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Sample records for cysteine desulfhydrase du

  1. L-Cysteine Desulfhydrase 1 modulates the generation of the signaling molecule sulfide in plant cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis C.; García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Consistent with data in animal systems, experimental evidence highlights sulfide as a signaling molecule of equal importance to NO and H2O2 in plant systems. In mammals, two cytosolic enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), have been shown to be responsible for the endogenous production of sulfide. L-cysteine desulfhydrase 1 (DES1) has been recently established as the only enzyme that is involved in the generation of hydrogen sulfide in plant cytosol. Although plants have an available source of sulfide within chloroplasts, the basic stromal pH prevents sulfide release into the cytosol. Therefore, DES1 is essential for the production of sulfide for signaling purposes. PMID:23428891

  2. Cystalysin, a 46-kilodalton cysteine desulfhydrase from Treponema denticola, with hemolytic and hemoxidative activities.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, L; Ebersole, J L; Kurzban, G P; Holt, S C

    1997-01-01

    A 46-kDa hemolytic protein, referred to as cystalysin, from Treponema denticola ATCC 35404 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli LC-67. Both the native and recombinant 46-kDa proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins expressed identical biological and functional characteristics. In addition to its biological function of lysing erythrocytes and hemoxidizing the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, cystalysin was also capable of removing the sulfhydryl and amino groups from selected S-containing compounds (e.g., cysteine) producing H2S, NH3, and pyruvate. This cysteine desulfhydrase resulted in the following Michaelis-Menten kinetics: Km = 3.6 mM and k(cat) = 12 s(-1). Cystathionine and S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine were also substrates for the protein. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the end products revealed NH3, pyruvate, homocysteine (from cystathionine), and cysteamine (from S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine). The enzyme was active over a broad pH range, with highest activity at pH 7.8 to 8.0. The enzymatic activity was increased by beta-mercaptoethanol. It was not inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor TLCK (N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone), pronase, or proteinase K, suggesting that the functional site was physically protected or located in a small fragment of the polypeptide. We hypothesize that cystalysin is a pyridoxal-5-phosphate-containing enzyme, with activity of an alphaC-N and betaC-S lyase (cystathionase) type. Since large amounts of H2S have been reported in deep periodontal pockets, cystalysin may also function in vivo as an important virulence molecule. PMID:9234780

  3. Assessing the transcriptional regulation of L-cysteine desulfhydrase 1 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M.; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C.; Gotor, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important signaling molecule that functions as a physiological gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO in mammalian systems. In plants, numerous studies have shown that sulfide increases tolerance/resistance to stress conditions and regulates essential processes. The endogenous production of hydrogen sulfide in the cytosol of Arabidopsis thaliana occurs by the enzymatic desulfuration of L-cysteine, which is catalyzed by the L-cysteine desulfhydrase enzyme DES1. To define the functional role of DES1 and the role that the sulfide molecule may play in the regulation of physiological processes in plants, we studied the localization of the expression of this gene at the tissue level. Transcriptional data reveal that DES1 is expressed at all developmental stages and is more abundant at the seedling stage and in mature plants. At the tissue level, we analyzed the expression of a GFP reporter gene fused to promoter of DES1. The GFP fluorescent signal was detected in the cytosol of both epidermal and mesophyll cells, including the guard cells. GFP fluorescence was highly abundant around the hydathode pores and inside the trichomes. In mature plants, fluorescence was detected in floral tissues; a strong GFP signal was detected in sepals, petals, and pistils. When siliques were examined, the highest GFP fluorescence was observed at the bases of the siliques and the seeds. The location of GFP expression, together with the identification of regulatory elements within the DES1 promoter, suggests that DES1 is hormonally regulated. An increase in DES1 expression in response to ABA was recently demonstrated; in the present work, we observe that in vitro auxin treatment significantly repressed the expression of DES1. PMID:25538717

