(1) concentration, indicating that active infections failed to be established at this level of exposure. The highest bait concentration chosen, 10(9), appeared most effective from a control aspect; mean colony brood rating at this concentration (1.1 ± 0.9 at the 60 day time point) indicated poor colony health with minimal brood production. No clear relationship was observed between the quantity of plus genome strand detected and brood rating. Conversely, there was a strong relationship between the presence of the replicative genome strand and declining brood rating, which may serve as a predictor of disease severity. Recommendations for field treatment levels to control fire ants with SINV-3 are discussed. PMID:26162304

  16. Antibody screening identifies 78 putative host proteins involved in Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 infection or propagation in common carp, Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed Central

    Gotesman, M; Soliman, H; El-Matbouli, M

    2014-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is the aetiological agent of a serious and notifiable disease afflicting common and koi carp, Cyprinus carpio L., termed koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD). Significant progress has been achieved in the last 15 years, since the initial reports surfaced from Germany, USA and Israel of the CyHV-3 virus, in terms of pathology and detection. However, relatively few studies have been carried out in understanding viral replication and propagation. Antibody-based affinity has been used for detection of CyHV-3 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and PCR-based techniques, and immunohistological assays have been used to describe a CyHV-3 membrane protein, termed ORF81. In this study, monoclonal antibodies linked to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated spin columns were used to purify CyHV-3 and host proteins from tissue samples originating in either CyHV-3 symptomatic or asymptomatic fish. The samples were next analysed either by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and subsequently by electrospray ionization coupled to mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) or by ESI-MS analysis directly after purification. A total of 78 host proteins and five CyHV-3 proteins were identified in the two analyses. These data can be used to develop novel control methods for CyHV-3, based on pathways or proteins identified in this study. PMID:23347276

  17. Invasive Cyprinid Fish in Europe Originate from the Single Introduction of an Admixed Source Population Followed by a Complex Pattern of Spread

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Andrea; Britton, Robert; Gozlan, Rodolphe; van Oosterhout, Cock; Volckaert, Filip A. M.; Hänfling, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The Asian cyprinid fish, the topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva), was introduced into Europe in the 1960s. A highly invasive freshwater fish, it is currently found in at least 32 countries outside its native range. Here we analyse a 700 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to examine different models of colonisation and spread within the invasive range, and to investigate the factors that may have contributed to their invasion success. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity of the introduced populations from continental Europe was higher than that of the native populations, although two recently introduced populations from the British Isles showed low levels of variability. Based on coalescent theory, all introduced and some native populations showed a relative excess of nucleotide diversity compared to haplotype diversity. This suggests that these populations are not in mutation-drift equilibrium, but rather that the relative inflated level of nucleotide diversity is consistent with recent admixture. This study elucidates the colonisation patterns of P. parva in Europe and provides an evolutionary framework of their invasion. It supports the hypothesis that their European colonisation was initiated by their introduction to a single location or small geographic area with subsequent complex pattern of spread including both long distance and stepping-stone dispersal. Furthermore, it was preceded by, or associated with, the admixture of genetically diverse source populations that may have augmented its invasive-potential. PMID:21674031

  18. Necrotizing Keratitis Caused by Acyclovir-Resistant Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Toriyama, Koji; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Background We report a case of necrotizing keratitis caused by acyclovir (ACV)-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV) with a clinical appearance similar to a previous fungal keratitis infection. Methods Observational case report. Results Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in the left eye with a history of herpetic keratitis that resolved with periodic treatment with ACV ointment and a topical steroid. The left eye was painful and red with an abscess and corneal erosion in the peripheral donor cornea. Examination of the scraped corneal epithelium by light microscopy and culturing identified Candida albicans; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was negative for human herpes viruses. After antifungal treatment, the ocular pain gradually decreased and the lesions slowly improved but recurred with a similar clinical appearance. A second light microscopy examination and cultures were negative for pathogens including C. albicans. PCR was positive for HSV-1 DNA; treatment with 3% topical ACV ointment was unsuccessful. A third examination showed only HSV-1 DNA. Despite antiviral ACV ointment, no clinical improvement occurred based on the HSV DNA copy numbers, which were the same before and after treatment, indicating a possible ACV-resistant strain. When topical trifluorothymidine was substituted for ACV, clinical improvement occurred and the HSV DNA copy numbers decreased. Conclusion Necrotizing keratitis induced by ACV-resistant HSV occurred independently after fungal keratitis, with a similar clinical appearance in this case, making diagnosis and treatment difficult. Monitoring the HSV DNA load by real-time PCR could be useful for refractory cases even with atypical clinical appearances. PMID:25473399

  19. Exploiting Herpes Simplex Virus Entry for Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hadigal, Satvik; Shukla, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) is associated with a variety of diseases such as genital herpes and numerous ocular diseases. At the global level, high prevalence of individuals who are seropositive for HSV, combined with its inconspicuous infection, remains a cause for major concern. At the molecular level, HSV entry into a host cell involves multiple steps, primarily the interaction of viral glycoproteins with various cell surface receptors, many of which have alternate substitutes. The molecular complexity of the virus to enter a cell is also enhanced by the existence of different modes of viral entry. The availability of many entry receptors, along with a variety of entry mechanisms, has resulted in a virus that is capable of infecting virtually all cell types. While HSV uses a wide repertoire of viral and host factors in establishing infection, current therapeutics aimed against the virus are not as diversified. In this particular review, we will focus on the initial entry of the virus into the cell, while highlighting potential novel therapeutics that can control this process. Virus entry is a decisive step and effective therapeutics can translate to less virus replication, reduced cell death, and detrimental symptoms. PMID:23752649

  20. Unusual Initial Presentation of Herpes Simplex Virus as Inguinal Lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Sarah A.; Strickler, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are a common cause of inguinal lymphadenopathy. However, surgical excision of enlarged inguinal nodes is almost never performed to initially diagnose genital herpes simplex virus, due to the distinct external presentation of genital herpetic vesicles that usually occur with the first symptoms of infection. Therefore, the histologic and immunophenotypic features of HSV-associated inguinal lymphadenopathy are unfamiliar to most pathologists. The current report describes the lymph node pathology of two immunocompetent patients, whose initial HSV diagnosis was established through surgical excision of enlarged inguinal lymph nodes. Histologic examination showed features consistent with viral lymphadenopathy, including florid follicular hyperplasia, monocytoid B-cell hyperplasia, and paracortical hyperplasia without extensive necrosis. Immunohistochemical stains for HSV antigens, using polyclonal anti-HSV I and II antibodies, demonstrate strong immunoreactivity for HSV in a small number of cells in the subcapsular sinuses, especially in areas with monocytoid B-cell hyperplasia. Rare scattered HSV-positive cells also are identified in paracortical areas and germinal centers. We conclude that an initial diagnosis of genital HSV infection may be established by inguinal lymph node biopsy. PMID:25815228

  1. Rapid Detection of Herpes Viruses for Clinical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane; Mehta, Satish

    2013-01-01

    There are eight herpes viruses that infect humans, causing a wide range of diseases resulting in considerable morbidity and associated costs. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpes virus that causes chickenpox in children and shingles in adults. Approximately 1,000,000 new cases of shingles occur each year; post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) follows shingles in 100,000 to 200,000 people annually. PHN is characterized by debilitating, nearly unbearable pain for weeks, months, and even years. The onset of shingles is characterized by pain, followed by the zoster rash, leading to blisters and severe pain. The problem is that in the early stages, shingles can be difficult to diagnose; chickenpox in adults can be equally difficult to diagnose. As a result, both diseases can be misdiagnosed (false positive/negative). A molecular assay has been adapted for use in diagnosing VZV diseases. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay is a non-invasive, rapid, sensitive, and highly specific method for VZV DNA detection. It provides unequivocal results and can effectively end misdiagnoses. This is an approximately two-hour assay that allows unequivocal diagnosis and rapid antiviral drug intervention. It has been demonstrated that rapid intervention can prevent full development of the disease, resulting in reduced likelihood of PHN. The technology was extended to shingles patients and demonstrated that VZV is shed in saliva and blood of all shingles patients. The amount of VZV in saliva parallels the medical outcome.

  2. The molecular basis of herpes simplex virus latency

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Michael P; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a neurotropic herpesvirus that establishes latency within sensory neurones. Following primary infection, the virus replicates productively within mucosal epithelial cells and enters sensory neurones via nerve termini. The virus is then transported to neuronal cell bodies where latency can be established. Periodically, the virus can reactivate to resume its normal lytic cycle gene expression programme and result in the generation of new virus progeny that are transported axonally back to the periphery. The ability to establish lifelong latency within the host and to periodically reactivate to facilitate dissemination is central to the survival strategy of this virus. Although incompletely understood, this review will focus on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of latency that centre on the functions of the virus-encoded latency-associated transcripts (LATs), epigenetic regulation of the latent virus genome and the molecular events that precipitate reactivation. This review considers current knowledge and hypotheses relating to the mechanisms involved in the establishment, maintenance and reactivation herpes simplex virus latency. PMID:22150699

  3. Herpes Simplex Esophagitis in Immunocompetent Host: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, G.; Pisello, F.; Modica, G.; Li Volsi, F.; Cajozzo, M.; Sciumè, C.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Herpes simplex esophagitis is well recognized in immunosuppressed subjects, but it is infrequent in immunocompetent patients. We present a case of HSE in a 53-year-old healthy man. Materials and Methods. The patient was admitted with dysphagia, odynophagia, and retrosternal chest pain. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed minute erosive area in distal esophagus and biopsies confirmed esophagitis and findings characteristic of Herpes Simplex Virus infection. Results. The patients was treated with high dose of protonpump inhibitor, sucralfate, and acyclovir, orally, with rapid resolution of symptoms. Discussion. HSV type I is the second most common cause of infectious esophagitis. The majority of symptomatic immunocompetent patients with HSE will present with an acute onset of esophagitis. Endoscopic biopsies from the ulcer edges should be obtained for both histopathology and viral culture. In immunocompetent host, HSE is generally a self-limited condition. Conclusions. HSE should be suspected in case of esophagitis without evident cause, even if the patient is immunocompetent. When the diagnosis of HSE is confirmed, careful history and assessment for an immune disorder such as HIV infection is crucial, to look for underlying immune deficiency. PMID:19750238

  4. A serological study of canine herpes virus-1 infection in the English dog population.

    PubMed

    Reading, M J; Field, H J

    1998-01-01

    An epidemiological survey investigated the prevalence of canine herpes virus-1 antibodies in a population of 325 pet dogs in England. Sera were analysed for the presence of canine herpes virus-1 neutralising antibody by means of a serum neutralisation test and for virus-specific IgG and IgM by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In contrast with published results from other parts of the world, canine herpes virus-1 infection was shown to be common among the domestic dog population of England. PMID:9739327

  5. Effects of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Glycoprotein Vaccines and CLDC Adjuvant on Genital Herpes Infection in the Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, David I; Earwood, Julie D.; Bravo, Fernando J.; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Clark, Jennifer R.; Fairman, Jeffrey; Cardin, Rhonda D.

    2011-01-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are common but results from vaccine trials with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) have been disappointing. We therefore compared a similar HSV gD2 vaccine, to a further truncated gD2 vaccine, to a vaccine with gD2 plus gB2 and gH2/gL2 and to a vaccine with only gB2 and gH2/gL2 in a guinea pig model of genital herpes. All vaccines were administered with cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) as an adjuvant. All vaccines significantly decreased the severity of acute genital disease and vaginal virus replication compared to the placebo group. The majority of animals in all groups developed at least one episode of recurrent disease but the frequency of recurrent disease was significantly reduced by each vaccine compared to placebo. No vaccine was significantly more protective than gD2 alone for any of the parameters described above. No vaccine decreased recurrent virus shedding. When protection against acute infection of dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord was evaluated all vaccines decreased the per cent of animal with detectable virus and the quantity of virus but again no vaccine was significantly more protective than another. Improvements in HSV-2 vaccines may require inclusion of more T cell targets, more potent adjuvants or live virus vaccines. PMID:21238569

  6. Effects of herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein vaccines and CLDC adjuvant on genital herpes infection in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Earwood, Julie D; Bravo, Fernando J; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Clark, Jennifer R; Fairman, Jeffrey; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2011-03-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are common but results from vaccine trials with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) have been disappointing. We therefore compared a similar HSV gD2 vaccine, to a further truncated gD2 vaccine, to a vaccine with gD2 plus gB2 and gH2/gL2 and to a vaccine with only gB2 and gH2/gL2 in a guinea pig model of genital herpes. All vaccines were administered with cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) as an adjuvant. All vaccines significantly decreased the severity of acute genital disease and vaginal virus replication compared to the placebo group. The majority of animals in all groups developed at least one episode of recurrent disease but the frequency of recurrent disease was significantly reduced by each vaccine compared to placebo. No vaccine was significantly more protective than gD2 alone for any of the parameters described above. No vaccine decreased recurrent virus shedding. When protection against acute infection of dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord was evaluated all vaccines decreased the per cent of animal with detectable virus and the quantity of virus but again no vaccine was significantly more protective than another. Improvements in HSV-2 vaccines may require inclusion of more T cell targets, more potent adjuvants or live virus vaccines. PMID:21238569

  7. Herpes simplex virus 1 interaction with Toll-like receptor 2 contributes to lethal encephalitis

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    Herpes simplex virus 1 interaction with Toll-like receptor 2 contributes to lethal encephalitis-1) is the most commonly diagnosed cause of sporadic (nonepidemic) encephalitis in humans. Without hosts, including disseminated infection, pneumonia, and hepatitis, encephalitis is commonly seen

  8. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  9. Herpes Simplex Virus Sepsis in a Young Woman with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Hofmann, Jörg; Kredel, Lea Isabell; Holzem, Christina; Kühl, Anja A; Taube, Eliane T; Schubert, Stefan; Siegmund, Britta; Epple, Hans-Jörg

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a herpes simplex virus-1 [HSV-1] sepsis with severe herpes hepatitis in a young female treated with triple immunosuppressive therapy [adalimumab, azathioprine, prednisolone] for refractory Crohn's disease [CD]. The patient presented with high fever, generalised abdominal tenderness, strongly elevated transaminases, coagulopathy, and pancytopenia. Comprehensive diagnostics including blood HSV-1 polymerase chain reaction [PCR], liver biopsy, and immunohistochemistry revealed the diagnosis of fulminant herpes hepatitis. HSV-1 positivity of cutaneous lesions proved the disseminated nature of the infection. Early treatment with intravenous acyclovir led to a rapid improvement of the patient's condition and resulted in a full recovery of her liver function. This is the first reported case of HSV-sepsis in a patient with CD. Physicians treating inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] patients with combined immunosuppressive therapy should be aware of the possibility of herpes hepatitis, and early empirical antiviral therapy should be considered in immunosuppressed patients presenting with fever and severe anicteric hepatitis. PMID:26351382

  10. PARAMETERS DISTINGUISHING HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS TYPE 2-TRANSFORMED TUMORIGENIC AND NONTUMORIGENIC RAT CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A newly developed experimental model system was used to determine in vitro transformation-specific parameters which correlate with tumorigenicity. The data suggested that clonal herpes simplex virus type 2-transformed syngeneic rat embryo cells with intermediate, transformed rat ...

  11. Legal and Moral Considerations in Educating Children with Herpes in Public School Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guess, Doug; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The article examines legal and moral implications in providing classroom education to children with herpes. Conclusions suggest the integration of the child into educationally appropriate programs during the disease's inactive stage. (CL)

  12. Fatal herpes simplex virus hepatitis following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and anterior resection for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Toomey, D P; Dhadda, A S; Sanni, L A; Cooke, J P; Hartley, J E

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a young patient who contracted fatal herpes simplex virus hepatitis following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and anterior resection for rectal cancer. The rarity and non-specific presentation of this treatable disease, which masqueraded as the sequelae of postoperative sepsis, resulted in a diagnosis following death. Features that should prompt inclusion of herpes simplex virus hepatitis in the differential diagnoses are suggested and the case is a reminder of how neoadjuvant therapy may subtly alter a patient's immunocompetency. PMID:25350168

  13. Atypical oral presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a patient after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burke, E M; Karp, D L; Wu, T C; Corio, R L

    1994-01-01

    An atypical oral presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a 49-year-old woman after orthotopic liver transplantation is reported. Clinically, the differential diagnosis included chronic hyperplastic candidiasis, nodular leukoplakia of undetermined etiology, and malignant neoplasm. An excisional biopsy revealed herpesvirus infection, and immunoperoxidase staining confirmed herpes simplex virus infection. This report describes the clinical and histologic appearance of these lesions and the course and treatment of the patient. PMID:7986503

  14. During latency, herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA is associated with nucleosomes in a chromatin structure.

    PubMed Central

    Deshmane, S L; Fraser, N W

    1989-01-01

    Latent herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA has a nucleosomal structure similar to that of cellular chromatin, as determined by micrococcal nuclease digestion. All of the major regions, including the transcriptionally active region of the genome, were found to be associated with nucleosomes. Such a chromatin structure is likely to be an important element in the control of herpes simplex virus type 1 gene expression during latency. Images PMID:2536115

  15. Sensitivity and permissivity of Cyprinus carpio to cyprinid herpesvirus 3 during the early stages of its development: importance of the epidermal mucus as an innate immune barrier.

    PubMed

    Ronsmans, Maygane; Boutier, Maxime; Rakus, Krzysztof; Farnir, Frédéric; Desmecht, Daniel; Ectors, Fabien; Vandecan, Michaël; Lieffrig, François; Mélard, Charles; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) causes a lethal disease in common and koi carp (Cyprinus carpio). The present study investigated the ability of CyHV-3 to infect common carp during the early stages of its development (from embryos to fingerlings) after inoculation by immersion in water containing the virus. Fish were inoculated at different times after hatching with a pathogenic recombinant CyHV-3 strain expressing luciferase. The sensitivity and permissivity of carp to CyHV-3 were investigated using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The susceptibility of carp to CyHV-3 disease was investigated by measuring the survival rate. Carp were sensitive and permissive to CyHV-3 infection and susceptible to CyHV-3 disease at all stages of development, but the sensitivity of the two early developmental stages (embryo and larval stages) was limited compared to later stages. The lower sensitivity observed for the early developmental stages was due to stronger inhibition of viral entry into the host by epidermal mucus. In addition, independent of the developmental stage at which inoculation was performed, the localization of light emission suggested that the skin is the portal of CyHV-3 entry. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate that carp are sensitive and permissive to CyHV-3 at all stages of development and confirm that the skin is the major portal of entry after inoculation by immersion in infectious water. The results also stress the role of epidermal mucus as an innate immune barrier against pathogens even and especially at the early stages of development. PMID:25281322

  16. When Anthropogenic River Disturbance Decreases Hybridisation between Non-Native and Endemic Cyprinids and Drives an Ecomorphological Displacement towards Juvenile State in Both Species

    PubMed Central

    Sinama, Melthide; Costedoat, Caroline; Chappaz, Rémi; Gilles, André

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the impact of non-native species on native species is a major challenge in molecular ecology, particularly for genetically compatible fish species. Invasions are generally difficult to study because their effects may be confused with those of environmental or human disturbances. Colonized ecosystems are differently impacted by human activities, resulting in diverse responses and interactions between native and non-native species. We studied the dynamics between two Cyprinids species (invasive Chondrostoma nasus and endemic Parachondrostoma toxostoma) and their hybrids in 16 populations (from allopatric to sympatric situations and from little to highly fragmented areas) corresponding to 2,256 specimens. Each specimen was assigned to a particular species or to a hybrid pool using molecular identification (cytochrome b and 41 microsatellites). We carried out an ecomorphological analysis based on size, age, body shape, and diet (gut vacuity and molecular fecal contents). Our results contradicted our initial assumptions on the pattern of invasion and the rate of introgression. There was no sign of underperformance for the endemic species in areas where hybridisation occurred. In the unfragmented zone, the introduced species was found mostly downstream, with body shapes similar to those in allopatric populations while both species were found to be more insectivorous than the reference populations. However, high level of hybridisation was detected, suggesting interactions between the two species during spawning and/or the existence of hybrid swarm. In the disturbed zone, introgression was less frequent and slender body shape was associated with diatomivorous behaviour, smaller size (juvenile characteristics) and greater gut vacuity. Results suggested that habitat degradation induced similar ecomorphological trait changes in the two species and their hybrids (i.e. a transition towards a pedomorphic state) where the invasive species is more affected than the native species. Therefore, this study reveals a diversity of relationships between two genetically compatible species and emphasizes constraints on the invasion process in disturbed areas. PMID:26561027

  17. Cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) disturbs osmotic balance in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)--A potential cause of mortality.

    PubMed

    Negenborn, J; van der Marel, M C; Ganter, M; Steinhagen, D

    2015-06-12

    Cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) causes a fatal disease in carp (Cyprinus carpio) and its ornamental koi varieties which seriously affects production and trade of this fish species globally. Up to now, the pathophysiology of this disease remains unclear. Affected individuals develop most prominent lesions in gills, skin and kidney, in tissues which are involved in the osmotic regulation of freshwater teleosts. Therefore, here serum and urine electrolyte levels were examined during the course of an experimental infection of carp with CyHV-3. In infected carp an interstitial nephritis with a progressive deterioration of nephric tubules developed, which was paralleled by elevated electrolyte losses, mainly Na(+) in the urine. The urine/plasma ratio for Na(+) increased from 0.03 in uninfected carp to 0.43-0.83 in carp under CyHV-3 infection, while concentration of divalent ions were not significantly changed. These electrolyte losses could not be compensated since plasma osmolality and Na(+) concentration dropped significantly in CyHV-3 infected carp. This was most probably caused by the progressive deterioration of the branchial epithelium, which in teleosts plays a prominent role in osmoregulation, and which was seen concomitantly with decreasing electrolyte levels in the serum of carp under CyHV-3 infection. Immediately after infection with CyHV-3, by day 2 post exposure, affected carp showed severe anaemia and prominent leucocytosis indicating the development of an acute inflammation, which could intensify the observed hydro-mineral imbalances. The data presented here show that an infection with CyHV-3 induces an acute inflammation and a severe dysfunction of osmoregulation in affected carp or koi, which may lead to death in particular in the case of acute disease progression. PMID:25888311

  18. Phylogeography, historical demography and habitat suitability modelling of freshwater fishes inhabiting seasonally fluctuating Mediterranean river systems: a case study using the Iberian cyprinid Squalius valentinus.

    PubMed

    Perea, S; Doadrio, I

    2015-07-01

    The Mediterranean freshwater fish fauna has evolved under constraints imposed by the seasonal weather/hydrological patterns that define the Mediterranean climate. These conditions have influenced the genetic and demographic structure of aquatic communities since their origins in the Mid-Pliocene. Freshwater species in Mediterranean-type climates will likely constitute genetically well-differentiated populations, to varying extents depending on basin size, as a consequence of fragmentation resulting from drought/flood cycles. We developed an integrative framework to study the spatial patterns in genetic diversity, demographic trends, habitat suitability modelling and landscape genetics, to evaluate the evolutionary response of Mediterranean-type freshwater fish to seasonal fluctuations in weather. To test this evolutionary response, the model species used was Squalius valentinus, an endemic cyprinid of the Spanish Levantine area, where seasonal weather fluctuations are extreme, although our findings may be extrapolated to other Mediterranean-type species. Our results underscore the significant role of the Mediterranean climate, along with Pleistocene glaciations, in diversification of S. valentinus. We found higher nuclear diversity in larger drainage basins, but higher mitochondrial diversity correlated to habitat suitability rather than basin size. We also found strong correlation between genetic structure and climatic factors associated with Mediterranean seasonality. Demographic and migration analyses suggested population expansion during glacial periods that also contributed to the current genetic structure of S. valentinus populations. The inferred models support the significant contribution of precipitation and temperature to S. valentinus habitat suitability and allow recognizing areas of habitat stability. We highlight the importance of stable habitat conditions, fostered by typical karstic springs found on the Mediterranean littoral coasts, for the preservation of freshwater species inhabiting seasonally fluctuating river systems. PMID:26085305

  19. Herpes Zoster as a Predictor of HIV Infection in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuan-Ti; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Tantoh, Disline Manli; Huang, Jing-Yang; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Shu-Yi; Ko, Pei-Chieh; Hung, Hung-Chang; Jan, Cheng-Feng; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between herpes zoster (HZ) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Data were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Databases (LHID 2005 and 2010), Taiwan. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes were used to identify Hz from 2001–2004. Identification of HIV infection was from 2005–2010. The hazard ratios of HIV among herpes zoster infected and non-herpes zoster infected patients were estimated using multiple Cox proportional hazard model. In general, 19685 participants were identified with Hz. The HIV incidence rates (per 104 person-months) in herpes zoster infected and non-infected patients were 0.191(95% CI 0.130–0.280) and 0.079 (95% CI 0.074–0.084), respectively while the hazard ratio (HR) of HIV among infected individuals was 3.518 (95% CI 2.375–5.211). This study concludes that herpes zoster could be considered as a predictor of HIV infection especially among Asian populations, hence it is vital to test herpes zoster infected individuals for HIV antibodies. PMID:26535574

  20. New-Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus Mimicking Herpes Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Puoti, Gianfranco; Elefante, Andrea; Saracino, Dario; Capasso, Antonella; Cotrufo, Roberto; Anello, Clara Belluomo

    2013-01-01

    New-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a recently defined clinical entity that describes patients who present with status epilepticus of unclear etiology that is highly refractory to therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of NORSE usually discloses no specific abnormalities except for an occasional mild T2/FLAIR hyperintense signal of the mesial temporal lobe. Here, we report a peculiar case of NORSE in which brain MRI showed massive alteration of both temporal lobes, with features strongly supporting the diagnosis of herpes virus encephalitis, but lacking any laboratory evidence of viral infection in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. It showed also striking signal alterations in the thalamus, which got worse in the course of the disease. This report emphasizes the possibility that seizure activity alone plays a critical role in both determining the disease and whether it will be self-sustaining. PMID:24163672

  1. New-onset refractory status epilepticus mimicking herpes virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Puoti, Gianfranco; Elefante, Andrea; Saracino, Dario; Capasso, Antonella; Cotrufo, Roberto; Anello, Clara Belluomo

    2013-01-01

    New-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a recently defined clinical entity that describes patients who present with status epilepticus of unclear etiology that is highly refractory to therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of NORSE usually discloses no specific abnormalities except for an occasional mild T2/FLAIR hyperintense signal of the mesial temporal lobe. Here, we report a peculiar case of NORSE in which brain MRI showed massive alteration of both temporal lobes, with features strongly supporting the diagnosis of herpes virus encephalitis, but lacking any laboratory evidence of viral infection in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. It showed also striking signal alterations in the thalamus, which got worse in the course of the disease. This report emphasizes the possibility that seizure activity alone plays a critical role in both determining the disease and whether it will be self-sustaining. PMID:24163672

  2. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Esther; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Sonda, Sabrina; Kaech, Andres; Lucas, Miriam S.; Ackermann, Mathias; Wild, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  3. Recombination Promoted by DNA Viruses: Phage ? to Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Sandra K.; Sawitzke, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage ? and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on ? and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies. PMID:25002096

  4. Local clinical phototreatment of herpes infection in São Paulo.

    PubMed

    Tardivo, Joao Paulo; Wainwright, Mark; Baptista, Mauricio S

    2012-06-01

    The clinical use of topical photodynamic therapy in herpes simplex lesions in São Paulo is presented and discussed. Although previous attempts utilising this type of approach in the USA were discontinued in the early 1970s due to several presentations of post-treatment Bowen's disease, none of the cases from the clinic presented here have displayed any complications on follow-up. In addition, lesion recrudescence periods are generally much longer than with conventional approaches. This is thought to be due to improvements in the treatment protocol, viz. use of the non-toxic photosensitisers methylene blue and Hypericum perforatum extract in place of proflavine and neutral red in the original trials, differences in photosensitisation pathway and illumination of the treatment site with red rather than fluorescent/UV light. Post-treatment cosmesis is also excellent. PMID:22594981

  5. Animal models of herpes simplex virus immunity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kollias, Christina M; Huneke, Richard B; Wigdahl, Brian; Jennings, Stephen R

    2015-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous human pathogens represented by two distinct serotypes: herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1); and HSV type 2 (HSV-2). In the general population, adult seropositivity rates approach 90% for HSV-1 and 20-25% for HSV-2. These viruses cause significant morbidity, primarily as mucosal membrane lesions in the form of facial cold sores and genital ulcers, with much less common but more severe manifestations causing death from encephalitis. HSV infections in humans are difficult to study in many cases because many primary infections are asymptomatic. Moreover, the neurotropic properties of HSV make it much more difficult to study the immune mechanisms controlling reactivation of latent infection within the corresponding sensory ganglia and crossover into the central nervous system of infected humans. This is because samples from the nervous system can only be routinely obtained at the time of autopsy. Thus, animal models have been developed whose use has led to a better understanding of multiple aspects of HSV biology, molecular biology, pathogenesis, disease, and immunity. The course of HSV infection in a spectrum of animal models depends on important experimental parameters including animal species, age, and genotype; route of infection; and viral serotype, strain, and dose. This review summarizes the animal models most commonly used to study HSV pathogenesis and its establishment, maintenance, and reactivation from latency. It focuses particularly on the immune response to HSV during acute primary infection and the initial invasion of the ganglion with comparisons to the events governing maintenance of viral latency. PMID:25388226

  6. The burden of disease of Herpes Zoster in Tuscany

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Miriam; Bellini, Irene; Capecchi, Leonardo; Pieri, Luca; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara; Callaioli, Silvia; Gasparini, Roberto; Panatto, Donatella; Tiscione, Emilia; Bonanni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a disease caused by the reactivation of the latent ?-herpes virus varicella zoster virus (VZV), for which, in Italy, a specific surveillance system does not exist, but around 200?000 cases are estimated each year. In older patients, who are at increased risk of developing HZ, symptoms are more severe and the chances to develop postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), the most severe complication, are substantially higher. A vaccine against HZ with demonstrated efficacy and an acceptable safety profile is now available and is recommended in Europe for adults >50 years. In anticipation of the possible introduction of an immunization programme for the elderly in Tuscany, the burden of disease caused by HZ and its complications was assessed through a retrospective analysis of the hospital discharge records between 2002 and 2012, using the ICD-9-CM 053 code. In the period 2002–2012, 4475 hospital admissions were registered with annual means of 368 hospitalizations and 39 day-hospital admissions. Most of the hospitalizations (68%) involved subjects > 65 years; the mean length of stay was 9.5 days. Slightly more than half (51.2%) of total hospital admissions were complicated cases. The most frequent were neurological complications (24.2% of total admissions), followed by ophthalmic complications (16.5%). Cases with neurological complications were those with the higher average length of stay and higher average costs for case. This study confirmed the epidemiological impact of HZ and its complications and the positive impact on morbidity that the introduction of the HZ vaccination could have in older age groups. PMID:25483534

  7. A case of herpes zoster uveitis with severe hyphema

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uveitis sometimes causes hyphema, but severe hyphema as a complication following herpes zoster uveitis has rarely been reported. We report a rare case of zoster sine herpete with unusually severe hyphema. Case presentation A 41-year-old Japanese female developed hyphema filling almost one-half of the depth of the anterior chamber after a two-week history of unilateral anterior uveitis. Hyphema persisted for four weeks while sectorial iris atrophy became gradually apparent. Systemic prednisolone and valaciclovir resulted in prompt resolution of uveitis and hyphema. Serum anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) IgG measured by enzyme immunoassay was 116 at presentation and decreased to 20.3 four month later. In addition, the antibody level in aqueous humor was almost 10-fold higher than that in serum examined 9 months after presentation. Because there was no skin lesion, this case was diagnosed as zoster sine herpete. The patient underwent cataract operation due to secondary cataract. The final visual acuity in decimal notation was 1.0, but complications such as severe iris atrophy, wide anterior synechiae, corneal opacity, and decrease in corneal endothelial cell count remained. Conclusion Zoster sine herpete is an important differential diagnosis in a case of acute anterior uveitis with severe hyphema, although such cases are quite rare. Measurement of anti-VZV IgG levels by enzyme immunoassay in aqueous humor and serum would be useful in the diagnosis of VZV reactivation. Prompt diagnosis and administration of corticosteroids and anti-herpes virus medication may improve the outcome. PMID:24885484

  8. A Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Human Asymptomatic CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes-Based Vaccine Protects Against Ocular Herpes in a “Humanized” HLA Transgenic Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Huang, Jiawei; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical vaccine that protects from ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and disease still is lacking. In the present study, preclinical vaccine trials of nine asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptides, selected from HSV-1 glycoproteins B (gB), and tegument proteins VP11/12 and VP13/14, were performed in the “humanized” HLA–transgenic rabbit (HLA-Tg rabbit) model of ocular herpes. We recently reported that these peptides are highly recognized by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HSV-1–seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Methods. Mixtures of three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell peptides derived from either HSV-1 gB, VP11/12, or VP13/14 were delivered subcutaneously to different groups of HLA-Tg rabbits (n = 10) in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, twice at 15-day intervals. The frequency and function of HSV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells induced by these peptides and their protective efficacy, in terms of survival, virus replication in the eye, and ocular herpetic disease were assessed after an ocular challenge with HSV-1 (strain McKrae). Results. All mixtures elicited strong and polyfunctional IFN-?– and TNF-?–producing CD107+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, associated with a significant reduction in death, ocular herpes infection, and disease (P < 0.015). Conclusions. The results of this preclinical trial support the screening strategy used to select the HSV-1 ASYMP CD8+ T-cell epitopes, emphasize their valuable immunogenic and protective efficacy against ocular herpes, and provide a prototype vaccine formulation that may be highly efficacious for preventing ocular herpes in humans. PMID:26098469

  9. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine development. We review the role of animal models in herpes vaccine development and discuss its current status, challenges, and prospects. PMID:25446827

  10. Comparison of an avidin-biotin immunoassay with three commercially available immunofluorescence kits for typing of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, D L; Johnson, F B; Richards, D F

    1985-01-01

    An avidin-biotin complex system was compared with three commercially available immunofluorescence kits for serotyping herpes simplex virus isolates from clinical specimens. Sensitivity values showed that the Electro-Nucleonics and Immulok reagents were useful in detecting the presence of virus, whereas the predictive values showed that the Syva and Immulok reagents possessed adequate discrimination between the herpes simplex virus serotypes. The avidin-biotin complex system was equal or superior to the immunofluorescence reagents tested both in detecting herpes simplex virus antigens in cell culture and in serotyping herpes simplex virus isolates. PMID:2997305

  11. The Structure of the Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 ORF112-Z?·Z-DNA Complex Reveals a Mechanism of Nucleic Acids Recognition Conserved with E3L, a Poxvirus Inhibitor of Interferon Response.

    PubMed

    Ku?, Krzysztof; Rakus, Krzysztof; Boutier, Maxime; Tsigkri, Theokliti; Gabriel, Luisa; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Athanasiadis, Alekos

    2015-12-25

    In vertebrate species, the innate immune system down-regulates protein translation in response to viral infection through the action of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR). In some teleost species another protein kinase, Z-DNA-dependent protein kinase (PKZ), plays a similar role but instead of dsRNA binding domains, PKZ has Z? domains. These domains recognize the left-handed conformer of dsDNA and dsRNA known as Z-DNA/Z-RNA. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 infects common and koi carp, which have PKZ, and encodes the ORF112 protein that itself bears a Z? domain, a putative competitive inhibitor of PKZ. Here we present the crystal structure of ORF112-Z? in complex with an 18-bp CpG DNA repeat, at 1.5 Å. We demonstrate that the bound DNA is in the left-handed conformation and identify key interactions for the specificity of ORF112. Localization of ORF112 protein in stress granules induced in Cyprinid herpesvirus 3-infected fish cells suggests a functional behavior similar to that of Z? domains of the interferon-regulated, nucleic acid surveillance proteins ADAR1 and DAI. PMID:26559969

  12. Predictive Factors of Herpes Zoster HIV-Infected Patients: Another Adverse Effect of Crack Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Nacher, Mathieu; Basurko, Celia; Adenis, Antoine; Gaubert-Marechal, Emilie; Mosnier, Emilie; Edouard, Sophie; Vantilcke, Vincent; Sivapregassam, Sindou; Tressières, Benoit; Cabié, André; Couppié, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1541 HIV-infected patients to determine variables associated with the incidence of herpes zoster. A single failure Cox model showed that herpes zoster incidence increased following the first 6 months of antiretroviral treatment adjusted hazard ratio (AHR)=5 (95%CI=2.6-9.2), P<0.001; in the >60 years age group AHR=2 (95%CI=1-4), P=0.04; in patients in the top CD8 quartile AHR=2.1 (95%CI=1.3-3.6), P<0.001; and in patients previously reported to use crack cocaine AHR=5.9, (95%CI=1.4-25), P=0.02. Herpes zoster incidence increased in patients with CD4 counts<500 per mm3 and gradually declined since 1992-1996, with AHR=0.3 (95%CI=0.2-0.5), P<0.001 for the 1997-2002 period and AHR=0.24 (95%CI=0.14-0.4), P<0.001 for the 2002-2008 period. Contrary to what has been described elsewhere, there was no specific effect of protease inhibitors on herpes zoster incidence. The present study is the first to suggest that crack cocaine is associated with an increased incidence of herpes zoster. The neurological or immunological effects of crack are discussed. PMID:24244647

  13. Herpes-like virus detection in infected Crassostrea gigas spat using DIG-labelled probes.

    PubMed

    Lipart, C; Renault, T

    2002-03-01

    An in situ hybridization protocol for detecting the herpes-like virus which infects French Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, was developed. Two DNA probes were synthesized by incorporation of digoxigenin 11-dUTP during PCR. Two oyster herpes-like virus specific primer pairs, A5/A6 and C1/C6, were used. Both DIG-labelled probes were able to detect 50 pg of herpes-like virus PCR amplified DNA in Southern blot hybridizations. The probes hybridized with viral DNA in paraffin sections of infected C. gigas spat. No non-specific binding was observed. The ability of the defined in situ hybridization technique to diagnose herpes-like virus infections in oysters was compared with light and transmission electron microscopy techniques in infected and non-infected spat. In situ hybridization assays were also conducted on paraffin sections to determine virus distribution within the host and to study the pathogenesis infection. In situ hybridization confirmed that the expression pattern of the herpes-like virus was restricted to connective tissues as described previously by light and transmission electron microscopy. However, this technique also allowed the detection of viral DNA in the oyster nervous system. Some labelled cells were observed in the visceral ganglion of infected oyster spat. PMID:11849678

  14. Functional decline and herpes zoster in older people: an interplay of multiple factors.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Herpes zoster is a frequent painful infectious disease whose incidence and severity increase with age. In older people, there is a strong bidirectional link between herpes zoster and functional decline, which refers to a decrement in ability to perform activities of daily living due to ageing and disabilities. However, the exact nature of such link remains poorly established. Based on the opinion from a multidisciplinary group of experts, we here propose a new model to account for the interplay between infection, somatic/psychiatric comorbidity, coping skills, polypharmacy, and age, which may account for the functional decline related to herpes zoster in older patients. This model integrates the risk of decompensation of underlying disease; the risk of pain becoming chronic (e.g. postherpetic neuralgia); the risk of herpes zoster non-pain complications; the detrimental impact of herpes zoster on quality of life, functioning, and mood; the therapeutic difficulties due to multimorbidity, polypharmacy, and ageing; and the role of stressful life events in the infection itself and comorbid depression. This model underlines the importance of early treatment, strengthening coping, and vaccine prevention. PMID:26440662

  15. To Test or Not to Test? Campus Health Officials Grapple with Questions about Screening Students for Genital Herpes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.

    2005-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, 17 percent of 20- to 29-year-olds are infected with genital herpes, one of the most common sexually-transmitted diseases in the United States. Because of lack or mildness of symptoms and the tendency to not test for herpes during routine medical exams, the disease can go undiagnosed and can easily be…

  16. The Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Latency-Associated Transcript Inhibits Phenotypic and Functional Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    E-print Network

    2012-01-01

    + T cell epitope- based vaccines against ocular herpes. Jagainst ocular herpes infection and disease induced by highly immunogenic self-adjuvanting glycoprotein D lipo- peptide vaccines.vaccine targeting TLR-2 efficiently induces local and systemic CD8 + T cells and protects against

  17. Frog virus 3 ORF 53R, a putative myristoylated membrane protein, is essential for virus replication in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, Dexter S.; Yu, Kwang; Sample, Robert C.; Sinning, Allan; Henegar, Jeffrey; Norcross, Erin; Chinchar, V. Gregory

    2010-09-30

    Although previous work identified 12 complementation groups with possible roles in virus assembly, currently only one frog virus 3 protein, the major capsid protein (MCP), has been linked with virion formation. To identify other proteins required for assembly, we used an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide to target 53R, a putative myristoylated membrane protein, and showed that treatment resulted in marked reductions in 53R levels and a 60% drop in virus titers. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed knock down and showed that 53R was found primarily within viral assembly sites, whereas transmission electron microscopy detected fewer mature virions and, in some cells, dense granular bodies that may represent unencapsidated DNA-protein complexes. Treatment with a myristoylation inhibitor (2-hydroxymyristic acid) resulted in an 80% reduction in viral titers. Collectively, these data indicate that 53R is an essential viral protein that is required for replication in vitro and suggest it plays a critical role in virion formation.

  18. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  19. Herpes zoster segmental paresis in an immunocompromised breast cancer woman

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Shirvan; Mahdavi, Sadegh Baradaran; Mahmoudi, Farhad; Basiri, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is an infectious disease with neurological complications caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus in dorsal root ganglia of spinal cord which is also known as “Shingles.” Suppression of immune system is the major predisposing factor for reactivation of latent virus. Disease is mainly characterized by rash, vesicles and pain along one or more dermatomes which are innervated from one or more spinal nerve roots. Complications may be present after a while despite of patient treatment. Motor involvement is included. Some previous studies showed segmental zoster paresis as a rare complication, a few weeks after first presentation, among immunocompetent individuals. We present post herpetic motor involvement of C5 and C6 in a 59-year-old woman who underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy due to breast cancer, manifesting left upper limb weakness and paresis, 6 months after left partial mastectomy. Segmental paresis of zoster virus should be considered as a cause of motor impairment in an immunocompromised person suffering from shingles. PMID:26436084

  20. An unusual presentation of herpes simplex encephalitis with negative PCR.

    PubMed

    Buerger, Kelly J; Zerr, Kayleigh; Salazar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented with acute right-sided hemiparesis and epilepsia partialis continua in association with fever and confusion. Initial workup revealed possible cerebritis in the left medial frontal lobe without involvement of the temporal lobes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed minimal lymphocytic pleocytosis but negative real-time herpes simplex virus (HSV) PCR. Acyclovir was discontinued on day 5 due to a negative infectious workup and clinical improvement. On day 9 his condition deteriorated and he was transferred to a higher level of acuity for advanced supportive care. Worsening encephalopathy and refractory status epilepticus ensued despite medical care. Repeat CSF analysis showed mild lymphocytic pleocytosis with negative real-time HSV PCR. Brain MRI revealed progression of cortical enhancement. Immunosuppressive therapy and plasma exchange were attempted without clinical response. On day 24, another lumbar puncture showed only mild lymphocytic pleocytosis. Brain MRI showed involvement of the right medial temporal lobe. Subsequently, acyclovir was resumed. The HSV-1 PCR result was positive on day 30. Unfortunately, the patient expired. PMID:26243746

  1. Subassemblies and Asymmetry in Assembly of Herpes Simplex Virus Procapsid

    PubMed Central

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Newcomb, William W.; Cheng, Naiqian; Winkler, Dennis C.; Fontana, Juan; Heymann, J. Bernard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsid is a massive particle (~200 MDa; 1,250-Å diameter) with T=16 icosahedral symmetry. It initially assembles as a procapsid with ~4,000 protein subunits of 11 different kinds. The procapsid undergoes major changes in structure and composition as it matures, a process driven by proteolysis and expulsion of the internal scaffolding protein. Assembly also relies on an external scaffolding protein, the triplex, an ?2? heterotrimer that coordinates neighboring capsomers in the procapsid and becomes a stabilizing clamp in the mature capsid. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate its assembly, we developed a novel isolation procedure for the metastable procapsid and collected a large set of cryo-electron microscopy data. In addition to procapsids, these preparations contain maturation intermediates, which were distinguished by classifying the images and calculating a three-dimensional reconstruction for each class. Appraisal of the procapsid structure led to a new model for assembly; in it, the protomer (assembly unit) consists of one triplex, surrounded by three major capsid protein (MCP) subunits. The model exploits the triplexes’ departure from 3-fold symmetry to explain the highly skewed MCP hexamers, the triplex orientations at each 3-fold site, and the T=16 architecture. These observations also yielded new insights into maturation. PMID:26443463

  2. Higher Throughput Quantification of Neutralizing Antibody to Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Tamara P.; Mitchell, Michelle C.; Korom, Maria; Wang, Hong; Yu, Yinyi; Morrison, Lynda A.; Belshe, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    We report a rapid, higher throughput method for measuring neutralizing antibody to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in human sera. Clinical isolates and sera from the Herpevac Trial for Women were used in a colorimetric assay in which infection of tissue culture (lack of neutralization) was indicated by substrate metabolism by beta-galactosidase induced in the ELVIS cell line. The neutralization assay was optimized by addition of guinea pig complement, which particularly enhanced neutralizing antibody titers to HSV-2. Higher neutralizing antibody titers were also achieved using virus particles isolated from the supernatant of infected cells rather than lysate of infected cells as the source of virus. The effect of assay incubation time and incubation time with substrate were also optimized. We found that incubating with substrate until a standard optical density of 1.0 was reached permitted a better comparison among virus isolates, and achieved reliable measurement of neutralizing antibody activity. Interestingly, in contrast to results in the absence of complement, addition of complement allowed sera from HSV-2 gD-vaccinated subjects to neutralize HSV-1 and HSV-2 clinical and laboratory isolates with equal potency. PMID:26658766

  3. Intentional reactivation of latent ocular herpes infection during BVDU therapy.

    PubMed

    Trousdale, M D; Robin, J B; Willey, D E; De Clercq, E

    1987-12-01

    Sixteen adult New Zealand white rabbits with previously confirmed herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections were stimulated by iontophoresis of 6-hydroxydopamine into the cornea and were followed-up by topical epinephrine treatment to confirm latency. A total of 224 ocular cultures were obtained, of which 73 were positive for HSV during the seven day cycle. Twenty-seven of the 32 eyes (84%) had at least one positive culture. Animals were randomly divided into two treatment groups. Upon repeat stimulation (Cycle 2), concurrent with oral and topical bromovinyl-deoxyuridine (BVDU) therapy, only 3/104 ocular cultures were HSV positive, while 24/112 ocular cultures from placebo-treated animals were positive. Anti-HSV serum titers were comparable before and after BVDU therapy and the HSV isolates from BVDU treated animals did not develop drug resistance (i.e., ED-50 values were approximately 0.1-0.2 ug/ml both before and after therapy). It was concluded that BVDU had a demonstrable therapeutic effect on the recovery of HSV-1 from ocular cultures during intentional reactivation, but the latent ganglionic infection was not eliminated. PMID:2827960

  4. Herpes simplex virus latent phase transcription facilitates in vivo reactivation.

    PubMed

    Hill, J M; Sedarati, F; Javier, R T; Wagner, E K; Stevens, J G

    1990-01-01

    The biological role of latent phase transcripts was studied in a rabbit model of herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-I) ocular reactivation. Virus X10-13, a variant of HSV which does not express latency associated transcripts (LAT), has been previously shown to establish latent infection in mouse sensory nerve ganglia, and LAT(-) virus can be recovered upon explantation and cocultivation of ganglia. In the rabbit, we show here that this virus replicates normally on the cornea and conjunctiva and establishes latent infections in corresponding trigeminal ganglionic neurons. However, X10-13 is not efficiently reactivated after iontophoresis of 0.01% epinephrine into the cornea. In contrast, XC-20, a LAT(+) derivative of X10-13 in which LAT expression had been restored by marker rescue of X10-13 with a cloned HSV-I EcoRI J + K fragment, reactivated at a significantly higher rate. Control experiments indicated that XC-20 and X10-13 established latent infections in an equivalent number of neurons. We conclude that latent phase transcription of HSV facilitates ganglionic reactivation and subsequent ocular shedding of the reactivated virus. PMID:2152989

  5. Increased Risk of Herpes Zoster Following Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wong, Ying-Chi; Yang, Tse-Yen; Kuo, Chien-Feng; Cheng, Jiung-Mou; Wang, Jyh-Seng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study explored the possible association between dermatomyositis or polymyositis (DM or PM) and the subsequent risk of herpes zoster (HZ). We used data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI) system to address the research topic. The exposure cohort comprised 2023 patients with new diagnoses of DM or PM. Each patient was frequency matched according to age, sex, index year, and comorbidities including diabetes, renal disease, obesity, malignancy, rheumatoid arthritis, immunodeficiency virus infection, autoimmune disease not elsewhere classified, mixed connective tissue disease, or vasculitis with 4 participants from the general population who did not have a history of HZ (control cohort). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to estimate the relationship between DM or PM and the risk of subsequent HZ. The incidence of HZ in the exposure and control cohorts was 35.8 and 7.01 per 1000 person-years, respectively. The exposure cohort had a significantly higher overall risk of subsequent HZ than did the control cohort (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]?=?3.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?3.18–4.77). The risk of HZ in patients with DM or PM in whichever stratification (including sex, age, and comorbidity) was also higher than that of the control cohort. The findings from this population-based retrospective cohort study suggest that DM or PM is associated with an increased risk of subsequent HZ. A synergistic effect was observed between DM or PM and one of the comorbidities. PMID:26181551

  6. The challenges and opportunities for the development of a T-cell epitope-based herpes simplex vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-11-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) infections have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a billion individuals worldwide. HSV-1 infections are predominant than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries, their development has been difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One "common denominator" among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or a whole viral protein, which contain both "pathogenic symptomatic" and "protective asymptomatic" antigens and epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate developing "asymptomatic" epitope-based sub-unit vaccine strategies that selectively incorporate "protective asymptomatic" epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized by effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (TEM cells) from "naturally" protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models of ocular and genital herpes. We review the role of animal models in herpes vaccine development and discuss their current status, challenges, and prospects. PMID:25446827

  7. Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculopathy: The Growing Association Between Herpes Zoster and Strokes.