  4. Assessing the transcriptional regulation of L-cysteine desulfhydrase 1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important signaling molecule that functions as a physiological gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO in mammalian systems. In plants, numerous studies have shown that sulfide increases tolerance/resistance to stress conditions and regulates essential processes. The endogenous production of hydrogen sulfide in the cytosol of Arabidopsis thaliana occurs by the enzymatic desulfuration of L-cysteine, which is catalyzed by the L-cysteine desulfhydrase enzyme DES1. To define the functional role of DES1 and the role that the sulfide molecule may play in the regulation of physiological processes in plants, we studied the localization of the expression of this gene at the tissue level. Transcriptional data reveal that DES1 is expressed at all developmental stages and is more abundant at the seedling stage and in mature plants. At the tissue level, we analyzed the expression of a GFP reporter gene fused to promoter of DES1. The GFP fluorescent signal was detected in the cytosol of both epidermal and mesophyll cells, including the guard cells. GFP fluorescence was highly abundant around the hydathode pores and inside the trichomes. In mature plants, fluorescence was detected in floral tissues; a strong GFP signal was detected in sepals, petals, and pistils. When siliques were examined, the highest GFP fluorescence was observed at the bases of the siliques and the seeds. The location of GFP expression, together with the identification of regulatory elements within the DES1 promoter, suggests that DES1 is hormonally regulated. An increase in DES1 expression in response to ABA was recently demonstrated; in the present work, we observe that in vitro auxin treatment significantly repressed the expression of DES1. PMID:25538717

  5. Hydrogen sulfide is a novel potential virulence factor of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: characterization of the unusual cysteine desulfurase/desulfhydrase HapE.

    PubMed

    Großhennig, Stephanie; Ischebeck, Till; Gibhardt, Johannes; Busse, Julia; Feussner, Ivo; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing atypical pneumonia with a minimalized and highly streamlined genome. So far, hydrogen peroxide production, cytadherence, and the ADP-ribosylating CARDS toxin have been identified as pathogenicity determinants. We have studied haemolysis caused by M. pneumoniae, and discovered that hydrogen peroxide is responsible for the oxidation of heme, but not for lysis of erythrocytes. This feature could be attributed to hydrogen sulfide, a compound that has previously not been identified as virulence factor in lung pathogens. Indeed, we observed hydrogen sulfide production by M. pneumoniae. The search for a hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme identified HapE, a protein with similarity to cysteine desulfurases. In contrast to typical cysteine desulfurases, HapE is a bifunctional enzyme: it has both the cysteine desulfurase activity to produce alanine and the cysteine desulfhydrase activity to produce pyruvate and hydrogen sulfide. Experiments with purified HapE showed that the enzymatic activity of the protein is responsible for haemolysis, demonstrating that HapE is a novel potential virulence factor of M. pneumoniae. PMID:26711628

  6. Hydrogen sulfide generated by L-cysteine desulfhydrase acts upstream of nitric oxide to modulate abscisic acid-dependent stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Scuffi, Denise; Álvarez, Consolación; Laspina, Natalia; Gotor, Cecilia; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mata, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a well-studied regulator of stomatal movement. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a small signaling gas molecule involved in key physiological processes in mammals, has been recently reported as a new component of the ABA signaling network in stomatal guard cells. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), H2S is enzymatically produced in the cytosol through the activity of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES1). In this work, we used DES1 knockout Arabidopsis mutant plants (des1) to study the participation of DES1 in the cross talk between H2S and nitric oxide (NO) in the ABA-dependent signaling network in guard cells. The results show that ABA did not close the stomata in isolated epidermal strips of des1 mutants, an effect that was restored by the application of exogenous H2S. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that ABA induces DES1 expression in guard cell-enriched RNA extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Furthermore, stomata from isolated epidermal strips of Arabidopsis ABA receptor mutant pyrabactin-resistant1 (pyr1)/pyrabactin-like1 (pyl1)/pyl2/pyl4 close in response to exogenous H2S, suggesting that this gasotransmitter is acting downstream, although acting independently of the ABA receptor cannot be ruled out with this data. However, the Arabidopsis clade-A PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE2C mutant abscisic acid-insensitive1 (abi1-1) does not close the stomata when epidermal strips were treated with H2S, suggesting that H2S required a functional ABI1. Further studies to unravel the cross talk between H2S and NO indicate that (1) H2S promotes NO production, (2) DES1 is required for ABA-dependent NO production, and (3) NO is downstream of H2S in ABA-induced stomatal closure. Altogether, data indicate that DES1 is a unique component of ABA signaling in guard cells. PMID:25266633

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Generated by l-Cysteine Desulfhydrase Acts Upstream of Nitric Oxide to Modulate Abscisic Acid-Dependent Stomatal Closure1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Scuffi, Denise; Álvarez, Consolación; Laspina, Natalia; Gotor, Cecilia; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mata, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a well-studied regulator of stomatal movement. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a small signaling gas molecule involved in key physiological processes in mammals, has been recently reported as a new component of the ABA signaling network in stomatal guard cells. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), H2S is enzymatically produced in the cytosol through the activity of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES1). In this work, we used DES1 knockout Arabidopsis mutant plants (des1) to study the participation of DES1 in the cross talk between H2S and nitric oxide (NO) in the ABA-dependent signaling network in guard cells. The results show that ABA did not close the stomata in isolated epidermal strips of des1 mutants, an effect that was restored by the application of exogenous H2S. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that ABA induces DES1 expression in guard cell-enriched RNA extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Furthermore, stomata from isolated epidermal strips of Arabidopsis ABA receptor mutant pyrabactin-resistant1 (pyr1)/pyrabactin-like1 (pyl1)/pyl2/pyl4 close in response to exogenous H2S, suggesting that this gasotransmitter is acting downstream, although acting independently of the ABA receptor cannot be ruled out with this data. However, the Arabidopsis clade-A PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE2C mutant abscisic acid-insensitive1 (abi1-1) does not close the stomata when epidermal strips were treated with H2S, suggesting that H2S required a functional ABI1. Further studies to unravel the cross talk between H2S and NO indicate that (1) H2S promotes NO production, (2) DES1 is required for ABA-dependent NO production, and (3) NO is downstream of H2S in ABA-induced stomatal closure. Altogether, data indicate that DES1 is a unique component of ABA signaling in guard cells. PMID:25266633

  8. Sulforaphane-cysteine suppresses invasion via downregulation of galectin-1 in human prostate cancer DU145 and PC3 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Gaoxiang; Geng, Yang; Wu, Sai; Hu, Yabin; Lin, Kai; Wu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study showed that sulforaphane (SFN) inhibits invasion in human prostate cancer DU145 cells; however, the underlying mechanisms were not profoundly investigated. In the present study, we found that sulforaphane-cysteine (SFN-Cys), as a metabolite of SFN, inhibits invasion and possesses a novel mechanism in prostate cancer DU145 and PC3 cells. The scratch and Transwell assays showed that SFN-Cys (15 µM) inhibited both migration and invasion, with cell morphological changes, such as cell shrinkage and pseudopodia shortening. The cell proliferation (MTS) assay indicated that cell viability was markedly suppressed with increasing concentrations of SFN‑Cys. Furthermore, the Transwell assay showed that inhibition of SFN‑Cys‑triggered invasion was tightly linked to the sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Western blot analysis revealed that SFN-Cys downregulated galectin-1 protein, an invasion‑related protein, and that the galectin‑1 reduction could be blocked by ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 (25 µM). Moreover, immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression level of galectin-1 protein was significantly reduced in the cells treated with SFN‑Cys. Hence, SFN‑Cys‑inhibited invasion resulted from the sustained ERK1/2 phosphorylation and ERK1/2‑triggered galectin-1 downregulation, suggesting that galectin-1 is a new SFN-Cys target inhibiting invasion apart from ERK1/2, in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:27430422

  9. Cysteine-Generated Sulfide in the Cytosol Negatively Regulates Autophagy and Modulates the Transcriptional Profile in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Consolación; García, Irene; Moreno, Inmaculada; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Crespo, José L.; Romero, Luis C.; Gotor, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, DES1 is the only identified l-Cysteine desulfhydrase located in the cytosol, and it is involved in the degradation of cysteine and the concomitant production of H2S in this cell compartment. Detailed characterization of the T-DNA insertion mutants des1-1 and des1-2 has provided insight into the role of sulfide metabolically generated in the cytosol as a signaling molecule. Mutations of L-CYS DESULFHYDRASE 1 (DES1) impede H2S generation in the Arabidopsis cytosol and strongly affect plant metabolism. Senescence-associated vacuoles are detected in mesophyll protoplasts of des1 mutants. Additionally, DES1 deficiency promotes the accumulation and lipidation of the ATG8 protein, which is associated with the process of autophagy. The transcriptional profile of the des1-1 mutant corresponds to its premature senescence and autophagy-induction phenotypes, and restoring H2S generation has been shown to eliminate the phenotypic defects of des1 mutants. Moreover, sulfide is able to reverse ATG8 accumulation and lipidation, even in wild-type plants when autophagy is induced by carbon starvation, suggesting a general effect of sulfide on autophagy regulation that is unrelated to sulfur or nitrogen limitation stress. Our results suggest that cysteine-generated sulfide in the cytosol negatively regulates autophagy and modulates the transcriptional profile of Arabidopsis. PMID:23144183