    PubMed

    Powell, David R; Patel, Shiddhi; Franco-Paredes, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is herpes virus that after its reactivation from nerve ganglia to cause herpes zoster may lead to a variety of neurologic complications, including encephalitis, meningitis, retinal necrosis or myelitis. In addition, VZV can spread to arteries in the central nervous system and cause hemorrhagic or ischemic complications due to an inflammatory vasculopathy. In fact, there is a growing epidemiological and clinical recognition that there is an association between VZV reactivation and subsequent strokes. Herein, we present a case of an immune compromised individual with reactivation of VZV causing dermatomal herpes zoster followed by multifocal vasculopathy. We also review the literature to highlight key aspects of VZV-associated vasculopathy. PMID:25211583

  8. Valaciclovir versus aciclovir for the treatment of primary genital herpes simplex: a cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Melissa; Wright, Alison

    2015-11-01

    The current guidelines for the treatment of primary herpes simplex in the Genito-urinary department in Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, recommend valaciclovir as a first-line medication. This is a prodrug of aciclovir, which has been used for many years as a treatment for primary herpes simplex virus. The basis of the recommendation largely relates to valaciclovir being more bioavailable than aciclovir. However, there is no evidence to suggest this has an effect on overall outcome with regard to symptom control and viral shedding. The purpose of the service evaluation was to discover if significant cost savings could be made by changing the prescribing policy to make aciclovir the drug of choice for primary herpes simplex virus. Based on 160 patients receiving valaciclovir (500?mg BD) during April 2013 and March 2014, if they had been treated with aciclovir (400?mg TDS) instead, a saving of £828.80 (66% reduction) could have been made. PMID:25505043

  9. The co-chaperone BAG3 regulates Herpes Simplex Virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Kyratsous, Christos A.; Silverstein, Saul J.

    2008-01-01

    Viruses as obligate intracellular parasites use host cell proteins to ensure efficient replication and spread. Cellular proteins are required for several stages of a virus life cycle. Here, we identify BAG3, a co-chaperone, as a regulator of herpes virus immediate early gene expression. We report that a herpes simplex virus lacking the gene encoding a potent transcriptional activator, ICP0, is compromised for replication in cells silenced for BAG3 in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner. We also show a requirement for BAG3 to augment virus gene expression and demonstrate that the co-chaperone acts independently of promyelocytic leukemia to increase herpes simplex virus replication. PMID:19088197

  10. Isolation and characterization of Solenopsis invicta virus 3, a new positive-strand RNA virus infecting the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the discovery of a new virus from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) represents the third virus identified from this ant species using the metagenomics approach. The single (positive)-strand RNA, monopartite, bicistronic genome of SINV-3 wa...

  11. Lack of efficacy of AMP against recrudescent genital herpes infections in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser-Smith, E B; Smee, D F; Matthews, T R

    1983-01-01

    AMP was evaluated for its efficacy against herpes simplex virus type 2 genital infections in guinea pigs. Vaginally infected animals were treated twice a day with AMP at 50 mg/kg per dose for 2 weeks. Subcutaneous doses were started 10 weeks postinfection. AMP treatment did not reduce the number of animals with recrudescent episodes when compared with saline-treated controls. In addition, AMP treatment did not reduce either the number of lesions or the duration of the recrudescent episodes which did develop. These results suggest that AMP has no effect on recrudescent herpes simplex virus type 2 vaginal infections. PMID:6685993

  12. Non-healing genital herpes mimicking donovanosis in an immunocompetent man.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Khute, Prakash; Patel, Anjali; Gupta, Somesh

    2016-01-01

    Although atypical presentations of herpetic infection in immunocompetent individuals are common, they very rarely have the extensive, chronic and verrucous appearances seen in the immunocompromised host. We report a case of genital herpes manifesting as painless chronic non-healing genital ulcers with exuberant granulation tissue in an immunocompetent man. Owing to this morphology, the ulcers were initially mistaken for donovanosis. To the best of our knowledge, such a presentation of genital herpes in an immunocompetent individual has not been described previously. PMID:25614521

  13. Herpes simplex-like infection in a bottlenose dolphin stranded in the Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Esperón, F; Fernández, A; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2008-08-19

    A bottlenose dolphin, stranded in the Canary Islands in 2001 exhibited non-suppurative encephalitis. No molecular detection of cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) was found, but a herpesviral-specific band of 250 bp was detected in the lung and brain. The sequenced herpesviral PCR product was compared with GenBank sequences, obtaining 98% homology (p-distance of 0.02) with Human herpesvirus 1 (herpes simplex virus 1 or HSV-1). This is the first report of a herpes simplex-like infection in a stranded dolphin. PMID:18828564

  14. Digallate Dimers of (?)-Epigallocatechin Gallate Inactivate Herpes Simplex Virus ?

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Charles E.; Xu, Weimin; Merz, George; Hillier, Sharon; Rohan, Lisa; Wen, Guang Y.

    2011-01-01

    Topical microbicides are potentially an alternative method to vaccines for reducing the spread of herpes simplex virus (HSV). We have previously shown (S. Liu et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1723:270–281, 2005) that the catechin (?)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) inactivates HSV at neutral pH; however, to function in the female genital tract EGCG must also be effective at acidic pH. EGCG inactivated HSV-1 and HSV-2 at pH 8.0 by 3 log10 to 4 log10 but was ineffective at pH 5.7. The EGCG digallate dimers theasinensin A, P2, and theaflavin-3,3?-digallate (TF-3) inactivated both viruses by 3 log10 to 4 log10 at pH 5.7 and as much as 5 log10 at pH 8.0. TF-3 inactivated HSV-1 and HSV-2 by 4 to 5 log10 in the pH range of 4.0 to 5.7. Dimers with one gallate moiety had antiviral activity intermediate between the activities of EGCG and digallate dimers. Confocal and electron microscopy showed that theasinensin A did not damage Vero cells. All EGCG dimers inactivated enveloped viruses with class I, class II, and class III (HSV-1, HSV-2) fusion proteins more effectively than did monomeric EGCG. EGCG had no activity against the nonenveloped viruses tested, but TF-3 reduced the titer of 4 of 5 nonenveloped viruses by ?2 to 3.5 log10. Results also showed that HSV-1 glycoprotein B (gB) was aggregated more rapidly by theasinensin A than EGCG, which, when taken together with the nonenveloped virus data, suggests that dimers may inhibit the function of viral proteins required for infectivity. Digallate dimers of EGCG appear to have excellent potential as microbicidal agents against HSV at acidic and neutral pHs. PMID:21947401

  15. Adenovirus vector expressing functional herpes simplex virus ICP0.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X X; Young, C S; Silverstein, S

    1988-01-01

    ICP0, one of the five immediate-early (IE) gene products of herpes simplex virus (HSV), is a potent activator of transcription. To assess the biological activities of ICP0 and to explore its mechanisms of action, two helper-independent recombinant adenoviruses were constructed. In each recombinant, the E1 region was substituted with the ICP0-encoding genomic segment under the control of either the adenovirus major late promoter (MLP-0) or the HSV IE-0 promoter (0PRO-0). Infection of HeLa cells or 293 cells (a human embryo kidney cell line expressing adenovirus 5 E1a and -b functions) with the MLP-0 recombinant results in the synthesis of more IE-0 mRNA and ICP0 protein than did infection with the 0PRO-0 recombinant. Although 293 cells infected with MLP-0 accumulate 5- to 10-fold more IE-0 mRNA late in the infection than cells infected with HSV, the level of the protein product, ICP0, increased only slightly. In 293 cells, both recombinants could replicate, albeit at a slower rate and with lower final yields than wild-type adenovirus. Neither virus replicates its DNA in HeLa cells, and thus ICP0 cannot substitute for adenovirus E1a; however, the level of ICP0 that accumulates in MLP-0-infected HeLa cells was comparable to that of HSV-infected HeLa cells. In a functional test, we demonstrated that the adeno-ICP0 recombinant viruses can transactivate a transfected TK-CAT cassette, indicating that the ICP0 is biologically active. Images PMID:2846870

  16. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination against herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Pieter T; Wilschut, Jan C; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a common disease among elderly, which may develop into a severe pain syndrome labeled postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). A live-attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccine has been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence and burden of illness of HZ and PHN, providing the opportunity to prevent significant health-related and financial consequences of HZ. In this review, we summarize the available literature on cost-effectiveness of HZ vaccination and discuss critical parameters for cost-effectiveness results. A search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed to identify full cost-effectiveness studies published before April 2013. Fourteen cost-effectiveness studies were included, all performed in western countries. All studies evaluated cost-effectiveness among elderly above 50 years and used costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained as primary outcome. The vast majority of studies showed vaccination of 60- to 75-year-old individuals to be cost-effective, when duration of vaccine efficacy was longer than 10 years. Duration of vaccine efficacy, vaccine price, HZ incidence, HZ incidence and discount rates were influential to the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). HZ vaccination may be a worthwhile intervention from a cost-effectiveness point of view. More extensive reporting on methodology and more detailed results of sensitivity analyses would be desirable to address uncertainty and to guarantee optimal comparability between studies, for example regarding model structure, discounting, vaccine characteristics and loss of quality of life due to HZ and PHN. PMID:25424815

  17. Herpes Zoster--Eye Complications: Rates and Trends

    PubMed Central

    Yawn, Barbara P.; Wollan, Peter M.; St Sauver, Jennifer L.; Butterfield, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To provide population based data on the risk, types and outcomes of eye involvement in herpes zoster (HZ). Methods A cohort study based on medical record review of patients diagnosed with HZ between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 2007. HZ was confirmed by typical rash and symptoms or laboratory testing and eye involvement was confirmed by ophthalmologists’ evaluation. Information was collected on all eye diagnoses, all HZ eye related visits, treatments, procedures and outcomes. Results Of the 2035 individuals with HZ in any dermatome, 184 patients (9.0%) had eye involvement. Mean age of the 184 was 62.6 with 5 cases in patients <21. Overall, 6.5% were immune suppressed at the time of the eye complications. The rate of increase of HZ eye involvement was 23% by decade from 1980 to 2007. Common eye complications were keratitis (76.2%), uveitis/iritis (46.6%) and conjunctivitis (35.4%). Recurrent keratitis and recurrent iritis/uveitis occurred in 6.9% and 7.4% respectively. Outcomes included six (3.3%) patients with new vision decrements to 20/200 or worse. Two individuals had successful corneal transplants. Another six (3.3%) individuals had lid ptosis that affected vision including one elderly woman with a permanent unilateral tarsorrhaphy. Severe HZ eye pain was reported to be directly responsible for one unsuccessful suicide attempt. No one developed ARN. A mean of 10.8 HZ eye visits per HZ patient with eye involvement were reported over a mean of 308 days. Conclusion Eye complications are common, result in significant health care utilization and in permanent vision decrement in about 6.6% of individuals with HZ eye involvement. Most health care utilization and long term adverse outcomes were in patients in whom administration of HZ prevention with the zoster vaccine would be possible. PMID:23664666

  18. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Epitope-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Individuals with Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Spencer, Doran; Garg, Sumit; Fremgen, Daniel; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Pham, Thanh T.; Hewett, Charlie; Kuang, Jasmine; Ong, Nicolas; Huang, Lei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB)-specific CD8+ T cells protect mice from herpes infection and disease. However, whether and which HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells play a key role in the “natural” protection seen in HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we have dissected the phenotypes and the functions of HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells from HLA-A*02:01 positive, HSV-1 seropositive ASYMP and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpes disease). We found the following. (i) Healthy ASYMP individuals maintained a significantly higher proportion of differentiated HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow). In contrast, SYMP patients had frequent less-differentiated central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh). (ii) ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportions of multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells which responded mainly to gB342–350 and gB561–569 “ASYMP” epitopes, and simultaneously produced IFN-?, CD107a/b, granzyme B, and perforin. In contrast, effector CD8+ T cells from SYMP individuals were mostly monofunctional and were directed mainly against nonoverlapping gB17–25 and gB183–191 “SYMP” epitopes. (iii) Immunization of an HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model of ocular herpes with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong CD8+ T cell-dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings provide insights into the role of HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells in protection against herpes and should be considered in the development of an effective vaccine. IMPORTANCE A significantly higher proportion of differentiated and multifunctional HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow) were found in healthy ASYMP individuals who are seropositive for HSV-1 but never had any recurrent herpetic disease, while there were frequent less-differentiated and monofunctional central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh) in SYMP patients. Immunization with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong protective HSV-specific CD8+ T cell response in HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice. These findings are important for the development of a safe and effective T cell-based herpes vaccine. PMID:25609800

  19. Epidermal multinucleated giant cells are not always a histopathologic clue to a herpes virus infection: multinucleated epithelial giant cells in the epidermis of lesional skin biopsies from patients with acantholytic dermatoses can histologically mimic a herpes virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.; Paravar, Taraneh; Lee, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can either be epithelial or histiocytic. Epithelial multinucleated giant cells are most often associated with herpes virus infections. Purpose: To review the histologic differential diagnosis of conditions with epithelial and histiocytic multinucleated giant cells—since multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis are not always pathognomonic of a cutaneous herpes virus infection—and to summarize dermatoses in which herpes virus infection has been observed to coexist. Methods: Two individuals with acantholytic dermatoses whose initial lesional skin biopsies showed multinucleated epithelial giant cells suggestive of a herpes virus infection are reported. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed on multinucleated giant cell (and epidermis, epithelial, and histiocytic) and herpes virus infection. Relevant papers were reviewed to discover the skin conditions with either multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis or coincident cutaneous herpes virus infection. Results: Initial skin biopsies from patients with either pemphigus vulgaris or transient acantholytic dermatosis mimicked herpes virus infection; however, laboratory studies and repeat biopsies established the correct diagnosis of their acantholytic dermatosis. Hence, epidermal multinucleated giant cells are not always a histopathologic clue to a herpes virus infection. Indeed, epithelial multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can be observed not only in the presence of infection (herpes virus), but also acantholytic dermatoses and tumors (trichoepithelioma and pleomorphic basal cell carcinoma). Histiocytic multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can be observed in patients with either giant cell lichenoid dermatitis or lichen nitidus of the palms. Conclusions: Epithelial and histiocytic multinucleated giant cell can occur in the epidermis. Keratinocyte-derived multinucleated giant cells are most commonly associated with herpes virus infection; yet, they can also be observed in patients with skin tumors or acantholytic dermatoses. Cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection can coexist in association with other conditions such as acantholytic dermatoses, benign skin tumors, bullous disorders, hematologic malignancies, inflammatory dermatoses, and physical therapies. However, when a herpes virus infection is suspected based upon the discovery of epithelial multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis, but either the clinic presentation or lack of response to viral therapy or absence of confirmatory laboratory studies does not support the diagnosis of a viral infection, the possibility of a primary acantholytic dermatosis should be considered and additional lesional skin biopsies performed. Also, because hematoxylin and eosin staining is not the golden standard for confirmation of autoimmune bullous dermatoses, skin biopsies for direct immunofluorescence should be performed when a primary bullous dermatosis is suspected since the histopathology observed on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections can be misleading. PMID:25396080

  20. Different presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii in schizophrenia: meta-analysis and analytical study

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, José; Luna del Castillo, Juan de Dios; Mañanes-González, Sara; Carrillo-Ávila, José Antonio; Gutiérrez, Blanca; Cervilla, Jorge A; Sorlózano-Puerto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have performed both a meta-analysis and an analytical study exploring the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in a sample of 143 schizophrenic patients and 143 control subjects. The meta-analysis was performed on papers published up to April 2014. The presence of serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. The detection of microbial DNA in total peripheral blood was performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. The meta-analysis showed that: 1) C. pneumoniae DNA in blood and brain are more common in schizophrenic patients; 2) there is association with parasitism by T. gondii, despite the existence of publication bias; and 3) herpes viruses were not more common in schizophrenic patients. In our sample only anti-Toxoplasma immunoglobulin G was more prevalent and may be a risk factor related to schizophrenia, with potential value for prevention. PMID:25848282

  1. [Analysis on clinical features and treatment of herpes zoster patients hospitalized in real world].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ling-Lian; Wang, Lian-Xin; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhi-Xin; Zhuang, Yan; Zhang, Yun-Bi

    2014-09-01

    From the hospital information system (HIS) of 20 national grade III-A general hospitals, 2 960 cases of herpes zoster as the research object, analyzes the relations between the general information, syndrome of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), western medicine combined diseases, the relationship between the solar term and the incidence of herpes zoster, and the combined use of Chinese and western medicine. Among the patients with 46-65 year old has the highest percentage of diseased; admission to general outpatient clinic is the most; the most common medical payment is medicare; combined disease such as hypertension, diabetes and coronary heart disease is more common; early treatment effect of herpes zoster is better than the sequelae; summer and autumn solar term patients is hospitalized more, TCM syndrome is damp heat of liver fire; about drugs, western medicine is the most commonly used vitamin B1 and mecobalamin, traditional Chinese medicine is the most frequently used Danhong injection, combination therapy with promoting blood circulation drugs and neurotrophic drugs. Thus, herpes zoster, more common in elderly patients, with no obvious relationship between solar term, should be early diagnosis and early treatment, often with combination of Chinese traditional and western medicine treatment. PMID:25532379

  2. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of focal herpes simplex virus encephalitis using a radiolabeled antiviral drug

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.

    1984-12-18

    A method of mapping herpes simplex viral infection comprising administering a radiolabeled antiviral active 5-substituted 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-substituted-D-arabinofuranosyl) pyrimidine nucleoside to the infected subject, and scanning the area in which the infection is to be mapped for the radiolabel.

  3. HIV-1 replication activates CD4+ T cells with specificities for persistent herpes viruses

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Anna; Rehr, Manuela; Graw, Frederik; Rusert, Peter; Bossart, Walter; Kuster, Herbert; Trkola, Alexandra; Günthard, Huldrych F; Oxenius, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Hyperactivation of CD4+ T cells is a hallmark of untreated HIV-1 infection. The antigenic specificities of activated CD4+ T cells and the underlying mechanisms leading to their activation remain thus far elusive. We report here that during HIV rebound the dynamics of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells is highly correlated with the dynamics of CD4+ T cells specific for persistent antigens derived from various members of the herpes virus family, whereas CD4 responses towards non-persistent antigens were unaffected by HIV replication. Notably, the dynamics of HIV and herpes viral antigen-specific CD4+ T cells responses correlated with the expression level of activation markers on dendritic cells (DCs) and activated DCs were more potent in restimulating memory T cells. These data strongly suggest that HIV replication costimulates activation of CD4+ T cells specific for persistent herpes viral antigens via activation of DCs. We propose that a large proportion of activated T cells during untreated HIV infection may be specific for herpes viral antigens and identify a novel mechanism contributing to chronic immune activation in untreated HIV-1 infection. PMID:20533427

  4. Blood Glucose Measurements in Critically Ill Patients Tom Van Herpe, Ph.D.,1,2

    E-print Network

    22 Blood Glucose Measurements in Critically Ill Patients Tom Van Herpe, Ph.D.,1,2 and Dieter) blood glucose, (Hct) hematocrit, (ICU) intensive care unit, (ISO) International Organization for Standardization, (NICE-SUGAR) Normoglycemia in Intensive Care Evaluation and Survival Using Glucose Algorithm

  5. Disseminated herpes zoster with increased CD4 counts in 3 HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Lidhoo, Pooja; Unemori, Patrick; Leslie, Kieron S.; Maurer, Toby

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that the diagnosis of multidermatomal herpes zoster in HIV-infected patients occurs at a lower CD4 level than zoster involving a single dermatome. Herein, we describe 3 cases of HIV-infected patients presenting with disseminated zoster at high CD4 counts and low HIV viral loads. PMID:19615545

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  7. Characteristics Associated with Genital Herpes Testing among Young Adults: Assessing Factors from Two National Data Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Lisa K.; Levandowski, Brooke A.; Roberts, Craig M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives and Participants: In the United States, genital herpes (GH) prevalence is 10.6% among 20- to 29-year-olds and about 90% of seropositive persons do not know their status. This study investigated individual characteristics associated with GH screening and diagnosis in sexually active young adults aged 18 to 24. Methods: Two data sets were…

  8. Rapid Communication Immunization with a replication-defective herpes simplex virus 2 mutant

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    no clinically approved vaccine and nearly all developmental vaccines are targeted against HSV-2 and genital of vaccines currently in development to prevent HSV infection are directed against HSV-2), a herpes vaccine should ideally protect against both HSV-1 and HSV-2. Such a vaccine would be capable

  9. 75 FR 59670 - Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Background of the Device In the Federal Register of April 3, 2007 (72 FR 15830), FDA published a final rule... serological tests to identify antibodies to herpes simplex virus in serum, and the devices that consist of... for tests for antibodies and antigens, as well as recommendations for sample selection inclusion...

  10. Molecular requirement for sterols in herpes simplex virus entry and infectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) required cholesterol for virion-induced membrane fusion. HSV successfully entered DHCR24-/-cells, which lack a desmosterol-to-cholesterol conversion enzyme, indicating entry can occur independently of cholesterol. Depletion of desmosterol from these cells resulted in d...

  11. Effects of innate immunity on herpes simplex virus and its ability to kill tumor cells

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    and initiation of adaptive responses.5 Innate immune responses against wild-type HSV1 include: (1) activationREVIEW Effects of innate immunity on herpes simplex virus and its ability to kill tumor cells H in both naive and immunized individuals is provided by innate humoral (complement, cytokines, chemokines

  12. Ranking Possible Cancer Hazards from Rodent Carcinogens, Using the Human Exposure/Rodent Potency Index (HERP)

    E-print Network

    Gold, Lois Swirsky

    Chemicals that occur naturally are in blue. Possible hazard HERP (%) (Column 1) is calculated using recommended) Symphytine, 1.8 mg 1.91 . (Culvenor et al., 1980; Hirono et al., 1978) 0.9 Methylene chloride: workers, industry average (1940s-80s) Methylene chloride, 471 mg 724 (1100) (CONSAD Research Corporation

  13. Recurrence of herpes simplex encephalitis associated with temozolomide chemoradiation for malignant glioma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Christman, Mitalee P; Turbett, Sarah E; Sengupta, Soma; Bakhadirov, Khamidulla U; Williamson, Craig A; Nayak, Lakshmi; Milligan, Tracey; Katz, Joel T

    2014-04-01

    Although herpes simplex encephalitis is not classically considered an opportunistic infection, reactivation of herpes simplex is being seen increasingly in patients with cancer or immunosuppression. The authors present a patient with malignant glioma and HSV-1 encephalitis whose PCR-proven encephalitis recurred after temozolomide (TMZ) chemoradiation despite acyclovir therapy, and summarize details of four other cases of HSV-1 encephalitis associated with TMZ. The similarity among these cases raises the likely need for longer treatment courses and/or oral suppressive therapy in patients at risk for herpes simplex infections who are receiving TMZ. PMID:25988006

  14. Recurrence of herpes simplex encephalitis associated with temozolomide chemoradiation for malignant glioma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Mitalee P.; Turbett, Sarah E.; Sengupta, Soma; Bakhadirov, Khamidulla U.; Williamson, Craig A.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Milligan, Tracey; Katz, Joel T.

    2014-01-01

    Although herpes simplex encephalitis is not classically considered an opportunistic infection, reactivation of herpes simplex is being seen increasingly in patients with cancer or immunosuppression. The authors present a patient with malignant glioma and HSV-1 encephalitis whose PCR-proven encephalitis recurred after temozolomide (TMZ) chemoradiation despite acyclovir therapy, and summarize details of four other cases of HSV-1 encephalitis associated with TMZ. The similarity among these cases raises the likely need for longer treatment courses and/or oral suppressive therapy in patients at risk for herpes simplex infections who are receiving TMZ. PMID:25988006

  15. Double encephalitis with herpes simplex virus type II and cytomegalovirus in an elder Chinese: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaobiao; Chen, Shaoxian; Lin, Qi; Zhou, Houshi; Huang, Chuming; Lin, Jiyuan; Xie, Weihang; Chen, Kai; Zhou, Dongming; Ma, Wan; Ma, Feiyu; Xu, Haiyun

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is a rare disease. In adults, most of the reported cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections are seen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of 67-year-old Chinese male with the coinfection of CMV and herpes simplex virus type II (HSV-II). He had no history of being treated with immunosuppressants, showed symptoms of psychosis and was scored 109 on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. This patient presented with a rare case of coinfection of CMV and herpes simplex virus type II with psychotic symptoms. PMID:26586947

  16. Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia in Catalonia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Salleras, Luis; Salleras, Montse; Salvador, Patricia; Soldevila, Núria; Prat, Andreu; Garrido, Patricio; Domínguez, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the descriptive epidemiology and costs of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) in people aged ?50 years in Catalonia (Spain). The incidence of HZ in Catalonia was estimated by extrapolating the incidence data from Navarre (Spain) to the population of Catalonia. The incidence of PHN was estimated according to the proportion of cases of HZ in the case series of the Hospital del Sagrado Corazón de Barcelona that evolved to PHN. Drug costs were obtained directly from the prescriptions included in the medical record (according to official prices published by the General Council of the College of Pharmacists). The cost of care was obtained by applying the tariffs of the Catalan Health Institute to the number of outpatient visits and the number and duration of hospital admissions. The estimated annual incidence of HZ was 31?763, of which 21?532 (67.79%) were in patients aged ?50 years. The respective figures for PHN were 3194 and 3085 (96.59) per annum, respectively. The mean cost per patient was markedly higher in cases of PHN (916.66 euros per patient) than in cases of HZ alone (301.52 euros per patient). The cost increased with age in both groups of patients. The estimated total annual cost of HZ and its complications in Catalonia was € 9.31 million, of which 6.54 corresponded to HZ and 2.77 to PHN. This is the first Spanish study of the disease burden of HZ in which epidemiological data and costs were collected directly from medical records. The estimated incidence of HZ is probably similar to the real incidence. In contrast, the incidence of PHN may be an underestimate, as around 25% of patients in Catalonia attend private clinics financed by insurance companies. It is also probable that the costs may be an underestimate as the costs derived from the prodromal phase were not included. In Catalonia, HZ and PHN cause an important disease burden (21?532 cases of HZ and 3085 de PHN with an annual cost of € 9.31 million) in people aged ?50 years, in whom vaccination is indicated. PMID:25483532

  17. Structural basis for the antibody neutralization of Herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Li-Ling; Chan, Woan-Eng; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Lai, Jiann-Shiun; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2013-10-01

    The gD–E317-Fab complex crystal revealed the conformational epitope of human mAb E317 on HSV gD, providing a molecular basis for understanding the viral neutralization mechanism. Glycoprotein D (gD) of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) binds to a host cell surface receptor, which is required to trigger membrane fusion for virion entry into the host cell. gD has become a validated anti-HSV target for therapeutic antibody development. The highly inhibitory human monoclonal antibody E317 (mAb E317) was previously raised against HSV gD for viral neutralization. To understand the structural basis of antibody neutralization, crystals of the gD ectodomain bound to the E317 Fab domain were obtained. The structure of the complex reveals that E317 interacts with gD mainly through the heavy chain, which covers a large area for epitope recognition on gD, with a flexible N-terminal and C-terminal conformation. The epitope core structure maps to the external surface of gD, corresponding to the binding sites of two receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, which mediate HSV infection. E317 directly recognizes the gD–nectin-1 interface and occludes the HVEM contact site of gD to block its binding to either receptor. The binding of E317 to gD also prohibits the formation of the N-terminal hairpin of gD for HVEM recognition. The major E317-binding site on gD overlaps with either the nectin-1-binding residues or the neutralizing antigenic sites identified thus far (Tyr38, Asp215, Arg222 and Phe223). The epitopes of gD for E317 binding are highly conserved between two types of human herpesvirus (HSV-1 and HSV-2). This study enables the virus-neutralizing epitopes to be correlated with the receptor-binding regions. The results further strengthen the previously demonstrated therapeutic and diagnostic potential of the E317 antibody.

  18. Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia in Catalonia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Salleras, Luis; Salleras, Montse; Salvador, Patricia; Soldevila, Núria; Prat, Andreu; Garrido, Patricio; Domínguez, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the descriptive epidemiology and costs of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) in people aged ?50 years in Catalonia (Spain). The incidence of HZ in Catalonia was estimated by extrapolating the incidence data from Navarre (Spain) to the population of Catalonia. The incidence of PHN was estimated according to the proportion of cases of HZ in the case series of the Hospital del Sagrado Corazón de Barcelona that evolved to PHN. Drug costs were obtained directly from the prescriptions included in the medical record (according to official prices published by the General Council of the College of Pharmacists). The cost of care was obtained by applying the tariffs of the Catalan Health Institute to the number of outpatient visits and the number and duration of hospital admissions. The estimated annual incidence of HZ was 31?763, of which 21?532 (67.79%) were in patients aged ?50 years. The respective figures for PHN were 3194 and 3085 (96.59) per annum, respectively. The mean cost per patient was markedly higher in cases of PHN (916.66 euros per patient) than in cases of HZ alone (301.52 euros per patient). The cost increased with age in both groups of patients. The estimated total annual cost of HZ and its complications in Catalonia was € 9.31 million, of which 6.54 corresponded to HZ and 2.77 to PHN. This is the first Spanish study of the disease burden of HZ in which epidemiological data and costs were collected directly from medical records. The estimated incidence of HZ is probably similar to the real incidence. In contrast, the incidence of PHN may be an underestimate, as around 25% of patients in Catalonia attend private clinics financed by insurance companies. It is also probable that the costs may be an underestimate as the costs derived from the prodromal phase were not included. In Catalonia, HZ and PHN cause an important disease burden (21?532 cases of HZ and 3085 de PHN with an annual cost of € 9.31 million) in people aged ?50 years, in whom vaccination is indicated. PMID:25483532

  19. A herpes-like virus infects a non-ostreid bivalve species: virus replication in Ruditapes philippinarum larvae.

    PubMed

    Renault, T; Lipart, C; Arzul, I

    2001-05-01

    Sporadic high mortalities were reported in June 1997 among hatchery-reared larval Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum in a French commercial hatchery. Cellular abnormalities were observed in semi-thin sections in affected animals. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of herpes-like virus particles in larvae. This is the first description of a herpes-like virus infection in larval R. philippinarum, a non-ostreid bivalve species. Virus particles were similar to other herpes-like viruses described from different oyster species with respect to ultrastructure and morphogenesis. Electron microscopic examination also demonstrated cells with condensed chromatin and extensive perinuclear fragmentation of chromatin. Like viruses infecting oysters, the herpes-like virus detected in clams may induce apoptosis in infected animals. PMID:11411639

  20. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: Mapping of Structural Proteins, Ribosomal Frameshifting, and Similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and Kelp fly virus

    PubMed Central

    Valles, Steven M.; Bell, Susanne; Firth, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF) of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the structural proteins map to both ORF2 and the 3' end of ORF1, downstream of the sequence that encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The genome organization and structural protein expression strategy resemble those of Acyrthosiphon pisum virus (APV), an aphid virus. The capsid protein that is encoded by the 3' end of ORF1 in SINV-3 and APV is predicted to have a jelly-roll fold similar to the capsid proteins of picornaviruses and caliciviruses. The capsid-extension protein that is produced by frameshifting, includes the jelly-roll fold domain encoded by ORF1 as its N-terminus, while the C-terminus encoded by the 5' half of ORF2 has no clear homology with other viral structural proteins. A third protein, encoded by the 3' half of ORF2, is associated with purified virions at sub-stoichiometric ratios. Although the structural proteins can be translated from the genomic RNA, we show that SINV-3 also produces a subgenomic RNA encoding the structural proteins. Circumstantial evidence suggests that APV may also produce such a subgenomic RNA. Both SINV-3 and APV are unclassified picorna-like viruses distantly related to members of the order Picornavirales and the family Caliciviridae. Within this grouping, features of the genome organization and capsid domain structure of SINV-3 and APV appear more similar to caliciviruses, perhaps suggesting the basis for a "Calicivirales" order. PMID:24686475

  1. Herpes virus-like DNA (HHV-8) in immunosuppressive therapy-related, HIV-related and classical Kaposi's sarcoma in Norwegian patients.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P; Huang, Y Q; Li, J J; Clausen, O P; Friedman-Kien, A E

    1998-05-01

    The recently discovered human herpes virus 8 (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma. Using polymerase chain reaction we detected DNA sequences of this herpes virus in 11 of 14 biopsy specimens from Kaposi's sarcoma in Norwegian patients, including the immunosuppressive therapy-related type (3 of 3), the HIV-related type (4 of 5), and the classical type (4 of 6). The results support the hypothesis of a role for human herpes virus 8 in all types of Kaposi's sarcoma independent of geographical area. PMID:9602228

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early protein Vmw110 reactivates latent herpes simplex virus type 2 in an in vitro latency system.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, R A; Everett, R D; Zhu, X X; Silverstein, S; Preston, C M

    1989-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) by the immediate-early protein Vmw110 was studied by using an in vitro latency system. Adenovirus recombinants that express Vmw110 reactivated latent HSV-2. An HSV-1 mutant possessing a deletion in a carboxy-terminal region of Vmw110 reactivated latent HSV-2, whereas mutant FXE, which has a deletion in the second exon, did not. Therefore, Vmw110 alone is required to reactivate latent HSV-2 in vitro, and the region of Vmw110 defined by the deletion in FXE is important for this process. Images PMID:2545921

  3. D-(+)-iso-Methanocarbathymidine: a high affinity substrate for herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Comin, Maria J.; Vu, B. Christie; Boyer, Paul L.; Liao, Chenzhong; Hughes, Stephen H.; Marquez, Victor E.

    2009-01-01

    The stereoselective syntheses of the (+)-D and (?)-L enantiomers of racemic iso-methanocarbathymidine (iso-MCT) was achieved through two independent linear approaches that converged on two antipodal enantiomers, common to a key precursor utilized in the synthesis of racemic iso-MCT. In this study we identified (+)-3 [D-iso-(+)-MCT] as the active enantiomer that was exclusively recognized by the herpes 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) as was predicted by molecular modeling. For this purpose, a human osteosarcoma (HOS) cell line modified to contain, and express, HSV1-tk from herpes simplex virus (HSV1) was utilized to determine the cytotoxicity of the compounds via an assay that measures the level of ATP in the cells. The work demonstrates that changes in the substitution pattern of rigid bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane nucleosides, which relative to normal nucleosides appear unconventional, can lead to the spatial optimization of pharmacophores and a vastly improved substrate recognition. PMID:18399509

  4. Early events in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection: photosensitivity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-treated virions

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, N.; Bzik, D.; Person, S.; Snipes, W.

    1981-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is photosensitized by treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The inactivation of FITC-treated virions upon subsequent exposure to light is inhibited by the presence of sodium azide, suggesting the involvement of singlet oxygen in the process. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that treatment with FITC plus light induces crosslinks in viral envelope glycoproteins. Treatment of virions with high concentrations of FITC (50 ..mu..g/ml) plus light causes a reduction in the adsorption of the virus to monolayers of human embryonic lung cells. For lower concentrations of FITC (10 ..mu..g/ml) plus light, treated virions adsorb to the host cells, but remain sensitive to light until entry occurs. The loss of light sensitivity coincides with the development of resistance to antibodies. These results are most consistent with a mechanism of entry for herpes simplex virus involving fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane of the host cell.

  5. Social Stress and the Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, David A.; Sheridan, John F.; Dorne, Julianne; Berntson, Gary G.; Candelora, Jessica; Glaser, Ronald

    1998-06-01

    Psychological stress is thought to contribute to reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV). Although several animal models have been developed in an effort to reproduce different pathogenic aspects of HSV keratitis or labialis, until now, no good animal model existed in which application of a psychological laboratory stressor results in reliable reactivation of the virus. Reported herein, disruption of the social hierarchy within colonies of mice increased aggression among cohorts, activated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and caused reactivation of latent HSV type 1 in greater than 40% of latently infected animals. However, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis using restraint stress did not activate the latent virus. Thus, the use of social stress in mice provides a good model in which to investigate the neuroendocrine mechanisms that underlie behaviorally mediated reactivation of latent herpes-viruses.

  6. Herpes virus-mediated preproenkephalin gene transfer to the amygdala is antinociceptive.

    PubMed

    Kang, W; Wilson, M A; Bender, M A; Glorioso, J C; Wilson, S P

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the role of the amygdala in pain modulation and opioid-mediated antinociception, a recombinant, replication-defective herpes virus carrying the human preproenkephalin cDNA was injected bilaterally into the rat amygdala. Four days after gene delivery nociceptive behavior was assessed by the formalin test. Rats infected with the virus expressing preproenkephalin showed a selective, naloxone-reversible abolition of phase 2 flinching behavior compared to rats infected with a control virus. The results implicate the amygdala in the control of pain and in opioid analgesia and demonstrate the use of recombinant herpes viruses as tools for studying gene function in specific neural pathways of the central nervous system. PMID:9593860

  7. Detection of aerosolized varicella-zoster virus DNA in patients with localized herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kayoko; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tomitaka, Akiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Asano, Yoshizo

    2004-03-15

    We examined the excretion of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in hospitalized patients with herpes zoster localized to the thoracic region whose skin lesions were covered with either hydrocolloid dressing agents (hydrocolloid group) or conventional gauze bandages (gauze group). The presence of VZV DNA in swab samples from lesion coverings, the throat, and filters of air purifiers was examined by use of a sensitive polymerase chain reaction assay. For the hydrocolloid group, VZV was detected in none of the samples from lesion coverings or air purifier filters; for the gauze group, VZV DNA was detected in samples from gauze coverings and air purifier filters for all 6 patients. VZV DNA was detected less frequently in throat samples from patients in the hydrocolloid group than in those from patients in the gauze group. The results of the present study suggest that hydrocolloid dressing agents prevent excretion of aerosolized VZV DNA from skin lesions of patients with localized herpes zoster. PMID:14999603

  8. Case report: epithelial intracytoplasmic herpes viral inclusions associated with an outbreak of duck virus enteritis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, B.C.; Jessup, David A.; Docherty, Douglas E.; Lownestine, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Several muscovy ducks from a free-roaming flock of 65 muscovy and mallard ducks died over a 3-week period. Three muscovy ducks were necropsied. Gross and microscopic changes were compatible with duck virus enteritis, and the virus was isolated. In addition to intranuclear viral inclusion bodies in several tissues, intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in esophageal and cloacal epithelium, By electron microscopy, the membrane-bound intracytoplasmic inclusions were found to contain enveloped herpesvirus, and nuclei contained herpes viral nucleocapsids.

  9. Contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 envelope proteins to entry by endocytosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) proteins specifically required for endocytic entry but not direct penetration have not been identified. HSVs deleted of gE, gG, gI, gJ, gM, UL45, or Us9 entered cells via either pH-dependent or pH-independent endocytosis and were inactivated by mildly acidic pH. Thus, the ...

  10. Proton MR spectroscopy in herpes simplex encephalitis: Assessment of neuronal loss

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, D.K.; Sargentoni, J.; Peden, C.J.; Bell, J.D.; Cox, I.J.; Coutts, G.A.; Baudouin, C.; Newman, C.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We present here the case of an 11-year-old boy with herpes simplex encephalitis diagnosed on the basis of clinical features, serology, and response to acyclovir, who relapsed after 3 weeks of therapy. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) of the brain, at 8 and 16 weeks after the onset of symptoms, showed abnormalities, most prominently a reduction in the N-acetylaspartate/choline ratio. The role of 1H MRS in assessing disease activity is discussed.

  11. Inhibitory activity of Melissa officinalis L. extract on Herpes simplex virus type 2 replication.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, G; Battinelli, L; Pompeo, C; Serrilli, A M; Rossi, R; Sauzullo, I; Mengoni, F; Vullo, V

    2008-01-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) (lemon balm) is used in folk medicine for nervous complaints, lower abdominal disorders and, more recently, for treating Herpes simplex lesions. In this work the antiviral activity of a hydroalcoholic extract of lemon balm leaves against the Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was assessed by the cytopathic effect inhibition assay on Vero cells (ATCC CCL-81), in comparison with acyclovir. The cytotoxicity of the extract on Vero cells was previously tested by evaluating the cellular death and was confirmed by the Trypan blue test. Lemon balm showed to reduce the cytopathic effect of HSV-2 on Vero cells, in the range of non-toxic concentrations of 0.025-1 mg mL(-1) (with reference to the starting crude herbal material). The maximum inhibiting effect (60%) was obtained with 0.5 mg mL(-1). The viral binding assay showed that the extract does not prevent the entry of HSV-2 in the cells, thus suggesting a mechanism of action subsequent to the penetration of the virus in the cell. The extract was also chemically characterised by NMR and HPLC analysis; it showed to contain cinnamic acid-like compounds, mainly rosmarinic acid (4.1% w/w). Our experiments support the use of lemon balm for treating Herpes simplex lesions and encourage clinical trials on this medicinal plant. PMID:19023806

  12. [Herpes zoster in the Czech Republic--epidemiology and clinical manifestations].

    PubMed

    Smetana, J; Salavec, M; Bostíková, V; Chlíbek, R; Bostík, P; Hanovcová, I; Vacková, M; Matulková, P; Splino, M

    2010-08-01

    Herpes zoster (shingles) is a viral infection of the skin that manifests itself as painful, unilateral vesicular rash. The causative agent is varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Primary infection with VZV causes chickenpox, a common childhood infection, and then the virus lies dormant in the sensory neural ganglia, reactivating to cause shingles. The most important complications are neurological disorders (in particular postherpetic neuralgia) and eye disorders. First-line therapy are antiviral agents. A single vaccine has been registered to date. Herpes zoster occurs sporadically in the Czech Republic and its incidence is long-term stable. In 1990-2008 the average annual incidence was 6306 cases (61.3 cases/100,000 population), with the lowest number of 5511 cases (53.5/100,000) reported in 1991 and the highest number of 6,894 cases (67.6/100,000) reported in 2002. The incidence rate in females (69.9/100,000) was 1.4 times as high as in males (49.5/100,000). From the age perspective, the elderly are at a considerably higher risk of developing shingles. In 2008, the incidence rate was the highest in the age group 70 years (155.0/100,000). Nevertheless, the beginning of the upward trend is seen in the age group 45-49 years. Herpes zoster does not show any seasonal trend. PMID:20925251

  13. Update On Emerging Antivirals For The Management Of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections: A Patenting Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D.; Vadlapatla, Ramya K.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections. PMID:23331181

  14. Therapeutic low-intensity red laser for herpes labialis on plasmid survival and bacterial transformation.

    PubMed

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe da Silva; Marciano, Roberta da Silva; Teixeira, Gleica Rocha; Canuto, Keila da Silva; Polignano, Giovanni Augusto Castanheira; Guimarães, Oscar Roberto; Geller, Mauro; de Paoli, Flavia; da Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza

    2013-05-01

    A low-intensity laser is used in treating herpes labialis based on the biostimulative effect, albeit the photobiological basis is not well understood. In this work experimental models based on Escherichia coli cultures and plasmids were used to evaluate effects of low-intensity red laser on DNA at fluences for treatment of herpes labialis. To this end, survival and transformation efficiency of plasmids in E. coli AB1157 (wild type), BH20 (fpg/mutM(-)) and BW9091 (xthA(-)), content of the supercoiled form of plasmid DNA, as well as nucleic acids and protein content from bacterial cultures exposed to the laser, were evaluated. The data indicate low-intensity red laser: (i) alters the survival of plasmids in wild type, fpg/mutM(-) and xthA(-)E. coli cultures depending of growth phase, (ii) alters the content of the supercoiled form of plasmids in the wild type and fpg/mutM(-)E. coli cells, (iii) alters the content of nucleic acids and proteins in wild type E. coli cells, (iv) alters the transformation efficiency of plasmids in wild type and fpg/mutM(-)E. coli competent cells. These data could be used to understand positive effects of low-intensity lasers on herpes labialis treatment. PMID:23483124

  15. Varicella and herpes zoster vaccines: WHO position paper, June 2014 - Recommendations.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations for the use of varicella and herpes zoster vaccination from the WHO position paper on varicella and herpes zoster vaccines - June 2014, published in the Weekly Epidemiological Record [1]. This position paper summarizes the WHO position on the use of varicella and herpes zoster vaccines. The current document replaces the position paper on the use of varicella vaccines published in 1998 [2]. Footnotes to this paper provide a number of core references. In accordance with its mandate to provide guidance to Member States on health policy matters, WHO issues a series of regularly updated position papers on vaccines and combinations of vaccines against diseases that have an international public health impact. These papers are concerned primarily with the use of vaccines in large-scale immunization programmes; they summarize essential background information on diseases and vaccines, and conclude with WHO's current position on the use of vaccines in the global context. This paper reflects the recommendations of WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on immunization. These recommendations were discussed by SAGE at its April 2014 meeting. Evidence presented at the meeting can be accessed at http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/previous/en/index.html. PMID:26723191

  16. Attachment and penetration of acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus are inhibited by Melissa officinalis extract.

    PubMed

    Astani, Akram; Navid, Mojdeh Heidary; Schnitzler, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Medicinal plants are increasingly of interest as novel source of drugs for antiherpetic agents, because herpes simplex virus (HSV) might develop resistance to commonly used antiviral drugs. An aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis and the phenolic compounds caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and rosmarinic acid were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) acyclovir-sensitive and clinical isolates of acyclovir-resistant strains in vitro. When drugs were added during the intracellular replication of HSV-1 infected cells, no antiviral effect was observed by plaque reduction assay. However, Melissa extract interacted directly with free viral particles of two acyclovir-resistant HSV strains at low IC50 values of 0.13 and 0.23?µg/mL and high selectivity indices of 2692 and 1522, respectively. The Melissa extract and rosmarinic acid inhibited HSV-1 attachment to host cells in a dose-dependent manner for acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant strains. These results indicate that mainly rosmarinic acid contributed to the antiviral activity of Melissa extract. Penetration of herpes viruses into cells was inhibited by Melissa extract at 80% and 96% for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant viruses, respectively. Melissa extract exhibits low toxicity and affects attachment and penetration of acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant HSVs in vitro. PMID:24817544

  17. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active mucocutaneous lesions, regardless of anatomic location or viral type. Alternatively, antigen detection—an immunofluorescence test or enzyme immunoassay from samples from symptomatic patients--could be employed, but HSV type determination is of importance. Type-specific serology based on glycoprotein G should be used for detecting asymptomatic individuals but widespread screening for HSV antibodies is not recommended. In conclusion, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of HSV is now become a necessity, given the difficulty in making the clinical diagnosis of HSV, the growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes and the availability of effective antiviral therapy. PMID:24885431

  18. Predictors of the Sexual Well-being of Individuals Diagnosed with Herpes and Human Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lyndsay R; Byers, E Sandra

    2016-02-01

    Research suggests that having a sexually transmitted infection (STI) such as genital herpes and human papillomavirus (HPV) can negatively affect sexual well-being. However, there is little research examining factors associated with poorer sexual well-being among individuals with a STI. This study investigated the extent to which stigma experiences, individual characteristics, and STI characteristics were associated with multiple aspects of sexual well-being among individuals diagnosed with herpes and/or HPV. Participants were an average of 36 years old (SD = 11.58) and included 188 individuals with herpes and/or HPV who completed measures of sexual activity, sexual problems, and sexual cognitive-affective factors. The results showed that experiences of stigmatization were the most important predictors of sexual well-being. Participants who perceived were stigmatized by others as well as those who internalized negative social attitudes to a greater extent reported poorer sexual well-being across all dimensions, over and above individual and STI characteristics. The implications of these findings for sexual health professionals are discussed. PMID:25408498

  19. The Short- and Long-Term Risk of Stroke after Herpes Zoster - A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Nandini; Basit, Saima; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Pasternak, Björn; Munch, Tina N.; Nielsen, Lars P.; Melbye, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is known to cause VZV vasculopathy, which may be associated with stroke. A recent study found an increased risk of stroke within one year of herpes zoster. We aimed to investigate the short and long-term effects of herpes zoster on the risk of stroke. Methods Using Danish national registers, we constructed a cohort consisting of all Danish adults ?18 years old between 1995 and 2008 (n?=?4.6 million; person-years of follow-up?=?52.9 million). Individual-level information on prescriptions for herpes zoster antiviral treatment and diagnoses of stroke was obtained from national registers. We compared the risk of stroke in persons who had received the specific dosage of acyclovir for herpes zoster with persons who had never received antiviral treatment by Poisson regression. Results During follow-up, 2.5% received treatment for herpes zoster and 5.0% were diagnosed with stroke. Individuals who had received medication had a 127% (95% CI 83–182%) increased risk the first two weeks, 17% (CI 9–24%) between two weeks and one year, and 5% (2–9%) after the first year. The increased risk was greatest in the youngest age group (<40). To control for healthcare-seeking behaviour, we conducted parallel analyses investigating the risk of selected fractures after herpes zoster and found no similar increased risks. Conclusions This large nationwide cohort study found an increased risk of stroke after treatment for herpes zoster. Although the short-term risk was particularly high, we cannot rule out the possibility of a small but important long-term risk. PMID:23874897

  20. Development of a PCR procedure for the detection of a herpes-like virus infecting oysters in France.

    PubMed

    Renault, T; Le Deuff, R M; Lipart, C; Delsert, C

    2000-07-01

    A PCR-based procedure for detecting a herpes-like virus that infects the Japanese oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in France was developed. Two primers were designed to provide specific amplification products ranging in size from 917 to 1001 bp when carried out on oyster herpes-like virus DNA. No amplification was observed of oyster genomic DNA nor of the DNA from vertebrate herpesviruses. Crude samples were prepared and submitted to nested PCR, allowing amplification of DNA fragments of the expected size when carried out on infected larval and spat samples. The procedure used to prepare the sample for PCR was found to be critical because of the presence of unidentified substances in oyster tissues that inhibit the PCR reaction. A rapid and convenient sample preparation using ground tissues allowed a sensitive detection of the herpes-like virus infected oysters. The ability of the defined PCR protocol to diagnose herpes-like virus infections in oysters was compared to the transmission electron microscopy technique using 15 C. gigas larval batches with or without mortalities. PCR amplification is as sensitive a diagnostic assay for herpes-like virus as transmission electron microscopy. However, the nested PCR protocol is more convenient and less time consuming. The relationship between reported mortalities among C. gigas oyster spat and herpes-like virus DNA detection by PCR was also investigated. Statistical analysis showed that virus detection and mortalities are correlated. This observation highlights the importance of studying the causative role of herpes-like virus in oyster spat mortalities. PMID:10921841

  1. The treatment of herpes simplex virus epithelial keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmus, K R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epithelial keratitis is the most common presentation of ocular infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Quantitative assessment of available therapy is needed to guide evidence-based ophthalmology. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of various treatments for dendritic or geographic HSV epithelial keratitis and to evaluate the role of various clinical characteristics on epithelial healing. METHODS: Following a systematic review of the literature, information from clinical trials of HSV dendritic or geographic epithelial keratitis was extracted, and the methodological quality of each study was scored. Methods of epithelial cauterization and curettage were grouped as relatively equivalent physicochemical therapy, and solution and ointment formulations of a given topical antiviral agent were combined. The proportion healed with 1 week of therapy, a scheduled follow-up day that approximated the average time of resolution with antiviral therapy, was selected as the primary outcome based on a masked evaluation of maximum treatment differences in published healing curves. The proportion healed at 14 days was recorded as supplemental information. Fixed-effects and random-effects meta-analysis models were used to obtain summary estimates by pooling results from comparative treatment trials. Hypotheses about which prognostic factors might affect epithelial healing during antiviral therapy were developed by multivariate analysis of the Herpetic Eye Disease Study dataset. RESULTS: After excluding 48 duplicate reports, 14 nonrandomized studies, 15 studies with outdated or similar treatments, and 29 trials lacking sufficient data on healing or accessibility, 76 primary reports were identified. These reports involved 4,251 patients allocated to 93 treatment comparisons of dendritic epithelial keratitis in 28 categories and 9 comparisons of geographic epithelial keratitis in 6 categories. For dendritic keratitis, idoxuridine was better than placebo at 7 days (combined odds ratio [OR], 3.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92-6.70), and at 14 days (OR, 4.17; 95% CI, 1.33-13.04), but pooling was limited by lack of homogeneity and low study quality. Direct comparisons at 1 week of treatment showed that trifluridine or acyclovir was significantly better than idoxuridine (OR, 3.12 and 4.56; 95% CI, 1.55-6.29 and 2.76-7.52, respectively), and indirect comparisons were also consistent with a clinically significant benefit. Vidarabine was not significantly better than idoxuridine in pooled treatment comparisons at 1 week (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.72-2.00) but was better in 2 indirect comparisons (OR, 4.22 and 4.78; 95% CI, 1.69-10.54 and 2.15-10.65, respectively). At 14 days, trifluridine (OR, 6.05; 95% CI, 2.50-14.66), acyclovir (OR, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.39-4.78), and vidarabine (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.65-2.37) were each better than idoxuridine. Trials of geographic epithelial keratitis also suggested that trifluridine, acyclovir, and vidarabine were more effective that idoxuridine. Other topical antiviral agents, such as bromovinyldeoxuridine, ganciclovir, and foscarnet, appeared equivalent to trifluridine or acyclovir. Oral acyclovir was equivalent to topical antiviral therapy and did not hasten healing when used in combination with topical treatment. Antiviral agents did not increase the speed of healing when compared to debridement but reduced the risk of recrudescent epithelial keratitis. The combination of physicochemical treatment with an antiviral agent seemed to be better than either physicochemical or antiviral treatment alone, but the heterogeneous cauterization and curettage techniques and the various treatment combinations limited valid quantitative summary effect measures. The combination of topical interferon with an antiviral agent was significantly better than antiviral therapy at 7 days (OR, 13.49; 95% CI, 7.39-24.61) but not at 14 days (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 0.82-6.79). Finding apparent heterogeneity for some pooled estimates suggested that dissimilarities in patients, interventions, outcomes, or other logistical aspects of cli

  2. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Not Associated with Recurrence of Oral or Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Kuniholm, Mark H.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Chen, Sabrina; Desai, Seema; Edlin, Brian R.; Peters, Marion G.; Plankey, Michael; Sharp, Gerald B.; Strickler, Howard D.; Villacres, Maria C.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gange, Stephen J.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; O’Brien, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4-?G/TT (rs368234815) genotype is associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and may play a role in other infections. IFN-?4 protein is generated only in individuals who carry the IFNL4-?G allele. The IFNL4 rs12979860-T allele, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with IFNL4-?G, was recently reported to be associated with more frequent and severe oral herpes episodes. We investigated the association of IFNL4-?G/TT with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-related outcomes among 2,192 African American and European American participants in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). WIHS is a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and at-risk women that began in 1994. This report includes follow-up through 2013. Available data included: HSV–1 and HSV–2 antibodies at study entry; bi-annually ascertained episodes of (self-reported) oral herpes, (self-reported) genital sores and (clinician-observed) genital ulcers; HSV–2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens. IFNL4-?G/TT genotyping was determined by TaqMan. We compared women with IFNL4-?G/?G or IFNL4-TT/?G genotypes (i.e., IFNL4-?G carriers) to those with the IFNL4-TT/TT genotype, adjusting for age, race and HIV status. For outcomes with repeated measurements, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval [CI] and p-value were determined using a generalized estimating equations approach. Median participant age at enrollment was 36 years; 81% were African American, 74% were HIV-infected. Among 1,431 participants tested for antibodies, 72.8% were positive for HSV–1 and 79.0% were positive for HSV–2. We observed no association between IFNL4-?G/TT genotype and any outcome: HSV–1 or HSV–2 antibody prevalence (p>0.1, all comparisons); oral herpes (aOR, 1.2; p = 0.35); genital sores (aOR, 1.0; p = 0.71); genital ulcers (aOR, 1.1; p = 0.53); detectable HSV–2 DNA in CVL (N = 322; aOR, 0.71; p = 0.49); HSV–2 DNA level (p = 0.68). In this large prospective study, IFNL4-?G/TT genotype was not associated with HSV-related outcomes, including episodes of oral or genital herpes. PMID:26431156

  3. Human herpes virus-8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease in an HIV-positive patient presenting with relapsing and remitting hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroaki; Maeda, Takuya; Hara, Yu; Osa, Morichika; Imai, Kazuo; Moriguchi, Kota; Mikita, Kei; Fujikura, Yuji; Kaida, Kenichi; Kawana, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of human herpes virus-8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease in an HIV-positive patient with hyponatraemia. A 65-year-old man was admitted with relapsing and remitting fever, scattered skin eruptions and hepatosplenomegaly following combination antiretroviral therapy for his HIV infection. Based on histopathological findings, he was diagnosed as having human herpes virus-8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease and was treated with four-weekly infusions of rituximab. Prior to receiving chemotherapy, we observed several suspected biomarkers of disease activity, positive correlations between plasma human herpes virus-8 viral load and the levels of plasma interleukin-6, C-reactive protein and soluble interleukin-2 receptor, and negative correlations between platelet count, albumin levels and especially serum sodium levels. We hypothesize that non-osmotic release of plasma antidiuretic hormone is a cause of hyponatraemia in human herpes virus-8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease and that relapsing and remitting hyponatraemia could be correlated with plasma human herpes virus-8 viral load. PMID:25504830

  4. Longitudinal risk of herpes zoster in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma receiving chemotherapy: A nationwide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Shih-Feng; Wu, Wan-Hsuan; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Liu, Yi-Chang; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Chang, Chao-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the incidence of and risk factors for herpes zoster in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who were receiving anti-lymphoma treatment. The overall incidence density of herpes zoster was 12.21% (472/3865); 11.79% (258/2188) of the patients received conventional chemotherapy and 12.76% (214/1677) of the patients received rituximab-containing chemotherapy. For the patients who received conventional chemotherapy, the risk factors included female gender, multiple courses of chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. For the patients who received rituximab-containing chemotherapy, the risk factors included female gender, diabetes mellitus, multiple courses of chemotherapy, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and higher accumulated rituximab dose. The majority of the herpes zoster episodes occurred within the first two years after the diagnosis of NHL. After adjusting for the propensity score matching, rituximab-containing chemotherapy was not associated with a higher overall incidence density of herpes zoster (P?=?0.155). However, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy increased the short-term risk of herpes zoster with adjusted odd ratios of 1.38 (95% confidence intervals (CI)?=?1.05–1.81, P?=?0.021) and 1.37 (95% CI?=?1.08–1.73, P?=?0.010) during the 1-year and 2-year follow-up periods, respectively. PMID:26391893

  5. High Risk of Herpes Zoster among Patients with Advance Acute Kidney Injury--A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Shun; Hu, Fu-Chang; Chen, Meng-Kan; Ko, Wen-Je; Chen, Likwang; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Wu, Vin-Cent

    2015-01-01

    The risk for herpes zoster (HZ) in acute kidney injury (AKI) survivors was never explored. We identified 2,387 adults in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database who recovered from dialysis-requiring AKI and matched them with non-recovery and non-AKI patients by propensity score. During a mean follow-up of 2.7 years, the incidences of HZ were 6.9, 8.2 and 4.8 episodes per 1,000 person-years in AKI-non-recovery, AKI-recovery and non-AKI group, respectively. The recovery group was more likely to develop herpes zoster than those without acute kidney injury [incidence-rate ratios 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.16-2.52; p?=?0.007]. Patients without acute kidney injury were less likely to develop herpes zoster than those AKI, recovered from dialysis or not (hazard ratio HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.46-0.95). Dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury poses a long-term risk of herpes zoster after hospital discharge. Even patients who have recovered from dialysis still carry a significantly higher risk of developing herpes zoster. PMID:26333822

  6. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Please cite this article in press as: Liu X, et al. Genetic engineering of a modified herpes simplex virus 1 vaccine vector. Vaccine (2009),

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    2009-01-01

    of a modified herpes simplex virus 1 vaccine vector. Vaccine (2009), doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2009.03.003 ARTICLE IN PRESSG Model JVAC9083 1­8 Vaccine xxx (2009) xxx­xxx Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Vaccine journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/vaccine Genetic engineering of a modified herpes simplex virus 1

  7. Comparison of Different Forms of Herpes Simplex Replication-Defective Mutant Viruses as Vaccines in a Mouse Model of HSV-2 Genital Infection

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    Comparison of Different Forms of Herpes Simplex Replication-Defective Mutant Viruses as Vaccines for revision June 6, 2001; accepted July 11, 2001 Some subunit vaccines composed of herpes simplex virus (HSV. However, these vaccines were ineffective or only marginally effective in clinical trials. To attempt

  8. Comparative complement fixation and serum neutralization antibody titers to herpes simplex virus type 1 and Herpesvirus simiae in Macaca mulatta and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Gary, G W; Palmer, E L

    1977-01-01

    The serological relationship of herpes simplex type 1 virus and Herpesvirus simiae was studied. Antibody titers to these viruses were determined in 163 Macaca mulatta sera and 67 human sera by serum neutralization (SN) and complement fixation (CF) tests. Both groups of sera were also tested by CF with envelope and capsid antigens of herpes simplex type 1. By SN, the majority of the monkeys and all of the humans had a higher titer to herpes simplex type 1 than to H. simiae. By CF, with crude antigens the titers in the monkey sera were greater to H. simiae than to herpes simplex type 1, although four sera had equal titers to both antigens; the titers in the human sera were conversely higher with the herpes simplex type 1 antigen, except for four sera which had equal titers to both antigens. The capsid CF antigen of herpes simplex type 1 was reactive with the human sera but virtually nonreactive with the monkey sera; the envelope CF antigen of herpes simplex type 1 was reactive with both monkey and human sera but was somewhat less reactive than the crude herpes simplex type 1 CF antigen. In addition, serum samples from a patient recently infected with H. simiae were examined by CF and SN for antibody to both herpes simplex type 1 and H. simiae viruses. The serological profile indicated a positive correlation with the infecting virus. Although the SN titers did not conclusively reflect an infection with H. simiae, the CF titers were higher to H. simiae than to herpes simplex in later sera and thus appeared to be compatible with H. simiae infection. PMID:192762

  9. N-methanocarbathymidine is more effective than acyclovir for treating neonatal herpes simplex virus infection in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, David I.; Bravo, Fernando J.; Clark, Jennifer R.; Earwood, Julie D.; Rahman, Aquilur; Glazer, Robert; Cardin, Rhonda D.

    2011-01-01

    The outcome of neonatal herpes simplex (HSV) infection, even after therapy with high dose acyclovir (ACV), is not optimum. We therefore evaluated N-methanocarbathymidine ((N)-MCT) using the guinea pig model of neonatal herpes. Treatment with ACV (60 mg/kg/day) was compared to doses of 1, 5, and 25 mg/kg/day of (N)-MCT initiated 1, 2 or 3 days post inoculation (dpi). Both ACV and (N)-MCT significantly improved survival, but only (N)-MCT significantly reduced the number of animals with symptoms when begun at 1 dpi. When therapy was begun at 2 dpi, only (N)-MCT (1, 5, or 25 mg/kg/day) significantly increased survival. In fact, (N)-MCT improved survival up to 3 dpi, the last time point evaluated. (N)-MCT was highly effective and superior to high dose ACV therapy for the treatment of neonatal herpes in the guinea pig model. PMID:21924293

  10. N-Methanocarbathymidine is more effective than acyclovir for treating neonatal herpes simplex virus infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Bravo, Fernando J; Clark, Jennifer R; Earwood, Julie D; Rahman, Aquilur; Glazer, Robert; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2011-11-01

    The outcome of neonatal herpes simplex (HSV) infection, even after therapy with high dose acyclovir (ACV), is not optimum. We therefore evaluated N-Methanocarbathymidine ((N)-MCT) using the guinea pig model of neonatal herpes. Treatment with ACV (60 mg/kg/day) was compared to doses of 1, 5, and 25 mg/kg/day of (N)-MCT initiated 1, 2, or 3 days postinoculation (dpi). Both ACV and (N)-MCT significantly improved survival, but only (N)-MCT significantly reduced the number of animals with symptoms when begun at 1 dpi. When therapy was begun at 2 dpi, only (N)-MCT (1, 5, or 25 mg/kg/day) significantly increased survival. In fact, (N)-MCT improved survival up to 3 dpi, the last time point evaluated. (N)-MCT was highly effective and superior to high dose ACV therapy for the treatment of neonatal herpes in the guinea pig model. PMID:21924293

  11. Use of Adeno-Associated and Herpes Simplex Viral Vectors for In Vivo Neuronal Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Penrod, Rachel D.; Wells, Audrey M.; Carlezon, William A.; Cowan, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses and the herpes simplex virus are the two most widely used vectors for the in vivo expression of exogenous genes. Advances in the development of these vectors have enabled remarkable temporal and spatial control of gene expression. This unit provides methods for storing, delivering, and verifying expression of adeno-associated and herpes simplex viruses in the adult mouse brain. It also describes important considerations for experiments using in vivo expression of these viral vectors, including serotype and promoter selection, as well as timing of expression. Additional protocols are provided that describe methods for preliminary experiments to determine the appropriate conditions for in vivo delivery. PMID:26426386

  12. Herpes zoster with skin lesions and meningitis caused by 2 different genotypes of the Oka varicella-zoster virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Levin, Myron J; DeBiasi, Roberta L; Bostik, Vanda; Schmid, D Scott

    2008-11-15

    A previously healthy boy who had received varicella vaccine developed herpes zoster with meningitis. The vaccine strain recovered from scabs of 3 skin lesions had the wild-type allele at position 108111, a vaccine marker never previously associated with vaccine-associated adverse events. The vaccine strain from cerebrospinal fluid also contained mutations never previously observed at vaccine-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms that would alter amino acid sequences in ORF54 and ORF59. The presence of distinct strains in skin lesions and cerebrospinal fluid indicate that >1 variant strain may reactivate to cause herpes zoster. PMID:18826373

  13. Homology Between Burkitt Herpes Viral DNA and DNA in Continuous Lymphoblastoid Cells from Patients with Infectious Mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieff, Elliott; Levine, Judith

    1974-01-01

    At least 90% of the sequences of purified, in vitro labeled, DNA from Epstein-Barr virus (prepared from HR-1, Burkitt's lymphoblastoid cells) are homologous to the DNA of the herpes virus contained in cell lines derived from patients with infectious mononucleosis. The thermal stability of the homologous and heterologous hybrid DNA molecules could not be differentiated, indicating at least 97% matching of base pairs between DNA of Epstein-Barr virus and the herpes viral DNA contained in the lymphoblasts from patients with infectious mononucleosis. PMID:4360941

  14. Mandibular osteonecrosis following herpes zoster infection in the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster virus (HZV) infections are caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. Reactivation symptoms commonly affect the thoracolumbar trunk, and rarely affect the mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve. When the mandibular branches are involved, lesions appear proximal to the innervation area. This condition may be associated with exfoliation of the teeth and osteonecrosis of the jawbone. We report a case of mandibular osteomyelitis after herpes zoster infection and we present a review of the literature on mandibular-branch involvement of HZV-related osteonecrosis.

  15. Mandibular osteonecrosis following herpes zoster infection in the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Min; Seo, Jeong-Seok; Lee, Jae-Yeol

    2015-12-01

    Herpes zoster virus (HZV) infections are caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. Reactivation symptoms commonly affect the thoracolumbar trunk, and rarely affect the mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve. When the mandibular branches are involved, lesions appear proximal to the innervation area. This condition may be associated with exfoliation of the teeth and osteonecrosis of the jawbone. We report a case of mandibular osteomyelitis after herpes zoster infection and we present a review of the literature on mandibular-branch involvement of HZV-related osteonecrosis. PMID:26733193

  16. Conjunctival geographic ulcer: an overlooked sign of herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jia-Horung; Chu, Chang-Yao; Lee, Chaw-Ning; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Lee, Julia Yu-Yun; Wang, Jen-Ren; Chang, Kung-Chao; Huang, Fu-Chin

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) ocular infection causes significant visual burden worldwide. Despite the fact that dendritic or geographic corneal ulcers are typical findings in HSV epithelial keratitis, conjunctival ulcer as a sign of HSV infection has rarely been reported. Although easily overlooked, this important sign could be enhanced by fluorescein staining. We report two cases of conjunctival geographic ulcers proven to be HSV infection by viral isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One patient had bilateral disease and blepharitis, and the other had unilateral involvement without skin lesions. With timely diagnosis and proper management, excellent visual outcome can be expected. PMID:25728077

  17. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Does Not Induce Apoptosis in Human Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Hüfner, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can establish lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia. Latently infected ganglia contain CD8+ T cells, which secrete granzyme B and are thus capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry and single-cell reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), higher frequency and transcript levels of caspase-3 were found in HSV-1-negative compared to HSV-1-positive ganglia and neurons, respectively. No terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay-positive neurons were detected. The infiltrating T cells do not induce apoptosis in latently infected neurons. PMID:25762734

  18. Acute retinal necrosis secondary to herpes simplex virus type 2 in neonates.

    PubMed

    Venincasa, Vincent D; Emanuelli, Andres; Leng, Theodore; Perlini, Erin; Villegas, Victor; Diaz-Barbosa, Magaly; Gutierrez, Maria; Miller, Darlene; Berrocal, Audina M

    2015-04-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) should be in the differential diagnosis of a neonate who presents with vitritis. This report includes three cases of neonatal ARN at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute from 2004 to 2009. Medical treatment with acyclovir helped reduce sequelae of herpes simplex virus (HSV) 2 infection. Patients with ARN are at risk for retinal detachment and blindness. Although mothers are screened during pregnancy, they are at risk of reactivation or primary contraction of HSV. A neonate presenting with vitritis should raise suspicion of ARN. PMID:25932732

  19. Disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection between black and white men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Netochukwu; Rosenberg, Eli S; Luisi, Nicole; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2015-09-01

    HIV disproportionately affects black men who have sex with men, and herpes simplex virus type 2 is known to increase acquisition of HIV. However, data on racial disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence and risk factors are limited among men who have sex with men in the United States. InvolveMENt was a cohort study of black and white HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA. Univariate and multivariate cross-sectional associations with herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence were assessed among 455 HIV-negative men who have sex with men for demographic, behavioural and social determinant risk factors using logistic regression. Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 was 23% (48/211) for black and 16% (38/244) for white men who have sex with men (p?=?0.05). Education, poverty, drug/alcohol use, incarceration, circumcision, unprotected anal intercourse, and condom use were not associated with herpes simplex virus type 2. In multivariate analyses, black race for those ?25 years, but not >25 years, and number of sexual partners were significantly associated. Young black men who have sex with men are disproportionately affected by herpes simplex virus type 2, which may contribute to disparities in HIV acquisition. An extensive assessment of risk factors did not explain this disparity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection suggesting differences in susceptibility or partner characteristics. PMID:25246424

  20. Disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection between black and white men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Netochukwu; Rosenberg, Eli S; Luisi, Nicole; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background HIV disproportionately affects black men who have sex with men, and herpes simplex virus type 2 is known to increase acquisition of HIV. However, data on racial disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence and risk factors are limited among men who have sex with men in the United States. Methods InvolveMENt was a cohort study of black and white HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA. Univariate and multivariate cross-sectional associations with herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence were assessed among 455 HIV-negative men who have sex with men for demographic, behavioral, and social determinant risk factors using logistic regression. Results Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 was 23% (48/211) for black and 16% (38/244) for white men who have sex with men (p = 0.05). Education, poverty, drug/alcohol use, incarceration, circumcision, unprotected anal intercourse, and condom use were not associated with herpes simplex virus type 2. In multivariate analyses, black race for those ?25 years, but not >25 years, and number of sexual partners were significantly associated. Conclusions Young black men who have sex with men are disproportionately affected by herpes simplex virus type 2, which may contribute to disparities in HIV acquisition. An extensive assessment of risk factors did not explain this disparity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection suggesting differences in susceptibility or partner characteristics. PMID:25246424

  1. Activities of 1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodocytosine and its metabolites against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 in cell culture and in mice infected intracerebrally with herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Schinazi, R F; Fox, J J; Watanabe, K A; Nahmias, A J

    1986-01-01

    As measured by plaque and yield reduction assays, several metabolites of 1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodocytosine (FIAC) were highly active against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. These metabolites included the 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoroarabinosyl derivatives of 5-iodouracil (FIAU), cytosine (FAC), uracil (FAU), and thymine (FMAU). In mice inoculated intracerebrally with herpes simplex virus type 2, the relative order of potency of these compounds and licensed antiviral drugs was as follows: FMAU much greater than FIAC approximately equal to FIAU greater than acyclovir approximately equal to vidarabine much greater than FAC approximately equal to FAU. One of the main metabolites of FMAU, 2'-fluoro-5-hydroxymethyl-arabinosyluracil, was essentially inactive in vivo. FIAC-, FIAU-, FMAU-, FAC-, and FAU-resistant herpes simplex virus variants prepared in cell culture were found to be (i) devoid of viral thymidine kinase, (ii) cross-resistant to one another and resistant to drugs requiring viral thymidine kinase for activation, and (iii) sensitive to vidarabine or phosphonoformate. These results indicate that FIAC, FIAU, and FMAU require the virally encoded thymidine kinase for activation and suggest that the antiviral activity of FAU and FAC in cell cultures is also mediated by this enzyme. The interaction of the fluoroarabinosyl pyrimidine nucleosides with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase in a cell-free system is also described. PMID:3015003

  2. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial ?-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of ?-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase ? and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  3. Spectroscopic evaluation of the effect of a red microalgal polysaccharide on herpes-infected Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Huleihel, Mahmoud; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly

    2003-04-01

    The sulfated polysaccharide obtained from a species of red microalga has proved to be a potent antiviral agent against various members of the herpes family. In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) to investigate differences between normal cells, those infected with herpes viruses, and infected cells treated with red microalgal polysaccharide. FT-IR enables the characterization of cell or tissue pathology based on characteristic molecular vibrational spectra of the cells. The advantage of microscopic FT-IR spectroscopy over conventional FT-IR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell cultures or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and noninfected cells, and between infected cells treated with the polysaccharide and those not treated. In infected cells, there was an impressive decrease in sugar content and a considerable increase in phosphate levels in conjunction with the infection progress. Our results also proved that sugars penetrated and accumulated inside cells treated with the red microalgal polysaccharide. These could have been sugar fragments of low molecular weight present in the polysaccharide solution, despite purification by dialysis. Such sugar accumulation might be responsible for a breakdown in the internal steps of the viral replication cycle. PMID:14658634

  4. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of herpes simplex virus encephalitis with a radiolabeled antiviral drug

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y.; Price, R.W.; Rottenberg, D.A.; Fox, J.J.; Su, T.L.; Watanabe, K.A.; Philips, F.S.

    1982-09-17

    2'-Fluoro-5-methyl-1-..beta..-D-arabinosyluracil (FMAU) labeled with carbon-14 was used to image herpes simplex virus type 1-infected regions of rat brain by quantitative autoradiography. FMAU is a potent antiviral pyrimidine nucleoside which is selectively phosphorylated by virus-coded thymidine kinase. When the labeled FMAU was administered 6 hours before the rats were killed, the selective uptake and concentration of the drug and its metabolites by infected cells (defined by immunoperoxidase staining of viral antigens) allowed quantitative definition and mapping of HSV-1-infected structures in autoradiograms of brain sections. These results shown that quantitative autoradiography can be used to characterize the local metabolism of antiviral drugs by infected cells in vivo. They also suggest that the selective uptake of drugs that exploit viral thymidine kinase for their antiviral effect can, by appropriate labeling, be used in conjunction with clinical neuroimaging techniques to define infected regions of human brain, thereby providing a new approach to the diagnosis of herpes encephalitis in man.

  5. [Herpes simplex virus type 2 fulminant hepatitis after umbilical cord blood transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Mitsuhiro; Ishiwata, Kazuya; Sugio, Takeshi; Kaji, Daisuke; Ota, Hikari; Tsuji, Masanori; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Go; Asano-Mori, Yuki; Uchida, Naoyuki; Izutsu, Koji; Taniguchi, Shuichi

    2014-06-01

    This report describes a 41-year-old patient, who developed herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-hepatitis after umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT). The patient had received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from an unrelated donor for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) not in remission. AML relapsed 18 months after the first transplantation, and CBT was performed. AML relapsed again 5 months later and the patient was given chemotherapy. Although there was no active chronic graft-versus-host disease, liver dysfunction appeared, and one week later, progressed to acute liver failure. Viral screening of blood by PCR including hepatitis B and C viruses, human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1 and HSV-2 revealed elevation of HSV-2 (2.34 × 10? copies/ml). We diagnosed the patient as having HSV-2 acute hepatitis, and initiated treatment with antiviral drugs (acyclovir, foscarnet) and plasma exchange. However, liver functions deteriorated rapidly, and the patient died on day 6 after the onset of acute liver failure. Although HSV hepatitis is very rare after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, it is rapidly progressive and associated with a high mortality rate. Thus, early diagnosis with prompt antiviral intervention is recommended. PMID:24975337

  6. Long-term valacyclovir treatment and immune modulation for Herpes-associated erythema multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Staikuniene, Jurate

    2015-01-01

    Objective Erythema multiforme (EM) is an immune-mediated condition characterized by the appearance of target-like lesions on the skin and often accompanied by erosions or bullae involving the oral, genital, and/or ocular mucosae. 70% of recurrent EM cases are associated with HSV reactivation and it is labelled as herpes-associated erythema multiforme (HAE M). Recurrences are seen in approximately 20-25% of EM cases and managing these conditions are challenging for both the patient and the doctor. The effectiveness of antiviral drugs is proven for Herpes simplex infection, however most patients use a multiplicity of alternative and complementary therapies. Clinical presentation We present clinical data of 3 patients with recurrent HAE M managed by long-term valacyclovir therapy and immunostimulation with Echinacea or replacement immunoglobulin therapy in the case of IgG1 subclass deficiency. The presented cases have demonstrated that immune mechanisms are relevant for HAEM recurrences. Conclusions The immune abnormalities, such as antibody deficiency, in the patients with HSV-associated EM can lead to frequent relapses of disease and should be evaluated. Long-term antiviral therapy with immunomodulation can control the relapses of HAEM. PMID:26648786

  7. D-(+)-iso-methanocarbathymidine: a high-affinity substrate for herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Comin, Maria J; Vu, B Christie; Boyer, Paul L; Liao, Chenzhong; Hughes, Stephen H; Marquez, Victor E

    2008-07-01

    The stereoselective syntheses of the (+)-D and (-)-L enantiomers of iso-methanocarbathymidine (iso-MCT) was achieved through two independent linear approaches that converged on two antipodal enantiomers, common to a key precursor used in the synthesis of racemic iso-MCT. In the study reported herein we identified (+)-3 [D-(+)-iso-MCT] as the active enantiomer that was exclusively recognized by the herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk), as was predicted by molecular modeling. For this purpose, a human osteosarcoma (HOS) cell line modified to contain and express HSV1-tk from herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) was used to determine the cytotoxicity of the compounds by an assay that measures the level of ATP in the cells. The work demonstrates that changes in the substitution pattern of rigid bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane nucleosides, which, relative to normal nucleosides, appear unconventional, can lead to the spatial optimization of pharmacophores and vastly improved substrate recognition. PMID:18399509

  8. Salivary Varicella Zoster Virus in Astronauts and in Patients of Herpes Zoster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish; Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    Spaceflight is a uniquely stressful environment with astronauts experiencing a variety of stressors including: isolation and confinement, psychosocial, noise, sleep deprivation, anxiety, variable gravitational forces, and increased radiation. These stressors are manifested through the HPA and SAM axes resulting in increased stress hormones. Diminished T-lymphocyte functions lead to reactivation of latent herpes viruses in astronauts during spaceflight. Herpes simplex virus reactivated with symptoms during spaceflight whereas Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivate and are shed without symptoms. EBV and VZV are shed in saliva and CMV in the urine. The levels of EBV shed in astronauts increased 10-fold during the flight; CMV and VZV are not typically shed in low stressed individuals, but both were shed in astronauts during spaceflight. All herpesviruses were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Culturing revealed that VZV shed in saliva was infectious virus. The PCR technology was extended to test saliva of 54 shingles patients. All shingles patients shed VZV in their saliva, and the levels followed the course of the disease. Viremia was also found to be common during shingles. The technology may be used before zoster lesions appear allowing for prevention of disease. The technology may be used for rapid detection of VZV in doctors? offices. These studies demonstrated the value of applying technologies designed for astronauts to people on Earth.

  9. Herpes Simplex Virus: The Interplay Between HSV, Host, and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Desai, Dipen Vijay; Kulkarni, Smita Shrikant

    2015-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus proteins interact with host (human) proteins and create an environment conducive for its replication. Genital ulceration due to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections is an important clinical manifestation reported to increase the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition and replication in HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfection. Dampening the innate and adaptive immune responses of the skin-resident dendritic cells, HSV-2 not only helps itself, but creates a "yellow brick road" for one of the most dreaded viruses HIV, which is transmitted mainly through the sexual route. Although, data from clinical trials show that HSV-2 suppression reduces HIV-1 viral load, there are hardly any reports presenting conclusive evidence on the impact of HSV-2 coinfection on HIV-1 disease progression. Be that as it may, understanding the interplay between these three characters (HSV, host, and HIV-1) is imperative. This review endeavors to collate studies on the influence of HSV-derived proteins on the host response and HIV-1 replication. Studying such complex interactions may help in designing and developing common strategies for the two viruses to keep these "partners in crime" at bay. PMID:26331265

  10. Detection of herpes simplex virus using the polymerase chain reaction followed by endonuclease cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, B. B.; Josephson, S. L.; Mak, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify herpes simplex virus DNA using a single set of primers that amplify both herpes simplex virus I (HSVI) and II (HSVII). The viruses can be differentiated by a single restriction enzyme cleavage. Virus from dilutions of HSV-infected A549 cell suspensions were amplified and the infectivity endpoints of cell culture were compared with the PCR, and with another direct detection method, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The PCR was capable of detecting virus at a 10(-4) dilution for both HSVI and HSVII, when the corresponding TCID50 endpoints were 10(-5.9) and 10(-5.7), respectively. The ELISA detected virus only down to the 10(-1) dilution. The amplification procedure showed the greatest sensitivity when an initial protease digestion was followed by filtration. The PCR may have use in detection of HSV in clinical situations in which a rapid result is desirable. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1649552

  11. Immune responses to labial infection of BALB/c mice with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Morahan, P S; Thomson, T A; Kohl, S; Murray, B K

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of appearance of five humoral antibody responses (micro-neutralization assay [NT], complement fixation [CF], enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], radioimmunoassay [RIA], antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity [ADCC]), were compared during labial infection of BALB/c mice with herpes simplex virus type 1 strain Patton. The ELISA/RIA antibody responses were present in most mice by day 5 after infection, at the beginning of the herpetic lip lesions; antibody effective in ADCC showed identical early kinetics. In contrast, NT/CF antibodies were not detected in most mice until day 10, at the time of resolution of the herpetic lip lesions. The humoral immune responses persisted for at least 6 months after infection. The NT and CF responses were closely correlated in time of appearance and titers (r = 0.9), as were the ELISA and RIA responses (r = 0.99). However, there was little correlation between NT/CF and ELISA/RIA responses (r = 0.02). The kinetics of the delayed type hypersensitivity response showed similar kinetics of appearance to the ELISA/RIA/ADCC humoral responses, and peaked similarly, but waned gradually over 2 months. The importance of antibody in protection against labial herpes simplex virus type 1 infection was demonstrated by the ability of passively transferred convalescent serum (that produced a minimum NT titer of 10 in recipient mice) to protect against development of herpetic lesions and death. PMID:7216485

  12. Looking for an asymptomatic infection: usefulness of screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Delmonte, S; Latino, M A

    2012-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital infections are among the more frequent sexually transmissible infections with different prevalence by age, populations and geographical areas. Both are widespread, have an asymptomatic latent stage detectable only by laboratory and can have serious consequences such as tubal infertility and neonatal herpes. The direct isolation of CT in cervical or urethral discharge through Nucleic Acid Amplification Test (NAATs) allows to detect and to treat the infection with effective antibiotic medication. The screening of all women younger than 25 year old showed to be effective in reducing tubal complications but not in decreasing the incidence of the infection in the general population. Only a proactive screening of younger women, repeated yearly and associated with an effective partner notification could achieve a decrease of the incidence rate in the general population. The detection of type specific herpetic antibodies allows to identify persons with herpetic infection regardless of symptoms. While a population-based screening of general population cannot be proposed at the moment, a selective screening (attenders of STI clinic, HIV-positive patients, pregnant women) is a debated issue between those who consider it an effective means to detect persons with unrecognized symptoms who are infectious and those who think that preventive measures and antiviral medication are not effective enough to be proposed. PMID:23007249

  13. Fatigue in Medical Residents Leads to Reactivation of Herpes Virus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Uchakin, Peter N.; Parish, David C.; Dane, Francis C.; Uchakina, Olga N.; Scheetz, Allison P.; Agarwal, Neal K.; Smith, Betsy E.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to detect fatigue-induced clinical symptoms of immune suppression in medical residents. Samples were collected from the subjects at rest, following the first night (low-stress), and the last night (high-stress) of night float. Computerized reaction tests, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Wellness Profile questionnaires were used to quantify fatigue level. DNA of human herpes viruses HSV-1, VZV, EBV, as well as cortisol and melatonin concentrations, were measured in saliva. Residents at the high-stress interval reported being sleepier compared to the rest interval. EBV DNA level increased significantly at both stress intervals, while VZV DNA level increased only at low-stress. DNA levels of HSV-1 decreased at low-stress but increased at high-stress. Combined assessment of the viral DNA showed significant effect of stress on herpes virus reactivation at both stress intervals. Cortisol concentrations at both stress intervals were significantly higher than those at rest. PMID:22229027

  14. Diagnosing of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections in Suspected Patients Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Aliabadi, Nasrin; Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Asaei, Sadaf; Namayandeh, Mandana; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Herpes simplex virus infections are very common worldwide. The virus can cause infection in various body parts, especially eyes and the nervous system. Therefore, an early diagnosis and highly sensitive method is very helpful. Objectives: The present study sought to investigate the efficiency of Real-time TaqMan probe PCR in the diagnosis of HSV infection in suspected patients. Patients and Methods: In this study, 1566 patients with suspected HSV infections were enrolled. They aged 17 days to 96 years. The collected specimens were classified into four groups; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from HSE suspected individuals, samples from eye epithelial scraping, tear fluid or aqueous humor from herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) suspected patients, plasma of immune compromised patients and mucocutaneous collected samples from different body parts. The samples were analyzed by Real-time PCR assays. Results: In total, 44 (5.6%), 118 (26.8%), 23 (11.7%), 13 (44.8%) and 65 (45.5%) of 791 HSE, 407 HSK, 29 skin HSV, 143 oropharyngeal suspected patients and 196 patients with systemic HSV infection HSV had positive results by Real-time PCR assays, respectively. Conclusions: Real-time PCR assay, due to its high sensitivity and specificity, can help in early diagnosis and more effective treatment for patients. Also, it requires shorter hospital stay and promotes patients' survival. PMID:25834711

  15. A Case Study of the Cognitive and Behavioral Deficits of Temporal Lobe Damage in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Margaret K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This case study illustrates the highly significant language difficulties, marked memory deficits, and propensity for physical aggression following temporal lobe damage brought about by herpes encephalitis, and presents the usefulness of a new diagnostic measure in delineating such a variable cognitive pattern. (Author)

  16. College Students' Perceptions of and Experiences with Human Papillomavirus and Herpes: Implications for College Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschler, Christopher; Hope, Andrea; Myers, Jaime L.

    2015-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections spread through skin-to-skin contact represent unique prevention challenges. This study examines how college students perceive safer sex practices with respect to human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes. Qualitative and quantitative data (n = 275) were collected using an online questionnaire. College students'…

  17. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Blocks Events in the G1 Phase of the Cell Cycle Byeongwoon Song,1

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Blocks Events in the G1 Phase of the Cell Cycle Byeongwoon Song,1 J events that normally occur in the cell cycle during G1 phase, arguing that the HSV-induced block in the cell cycle occurs in early to mid-G1 phase. © 2000 Academic Press INTRODUCTION Viruses modify

  18. A herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcript mutant with increased virulence and reduced spontaneous reactivation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) gene is essential for efficient spontaneous reactivation of HSV-1 from latency. We previously reported that insertion of the LAT promoter and just the first 1.5 kb of the 8.3 LAT gene into an ectopic location in the virus re...

  19. Metagenomic analysis indicates that stressors induce production of herpes-like viruses in the coral Porites compressa

    PubMed Central

    Vega Thurber, Rebecca L.; Barott, Katie L.; Hall, Dana; Liu, Hong; Rodriguez-Mueller, Beltran; Desnues, Christelle; Edwards, Robert A.; Haynes, Matthew; Angly, Florent E.; Wegley, Linda; Rohwer, Forest L.

    2008-01-01

    During the last several decades corals have been in decline and at least one-third of all coral species are now threatened with extinction. Coral disease has been a major contributor to this threat, but little is known about the responsible pathogens. To date most research has focused on bacterial and fungal diseases; however, viruses may also be important for coral health. Using a combination of empirical viral metagenomics and real-time PCR, we show that Porites compressa corals contain a suite of eukaryotic viruses, many related to the Herpesviridae. This coral-associated viral consortium was found to shift in response to abiotic stressors. In particular, when exposed to reduced pH, elevated nutrients, and thermal stress, the abundance of herpes-like viral sequences rapidly increased in 2 separate experiments. Herpes-like viral sequences were rarely detected in apparently healthy corals, but were abundant in a majority of stressed samples. In addition, surveys of the Nematostella and Hydra genomic projects demonstrate that even distantly related Cnidarians contain numerous herpes-like viral genes, likely as a result of latent or endogenous viral infection. These data support the hypotheses that corals experience viral infections, which are exacerbated by stress, and that herpes-like viruses are common in Cnidarians. PMID:19017800

  20. Knowledge and Attitudes of University Health Service Clients about Genital Herpes: Implications for Patient Education and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillard, James R.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Genital herpes virus infection can cause both psychological and medical consequences. A study surveyed knowledge and attitudes of college students to assess degree of familiarity with this disease. Findings suggest misconceptions that could be dealt with in health education programs. (Author/DF)

  1. AMINOACYL FUCOSIDES AS POSSIBLE BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF TUMORIGENIC AND METASTATIC POTENTIAL IN HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS TYPE 2-TRANSFORMED RAT CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two classes of aminoacyl fucosides termed F13 and F14 were studied as possible markers of tumorigenic and metastatic potential in herpes simplex virus type 2 transformed rat cells. In the present study, clonal cell lines of transformed highly tumorigenic and metastatic (t-REF-G-2...

  2. Nasal and skin delivery of IC31(®)-adjuvanted recombinant HSV-2 gD protein confers protection against genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Wizel, Benjamin; Persson, Josefine; Thörn, Karolina; Nagy, Eszter; Harandi, Ali M

    2012-06-19

    Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) remains the leading cause of genital ulcers worldwide. Given the disappointing results of the recent genital herpes vaccine trials in humans, development of novel vaccine strategies capable of eliciting protective mucosal and systemic immune responses to HSV-2 is urgently required. Here we tested the ability of the adjuvant IC31(®) in combination with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) used through intranasal (i.n.), intradermal (i.d.), or subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization routes for induction of protective immunity against genital herpes infection in C57BL/6 mice. Immunization with gD plus IC31(®) through all three routes of immunization developed elevated gD-specific serum antibody responses with HSV-2 neutralizing activity. Whereas the skin routes promoted the induction of a mixed IgG2c/IgG1 isotype profile, the i.n. route only elicited IgG1 antibodies. All immunization routes were able to induce gD-specific IgG antibody responses in the vaginas of mice immunized with IC31(®)-adjuvanted gD. Although specific lymphoproliferative responses were observed in splenocytes from mice of most groups vaccinated with IC31(®)-adjuvanted gD, only i.d. immunization resulted in a significant splenic IFN-? response. Further, immunization with gD plus IC31(®) conferred 80-100% protection against an otherwise lethal vaginal HSV-2 challenge with amelioration of viral replication and disease severity in the vagina. These results warrant further exploration of IC31(®) for induction of protective immunity against genital herpes and other sexually transmitted infections. PMID:22682292

  3. Influence of the host cell factors CK2, hTERT, and PML, on the antiviral response to herpes simplex virus type I infection

    E-print Network

    Smith, Miles Christian

    2013-08-31

    Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is a significant human pathogen that infects a large portion of the human population. As an obligate intracellular parasite, HSV-1 requires certain cellular factors for its replication; ...

  4. A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Peter G E; Rovnak, Joel; Badani, Hussain; Cohrs, Randall J

    2015-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; human herpesvirus 1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) are human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses that cause lifelong infections in ganglia. Following primary infection and establishment of latency, HSV-1 reactivation typically results in herpes labialis (cold sores), but can occur frequently elsewhere on the body at the site of primary infection (e.g. whitlow), particularly at the genitals. Rarely, HSV-1 reactivation can cause encephalitis; however, a third of the cases of HSV-1 encephalitis are associated with HSV-1 primary infection. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (chickenpox) following which latent virus may reactivate decades later to produce herpes zoster (shingles), as well as an increasingly recognized number of subacute, acute and chronic neurological conditions. Following primary infection, both viruses establish a latent infection in neuronal cells in human peripheral ganglia. However, the detailed mechanisms of viral latency and reactivation have yet to be unravelled. In both cases latent viral DNA exists in an 'end-less' state where the ends of the virus genome are joined to form structures consistent with unit length episomes and concatemers, from which viral gene transcription is restricted. In latently infected ganglia, the most abundantly detected HSV-1 RNAs are the spliced products originating from the primary latency associated transcript (LAT). This primary LAT is an 8.3 kb unstable transcript from which two stable (1.5 and 2.0 kb) introns are spliced. Transcripts mapping to 12 VZV genes have been detected in human ganglia removed at autopsy; however, it is difficult to ascribe these as transcripts present during latent infection as early-stage virus reactivation may have transpired in the post-mortem time period in the ganglia. Nonetheless, low-level transcription of VZV ORF63 has been repeatedly detected in multiple ganglia removed as close to death as possible. There is increasing evidence that HSV-1 and VZV latency is epigenetically regulated. In vitro models that permit pathway analysis and identification of both epigenetic modulations and global transcriptional mechanisms of HSV-1 and VZV latency hold much promise for our future understanding in this complex area. This review summarizes the molecular biology of HSV-1 and VZV latency and reactivation, and also presents future directions for study. PMID:25794504

  5. The herpes simplex virus type 2 equivalent of the herpes simplex virus type 1 US7 gene and its flanking sequences.

    PubMed

    Hodgman, T C; Minson, A C

    1986-08-01

    Nucleotide sequencing studies (D. J. McGeoch, A. Dolan, S. Donald, and F. Rixon, 1985, J. Mol. Biol. 181, 1-14) have indicated that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has a coding sequence, referred to as US7, between the genes for the glycoproteins D and E (gD and gE). Northern blot analysis and nucleotide sequencing have been carried out to show that the type 2 virus (HSV-2) has an equivalent to the US7 gene. A comparison with the HSV-1 sequence has revealed some surprising similarities and differences. At the nucleotide level, HSV-2 has inserted a large sequence into the gE promoter, retained a large palindrome present in the coding sequence but not some tandem repeats, and deleted a region beside those repeats. At the amino acid level, the putative transmembrane sequence has been remarkably well conserved, and hydrophobic moment analysis indicates that it could be interacting with polar species within the plane of the membrane. Immediately after the deletion in the HSV-2 sequence, there is an N-glycosylation signal, and HSV-2 has one more such signal than HSV-1. The longest conserved sequence at the nucleotide level codes for a region of polypeptide that is strongly predicted to fold into alpha-helix. Implications of these analyses to the structure and possible function of these molecules are discussed. PMID:3016980

  6. Different expression profiles of Interleukin 11 (IL-11), Intelectin (ITLN) and Purine nucleoside phosphorylase 5a (PNP 5a) in crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio) in response to Cyprinid herpesvirus 2 and Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Podok, Patarida; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Dan; Lu, Liqun

    2014-05-01

    Interleukin 11 (IL-11), Intelectin (ITLN) and Purine nucleoside phosphorylase 5a (PNP5a) play important roles in innate immunity. In a previous study to identify differentially expressed immune-related genes, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) assay was used to characterize differentially expressed genes in crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio) infected with Cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2) in which IL-11, ITLN and PNP5a were identified to be the three most significantly up-regulated genes (Xu et al., Archives of Virology, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-014-2011-9). In this study, the complete open reading frames (ORF) of IL-11, ITLN and PNP5a genes were cloned and sequenced. The full-length cDNAs of the three genes contained an ORF of 597, 945 and 882 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 198, 314 and 293 amino acids, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the three genes shared high homology to other bony fish species including Zebrafish. Interestingly, the ITLN gene of crucian carp lacked a 10 aa peptide that was found in the C-terminal of other fish species. A real-time RT-PCR assay was developed to quantitatively examine their tissue distribution. We found that IL-11, ITLN and PNP5a were expressed at low levels in all of the tissues examined. To monitor the response of these genes to CyHV- 2 or Aeromonas hydrophila (A. hydrophila) infection, we determined the expression level of IL-11, ITLN and PNP5a at different time points after infection in kidney. Significant up-regulation of IL-11, ITLN and PNP5a was only observed 72 h post-CyHV-2 injection (P < 0.01), whereas significant up-regulation was observed as early as 6 h after infection with A. hydrophila (P < 0.01). Our results demonstrated that host innate immune response to CyHV-2, at least in which IL-11, ITLN and PNP5a were involved, was slow in comparison to that induced by A. hydrophila. It suggested that CyHV-2 might suppress host innate response during early infection. The lack of a C-terminal peptide of crucian carp ITLN gene implied a possible functional difference of this gene during evolution, which merit further investigation. PMID:24636855

  7. Multiple Antibody Targets on Herpes B Glycoproteins B and D Identified by Screening Sera of Infected Rhesus Macaques with Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Beutling, Ulrike; Jentsch, Dieter; Motzkus, Dirk; Frank, Ronald; Hunsmann, Gerhard; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Fritz, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Herpes B virus (or Herpesvirus simiae or Macacine herpesvirus 1) is endemic in many populations of macaques, both in the wild and in captivity. The virus elicits only mild clinical symptoms (if any) in monkeys, but can be transmitted by various routes, most commonly via bites, to humans where it causes viral encephalitis with a high mortality rate. Hence, herpes B constitutes a considerable occupational hazard for animal caretakers, veterinarians and laboratory personnel. Efforts are therefore being made to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection and to improve prognosis after accidental exposure. Among the measures envisaged are serological surveillance of monkey colonies and specific diagnosis of herpes B zoonosis against a background of antibodies recognizing the closely related human herpes simplex virus (HSV). 422 pentadecapeptides covering, in an overlapping fashion, the entire amino acid sequences of herpes B proteins gB and gD were synthesized and immobilized on glass slides. Antibodies present in monkey sera that bind to subsets of the peptide collection were detected by microserological techniques. With 42 different rhesus macaque sera, 114 individual responses to 18 different antibody target regions (ATRs) were recorded, 17 of which had not been described earlier. This finding may pave the way for a peptide-based, herpes B specific serological diagnostic test. PMID:24497986

  8. The use of corticosteroids in management of Herpes associated Erythema Multiforme.

    PubMed

    AlFar, Maan Yacoub; AlRousan, Medyan; Almajali, Zahi; Batarseh, Emil; Alsaddi, Rania

    2015-12-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute self-limiting condition considered to be hypersensitivity reaction associated commonly with infections or medications. It is characterized by skin lesions, with oral or other mucous membrane involvement. Occasionally EM may involve the mouth alone. We report a ten year-old healthy male child who developed skin lesions of both palms and soles associated with oral ulcerative lesions. The patient first noticed the lesions on the palms and soles followed by involvement of the oral cavity in form of multiple haemorrhagic crusting ulcerations involving lips and buccal mucosa. The diagnosis was established clinically based on the signs and symptoms as erythema multiforme minor associated with herpes simplex infection. Systemic corticosteroids as a treatment modality should always be considered for the treatment of erythema multiforme minor. PMID:26627523

  9. Concurrent meningococcal and herpes simplex infection in a non-immunocompromised child.

    PubMed

    Ali, Jasmin; Walsh, Hannah; Sanapala, Swathi; Syed, Nadeem

    2014-01-01

    A previously well 11-month-old infant presented with lethargy, a blanching rash, vomiting and diarrhoea. She was diagnosed with suspected gastroenteritis and discharged. The patient deteriorated and re-presented 24 h later with lumbar puncture (LP) confirming Neisseria meningitidis. Following an initial good response to ceftriaxone, the patient then developed a blistering facial rash on day 3 for which topical aciclovir was started with no improvement. She subsequently developed fever and redeveloped a rising C reactive protein (CRP). A CT of the head on day 6 was normal, however a repeat LP on day 7 showed persistently raised cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), white cell count (WCC), high proteins and low CSF glucose. A CSF viral PCR confirmed concurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 for which parenteral aciclovir was started. The patient responded well to bacterial and viral anti-infective treatments and was subsequently discharged on day 16 with no neurological sequelae. PMID:24810444

  10. Rapid detection of herpes simplex virus with fluorescein-labeled Helix pomatia lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Cumbie, R

    1989-01-01

    The use of fluorescein-conjugated Helix pomatia lectin was shown to be as effective as fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibody reagents for the detection and differentiation of herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) in MRC-5 cell culture. Cells infected with HSV-1 generally displayed a pattern of nongranular or diffuse fluorescence, while cells infected with HSV-2 were identified by the production of fluorescent grains and flecks. This unique nonimmunological reagent, when used in combination with low-speed centrifugation, provides a remarkably specific, sensitive, rapid, and cost-effective means to detect HSV-infected MRC-5 or BHK-21 cells as early as 20 h postinoculation. In contrast to the immunofluorescence method, the serotypes of HSV can be differentiated with only one fluorescein-H. pomatia reagent in MRC-5 cell cultures. Images PMID:2545739

  11. Vaccination against herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia in France: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Bresse, Xavier; Annemans, Lieven; Préaud, Emmanuelle; Bloch, Karine; Duru, Gérard; Gauthier, Aline

    2013-06-01

    This study assesses the cost-effectiveness of vaccination against herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia in France, using a published Markov model. The cost-effectiveness of vaccinating individuals aged from 65 years or between 70 and 79 years was evaluated over their lifetime, from a third-party payer perspective. French-specific data were combined with results from clinical studies and international quality-of-life-based (EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire) utilities from the literature. HZ vaccination was highly cost effective in both populations. Incremental cost-effective ratios were estimated between €9513 and 12,304 per quality-adjusted life year gained, corresponding to €2240-2651 per HZ case avoided and €3539-4395 per postherpetic neuralgia case avoided. In addition to epidemiological and clinical evidence, economic evidence also supports the implementation of HZ vaccination in France. PMID:23537397

  12. Herpes virus entry mediator licenses Listeria infection induced immunopathology through control of type I interferon

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Mengjie; Wu, Weiwei; Zhang, Yuejiao; Zhu, Mingzhao

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis of the splenic lymphocytes is often induced during the acute phase of Listeria infection in mice. However, the underlying mechanism remains incompletely understood. Here, we found that herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) plays an important role for Listeria infection induced lymphocyte apoptosis. Mechanistically, HVEM is not directly involved in listeriolysin O (LLO) induced lymphocyte apoptosis or interferon beta induced T cell activation per se. Interestingly, HVEM is partially required for Listeria induced interferon (IFN)-I production in the spleen, particularly in macrophages. Consequently, the bystander activation of lymphocytes is significantly lower in HVEM deficient mice than that in wild-type (WT) mice upon Listeria infection. Thus, our results have revealed a novel role of HVEM on the regulation of IFN-I and immunopathology during Listeria infection. PMID:26245828

  13. Spread of herpes simplex virus in lymph nodes after experimental infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Klein, R J; Czelusniak, S M

    1987-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus was frequently isolated from ipsilateral popliteal lymph nodes after percutaneous inoculation of the dorsal face of the footpad, and from ipsi- and contralateral submandibular lymph nodes after percutaneous inoculation of the cheek or the orofacial area of mice. Virus was detected only on very rare occasion in nondraining lymph nodes (inguinal or axillary) or in contralateral popliteal lymph nodes, but was frequently isolated in contralateral lumbar lymph nodes after footpad inoculation. The presence of virus in lymph nodes paralleled or followed the invasion of ipsilateral sensory ganglia and was associated with dissemination of virus in contralateral sensory ganglia after unilateral inoculation. In older mice virus was detected only occasionally in lymph nodes and dissemination of virus in contralateral sensory ganglia was generally not observed. The results suggest that lymphatic spread may contribute to dissemination of virus in contralateral sensory ganglia after unilateral inoculation of mice. PMID:3025889

  14. Hypomethylation of host cell DNA synthesized after infection or transformation of cells by herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Macnab, J.C.M.; Adams, R.L.P.; Rinaldi, A.; Orr, A.; Clark, L.