  10. Mechanisms of H2S Production from Cysteine and Cystine by Microorganisms Isolated from Soil by Selective Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Matthew J.; Dick, Warren A.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a major component of biogenic gaseous sulfur emissions from terrestrial environments. However, little is known concerning the pathways for H2S production from the likely substrates, cysteine and cystine. A mixed microbial culture obtained from cystine-enriched soils was used in assays (50 min, 37°C) with 0.05 M Tris-HCl (pH 8.5), 25 μmol of l-cysteine, 25 μmol of l-cystine, and 0.04 μmol of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate. Sulfide was trapped in a center well containing zinc acetate, while pyruvate was measured by derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Sulfide and total pyruvate production were 17.6 and 17.2 nmol mg of protein-1 min-1, respectively. Dithiothreitol did not alter reaction stoichiometry or the amount of H2S and total pyruvate, whereas N-ethylmaleimide reduced both H2S and total pyruvate production equally. The amount of H2S produced was reduced by 96% when only l-cystine was included as the substrate in the assay and by 15% with the addition of propargylglycine, a specific suicide inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase. These data indicate that the substrate for the reaction was cysteine and the enzyme responsible for H2S and pyruvate production was cysteine desulfhydrase (EC 4.4.1.1). The enzyme had a Km of 1.32 mM and was inactivated by temperatures greater than 60°C. Because cysteine is present in soil and cysteine desulfhydrase is an inducible enzyme, the potential for H2S production by this mechanism exists in terrestrial environments. The relative importance of this mechanism compared with other processes involved in H2S production from soil is unknown. PMID:16348483

  11. Mechanisms of H sub 2 S production from cysteine and cystine by microorganisms isolated from soil by selective enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Morra, M.J.; Dick, W.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a major component of biogenic gaseous sulfur emissions from terrestrial environments. However, little is known concerning the pathways for H{sub 2}S production from the likely substrates, cysteine and cystine. A mixed microbial culture obtained from Cystine-enriched soils was used in assays (50 min, 37C) with 0.05 M Tris-HCI (pH 8.5), 25 {mu}mol of L-cysteine, 25 {mu}mol of L-cystine, and 0.04 {mu}mol of pyridoxal 5 feet-phosphate. Sulfide and total pyruvate production were 17.6 and 17.2 nmol mg of protein{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Dithiothreitol did not alter reaction stoichiometry or the amount of H{sub 2}S and total pyruvate, whereas N-ethylmaleimide reduced both H{sub 2}S and total pyruvate production in the assay and by 15% with the addition of propargylglycine, a specific suicide inhibitor of cystathionine {gamma}-lyase. These data indicate that the substrate for the reaction was cysteine and the enzyme responsible for H{sub 2}S and pyruvate production was cysteine desulfhydrase. The enzyme had a K{sub m} of 1.32 mM and was inactivated by temperatures greater that 60C. Because cysteine is present in soil and cysteine desulfhydrase is an inducible enzyme, the potential for H{sub 2}S production by this mechanism exists in terrestrial environments.

  12. Endogenous Synthesis of 2-Aminoacrylate Contributes to Cysteine Sensitivity in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Dustin C.; Lambrecht, Jennifer A.; Schomer, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    RidA, the archetype member of the widely conserved RidA/YER057c/UK114 family of proteins, prevents reactive enamine/imine intermediates from accumulating in Salmonella enterica by catalyzing their hydrolysis to stable keto acid products. In the absence of RidA, endogenous 2-aminoacrylate persists in the cellular environment long enough to damage a growing list of essential metabolic enzymes. Prior studies have focused on the dehydration of serine by the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent serine/threonine dehydratases, IlvA and TdcB, as sources of endogenous 2-aminoacrylate. The current study describes an additional source of endogenous 2-aminoacrylate derived from cysteine. The results of in vivo analysis show that the cysteine sensitivity of a ridA strain is contingent upon CdsH, the predominant cysteine desulfhydrase in S. enterica. The impact of cysteine on 2-aminoacrylate accumulation is shown to be unaffected by the presence of serine/threonine dehydratases, revealing another mechanism of endogenous 2-aminoacrylate production. Experiments in vitro suggest that 2-aminoacrylate is released from CdsH following cysteine desulfhydration, resulting in an unbound aminoacrylate substrate for RidA. This work expands our understanding of the role played by RidA in preventing enamine stress resulting from multiple normal metabolic processes. PMID:25002544

  13. Signaling in the plant cytosol: cysteine or sulfide?

    PubMed

    Gotor, Cecilia; Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Aroca, Ángeles; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C

    2015-10-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is the first organic compound containing reduced sulfur that is synthesized in the last stage of plant photosynthetic assimilation of sulfate. It is a very important metabolite not only because it is crucial for the structure, function and regulation of proteins but also because it is the precursor molecule of an enormous number of sulfur-containing metabolites essential for plant health and development. The biosynthesis of Cys is accomplished by the sequential reaction of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine(thiol)synthase (OASTL). In Arabidopsis thaliana, the analysis of specific mutants of members of the SAT and OASTL families has demonstrated that the cytosol is the compartment where the bulk of Cys synthesis takes place and that the cytosolic OASTL enzyme OAS-A1 is the responsible enzyme. Another member of the OASTL family is DES1, a novel L-cysteine desulfhydrase that catalyzes the desulfuration of Cys to produce sulfide, thus acting in a manner opposite to that of OAS-A1. Detailed studies of the oas-a1 and des1 null mutants have revealed the involvement of the DES1 and OAS-A1 proteins in coordinate regulation of Cys homeostasis and the generation of sulfide in the cytosol for signaling purposes. Thus, the levels of Cys in the cytosol strongly affect plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress conditions, while sulfide specifically generated from the degradation of Cys negatively regulates autophagy induced in different situations. In conclusion, modulation of the levels of Cys and sulfide is likely critical for plant performance. PMID:24990521

  14. The Cysteine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Chandler, Joshua D.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine (Cys) proteome is a major component of the adaptive interface between the genome and the exposome. The thiol moiety of Cys undergoes a range of biologic modifications enabling biological switching of structure and reactivity. These biological modifications include sulfenylation and disulfide formation, formation of higher oxidation states, S-nitrosylation, persulfidation, metallation, and other modifications. Extensive knowledge about these systems and their compartmentalization now provides a foundation to develop advanced integrative models of Cys proteome regulation. In particular, detailed understanding of redox signaling pathways and sensing networks is becoming available to discriminate network structures. This research focuses attention on the need for atlases of Cys modifications to develop systems biology models. Such atlases will be especially useful for integrative studies linking the Cys proteome to imaging and other omics platforms, providing a basis for improved redox-based therapeutics. Thus, a framework is emerging to place the Cys proteome as a complement to the quantitative proteome in the omics continuum connecting the genome to the exposome. PMID:25843657

  15. Evolutionary lines of cysteine peptidases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A J; Rawlings, N D

    2001-05-01

    The proteolytic enzymes that depend upon a cysteine residue for activity have come from at least seven different evolutionary origins, each of which has produced a group of cysteine peptidases with distinctive structures and properties. We show here that the characteristic molecular topologies of the peptidases in each evolutionary line can be seen not only in their three-dimensional structures, but commonly also in the two-dimensional structures. Clan CA contains the families of papain (C1), calpain (C2), streptopain (C10) and the ubiquitin-specific peptidases (C12, C19), as well as many families of viral cysteine endopeptidases. Clan CD contains the families of clostripain (C11), gingipain R (C25), legumain (C13), caspase-1 (C14) and separin (C50). These enzymes have specificities dominated by the interactions of the S1 subsite. Clan CE contains the families of adenain (C5) from adenoviruses, the eukaryotic Ulp1 protease (C48) and the bacterial YopJ proteases (C55). Clan CF contains only pyroglutamyl peptidase I (C15). The picornains (C3) in clan PA have probably evolved from serine peptidases, which still form the majority of enzymes in the clan. The cysteine peptidase activities in clans PB and CH are autolytic only. In conclusion, we suggest that although almost all the cysteine peptidases depend for activity on catalytic dyads of cysteine and histidine, it is worth noting some important differences that they have inherited from their distant ancestral peptidases. PMID:11517925

  16. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  17. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5271 Cysteine. (a) Product. Cysteine...