    1988-04-01

    Infection of rat embryo cells with herpes simplex virus type 2 caused undermethylation of host cell DNA synthesized during infection. DNA made prior to infection was not demethylated, but some of its degradation products, including methyl dCMP, were incorporated into viral DNA. The use of mutant virus showed that some viral DNA synthesis appears to be required for the inhibition of methylation. Inhibition of methylation cannot be explained by an absence of DNA methyltransferase as the activity of this enzyme did not change during the early period of infection. Inhibition of host cell DNA methylation may be an important step in the transformation of cells by herpesviruses, and various transformed cell lines tested showed reduced levels of DNA methylation.

  15. Cell surface receptors for herpes simplex virus are heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The role of cell surface heparan sulfate in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection was investigated using CHO cell mutants defective in various aspects of glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Binding of radiolabeled virus to the cells and infection were assessed in mutant and wild-type cells. Virus bound efficiently to wild-type cells and initiated an abortive infection in which immediate-early or alpha viral genes were expressed, despite limited production of late viral proteins and progeny virus. Binding of virus to heparan sulfate-deficient mutant cells was severely impaired and mutant cells were resistant to HSV infection. Intermediate levels of binding and infection were observed for a CHO cell mutant that produced undersulfated heparan sulfate. These results show that heparan sulfate moieties of cell surface proteoglycans serve as receptors for HSV. PMID:1310996

  16. Microtubule-mediated Transport of Incoming Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Capsids to the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sodeik, Beate; Ebersold, Melanie W.; Helenius, Ari

    1997-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 fuses with the plasma membrane of a host cell, and the incoming capsids are efficiently and rapidly transported across the cytosol to the nuclear pore complexes, where the viral DNA genomes are released into the nucleoplasm. Using biochemical assays, immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy in the presence and absence of microtubule depolymerizing agents, it was shown that the cytosolic capsid transport in Vero cells was mediated by microtubules. Antibody labeling revealed the attachment of dynein, a minus end–directed, microtubule-dependent motor, to the viral capsids. We propose that the incoming capsids bind to microtubules and use dynein to propel them from the cell periphery to the nucleus. PMID:9060466

  17. Systems Analysis of Protein Fatty Acylation in Herpes Simplex Virus-Infected Cells Using Chemical Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Serwa, Remigiusz A; Abaitua, Fernando; Krause, Eberhard; Tate, Edward W; O'Hare, Peter

    2015-08-20

    Protein fatty acylation regulates diverse aspects of cellular function and organization and plays a key role in host immune responses to infection. Acylation also modulates the function and localization of virus-encoded proteins. Here, we employ chemical proteomics tools, bio-orthogonal probes, and capture reagents to study myristoylation and palmitoylation during infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Using in-gel fluorescence imaging and quantitative mass spectrometry, we demonstrate a generalized reduction in myristoylation of host proteins, whereas palmitoylation of host proteins, including regulators of interferon and tetraspanin family proteins, was selectively repressed. Furthermore, we found that a significant fraction of the viral proteome undergoes palmitoylation; we identified a number of virus membrane glycoproteins, structural proteins, and kinases. Taken together, our results provide broad oversight of protein acylation during HSV infection, a roadmap for similar analysis in other systems, and a resource with which to pursue specific analysis of systems and functions. PMID:26256475

  18. Systems Analysis of Protein Fatty Acylation in Herpes Simplex Virus-Infected Cells Using Chemical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Abaitua, Fernando; Krause, Eberhard; Tate, Edward W.; O’Hare, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein fatty acylation regulates diverse aspects of cellular function and organization and plays a key role in host immune responses to infection. Acylation also modulates the function and localization of virus-encoded proteins. Here, we employ chemical proteomics tools, bio-orthogonal probes, and capture reagents to study myristoylation and palmitoylation during infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Using in-gel fluorescence imaging and quantitative mass spectrometry, we demonstrate a generalized reduction in myristoylation of host proteins, whereas palmitoylation of host proteins, including regulators of interferon and tetraspanin family proteins, was selectively repressed. Furthermore, we found that a significant fraction of the viral proteome undergoes palmitoylation; we identified a number of virus membrane glycoproteins, structural proteins, and kinases. Taken together, our results provide broad oversight of protein acylation during HSV infection, a roadmap for similar analysis in other systems, and a resource with which to pursue specific analysis of systems and functions. PMID:26256475

  19. New onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) as the heralding manifestation of herpes simplex encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Raut, Tushar Premraj; Giri, Prithvi; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2013-01-01

    New onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a relatively novel concept used to describe a cohort of previously healthy young adults mostly women presenting with denovo refractory status epilepticus which has a miserable impact on the outcome. Various infectious and non-infectious causes have been considered to be responsible for this dreaded syndrome; however, many a times the exact cause is not identified. As therapy with antiepileptic and anaesthetic drugs is not so successful, identifying and treating the exact cause could improve the outcome. Here the authors describe a woman who presented with NORSE. Investigations confirmed the diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and she responded drastically to acyclovir along with complete control of seizures. In this case, NORSE was the presenting feature of HSE and the refractoriness of her seizures was terminated only after treating the exact cause, that is, encephalitis. PMID:23887985

  20. New onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) as the heralding manifestation of herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Raut, Tushar Premraj; Giri, Prithvi; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2013-01-01

    New onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a relatively novel concept used to describe a cohort of previously healthy young adults mostly women presenting with denovo refractory status epilepticus which has a miserable impact on the outcome. Various infectious and non-infectious causes have been considered to be responsible for this dreaded syndrome; however, many a times the exact cause is not identified. As therapy with antiepileptic and anaesthetic drugs is not so successful, identifying and treating the exact cause could improve the outcome. Here the authors describe a woman who presented with NORSE. Investigations confirmed the diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and she responded drastically to acyclovir along with complete control of seizures. In this case, NORSE was the presenting feature of HSE and the refractoriness of her seizures was terminated only after treating the exact cause, that is, encephalitis. PMID:23887985

  1. Lower Back Pain with Sciatic Disorder Following L5 Dermatome Caused by Herpes Zoster Infection.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Roslind Karolina; von den Driesch, Arnd; König, Dietmar Pierre

    2015-09-28

    We report the case of a 62-year-old patient with lower back pain radiating into the right leg accompanied by numbness. The pain had an acute onset and was resistant to conservative pain treatment. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the lumbar spine showed no degenerative discovertebral lesions, but a swelling of the nerve root supplying the affected dermatome. For pain treatment the patient received lumbar epidural infiltrations. During this treatment the patient suddenly developed a skin rash with grouped vesicular blisters on an erythematous ground. After the diagnosis of a lumbar herpes zoster and an acyclovir treatment, the patient could be discharged in an ameliorated condition. This case demonstrates the importance to consider rare causes of lumbosciatic pain and disorders and to acknowledge unspecific changes in a MRI scan. PMID:26605030

  2. Neuronal Interferon Signaling Is Required for Protection against Herpes Simplex Virus Replication and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Pamela C.; Leib, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses are critical for controlling herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). The importance of neuronal IFN signaling in controlling acute and latent HSV-1 infection remains unclear. Compartmentalized neuron cultures revealed that mature sensory neurons respond to IFN? at both the axon and cell body through distinct mechanisms, resulting in control of HSV-1. Mice specifically lacking neural IFN signaling succumbed rapidly to HSV-1 corneal infection, demonstrating that IFN responses of the immune system and non-neuronal tissues are insufficient to confer survival following virus challenge. Furthermore, neurovirulence was restored to an HSV strain lacking the IFN-modulating gene, ?34.5, despite its expected attenuation in peripheral tissues. These studies define a crucial role for neuronal IFN signaling for protection against HSV-1 pathogenesis and replication, and they provide a novel framework to enhance our understanding of the interface between host innate immunity and neurotropic pathogens. PMID:26153886

  3. Varicella-zoster virus in the saliva of patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Satish K; Tyring, Stephen K; Gilden, Donald H; Cohrs, Randall J; Leal, Melanie J; Castro, Victoria A; Feiveson, Alan H; Ott, C Mark; Pierson, Duane L

    2008-03-01

    Fifty-four patients with herpes zoster were treated with valacyclovir. On treatment days 1, 8, and 15, pain was scored and saliva examined for varicella-zoster virus (VZV) DNA. VZV DNA was found in every patient the day treatment was started and later disappeared in 82%. There was a positive correlation between the presence of VZV DNA and pain and between VZV DNA copy number and pain (P <.0005). VZV DNA was present in 1 patient before rash and in 4 after pain resolved and was not present in any of 6 subjects with chronic pain or in 14 healthy subjects. Analysis of human saliva has potential usefulness in the diagnosis of neurological disease produced by VZV without rash. PMID:18260763

  4. Lower Back Pain with Sciatic Disorder Following L5 Dermatome Caused by Herpes Zoster Infection

    PubMed Central

    von den Driesch, Arnd; König, Dietmar Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old patient with lower back pain radiating into the right leg accompanied by numbness. The pain had an acute onset and was resistant to conservative pain treatment. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the lumbar spine showed no degenerative discovertebral lesions, but a swelling of the nerve root supplying the affected dermatome. For pain treatment the patient received lumbar epidural infiltrations. During this treatment the patient suddenly developed a skin rash with grouped vesicular blisters on an erythematous ground. After the diagnosis of a lumbar herpes zoster and an acyclovir treatment, the patient could be discharged in an ameliorated condition. This case demonstrates the importance to consider rare causes of lumbosciatic pain and disorders and to acknowledge unspecific changes in a MRI scan. PMID:26605030

  5. [Exudative uveitis, chronic labial herpes and interstitial pneumonia in an HIV-positive child].

    PubMed

    Popa, G C

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the case of a 6 and a half year-old child, with marked hipotrophy in height and weight (15 kg weight, which make a deficit of about 6 kg). The right eye presented pupilar sinekies, loaded vitreous and two white-yellow exsudative coroidal placards. One of them was inter-maculo-papilar having 4DP in diameter, difuse margins and aspect, the other was infero-macular. The right eye vision was only 2/50 n.c. The child also presented cronical labial herpes and intersti?ial pneumony. The ELISA test (+) confirmed the HIV suspicion. The paper insisted on the herpetical ethiology of the corio-retineal exsudative lesions. PMID:8714110

  6. Experimental herpes-like viral infections in marine bivalves: demonstration of interspecies transmission.

    PubMed

    Arzul, I; Renault, T; Lipart, C

    2001-08-22

    Since 1972, herpes-like virus infections have been reported in several marine bivalve species around the world. Viral detection was often associated with high mortality rates in larvae and spat. To determine whether a single virus is able to infect different bivalve host species, we carried out experimental transmission assays. As a first step, 8 assays were performed to infect axenic Crassostrea gigas larvae with virus from infected C. gigas larvae using a previously described protocol. The protocol appeared reliable and PCR was confirmed as a powerful technique for detecting viral DNA in experimentally infected oysters. The defined protocol was then applied to infect different bivalve species. Interspecies viral transmission was demonstrated under laboratory conditions. The same phenomenon may occur in private hatcheries and may be promoted by intensive rearing conditions. This hypothesis is reinforced by reports of concomitant mortalities in the larvae of several bivalve species and by the first molecular analysis of infected larval samples. PMID:11592697

  7. Herpes-like virus infection causing mortality of cultured abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pen Heng; Kuo, Shu Ting; Lai, San Huei; Yang, Hong Shii; Ting, Yun Yuan; Hsu, Ching Lung; Chen, Hon Cheng

    2005-06-14

    A herpes-like virus is demonstrated for the first time to be associated with high mortality rates in maricultured abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta in Taiwan. Histopathology of moribund abalone indicated that the nerve system was the primary target tissue. The lesions were characterised by tissue necrosis accompanied with infiltration of haemocytes. Electron microscopic examination demonstrated viral particles within the degenerated cerebral ganglion cells. The viruses were hexagonal, approximately 100 nm in diameter and had a single coat. Some viral particles contained a dense nucleoid, while others were empty. The ultrastructure and morphogenesis of the virus particles were consistent with those of the herpesvirus described from the oyster Crassostrea virginica. Experimental infection using supernatant collected from minced visceral organs and muscle of moribund abalone induced 100 % mortality through both intramuscular injection and bath treatments. PMID:16042040

  8. Herpes Simples Virus Type 2 Shedding From Male Circumcision Wounds in Rakai, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Mary K; Kigozi, Godfrey; Gray, Ronald H; Armour, Benjamin; Manucci, Jordyn; Serwadda, David; Redd, Andrew D; Nalugoda, Fred; Patel, Eshan U; Wawer, Maria J; Quinn, Thomas C; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2015-11-15

    A prospective observational study of 176 men coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was conducted to assess whether their sexual partners may be at an increased risk of HSV-2 from male circumcision (MC) wounds. Preoperative and weekly penile lavage samples were tested for penile HSV-2 shedding. Prevalence risk ratios (PRRs) were estimated using Poisson regression. Detectable penile HSV-2 shedding was present in 9.7% of men (17 of 176) before MC, compared with 12.9% (22 of 170) at 1 week (PRR, 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], .74-2.38) and 14.8% (23 of 155) at 2 weeks (PRR, 1.50; 95% CI, .86-2.62) after MC. HSV-2 shedding was lower among men with healed MC wounds (adjusted PRR, 0.62; 95% CI, .35-1.08). Men undergoing MC should be counseled on sexual abstinence and condom use. PMID:25943201

  9. The function of herpes simplex virus genes: a primer for genetic engineering of novel vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Roizman, B

    1996-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus vectors are being developed for delivery and expression of human genes to the central nervous system, selective destruction of cancer cells, and as carriers for genes encoding antigens that induce protective immunity against infectious agents. Vectors constructed to meet these objectives must differ from wild-type virus with respect to host range, reactivation from latency, and expression of viral genes. The vectors currently being developed are (i) helper free amplicons, (ii) replication defective viruses, and (iii) genetically engineered replication competent viruses with restricted host range. Whereas the former two types of vectors require stable, continuous cell lines expressing viral genes for their replication, the replication competent viruses will replicate on approved primary human cell strains. PMID:8876131

  10. Heparanase is a Host Enzyme Required for Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Release from Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadigal, Satvik R.; Agelidis, Alex M.; Karasneh, Ghadah A.; Antoine, Thessicar E.; Yakoub, Abraam M.; Ramani, Vishnu C.; Djalilian, Ali R.; Sanderson, Ralph D.; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses exemplified by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) attach to cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into host cells. However, during a productive infection the HS moieties on parent cells can trap newly exiting viral progenies and inhibit their release. Here, we demonstrate that a HS-degrading enzyme of the host, heparanase (HPSE), is upregulated through NF-kB and translocated to the cell surface upon HSV-1 infection for the removal of HS to facilitate viral release. We also find a significant increase in HPSE release in vivo during infection of murine corneas and that knockdown of HPSE in vivo inhibits virus shedding. Overall, we propose that HPSE acts as a molecular switch for turning a virus-permissive “attachment mode” of host cells to a virus-deterring “detachment mode”. Since many human viruses use HS as an attachment receptor, the HPSE-HS interplay may delineate a common mechanism for virus release. PMID:25912399

  11. Herpes simplex virus genes controlling reactivation from latency in rabbit eye model.

    PubMed

    Batra, S K; Brown, S M

    1990-07-01

    Using the rabbit eye model of latency, herpes simplex virus type 1 strain McKrae invariably reactivated after epinephrine iontophoresis, whereas type 2(HSV-2) virus strain HG 52 failed to reactivate. Both strains established a latent infection with the same frequency. To identify the viral genes involved in this reactivation difference, intertypic recombinants were selected following cotransfection of intact McKrae DNA and Xba I or Hpa I cleaved HG52 DNA. Eleven separately obtained recombinants containing HG52 inserts between 0.35-0.56 and/or 0.82-1.0 map units (mu) were isolated but as four that were tested reactivated with the same frequency as the parental Mckrae virus, it was established that the genes encoded between these map coordinates do not determine the reactivation difference. PMID:2172160

  12. Ocular herpes simplex virus: how are latency, reactivation, recurrent disease and therapy interrelated?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dujaili, Lena J; Clerkin, Patrick P; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2012-01-01

    Most humans are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in early childhood and remain latently infected throughout life. While most individuals have mild or no symptoms, some will develop destructive HSV keratitis. Ocular infection with HSV-1 and its associated sequelae account for the majority of corneal blindness in industrialized nations. Neuronal latency in the peripheral ganglia is established when transcription of the viral genome is repressed (silenced) except for the latency-associated transcripts and microRNAs. The functions of latency-associated transcripts have been investigated since 1987. Roles have been suggested relating to reactivation, establishment of latency, neuronal protection, antiapoptosis, apoptosis, virulence and asymptomatic shedding. Here, we review HSV-1 latent infections, reactivation, recurrent disease and antiviral therapies for the ocular HSV diseases. PMID:21861620

  13. Reinfections and site-specific immunity in herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Klein, R J

    1989-10-01

    Studies with human volunteers and patients suffering from recurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections have shown that reinfections with autologous or heterologous strains, occurring at sites distant from those of the recurrences, are possible in a variable proportion of the subjects. Experiments in animals have shown that mice surviving a primary HSV infection in the lumbo-sacral area, can become latently infected in trigeminal ganglia upon reinfection of the orofacial site. Similar results were obtained after vaccination of mice with a thymidine-kinase negative, non-pathogenic HSV-1 mutant. It was also demonstrated that initial HSV-1 eye infection in rabbits prevents superinfection of trigeminal ganglia by other strains. PMID:2683458

  14. Treatment of acyclovir-unresponsive cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection with topically applied SP-303.

    PubMed

    Safrin, S; McKinley, G; McKeough, M; Robinson, D; Spruance, S L

    1994-12-01

    The naturally occurring polyphenolic biopolymer SP-303 has in vitro activity against both HSV-1 and HSV-2, including strains that are resistant to acyclovir. Nine AIDS patients with acyclovir-unresponsive mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus infection were treated with thrice daily topical SP-303T ointment in an open-label pilot study. Although a transient decrease in lesion size was observed in 4 patients during study drug therapy, and 3 patients sustained a quantitative decrease in virus burden, neither complete healing nor cessation of virus shedding occurred in any patient. Seven patients complained of pain or burning upon application of the study ointment, causing 1 patient to terminate the study. In summary, application of SP-303T ointment effected no significant improvement in the clinical course of 9 AIDS patients with acyclovir-unresponsive HSV infection. PMID:7710268

  15. Role for herpes simplex virus 1 ICP27 in the inhibition of type I interferon signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Karen E.; Song, Byeongwoon; Knipe, David M.

    2008-05-10

    Host cells respond to viral infection by many mechanisms, including the production of type I interferons which act in a paracrine and autocrine manner to induce the expression of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Viruses have evolved means to inhibit interferon signaling to avoid induction of the innate immune response. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has several mechanisms to inhibit type I interferon production, the activities of ISGs, and the interferon signaling pathway itself. We report that the inhibition of the Jak/STAT pathway by HSV-1 requires viral gene expression and that viral immediate-early protein ICP27 plays a role in downregulating STAT-1 phosphorylation and in preventing the accumulation of STAT-1 in the nucleus. We also show that expression of ICP27 by transfection causes an inhibition of IFN-induced STAT-1 nuclear accumulation. Therefore, ICP27 is necessary and sufficient for at least some of the effects of HSV infection on STAT-1.

  16. Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: Practical Consideration for Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a transient disease caused by the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) in spinal or cranial sensory ganglia. It is characterized by a painful rash in the affected dermatome. Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the most troublesome side effect associated with HZ. However, PHN is often resistant to current analgesic treatments such as antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, and topical agents including lidocaine patches and capsaicin cream and can persist for several years. The risk factors for reactivation of HZ include advanced age and compromised cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Early diagnosis and treatment with antiviral agents plus intervention treatments is believed to shorten the duration and severity of acute HZ and reduce the risk of PHN. Prophylactic vaccination against VZV can be the best option to prevent or reduce the incidence of HZ and PHN. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of HZ and PHN, as well as the efficacy of the HZ vaccine. PMID:26175877

  17. A herpes-like virus in king crabs: Characterization and transmission under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Ryazanova, T V; Eliseikina, M G; Kalabekov, I M; Odintsova, N A

    2015-05-01

    A herpes-like virus was found infecting the antennal gland and bladder epithelium in the blue king crab Paralithodes platypus from the eastern area of the Sea of Okhotsk. Electron microscopic analysis of antennal gland samples from blue king crabs with histologically confirmed signs of disease revealed virus particles, which were mostly hexagonal in shape and located primarily in the nucleus; these particles were rarely observed in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Most virus particles ranged in size from 115 to 125nm. Hemocytes of the red king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus in cell culture could be experimentally infected with virus from thawed antennal gland samples of the blue king crabs with histologically confirmed signs of viral infection. Clear signs of infection were observed in hemocyte cultures at 3-4days post-inoculation as small foci of highly vacuolated formations. These formations included several nuclei and were surrounded by a halo of small cytoplasmic bubbles containing actin and tubulin. As demonstrated by electron microscopic studies, no virus-like particles were found in the cells 1day post-inoculation, but particles become abundant at 7days post-inoculation. We developed a consensus primer PCR method for amplification of a region of the herpesviral DNA-directed DNA polymerase. Primers were designed to target sequences encoding highly conserved amino acid motifs covering a region of approximately 800bp. Thus, macroscopic, histological and ultra-structural examinations of blue king crabs infected with a virus and the molecular identification of the pathogen revealed the presence of herpesviruses. The frequency of the herpes-like viral infection in natural populations of blue king crabs in the Sea of Okhotsk ranged from 0% to 3% in different years. PMID:25712900

  18. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  19. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you have sores or prodromal symptoms at the time of delivery, you will need to have a cesarean delivery . ... not have sores or prodromal symptoms at the time of delivery, a vaginal birth may be possible. Can women ...

  20. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sooner. Medicines used to treat mouth sores include: Acyclovir Famciclovir Valacyclovir These medicines work best if you ... a weakened immune system due to atopic dermatitis , cancer , or HIV infection

  1. Sacral Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... virus infection includes the following oral antiviral medications: Acyclovir pills Valacyclovir pills Famciclovir pills These medications are ... virus infection includes the same oral antiviral medications: Acyclovir pills Valacyclovir pills Famciclovir pills People who experience ...

  2. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Unfortunately, these medicines do not cure HSV infections. Treatment for primary and recurrent HSV infections are oral antiviral medications, such as acyclovir (Zovirax®), valacyclovir (Valtrex®), and famciclovir (Famvir®). Each of ...

  3. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

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  4. Oral Herpes

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  5. Herpes Keratitis

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  6. Herpes Simplex

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  7. Genital Herpes

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    ... tested and has negative STD test results; • Using latex condoms the right way every time you have ... female genital areas that are covered by a latex condom. However, outbreaks can also occur in areas ...

  8. Herpes Simplex

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  9. Genital Herpes

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  10. Genital Herpes

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  11. Peripheral Blood CD4 T-Cell and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell (pDC) Reactivity to Herpes Simplex Virus 2 and pDC Number Do Not Correlate with the Clinical or Virologic Severity of Recurrent Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Nicholas J.; Magaret, Amalia; Laing, Kerry J.; Kask, Angela Shaulov; Wang, Minna; Mark, Karen E.; Schiffer, Joshua T.; Wald, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Leukocytes participate in the immune control of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Data from HIV coinfections, germ line mutations, and case reports suggest involvement of CD4 T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). We investigated the relationships between these cells and recurrent genital herpes disease severity in the general population. Circulating CD4 T-cell responses to HSV-2 were measured in specimens from 67 immunocompetent individuals with measured genital lesion and HSV shedding rates. Similarly, pDC number and functional responses to HSV-2 were analyzed in 40 persons. CD4 responses and pDC concentrations and responses ranged as much as 100-fold between persons while displaying moderate within-person consistency over time. No correlations were observed between these immune response parameters and genital HSV-2 severity. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) coinfection was not correlated with differences in HSV-2-specific CD4 T-cell responses. The CD4 T-cell response to HSV-2 was much more polyfunctional than was the response to CMV. These data suggest that other immune cell subsets with alternate phenotypes or anatomical locations may be responsible for genital herpes control in chronically infected individuals. PMID:22761381

  12. Diagnostic imaging of herpes simplex virus encephalitis using a radiolabeled antiviral drug: autoradiographic assessment in an animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y.; Rubenstein, R.; Price, R.W.; Fox, J.J.; Watanabe, K.A.

    1984-06-01

    To develop a new approach to the diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis, we used a radiolabeled antiviral drug, 2'-fluoro-5-methyl-1-beta-D-arabinosyluracil labeled with carbon 14 ((14C)FMAU), as a probe for selectively imaging brain infection in a rat model by quantitative autoradiography. A high correlation was found between focal infection, as defined by immunoperoxidase viral antigen staining, and increased regional (14C)FMAU uptake in brain sections. Two potential sources of false-positive imaging were defined: high concentrations of drug in the choroid plexus because of its higher permeability compared with brain, and drug sequestration by proliferating uninfected cell populations. Our results support the soundness of the proposed strategy of using a labeled antiviral drug that is selectively phosphorylated by herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase in conjunction with scanning methods for human diagnosis, and also define some of the factors that must be taken into account when planning clinical application.

  13. Efficacy of Topical 5% Acyclovir-1% Hydrocortisone Cream (ME-609) for Treatment of Herpes Labialis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Maria Inês; Souza, Suéli L; de Farias, Bruna F; Pires, Patrícia D S; Dondossola, Eduardo R; dos Reis, Maria Eduarda F

    2015-08-01

    We performed a systematic review with the objective of verifying the efficacy of topical use 5% Acyclovir-1% Hydrocortisone cream compared to the placebo group for herpes simplex labialis treatment. We performed a literature search using MEDLINE, Embase, BIOSIS, LILACS, Scopus, Grey literature, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the ISI Web of Science and IBECS from 1990 to June 2014. We reported the outcomes using relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. The literature search yielded 180 potentially relevant publications. Reviews of the reference lists yielded two further citations. Among these papers, two were considered eligible for inclusion in this review. Both trials included 1,213 patients. A meta-analysis of these studies showed a RR = 0.77, (95% CI 0.70-0.86; p<0.001).This result suggests that an early episodic treatment with the combination of an antiviral and a steroid is beneficial for herpes simplex labialis treatment. PMID:26247156

  14. Chromosomal organization of the herpes simplex virus genome during acute infection of the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Muggeridge, M I; Fraser, N W

    1986-01-01

    After corneal inoculation, herpes simplex virus type 1 replicates in the mouse eye, trigeminal ganglia, and brainstem, producing first an acute and then a latent infection. Previous work from this laboratory focused on the structure of the viral DNA in this system. We have now examined the structure of the viral genome at the chromosome level by using micrococcal nuclease digestion. Studies with disaggregated cell preparations made from the brainstems of acutely infected mice show that the majority of the viral DNA is in a nonnucleosomal form; however, a nucleosomelike fraction was also consistently detected. A similar result was obtained for viral DNA in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected C1300 (clone NA) neuroblastoma cells (a neuronal cell line). Images PMID:3016340

  15. The adjuvant CLDC increases protection of a herpes simplex type 2 glycoprotein D vaccine in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Farley, Nicholas; Bravo, Fernando J; Earwood, Julie; McNeal, Monica; Fairman, Jeff; Cardin, Rhonda

    2010-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are common but there is no vaccine available. We evaluated cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) as an adjuvant for an HSV gD2 vaccine and compared it to an MPL/Alum adjuvant in a guinea pig model of genital herpes. The addition of CLDC to the gD2 vaccine significantly decreased acute and recurrent disease and most importantly the number of days with recurrent virus shedding compared to gD2 alone. Reductions in these outcomes were also detected when gD2+CLDC was compared to gD2+MPL/Alum. When the vaccine and adjuvants were evaluated as therapeutic vaccines, they were ineffective. CLDC enhanced protection compared to MPL/Alum and is the first vaccine to reduce recurrent virus shedding, a key to decreasing the spread of HSV-2. PMID:19857450

  16. The Adjuvant CLDC Increases Protection of a Herpes Simplex Type 2 Glycoprotein D Vaccine in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, David I; Farley, Nicholas; Bravo, Fernando J.; Earwood, Julie; McNeal, Monica; Fairman, Jeff; Cardin, Rhonda

    2009-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are common but there is no vaccine available. We evaluated cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) as an adjuvant for an HSV gD2 vaccine and compared it to an MPL/Alum adjuvant in a guinea pig model of genital herpes. The addition of CLDC to the gD2 vaccine significantly decreased acute and recurrent disease and most importantly the number of days with recurrent virus shedding compared to gD2 alone. Reductions in these outcomes were also detected when gD2+CLDC was compared to gD2+MPL/Alum. When the vaccine and adjuvants were evaluated as therapeutic vaccines, they were ineffective. CLDC enhanced protection compared to MPL/Alum and is the first vaccine to reduce recurrent virus shedding, a key to decreasing the spread of HSV-2. PMID:19857450

  17. Comparison of the anti-herpes simplex virus activities of propolis and 3-methyl-but-2-enyl caffeate.

    PubMed

    Amoros, M; Lurton, E; Boustie, J; Girre, L; Sauvager, F; Cormier, M

    1994-05-01

    The in vitro activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 of 3-methyl-but-2-enyl caffeate isolated from poplar buds or prepared by synthesis was investigated. Under conditions of one or multiple multiplication cycles, this compound, which is a minor constituent of propolis, was found to reduce the viral titer by 3 log10, and viral DNA synthesis by 32-fold. PMID:8064297

  18. Synthesis and antiviral effect against herpes simplex type 1 of 12-substituted benzo[c]phenanthridinium salts.

    PubMed

    Vanquelef, Enguerran; Amoros, Maryvonne; Boustie, Joel; Lynch, Michael A; Waigh, Roger D; Duval, Olivier

    2004-12-01

    The synthesis of benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid derivatives is described. In vitro antiviral activity against herpes simplex type 1 (HSV1) has been investigated. Contrary to the natural product fagaronine, which did not have any activity in the HSV1 antiviral tests, four 12-alkoxy derivatives showed good activity demonstrating the importance of the 12-substitution in the structure-activity relationships. PMID:15662952

  19. Production of a fragment of glycoprotein G of herpes simplex virus type 2 and evaluation of its diagnostic potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Liu, Ji Feng; Yu, Hua; Si, Guo Jing; Hu, Jun; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is the most common cause of genital herpes. Glycoprotein G (gG) is a prototype antigen for type-specific serodiagnosis distinguishing between HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 infections. As immunological diagnosis kits for accurate differentiation between HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies can be expensive, there is a need to develop a convenient, sensitive, specific and cost-effective serodiagnostic kit. METHODS We successfully expressed a fragment of gG comprising residues 321–580 of HSV-2 with histidine tag (gG321–580His) in a Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system, which had an antigenicity similar to its native counterpart. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using gG321–580His as the diagnostic antigen and evaluated by comparison with a commercial HerpeSelect 2 ELISA immunoglobulin G kit as reference. RESULTS In testing 318 field serum samples, the diagnostic relative sensitivity and specificity of the developed gG321–580His-ELISA test in qualitative comparison with the commercial kit were 93.81% and 96.74%, respectively, and the accuracy was 94.65%. CONCLUSION The study indicates that gG321–580His has a high diagnostic potential for HSV-2 virus serodiagnosis in humans. PMID:25532518

  20. Encephalomyocarditis Virus 3C Protease Relieves TRAF Family Member-associated NF-?B Activator (TANK) Inhibitory Effect on TRAF6-mediated NF-?B Signaling through Cleavage of TANK.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Liu, Qinfang; Zhang, Lijie; Zhang, Quan; Hu, Liang; Li, Changyao; Wang, Shengnan; Li, Jiangnan; Zhang, Yuanfeng; Yu, Huibin; Wang, Yan; Zhong, Zhaohua; Xiong, Tao; Xia, Xueshan; Wang, Xiaojun; Yu, Li; Deng, Guohua; Cai, Xuehui; Cui, Shangjin; Weng, Changjiang

    2015-11-13

    TRAF family member-associated NF-?B activator (TANK) is a negative regulator of canonical NF-?B signaling in the Toll-like receptor- and B-cell receptor-mediated signaling pathways. However, functions of TANK in viral infection-mediated NF-?B activation remain unclear. Here, we reported that TANK was cleaved by encephalomyocarditis virus 3C at the 197 and 291 glutamine residues, which depends on its cysteine protease activity. In addition, encephalomyocarditis virus 3C impaired the ability of TANK to inhibit TRAF6-mediated NF-?B signaling. Interestingly, we found that several viral proteases encoded by the foot and mouth disease virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and equine arteritis virus also cleaved TANK. Our results suggest that TANK is a novel target of some viral proteases, indicating that some positive RNA viruses have evolved to utilize their major proteases to regulate NF-?B activation. PMID:26363073

  1. The Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Virion-Associated Ribonuclease vhs Interferes with Stress Granule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Finnen, Renée L.; Hay, Thomas J. M.; Dauber, Bianca; Smiley, James R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a previous study, it was observed that cells infected with herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) failed to accumulate stress granules (SGs) in response to oxidative stress induced by arsenite treatment. As a follow-up to this observation, we demonstrate here that disruption of arsenite-induced SG formation by HSV-2 is mediated by a virion component. Through studies on SG formation in cells infected with HSV-2 strains carrying defective forms of UL41, the gene that encodes vhs, we identify vhs as a virion component required for this disruption. Cells infected with HSV-2 strains producing defective forms of vhs form SGs spontaneously late in infection. In addition to core SG components, these spontaneous SGs contain the viral immediate early protein ICP27 as well as the viral serine/threonine kinase Us3. As part of these studies, we reexamined the frameshift mutation known to reside within the UL41 gene of HSV-2 strain HG52. We demonstrate that this mutation is unstable and can rapidly revert to restore wild-type UL41 following low-multiplicity passaging. Identification of the involvement of virion-associated vhs in the disruption of SG formation will enable mechanistic studies on how HSV-2 is able to counteract antiviral stress responses early in infection. In addition, the ability of Us3 to localize to stress granules may indicate novel roles for this viral kinase in the regulation of translation. IMPORTANCE Eukaryotic cells respond to stress by rapidly shutting down protein synthesis and storing mRNAs in cytoplasmic stress granules (SGs). Stoppages in protein synthesis are problematic for all viruses as they rely on host cell machinery to synthesize viral proteins. Thus, many viruses target SGs for disruption or modification. Infection by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) was previously observed to disrupt SG formation induced by oxidative stress. In this follow-up study, we identify virion host shutoff protein (vhs) as a viral protein involved in this disruption. The identification of a specific viral protein involved in disrupting SG formation is a key step toward understanding how HSV-2 interacts with these antiviral structures. Additionally, this understanding may provide insights into the biology of SGs that may find application in studies on human motor neuron degenerative diseases, like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which may arise as a result of dysregulation of SG formation. PMID:25142597

  2. Association between the initiation of anti-TNF therapy and the risk of herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin L.; Baddley, John W.; Chen, Lang; Liu, Liyan; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Delzell, Elizabeth; Beukelman, Timothy; Patkar, Nivedita M.; Xie, Fenglong; Saag, Kenneth G.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Lewis, James D.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Herpes zoster (HZ) reactivation disproportionately affects patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is unclear whether anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy elevates HZ risk, and whether monoclonal antibodies carry greater risk than etanercept. Objectives To ascertain whether initiation of anti-TNF therapy compared with non-biologic comparators is associated with increased HZ risk Design, Setting, and Patients We identified new users of anti-TNF therapy among cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and psoriasis-psoriatic arthritis-ankylosing spondylitis (PsO-PsA-AS) patients during 1998–2007 within a large US multi-institutional collaboration combining data from Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Pharmaceutical Assistance Contract for the Elderly, Tennessee Medicaid, and national Medicaid/Medicare programs. We compared HZ incidence between new anti-TNF users and patients initiating non-biologic disease modifying drugs (DMARDs) within each inflammatory disease cohort (last participant follow-up Dec 31, 2007). Within these cohorts, we used Cox regression models to compare propensity-score adjusted HZ incidence between new anti-TNF and non-biologic DMARD users while controlling for baseline corticosteroid use. Main Outcome Measure Incidence of herpes zoster cases occurring after initiation of new anti- TNF or non-biologic DMARD therapy Results Among 32,208 new users of anti-TNF therapy, we identified 310 HZ cases. Crude incidence rates among anti-TNF users for RA, IBD, and PsO-PsA-AS were 12.1/1000 pt-yrs, (95% CI 10.7–13.6), 11.3/1000 (95% CI 7.7–16.7), and 4.4/1000 (95% CI 2.8–7.0) respectively. Baseline use of corticosteroids of > 10mg/day was associated with elevated risk [adjusted HR 2.13 (1.64, 2.75) compared with no baseline use. For RA patients, adjusted incidence rates were similar between anti-TNF and nonbiologic DMARD initiators [adjusted HR 1.00 (95% CI 0.77–1.29) and comparable between all three anti-TNF therapies studied. Conclusions and Relevance Among patients with RA and other select inflammatory diseases, those who initiated anti-TNF therapies were not at higher risk for HZ compared to patients who initiated non-biologic treatment regimens. PMID:23462785

  3. Association between Vaccination for Herpes Zoster and Risk of Herpes Zoster Infection among Older Patients with Selected Immune-mediated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Xie, Fenglong; Delzell, Elizabeth; Chen, Lang; Winthrop, Kevin; Lewis, James D; Saag, Kenneth; Baddley, John W; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Context Based on limited data, the live attenuated herpes zoster (HZ) vaccine is contraindicated in patients taking anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) therapies or other biologics commonly used to treat immune-mediated diseases. The safety and effectiveness of the vaccine is unclear for these patients. Objective To examine the association between HZ vaccination and HZ incidence within and beyond 42 days after vaccination in patients with selected immune-mediated diseases and in relation to biologics and other therapies used to treat these conditions. Design, Setting and Patients Retrospective cohort study of 463,541 Medicare beneficiaries 60 years and older with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and/or inflammatory bowel disease using Medicare claims data from 1/1/2006 to 12/31/2009. Main Outcome Measure(s) HZ incidence rate within 42 days after vaccination (a safety concern) and beyond 42 days; hazard ratios estimated using Cox proportional hazards models for HZ comparing vaccinated versus unvaccinated patients. Results Median (inter-quartile range) duration of follow-up was 2.0 (0.8-3.0) years; 4.0% of patients received HZ vaccine. The overall crude HZ incidence rate (95% Confidence Interval [CI]) was 7.8 (3.7-16.5) cases per 1,000 person-years (PYs) within 42 days after vaccination. The rate among the unvaccinated was 11.7 cases per 1,000 PYs (95% CI: 11.4-11.9). Among 633 patients exposed to biologics at the time of vaccination or within the subsequent 42 days, no case of HZ or varicella occurred. After multivariable adjustment, HZ vaccination was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.61 (95% CI: 0.52-0.71) for HZ risk after 42 days. Conclusions Receipt of HZ vaccine was not associated with a short-term increase in HZ incidence among Medicare beneficiaries with selected immune-mediated diseases, including those exposed to biologics. The vaccine was associated with a lower HZ incidence over a median of 2 years of follow up. PMID:22760290

  4. Complete genome analysis of a frog virus 3 (FV3) isolate and sequence comparison with isolates of differing levels of virulence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Frog virus 3 (FV3) is the type species of the genus Ranavirus, and in the past few decades, FV3 infections have resulted in considerable morbidity and mortality in a range of wild and cultivated amphibian species in the Americas, Europe, and Asia. The reasons for the pathogenicity of FV3 are not well understood. Findings We investigated three FV3 isolates designated SSME, wt-FV3, and aza-Cr, and reported that our wt-FV3 and aza-Cr strains showed similar levels of virulence, while SSME was the least virulent in an in vivo study with Lithiobates pipiens tadpoles. Using 454 GS-FLX sequencing technology, we sequenced SSME and compared it to the published wt-FV3 genome. SSME had multiple amino acid deletions in ORFs 49/50L, 65L, 66L, and 87L, which may explain its reduced virulence. We also investigated repeat regions and found that repeat copy number differed between isolates, with only one group of 3 isolates and 1 pair of isolates being identical at all 3 locations. Conclusions In this study we have shown that genetic variability is present between closely related FV3 isolates, both in terms of deletions/insertions, and even more so at select repeat locations. These genomic areas with deletions/insertions may represent regions that affect virulence, and therefore require investigation. Furthermore, we have identified repeat regions that may prove useful in future phylogeographical tracking and identification of ranaviral strains across different environmental regions. PMID:24620832

  5. Isolation and characterization of Solenopsis invicta virus 3, a new positive-strand RNA virus infecting the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Steven M.; Hashimoto, Yoshifumi

    2009-06-05

    We report the discovery of a new virus from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) represents the third virus discovered from this ant species using the metagenomics approach. The single (positive)-strand RNA, monopartite, bicistronic genome of SINV-3 was sequenced in entirety (GenBank accession number (FJ528584)), comprised of 10,386 nucleotides, and polyadenylated at the 3' terminus. This genome size was confirmed by Northern analysis. The genome revealed 2 large open reading frames (ORFs) in the sense orientation with an untranslated region (UTR) at each end and between the two ORFs. The 5' proximal ORF (ORF 1) encoded a predicted protein of 299.1 kDa (2580 amino acids). The 3' proximal ORF (ORF 2) encoded a predicted protein of 73.2 kDa (651 amino acids). RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), helicase, and protease domains were recognized in ORF 1. SDS-PAGE separation of purified SINV-3 particles yielded 2 bands (ostensibly capsid proteins) with a combined molecular mass of 77.3 kDa which was similar to the mass predicted by ORF 2 (73.2 kDa). Phylogenetic analysis of the conserved amino acid sequences containing domains I to VIII of the RdRp from dicistroviruses, iflaviruses, plant small RNA viruses, picornaviruses, and 4 unassigned positive-strand RNA viruses revealed a trichotomous phenogram with SINV-3 and Kelp fly virus comprising a unique cluster. Electron microscopic examination of negatively stained samples of SINV-3 revealed isometric particles with apparent projections and a diameter of 27.3 +- 1.3 nm. SINV-3 was successfully transmitted to uninfected workers by feeding. The minus (replicative) strand of SINV-3 was detected in worker ants indicating replication of the virus. The possibility of using SINV-3 as a microbial control agent for fire ants is discussed.

  6. Interaction of humic acids and humic-acid-like polymers with herpes simplex virus type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöcking, Renate; Helbig, Björn

    The study was performed in order to compare the antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) of synthetic humic-acid-like polymers to that of their low-molecular-weight basic compounds and naturally occurring humic acids (HA) in vitro. HA from peat water showed a moderate antiviral activity at a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 µg/ml. HA-like polymers, i.e. the oxidation products of caffeic acid (KOP), hydrocaffeic acid (HYKOP), chlorogenic acid (CHOP), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPOP), nordihydroguaretic acid (NOROP), gentisinic acid (GENOP), pyrogallol (PYROP) and gallic acid (GALOP), generally inhibit virus multiplication, although with different potency and selectivity. Of the substances tested, GENOP, KOP, 3,4-DHPOP and HYKOP with MEC values in the range of 2 to 10 µg/ml, proved to be the most potent HSV-1 inhibitors. Despite its lower antiviral potency (MEC 40 µg/ml), CHOP has a remarkable selectivity due to the high concentration of this polymer that is tolerated by the host cells (>640 µg/ml). As a rule, the antiviral activity of the synthetic compounds was restricted to the polymers and was not preformed in the low-molecular-weight basic compounds. This finding speaks in favour of the formation of antivirally active structures during the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds and, indirectly, of corresponding structural parts in different HA-type substances.

  7. Cell-mediated cytotoxic responses in lungs following a primary bovine herpes virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, M; Griebel, P; Bielefeldt Ohmann, H; Babiuk, L A

    1992-01-01

    Non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restricted cytotoxicity is an important part of the immune reaction mounted in response to bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV-1) infection. In this study, we evaluated the effect of BHV-1 infection on the ability of lung parenchyma leucocytes (LPL), cranial tracheobronchial lymph node cells (BLNC) and peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes (PBML) to mediate this function. While LPL from non-infected calves mediated cytotoxicity against BHV-1-infected cells, a similar activity could not be detected in PBML or BLNC. In contrast, both LPL and PBML from naive calves could mediate cytotoxicity against K562 target cells but only after activation with interleukin-2 (IL-2). BLNC were unable to kill K562 cells. Infection of calves with BHV-1 enhanced the ability of LPL and PBML to kill BHV-1-infected cells. This enhancement was detected as early as Day 1 after infection in LPL whereas it could only be detected in PBML 8 days after infection. The results demonstrate that the leucocyte population present at the site of infection was able to mediate a potentially important antiviral function and that this function was enhanced rapidly in response to infection. Thus LPL-mediated cytotoxicity may be an important mechanism for the recovery from BHV-1 infection. PMID:1537602

  8. Involvement of UL24 in herpes-simplex-virus-1-induced dispersal of nucleolin

    SciTech Connect

    Lymberopoulos, Maria H. . E-mail: maria.lymberopoulos@iaf.inrs.ca; Pearson, Angela . E-mail: angela.pearson@iaf.inrs.ca

    2007-07-05

    UL24 of herpes simplex virus 1 is important for efficient viral replication, but its function is unknown. We generated a recombinant virus, vHA-UL24, encoding UL24 with an N-terminal hemagglutinin tag. By indirect immunofluorescence at 9 h post-infection (hpi), we detected HA-UL24 in nuclear foci and in cytoplasmic speckles. HA-UL24 partially co-localized with nucleolin, but not with ICP8 or coilin, markers for nucleoli, viral replication compartments, and Cajal bodies respectively. HA-UL24 staining was often juxtaposed to that of another nucleolar protein, fibrillarin. Analysis of HSV-1-induced nucleolar modifications revealed that by 18 hpi, nucleolin staining had dispersed, and fibrillarin staining went from clusters of small spots to a few separate but prominent spots. Fibrillarin redistribution appeared to be independent of UL24. In contrast, cells infected with a UL24-deficient virus retained foci of nucleolin staining. Our results demonstrate involvement of UL24 in dispersal of nucleolin during infection.

  9. Risk factors of herpes simplex virus type 2 among STD clinic attenders in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Mittal, Nalini; Bhalla, P; Reddy, B N S; Baveja, Usha K

    2006-12-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with HSV-2 infection among sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic attenders of Delhi in India. Out of 128 patients included, 76 were males and 52 were females. Antibodies to HSV 1 and 2 and HIV infection were determined by ELISA. Syphilis seropositivity was determined by VDRL test and confirm by TPHA test. Ulcer scrapping were stained by Giemsa for Herpes progenitalis and Donovan bodies and Grams for Haemophilus decreyi infection. The HSV-2 and HSV-I seroprevalence was found to be 85.2% and 77.3% respectively. 87.3% of HSV-2 seropositive patients were asymptomic. 10.7% of patients had coinfection of HSV-2 and HIV. STDs like syphilis, chancroid, gonococcal and non-gonococcal urethritis were significantly associated in HSV-2 infection. Thus the study demonstrates high prevalence of HSV-2 infection in Delhi city. Significant association of HSV-2 infection with previous history of STD (p < 0.02) and multiple sexual partners in males was found (p < 0.002). PMID:17913210

  10. Mutational analysis of a transcriptional activation region of the VP16 protein of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, S M; Horn, P J; Olson, V A; Koop, A H; Niu, W; Ebright, R H; Triezenberg, S J

    1998-10-01

    The VP16 protein of herpes simplex virus is a potent transcriptional activator of the viral immediate early genes. The transcriptional activation region of VP16 can be divided into two functional subregions, here designated VP16N (comprising amino acids 413-456) and VP16C (amino acids 450-490). Assays of VP16C mutants resulting from both random and alanine-scanning mutagenesis indicated that the sidechains of three phenylalanines (at positions 473, 475 and 479) and one acidic residue (glutamate 476) are important for transcriptional activation. Aromatic and bulky hydrophobic amino acids were effective substitutes for each of the three Phe residues, whereas replacement with smaller or polar amino acids resulted in loss of transcriptional function. In contrast, many changes were tolerated for Glu476, including bulky hydrophobic and basic amino acids, indicating that the negative charge at this position contributes little to the function of this subregion. Similar relative activities for most of the mutants were observed in yeast and in mammalian cells, indicating that the structural requirements for this activation region are comparable in these two species. These results reinforce the hypothesis that bulky hydrophobic residues, not acidic residues, are most critical for the activity of this 'acidic' transcriptional activation region. PMID:9742254

  11. Antiviral activity of Spirulina maxima against herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Corona, Armida; Nieves, Irma; Meckes, Mariana; Chamorro, Germán; Barron, Blanca L

    2002-12-01

    Spirulina has been used in a variety of practical applications in biotechnology and medical sciences. This paper presents the antiviral activity found in a hot water extract (HWE) of a commercial preparation of Spirulina maxima, studied by a microplate inhibition assay, using several viruses. The HWE inhibited the infection for: herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), pseudorabies virus (PRV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), and HSV-1, and the 50% effective inhibition doses (ED(50)) were 0.069, 0.103, 0.142, and 0.333 mg/ml for each virus, respectively. For adenovirus the inhibition was less than 20%, and no inhibition was found for measles virus, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis virus (SSPE), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), poliovirus 1 and rotavirus SA-11, at concentrations of 2 mg/ml of the HWE. The highest antiviral activity was for HSV-2, with a selectivity index of 128. The antiviral activity was not due to a virucidal effect. Herpesvirus infection was inhibited at the initial events (adsorption and penetration) of the viral cycle. To initiate the isolation and identification of the compound that exhibits the antiviral activity of S. maxima, some extracts made by using several solvents with different polarity were evaluated by microplate inhibition assay using HSV-2. The highest antiviral activity was detected in the methanol-water 3:1, which suggests that the antiviral activity is probably due to highly polar compounds. PMID:12406511

  12. Activity of Porphyridium sp. polysaccharide against herpes simplex viruses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huheihel, Mahmoud; Ishanu, Vladimir; Tal, Jacov; Arad, Shoshana Malis

    2002-01-01

    The cell wall sulfated polysaccharide of the red microalga Porphyridium sp. exhibited impressive antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and -2) both in vitro (cell culture) and in vivo (rats and rabbits). Depending on the concentration, this polysaccharide completely inhibited or slowed down the development of the cytopathic effect in HSV-infected cells, but did not show any cytotoxic effects on vero cells even when a concentration as high as 250 microg/ml was used. There was indirect evidence for a strong interaction between the polysaccharide and HSV and a weak interaction with the cell surface. When tested in vivo, Porphyridium sp. polysaccharide conferred significant and efficient protection against HSV-1 infection: at a concentration as low as 100 microg/ml, it prevented the appearance and development of symptoms of HSV-1 infection in rats and rabbits. The polysaccharide did not exhibit any cytotoxic effects at a concentration of 2 mg/ml in vivo. PMID:11741707

  13. Entry of Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus into Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Okunaga, Shusuke; Takasu, Ayako; Meshii, Noritoshi; Imai, Tomoaki; Hamada, Masakagu; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Low-intensity ultrasound is a useful method to introduce materials into cells due to the transient formation of micropores, called sonoporations, on the cell membrane. Whether oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can be introduced into oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through membrane pores remains undetermined. Human SCC cell line SAS and oncolytic HSV-1 RH2, which was deficient in the ?134.5 gene and fusogenic, were used. Cells were exposed to ultrasound in the presence or absence of microbubbles. The increase of virus entry was estimated by plaque numbers. Viral infection was hardly established without the adsorption step, but plaque number was increased by the exposure of HSV-1-inoculated cells to ultrasound. Plaque number was also increased even if SAS cells were exposed to ultrasound and inoculated with RH2 without the adsorption step. This effect was abolished when the interval from ultrasound exposure to virus inoculation was prolonged. Scanning electron microscopy revealed depressed spots on the cell surface after exposure to ultrasound. These results suggest that oncolytic HSV-1 RH2 can be introduced into SAS cells through ultrasound-mediated pores of the cell membrane that are resealed after an interval. PMID:26516901

  14. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part I: strategies for utilizing oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    PubMed Central

    Cripe, Timothy P; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Gillespie, George Yancey; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Friedman, Gregory K

    2015-01-01

    Progress for improving outcomes in pediatric patients with solid tumors remains slow. In addition, currently available therapies are fraught with numerous side effects, often causing significant life-long morbidity for long-term survivors. The use of viruses to kill tumor cells based on their increased vulnerability to infection is gaining traction, with several viruses moving through early and advanced phase clinical testing. The prospect of increased efficacy and decreased toxicity with these agents is thus attractive for pediatric cancer. In part I of this two-part review, we focus on strategies for utilizing oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV) to target pediatric malignancies. We discuss mechanisms of action, routes of delivery, and the role of preexisting immunity on antitumor efficacy. Challenges to maximizing oncolytic HSV in children are examined, and we highlight how these may be overcome through various arming strategies. We review the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating safety of a variety of oncolytic HSVs. In Part II, we focus on the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic HSV in pediatric tumor types, pediatric clinical advances made to date, and future prospects for utilizing HSV in pediatric patients with solid tumors. PMID:26436135

  15. Invasion of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 into Murine Epidermis: An Ex Vivo Infection Study.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elena; Petermann, Philipp; Thier, Katharina; Bloch, Wilhelm; Morgner, Jessica; Wickström, Sara A; Knebel-Mörsdorf, Dagmar

    2015-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) invades its human host via the skin or mucosa. We aim to understand how HSV-1 overcomes the barrier function of the host epithelia, and for this reason, we established an ex vivo infection assay initially with murine skin samples. Here, we report how tissue has to be prepared to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Most efficient infection of the epidermis was achieved by removing the dermis. HSV-1 initially invaded the basal epidermal layer, and from there, spreading to the suprabasal layers was observed. Strikingly, in resting stage hair follicles, only the hair germ was infected, whereas the quiescent bulge stem cells (SCs) were resistant to infection. However, during the growth phase, infected cells were also detected in the activated bulge SCs. We demonstrated that cell proliferation was not a precondition for HSV-1 invasion, but SC activation was required as shown by infection of aberrantly activated bulge SCs in integrin-linked kinase (ILK)-deficient hair follicles. These results suggest that the status of the bulge SCs determines whether HSV-1 can reach its receptors, whereas the receptors on basal keratinocytes are accessible irrespective of their proliferation status. PMID:26203638

  16. Glycoprotein D actively induces rapid internalization of two nectin-1 isoforms during herpes simplex virus entry

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, Katie M.; Krummenacher, Claude

    2010-03-30

    Entry of herpes simplex virus (HSV) occurs either by fusion at the plasma membrane or by endocytosis and fusion with an endosome. Binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to a receptor such as nectin-1 is essential in both cases. We show that virion gD triggered the rapid down-regulation of nectin-1 with kinetics similar to those of virus entry. In contrast, nectin-1 was not constitutively recycled from the surface of uninfected cells. Both the nectin-1alpha and beta isoforms were internalized in response to gD despite having different cytoplasmic tails. However, deletion of the nectin-1 cytoplasmic tail slowed down-regulation of nectin-1 and internalization of virions. These data suggest that nectin-1 interaction with a cytoplasmic protein is not required for its down-regulation. Overall, this study shows that gD binding actively induces the rapid internalization of various forms of nectin-1. We suggest that HSV activates a nectin-1 internalization pathway to use for endocytic entry.

  17. Mutations in the TLR3 signaling pathway and beyond in adult patients with herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Mørk, N; Kofod-Olsen, E; Sørensen, K B; Bach, E; Ørntoft, T F; Østergaard, L; Paludan, S R; Christiansen, M; Mogensen, T H

    2015-12-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) in children has previously been linked to defects in type I interferon production downstream of Toll-like receptor (TLR)3. In the present study, we used whole-exome sequencing to investigate the genetic profile of 16 adult patients with a history of HSE. We identified novel mutations in IRF3, TYK2 and MAVS, molecules involved in generating innate antiviral immune responses, which have not previously been associated with HSE. Moreover, data revealed mutations in TLR3, TRIF, TBK1 and STAT1 known to be associated with HSE in children but not previously described in adults. All discovered mutations were heterozygous missense mutations, the majority of which were associated with significantly decreased antiviral responses to HSV-1 infection and/or the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) in patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared with controls. Altogether, this study demonstrates novel mutations in the TLR3 signaling pathway in molecules previously identified in children, suggesting that impaired innate immunity to HSV-1 may also increase susceptibility to HSE in adults. Importantly, the identification of mutations in innate signaling molecules not directly involved in TLR3 signaling suggests the existence of innate immunodeficiencies predisposing to HSE beyond the TLR3 pathway. PMID:26513235

  18. Global and Regional Estimates of Prevalent and Incident Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infections in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Looker, Katharine J.; Magaret, Amalia S.; May, Margaret T.; Turner, Katherine M. E.; Vickerman, Peter; Gottlieb, Sami L.; Newman, Lori M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) commonly causes orolabial ulcers, while HSV-2 commonly causes genital ulcers. However, HSV-1 is an increasing cause of genital infection. Previously, the World Health Organization estimated the global burden of HSV-2 for 2003 and for 2012. The global burden of HSV-1 has not been estimated. Methods We fitted a constant-incidence model to pooled HSV-1 prevalence data from literature searches for 6 World Health Organization regions and used 2012 population data to derive global numbers of 0-49-year-olds with prevalent and incident HSV-1 infection. To estimate genital HSV-1, we applied values for the proportion of incident infections that are genital. Findings We estimated that 3709 million people (range: 3440–3878 million) aged 0–49 years had prevalent HSV-1 infection in 2012 (67%), with highest prevalence in Africa, South-East Asia and Western Pacific. Assuming 50% of incident infections among 15-49-year-olds are genital, an estimated 140 million (range: 67–212 million) people had prevalent genital HSV-1 infection, most of which occurred in the Americas, Europe and Western Pacific. Conclusions The global burden of HSV-1 infection is huge. Genital HSV-1 burden can be substantial but varies widely by region. Future control efforts, including development of HSV vaccines, should consider the epidemiology of HSV-1 in addition to HSV-2, and especially the relative contribution of HSV-1 to genital infection. PMID:26510007

  19. Mapping of dendritic lesions in patients with herpes simplex keratitis using in vivo confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Akira; Mori, Natsuko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To produce a two-dimensional reconstruction map of dendritic lesions in patients with herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) using in vivo confocal microscopy. Methods Four eyes of four patients (mean 65.8 years) with HSK presenting with a dendritic lesion were enrolled. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy and in vivo laser confocal microscopy were performed. Acquired confocal images at the level of the epithelium were arranged and mapped into subconfluent montages. Changes in the shape and degree of light reflection of abnormal cells and deposits around dendritic lesions as well as other corneal layers were qualitatively evaluated. Results Mapping of dendritic lesion was successful in all cases, and the subconfluent montages clearly showed the larger image of dendritic lesion. In all cases, the dendritic lesion consisted of hyperreflective irregular epithelial cells, and was surrounded by distorted and elongated epithelial cells. In three cases, hyperreflective deposits were noted at the midline of the lesion. The corneal stroma showed a hyperreflective honeycomb pattern. In two cases, inflammatory cells were observed at the level of endothelial cell layer. Conclusion Mapping of dendritic lesions in patients with HSK was successful in all patients using in vivo confocal microscopy. Cellular level observation of dendritic lesion at a relatively larger magnification may help understand the in vivo morphological change of HSK. Further study in more patients with HSK and nonherpetic dendritic lesion is needed to utilize confocal microscopy images in differential diagnosis and follow-up of the epithelial lesions with dendrite. PMID:26445524

  20. Structural analysis of herpes simplex virus by optical super-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Romain F.; Albecka, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Rees, Eric J.; Crump, Colin M.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread pathogens among humans. Although the structure of HSV-1 has been extensively investigated, the precise organization of tegument and envelope proteins remains elusive. Here we use super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with a model-based analysis of single-molecule localization data, to determine the position of protein layers within virus particles. We resolve different protein layers within individual HSV-1 particles using multi-colour dSTORM imaging and discriminate envelope-anchored glycoproteins from tegument proteins, both in purified virions and in virions present in infected cells. Precise characterization of HSV-1 structure was achieved by particle averaging of purified viruses and model-based analysis of the radial distribution of the tegument proteins VP16, VP1/2 and pUL37, and envelope protein gD. From this data, we propose a model of the protein organization inside the tegument. PMID:25609143

  1. Herpes simplex virus 2 and syphilis among young drug users in Baltimore, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Plitt, S; Sherman, S; Strathdee, S; Taha, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the sex specific seroprevalence and correlates of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and syphilis among a cohort of young drug users. Methods: Drug users aged 15–30 years old who used heroin, cocaine, or crack were recruited between October 1999 and August 2002. Baseline interviews gathered information on sociodemographics, drug use and sexual behaviours. Serum was tested at baseline for HSV-2 and syphilis seroreactivity. For each sexually transmitted infection (STI), infected and non-infected participants were stratified by sex and compared using ?2, Mann-Whitney tests, and logistic regression. Results: Of the 543 participants recruited, 42.4% were female and 39.3% were African-American. The seroprevalence of STIs among females and males, respectively, were HSV-2: 58.7% and 22.0%; syphilis: 4.3% and 0.3%. In multivariate models, older age, African-American race, having over 30 lifetime sex partners, current HIV infection and previous incarceration were independently associated with HSV-2 infection among males. For females, older age, African-American race, sex trade, and daily heroin use were independently associated with HSV-2. For females, only a self reported previous syphilis diagnosis was associated with current syphilis seroreactivity in multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Examination of this cohort revealed a particularly high seroprevalence of HSV-2 and syphilis, especially among female drug users. Few infected participants had been previously diagnosed with these infections. PMID:15923296

  2. The herpes simplex virus 1 U{sub S}3 regulates phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Peter; Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich ; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Sonda, Sabrina; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich ; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2012-10-25

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear and Golgi membranes for envelopment by phospholipid bilayers. In the absence of U{sub S}3, nuclear membranes form multiple folds harboring virions that suggests disturbance in membrane turnover. Therefore, we investigated phospholipid metabolism in cells infected with the U{sub S}3 deletion mutant R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), and quantified membranes involved in viral envelopment. We report that (i) [{sup 3}H]-choline incorporation into nuclear membranes and cytoplasmic membranes was enhanced peaking at 12 or 20 h post inoculation with wild type HSV-1 and R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), respectively, (ii) the surface area of nuclear membranes increased until 24 h of R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection forming folds that equaled {approx}45% of the nuclear surface, (iii) the surface area of viral envelopes between nuclear membranes equaled {approx}2400 R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) virions per cell, and (iv) during R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection, the Golgi complex expanded dramatically. The data indicate that U{sub S}3 plays a significant role in regulation of membrane biosynthesis.

  3. Herpes simplex viral-vector design for efficient transduction of nonneuronal cells without cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Marino, Pietro; Verlengia, Gianluca; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F.; Yokota, Shinichiro; Geller, David A.; Yoshida, Osamu; Mester, Joseph; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    The design of highly defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors for transgene expression in nonneuronal cells in the absence of toxic viral-gene activity has been elusive. Here, we report that elements of the latency locus protect a nonviral promoter against silencing in primary human cells in the absence of any viral-gene expression. We identified a CTCF motif cluster 5? to the latency promoter and a known long-term regulatory region as important elements for vigorous transgene expression from a vector that is functionally deleted for all five immediate-early genes and the 15-kb internal repeat region. We inserted a 16.5-kb expression cassette for full-length mouse dystrophin and report robust and durable expression in dystrophin-deficient muscle cells in vitro. Given the broad cell tropism of HSV, our design provides a nontoxic vector that can accommodate large transgene constructs for transduction of a wide variety of cells without vector integration, thereby filling an important void in the current arsenal of gene-therapy vectors. PMID:25775541

  4. Crystal Structure of the Conserved Herpes Virus Fusion Regulator Complex gH–gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, T.; Cairns, T; Atanasiu, D; Cohen, G; Eisenberg, R; Heldwein, E

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  5. Herpes zoster epidemiology, management, and disease and economic burden in Europe: a multidisciplinary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert W.; Alvarez-Pasquin, Marie-José; Bijl, Marc; Franco, Elisabetta; Gaillat, Jacques; Clara, João G.; Labetoulle, Marc; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Naldi, Luigi; Sanmarti, Luis S.; Weinke, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is primarily a disease of nerve tissue but the acute and longer-term manifestations require multidisciplinary knowledge and involvement in their management. Complications may be dermatological (e.g. secondary bacterial infection), neurological (e.g. long-term pain, segmental paresis, stroke), ophthalmological (e.g. keratitis, iridocyclitis, secondary glaucoma) or visceral (e.g. pneumonia, hepatitis). The age-related increased incidence of HZ and its complications is thought to be a result of the decline in cell-mediated immunity (immunosenescence), higher incidence of comorbidities with age and social-environmental changes. Individuals who are immunocompromised as a result of disease or therapy are also at increased risk, independent of age. HZ and its complications (particularly postherpetic neuralgia) create a significant burden for the patient, carers, healthcare systems and employers. Prevention and treatment of HZ complications remain a therapeutic challenge despite recent advances. This is an overview of the multidisciplinary implications and management of HZ in which the potential contribution of vaccination to reducing the incidence HZ and its complications are also discussed. PMID:26478818

  6. [Rare differential diagnosis of a radicular spine syndrome: herpes zoster radiculitis].

    PubMed

    Koch, P; Diedrich, O; Pennekamp, P H; Schmitz, A

    2006-01-01

    We report on the case of a 66-year-old patient who was hospitalized because of intractable low back pain radiating into the right leg. Leg pain was accompanied by a numbness and muscle weakness which was clearly assigned to the L5 dermatome. Concerning the patient's medical history a nucleotomy L4/5 and a osteomyelofibrosis were known. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed a multisegmental stenosis which was pronounced on the level L4/5. One day after admission of the patient to the hospital a typical zoster exanthema involving the L5 dermatome appeared. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was detected in the fluid of the vesicular skin lesions by polymerase chain reaction. Intravenous administration of aciclovir lead to rapid decrease of pain and exanthema. A few months later the patient died because of an acute myeloid leukemia as a complication of the known osteomyelofibrosis. This case report shows that a herpes zoster infection can imitate a radicular spine syndrome usually caused by degenerative changes. Especially in immunocompromised patients, a zoster radiculitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of radiculopathy. VZV infection might also occur without skin lesions (zoster sine herpete) so that serological assays for the early detection of virus DNA can be useful. PMID:17187332

  7. Rapid and sensitive detection of varicella zoster virus in saliva of patients with herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Satish K.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Don; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lechler, Kayla J.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2013-01-01

    VZV reactivation produces zoster (shingles) which may be further complicated by meningoencephalitis, myelopathy, vasculopathy and multiple ocular disorders. Importantly, these neurological and ocular complications of VZV reactivation can occur without rash. In such instances, virological verification relies on detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV IgG antibody in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or less often, the presence of VZV DNA in blood mononuclear cells or anti-VZV IgM antibody in serum or CSF. If VZV were readily detected in other tissue samples (e.g., saliva or tears) in patients with neurological disease in the absence of rash and shown to correlate with the standard tests listed above, more invasive tests such as lumbar puncture might be obviated. In patients with acute herpes zoster, the yield of cell DNA was greater in saliva collected by passive drool or synthetic swab than by cotton swab. The time to process saliva from collection to obtaining DNA was one hour. VZV DNA was present exclusively in the pelleted fraction of saliva and was found in 100% of patients before antiviral treatment. This rapid sensitive method can be applied readily to saliva from humans with neurologic and other disease that might be caused by VZV in the absence of rash. PMID:23747545

  8. Increased Risk of Herpes Zoster Following Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wong, Ying-Chi; Yang, Tse-Yen; Kuo, Chien-Feng; Cheng, Jiung-Mou; Wang, Jyh-Seng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    This study explored the possible association between dermatomyositis or polymyositis (DM or PM) and the subsequent risk of herpes zoster (HZ). We used data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI) system to address the research topic. The exposure cohort comprised 2023 patients with new diagnoses of DM or PM. Each patient was frequency matched according to age, sex, index year, and comorbidities including diabetes, renal disease, obesity, malignancy, rheumatoid arthritis, immunodeficiency virus infection, autoimmune disease not elsewhere classified, mixed connective tissue disease, or vasculitis with 4 participants from the general population who did not have a history of HZ (control cohort). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to estimate the relationship between DM or PM and the risk of subsequent HZ. The incidence of HZ in the exposure and control cohorts was 35.8 and 7.01 per 1000 person-years, respectively. The exposure cohort had a significantly higher overall risk of subsequent HZ than did the control cohort (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]?=?3.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?3.18-4.77). The risk of HZ in patients with DM or PM in whichever stratification (including sex, age, and comorbidity) was also higher than that of the control cohort. The findings from this population-based retrospective cohort study suggest that DM or PM is associated with an increased risk of subsequent HZ. A synergistic effect was observed between DM or PM and one of the comorbidities. PMID:26181551

  9. The herpes simplex virus vhs protein induces endoribonucleolytic cleavage of target RNAs in cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Elgadi, M M; Hayes, C E; Smiley, J R

    1999-09-01

    The herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff (vhs) protein (UL41 gene product) is a component of the HSV virion tegument that triggers shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated mRNA degradation during the early stages of HSV infection. Previous studies have demonstrated that extracts from HSV-infected cells and partially purified HSV virions display vhs-dependent RNase activity and that vhs is sufficient to trigger accelerated RNA degradation when expressed as the only HSV protein in an in vitro translation system derived from rabbit reticulocytes. We have used the rabbit reticulocyte translation system to characterize the mode of vhs-induced RNA decay in more detail. We report here that vhs-dependent RNA decay proceeds through endoribonucleolytic cleavage, is not affected by the presence of a 5' cap or a 3' poly(A) tail in the RNA substrate, requires Mg(2+), and occurs in the absence of ribosomes. Intriguingly, sites of preferential initial cleavage were clustered over the 5' quadrant of one RNA substrate that was characterized in detail. The vhs homologue of pseudorabies virus also induced accelerated RNA decay in this in vitro system. PMID:10438802

  10. Nelfinavir Impairs Glycosylation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Envelope Proteins and Blocks Virus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Gachelet, Eliora; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Barcy, Serge; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nelfinavir (NFV) is an HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitor that has numerous effects on human cells, which impart attractive antitumor properties. NFV has also been shown to have in vitro inhibitory activity against human herpesviruses (HHVs). Given the apparent absence of an aspartyl protease encoded by HHVs, we investigated the mechanism of action of NFV herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in cultured cells. Selection of HSV-1 resistance to NFV was not achieved despite multiple passages under drug pressure. NFV did not significantly affect the level of expression of late HSV-1 gene products. Normal numbers of viral particles appeared to be produced in NFV-treated cells by electron microscopy but remain within the cytoplasm more often than controls. NFV did not inhibit the activity of the HSV-1 serine protease nor could its antiviral activity be attributed to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. NFV was found to decrease glycosylation of viral glycoproteins B and C and resulted in aberrant subcellular localization, consistent with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response by NFV. These results demonstrate that NFV causes alterations in HSV-1 glycoprotein maturation and egress and likely acts on one or more host cell functions that are important for HHV replication. PMID:25709648

  11. Results of total DNA measurement in koi tissue by Koi Herpes Virus real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Eide, Kathleen; Miller-Morgan, Tim; Heidel, Jerry; Bildfell, Rob; Jin, Ling

    2011-03-01

    Koi Herpes Virus (KHV) has been classified recently as a member of the Alloherpesviridae within the Herpesvirales order (Waltzek et al., 2005). Although one of the unique features of Herpesviridae, the sister family of Herpesvirales, is latent infection, it has not been demonstrated consistently that KHV of Alloherpesviridae can cause latent infection and be reactivated from latency. To investigate if KHV genomic DNA is present in koi exposed to KHV infection, 10 healthy fish were investigated from a koi population with a history of a KHV outbreak. No gross lesions or microscopic changes were observed at necropsy or by histological examination. No infectious virus was isolated from either the blood plasma or tissues. However, KHV DNA was detected in the white blood cells of nine of the ten fish by real-time PCR and PCR-Southern blot. KHV DNA was also detected in the brain, eye, spleen, gills hematopoietic kidney, trunk kidney, and intestine of nine of the ten fish by PCR-Southern blot. Interestingly, KHV DNA was also detected in the intestinal contents from seven of ten koi. Portions of major capsid gene DNA, amplified from two of the ten koi WBCs, were found to be identical to KHV-U. This study demonstrated that KHV genomic DNA can be detected in normal koi exposed previously to KHV and suggests that KHV becomes latent in fish. PMID:21185329

  12. Structural analysis of herpes simplex virus by optical super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Romain F.; Albecka, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Rees, Eric J.; Crump, Colin M.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread pathogens among humans. Although the structure of HSV-1 has been extensively investigated, the precise organization of tegument and envelope proteins remains elusive. Here we use super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with a model-based analysis of single-molecule localization data, to determine the position of protein layers within virus particles. We resolve different protein layers within individual HSV-1 particles using multi-colour dSTORM imaging and discriminate envelope-anchored glycoproteins from tegument proteins, both in purified virions and in virions present in infected cells. Precise characterization of HSV-1 structure was achieved by particle averaging of purified viruses and model-based analysis of the radial distribution of the tegument proteins VP16, VP1/2 and pUL37, and envelope protein gD. From this data, we propose a model of the protein organization inside the tegument.

  13. Herpes simplex virus type 2 infection induces AD-like neurodegeneration markers in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kristen, Henrike; Santana, Soraya; Sastre, Isabel; Recuero, Maria; Bullido, Maria J; Aldudo, Jesus

    2015-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are neurotropic viruses that establish lifelong latent infections in neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The relationships between other herpesvirus infections and events associated with neurodegeneration have not, however, been extensively studied. The present work reports that HSV-2 infection leads to the strong accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and the amyloid-? peptides A?40 and A?42 (all major pathological hallmarks of AD) in human SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells. Infection is also associated with a marked reduction in the amount of A?40 secreted and in the proteolytic fragments of the amyloid-? precursor protein (APP) (secreted APP? and the ?-C-terminal fragment). These results indicate that HSV-2 infection inhibits the nonamyloidogenic pathway of APP processing and impairs A? secretion in these cells. In addition, HSV-2 induces the accumulation of intracellular autophagic compartments containing A? due to a failure in the late stages of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that HSV-2 infection strongly alters the tau phosphorylation state, APP processing, and autophagic process in human neuroblastoma cells, leading to the appearance of AD-like neurodegeneration markers. PMID:26163986

  14. Varicella-Zoster Virus–Specific Immune Responses in Elderly Recipients of a Herpes Zoster Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Levin, M. J; Oxman, M. N; Zhang, J. H; Johnson, G. R; Stanley, H; Hayward, A. R; Caulfield, M. J; Irwin, M. R; Smith, J. G; Clair, J; Chan, I. S. F; Williams, H; Harbecke, R; Marchese, R; Straus, S. E; Gershon, A; Weinberg, A

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundA double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that involved 38,546 subjects ?60 years old demonstrated efficacy of a high-potency live-attenuated Oka/Merck varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccine. The trial included an immunology substudy to determine the relationship of VZV-specific immune responses to vaccination and clinical outcome MethodsThe immunology substudy enrolled 1395 subjects at 2 sites where blood samples obtained prior to vaccination, at 6 weeks after vaccination, and at 1, 2, and 3 years thereafter were tested for VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity (VZV-CMI) by ?-interferon ELISPOT and responder cell frequency assays and for VZV antibody by glycoprotein ELISA ResultsVZV-CMI and VZV antibodies were significantly increased in vaccine recipients at 6 weeks after vaccination. The vaccine-induced increases in VZV-CMI persisted during the 3 years of follow-up, although their magnitude decreased over time. The magnitude of these VZV-specific immune responses was greater in subjects 60–69 years old than in subjects ?70 years old ConclusionsThe zoster vaccine induced a significant increase in VZV-CMI and VZV antibody. The magnitude and duration of the boost in VZV-CMI in vaccine recipients and the relationship of this boost to age paralleled the clinical effects of the vaccine observed during the efficacy trial. These findings support the hypothesis that boosting VZV-CMI protects older adults against herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia PMID:18419349

  15. Efficient delivery of RNA Interference to peripheral neurons in vivo using herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Anesti, Anna-Maria; Peeters, Pieter J; Royaux, Ines; Coffin, Robert S

    2008-08-01

    Considerable interest has been focused on inducing RNA interference (RNAi) in neurons to study gene function and identify new targets for disease intervention. Although small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been used to silence genes in neurons, in vivo delivery of RNAi remains a major challenge limiting its applications. We have developed a highly efficient method for in vivo gene silencing in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) using replication-defective herpes simplex viral (HSV-1) vectors. HSV-mediated delivery of short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting reporter genes resulted in highly effective and specific silencing in neuronal and non-neuronal cells in culture and in the DRG of mice in vivo including in a transgenic mouse model. We further establish proof of concept by demonstrating in vivo silencing of the endogenous trpv1 gene. These data are the first to show silencing in DRG neurons in vivo by vector-mediated delivery of shRNA. Our results support the utility of HSV vectors for gene silencing in peripheral neurons and the potential application of this technology to the study of nociceptive processes and in pain gene target validation studies. PMID:18583367

  16. Efficient delivery of RNA Interference to peripheral neurons in vivo using herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Anesti, Anna-Maria; Peeters, Pieter J.; Royaux, Ines; Coffin, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable interest has been focused on inducing RNA interference (RNAi) in neurons to study gene function and identify new targets for disease intervention. Although small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been used to silence genes in neurons, in vivo delivery of RNAi remains a major challenge limiting its applications. We have developed a highly efficient method for in vivo gene silencing in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) using replication-defective herpes simplex viral (HSV-1) vectors. HSV-mediated delivery of short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting reporter genes resulted in highly effective and specific silencing in neuronal and non-neuronal cells in culture and in the DRG of mice in vivo including in a transgenic mouse model. We further establish proof of concept by demonstrating in vivo silencing of the endogenous trpv1 gene. These data are the first to show silencing in DRG neurons in vivo by vector-mediated delivery of shRNA. Our results support the utility of HSV vectors for gene silencing in peripheral neurons and the potential application of this technology to the study of nociceptive processes and in pain gene target validation studies. PMID:18583367

  17. Houttuynia cordata Targets the Beginning Stage of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Pei-Yun; Ho, Bing-Ching; Lee, Szu-Yuan; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Lee, Shoei-Sheng; Lee, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a common latent virus in humans, causes certain severe diseases. Extensive use of acyclovir (ACV) results in the development of drug-resistant HSV strains, hence, there is an urgent need to develop new drugs to treat HSV infection. Houttuynia cordata (H. cordata), a natural herbal medicine, has been reported to exhibit anti-HSV effects which is partly NF-?B-dependent. However, the molecular mechanisms by which H. cordata inhibits HSV infection are not elucidated thoroughly. Here, we report that H. cordata water extracts (HCWEs) inhibit the infection of HSV-1, HSV-2, and acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 mainly via blocking viral binding and penetration in the beginning of infection. HCWEs also suppress HSV replication. Furthermore, HCWEs attenuate the first-wave of NF-?B activation, which is essential for viral gene expressions. Further analysis of six compounds in HCWEs revealed that quercetin and isoquercitrin inhibit NF-?B activation and additionally, quercetin also has an inhibitory effect on viral entry. These results indicate that HCWEs can inhibit HSV infection through multiple mechanisms and could be a potential lead for development of new drugs for treating HSV. PMID:25643242

  18. Herpes Murine Model as a Biological Assay to Test Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Becerril-García, Miguel Angel; Limón-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Vázquez-Leyva, Said; Pavón, Lenin; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-? and reduced IL-6 and TNF-? concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i) this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii) the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii) Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv) Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v) the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines. PMID:25984538

  19. Genetic variation in the HLA region is associated with susceptibility to herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Crosslin, D R; Carrell, D S; Burt, A; Kim, D S; Underwood, J G; Hanna, D S; Comstock, B A; Baldwin, E; de Andrade, M; Kullo, I J; Tromp, G; Kuivaniemi, H; Borthwick, K M; McCarty, C A; Peissig, P L; Doheny, K F; Pugh, E; Kho, A; Pacheco, J; Hayes, M G; Ritchie, M D; Verma, S S; Armstrong, G; Stallings, S; Denny, J C; Carroll, R J; Crawford, D C; Crane, P K; Mukherjee, S; Bottinger, E; Li, R; Keating, B; Mirel, D B; Carlson, C S; Harley, J B; Larson, E B; Jarvik, G P

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly referred to as shingles, is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV). VZV initially manifests as chicken pox, most commonly in childhood, can remain asymptomatically latent in nerve tissues for many years and often re-emerges as shingles. Although reactivation may be related to immune suppression, aging and female sex, most inter-individual variability in re-emergence risk has not been explained to date. We performed a genome-wide association analyses in 22?981 participants (2280 shingles cases) from the electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network. Using Cox survival and logistic regression, we identified a genomic region in the combined and European ancestry groups that has an age of onset effect reaching genome-wide significance (P>1.0 × 10?8). This region tags the non-coding gene HCP5 (HLA Complex P5) in the major histocompatibility complex. This gene is an endogenous retrovirus and likely influences viral activity through regulatory functions. Variants in this genetic region are known to be associated with delay in development of AIDS in people infected by HIV. Our study provides further suggestion that this region may have a critical role in viral suppression and could potentially harbor a clinically actionable variant for the shingles vaccine. PMID:25297839

  20. Herpesvirus entry mediator is a serotype specific determinant of pathogenesis in ocular herpes

    PubMed Central

    Karaba, Andrew H.; Kopp, Sarah J.; Longnecker, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 is initiated by viral glycoprotein D (gD) binding to a receptor on the host cell. Two receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, mediate entry in murine models of HSV-1 and HSV-2. HVEM is dispensable for HSV-2 infection of the vagina and brain, but is required for WT pathogenesis of HSV-1 infection of the cornea. By challenging WT and HVEM KO mice with multiple strains of HSV-1 and HSV-2, we demonstrate that without HVEM, all HSV-1 strains tested do not replicate well in the cornea and infection does not result in severe symptoms, as observed in WT mice. In contrast, all HSV-2 strains tested had no requirement for HVEM to replicate to WT levels in the cornea and still cause severe disease. These findings imply that HSV-2 does not require HVEM to cause disease regardless of route of entry, but HVEM must be present for HSV-1 to cause full pathogenesis in the eye. These findings uncover a unique role for HVEM in mediating HSV-1 infection in an area innervated by the trigeminal ganglion and may explain why the presence of HVEM can lead to severe inflammation in the cornea. Thus, the dependence on HVEM is a dividing point between HSV-1 and HSV-2 that evolved to infect areas innervated by different sensory ganglia. PMID:23184983

  1. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus 1 gene expression by designer zinc-finger transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Papworth, Monika; Moore, Michael; Isalan, Mark; Minczuk, Michal; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) replicative cycle begins by binding of the viral activator, VP16, to a set of sequences in the immediate-early (IE) gene promoters. With the aim of inhibiting this cycle, we have constructed a number of synthetic zinc-finger DNA-binding peptides by using recently reported methods. Peptides containing either three or six fingers, targeted to a viral promoter, were engineered as fusions with a KOX-1 transcription repression domain. These proteins bound to the HSV-1 IE175k (ICP4) promoter, in vitro, with nanomolar or subnanomolar binding affinity. However, in a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system, only the six-finger protein was found to repress VP16-activated transcription significantly. Thus the longer array of zinc fingers is required to compete successfully against VP16, one of the most powerful natural activators known. We found that the HSV-1 replication cycle can be partially repressed by the six-finger peptide with the viral titer reduced by 90%. PMID:12574501

  2. Function of Dynein and Dynactin in Herpes Simplex Virus Capsid Transport

    PubMed Central

    Döhner, Katinka; Wolfstein, André; Prank, Ute; Echeverri, Christophe; Dujardin, Denis; Vallee, Richard; Sodeik, Beate

    2002-01-01

    After fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) capsids are transported along microtubules (MTs) from the cell periphery to the nucleus. The motor ATPase cytoplasmic dynein and its multisubunit cofactor dynactin mediate most transport processes directed toward the minus-ends of MTs. Immunofluorescence microscopy experiments demonstrated that HSV1 capsids colocalized with cytoplasmic dynein and dynactin. We blocked the function of dynein by overexpressing the dynactin subunit dynamitin, which leads to the disruption of the dynactin complex. We then infected such cells with HSV1 and measured the efficiency of particle binding, virus entry, capsid transport to the nucleus, and the expression of immediate-early viral genes. High concentrations of dynamitin and dynamitin-GFP reduced the number of viral capsids transported to the nucleus. Moreover, viral protein synthesis was inhibited, whereas virus binding to the plasma membrane, its internalization, and the organization of the MT network were not affected. We concluded that incoming HSV1 capsids are propelled along MTs by dynein and that dynein and dynactin are required for efficient viral capsid transport to the nucleus. PMID:12181347

  3. The Use of Herpes Simplex Virus in Ex Vivo Slice Culture.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Allyson K; Han, Ming-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) can be used for a wide range of genetic manipulations in ex vivo slices of central nervous system tissue from both young and adult rodents. The fast expression of the HSV viral-mediated gene transfer, which can be engineered to produce cell-type specificity, can be utilized in slice cultures for a variety of purposes over a 1- to 4-day period with spatial and temporal specificity. This protocol exploits the rapid expression of HSV viral vectors by utilizing slice culture for electrophysiological recordings, avoiding the need to do intracranial viral injections. Brain slice cultures maintain many aspects of in vivo biology, including functional local synaptic circuitry with preserved brain architecture, while allowing good experimental access and precise control of the extracellular environment, making them ideal platforms for quick access to evaluate expression effects of HSV viral-mediated gene transfer on the molecular and cellular properties of specific neurons. This protocol provides an easy way to study neuronal function following viral expression of a gene of interest. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26131662

  4. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase activity involved in O-glycosylation of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Serafini-Cessi, F; Dall'Olio, F; Scannavini, M; Costanzo, F; Campadelli-Fiume, G

    1983-01-01

    We report on N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (UDPacetylgalactosamine--protein acetylgalactosaminyltransferase; EC 2.4.1.41) activity in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected BHK and RicR14 cells, a line of ricin-resistant BHK cells defective in N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I. The enzyme catalyzed the transfer of [14C]N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) from UDP-[14C]GalNAc into HSV glycoproteins, as identified by immunoprecipitation. The sugar was selectively incorporated into the immature forms of herpesvirus glycoproteins pgC, pgD, and gA-pgB, which are known to contain N-linked glycans of the high-mannose type. The high incorporation of [14C]GalNAc into endogenous acceptors of HSV-1-infected RicR14 cells was consistent with the accumulation of immature forms of HSV glycoproteins which occurs in these cells. Mild alkaline borohydride treatment of glycoproteins labeled via GalNAc transferase showed that the transferred GalNAc was O-linked and represented the first sugar added to the peptide backbone. Images PMID:6310156

  5. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 regulates herpes simplex virus replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jungeun; Shin, Bongjin; Park, Eui-Soon; Yang, Sujeong; Choi, Seunga; BK21 Bio Brain Center, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 ; Kang, Misun; Rho, Jaerang; BK21 Bio Brain Center, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764; GRAST, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764

    2010-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is involved in viral infection and replication through the modulation of diverse cellular processes including RNA metabolism, cytokine signaling, and subcellular localization. It has been suggested previously that the protein arginine methylation of the RGG-box of ICP27 is required for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) viral replication and gene expression in vivo. However, a cellular mediator for this process has not yet been identified. In our current study, we show that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a cellular mediator of the arginine methylation of ICP27 RGG-box. We generated arginine substitution mutants in this domain and examined which arginine residues are required for methylation by PRMT1. R138, R148 and R150 were found to be the major sites of this methylation but additional arginine residues serving as minor methylation sites are still required to sustain the fully methylated form of ICP27 RGG. We also demonstrate that the nuclear foci-like structure formation, SRPK interactions, and RNA-binding activity of ICP27 are modulated by the arginine methylation of the ICP27 RGG-box. Furthermore, HSV-1 replication is inhibited by hypomethylation of this domain resulting from the use of general PRMT inhibitors or arginine mutations. Our data thus suggest that the PRMT1 plays a key role as a cellular regulator of HSV-1 replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation.

  6. Evidence that two latency-associated transcripts of herpes simplex virus type 1 are nonlinear.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T T; Su, Y H; Block, T M; Taylor, J M

    1996-01-01

    The latency-associated transcripts (LATs) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are the only viral gene products that accumulate to abundant levels in latently infected cells. Others have reported species of 2.0, 1.50, and 1.45 kb; only the 2.0-kb species is seen in productively infected cells, and there is evidence that it behaves as an intron. We examined the LATs both in trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice and in productively infected cultures of monkey CV-1 cells. After glyoxalation, RNA was subjected to high-resolution agarose gel electrophoresis and Northern (RNA) analysis, a procedure capable of resolving linear and nonlinear RNA species. Under these conditions, we resolved the 2.0-kb LAT into two species; the slower species was much more abundant and had a mobility significantly slower than expected for a linear RNA. To test the hypothesis that this RNA was in fact nonlinear, we used partial hydrolysis by sodium carbonate and oligonucleotide-directed RNase H digestion. These procedures changed the mobility of the slower species into that of the faster species. Similarly, the mobility of the 1.50-kb LAT, which was much more abundant than the 1.45-kb LAT, was changed by these procedures to that of the 1.45-kb LAT. Our data show that the two major LAT species are nonlinear, and they support an interpretation of stable lariat structures. PMID:8709218

  7. Acute Morphine Administration Reduces Cell-Mediated Immunity and Induces Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mojadadi, Shafi; Jamali, Abbas; Khansarinejad, Behzad; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Bamdad, Taravat

    2009-01-01

    Acute morphine administration is known to alter the course of herpes simplex virus infection. In this study, the effect of acute morphine administration on the reactivation of latent herpes was investigated in a mouse model. Because of the important role of cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in the inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivation, the effect of acute morphine administration on CTL responses was also evaluated. Furthermore, lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-? production were evaluated for their roles in the induction of the CTL response. The findings showed that acute morphine administration significantly reduced CTL responses, lymphocyte proliferation, and IFN-? production. Furthermore, acute morphine administration has been shown to reactivate latent HSV-1. Previous studies have shown that cellular immune responses have important roles in the inhibition of HSV reactivation. These findings suggest that suppression of a portion of the cellular immune response after acute morphine administration may constitute one part of the mechanism that induces HSV reactivation. PMID:19403060

  8. One-step multiplex real time RT-PCR for the detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine parainfluenza virus 3

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Detection of respiratory viruses in veterinary species has traditionally relied on virus detection by isolation or immunofluorescence and/or detection of circulating antibody using ELISA or serum neutralising antibody tests. Multiplex real time PCR is increasingly used to diagnose respiratory viruses in humans and has proved to be superior to traditional methods. Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in housed cattle and virus infections can play a major role. We describe here a one step multiplex reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (mRT-qPCR) to detect the viruses commonly implicated in BRD. Results A mRT-qPCR assay was developed and optimised for the simultaneous detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpes virus type 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPI3 i & ii) nucleic acids in clinical samples from cattle. The assay targets the highly conserved glycoprotein B gene of BoHV-1, nucleocapsid gene of BRSV and nucleoprotein gene of BPI3. This mRT-qPCR assay was assessed for sensitivity, specificity and repeatability using in vitro transcribed RNA and recent field isolates. For clinical validation, 541 samples from clinically affected animals were tested and mRT-qPCR result compared to those obtained by conventional testing using virus isolation (VI) and/or indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Conclusions The mRT-qPCR assay was rapid, highly repeatable, specific and had a sensitivity of 97% in detecting 102 copies of BRSV, BoHV-1 and BPI3 i & ii. This is the first mRT-qPCR developed to detect the three primary viral agents of BRD and the first multiplex designed using locked nucleic acid (LNA), minor groove binding (MGB) and TaqMan probes in one reaction mix. This test was more sensitive than both VI and IFAT and can replace the aforesaid methods for virus detection during outbreaks of BRD. PMID:22455597

  9. Carbamazepine-Induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Sparing the Skin Previously Affected by Herpes Zoster Infection in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Reverse Isotopic Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Tenea, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The reverse isotopic response is a rarely encountered phenomenon. The spared lesions are various and mainly inflammatory in nature, with herpes zoster infection being the most common. A novel case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome triggered by carbamazepine sparing the skin area previously affected by herpes zoster infection in a 39-year-old Indian female with systemic lupus erythematosus is documented. Several features as well as possible pathomechanisms that bear discussion have emerged from this case documentation. These may be related to the virus immunity, the underlying autoimmune disease (systemic lupus erythematosus) and/or drug metabolism. PMID:21076686

  10. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection following Jewish ritual circumcisions that included direct orogenital suction - New York City, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection commonly causes "cold sores" (HSV type 1 [HSV-1]) and genital herpes (HSV-1 or HSV type 2 [HSV-2]); HSV infection in newborns can result in death or permanent disability. During November 2000-December 2011, a total of 11 newborn males had laboratory-confirmed HSV infection in the weeks following out-of-hospital Jewish ritual circumcision, investigators from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) learned. Ten of the 11 newborns were hospitalized; two died. In six of the 11 cases, health-care providers confirmed parental reports that the ritual circumcision included an ultra-Orthodox Jewish practice known as metzitzah b'peh, in which the circumciser (mohel, plural: mohelim) places his mouth directly on the newly circumcised penis and sucks blood away from the circumcision wound (direct orogenital suction). In the remaining cases, other evidence suggested that genital infection was introduced by direct orogenital suction (probable direct orogenital suction). Based on cases reported to DOHMH during April 2006-December 2011, the risk for neonatal herpes caused by HSV-1 and untyped HSV following Jewish ritual circumcision with confirmed or probable direct orogenital suction in New York City was estimated at 1 in 4,098 or 3.4 times greater than the risk among male infants considered unlikely to have had direct orogenital suction. Oral contact with a newborn's open wound risks transmission of HSV and other pathogens. Circumcision is a surgical procedure that should be performed under sterile conditions. Health-care professionals advising parents and parents choosing Jewish ritual circumcision should inquire in advance whether direct orogenital suction will be performed, and orogenital suction should be avoided. PMID:22672975

  11. Establishment and Characterization of an Air-Liquid Canine Corneal Organ Culture Model To Study Acute Herpes Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Rebecca M.; Bussche, Leen; Ledbetter, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the clinical importance of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-induced ocular disease, the underlying pathophysiology of the disease remains poorly understood, in part due to the lack of adequate virus–natural-host models in which to study the cellular and viral factors involved in acute corneal infection. We developed an air-liquid canine corneal organ culture model and evaluated its susceptibility to canine herpesvirus type 1 (CHV-1) in order to study ocular herpes in a physiologically relevant natural host model. Canine corneas were maintained in culture at an air-liquid interface for up to 25 days, and no degenerative changes were observed in the corneal epithelium during cultivation using histology for morphometric analyses, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Next, canine corneas were inoculated with CHV-1 for 48 h, and at that time point postinfection, viral plaques could be visualized in the corneal epithelium and viral DNA copies were detected in both the infected corneas and culture supernatants. In addition, we found that canine corneas produced proinflammatory cytokines in response to CHV-1 infection similarly to what has been described for HSV-1. This emphasizes the value of our model as a virus–natural-host model to study ocular herpesvirus infections. IMPORTANCE This study is the first to describe the establishment of an air-liquid canine corneal organ culture model as a useful model to study ocular herpesvirus infections. The advantages of this physiologically relevant model include the fact that (i) it provides a system in which ocular herpes can be studied in a virus–natural-host setting and (ii) it reduces the number of experimental animals needed. In addition, this long-term explant culture model may also facilitate research in other fields where noninfectious and infectious ocular diseases of dogs and humans are being studied. PMID:25231295

  12. Nonthermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Suppresses Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Replication in Corneal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Oleg; Donovan, Kelly; Limonnik, Vladimir; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Herpes keratitis (HK) is the leading cause of cornea-derived and infection-associated blindness in the developed world. Despite the availability of effective antivirals, some patients develop refractory disease, drug-resistant infection, and topical toxicity. A nonpharmaceutical treatment modality may offer a unique advantage in the management of such cases. This study investigated the antiviral effect of nonthermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma, a partially ionized gas that can be applied to organic substances to produce various biological effects. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells and explanted corneas were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and exposed to culture medium treated with nonthermal DBD plasma. The extent of infection was measured by plaque assay, quantitative PCR, and Western blot. Corneal toxicity assessment was performed with fluorescein staining, histologic examination, and 8-OHdG detection. Results Application of DBD plasma–treated medium to human corneal epithelial cells and explanted corneas produced a dose-dependent reduction of the cytopathic effect, viral genome replication, and the overall production of infectious viral progeny. Toxicity studies showed lack of detrimental effects in explanted human corneas. Conclusions Nonthermal DBD plasma substantially suppresses corneal HSV-1 infection in vitro and ex vivo without causing pronounced toxicity. Translational Relevance Nonthermal plasma is a versatile tool that holds great biomedical potential for ophthalmology, where it is being investigated for wound healing and sterilization and is already in use for ocular microsurgery. The anti-HSV-1 activity of DBD plasma demonstrated here could be directly translated to the clinic for use against drug-resistant herpes keratitis. PMID:24757592

  13. Herpes virus in juvenile Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas from Tomales Bay, California, coincides with summer mortality episodes.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Carolyn S; Estes, Robyn M; Stokes, Nancy A; Burge, Colleen A; Hargove, John S; Barber, Bruce J; Elston, Ralph A; Burreson, Eugene M; Reece, Kimberly S

    2005-01-25

    Pacific Crassostrea gigas and eastern C. virginica oysters were examined between June 2002 and April 2003 from 8 locations along the east, west and south USA coasts for oyster herpes virus (OsHV) infections using the A primer set in a previously developed PCR test. Only surviving Pacific oysters from a mortality event in Tomales Bay, California, USA, where annual losses of oysters have occurred each summer since 1993, were infected with a herpes-like virus in 2002. PCR examination using template amounts of both 50 and 500 ng were essential for OsHV detection. Sequence analysis indicated that the Tomales Bay OsHV was similar to that identified in France with the exception of a single base pair substitution in a 917 bp fragment of the viral genome. However, unlike the French OsHV-1, the Tomales Bay OsHV did not amplify with the primer pair of a second OsHV-1 PCR assay, suggesting that further characterization of these viruses is warranted. No evidence of Cowdry type A viral infections characteristic of herpes virus infections or other pathogens were observed in OsHV-infected oysters. Hemocytosis, diapedesis and hemocyte degeneration characterized by nuclear pycnosis and fragmentation were observed in infected oysters, which is consistent with previous observations of OsHV infections in France. Together these data suggest that OsHV may be associated with the annual summer Pacific oyster seed mortality observed in Tomales Bay, but establishment of a causal relationship warrants further investigation. PMID:15759798

  14. Amino acid substitutions in the thymidine kinase gene of induced acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussin, Ainulkhir; Nor, Norefrina Shafinaz Md; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    Acyclovir (ACV) is an antiviral drug of choice in healthcare setting to treat infections caused by herpes viruses, including, but not limited to genital herpes, cold sores, shingles and chicken pox. Acyclovir resistance has emerged significantly due to extensive use and misuse of this antiviral in human, especially in immunocompromised patients. However, it remains unclear about the amino acid substitutions in thymidine (TK) gene, which specifically confer the resistance-associated mutation in herpes simplex virus. Hence, acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 was selected at high concentration (2.0 - 4.5 ?g/mL), and the TK-gene was subjected to sequencing and genotypic characterization. Genotypic sequences comparison was done using HSV-1 17 (GenBank Accesion no. X14112) for resistance-associated mutation determination whereas HSV-1 KOS, HSV-1 473/08 and HSV clinical isolates sequences were used for polymorphism-associated mutation. The result showed that amino acid substitutions at the non-conserved region (UKM-1: Gln34Lys, UKM-2: Arg32Ser & UKM-5: Arg32Cys) and ATP-binding site (UKM-3: Tyr53End & UKM-4: Ile54Leu) of the TK-gene. These discoveries play an important role to extend another dimension to the evolution of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 and suggest that selection at high ACV concentration induced ACV-resistant HSV-1 evolution. These findings also expand the knowledge on the type of mutations among acyclovir-resistant HSV-1. In conclusion, HSV-1 showed multiple strategies to exhibit acyclovir resistance, including amino acid substitutions in the TK gene.

  15. Studies on the constituents of seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus and their anti herpes simplex virus (HSV) activities.

    PubMed

    Phrutivorapongkul, Ampai; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri; Watanabe, Toshiko; Ishikawa, Tsutomu

    2002-04-01

    Studies on the chemical constituents of the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus (Leguminosae) resulted in the isolation of nine known components: five rotenoids [dolineone (3), pachyrrhizone (5), 12a-hydroxydolineone (7), 12a-hydroxypachyrrhizone (9), and 12a-hydroxyrotenone (2)], two isoflavonoids [neotenone (4) and dehydroneotenone (8)], one phenylfuranocoumarin [pachyrrhizine (6)], and a monosaccharide (dulcitol). The full 1H- and 13C-NMR assignments for the isolated products except a sugar, including revision of previous assignments in the literature, are reported. Moderate anti herpes simplex virus (HSV) activity was observed in 12a-hydroxydolineone (7) and 12a-hydroxypachyrrhizone (9) among the isolated products. PMID:11964004

  16. Immunological properties of an N-terminal fragment of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kocken, C H; Geerligs, H J; Bos, C A; Ab, G; Weijer, W J; Drijfhout, J W; Welling, G W; Welling-Wester, S

    1988-01-01

    The N-terminal fragment, comprising residues -5 to 55 of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D was expressed as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. This gD-fusion protein reacts with monoclonal antibody LP 14 directed against glycoprotein D of HSV. Antisera obtained after immunization of rabbits with purified gD-fusion protein react with HSV-1 gD in a Western blot and with N-terminal synthetic peptides of gD. In addition, these antisera are able to neutralize viral infectivity in vitro. PMID:2850785

  17. Function of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Small Capsid Protein VP26 Is Regulated by Phosphorylation at a Specific Site

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Kato, Akihisa; Oda, Shinya; Koyanagi, Naoto; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Arii, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of the herpes simplex virus 1 small capsid protein VP26 phosphorylation site Thr-111 with alanine reduced viral replication and neurovirulence to levels observed with the VP26 null mutation. This mutation reduced VP26 expression and mislocalized VP26 and its binding partner, the major capsid protein VP5, in the nucleus. VP5 mislocalization was also observed with the VP26 null mutation. Thus, we postulate that phosphorylation of VP26 at Thr-111 regulates VP26 function in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25810545

  18. The UL12 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Is Regulated by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hikaru; Kato, Akihisa; Mugitani, Michio; Kashima, Yukie; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Arii, Jun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL12 protein (pUL12) is a nuclease that is critical for viral replication in vitro and neurovirulence in vivo. In this study, mass spectrometric analysis of pUL12 and phosphate-affinity SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis identified tyrosine at pUL12 residue 371 (Tyr-371) as a pUL12 phosphorylation site: Tyr-371 is conserved in pUL12 homologs in herpesviruses in all Herpesviridae subfamilies. Replacement of Tyr-371 with phenylalanine (Y371F) in pUL12 (i) abolished its exonuclease activity in HSV-1-infected Vero, HEL, and A549 cells, (ii) reduced viral replication, cell-cell spread, and pUL12 expression in infected cells in a cell type-dependent manner, (iii) led to aberrant subcellular localization of pUL12 in infected cells in a cell type-dependent manner, and (iv) reduced HSV-1 neurovirulence in mice. The effects of the pUL12 Y371F mutation in cell cultures and mice were similar to those of a nuclease-dead double mutation in pUL12, although the Y371F mutation reduced viral replication severalfold more than the nuclease-dead double mutation in a cell type- and multiplicity-of-infection-dependent manner. Replacement of Tyr-371 with glutamic acid, which mimics constitutive phosphorylation, restored the wild-type phenotype in cell cultures and mice. These results suggested that phosphorylation of pUL12 Tyr-371 was essential for pUL12 to express its nuclease activity in HSV-1-infected cells and that this phosphorylation promoted viral replication and cell-cell spread in cell cultures and neurovirulence in mice mainly by upregulating pUL12 nuclease activity and, in part, by regulating the subcellular localization and expression of pUL12 in HSV-1-infected cells. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses encode a considerable number of enzymes for their replication. Like cellular enzymes, the viral enzymes need to be properly regulated in infected cells. Although the functional aspects of herpesvirus enzymes have gradually been clarified, information on how most of these enzymes are regulated in infected cells is lacking. In the present study, we report that the enzymatic activity of the herpes simplex virus 1 alkaline nuclease pUL12 was regulated by phosphorylation of pUL12 Tyr-371 in infected cells and that this phosphorylation promoted viral replication and cell-cell spread in cell cultures and neurovirulence in mice, mainly by upregulating pUL12 nuclease activity. Interestingly, pUL12 and tyrosine at pUL12 residue 371 appeared to be conserved in all herpesviruses in the family Herpesviridae, raising the possibility that the herpesvirus pUL12 homologs may also be regulated by phosphorylation of the conserved tyrosine residue. PMID:24991005

  19. IgG in cervicovaginal mucus traps HSV and prevents vaginal Herpes infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Kannan, Arthi; Nunn, Kenetta L.; Murphy, Michael A.; Subramani, Durai B.; Moench, Thomas; Cone, Richard; Lai, Samuel K.

    2014-01-01

    IgG is the predominant immunoglobulin in cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), yet how IgG in mucus can protect against infections is not fully understood. IgG diffuses rapidly through cervical mucus, slowed only slightly by transient adhesive interactions with mucins. We hypothesize this almost unhindered diffusion allows IgG to accumulate rapidly on pathogen surfaces, and the resulting IgG array forms multiple weak adhesive crosslinks to mucus gel that effectively trap (immobilize) pathogens, preventing them from initiating infections. Here, we report herpes simplex virus serotype 1 (HSV-1) readily penetrated fresh, pH-neutralized ex vivo samples of CVM with low or no detectable levels of anti-HSV-1 IgG, but was trapped in samples with even modest levels of anti-HSV-1 IgG. In samples with little or no endogenous anti-HSV-1 IgG, addition of exogenous anti-HSV-1 IgG, affinity purified from intravenous immunoglobulin, trapped virions at concentrations below those needed for neutralization and with similar potency as endogenous IgG. Deglycosylating purified anti-HSV-1 IgG, or removing its Fc component, markedly reduced trapping potency. Finally, a non-neutralizing IgG against HSV-gG significantly protected mice against vaginal infection, and removing vaginal mucus by gentle lavage abolished protection. These observations suggest IgG-Fc has a glycan dependent “muco-trapping” effector function that may provide exceptionally potent protection at mucosal surfaces. PMID:24496316

  20. Expanding the role of 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate in herpes simplex virus type-1 entry

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, Christopher D.; Kovacs, Maria; Akhtar, Jihan; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Shukla, Deepak

    2010-02-20

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are commonly exploited by multiple viruses for initial attachment to host cells. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is unique because it can use HS for both attachment and penetration, provided specific binding sites for HSV-1 envelope glycoprotein gD are present. The interaction with gD is mediated by specific HS moieties or 3-O sulfated HS (3-OS HS), which are generated by all but one of the seven isoforms of 3-O sulfotransferases (3-OSTs). Here we demonstrate that several common experimental cell lines express unique sets of 3-OST isoforms. While the isoforms 3-OST-3, -5 and -6 were most commonly expressed, isoforms 3-OST-2 and -4 were undetectable in the cell lines examined. Since most cell lines expressed multiple 3-OST isoforms, we addressed the significance of 3-OS HS in HSV-1 entry by down-regulating 2-O-sulfation, a prerequisite for 3-OS HS formation, by knocking down 2-OST expression by RNA interference (RNAi). 2-OST knockdown was verified by reverse-transcriptase PCR and Western blot analysis, while 3-OS HS knockdown was verified by immunofluorescence. Cells showed a significant decrease in viral entry, suggesting an important role for 3-OS HS. Implicating 3-OS HS further, cells knocked down for 2-OST expression also demonstrated decreased cell-cell fusion when cocultivated with effector cells transfected with HSV-1 glycoproteins. Our findings suggest that 3-OS HS may play an important role in HSV-1 entry into many different cell lines.

  1. Griffithsin and Carrageenan Combination To Target Herpes Simplex Virus 2 and Human Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Levendosky, Keith; Mizenina, Olga; Martinelli, Elena; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Kizima, Larisa; Rodriguez, Aixa; Kleinbeck, Kyle; Bonnaire, Thierry; Robbiani, Melissa; Zydowsky, Thomas M; O'Keefe, Barry R; Fernández-Romero, José A

    2015-12-01

    Extensive preclinical evaluation of griffithsin (GRFT) has identified this lectin to be a promising broad-spectrum microbicide. We set out to explore the antiviral properties of a GRFT and carrageenan (CG) combination product against herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and human papillomavirus (HPV) as well as determine the mechanism of action (MOA) of GRFT against both viruses. We performed the experiments in different cell lines, using time-of-addition and temperature dependence experiments to differentiate inhibition of viral attachment from entry and viral receptor internalization. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to assess GRFT binding to viral glycoproteins, and immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry were used to identify the specific glycoprotein involved. We determined the antiviral activity of GRFT against HSV-2 to be a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 230 nM and provide the first evidence that GRFT has moderate anti-HPV activity (EC50 = 0.429 to 1.39 ?M). GRFT blocks the entry of HSV-2 and HPV into target cells but not the adsorption of HSV-2 and HPV onto target cells. The results of the SPR, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemistry analyses of HSV-2 combined suggest that GRFT may block viral entry by binding to HSV-2 glycoprotein D. Cell-based assays suggest anti-HPV activity through ?6 integrin internalization. The GRFT-CG combination product but not GRFT or CG alone reduced HSV-2 vaginal infection in mice when given an hour before challenge (P = 0.0352). While GRFT significantly protected mice against vaginal HPV infection when dosed during and after HPV16 pseudovirus challenge (P < 0.026), greater CG-mediated protection was afforded by the GRFT-CG combination for up to 8 h (P < 0.0022). These findings support the development of the GRFT-CG combination as a broad-spectrum microbicide. PMID:26369967

  2. Safety of Zoster Vaccine in Elderly Adults Following Documented Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Vicki A.; Oxman, Michael N.; Levin, Myron J.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Guatelli, John C.; Betts, Robert F.; Gelb, Larry D.; Pachucki, Constance T.; Keay, Susan K.; Menzies, Barbara; Griffin, Marie R.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Marques, Adriana R.; Toney, John F.; Simberkoff, Michael S.; Serrao, Richard; Arbeit, Robert D.; Gnann, John W.; Greenberg, Richard N.; Holodniy, Mark; Keitel, Wendy A.; Yeh, Shingshing S.; Davis, Larry E.; Crawford, George E.; Neuzil, Kathy M.; Johnson, Gary R.; Zhang, Jane H.; Harbecke, Rith; Chan, Ivan S. F.; Keller, Paul M.; Williams, Heather M.; Boardman, Kathy D.; Silber, Jeffrey L.; Annunziato, Paula W.

    2013-01-01

    Background.?After completion of the Shingles Prevention Study (SPS; Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program Number 403), SPS participants who had initially received placebo were offered investigational zoster vaccine without charge. This provided an opportunity to determine the relative safety of zoster vaccine in older adults following documented herpes zoster (HZ). Methods.?A total of 13 681 SPS placebo recipients who elected to receive zoster vaccine were followed for serious adverse events (SAE) for 28 days after vaccination. In contrast to the SPS, a prior episode of HZ was not a contraindication to receiving zoster vaccine. The SPS placebo recipients who received zoster vaccine included 420 who had developed documented HZ during the SPS. Results.?The mean interval between the onset of HZ and the receipt of zoster vaccine in the 420 recipients with prior HZ was 3.61 years (median interval, 3.77 years [range, 3–85 months]); the interval was <5 years for approximately 80% of recipients. The proportion of vaccinated SPS placebo recipients with prior HZ who developed ?1 SAE (0.95%) was not significantly different from that of vaccinated SPS placebo recipients with no prior history of HZ (0.66%), and the distribution of SAEs in the 2 groups was comparable. Conclusions.?These results demonstrate that the general safety of zoster vaccine in older persons is not altered by a recent history of documented HZ, supporting the safety aspect of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendation to administer zoster vaccine to all persons ?60 years of age with no contraindications, regardless of a prior history of HZ. PMID:23633406

  3. Griffithsin and Carrageenan Combination To Target Herpes Simplex Virus 2 and Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Levendosky, Keith; Mizenina, Olga; Martinelli, Elena; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Kizima, Larisa; Rodriguez, Aixa; Kleinbeck, Kyle; Bonnaire, Thierry; Robbiani, Melissa; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; O'Keefe, Barry R.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive preclinical evaluation of griffithsin (GRFT) has identified this lectin to be a promising broad-spectrum microbicide. We set out to explore the antiviral properties of a GRFT and carrageenan (CG) combination product against herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and human papillomavirus (HPV) as well as determine the mechanism of action (MOA) of GRFT against both viruses. We performed the experiments in different cell lines, using time-of-addition and temperature dependence experiments to differentiate inhibition of viral attachment from entry and viral receptor internalization. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to assess GRFT binding to viral glycoproteins, and immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry were used to identify the specific glycoprotein involved. We determined the antiviral activity of GRFT against HSV-2 to be a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 230 nM and provide the first evidence that GRFT has moderate anti-HPV activity (EC50 = 0.429 to 1.39 ?M). GRFT blocks the entry of HSV-2 and HPV into target cells but not the adsorption of HSV-2 and HPV onto target cells. The results of the SPR, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemistry analyses of HSV-2 combined suggest that GRFT may block viral entry by binding to HSV-2 glycoprotein D. Cell-based assays suggest anti-HPV activity through ?6 integrin internalization. The GRFT-CG combination product but not GRFT or CG alone reduced HSV-2 vaginal infection in mice when given an hour before challenge (P = 0.0352). While GRFT significantly protected mice against vaginal HPV infection when dosed during and after HPV16 pseudovirus challenge (P < 0.026), greater CG-mediated protection was afforded by the GRFT-CG combination for up to 8 h (P < 0.0022). These findings support the development of the GRFT-CG combination as a broad-spectrum microbicide. PMID:26369967

  4. Cellular and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus microRNAs in sepsis and surgical trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, S; Giza, D E; Lin, H Y; Fabris, L; Yoshiaki, K; D'Abundo, L; Toale, K M; Shimizu, M; Ferracin, M; Challagundla, K B; Angelica Cortez, M; Fuentes-Mattei, E; Tulbure, D; Gonzalez, C; Henderson, J; Row, M; Rice, T W; Ivan, C; Negrini, M; Fabbri, M; Morris, J S; Yeung, S-C J; Vasilescu, C; Calin, G A

    2014-01-01

    Once a patient is in septic shock, survival rates drop by 7.6% for every hour of delay in antibiotic therapy. Biomarkers based on the molecular mechanism of sepsis are important for timely diagnosis and triage. Here, we study the potential roles of a panel of cellular and viral miRNAs as sepsis biomarkers. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling in leukocytes from septic patients and nonseptic controls, combined with quantitative RT-PCR in plasmas from two cohorts of septic patients, two cohorts of nonseptic surgical patients and healthy volunteers. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, miRNA transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to study the effects of Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) miRNAs on interleukin's secretion. Differences related to sepsis etiology were noted for plasma levels of 10 cellular and 2 KSHV miRNAs (miR-K-10b and miR-K-12-12*) between septic and nonseptic patients. All the sepsis groups had high KSHV miRNAs levels compared with controls; Afro-American patients had higher levels of KSHV-miR-K12-12* than non-Afro-American patients. Both KSHV miRNAs were increased on postoperative day 1, but returned to baseline on day 7; they acted as direct agonists of Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8), which might explain the increased secretion of the IL-6 and IL-10. Cellular and KSHV miRNAs are differentially expressed in sepsis and early postsurgical patients and may be exploited for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Increased miR-K-10b and miR-K12-12* are functionally involved in sepsis as agonists of TLR8, forming a positive feedback that may lead to cytokine dysregulation. PMID:25476907

  5. Resistance testing of clinical herpes simplex virus type 2 isolates collected over 4 decades.

    PubMed

    Bohn-Wippert, Kathrin; Schmidt, Susanne; Runtze, Anna; Zell, Roland; Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    There is only little information about the role of mutations of the thymidine kinase (TK) and DNA polymerase (pol) genes of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) for the development of antiviral resistance. In this study, the polymorphism of TK and DNA pol genes was examined in 82 clinical isolates collected routinely between 1973 and 2013. If novel, presently unclear or resistance-related mutations were found, the resistance phenotype against acyclovir (ACV) and foscarnet (FOS) was analyzed. The four novel amino acid changes G150D, A157T, R248W, L342W and the hitherto phenotypically unclear substitution T131M within the TK gene were identified as natural polymorphisms. Within the DNA pol gene, 17 novel substitutions and the to-date unclear change R628C were characterized as part of natural gene polymorphism. Two novel DNA pol mutations were linked to resistance (M910T) and weak susceptibility to ACV (684 insertion ED), respectively. In one isolate, the genomic cause of ACV resistance could not be identified. Phylogenetic analysis including sequences of this study and of the GenBank revealed a hierarchy of mutation clusters in TK displaying G39E as first common mutation step, followed by N78D and L140F. In conclusion, the present findings allow a deeper insight in the variability of HSV-2 TK and DNA pol genes. The most common substitution G39E can be excluded as unique cause of HSV-2 resistance. This study supports once more the importance of phenotypic adjustment of genotypic results to enhance the clinical utility of genotypic findings. PMID:26338148

  6. The potential cost-effectiveness of vaccination against herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Marc; Pellissier, James M; Camden, Stéphanie; Quach, Caroline; De Wals, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    A clinical trial has shown that a live-attenuated varicella-zoster virus vaccine is effective against herpes zoster (HZ) and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). The aim of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of vaccination against HZ and PHN in Canada. A cohort model was developed to estimate the burden of HZ and the cost-effectiveness of HZ vaccination, using Canadian population-based data. Different ages at vaccination were examined and probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed. The economic evaluation was conducted from the ministry of health perspective and 5% discounting was used for costs and benefits. In Canada (population = 30 million), we estimate that each year there are 130,000 new cases of HZ, 17,000 cases of PHN and 20 deaths. Most of the pain and suffering is borne by adults over the age of 60 years and is due to PHN. Vaccinating 65-year-olds (HZ efficacy = 63%, PHN efficacy = 67%, no waning, cost/course = $150) is estimated to cost $33,000 per QALY-gained (90% CrI: 19,000-63,000). Assuming the cost per course of HZ vaccination is $150, probabilistic sensitivity analysis suggest that vaccinating between 65 and 75 years of age will likely yield cost-effectiveness ratios below $40,000 per Quality-Adjusted Life-Year (QALY) gained, while vaccinating adults older than 75 years will yield ratios less than $70,000 per QALY-gained. These results are most sensitive to the duration of vaccine protection and the cost of vaccination. In conclusion, results suggest that vaccinating adults between the ages of 65 and 75 years is likely to be cost-effective and thus to be a judicious use of scarce health care resources. PMID:18382137

  7. Prevention of hepatic tumor metastases in rats with herpes viral vaccines and gamma-interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Karpoff, H M; D'Angelica, M; Blair, S; Brownlee, M D; Federoff, H; Fong, Y

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies showed that gammaIFN decreases metastatic hepatic tumor growth by stimulating Kupffer cells (KC). The present studies examine whether lymphocyte stimulation via cells engineered to secrete GM-CSF or IL-2 decreases hepatic tumor growth, and whether stimulation of both macrophages and lymphocytes is more effective than either individually. Rats were immunized with irradiated hepatoma cells transduced by herpes viral amplicon vectors containing the genes for GM-CSF, IL-2 or LacZ. On day 18, half of each group was treated with 5 x 10(4) U gammaIFN, or saline intraperitoneally for 3 d. On day 21, all rats received 5 x 10(5) hepatoma cells intrasplenically. On day 41, rats were killed and tumor nodules were counted. Separate rats underwent splenocyte and KC harvest for assessment of lymphocyte- and macrophage-mediated tumor cell kill in vitro. GM-CSF or IL-2 vaccines or gammaIFN decreased tumor nodules significantly (GM-CSF 13+/-4, IL-2 14+/-6 vs. control 75+/-24, P < 0.001). Combination therapy was more effective, and completely eliminated tumor in 4 of 12 IFN-GM-CSF and 8 of 11 IFN-IL-2 animals. Additional rats underwent partial hepatectomy, an immunosuppressive procedure known to accelerate the growth of hepatic tumor, following tumor challenge. Therapy was equally effective in this immunosuppressive setting. Vaccination is associated with enhancement of splenocyte-mediated tumoricidal activity, whereas the effect of gammaIFN is mediated by KC. GM-CSF and IL-2 vaccine therapy and pretreatment with gammaIFN represent effective strategies in reducing hepatic tumor. Combination therapy targets both lymphocytes and macrophages, and is more effective in reducing tumor than either therapy alone. PMID:9045885

  8. Practice Patterns and Opinions in the Management of Recurrent or Chronic Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Aileen; McLeod, Stephen D.; Cohen, Elisabeth J.; Margolis, Todd P.; Mannis, Mark J.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to determine current practices and opinions among cornea specialists for treating and preventing recurrences of Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (HZO). Methods In November 2010, a survey of 15 questions was distributed to the Cornea Society listserv. Questions identified respondents’ treatment practices for recurrent HZO and opinions regarding prolonged antiviral prophylaxis and zoster vaccine. Results Of 100 respondents, the majority were cornea specialists (83/98, 85%). Eighty-seven percent (84/97) reported treating recurrent or chronic cases of HZO in the last year. The most common choice of treatment in the posed recurrent HZO clinical scenario was a combination of oral antiviral and topical corticosteroid (63/100, 63%), although significant variability existed in the duration of oral antiviral administration. Fifty-four respondents (56%) believed prolonged acyclovir prophylaxis could reduce recurrent signs of HZO; 28% (27/98) believed recurrences of HZO could be reduced after the period of acyclovir administration. For patients with a history of HZO, most respondents reported not recommending the adult zoster vaccine (63/98, 64%), but 46% (43/94) believed the vaccine could reduce recurrent signs or did not know. Conclusion Many cornea specialists are managing recurrent or chronic cases of HZO, but there is variability in the use of topical corticosteroids and antivirals. Additionally, no consensus exists on the efficacy of prolonged antiviral therapy or the adult zoster vaccine to reduce chronic or recurrent disease. These results demonstrate the need for further systematic study of treatment and prophylaxis for recurrent and chronic HZO. PMID:22269677

  9. Antibodies Are Required for Complete Vaccine-Induced Protection against Herpes Simplex Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Halford, William P.; Geltz, Joshua; Messer, Ronald J.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) 0?NLS is a live HSV-2 ICP0- mutant vaccine strain that is profoundly attenuated in vivo due to its interferon-hypersensitivity. Recipients of the HSV-2 0?NLS vaccine are resistant to high-dose HSV-2 challenge as evidenced by profound reductions in challenge virus spread, shedding, disease and mortality. In the current study, we investigated the requirements for HSV-2 0?NLS vaccine-induced protection. Studies using (UV)-inactivated HSV-2 0?NLS revealed that self-limited replication of the attenuated virus was required for effective protection from vaginal or ocular HSV-2 challenge. Diminished antibody responses in recipients of the UV-killed HSV-2 vaccine suggested that antibodies might be playing a critical role in early protection. This hypothesis was investigated in B-cell-deficient ?MT mice. Vaccination with live HSV-2 0?NLS induced equivalent CD8+ T cell responses in wild-type and ?MT mice. Vaccinated ?MT mice shed ~40-fold more infectious HSV-2 at 24 hours post-challenge relative to vaccinated wild-type (B-cell+) mice, and most vaccinated ?MT mice eventually succumbed to a slowly progressing HSV-2 challenge. Importantly, passive transfer of HSV-2 antiserum restored full protection to HSV-2 0?NLS-vaccinated ?MT mice. The results demonstrate that B cells are required for complete vaccine-induced protection against HSV-2, and indicate that virus-specific antibodies are the dominant mediators of early vaccine-induced protection against HSV-2. PMID:26670699

  10. Awareness, Knowledge, and Vaccine Acceptability of Herpes Zoster in Korea: A Multicenter Survey of 607 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Nam Kyung; Park, Young Min; Kang, Hoon; Choi, Gwang Seong; Kim, Beom Joon; Lew, Bark Lynn; Sim, Woo Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Herpes zoster (HZ) infection can significantly impair the quality of life of the affected individuals, and its treatment imposes a considerable cost burden on the health-care system and on society at large. However, there is little information on the perception of this disease and the acceptability of vaccines in Korea. Objective The aim of this study is to determine the awareness of HZ and its vaccine, and to identify factors associated with the acceptability of the HZ vaccine among outpatients of dermatology clinics. Methods A questionnaire-based survey was conducted on 607 outpatients who visited the dermatologic clinics. Results The responses of the patients revealed a high awareness of HZ (85.4%) but a relatively low knowledge about HZ and its vaccine (42.3%). The HZ vaccination rate among patients aged ?50 years was 9%. A history of HZ infection, being older, and greater knowledge about HZ and its vaccine were associated with a higher HZ vaccine acceptability. Of those who had not been vaccinated, 58.3% were interested in receiving the vaccine. The most frequent reason for this interest was "severe sequelae," followed by "knowing someone who has HZ" and "recommendation from a doctor." High cost was the most common reason for unwillingness to receive the vaccination. Conclusion Despite a high awareness of HZ, vaccine acceptability was extremely low among this study cohort. Vaccination acceptability would be improved by encouraging doctors to educate elderly patients about the disease and the availability of vaccination, and by the provision of insurance coverage for HZ vaccination. PMID:26512167

  11. Relationship between polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Devi-Rao, G B; Goodart, S A; Hecht, L M; Rochford, R; Rice, M K; Wagner, E K

    1991-01-01

    RNA from the region of the genome encoding herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcripts (LATs) expressed during lytic infection yields low abundances of both polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated forms. As has been previously shown for latent infection (A. T. Dobson, F. Sedarati, G. Devi-Rao, W. M. Flanagan, M. J. Farrell, J. G. Stevens, E. K. Wagner, and L. T. Feldman. J. Virol. 63:3844-3851, 1989), all lytic-phase expression of such transcripts requires promoter elements situated approximately 600 bases 5' of the previously mapped 5' end of the poly(A)- forms of LAT. Transient expression experiments revealed no other clear promoter elements within this region, and relatively small amounts of latent-phase transcripts initiating at the same site as observed for lytic-phase LAT could be detected by RNase protection assays. In the lytic phase of infection, the most abundant forms of polyadenylated LAT extended 1,600 bases from the initiation site near the LAT promoter to a potential splice donor site. Poly(A)- LAT species were not recovered in significant amounts from lytically infected neuroblastoma cells, but such RNA from lytically infected rabbit skin cells comapped with poly(A)- LAT from latently infected sensory neurons. Both map between canonical 5' splice donor and 3' splice acceptor site 1,950 bases apart. Poly(A)- LAT cochromatographed with uncapped rRNA on m-aminophenyl boronate agarose under conditions in which capped mRNA was bound. All of these data confirm the previously presented scheme for the expression of poly(A)- LAT as a stable intron derived from the splicing of a large primary transcript; however, we were unable to detect the spliced polyadenylated product of this splicing reaction. Images PMID:1850005

  12. Genome-wide prediction of vaccine targets for human herpes simplex viruses using Vaxign reverse vaccinology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are the most common infectious agents of humans. No safe and effective HSV vaccines have been licensed. Reverse vaccinology is an emerging and revolutionary vaccine development strategy that starts with the prediction of vaccine targets by informatics analysis of genome sequences. Vaxign (http://www.violinet.org/vaxign) is the first web-based vaccine design program based on reverse vaccinology. In this study, we used Vaxign to analyze 52 herpesvirus genomes, including 3 HSV-1 genomes, one HSV-2 genome, 8 other human herpesvirus genomes, and 40 non-human herpesvirus genomes. The HSV-1 strain 17 genome that contains 77 proteins was used as the seed genome. These 77 proteins are conserved in two other HSV-1 strains (strain F and strain H129). Two envelope glycoproteins gJ and gG do not have orthologs in HSV-2 or 8 other human herpesviruses. Seven HSV-1 proteins (including gJ and gG) do not have orthologs in all 40 non-human herpesviruses. Nineteen proteins are conserved in all human herpesviruses, including capsid scaffold protein UL26.5 (NP_044628.1). As the only HSV-1 protein predicted to be an adhesin, UL26.5 is a promising vaccine target. The MHC Class I and II epitopes were predicted by the Vaxign Vaxitop prediction program and IEDB prediction programs recently installed and incorporated in Vaxign. Our comparative analysis found that the two programs identified largely the same top epitopes but also some positive results predicted from one program might not be positive from another program. Overall, our Vaxign computational prediction provides many promising candidates for rational HSV vaccine development. The method is generic and can also be used to predict other viral vaccine targets. PMID:23514126

  13. Antihyperalgesic effects of infection with a preproenkephalin-encoding herpes virus.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S P; Yeomans, D C; Bender, M A; Lu, Y; Goins, W F; Glorioso, J C

    1999-03-16

    To test the utility of gene therapeutic approaches for the treatment of pain, a recombinant herpes simplex virus, type 1, has been engineered to contain the cDNA for an opioid peptide precursor, human preproenkephalin, under control of the human cytomegalovirus promoter. This virus and a similar recombinant containing the Escherichia coli lacZ gene were applied to the abraded skin of the dorsal hindpaw of mice. After infection, the presence of beta-galactosidase in neuronal cell bodies of the relevant spinal ganglia (lacZ-containing virus) and of human proenkephalin (preproenkephalin-encoding virus) in the central terminals of these neurons indicated appropriate gene delivery and expression. Baseline foot withdrawal responses to noxious radiant heat mediated by Adelta and C fibers were similar in animals infected with proenkephalin-encoding and beta-galactosidase-encoding viruses. Sensitization of the foot withdrawal response after application of capsaicin (C fibers) or dimethyl sulfoxide (Adelta fibers) observed in control animals was reduced or eliminated in animals infected with the proenkephalin-encoding virus for at least 7 weeks postinfection. Hence, preproenkephalin cDNA delivery selectively blocked hyperalgesia without disrupting baseline sensory neurotransmission. This blockade of sensitization was reversed by administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone, apparently acting in the spinal cord. The results demonstrate that the function of sensory neurons can be selectively altered by viral delivery of a transgene. Because hyperalgesic mechanisms may be important in establishing and maintaining neuropathic and other chronic pain states, this approach may be useful for treatment of chronic pain and hyperalgesia in humans. PMID:10077663

  14. Effects of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 on herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; McGrath, M. S.; Hanks, D.; Erickson, S.; Pulliam, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). dmPGA1 significantly inhibited viral replication in both HSV and HIV infection systems at concentrations of dmPGA1 that did not adversely alter cellular DNA synthesis. The 50% inhibitory concentration (ID50) for several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) strains ranged from 3.8 to 5.6 micrograms/ml for Vero cells and from 4.6 to 7.3 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. The ID50s for two HSV-2 strains varied from 3.8 to 4.5 micrograms/ml for Vero cells; the ID50 was 5.7 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. We found that closely related prostaglandins did not have the same effect on the replication of HSV; dmPGE2 and dmPGA2 caused up to a 60% increase in HSV replication compared with that in untreated virus-infected cells. HIV-1 replication in acutely infected T cells (VB line) and chronically infected macrophages was assessed by quantitative decreases in p24 concentration. The effective ID50s were 2.5 micrograms/ml for VB cells acutely infected with HIV-1 and 5.2 micrograms/m for chronically infected macrophages. dmPGA1 has an unusual broad-spectrum antiviral activity against both HSV and HIV-1 in vitro and offers a new class of potential therapeutic agents for in vivo use.

  15. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus by adenovirus recombinants encoding mutant IE-0 gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X X; Chen, J X; Young, C S; Silverstein, S

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that adenovirus recombinants expressing functional ICP0 reactivate latent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in an in vitro latency system. This study demonstrated that ICP0, independent of other HSV gene products, is sufficient to reactivate latent HSV-2 in this in vitro system. To assess the effects of defined mutations in the sequence encoding ICP0 (IE-0) on reactivation, seven in-frame insertion and three in-frame deletion mutants were moved into an adenovirus expression vector. Each recombinant directed the synthesis of stable ICP0 of the correct size. The transactivation activity of the mutated sequences in these recombinants was similar to that when they were tested in plasmids. When these recombinants were examined for their ability to reactivate in the in vitro latency system, mutants with dramatic defects in transactivation (Ad-0/125, Ad-0/89, Ad-0/2/7, and Ad-0/88/93) were unable to reactivate latent HSV-2 independent of the multiplicity of infection. An exception to this correlation was the finding that Ad-0/89, which transactivated poorly, was able to reactivate latent virus after prolonged incubation whereas other transactivation-deficient mutants could not. Moreover, the presence of ICP4 did not compensate for the inability of any of the recombinants tested to reactivate HSV-2. These results show that (i) the transactivation domains of ICP0 are also used in reactivation, (ii) the presence of another essential HSV regulatory protein ICP4 does not alter the pattern of reactivation by ICP0, and (iii) mutations in some regions of IE-0 previously shown to affect viral growth and plaque formation did not alter its ability to reactivate in this in vitro system. Images PMID:2166826

  16. Reactivation of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 After Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tobian, Aaron A. R.; Grabowski, Mary K.; Serwadda, David; Newell, Kevin; Ssebbowa, Paschal; Franco, Veronica; Nalugoda, Fred; Wawer, Maria J.; Gray, Ronald H.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Reynolds, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Background.?The association between initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and possible herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) shedding and genital ulcer disease (GUD) has not been evaluated. Methods.?GUD and vaginal HSV-2 shedding were evaluated among women coinfected with HIV and HSV-2 (n = 440 for GUD and n = 96 for HSV-2 shedding) who began ART while enrolled in a placebo-controlled trial of HSV-2 suppression with acyclovir in Rakai, Uganda. Monthly vaginal swabs were tested for HSV-2 shedding, using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Prevalence risk ratios (PRRs) of GUD were estimated using log binomial regression. Random effects logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of HSV-2 shedding. Results.?Compared with pre-ART values, GUD prevalence increased significantly within the first 3 months after ART initiation (adjusted PRR, 1.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–3.62) and returned to baseline after 6 months of ART (adjusted PRR, 0.80; 95% CI, .35–1.80). Detection of HSV-2 shedding was highest in the first 3 months after ART initiation (adjusted OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 1.48–4.49). HSV-2 shedding was significantly less common among women receiving acyclovir (adjusted OR, 0.13; 95% CI, .04–.41). Conclusions.?The prevalence of HSV-2 shedding and GUD increased significantly after ART initiation, possibly because of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Acyclovir significantly reduced both GUD and HSV-2 shedding and should be considered to mitigate these effects following ART initiation. PMID:23812240

  17. Origin of unenveloped capsids in the cytoplasm of cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Campadelli-Fiume, G; Farabegoli, F; Di Gaeta, S; Roizman, B

    1991-01-01

    In cells infected with herpes simplex viruses the capsids acquire an envelope at the nuclear membrane and are usually found in the cytoplasm in structures bound by membranes. Infected cells also accumulate unenveloped capsids alone or juxtaposed to cytoplasmic membranes. The juxtaposed capsids have been variously interpreted as either undergoing terminal deenvelopment resulting from fusion of the envelope with the membrane of the cytoplasmic vesicles or undergoing sequential envelopment and deenvelopment as capsids transit the cytoplasm into the extracellular space. Recent reports have shown that (i) wild-type virus attaches to but does not penetrate cells expressing glycoprotein D (G. Campadelli-Fiume, M. Arsenakis, F. Farabegoli, and B. Roizman, J. Virol. 62:159-167, 1988) and that (ii) a mutation in glycoprotein D enables the mutant virus to productively infect cells expressing the wild-type glycoprotein (G. Campadelli-Fiume, S. Qi, E. Avitabile, L. Foa-Tomasi, R. Brandimarti, and B. Roizman, J. Virol. 64:6070-6079, 1990). If the unenveloped capsids in the cytoplasm result from fusion of the cytoplasmic membranes with the envelopes of viruses transiting the cytoplasm, cells infected with virus carrying the mutation in glycoprotein D should contain many more unenveloped capsids in the cytoplasm inasmuch as there would be little or no restriction in the fusion of the envelope with cytoplasmic membranes. Comparison of thin sections of baby hamster kidney cells infected with wild-type and mutant viruses indicated that this was the case. Moreover, in contrast to the wild-type parent, the mutant virus was not released efficiently from infected cells. The conclusion that the unenveloped capsids are arrested forms of deenveloped capsids is supported by the observation that the unenveloped capsids were unstable in that they exhibited partially extruded DNA. Images PMID:1847476

  18. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 entry by chloride channel inhibitors tamoxifen and NPPB

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Kai; Chen, Maoyun; Xiang, Yangfei; Ma, Kaiqi; Jin, Fujun; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shaoxiang; Wang, Yifei

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We analyze the anti-HSV potential of chloride channel inhibitors. • Tamoxifen and NPPB show anti-HSV-1 and anti-ACV-resistant HSV-1 activities. • HSV-1 infection induces intracellular chloride concentration increasing. • Tamoxifen and NPPB inhibit HSV-1 early infection. • Tamoxifen and NPPB prevent the fusion process of HSV-1. - Abstract: Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is very common worldwide and can cause significant health problems from periodic skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. Appearance of drug-resistant viruses in clinical therapy has made exploring novel antiviral agents emergent. Here we show that chloride channel inhibitors, including tamoxifen and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl-propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB), exhibited extensive antiviral activities toward HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV viruses. HSV-1 infection induced chloride ion influx while treatment with inhibitors reduced the increase of intracellular chloride ion concentration. Pretreatment or treatment of inhibitors at different time points during HSV-1 infection all suppressed viral RNA synthesis, protein expression and virus production. More detailed studies demonstrated that tamoxifen and NPPB acted as potent inhibitors of HSV-1 early entry step by preventing viral binding, penetration and nuclear translocation. Specifically the compounds appeared to affect viral fusion process by inhibiting virus binding to lipid rafts and interrupting calcium homeostasis. Taken together, the observation that tamoxifen and NPPB can block viral entry suggests a stronger potential for these compounds as well as other ion channel inhibitors in antiviral therapy against HSV-1, especially the compound tamoxifen is an immediately actionable drug that can be reused for treatment of HSV-1 infections.

  19. Anaplastic astrocytoma mimicking herpes simplex encephalitis in 13-year old girl.

    PubMed

    Talathi, Saurabh; Gupta, Neha; Reddivalla, Naresh; Prokhorov, Sergey; Gold, Menachem

    2015-11-01

    Astrocytoma is the most common childhood brain tumor. Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) are high grade gliomas (HGG), found very rarely in pediatric patients. AA mainly results from a dedifferentiation of a low grade astrocytoma. Clinical features of supra-tentorial tumors vary according to their anatomic location, biologic aggressiveness and age of the patient. They can be either completely asymptomatic or present with signs of raised intracranial pressure, seizures (about 40% of cases), behavior changes, speech disorders, declining school performance, or hemiparesis. There have been published adult cases of brain tumor misdiagnosed as viral encephalitis. Due to variety of clinical presentations, diagnosis of AA can be challenging. Here we report a case of a 13 year old girl who presented with clinical features suggestive of viral encephalitis, such as fever, headache, dizziness, and first seizure with postictal sleep and prolonged drowsiness. However, her brain MRI findings were consistent with long standing mass effect from the underlying intracranial contents and that coupled with her history of unusual taste led to further investigations and the diagnosis of the AA. In retrospect, this presentation could have been a temporal epileptic aura. High grade astrocytomas are particularly difficult to treat with a two-year survival rates range from 10% to 30%. The treatment is multimodal with gross total surgical resection of the tumor, followed by radiotherapy with or without nitrosourea-containing chemotherapy regimen. Recent promising results seen with the use of temozolamide in adults has not been yet demonstrated in the pediatric patients. The extent of tumor resection remains the most significant indicator of survival and early recognition of this tumor is essential. This case report emphasizes the fact that mass lesions in the temporal lobe, including high-grade astrocytoma, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of suspected herpes simplex encephalitis, especially those not responding to therapy. Remodeling of the calvarium adjacent to an intracranial lesion suggests a long standing process. PMID:26272584

  20. The cytoplasmic domain of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein C is required for membrane anchoring.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, T C; Lerch, R J; Earhart, K

    1988-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein C (gC) gene was altered so that it encoded a truncated glycoprotein lacking a cytoplasmic domain but retaining 20 of 23 amino acids of the transmembrane domain. No additional amino acid residues were introduced into the glycoprotein encoded by the altered gene. The gene was recombined into the HSV-1 genome by marker transfer. Two recombinant viruses, dl1 and dl2, that expressed the mutant gene were isolated. Characterization of these viruses showed that a substantial fraction of the mutant glycoprotein was secreted from infected cells. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the kinetics of posttranslational modification of the mutant glycoprotein were similar to those of the wild type. However, comparison of the kinetics of secretion of gC by dl2 and gC-3, a gC mutant lacking both the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, showed that dl2 gC was secreted much more slowly than gC-3 gC. Iodination of plasma membrane glycoproteins showed that dl2 gC was initially expressed on the cell surface as a membrane protein and subsequently was slowly released from the membrane into the medium. These data indicate that a major function of the cytoplasmic domain of gC is to ensure the stable anchoring of the glycoprotein in plasma membranes. In contrast to these major changes in the membrane-anchoring properties of gC, characterization of the virions produced by dl1 and dl2 showed that they contain significant amounts of gC. Thus the cytoplasmic domain does not appear to be essential for incorporation of this glycoprotein into virions. Images PMID:3357210

  1. Mutational Analysis of the Herpes Simplex Virus Triplex Protein VP19C

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Walt E.; McNab, David; Preston, Valerie G.; Rixon, Frazer J.

    2006-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsids have an icosahedral structure with capsomers formed by the major capsid protein, VP5, linked in groups of three by distinctive structures called triplexes. Triplexes are heterotrimers formed by two proteins in a 1:2 stoichiometry. The single-copy protein is called VP19C, and the dimeric protein is VP23. We have carried out insertional and deletional mutagenesis on VP19C and have examined the effects of the mutations on virus growth and capsid assembly. Insertional mutagenesis showed that the N-terminal ?100 amino acids of the protein, which correspond to a region that is poorly conserved among herpesviruses, are insensitive to disruption and that insertions into the rest of the protein had various effects on virus growth. Some, but not all, severely disabled mutants were compromised in the ability to bind VP23 or VP5. Analysis of deletion mutants revealed the presence of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) near the N terminus of VP19C, and this was mapped to a 33-amino-acid region by fusion of specific sequences to a green fluorescent protein marker. By replacing the endogenous NLS with that from the simian virus 40 large T antigen, we were able to show that the first 45 amino acids of VP19C were not essential for assembly of functional capsids and infectious virus particles. However, removing the first 63 amino acids resulted in formation of aberrant capsids and prevented virus growth, suggesting that the poorly conserved N-terminal sequences have some as-yet-unidentified function. PMID:16415029

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 2 and other genital ulcerative infections as a risk factor for HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed Central

    Keet, I P; Lee, F K; van Griensven, G J; Lange, J M; Nahmias, A; Coutinho, R A

    1990-01-01

    We studied the role of genital ulcerative infections for acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in a cohort of 989 homosexual men in Amsterdam between October 1984 and December 1988. Among 53 HIV-1 seroconverters serological and anamnestic data were gathered regarding herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and syphilis in the 6 months before seroconversion. For statistical analysis a control who remained seronegative during the same interval was selected at random for each HIV-1 seroconverter. A significant difference between the prevalence of HSV-2 antibodies among HIV-1 seroconverters and controls was found (72% vs 38%). HSV-2 seroconversions among men initially seronegative for HSV-2 were found among three of 18 HIV-1 seroconverters and among three of 36 controls. (O.R. = 2.2, 95% C.I. 0.4-12.1). Self-reported cases of anogenital herpes were found more frequently among HIV-1 seroconverters (8) than among controls (4). One case of syphilis was diagnosed among HIV-1 seroconverters, and one among controls. Summing up these cases we assessed the total number of genital ulcerative infections: 12 among HIV-1 seroconverters and eight among controls (23 vs 15%, O.R. 1.7, C.I. 0.6-4.62). These data suggest little evidence for genital ulcerative infections being an important independent risk factor for HIV-1 acquisition among homosexual men in Amsterdam during the time period studied. PMID:2245979

  3. Autophagy is involved in anti-viral activity of pentagalloylglucose (PGG) against Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ying; Chen, Zhen-Ping; Ju, Huai-Qiang; Komatsu, Masaaki; Ji, Yu-hua; Liu, Ge; Guo, Chao-wan; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Yang, Chong-Ren; Wang, Yi-Fei; Kitazato, Kaio

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} We showed PGG has anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and can induce autophgy. {yields} Autophagy may be a novel and important mechanism mediating PGG anti-viral activities. {yields} Inhibition of mTOR pathway is an important mechanism of induction of autophagy by PGG. -- Abstract: Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with broad-spectrum anti-viral activity, however, the mechanisms underlying anti-viral activity remain undefined. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGG on anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) associated with autophagy. We found that the PGG anti-HSV-1 activity was impaired significantly in MEF-atg7{sup -/-} cells (autophagy-defective cells) derived from an atg7{sup -/-} knockout mouse. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that PGG-induced autophagosomes engulfed HSV-1 virions. The mTOR signaling pathway, an essential pathway for the regulation of autophagy, was found to be suppressed following PGG treatment. Data presented in this report demonstrated for the first time that autophagy induced following PGG treatment contributed to its anti-HSV activity in vitro.

  4. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis that developed after herpes encephalitis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bekta?, Ömer; Tanyel, Tutku; Kocaba?, Bilge Aldemir; Fitöz, Suat; Ince, Erdal; Deda, Gülhis

    2014-12-01

    Herpes encephalitis (HE) is among the most common forms of viral encephalitis. Earlier publications indicate the development of acyclovir-refractory choreoathetosis in patients with HE. These reports suggest the development of secondary autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of HE. Combined methylprednisolone and acyclovir treatment reduced the appearance of brain abnormalities relative to treatment with acyclovir alone in a mouse model of encephalitis. We describe a case of a 19-month-old previously healthy girl presenting with sudden onset seizures and loss of consciousness. Initial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for the presence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) were negative as were the tests for the limbic encephalitis antibodies. Steroids were administered with acyclovir to treat suspected autoimmune encephalitis as a result of the patient history of varicella vaccination. HSV PCR testing was positive on the 5th day; however, steroid treatment was continued due to the positive response seen in the patient. Steroid therapy was reduced on the 25th day of treatment due to the development of upper respiratory tract infection and the patient developed orofacial dyskinesia and choreoathetoid movements on the 28th day. Antibodies against N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor were detected in the in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on the 28th day. This case is an example of the emergence of autoimmune symptoms in the pathogenesis of HE. PMID:25261793

  5. Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in HIV Coinfected Individuals in Eastern India with Risk Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Soumyabrata; Sarkar, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy; Biswas, Rahul; SenGupta, Manideepa

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is the cause of most genital herpes while HSV-1 is responsible for orolabial and facial lesions. In immunocompromised individuals, like HIV patients, impaired immunity leads to more frequent symptomatic and asymptomatic HSV infection. Fifty-two blood samples from HIV patients with clinically diagnosed HSV infection were taken as cases, while 45 blood samples each from HIV-infected (HIV control) and noninfected patients without any herpetic lesion (non-HIV control) were taken as control. Serum was tested for IgM and IgG antibodies of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 by ELISA. The seroprevalence was compared among the three groups of study population, considering the demographic and socioeconomic parameters. The HSV-2 IgM was significantly higher (p < 0.005) in the HIV patient group (34.6%) than the HIV control (2.2%) and non-HIV control (2.2%) groups, whereas HSV-2 IgG seroprevalence was higher in both HIV patient (61.5%) and HIV control (57.8%) groups than the non-HIV control group (17.8%). The prevalence of HSV-2 was significantly higher in persons with multiple partners and in the reproductive age group. The overall seroprevalence of HSV-1 IgM was too low (<5%), whereas it was too high (about 90%) with HSV-1 IgG in all three study groups. PMID:26557849

  6. Purification and partial genome characterization of a herpes-like virus infecting the Japanese oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Le Deuff, R M; Renault, T

    1999-05-01

    First observed in 1972 in Crassostrea virginica, herpes-like viruses of bivalves were more recently found to be associated with high mortality rates in other cultured oyster species, such as Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis. The diagnosis of herpes-like virus infections is performed currently by laborious histological and transmission electron microscope examinations. Preparation of specific reagents for use in more amenable diagnostic techniques prompted purification of virus particles and investigation of the viral genome. This paper is the first description of the purification of a virus pathogen from a bivalve mollusc. A procedure was developed which facilitated purification of large amounts of virus particles on the 40-50% interface of sucrose gradients. Transmission electron microscopy showed that a purified virus suspension contained capsids and enveloped virus particles. High molecular mass viral DNA was extracted, and the genome size was estimated by the summation of the sizes of restriction endonuclease fragments to be approximately 180 kbp. Partial cloning of the virus genome was achieved and the specificity of certain cloned fragments was established by dot blot hybridization. PMID:10355779

  7. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G; Martin, Andrea P; Vassileva, Galya; Kelley, Kevin; Schwartz, Thue W; Lira, Sergio A

    2005-03-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor known as vGPCR that binds CXC chemokines with high affinity. In this study, we show that conditional transgenic expression of vGPCR by cells of endothelial origin triggers an angiogenic program in vivo, leading to development of an angioproliferative disease that resembles KS. This angiogenic program consists partly in the expression of the angiogenic factors placental growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor B, and inducible NO synthase by the vGPCR-expressing cells. Finally, we show that continued vGPCR expression is essential for progression of the KS-like phenotype and that down-regulation of vGPCR expression results in reduced expression of angiogenic factors and regression of the lesions. Together, these findings implicate vGPCR as a key element in KS pathogenesis and suggest that strategies to block its function may represent a novel approach for the treatment of KS. PMID:15749907

  8. Evaluation of Antiviral Activities of Four Local Malaysian Phyllanthus Species against Herpes Simplex Viruses and Possible Antiviral Target

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wee Chee; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoside analogues such as acyclovir are effective antiviral drugs against herpes simplex virus infections since its introduction. However, with the emergence of acyclovir-resistant HSV strains particularly in immunocompromised patients, there is a need to develop an alternative antiherpetic drug and plants could be the potential lead. In this study, the antiviral activity of the aqueous extract of four Phyllanthus species were evaluated against herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in Vero cells by quantitative PCR. The protein expressions of untreated and treated infected Vero cells were studied by 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blot. This is the first study that reported the antiviral activity of P. watsonii. P. urinaria was shown to demonstrate the strongest antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2, with SI >33.6. Time-of-addition studies suggested that the extract may act against the early infection stage and the replication stage. Protein expression studies indicated that cellular proteins that are involved in maintaining cytoskeletal structure could be potential target for development of antiviral drugs. Preliminary findings indicated that P. urinaria demonstrated potent inhibitory activity against HSV. Hence, further studies such as in vivo evaluation are required for the development of effective antiherpetic drug. PMID:24324358

  9. Case Presentation of a 23-Month-old Herpes Simplex Virus-infected Girl with Brain and Oesophageal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Kasiri, Karam-Ali; Rostampour, Noushin; Khoshdel, Abolfazl

    2015-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common identifiable cause of serious or life threatening sporadic, endemic encephalitis. Typical HSV encephalitis in patients outside neonatal age is caused by HSV-1. A 23-month-old girl was referred to our hospital with a three-day history of fever, listlessness, slurred speech, and suspicious oesophageal foreign body impaction. Laboratory evaluations showed white blood cell count of 10900 /mm3 with 65% neutrophils. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse severe ulceration in middle to distal third of oesophagus and no foreign body was found in oesophagus or stomach. Parenteral acyclovir was prescribed for herpes encephalitis in addition to antibiotics for central nervous system infection. Chest X-ray and brain MRI was unremarkable. Lumbar puncture revealed normal protein and glucose with 10 white cell count. She developed a raising liver enzyme tests. Total and direct bilirubin was 1.2 mg/dc and 0.2 mg/dc respectively. Because of neurological symptoms, acyclovir was adopted for our patient from the beginning. The girl did not respond to medication and died after 28 days. Progression of her disease prior to referral appears to contribute to the administered treatment inefficacy. Severe rapid progression of disease prior to referral and potential resistance to acyclovir could cause treatment failure. PMID:26155527

  10. Antiviral effect of aqueous extracts from species of the Lamiaceae family against Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nolkemper, Silke; Reichling, Jürgen; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold; Schnitzler, Paul

    2006-12-01

    Aqueous extracts from species of the Lamiaceae family were examined for their antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus (HSV). Extracts from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), peppermint (Mentha x piperita), prunella (Prunella vulgaris), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), sage (Salvia officinalis) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris) were screened. Their inhibitory activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), type 2 (HSV-2) and an acyclovir-resistant strain of HSV-1 (ACV (res)) was tested in vitro on RC-37 cells in a plaque reduction assay. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC (50)) of the extracts for HSV plaque formation were determined in dose-response studies. All test compounds showed a high antiviral activity against HSV-1, HSV-2 and ACV (res). In order to identify the mode of antiviral action, the extracts were added to the cells or viruses at different stages of infection. Both types of Herpes virus including ACV (res) were considerably neutralized after treatment with the extracts prior to infection. At maximum non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts, plaque formation was significantly reduced by > 90% for HSV-1 and HSV-2 and > 85% for ACV (res). In time-response studies over a period of 2 hours, a clearly time-dependent activity was demonstrated. These results indicate that the extracts affect HSV before adsorption, but have no effect on the intracellular virus replication. Therefore, the extracts exert their antiviral effect on free HSV and offer a chance to use them for topical therapeutic application against recurrent HERPES infections. PMID:17091431

  11. Cognitive and Learning Strategies for Longstanding Temporal Lobe Lesions in a Child Who Suffered from "Herpes Simplex" Virus Encephalitis: A Case Study over 10 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schoor, A. N.; Naude, H.; van Rensburg, M.; Pretorius, E.; Boon, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a case study indicating that "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis may cause permanent learning disabilities due to damage to the temporal lobes, as it discusses the results of a case study extending over 10 years to determine the long-term effects on both the anatomy of the brain and the intellectual functioning of the…

  12. Cognitive and Learning Strategies for Longstanding Temporal Lobe Lesions in a Child Who Suffered from "Herpes Simplex" Virus Encephalitis: A Case Study over 10 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schoor, A. N.; Naude, H.; van Rensburg, M.; Pretorius, E.; Boon, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a case study indicating that "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis may cause permanent learning disabilities due to damage to the temporal lobes as it discusses the results of a case study extending over 10 years to determine the long-term effects on both the anatomy of the brain and the intellectual functioning of the…

  13. Towards closed-loop glycaemic control Tom Van Herpe, PhD, Doctor a,*, Bart De Moor, PhD, Professor a

    E-print Network

    author. Tom Van Herpe, SCD Research Division, Electrical Engineering Department (ESAT), KatholiekeDirect Best Practice & Research Clinical Anaesthesiology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/bean 1521-6896/$ ­ see front matter Ó 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.bpa.2008.07.003 Best Practice

  14. Crassostrea gigas mortality in France: the usual suspect, a herpes virus, may not be the killer in this polymicrobial opportunistic disease

    PubMed Central

    Petton, Bruno; Bruto, Maxime; James, Adèle; Labreuche, Yannick; Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    Successive disease outbreaks in oyster (Crassostrea gigas) beds in France have resulted in dramatic losses in production, and subsequent decline in the oyster-farming industry. Deaths of juvenile oysters have been associated with the presence of a herpes virus (OsHV-1 ?var) and bacterial populations of the genus Vibrio. Although the pathogenicity of OsHV-1 ?var, as well as several strains of Vibrio has been demonstrated by experimental infections, our understanding of the complexity of infections occurring in the natural environment remains limited. In the present study, we use specific-pathogen-free (SPF) oysters infected in an estuarine environment to study the diversity and dynamics of cultured microbial populations during disease expression. We observe that rapid Vibrio colonization followed by viral replication precedes oyster death. No correlation was found between the vibrio concentration and viral load in co-infected animals. We show that the quantity of viral DNA is a predictor of mortality, however, in the absence of bacteria, a high load of herpes virus is not sufficient to induce the full expression of the disease. In addition, we demonstrate that juvenile mortalities can occur in the absence of herpes virus, indicating that the herpes virus appears neither essential nor sufficient to cause juvenile deaths; whereas bacteria are necessary for the disease. Finally, we demonstrate that oysters are a reservoir of putative pathogens, and that the geographic origin, age, and cultivation method of oysters influence disease expression. PMID:26217318

  15. Crassostrea gigas mortality in France: the usual suspect, a herpes virus, may not be the killer in this polymicrobial opportunistic disease.

    PubMed

    Petton, Bruno; Bruto, Maxime; James, Adèle; Labreuche, Yannick; Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    Successive disease outbreaks in oyster (Crassostrea gigas) beds in France have resulted in dramatic losses in production, and subsequent decline in the oyster-farming industry. Deaths of juvenile oysters have been associated with the presence of a herpes virus (OsHV-1 ?var) and bacterial populations of the genus Vibrio. Although the pathogenicity of OsHV-1 ?var, as well as several strains of Vibrio has been demonstrated by experimental infections, our understanding of the complexity of infections occurring in the natural environment remains limited. In the present study, we use specific-pathogen-free (SPF) oysters infected in an estuarine environment to study the diversity and dynamics of cultured microbial populations during disease expression. We observe that rapid Vibrio colonization followed by viral replication precedes oyster death. No correlation was found between the vibrio concentration and viral load in co-infected animals. We show that the quantity of viral DNA is a predictor of mortality, however, in the absence of bacteria, a high load of herpes virus is not sufficient to induce the full expression of the disease. In addition, we demonstrate that juvenile mortalities can occur in the absence of herpes virus, indicating that the herpes virus appears neither essential nor sufficient to cause juvenile deaths; whereas bacteria are necessary for the disease. Finally, we demonstrate that oysters are a reservoir of putative pathogens, and that the geographic origin, age, and cultivation method of oysters influence disease expression. PMID:26217318

  16. Susceptibility of Drug-Resistant Clinical Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Strains to Essential Oils of Ginger, Thyme, Hyssop, and Sandalwood?

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, Paul; Koch, Christine; Reichling, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    Acyclovir-resistant clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were analyzed in vitro for their susceptibilities to essential oils of ginger, thyme, hyssop, and sandalwood. All essential oils exhibited high levels of virucidal activity against acyclovir-sensitive strain KOS and acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 clinical isolates and reduced plaque formation significantly. PMID:17353250

  17. Similar herpes zoster incidence across Europe: results from a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Herpes zoster (HZ) is caused by reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and mainly affects individuals aged ?50 years. The forthcoming European launch of a vaccine against HZ (Zostavax®) prompts the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology of HZ in Europe. Therefore the aim of this systematic review was to summarize the available data on HZ incidence in Europe and to describe age-specific incidence. Methods The Medline database of the National Library of Medicine was used to conduct a comprehensive literature search of population-based studies of HZ incidence published between 1960 and 2010 carried out in the 27 member countries of the European Union, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. The identified articles were reviewed and scored according to a reading grid including various quality criteria, and HZ incidence data were extracted and presented by country. Results The search identified 21 studies, and revealed a similar annual HZ incidence throughout Europe, varying by country from 2.0 to 4.6/1 000 person-years with no clearly observed geographic trend. Despite the fact that age groups differed from one study to another, age-specific HZ incidence rates seemed to hold steady during the review period, at around 1/1 000 children <10 years, around 2/1 000 adults aged <40 years, and around 1–4/1 000 adults aged 40–50 years. They then increased rapidly after age 50 years to around 7–8/1 000, up to 10/1 000 after 80 years of age. Our review confirms that in Europe HZ incidence increases with age, and quite drastically after 50 years of age. In all of the 21 studies included in the present review, incidence rates were higher among women than men, and this difference increased with age. This review also highlights the need to identify standardized surveillance methods to improve the comparability of data within European Union Member States and to monitor the impact of VZV immunization on the epidemiology of HZ. Conclusions Available data in Europe have shortcomings which make an accurate assessment of HZ incidence and change over time impossible. However, data are indicative that HZ incidence is comparable, and increases with age in the same proportion across Europe. PMID:23574765

  18. Incidence of Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus: Results from the Pacific Ocular Inflammation Study

    PubMed Central

    Borkar, Durga S.; Tham, Vivien M.; Esterberg, Elizabeth; Ray, Kathryn J.; Vinoya, Aleli C.; Parker, John V.; Uchida, Aileen; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To provide a population-based estimate of the incidence of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) with comparisons across racial, gender, and age groups, as well as to estimate the frequency of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Design Retrospective, population-based cohort study Participants All patients enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Hawaii health plan during the study period (N=217,061). Methods All patient encounters between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2007 in the electronic medical record of Kaiser Permanente Hawaii were queried for International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition (ICD9) codes corresponding to HZO. Charts were reviewed to confirm a diagnosis of HZO and to collect information on specific ocular manifestations. Demographic data and information on PHN were collected electronically. Incidence rates were calculated per 100,000 person-years for the entire population, as well as for age-, gender-, and race-specific subgroups. Main Outcome Measure Clinical diagnosis of HZO during the study period. Results One hundred thirty-four cases of HZO were identified in this population of 217,061 people. The overall incidence was 30.9 per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): 25.9–36.6). The incidence rate for the population 65 years of age and over was 104.6 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI: 79.0–135.9), approximately five times the remainder of the population (p<0.001). The most common manifestation of HZO was dermatitis, followed by keratitis and conjunctivitis. The incidence of HZO for Pacific Islanders was 19.0 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI: 12.4– 28.3), which was significantly lower than the rate for non-Pacific Islanders (p=0.007). Twenty-one percent of HZO patients developed PHN. Older age and HZO with keratitis, conjunctivitis, and/or uveitis were found to be risk factors for PHN. Conclusions This study provides a population-based estimate of HZO and highlights differences across various age and racial groups. It also suggests that demographic characteristics may be useful in determining the risk of developing HZO. PMID:23207173

  19. Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Primary MicroRNA Transcript Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Marce, Marta; Patel, Amita; Margolis, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to understand factors that may influence latency-associated transcription and latency-associated transcript (LAT) phenotypes, we studied the expression of the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) LAT-associated microRNAs (miRNAs). We mapped the transcription initiation sites of all three primary miRNA transcripts and identified the ICP4-binding sequences at the transcription initiation sites of both HSV-2 LAT (pri-miRNA for miR-I and miR-II, which target ICP34.5, and miR-III, which targets ICP0) and L/ST (a pri-miRNA for miR-I and miR-II) but not at that of the primary miR-H6 (for which the target is unknown). We confirmed activity of the putative HSV-2 L/ST promoter and found that ICP4 trans-activates the L/ST promoter when the ICP4-binding site at its transcription initiation site is mutated, suggesting that ICP4 may play a dual role in regulating transcription of L/ST and, consequently, of miR-I and miR-II. LAT exon 1 (containing LAT enhancer sequences), together with the LAT promoter region, comprises a bidirectional promoter required for the expression of both LAT-encoded miRNAs and miR-H6 in latently infected mouse ganglia. The ability of ICP4 to suppress ICP34.5-targeting miRNAs and to activate lytic viral genes suggests that ICP4 could play a key role in the switch between latency and reactivation. IMPORTANCE The HSV-2 LAT and viral miRNAs expressed in the LAT region are the most abundant viral transcripts during HSV latency. The balance between the expression of LAT and LAT-associated miRNAs and the expression of lytic viral transcripts from the opposite strand appears to influence whether individual HSV-infected neurons will be latently or productively infected. The outcome of neuronal infection may thus depend on regulation of gene expression of the corresponding primary miRNAs. In the present study, we characterize promoter sequences responsible for miRNA expression, including identification of the primary miRNA 5? ends and evaluation of ICP4 response. These findings provide further insight into the virus' strategy to tightly control expression of lytic cycle genes (especially the neurovirulence factor, ICP34.5) and suggest a mechanism (via ICP4) for the transition from latency to reactivated productive infection. PMID:25673716

  20. Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and 2 in Taiwan and Risk Factor Analysis, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Chao-Yu, Chen; Chen, Chih-Jung; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2015-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) are common human pathogens and might cause severe illness. Following primary infection, the viruses establish lifelong latent infection and are transmitted by close contact, both sexual and nonsexual. However, the information about the seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 across all age groups is limited. Methods Residual sera collected during the nationwide serosurvey in 2007 in Taiwan were selected for the study. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 type-specific glycoprotein IgG. Demographics and personal health data were used for risk analysis. Results A total of 1411 and 1072 serum samples were included for anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 seroprevalence analysis, respectively. The weighted overall seroprevalence was 63.2% for HSV-1, and 7.7% for HSV-2, respectively. The HSV-1 seropositive rate was 19.2% for those less than 5 years old, increased to 46.4% for those aged 5–13 years, 60.9% for those aged 14–29 years, and reached as much as 95.0% for those aged over 30 years. In contrast, the HSV-2 seropositve rate was 1.6% for those less than 30 years old, rose to 10.1% for those age 30–39 years, and was up to 31.2% for those aged over 60 years. A significantly higher HSV-2 seropositive rate was noted in females than males aged over 40 years (26.3% v.s. 16.8%), and the overall HSV-2 seropositive rate was almost twice higher in females than males. Smoking history, drinking habit, and educational level were associated with the HSV-1 seropositivity. Female gender and rural residence were independent factors for the HSV-2 seropositivity. Conclusions An obvious increase of primary HSV-1 infection occurred in late adolescents and young adults, joined by the rise of HSV-2 infection in middle-aged adults, especially females. The acquistion and transmission of HSV warrant further studies in the susceptible population. PMID:26252011

  1. Use of synthetic peptides to map the antigenic determinants of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Strynadka, N C; Redmond, M J; Parker, J M; Scraba, D G; Hodges, R S

    1988-01-01

    The predictive algorithm Surfaceplot (J.M.R. Parker, D. Guo, and R.S. Hodges, Biochemistry 25:5425-5432, 1986) was used to examine glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) for amino acid residues with a high probability of being exposed on the molecular surface. Based on these data, 11 different peptides corresponding to 10-residue segments in the primary sequence of glycoprotein D and one 20-residue segment were synthesized, conjugated to carrier proteins, and used to generate specific antisera in rabbits. Two synthetic peptides predicted not to be on the surface of glycoprotein D were included as negative controls. The polyclonal antisera against individual synthetic peptide conjugates were in turn evaluated for their ability to recognize both isolated glycoprotein D and intact HSV-1 virions in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Based on Surfaceplot predictions, eight linear antigenic sites on glycoprotein D were thereby defined from the 12 antipeptide antisera prepared. Four of these sites contained epitopes to which complement-independent neutralizing antibodies could be generated. The latter sites corresponded to sequences 12 to 21, 267 to 276, 288 to 297, and 314 to 323 of the mature protein. An additional peptide sequence, 2 to 21, was found to generate antisera which had potent virus-neutralizing capacity in the presence of complement. Identification of a neutralizing epitope in the sequence 314 to 323 makes it likely that the membrane-spanning region of glycoprotein D is within the subsequent sequence, 323 to 339. Antipeptide antisera prepared in this study from 12 synthetic peptides contained 13 surface sites predicted by Surfaceplot, of which 7 were not predicted by the parameters of Hopp and Woods (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78:3824-3828, 1981). Of these seven sites not predicted by the Hopp and Woods plot, all generated antipeptide antibodies that bound to HSV-1 virions and three of these seven sites generated neutralizing antibodies. In total, 8 of 12 synthetic peptides containing surface regions produced antipeptide antibodies that bound to HSV-1 virions and 5 of these generated neutralizing antibodies. These results suggest the advantages of Surfaceplot in mapping antigenic determinants in proteins. Images PMID:2457115

  2. Infiltration Pattern of Blood Monocytes into the Central Nervous System during Experimental Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Menasria, Rafik; Canivet, Coraline; Piret, Jocelyne; Boivin, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and distribution of infiltrating blood monocytes into the central nervous system and their involvement in the cerebral immune response together with resident macrophages, namely microglia, were evaluated in experimental herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (HSE). To distinguish microglia from blood monocyte-derived macrophages, chimeras were generated by conditioning C57BL/6 recipient mice with chemotherapy regimen followed by transplantation of bone morrow-derived cells that expressed the green fluorescent protein. Mice were infected intranasally with a sub-lethal dose of HSV-1 (1.2x106 plaque forming units). Brains were harvested prior to and on days 4, 6, 8 and 10 post-infection for flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry analysis. The amounts of neutrophils (P<0.05) and «Ly6Chi» inflammatory monocytes (P<0.001) significantly increased in the CNS compared to non-infected controls on day 6 post-infection, which corresponded to more severe clinical signs of HSE. Levels decreased on day 8 for both leukocytes subpopulations (P<0.05 for inflammatory monocytes compared to non-infected controls) to reach baseline levels on day 10 following infection. The percentage of «Ly6Clow» patrolling monocytes significantly increased (P<0.01) at a later time point (day 8), which correlated with the resolution phase of HSE. Histological analysis demonstrated that blood leukocytes colonized mostly the olfactory bulb and the brainstem, which corresponded to regions where HSV-1 particles were detected. Furthermore, infiltrating cells from the monocytic lineage could differentiate into activated local tissue macrophages that express the microglia marker, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1. The lack of albumin detection in the brain parenchyma of infected mice showed that the infiltration of blood leukocytes was not necessarily related to a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier but could be the result of a functional recruitment. Thus, our findings suggest that blood monocyte-derived macrophages infiltrate the central nervous system and may contribute, with resident microglia, to the innate immune response seen during experimental HSE. PMID:26700486

  3. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific for herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D inhibit virus penetration.

    PubMed Central

    Highlander, S L; Sutherland, S L; Gage, P J; Johnson, D C; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C

    1987-01-01

    Nine monoclonal antibodies specific for glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus type 1 were selected for their ability to neutralize virus in the presence of complement. Four of these antibodies exhibited significant neutralization titers in the absence of complement, suggesting that their epitope specificities are localized to site(s) which contribute to the role of gD in virus infectivity. Each of these antibodies was shown to effectively neutralize virus after virion adsorption to cell surfaces, indicating that neutralization did not involve inhibition of virus attachment. Although some of the monoclonal antibodies partially inhibited adsorption of radiolabeled virions, this effect was only observed at concentrations much higher than that required to neutralize virus and did not correlate with complement-independent virus-neutralizing activity. All of the monoclonal antibodies slowed the rate at which virus entered cells, further suggesting that antibody binding of gD inhibits virus penetration. Experiments were carried out to determine the number of different epitopes recognized by the panel of monoclonal antibodies and to identify epitopes involved in complement-independent virus neutralization. Monoclonal antibody-resistant (mar) mutants were selected by escape from neutralization with individual gD-specific monoclonal antibodies. The reactivity patterns of the mutants and antibodies were then used to construct an operational antigenic map for gD. This analysis identified a minimum of six epitopes on gD that could be grouped into four antigenic sites. Antibodies recognizing four distinct epitopes contained in three antigenic sites were found to neutralize virus in a complement-independent fashion. Moreover, mar mutations in these sites did not affect the processing of gD, rate of virus penetration, or the ability of the virus to replicate at high temperature (39 degrees C). Taken together, these results (i) confirm that gD is a major target antigen for neutralizing antibody, (ii) indicate that the mechanism of neutralization can involve inhibition of virus penetration of the cell surface membrane, and (iii) strongly suggest that gD plays a direct role in the virus entry process. PMID:2444713

  4. Completely assembled virus particles detected by transmission electron microscopy in proximal and mid-axons of neurons infected with herpes simplex virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 2 and pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jialing Lazear, Helen M. Friedman, Harvey M.

    2011-01-05

    The morphology of alphaherpesviruses during anterograde axonal transport from the neuron cell body towards the axon terminus is controversial. Reports suggest that transport of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids and envelope proteins occurs in separate compartments and that complete virions form at varicosities or axon termini (subassembly transport model), while transport of a related alphaherpesvirus, pseudorabies virus (PRV) occurs as enveloped capsids in vesicles (assembled transport model). Transmission electron microscopy of proximal and mid-axons of primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons was used to compare anterograde axonal transport of HSV-1, HSV-2 and PRV. SCG cell bodies were infected with HSV-1 NS and 17, HSV-2 2.12 and PRV Becker. Fully assembled virus particles were detected intracellularly within vesicles in proximal and mid-axons adjacent to microtubules after infection with each virus, indicating that assembled virions are transported anterograde within axons for all three alphaherpesviruses.

  5. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection and Jewish Ritual Circumcision With Oral Suction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Leas, Brian F; Umscheid, Craig A

    2015-06-01

    Jewish ritual circumcision rarely but occasionally includes a procedure involving direct oral suction of the wound, which can expose an infant to infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). This practice has provoked international controversy in recent years, but no systematic review of the clinical literature has previously been published. We designed this review to identify and synthesize all published studies examining the association between circumcision with direct oral suction and HSV-1 infection. Our search strategy identified 6 published case series or case reports, documenting 30 cases between 1988 and 2012. Clinical findings were consistent with transmission of infection during circumcision, although the evidence base is limited by the small number of infections and incomplete case data. Published evidence suggests that circumcision with direct oral suction has resulted in severe neonatal illness and death from HSV-1 transmission, but further research is necessary to clarify the risk of infection. PMID:26407411

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument proteins VP1/2 and UL37 are associated with intranuclear capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Bucks, Michelle A.; O'Regan, Kevin J.; Murphy, Michael A.; Wills, John W.; Courtney, Richard J. . E-mail: rcourtney@psu.edu

    2007-05-10

    The assembly of the tegument of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a complex process that involves a number of events at various sites within virus-infected cells. Our studies focused on determining whether tegument proteins, VP1/2 and UL37, are added to capsids located within the nucleus. Capsids were isolated from the nuclear fraction of HSV-1-infected cells and purified by rate-zonal centrifugation to separate B capsids (containing the scaffold proteins and no viral DNA) and C capsids (containing DNA and no scaffold proteins). Western blot analyses of these capsids indicated that VP1/2 associated primarily with C capsids and UL37 associated with B and C capsids. The results demonstrate that at least two of the tegument proteins of HSV-1 are associated with capsids isolated from the nuclear fraction, and these capsid-tegument protein interactions may represent initial events of the tegumentation process.

  7. Synthetic pregnenolone derivatives as antiviral agents against acyclovir-resistant isolates of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1.

    PubMed

    Dávola, María Eugenia; Mazaira, Gisela I; Galigniana, Mario D; Alché, Laura E; Ramírez, Javier A; Barquero, Andrea A

    2015-10-01

    The conventional therapy for the management of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) infections mainly comprises acyclovir (ACV) and other nucleoside analogues. A common outcome of this treatment is the emergence of resistant viral strains, principally when immunosuppressed patients are involved. Thus, the development of new antiherpetic compounds remains as a central challenge. In this work we describe the synthesis and the in vitro antiherpetic activity of a new family of steroidal compounds derived from the endogenous hormone pregnenolone. Some of these derivatives showed a remarkable inhibitory effect on HSV-1 spread both on wild type and ACV-resistant strains. The results also show that these compounds seem to interfere with the late steps of the viral cycle. PMID:26259812

  8. Dendrimer functionalization with a membrane-interacting domain of herpes simplex virus type 1: towards intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Tom P; Tarallo, Rossella; Falanga, Annarita; Finamore, Emiliana; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Weck, Marcus; Galdiero, Stefania

    2012-10-22

    A poly(amide)-based dendrimer was synthesized and functionalized with the membrane-interacting peptide gH(625-644) (gH625) derived from the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) envelope glycoprotein H, which has previously been shown to assist in delivering large cargoes across the cellular membrane. We demonstrate that the attachment of the gH625 peptide sequence to the termini of a dendrimer allows the conjugate to penetrate into the cellular matrix, whereas the unfunctionalized dendrimer is excluded from translocation. The peptide-functionalized dendrimer is rapidly taken into the cells mainly through a non-active translocation mechanism. Our results suggest that the presented peptidodendrimeric scaffold may be a promising material for efficient drug delivery. PMID:22968943

  9. High prevalence of varicella-zoster virus reactivation in herpes simplex virus-seronegative patients with acute peripheral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Y; Ohtani, F; Kawabata, H; Fukuda, S; Bergström, T

    2000-03-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) are considered to be the major causes of acute peripheral facial palsy (APFP). One hundred and forty-two patients with APFP were analyzed by serological assays and polymerase chain reaction analysis. Ramsay Hunt syndrome was diagnosed in 21 patients. Of the remaining 121 patients clinically diagnosed with Bell's palsy, VZV reactivation without zoster (zoster sine herpete) was detected in 35 patients (29%). The prevalence of antibodies to HSV among patients with Bell's palsy was significantly higher than the prevalence among those with VZV reactivation (Ramsay Hunt syndrome or zoster sine herpete). In contrast, a high incidence (88%) of VZV reactivation among HSV-seronegative patients with APFP was observed. Our data indicate that VZV is one of the major etiologic agents of clinically diagnosed Bell's palsy and that VZV reactivation causes APFP in most patients who lack antibodies to HSV. PMID:10722439

  10. [Protective activity of aqueous extracts from higher mushrooms against Herpes simplex virus type-2 on albino mice model].

    PubMed

    Razumov, I A; Kazachinskaia, E I; Puchkova, L I; Kosogorova, T A; Gorbunova, I A; Loktev, V B; Tepliakova, T V

    2013-01-01

    Toxicity and antiviral activity of aqueous extracts from higher mushrooms such as Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler (shiitake), Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.) P. Kumm. (oyster), Inonotus obliquus (Ach. ex Pers.) Pilát (chaga), Hydnellum compactum (Pers.) P. Karst. (compact tooth) were studied. In doses of 0.8 to 4.0 mg (dry weight) per mouse administered orally or intraperitoneally the extracts showed no acute toxicity. When the dose of the chaga extract was increased to 20 mg per mouse, a half of the animals died. Intraperitoneal administration of the aqueous extracts in a dose of 0.4-2 mg per mouse prior to the contamination by a single LD50 of Herpes simplex type 2 provided 100-percent survival of the animals exposed to the Lentinula edodes or Pleurotus ostreatus extracts and 90-percent survival of the animals exposed to the Inonotus obliquus or Hydnellum compactum extracts. PMID:24738237

  11. Detection in antisera of antibodies that cross-react with herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gC.

    PubMed Central

    Zweig, M; Heilman, C J; Bladen, S V; Showalter, S D; Hampar, B

    1983-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein gC was purified by affinity chromatography with an immunosorbent column containing monoclonal antibody to HSV-1 gC, and its reactivity with rabbit antisera was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of radioimmunoprecipitates. Positive reactions were detected between HSV-1 gC and rabbit hyperimmune antisera to both HSV-1 and HSV-2. Electrophoretic analysis also revealed reactivity between the rabbit antisera and peptides of HSV-1 gC generated by partial digestion with trypsin. These findings indicate that HSV-1 gC has one or more cross-reactive or type-common determinants that are readily detected, and therefore, the presence of antibodies reacting with HSV-1 gC in sera may not necessarily be indicative of an earlier infection with HSV-1. Images PMID:6307870

  12. Antiviral activity of 5-ethyl-2'-deoxyuridine against herpes simplex viruses in cell culture, mice, and guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Schinazi, R F; Scott, R T; Peters, J; Rice, V; Nahmias, A J

    1985-01-01

    The susceptibility of 3 laboratory strains and 24 clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) to 5-ethyl-2'-deoxyuridine was determined in plaque reduction assays in Vero cells. The median effective doses were 8.6 and 7.8 microM, respectively. The drug was less potent than acyclovir and other related antiviral drugs, but it had a high therapeutic index against both HSV-1 and HSV-2. Drug-resistant viruses were readily produced in cell culture. These variants were cross-resistant to acyclovir, 2'-fluoro-5-iodoaracytosine, and 2'-fluoro-5-methylarauracil but were susceptible to vidarabine or phosphonoformate. These findings confirm that the selective antiviral activity of 5-ethyl-2'-deoxyuridine is mediated by the virus-induced thymidine kinase. Oral or intraperitoneal administration of the drug at nontoxic doses was ineffective in protecting mice against intracerebral challenge with virus. Using implanted osmotic minipumps or coadministering the drug with dimethyl sulfoxide failed to decrease the mortality rate. In guinea pigs infected genitally with HSV-2, topical drug treatment was more effective than placebo in reducing lesion severity and other clinical and virological variables. These effects were noted whether the drug treatment was initiated 3 or 24 h after infection (ascertained serologically). Drug-treated animals had a significantly lower herpes antibody titer than did placebo-treated guinea pigs, suggesting that the drug can also reduce the viral antigen load. In this model, the drug appeared to be as effective as topical phosphonoformate or acyclovir. PMID:3000291

  13. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection in Patients Attending a Baltimore City Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Eshan U.; Frank, Melanie A.; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Rothman, Richard E.; Baker, Amy E. O.; Kraus, Chadd K.; Shahan, Judy; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Kelen, Gabor D.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Laeyendecker, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a common sexually transmitted disease, but there is limited data on its epidemiology among urban populations. The urban Emergency Department (ED) is a potential venue for surveillance as it predominantly serves an inner city minority population. We evaluate the seroprevalence and factors associated with HSV-2 infection among patients attending the Johns Hopkins Hospital Adult Emergency Department (JHH ED). Methods An identity unlinked-serosurvey was conducted between 6/2007 and 9/2007 in the JHH ED; sera were tested by the Focus HerpeSelect ELISA. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) were used to determine factors associated with HSV-2 infection. Results Of 3,408 serum samples, 1,853 (54.4%) were seropositive for HSV-2. Females (adjPRR ?=?1.47, 95% CI 1.38–1.56), non-Hispanic blacks (adjPRR ?=?2.03, 95% CI 1.82–2.27), single (adjPRR ?=?1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.25), divorced (adjPRR ?=?1.28, 95% CI 1.15–1.41), and unemployed patients (adjPRR ?=?1.13, 95% CI 1.05–1.21) had significantly higher rates of HSV-2 infection. Though certain zip codes had significantly higher seroprevalence of HSV-2, this effect was completely attenuated when controlling for age and gender. Conclusions Seroprevalence of HSV-2 in the JHH ED was higher than U.S. national estimates; however, factors associated with HSV-2 infection were similar. The high seroprevalence of HSV-2 in this urban ED highlights the need for targeted testing and treatment. Cross-sectional serosurveys in the urban ED may help to examine the epidemiology of HSV-2. PMID:25036862

  14. Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 among persons aged 14-49 years--United States, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    2010-04-23

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide and the primary cause of genital and neonatal herpes and genital ulcer disease. Multiple studies have shown that HSV-2 infection increases the risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by at least twofold. HSV-2 infection is lifelong, and serologic testing provides the best method to estimate HSV-2 prevalence. Since 1976, CDC has monitored HSV-2 seroprevalence in the United States through the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). After increasing from 1976-1980 (NHANES II) to 1988--1994 (NHANES III), HSV-2 seroprevalence decreased, from 21.0% in 1988-1994 to 17.0% in NHANES 1999-2004. To determine whether HSV-2 seroprevalence in the United States has changed since 1999-2004 and to estimate HSV-2 seroprevalence by age, race/ethnicity, and reported lifetime number of sex partners, CDC analyzed serologic test results from persons aged 14-49 years who participated in NHANES 2005-2008. The results indicated that HSV-2 seroprevalence was 16.2% overall, not statistically different from the seroprevalence in 1999-2004. Seroprevalence was highest among women (20.9%) and non-Hispanic blacks (39.2%). Of those infected with HSV-2, 81.1% had not received a diagnosis. Clinicians, health departments, health-care organizations, and community groups should promote measures that prevent HSV-2 transmission, including minimizing the number of sex partners, avoiding concurrent sexual partnerships, and using condoms consistently and correctly. Patients with known HSV-2 infection should be tested for HIV. PMID:20414188

  15. Three phase III randomized controlled trials of topical resiquimod 0.01-percent gel to reduce anogenital herpes recurrences.

    PubMed

    Mark, Karen E; Spruance, Spotswood; Kinghorn, George R; Sacks, Stephen L; Slade, Herbert B; Meng, Tze-Chiang; Selke, Stacy; Magaret, Amalia; Wald, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Resiquimod, a Toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonist, stimulates production of cytokines that promote an antigen-specific T helper type 1 acquired immune response. Animal and phase II human trials showed posttreatment efficacy in reducing recurrent herpes lesion days and/or time to first recurrence. Three phase III randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled trials of topical resiquimod to reduce anogenital herpes recurrences were conducted in healthy adults with ?4 recurrences within the prior year. Participants applied resiquimod 0.01% gel or vehicle gel 2 times per week for 3 weeks to each recurrence for 12 months. Trials 1 and 2 had 2:1 resiquimod-vehicle randomization. Trial 3 had 1:1:1 randomization for resiquimod and 500 mg valacyclovir orally twice daily for 5 days (RESI-VAL), resiquimod and oral placebo (RESI-PLA), and vehicle and oral placebo (VEH-PLA). The median time to first recurrence was similar for resiquimod and vehicle (trial 1, 60 and 56 days, P=0.7; trial 2, 54 and 48 days, P=0.47; trial 3, 51 [RESI-VAL], 55 [RESI-PLA], and 44 [VEH-PLA] days, P=not significant [NS]). The median time to healing of initial treated recurrence was longer for resiquimod (trial 1, 18 compared to 10 days, P<0.001; trial 2, 19 compared to 13 days, P=0.16; trial 3, 14 [RESI-VAL], 16 [RESI-PLA], and 8 [VEH-PLA] days, P<0.001). In trials 1 and 2, moderate to severe erythema and erosion/ulceration at the application site were more common in resiquimod recipients. In conclusion, no posttreatment efficacy of resiquimod 0.01% gel was observed. Increased application site reactions and initial recurrence healing time are consistent with resiquimod-induced cytokine effects. PMID:24709264

  16. Harmine blocks herpes simplex virus infection through downregulating cellular NF-?B and MAPK pathways induced by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deyan; Su, Airong; Fu, Yuxuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Lv, Xiaowen; Xu, Wentao; Xu, Shijie; Wang, Huanru; Wu, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and -2) are highly prevalent in many populations and therapeutic options are limited. Both viruses can establish latency by maintaining viral genomes in neurons of sensory ganglia. Primary or recurrent HSV infections may lead to deleterious outcomes: HSV-1 infection may result in corneal blindness and encephalitis and HSV-2 infection leads to herpes genitalis. While no effective vaccine is available, acyclovir is widely used for therapy, which targets and inhibits viral DNA polymerase. Although acyclovir is of low toxicity, resistant strains arise due to persistent use, mainly in immune compromised patients. In our effort to identify new HSV inhibitory molecules, harmine was found to potently inhibit HSV infection. Harmine, a beta-carbon alkaloid with an indole core structure and a pyridine ring, is widely distributed in plants. Earlier studies showed that harmine exhibited pharmacological activities such as antifungal, antimicrobial, antitumor, antiplasmodial and antioxidants. In the current study, we showed that harmine was a potent inhibitor of HSV-2 infection in vitro assays with EC50 value at around 1.47?M and CC50 value at around 337.10?M. The HSV RNA transcription, protein synthesis, and virus titers were reduced by the presence of harmine in a dose dependent manner. Further study on the mechanism of the anti-HSV activity showed that harmine blocked HSV-induced ROS production and the upregulated cytokine/chemokine expression, but our evidence showed that the inhibition of viral replication was unlikely mediated by the blocking of ROS production. We demonstrated that harmine significantly reduced HSV-2-induced NF-?B activation, as well as I?B-? degradation and p65 nuclear translocation. We found that harmine also inhibited HSV-2-mediated p38 kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation. PMID:26348003

  17. Improving the diagnosis of meningitis due to enterovirus and herpes simplex virus I and II in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus and herpes simplex viruses are common causes of lymphocytic meningitis. The purpose of this study was to analyse the impact of the use molecular testing for Enteroviruses and Herpes simplex viruses I and II in all suspected cases of viral meningitis. Methods From November 18, 2008 to November 17, 2009 (phase II, intervention), all patients admitted with suspected viral meningitis (with pleocytosis) had a CSF sample tested using a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT). Data collected during this period were compared to those from the previous one-year period, i.e. November 18, 2007 to November 17, 2008 (phase I, observational), when such tests were available but not routinely used. Results In total, 2,536 CSF samples were assessed, of which 1,264 were from phase I, and 1,272 from phase II. Of this total, a NAAT for Enterovirus was ordered in 123 cases during phase I (9.7% of the total phase I sample) and in 221 cases in phase II (17.4% of the total phase II sample). From these, Enterovirus was confirmed in 35 (28.5%, 35/123) patients during phase I and 71 (32.1%, 71/221) patients during phase II (p?=?0.107). The rate of diagnosis of meningitis by HSV I and II did not differ between the groups (13 patients, 6.5% in phase I and 13, 4.7% in phase II) (p?=?1.0), from 200 cases in phase I and 274 cases in phase II. Conclusions The number of cases diagnosed with enteroviral meningitis increased during the course of this study, leading us to believe that the strategy of performing NAAT for Enterovirus on every CSF sample with pleocytosis is fully justified. PMID:24138798

  18. Topical liposomal gel of idoxuridine for the treatment of herpes simplex: pharmaceutical and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Seth, Avinash Kumar; Misra, Ambikanandan; Umrigar, Dipak

    2004-08-01

    The optimization of the method of preparation of idoxuridine (IDU) liposomes by the reverse phase evaporation (REV) method was carried out by three variables at three levels (3(3)) factorial design. The three independent variables selected were volume of organic phase (x1), volume of aqueous phase (x2), and drug/phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol in molar ratio (x3). Twenty-seven batches of IDU liposomes were prepared by the REV method and subjected to evaluation for percentage drug entrapment (PDE), size, and size distribution. A reduced polynomial equation was derived by multiple regression of the data of PDE and the transformed values of the three independent variables. Three contour plots at fixed level of-- 1 (low), 0 (medium), and 1 (high) of major contributing variable (x3) were plotted between x1 and x2 at predetermined PDE to understand the physical meaning of independent variables. Liposomal gels were prepared by dispersing optimized IDU liposomes in 2%w/w and 5%w/w (HPMC) K4M gel bases so as to contain 1%w/w IDU (LIG-1 and LIG-2, respectively). The percentage of drug retention (PDR) studies of optimized batch 14 (Lipo-14) and LIG-1 and LIG-2 were carried out at three different storage conditions (2-8 degrees C, 25 +/- 2 degrees C, and 37 degrees C). A comparative diffusion study of LIG-1 and LIG-2 with PIG-1 and PIG-2 (1%w/w IDU with components of liposome dispersed in 2%w/w and 5%w/w HPMC K4M gel bases, respectively), respectively, through human cadaver skin was conducted. A comparative double blind clinical pilot study of optimized LIG-2 gel was carried out for eight weeks and compared with PIG-2 on 20 Herpes simplex patients (10 patients each for HSV-1 and HSV-2, divided into two groups each of 5 patients). Batch 14 (Lipo-14) was found to have maximum PDE of 74.4%. The PDR study showed maximum drug retention at 2-8 degrees C. A significant increase in PDR (p<0.05) was observed in LIG-1 and LIG-2 when compared with Lipo-14 at all the three temperatures. In the diffusion studies, a significant (p<0.05) flux reduction; 3.5 times in LIG-1 when compared with PIG-1 and 2.3 times in LIG-2 when compared with PIG-2 was observed. Approximately 2.2- and 2.5-fold increase in skin drug retention in LIG-1 and LIG-2, respectively, was determined. A double blind clinical study demonstrated an approximately 2.0- and 1.6-fold increase in average percentage improvement in healing of the lesions in patients suffering from HSV-1 and HSV-2 diseases, respectively, when treated with LIG-2 compared with PIG-2. However, complete removal of lesions was not observed. Local side effects such as itching, burning, inflammation in HSV-1 and HSV-2, and burning micturation in HSV-2 associated with the use of PIG-2 were reduced considerably with the use of LIG-2. The findings of this investigation establish the role of the derived equation and plotted contour plots in predicting the values of independent variables for preparation of IDU liposomes by the REV method. The study also demonstrated that IDU liposomal gels retain more drug when compared with plain liposomes at all temperatures for the period of three months, while maximum PDR was found at refrigeration temperature. The skin retention of IDU was enhanced due to its entrapment in the liposomal vesicles. The clinical study suggested the improvement of therapeutic efficacy of IDU entrapped in liposomes in treatment of HSV-1 and HSV-2 patients. PMID:15458233

  19. Delayed control of herpes simplex virus infection and impaired CD4(+) T-cell migration to the skin in mouse models of DOCK8 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Inge E A; Randall, Katrina L; Hollett, Natasha A; Di Law, Hsei; Miosge, Lisa A; Sontani, Yovina; Goodnow, Christopher C; Tscharke, David C

    2015-07-01

    DOCK8 deficiency in humans and mice leads to multiple defects in immune cell numbers and function. Patients with this immunodeficiency have a high morbidity and mortality, and are distinguished by chronic cutaneous viral infections, including those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). The underlying mechanism of the specific susceptibility to these chronic cutaneous viral infections is currently unknown, largely because the effect of DOCK8 deficiency has not been studied in suitable models. A better understanding of these mechanisms is required to underpin the development of more specific therapies. Here we show that DOCK8-deficient mice have poor control of primary cutaneous herpes simplex lesions and this is associated with increased virus loads. Furthermore, DOCK8-deficient mice showed a lack of CD4(+) T-cell infiltration into HSV-infected skin. PMID:25776845

  20. Herpes simplex virus-1 infection or Simian virus 40-mediated immortalization of corneal cells causes permanent translocation of NLRP3 to the nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-Long; Zhao, Ge; Zhu, Wei; Dong, Xiao-Meng; Liu, Ting; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Wen-Gang; Wang, Yi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate into the potential involvement of pyrin containing 3 gene (NLRP3), a member of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with cytosolic pattern recognition, in the host defense of corneas against viruses. METHODS The herpes viral keratitis model was utilized in BALB/c mice with inoculation of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1). Corneal tissues removed during therapy of patients with viral keratitis as well as a Simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40)-immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line were also examined. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect NLRP3 in these subjects, focusing on their distribution in tissue or cells. Western blot was used to measure the level of NLRP3 and another two related molecules in NLPR3 inflammasome, namely caspase-1 and IL-1?. RESULTS The NLRP3 activation induced by HSV-1 infection in corneas was accompanied with redistribution of NLRP3 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in both murine and human corneal epithelial cells. Furthermore, in the SV40-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells, NLRP3 was exclusively located in the nucleus, and treatment of the cells with high concentration of extracellular potassium (known as an inhibitor of NLRP3 activation) effectively drove NLRP3 back to the cytoplasm as reflected by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. CONCLUSION It is proposed that herpes virus infection activates and causes redistribution of NLRP3 to nuclei. Whether this NLRP3 translocation occurs with other viral infections and in other cell types merit further study. PMID:25709906

  1. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  2. Concomitant herpes-like virus infections in hatchery-reared larvae and nursery-cultured spat Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis.

    PubMed

    Renault, T; Le Deuff, R M; Chollet, B; Cochennec, N; Gérard, A

    2000-09-28

    Concomitant sporadic high mortalities were reported in France in May 1994 among batches of hatchery-reared larval Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas and European flat oysters Ostrea edulis in 2 hatcheries, and in June and July 1994 among batches of cultured spat of both species in a shellfish nursery. Histological observation showed the presence of cellular abnormalities in moribund animals. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of herpes-like virus particles in infected larvae and spat of both oyster species. This is the first description of a herpes-like virus infection in larval O. edulis. Viruses observed in diseased larvae and spat of both species are similar with respect to ultrastructure and morphogenesis. They were detected simultaneously in C. gigas and O. edulis larvae and spat, indicating possible interspecific transmission. Moreover, these viruses are associated with high mortality rates in both oyster species. An electron microscopic examination revealed hemocytes with condensed chromatin and extensive perinuclear fragmentation of chromatin. These data suggest that herpes-like viruses infecting oysters may induce apoptosis in oyster hemocytes. PMID:11104068

  3. Non-nucleosidic inhibition of Herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase: mechanistic insights into the anti-herpetic mode of action of herbal drug withaferin A

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 causes several infections in humans including cold sores and encephalitis. Previous antiviral studies on herpes viruses have focussed on developing nucleoside analogues that can inhibit viral polymerase and terminate the replicating viral DNA. However, these drugs bear an intrinsic non-specificity as they can also inhibit cellular polymerase apart from the viral one. The present study is an attempt to elucidate the action mechanism of naturally occurring withaferin A in inhibiting viral DNA polymerase, thus providing an evidence for its development as a novel anti-herpetic drug. Results Withaferin A was found to bind very similarly to that of the previously reported 4-oxo-DHQ inhibitor. Withaferin A was observed binding to the residues Gln 617, Gln 618, Asn 815 and Tyr 818, all of which are crucial to the proper functioning of the polymerase. A comparison of the conformation obtained from docking and the molecular dynamics simulations shows that substantial changes in the binding conformations have occurred. These results indicate that the initial receptor-ligand interaction observed after docking can be limited due to the receptor rigid docking algorithm and that the conformations and interactions observed after simulation runs are more energetically favoured. Conclusions We have performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies to elucidate the binding mechanism of prospective herbal drug withaferin A onto the structure of DNA polymerase of Herpes simplex virus. Our docking simulations results give high binding affinity of the ligand to the receptor. Long de novo MD simulations for 10 ns performed allowed us to evaluate the dynamic behaviour of the system studied and corroborate the docking results, as well as identify key residues in the enzyme-inhibitor interactions. The present MD simulations support the hypothesis that withaferin A is a potential ligand to target/inhibit DNA polymerase of the Herpes simplex virus. Results of these studies will also guide the design of selective inhibitors of DNA POL with high specificity and potent activity in order to strengthen the therapeutic arsenal available today against the dangerous biological warfare agent represented by Herpes Simplex Virus. PMID:22373101

  4. Acute Cardiovascular Events after Herpes Zoster: A Self-Controlled Case Series Analysis in Vaccinated and Unvaccinated Older Residents of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Minassian, Caroline; Thomas, Sara L.; Smeeth, Liam; Douglas, Ian; Brauer, Ruth; Langan, Sinéad M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Herpes zoster is common and can have serious consequences. Additionally, emerging data suggest an increased risk of acute cardiovascular events following herpes zoster. However, to our knowledge, existing association studies compare outcomes between individuals and are therefore vulnerable to between-person confounding. In this study, we used a within-person study design to quantify any short-term increased risk of acute cardiovascular events (stroke and myocardial infarction [MI]) after zoster and to assess whether zoster vaccination modifies this association. Methods and Findings The self-controlled case series method was used to estimate rates of stroke and acute MI in defined periods after herpes zoster compared to other time periods, within individuals. Participants were fully eligible Medicare beneficiaries aged ?65 y with a herpes zoster diagnosis and either an ischemic stroke (n = 42,954) or MI (n = 24,237) between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011. Age-adjusted incidence ratios (IRs) for stroke and MI during predefined periods up to 12 mo after zoster relative to unexposed time periods were calculated using conditional Poisson regression. We observed a marked increase in the rate of acute cardiovascular events in the first week after zoster diagnosis: a 2.4-fold increased ischemic stroke rate (IR 2.37, 95% CI 2.17–2.59) and a 1.7-fold increased MI rate (IR 1.68, 95% CI 1.47–1.92), followed by a gradual resolution over 6 mo. Zoster vaccination did not appear to modify the association with MI (interaction p-value = 0.44). We also found no evidence for a difference in the IR for ischemic stroke between vaccinated (IR 1.14, 95% CI 0.75–1.74) and unvaccinated (IR 1.78, 95% CI 1.68–1.88) individuals during the first 4 wk after zoster diagnosis (interaction p-value = 0.28). The relatively few vaccinated individuals limited the study’s power to assess the role of vaccination. Conclusions Stroke and MI rates are transiently increased after exposure to herpes zoster. We found no evidence for a role of zoster vaccination in these associations. These findings enhance our understanding of the temporality and magnitude of the association between zoster and acute cardiovascular events. PMID:26671338

  5. Identification of Three Redundant Segments Responsible for Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 To Fuse with ND10 Nuclear Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a key regulator in both lytic and latent infections. In lytic infection, an important early event is the colocalization of ICP0 to nuclear domain 10 (ND10), the discrete nuclear bodies that impose restrictions on viral expression. ICP0 contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase that degrades promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) and Sp100, two major components of ND10, and disperses ND10 to alleviate repression. We previously reported that the association between ICP0 and ND10 is a dynamic process that includes three steps: adhesion, fusion, and retention. ICP0 residues 245 to 474, defined as ND10 entry signal (ND10-ES), is a region required for the fusion step. Without ND10-ES, ICP0 adheres at the ND10 surface but fails to enter. In the present study, we focus on characterizing ND10-ES. Here we report the following. (i) Fusion of ICP0 with ND10 relies on specific sequences located within ND10-ES. Replacement of ND10-ES by the corresponding region from ORF61 of varicella-zoster virus did not rescue ND10 fusion. (ii) Three tandem ND10 fusion segments (ND10-FS1, ND10-FS2, and ND10-FS3), encompassing 200 amino acids within ND10-ES, redundantly facilitate fusion. Each of the three segments is sufficient to independently drive the fusion process, but none of the segments by themselves are necessary for ND10 fusion. Only when all three segments are deleted is fusion blocked. (iii) The SUMO interaction motif located within ND10-FS2 is not required for ND10 fusion but is required for the complete degradation of PML, suggesting that PML degradation and ND10 fusion are regulated by different molecular mechanisms. IMPORTANCE ND10 nuclear bodies are part of the cell-intrinsic antiviral defenses that restrict viral gene expression upon virus infection. As a countermeasure, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) localizes to ND10s, degrades the ND10 organizer, and disperses ND10 components in order to alleviate repression. We studied the ICP0-ND10 association to delineate elements important for this dynamic interaction and to understand its role in viral replication and host defense. In this work, we show that ICP0 contains three redundant segments to ensure an effective mergence of ICP0 with ND10 nuclear bodies. This is the first study to systematically investigate ICP0 elements that are important for ICP0-ND10 fusion. PMID:25631093

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Reactivates from Autonomic Ciliary Ganglia Independently from Sensory Trigeminal Ganglia To Cause Recurrent Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungseok; Ives, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 establish latency in sensory and autonomic neurons after ocular or genital infection, but their recurrence patterns differ. HSV-1 reactivates from latency to cause recurrent orofacial disease, and while HSV-1 also causes genital lesions, HSV-2 recurs more efficiently in the genital region and rarely causes ocular disease. The mechanisms regulating these anatomical preferences are unclear. To determine whether differences in latent infection and reactivation in autonomic ganglia contribute to differences in HSV-1 and HSV-2 anatomical preferences for recurrent disease, we compared HSV-1 and HSV-2 clinical disease, acute and latent viral loads, and viral gene expression in sensory trigeminal and autonomic superior cervical and ciliary ganglia in a guinea pig ocular infection model. HSV-2 produced more severe acute disease, correlating with higher viral DNA loads in sensory and autonomic ganglia, as well as higher levels of thymidine kinase expression, a marker of productive infection, in autonomic ganglia. HSV-1 reactivated in ciliary ganglia, independently from trigeminal ganglia, to cause more frequent recurrent symptoms, while HSV-2 replicated simultaneously in autonomic and sensory ganglia to cause more persistent disease. While both HSV-1 and HSV-2 expressed the latency-associated transcript (LAT) in the trigeminal and superior cervical ganglia, only HSV-1 expressed LAT in ciliary ganglia, suggesting that HSV-2 is not reactivation competent or does not fully establish latency in ciliary ganglia. Thus, differences in replication and viral gene expression in autonomic ganglia may contribute to differences in HSV-1 and HSV-2 acute and recurrent clinical disease. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 establish latent infections, from which the viruses reactivate to cause recurrent disease throughout the life of the host. However, the viruses exhibit different manifestations and frequencies of recurrent disease. HSV-1 and HSV-2 establish latency in both sensory and autonomic ganglia. Autonomic ganglia are more responsive than sensory ganglia to stimuli associated with recurrent disease in humans, such as stress and hormone fluctuations, suggesting that autonomic ganglia may play an important role in recurrent disease. We show that HSV-1 can reactivate from autonomic ganglia, independently from sensory ganglia, to cause recurrent ocular disease. We found no evidence that HSV-2 could reactivate from autonomic ganglia independently from sensory ganglia after ocular infection, but HSV-2 did replicate in both ganglia simultaneously to cause persistent disease. Thus, viral replication and reactivation in autonomic ganglia contribute to different clinical disease manifestations of HSV-1 and HSV-2 after ocular infection. PMID:26041294

  7. Impact of the MRN Complex on Adeno-Associated Virus Integration and Replication during Coinfection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Rachel; Jolinon, Nelly; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Berger, Gregory; Cimarelli, Andrea; Greco, Anna; Bertrand, Pascale; Odenthal, Margarete; Büning, Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a helper-dependent parvovirus that requires coinfection with adenovirus (AdV) or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) to replicate. In the absence of the helper virus, AAV can persist in an episomal or integrated form. Previous studies have analyzed the DNA damage response (DDR) induced upon AAV replication to understand how it controls AAV replication. In particular, it was shown that the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex, a major player of the DDR induced by double-stranded DNA breaks and stalled replication forks, could negatively regulate AdV and AAV replication during coinfection. In contrast, MRN favors HSV-1 replication and is recruited to AAV replication compartments that are induced in the presence of HSV-1. In this study, we examined the role of MRN during AAV replication induced by HSV-1. Our results indicated that knockdown of MRN significantly reduced AAV DNA replication after coinfection with wild-type (wt) HSV-1 or HSV-1 with the polymerase deleted. This effect was specific to wt AAV, since it did not occur with recombinant AAV vectors. Positive regulation of AAV replication by MRN was dependent on its DNA tethering activity but did not require its nuclease activities. Importantly, knockdown of MRN also negatively regulated AAV integration within the human AAVS1 site, both in the presence and in the absence of HSV-1. Altogether, this work identifies a new function of MRN during integration of the AAV genome and demonstrates that this DNA repair complex positively regulates AAV replication in the presence of HSV-1. IMPORTANCE Viral DNA genomes trigger a DNA damage response (DDR), which can be either detrimental or beneficial for virus replication. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a defective parvovirus that requires the help of an unrelated virus such as adenovirus (AdV) or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for productive replication. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cellular Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex, a sensor and regulator of the DDR, negatively regulates AAV replication during coinfection with AdV, which counteracts this effect by inactivating the complex. Here, we demonstrate that MRN positively regulates AAV replication during coinfection with HSV-1. Importantly, our study also indicates that MRN also favors integration of AAV genomes within the human AAVS1 site. Altogether, this work indicates that MRN differentially regulates AAV replication depending on the helper virus which is present and identifies a new function of this DNA repair complex during AAV integration. PMID:25903339

  8. The use, safety, and effectiveness of herpes zoster vaccination in individuals with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases: a longitudinal observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Zostavax, a live attenuated vaccine, has been approved in the United States for use in older individuals to reduce the risk and severity of herpes zoster (HZ), also known as shingles. The vaccine is contraindicated in individuals taking anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) therapies or other biologics commonly used to treat autoimmune diseases because of the safety concern that zoster vaccine may be associated with a short-term HZ risk. The objective of the study was to examine the use, safety (short-term HZ risk after vaccination), and effectiveness of zoster vaccine in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and/or inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods We conducted a cohort study of patients aged 50 years and older with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and/or inflammatory bowel diseases by using administrative claims data from a nationwide health plan from January 1, 2005, to August 31, 2009. We examined the extent to which zoster vaccine was used; assessed factors associated with vaccine use (Cox proportional hazards regression); and compared the incidence rates of herpes zoster (HZ) between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients. Results Among 44,115 patients with the autoimmune diseases, 551 (1.2%) received zoster vaccine, and 761 developed HZ. Zoster vaccine use increased continuously after approval in 2006. Younger and healthier patients, those who had an HZ infection within the past 6 months, and those who were not using anti-TNF therapies were more likely to receive the vaccine. Approximately 6% of vaccinated patients were using anti-TNF therapies at the time of vaccination. The incidence rates of HZ were similar in vaccinated and unvaccinated patients (standardized incidence ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.29 to 3.43). Conclusions Use of the zoster vaccine was uncommon among older patients with autoimmune diseases, including those not exposed to immunosuppressive medications. The short-term risk of HZ did not appear to be increased in vaccinated patients, even among those using immunosuppressive therapies (for example, biologics) at the time of vaccination. However, our study was limited by the small number of vaccinated patients, and further evidence is needed to confirm the vaccine's safety and efficacy in this population. PMID:22024532

  9. Resistance of herpes simplex viruses to acyclovir: an update from a ten-year survey in France.

    PubMed

    Frobert, Emilie; Burrel, Sonia; Ducastelle-Lepretre, Sophie; Billaud, Geneviève; Ader, Florence; Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Nave, Viviane; Boutolleau, David; Michallet, Mauricette; Lina, Bruno; Morfin, Florence

    2014-11-01

    The widespread use of acyclovir (ACV) and the increasing number of immunocompromised patients have raised concern about an increase in ACV-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV). ACV resistance has traditionally been a major concern for immunocompromised patients with a frequency reported between 2.5% and 10%. The aim of this study was to reassess the status of HSV resistance to ACV in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients over a ten year period, between 2002 and 2011. This was done by retrospectively following 1425 patients. In immunocompetent patients, prevalence of resistance did not exceed 0.5% during the study period; whereas in immunocompromised patients, a significant increase was observed, rising from 3.8% between 2002 and 2006 (7/182 patients) to 15.7% between 2007 and 2011 (28/178) (p=0.0001). This sharp rise in resistance may largely be represented by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients, in which the prevalence of ACV resistance rose similarly from 14.3% (4/28) between 2002 and 2006 to 46.5% (26/56) between 2007 and 2011 (p=0.005). No increase in ACV resistance was detected in association with other types of immune deficiencies. Genotypic characterization of HSV UL23 thymidine kinase and UL30 DNA polymerase genes revealed 11 and 7 previously unreported substitutions, respectively. These substitutions may be related to potential polymorphisms, drug resistance, or other mutations of unclear significance. PMID:25218782

  10. Toxic effects of bis(thiosemicarbazone) compounds and its palladium(II) complexes on herpes simplex virus growth.

    PubMed

    Genova, Petia; Varadinova, Tatiana; Matesanz, Ana I; Marinova, Desislava; Souza, Pilar

    2004-06-01

    Here, we present data on the activity of benzyl bis(thiosemicarbazone); 3,5-diacyl-1,2,4-triazole bis(4-methylthiosemicarbazone) and their Pd(II) complexes against the replication of wild type and of acyclovir (ACV)-resistant, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV 1) and type 2 (HSV 2) strains. The data were compared to those under the action of acyclovir. The testing of cytotoxic activity suggests that these compounds may be endowed with important antiviral properties. It is interesting to note that the Pd(II)-benzyl bis(thiosemicarbazone) complex, 2, exhibits a significant activity against acyclovir-resistant viruses R-100 (HSV 1) and PU (HSV 2) with an in vitro selectivity index (SI) of 8.0 vs. 0.01 for acyclovir. This complex also negatively influenced the expression of key structural HSV 1 proteins (VP23, gH and gG/gD), thus suppressing simultaneously virus entry, transactivation of virus genome, capsid assembly, and cell-to-cell spread of infectious HSV progeny. PMID:15163546

  11. Cervical Infection with Herpes simplex Virus, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among Symptomatic Women, Dubai, UAE: A Molecular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Mohammad Amin; Azizi, Saeed; Payombarnia, Hamid; Vahdani, Ali; Namayandeh, Mandana; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2014-01-01

    Tragically, genital tract infections are still a major public health problem in many regions. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of cervical infection with Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) among married women referring to Iranian Hospital, Dubai, UAE. In a retrospective cross-sectional survey, 201 female patients aged 16–80 years who referred to the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of Iranian Hospital, Dubai, UAE, in 2010 were enrolled. The patients were categorized into three age groups: 15–30 (group I), 31–40 (group II), and ?41 years old (group III). A cervical swab sample was collected from each woman and the prevalence of cervical infection with HSV, CT, and NG was determined by PCR method. HSV, CT, and NG were detected in 6.5%, 10.4%, and 5.5% of swab samples, respectively. Regarding age, a significant difference was noticed for prevalence of NG and HSV between groups I and III. Because of public health importance of sexual transmitted diseases (STDs), their long-lasting impact on quality of life, and their economic burden, preventing measures and education of women seem necessary. PMID:24982675

  12. Impact of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia on patients’ quality of life: a patient-reported outcomes survey

    PubMed Central

    Edte, Alexander; Schmitt, Sonja; Lukas, Kati

    2010-01-01

    Background The impact of herpes zoster (HZ) and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) on patients’ quality of life (QoL) is currently poorly documented. Subjects and methods Telephone interviews in Germany identified patients ?50 years old with painful HZ diagnosed during the previous 5 years. Bespoke questions evaluated previous HZ episodes. Results Of 11,009 respondents, 280 met the screening criteria, and 32 (11%) developed PHN. PHN was associated with significantly worse outcomes than HZ (all P?

  13. In vitro evaluation of anti-herpes simplex-1 activity of three standardized medicinal plants from Lamiaceae

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mehdi; Sharififar, Fariba; Arabzadeh, Ali Mohammad; Mehni, Firoozeh; Mirtadzadini, Manosur; Iranmanesh, Zahra; Nikpour, Najmeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a phenolic acid with antioxidant and anti-viral effects. We have studied anti-herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) effect of three medicinal plants from Lamiaceae family which have been standardized on the basis of RA content. Materials and Methods: Methanolic extract of Teucrium polium, Ziziphora clinopoides, and Salvia rhytidea was prepared by maceration method and RA content of the plants was determined using a spectrophotometric method. Maximum nontoxic concentration (MNTC) of the extracts was determined using neutral red method. Serial dilutions of extracts up to MNTC were examined on Vero cells for anti-HSV-1 effect by plaque assay in comparison to acyclovir as a positive control. Results: Among the tested extracts, T. polium contained the highest percentage of RA (1.8%w/w) and exhibited the least toxicity (MNTC = 1000 ?g/ml). The greatest anti-HSV-1 was shown by T. polium and Z. clinopoides extracts which exhibited both time and concentration-dependent plaque inhibition. Conclusion: Considering the low toxicity and significant anti-viral effect of T. polium extract, this plant would prove valuable as an active anti-viral drug. PMID:25737608

  14. Anti-herpes simplex virus activity of n-docosanol correlates with intracellular metabolic conversion of the drug.

    PubMed

    Pope, L E; Marcelletti, J F; Katz, L R; Katz, D H

    1996-10-01

    The 22-carbon fatty alcohol, n-docosanol, exhibits in vitro antiviral activity against several lipid-enveloped viruses including herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 by a mechanism that interferes with normal viral entry into target cells. We previously reported that mammalian cells incorporate significant quantities of radiolabeled n-docosanol. Herein, we report that cells extensively metabolize the internalized fatty alcohol. This is evidenced by incorporation of up to 60% of cell-associated radiolabel into phospholipids that copurify with phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Analysis by chemical (Vitride) reduction suggests that a significant portion of n-docosanol is oxidized to n-docosanoic acid and then incorporated as an acyl group on polar lipids. A measurable amount of radiolabel, however, is resistant to Vitride reduction, consistent with incorporation of n-docosanol into ether lipids. The rate and extent of metabolic conversion of n-docosanol vary with the cell type and surfactant used to suspend the compound. Furthermore, the anti-HSV activity of n-docosanol is quantitatively proportional to the amount of metabolism observed. These findings suggest that the anti-HSV activity of n-docosanol involves cellular uptake and metabolism of the drug. PMID:8906594

  15. Herpes simplex virus-mediated expression of the axonal protein tau in human model neurons (NT2-N cells).

    PubMed

    Fath, T; Eidenmüller, J; Maas, T; Brandt, R

    2000-01-15

    The establishment of axonal-somatodendritic polarity is an important event during neuronal development. The analysis of the underlying molecular events requires experimental models that display characteristic steps in the development of polarity and that are accessible for experimental manipulations. Here we show that human model neurons (NT2-N cells) can be efficiently infected with an amplicon-based herpes simplex virus (HSV) system that expresses the axonal microtubule-associated protein tau. We demonstrate that the neurons express a high level of exogenous tau, which persists for several days, thus allowing us to analyze the morphological effects of the expressed protein. The intracellular interactions of tau and the effects on the microtubule structure of infected neurons, which were processed for immunocytochemistry, were determined using laser scanning microscopy (LSM). Exogenous tau expression does not result in an increased axon growth of the neurons but promotes neuronal microtubule assembly as indicated by an increased amount of total microtubule polymer as well as a labile, detyrosinated microtubule subpopulation. In contrast, tau expression does not induce a significant microtubule stabilization as judged from the quantitation of acetylated microtubule staining 24 hours after infection. The data demonstrate that HSV-mediated expression of proteins in human model neurons provides a useful system for analysis of the effect of neuronal proteins on the morphology and cytoskeletal organization of terminally differentiated polar neurons. In addition, it suggests a role for tau as a factor which locally promotes tubulin polymerization while the dynamics of axonal microtubules are preserved. PMID:10649509

  16. [Modelling of viral-chemical carcinogenesis in chronic infection in mice caused by the herpes simplex type 2 virus].

    PubMed

    Kitsak, V Ia; Mo?siadi, S A; Bocharov, A F

    1979-01-01

    The influence of chronic herpetic infection of white mice caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) on the blastomogenic effect of a polycyclic hydro-carbon, 20-methylcholanthrene (20-MCA), was studied. Solid tumors developed in 20-MCA-treated mice on the side of the carcinogen administration within 81--89 days. The simultaneous administration of 70 intracerebral LD50 of HSV-2 subcutaneously into a hind leg pad and 0.1 mg 20-MCA subcutaneously into the inguinal area was accompanied by a synergistic action of the two factors. The number of tumors in the animals treated with HSV-2 in combination with 20-MCA at all intervals of observation was 1.5--2.5 times greater than in mice treated with 20-MCA alone. Mice weighing 10--12 g were more sensitive to the synergistic effect of HSV-2 and 20-MCA, whereas animals weighing 25--30 g were more sensitive to the carcinogenic effect of 20-MCA alone. No tumors developed in mice infected with HSV-2 alone by 167 days (the observation period). Mice weighing 10--12 g were found to be more sensitive to the fatal effect of HSV-2 and HSV-2 plus 20-MCA, particularly in the first 2--3 weeks after inoculation. Six months after inoculation with HSV-2 the virus was isolated from posterior root ganglia of the sacral and lumbar spinal cord by cocultivation of the ganglia with human embryo skin-muscle tissue cells. PMID:462927

  17. A role for heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase isoform 2 in herpes simplex virus type 1 entry and spread

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, Christopher D.; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Oh, Myung-Jin; Shukla, Deepak . E-mail: dshukla@uic.edu

    2006-03-15

    Heparan sulfate (HS) 3-O-sulfotransferase isoform-2 (3-OST-2), which belongs to a family of enzymes capable of generating herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) entry and spread receptors, is predominantly expressed in human brain. Despite its unique expression pattern, the ability of 3-OST-2 to mediate HSV-1 entry and cell-to-cell fusion is not known. Our results demonstrate that expression of 3-OST-2 can render Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells susceptible to entry of wild-type and mutant strains of HSV-1. Evidence for generation of gD receptors by 3-OST-2 were suggested by gD-mediated interference assay and the ability of 3-OST-2-expressing CHO-K1 cells to preferentially bind HSV-1 gD, which could be reversed by prior treatment of cells with HS lyases (heparinases II/III). In addition, 3-OST-2-expressing CHO-K1 cells acquired the ability to fuse with cells-expressing HSV-1 glycoproteins, a phenomenon that mimics a way of viral spread in vivo. Demonstrating specificity, the cell fusion was inhibited by soluble 3-O-sulfated forms of HS, but not unmodified HS. Taken together, our results raise the possibility of a role of 3-OST-2 in the spread of HSV-1 infection in the brain.

  18. Effect of smokeless tobacco and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens on survival of ultraviolet light-inactivated herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dokko, H.; Min, P.S.; Cherrick, H.M.; Park, N.H. )

    1991-04-01

    Low doses of ultraviolet (UV) light, x-rays, photodynamic treatment, or aflatoxins increase the survival of UV-irradiated virus in cells. This effect is postulated to occur by enhancement of the error-prone cellular repair function, which could also be associated with oncogenic cell transformation. The present study was designed to investigate whether treatment of green monkey kidney cells with water extract of snuff (snuff extract), benzo(a)pyrene, nicotine, or tobacco-specific N'-nitrosamines would result in enhanced survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus (HSV). Exposure of the cells with snuff extract, benzo(a)pyrene, N'-nitrosonornicotine, or 4-(N-methyl-N'-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone resulted in an enhancement of survival of UV-irradiated HSV type 1 compared with the control whereas exposure of the cells with nicotine did not. These data indicate that the water-extractable component of snuff and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens increase the cellular repair mechanism and provides for increased survival of UV-irradiated HSV.

  19. Distribution of Health Effects and Cost-effectiveness of Varicella Vaccination are Shaped by the Impact on Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    van Lier, Alies; Lugnér, Anna; Opstelten, Wim; Jochemsen, Petra; Wallinga, Jacco; Schellevis, François; Sanders, Elisabeth; de Melker, Hester; van Boven, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the etiological agent of varicella and herpes zoster (HZ). It has been hypothesised that immune boosting of latently infected persons by contact with varicella reduces the probability of HZ. If true, universal varicella vaccination may increase HZ incidence due to reduced VZV circulation. To inform decision-making, we conduct cost-effectiveness analyses of varicella vaccination, including effects on HZ. Methods Effects of varicella vaccination are simulated with a dynamic transmission model, parameterised with Dutch VZV seroprevalence and HZ incidence data, and linked to an economic model. We consider vaccination scenarios that differ by whether or not they include immune boosting, and reactivation of vaccine virus. Results Varicella incidence decreases after introduction of vaccination, while HZ incidence may increase or decrease depending on whether or not immune boosting is present. Without immune boosting, vaccination is expected to be cost-effective or even cost-saving. With immune boosting, vaccination at 95% coverage is not expected to be cost-effective, and may even cause net health losses. Conclusions Cost-effectiveness of varicella vaccination depends strongly on the impact on HZ and the economic time horizon. Our findings reveal ethical dilemmas as varicella vaccination may result in unequal distribution of health effects between generations. PMID:26629544

  20. The herpes simplex virus receptor nectin-1 is down-regulated after trans-interaction with glycoprotein D

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, Katie M.; Milne, Richard S.B.; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Krummenacher, Claude

    2008-03-30

    During herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry, membrane fusion occurs either on the cell surface or after virus endocytosis. In both cases, binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to a receptor such as nectin-1 or HVEM is required. In this study, we co-cultured cells expressing gD with nectin-1 expressing cells to investigate the effects of gD on nectin-1 at cell contacts. After overnight co-cultures with gD expressing cells, there was a down-regulation of nectin-1 in B78H1-C10, SY5Y, A431 and HeLa cells, which HSV enters by endocytosis. In contrast, on Vero cells, which HSV enters at the plasma membrane, nectin-1 was not down-regulated. Further analysis of B78H1-derived cells showed that nectin-1 down-regulation corresponds to the ability of gD to bind nectin-1 and is achieved by internalization and low-pH-dependent degradation of nectin-1. Moreover, gD is necessary for virion internalization in B78H1 cells expressing nectin-1. These data suggest that the determinants of gD-mediated internalization of nectin-1 may direct HSV to an endocytic pathway during entry.

  1. Herpes simplex encephalitis as a complication of whole-brain radiotherapy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sermer, David J; Woodley, Jamie L; Thomas, Christian A; Hedlund, Jacquelyn A

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old male recently diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma presented with altered mental status approximately 1 week after the completion of 14 fractions of whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for brain metastases. On admission, he was somnolent but oriented and without focal neurological deficits. Brain imaging revealed marked regression of his brain metastases. Laboratory values were only significant for hyponatremia with urine hyperosmolality consistent with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. The patient developed seizures 3 days after admission, at which time cerebrospinal fluid was significant for positive herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 PCR but with a negative cell count, and acyclovir was started for HSV encephalitis (HSE). After 3 weeks of acyclovir 10 mg/dl i.v. 3 times per day, he had significant neurological recovery and was discharged. Although HSE is a relatively rare condition, it is the most common cause of sporadic encephalitis in Western countries. Since the pathogenesis is believed to be due to the reactivation of latent HSV, it is possible that patients who are immunosuppressed are at higher risk for HSE. In addition, patients who are immunosuppressed or immunocompromised often present atypically, which may delay time to diagnosis and treatment, thus significantly worsening prognosis. This case report intends to raise awareness of this severe condition in the context of patients who have received WBRT and immunosuppressive therapy. In addition, important considerations of diagnosis and treatment of HSE in this patient population are discussed. PMID:25722668

  2. Baylisascaris procyonis and Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Coinfection Presenting as Ocular Larva Migrans with Granuloma Formation in a Child.

    PubMed

    Liu, Grace; Fennelly, Glenn; Kazacos, Kevin R; Grose, Charles; Dobroszycki, Joanna; Saffra, Norman; Coyle, Christina M; Weiss, Louis M; Szlechter, Moshe M; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2015-09-01

    Ocular Baylisascaris procyonis infection results from ingestion of infective eggs of B. procyonis, the raccoon ascarid. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection of the retina is the result of either primary infection or reactivated disease. Herein, we report a case of a 12-year-old female resident of the Bronx in New York City, who presented with pan-uveitis and vision loss. Initial evaluation for etiologic causes was nondiagnostic. Serology for anti-Baylisascaris procyonis antibodies in serum and vitreous fluid were both positive. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of vitreous fluid was positive for HSV-2. Treatment with vitrectomy, albendazole, and acyclovir resulted in mild improvement of visual acuity. The atypical presentation of B. procyonis in this case, as ocular larva migrans with a peripheral granuloma and retinal detachment, underscores the importance of maintaining a high degree of suspicion for this pathogen even in non-diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN) patients in urban areas. This case further illustrates that it is possible to have coexisting infections in cases of posterior uveitis. PMID:26123955

  3. Successful Treatment of Corticosteroid with Antiviral Therapy for a Neonatal Liver Failure with Disseminated Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Maeba, Shinji; Hasegawa, Shunji; Shimomura, Maiko; Ichimura, Takuya; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Motoyama, Masashi; Fukunaga, Shinnosuke; Ito, Yoshinori; Ichiyama, Takashi; Ohga, Shouichi

    2015-10-01

    Background?Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection carries one of the poorest outcomes of neonatal liver failure (NLF). Neonates with disseminated HSV infection can develop hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and occasionally need orthotopic liver transplantation. Early interventions may be critical for the cure of NLF. Case Report?We describe herewith a 6-day-old neonate with fulminant hepatic failure due to disseminated HSV-1 infection, who successfully responded to high-dose corticosteroid therapy 72 hours after the onset of disease. Preceding acyclovir, gamma globulin, and exchange blood transfusion therapies failed to control the disease. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy led to a drastic improvement of liver function and cytokine storms, and prevented the disease progression to HLH. Sustained levels of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid HSV DNA declined after prolonged acyclovir therapy. Bilateral lesions of the periventricular white matter areas, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, disappeared at 3 months of age. The infant showed normal growth and development at 4 years of age. Conclusion?Early anti-hypercytokinemia therapy using corticosteroid, and prolonged antiviral therapy might only provide the transplantation-free cure of NLF with HSV dissemination. PMID:26495160

  4. Chitosan and Kappa-Carrageenan Vaginal Acyclovir Formulations for Prevention of Genital Herpes. In Vitro and Ex Vivo Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, María-Pilar; Martín-Illana, Araceli; Ruiz-Caro, Roberto; Bermejo, Paulina; Abad, María-José; Carro, Rubén; Bedoya, Luis-Miguel; Tamayo, Aitana; Rubio, Juan; Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; Otero-Espinar, Francisco; Veiga, María-Dolores

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal formulations for the prevention of sexually transmitted infections are currently gaining importance in drug development. Polysaccharides, such as chitosan and carrageenan, which have good binding capacity with mucosal tissues, are now included in vaginal delivery systems. Marine polymer-based vaginal mucoadhesive solid formulations have been developed for the controlled release of acyclovir, which may prevent the sexual transmission of the herpes simplex virus. Drug release studies were carried out in two media: simulated vaginal fluid and simulated vaginal fluid/simulated seminal fluid mixture. The bioadhesive capacity and permanence time of the bioadhesion, the prepared compacts, and compacted granules were determined ex vivo using bovine vaginal mucosa as substrate. Swelling processes were quantified to confirm the release data. Biocompatibility was evaluated through in vitro cellular toxicity assays, and the results showed that acyclovir and the rest of the materials had no cytotoxicity at the maximum concentration tested. The mixture of hydroxyl-propyl-methyl-cellulose with chitosan- or kappa-carrageenan-originated mucoadhesive systems that presented a complete and sustained release of acyclovir for a period of 8-9 days in both media. Swelling data revealed the formation of optimal mixed chitosan/hydroxyl-propyl-methyl-cellulose gels which could be appropriated for the prevention of sexual transmission of HSV. PMID:26393621

  5. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to efficient export of herpes simplex virus 1 mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Paunetto, Laurimar; Li Ling; Hernandez, Felicia P.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2010-06-05

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) mRNAs are exported to the cytoplasm through the export receptor TAP/NFX1. HSV-1 multifunctional protein ICP27 interacts with TAP/NXF1, binds viral RNAs, and is required for efficient viral RNA export. In ICP27 mutant infections, viral RNA export is reduced but not ablated, indicating that other export adaptors can aid in viral RNA export. Export adaptor protein Aly/REF is recruited to viral replication compartments, however, Aly/REF knockdown has little effect on viral RNA export. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 interact with TAP/NXF1 and mediate export of some cellular RNAs. We report that siRNA knockdown of SRp20 or 9G8 resulted in about a 10 fold decrease in virus yields and in nuclear accumulation of poly(A+) RNA. In infected cells depleted of SRp20, newly transcribed Bromouridine-labeled RNA also accumulated in the nucleus. We conclude that SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to HSV-1 RNA export.

  6. Entry Pathways of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 into Human Keratinocytes Are Dynamin- and Cholesterol-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mei-Ju; Rixon, Frazer J.; Knebel-Mörsdorf, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can enter cells via endocytic pathways or direct fusion at the plasma membrane depending on the cell line and receptor(s). Most studies into virus entry have used cultured fibroblasts but since keratinocytes represent the primary entry site for HSV-1 infection in its human host, we initiated studies to characterize the entry pathway of HSV-1 into human keratinocytes. Electron microscopy studies visualized free capsids in the cytoplasm and enveloped virus particles in vesicles suggesting viral uptake both by direct fusion at the plasma membrane and by endocytic vesicles. The ratio of the two entry modes differed in primary human keratinocytes and in the keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Inhibitor studies further support a role for endocytosis during HSV-1 entry. Infection was inhibited by the cholesterol-sequestering drug methyl-?-cyclodextrin, which demonstrates the requirement for host cholesterol during virus entry. Since the dynamin-specific inhibitor dynasore and overexpression of a dominant-negative dynamin mutant blocked infection, we conclude that the entry pathways into keratinocytes are dynamin-mediated. Electron microscopy studies confirmed that virus uptake is completely blocked when the GTPase activity of dynamin is inhibited. Ex vivo infection of murine epidermis that was treated with dynasore further supports the essential role of dynamin during entry into the epithelium. Thus, we conclude that HSV-1 can enter human keratinocytes by alternative entry pathways that require dynamin and host cholesterol. PMID:22022400

  7. Primary Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Type I in Preterm Prelabour Rupture of Membranes at 30 Weeks' Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Anna; Grivell, Rosalie

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the neonate is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend caesarean in third-trimester maternal primary genital HSV outbreaks to prevent transmission from mother to fetus. In the premature fetus, however, expectant management is often necessary to reduce morbidity of prematurity. The benefit of performing caesarean after 6?hrs of rupture of membranes (ROM) to reduce maternal-fetal transmission is unclear. Case. A female patient with primary genital HSV type 1 outbreak coinciding with preterm, prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) at 30 + 3 weeks' gestation. An immediate caesarean section was not performed after multidisciplinary team discussion due to the benefits of glucocorticoids on immune complications of prematurity. The patient had expectant management for 5 days with intravenous (IV) aciclovir and then delivered an infant vaginally with disseminated neonatal HSV. Conclusion. We address the rare presentation of primary HSV infection associated with PPROM and the dilemma of how to manage these patients given the limited literature. We discuss the role of intrauterine compartment monitoring with amniocentesis, the mode of delivery when ROM has occurred for 120 hours, expectant management to reduce prematurity, and the effectiveness of aciclovir to reduce viral shedding in the prevention of neonatal HSV. PMID:26649212

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Genital Tract Shedding Is Not Predictable over Months or Years in Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Dhankani, Varsha; Kutz, J. Nathan; Schiffer, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) is a chronic reactivating infection that leads to recurrent shedding episodes in the genital tract. A minority of episodes are prolonged, and associated with development of painful ulcers. However, currently, available tools poorly predict viral trajectories and timing of reactivations in infected individuals. We employed principal components analysis (PCA) and singular value decomposition (SVD) to interpret HSV-2 genital tract shedding time series data, as well as simulation output from a stochastic spatial mathematical model. Empirical and model-derived, time-series data gathered over >30 days consists of multiple complex episodes that could not be reduced to a manageable number of descriptive features with PCA and SVD. However, single HSV-2 shedding episodes, even those with prolonged duration and complex morphologies consisting of multiple erratic peaks, were consistently described using a maximum of four dominant features. Modeled and clinical episodes had equivalent distributions of dominant features, implying similar dynamics in real and simulated episodes. We applied linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to simulation output and identified that local immune cell density at the viral reactivation site had a predictive effect on episode duration, though longer term shedding suggested chaotic dynamics and could not be predicted based on spatial patterns of immune cell density. These findings suggest that HSV-2 shedding patterns within an individual are impossible to predict over weeks or months, and that even highly complex single HSV-2 episodes can only be partially predicted based on spatial distribution of immune cell density. PMID:25375183

  9. Reactivation of type 1 herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus in an immunosuppressed patient with acute peripheral facial weakness.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jean; Cohrs, Randall J; Nagel, Maria A; Mahalingam, Ravi; Schmid, D Scott; Choe, Alexander; Gilden, Don

    2012-02-15

    We describe a 26-year-old man treated with azathioprine for myasthenia gravis who developed acute left-sided peripheral facial weakness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed enhancement in the left geniculate ganglion and in the intracanalicular and tympanic segments of the facial nerve. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum revealed intrathecal synthesis of anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) IgG antibody. Although previous analyses of saliva, blood mononuclear cells, serum antibodies, middle ear fluid, and auricular and geniculate zone skin scrapings have shown that a small but definite proportion of patients with idiopathic peripheral facial palsy ("Bell's palsy") have the Ramsay Hunt syndrome zoster sine herpete (RHS ZSH), this is the first confirmation of RHS ZSH by intrathecal synthesis of anti-VZV IgG antibody. In addition, herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 DNA was found in saliva of the patient on 3 consecutive days. Simultaneous reactivation of two alphaherpesviruses (HSV-1 and VZV) in our immunosuppressed patient underscores the need to consider opportunistic infection as a cause of facial weakness. PMID:21924743

  10. A Case of Almost Painless Herpes Zoster Presenting with Symptoms of Cystitis, Penile Numbness, and Acute Vestibular Failure

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sardar, Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Herpes zoster (shingles) is an acute, painful, vesicular, and cutaneous eruption caused by varicella zoster virus, the same virus which causes chicken pox. It is due to the reactivation of the virus which remains dormant in sensory ganglions following chicken pox. It is usually confined to a single dermatome but may involve 2-3 dermatomes. Typically, it is a unilateral lesion which can affect both cranial and peripheral nerves. It is usually a self-limiting disease; however, it may cause significant morbidity especially in the elderly. It is more common in older people and individuals with immunocompromised conditions. Antiviral drugs can shorten the duration and the severity of the illness and need to be started as soon as possible after the appearance of the rash. Gabapentin and tricyclic antidepressant are effective in postherpetic neuralgia. Vaccine can reduce the risk of infection and its associated pain. Typically, it occurs once in a lifetime, but some individuals may have more than one episode. PMID:24251046

  11. Reactivation of type 1 herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus in an immunosuppressed patient with acute peripheral facial weakness

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jean; Cohrs, Randall J.; Nagel, Maria A.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Schmid, D. Scott; Choe, Alexander; Gilden, Don

    2011-01-01

    We describe a 26-year-old man treated with azathioprine for myasthenia gravis who developed acute left-sided peripheral facial weakness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed enhancement in the left geniculate ganglion and in the intracanalicular and tympanic segments of the facial nerve. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum revealed intrathecal synthesis of anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) IgG antibody. Although previous analyses of saliva, blood mononuclear cells, serum antibodies, middle ear fluid, and auricular and geniculate zone skin scrapings have shown that a small but definite proportion of patients with idiopathic peripheral facial palsy (“Bell's palsy”) have the Ramsay Hunt syndrome zoster sine herpete (RHS ZSH), this is the first confirmation of RHS ZSH by intrathecal synthesis of anti-VZV IgG antibody. In addition, herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 DNA was found in saliva of the patient on 3 consecutive days. Simultaneous reactivation of two alphaherpesviruses (HSV-1 and VZV) in our immunosuppressed patient underscores the need to consider opportunistic infection as a cause of facial weakness. PMID:21924743

  12. Interactions between herpesvirus entry mediator (TNFRSF14) and latency-associated transcript during herpes simplex virus 1 latency.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sariah J; Rhode-Kurnow, Antje; Mott, Kevin R; Jiang, Xianzhi; Carpenter, Dale; Rodriguez-Barbosa, J Ignacio; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L; Ware, Carl F; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2014-02-01

    Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) is one of several cell surface proteins herpes simplex virus (HSV) uses for attachment/entry. HVEM regulates cellular immune responses and can also increase cell survival. Interestingly, latency-associated transcript (LAT), the only viral gene consistently expressed during neuronal latency, enhances latency and reactivation by promoting cell survival and by helping the virus evade the host immune response. However, the mechanisms of these LAT activities are not well understood. We show here for the first time that one mechanism by which LAT enhances latency and reactivation appears to be by upregulating HVEM expression. HSV-1 latency/reactivation was significantly reduced in Hvem(-/-) mice, indicating that HVEM plays a significant role in HSV-1 latency/reactivation. Furthermore, LAT upregulated HVEM expression during latency in vivo and also when expressed in vitro in the absence of other viral factors. This study suggests a mechanism whereby LAT upregulates HVEM expression potentially through binding of two LAT small noncoding RNAs to the HVEM promoter and that the increased HVEM then leads to downregulation of immune responses in the latent microenvironment and increased survival of latently infected cells. Thus, one of the mechanisms by which LAT enhances latency/reactivation appears to be through increasing expression of HVEM. PMID:24307582

  13. Diagnosis of herpes simplex virus infection in a clinical setting by a direct antigen detection enzyme immunoassay kit.

    PubMed Central

    Dascal, A; Chan-Thim, J; Morahan, M; Portnoy, J; Mendelson, J

    1989-01-01

    A commercial 4-h direct herpes simplex virus (HSV) antigen detection enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit (Du Pont Herpchek) was evaluated by using 273 clinical specimens obtained in a hospital-based infectious disease practice. The EIA was compared with a standard culture method in which WI38 cells were inoculated within 20 min of sample collection. Cultures were observed for 2 weeks, and positive findings were confirmed by fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody (FA) staining. The values for the overall HSV detection rate were 40.7% by the standard culture method and 41.4% by EIA. In eight cases, the EIA was positive, while the culture method was negative; however, clinical data and confirmatory blocking EIA suggested that a true HSV infection was present. For six FA-confirmed, culture-positive samples, the direct EIA was negative; however, an EIA performed on the supernatants of these cultures was positive, suggesting that the failure of the EIA to detect these samples was not due to lack of strain specificity of the test. After confirmatory tests of standard culture and EIA discrepant results, the overall sensitivity of the test was 95.0% (113 of 119) and the specificity was 100% (154 of 154). PMID:2542362

  14. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that interferons-? and -? Interact in a multiplicative manner to disrupt herpes simplex virus replication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, William P.; Halford, Keith J.; Pierce, Amy T.

    2005-01-01

    Several studies suggest that the innate interferons (IFNs), IFN-? and IFN-?, can act in concert with IFN-?to synergistically inhibit the replication of cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The significance of this observation is not yet agreed upon in large part because the nature and magnitude of the interaction between IFN-?/? and IFN-? is not well defined. In the current study, we resolve this issue by demonstrating three points. First, the hyperbolic tangent function, tanh (x  ), can be used to describe the individual effects of IFN-? or IFN-? on HSV-1 replication over a 320,000-fold range of IFN concentration. Second, pharmacological methods prove that IFN-? and IFN-? interact in a greater-than-additive manner to inhibit HSV-1 replication. Finally, the potency with which combinations of IFN-? and IFN-? inhibit HSV-1 replication is accurately predicted by multiplying the individual inhibitory effects of each cytokine. Thus, IFN-? and IFN-? interact in a multiplicative manner. We infer that a primary antiviral function of IFN-? lies in its capacity to multiply the potency with which IFN-?/? restricts HSV-1 replication in vivo. This hypothesis has important ramifications for understanding how T lymphocyte-secreted cytokines such as IFN-? can force herpesviruses into a latent state without destroying the neurons or leukocytes that continue to harbor these viral infections for the lifetime of the host.

  15. Divergent molecular pathways of productive and latent infection with a virulent strain of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Speck, P G; Simmons, A

    1991-01-01

    Mutants of herpes simplex virus (HSV) have been used to show that a variety of key genes associated with initiation of lytic infection or replication of viral DNA are not essential for establishment of latency. These observations are extended in the present study, in which a virulent strain of HSV type 1 that is not compromised in its ability to productively infect neurons under favorable conditions was used to demonstrate early divergence of molecular pathways leading to productive and latent infection. Our experimental strategy made unique use of the segmental innervation of the vertebrate trunk to study the spread of virus throughout the peripheral nervous system after inoculation of mouse flanks. Evidence of viral gene expression, including that of immediate-early genes, was transient, confined to ganglia directly innervating the inoculated skin (8th through 12th thoracic segments), and seen only at sites from which infectious virus could be recovered. In contrast, neurons containing latency-associated transcripts and reactivatable virus were more widely distributed (sixth thoracic through first lumbar segments), from which we conclude that replication-competent HSV type 1 can establish latency without initiating productive infection. Images PMID:1649313

  16. Chitosan and Kappa-Carrageenan Vaginal Acyclovir Formulations for Prevention of Genital Herpes. In Vitro and Ex Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Sánchez, María-Pilar; Martín-Illana, Araceli; Ruiz-Caro, Roberto; Bermejo, Paulina; Abad, María-José; Carro, Rubén; Bedoya, Luis-Miguel; Tamayo, Aitana; Rubio, Juan; Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; Otero-Espinar, Francisco; Veiga, María-Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal formulations for the prevention of sexually transmitted infections are currently gaining importance in drug development. Polysaccharides, such as chitosan and carrageenan, which have good binding capacity with mucosal tissues, are now included in vaginal delivery systems. Marine polymer-based vaginal mucoadhesive solid formulations have been developed for the controlled release of acyclovir, which may prevent the sexual transmission of the herpes simplex virus. Drug release studies were carried out in two media: simulated vaginal fluid and simulated vaginal fluid/simulated seminal fluid mixture. The bioadhesive capacity and permanence time of the bioadhesion, the prepared compacts, and compacted granules were determined ex vivo using bovine vaginal mucosa as substrate. Swelling processes were quantified to confirm the release data. Biocompatibility was evaluated through in vitro cellular toxicity assays, and the results showed that acyclovir and the rest of the materials had no cytotoxicity at the maximum concentration tested. The mixture of hydroxyl-propyl-methyl-cellulose with chitosan- or kappa-carrageenan-originated mucoadhesive systems that presented a complete and sustained release of acyclovir for a period of 8–9 days in both media. Swelling data revealed the formation of optimal mixed chitosan/hydroxyl-propyl-methyl-cellulose gels which could be appropriated for the prevention of sexual transmission of HSV. PMID:26393621

  17. Herpes Simplex Type I (HSV-1) Infection of the Nervous System: Is an Immune Response a Good Thing?

    PubMed Central

    Conrady, Christopher D.; Drevets, Douglas A.; Carr, Daniel J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can induce a robust immune response initially thru the activation of pattern recognition receptors and subsequent type I interferon production that then shapes, along with other innate immune components, the adaptive immune response to the insult. While this response is necessary to quell virus replication, drive the pathogen into a “latent” state, and likely hinder viral reactivation, collateral damage can ensue with demonstrable cell death and foci of tissue pathology in the central nervous system (CNS) as a result of the release of inflammatory mediators including reactive oxygen species. Although rare, HSV-1 is the leading cause of frank sporadic encephalitis that, if left untreated, can result in death. A greater understanding of the contribution of resident glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes within the CNS in response to HSV-1 invasion is necessary to identify candidate molecules as targets for therapeutic intervention to reduce unwarranted inflammation coinciding with maintenance of the anti-viral state. PMID:19819030

  18. Disruption of adherens junctions liberates nectin-1 to serve as receptor for herpes simplex virus and pseudorabies virus entry.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Miri; Spear, Patricia G

    2002-07-01

    Nectin-1, a cell adhesion molecule belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, can bind to virion glycoprotein D (gD) to mediate entry of herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV). Nectin-1 colocalizes with E-cadherin at adherens junctions in epithelial cells. The disruption of cell junctions can result in the redistribution of nectin-1. To determine whether disruption of junctions by calcium depletion influenced the susceptibility of epithelial cells to viral entry, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing endogenous nectin-1 or transfected human nectin-1 were tested for the ability to bind soluble forms of viral gD and to be infected by HSV and PRV, before and after calcium depletion. Confocal microscopy revealed that binding of HSV and PRV gD was localized to adherens junctions in cells maintained in normal medium but was distributed, along with nectin-1, over the entire cell surface after calcium depletion. Both the binding of gD and the fraction of cells that could be infected by HSV-1 and PRV were enhanced by calcium depletion. Taken together, these results provide evidence that nectin-1 confined to adherens junctions in epithelial cells is not very accessible to virus, whereas dissociation of cell junctions releases nectin-1 to serve more efficiently as an entry receptor. PMID:12072519

  19. In vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-herpes simplex virus type 1 activity of Phellodendron amurense Rupr. from China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie; Reichling, Jürgen; Suschke, Ulrike; Nokemper, Silke; Zhang, Yuhong

    2009-01-01

    Phellodendron amurense Rupr. bark extracts were examined for antioxidant activity, antimicrobial activity and antiviral activity on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Ethanol extract showed higher content of both total phenolic and flavonoid than aqueous extract. In DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assay, the concentration providing 50% inhibition (IC(50)) values were 6.73 +/- 0.87 mg/ml and 4.26 +/- 0.59 mg/ml for aqueous and ethanol extracts respectively. Ethanol extract had a much higher antimicrobial activity than aqueous extract. Furthermore, the antiviral activity of the ethanol extract on HSV-1 was also tested. The maximum noncytotoxic concentration was 44.12 microg/ml for RC-37 cells. Plaque formation was inhibited by 74+/-6% when HSV-1 was pretreated with the extract prior to adsorption, whereas pretreatment of the cells with the extract, added during adsorption or after the adsorption only exhibited above 10% antiviral effect. This study has to some extent validated the medicinal potential of P. amurense bark. PMID:19222122

  20. Clinical manifestations of herpes zoster, its comorbidities, and its complications in north of iran from 2007 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Alikhani, Ahmad; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Delavarian, Leila; Barani, Hamidreza; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    Background. Herpes zoster infection is a painful worldwide disease. Inappropriate and delayed treatment causes prolongation of the disease with debilitating symptoms and postherpetic neuralgia. Method. A cross-sectional study evaluated shingles cases admitted in a teaching hospital with one-year followup in north of Iran from 2007 to 2013. Results. From 132 patients, 60.4% were male. Head and neck involvement occurred in 78 people (59.1%), thoracoabdominal region in 37 cases (28%), and extremities in 16 cases (12.1%), and one case (0.8%) got multisites involvement. 54 cases (40.9%) had predisposing factors including diabetes mellitus in 26 cases (19.7%), malignancy in 15 (11.4%), immunosuppressive medication in 7 (5.03%), HIV infection in 3 (2.3%), radiotherapy in 2 (1.5%), and tuberculosis in one patient (0.8%). The most common symptoms were pain (95.5%), weakness (56%), fever (31.1%), headache (30.3%), ocular complaints (27.3%), itching (24.2%), and dizziness (5.3%). 21 cases (15.9%) had bacterial superinfection on blistering areas and overall 18 cases (13.6%) had opium addiction. 4 cases (3.03%) died during admission because of comorbidities. Postherpetic neuralgia was reported in 56 patients (42.5%) after three months and seven cases (5%) in one-year followup. Conclusion. Shortening interval between skin lesion manifestation and starting medication can accelerate lesion improvement and decrease disease course, extension, and complication. PMID:25893116