  18. Cysteine Cathepsins in Human Carious Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, F.D.; Minciotti, C.L.; Geraldeli, S.; Carrilho, M.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.; Nader, H.B.; Salo, T.; Tjäderhane, L.; Tersariol, I.L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in dentinal caries, and analysis of recent data demonstrates the presence of other collagen-degrading enzymes, cysteine cathepsins, in human dentin. This study aimed to examine the presence, source, and activity of cysteine cathepsins in human caries. Cathepsin B was detected with immunostaining. Saliva and dentin cysteine cathepsin and MMP activities on caries lesions were analyzed spectrofluorometrically. Immunostaining demonstrated stronger cathepsins B in carious than in healthy dentin. In carious dentin, cysteine cathepsin activity increased with increasing depth and age in chronic lesions, but decreased with age in active lesions. MMP activity decreased with age in both active and chronic lesions. Salivary MMP activities were higher in patients with active than chronic lesions and with increasing lesion depth, while cysteine cathepsin activities showed no differences. The results indicate that, along with MMPs, cysteine cathepsins are important, especially in active and deep caries. PMID:21248362

  19. Plasma cysteine, cystine, and glutathione in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, R K; Lewis, F W; Kutner, M H; Bate, D M; Roy, R G; Rudman, D

    1984-10-01

    Plasma contains three forms of cyst(e)ine: cysteine, cystine, and protein-bound cysteine. The former is a thiol and the latter two are disulfides. The levels of all three types of cyst(e)ine, as well as the cysteinyl tripeptide glutathione, were measured in the plasma of 14 normal and 10 cirrhotic individuals. All subjects ate mixed foods. Some cirrhotic patients were studied during nasogastric hyperalimentation with Vivonex (Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Norwich, N.Y.) as well as during total parenteral nutrition with FreAmine III (American McGaw, Irvine, Calif.); neither formula contains cyst(e)ine. Regardless of the nature of the diet, cirrhotic patients had significantly subnormal values for cysteine, glutathione, and albumin. In addition, the following significant changes were found to be diet-dependent: (a) elevated methionine during Vivonex, (b) subnormal taurine during mixed foods and total parenteral nutrition, (c) depressed protein-bound cysteine during total parenteral nutrition, (d) depressed cyst(e)ine thiol/disulfide ratio during mixed foods, and (e) depressed total thiol during Vivonex and total parenteral nutrition. The data indicate multiple abnormalities in sulfur metabolism in cirrhosis. PMID:6468868

  20. Cysteine sensing by plasmons of silver nanocubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfassy, Eitan; Mastai, Yitzhak; Salomon, Adi

    2016-09-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are considered to be valuable nanostructures in the field of sensors due to their spectral response sensitivity to small changes in the surrounding refractive index which enables them to detect a small amount of molecules. In this research, we use silver nanocubes of about 50 nm length to detect low concentrations of cysteine, a semi-essential amino acid. Following cysteine adsorption onto the nanocubes, a redshift in the plasmonic modes was observed, enabling the detection of cysteine down to 10 μM and high sensitivity of about 125 nm/RIU (refractive index units). Furthermore, we found that multilayer adsorption of cysteine leads to the stabilization of the silver nanocubes. The cysteine growth onto the nanocubes was also characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM).

  1. Covalent targeting of acquired cysteines in cancer.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marieke; Arkin, Michelle R; Dansen, Tobias B

    2016-02-01

    The thiolate side chain of cysteine has a unique functionality that drug hunters and chemical biologists have begun to exploit. For example, targeting cysteine residues in the ATP-binding pockets of kinases with thiol-reactive molecules has afforded increased selectivity and potency to drugs like imbrutinib, which inhibits the oncogene BTK, and CO-1686 and AZD9291 that target oncogenic mutant EGFR. Recently, disulfide libraries and targeted GDP-mimetics have been used to selectively label the G12C oncogenic mutation in KRAS. We reasoned that other oncogenes contain mutations to cysteine, and thus screened the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer for frequently acquired cysteines. Here, we describe the most common mutations and discuss how these mutations could be potential targets for cysteine-directed personalized therapeutics. PMID:26629855

  2. Detection of Homocysteine and Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weihua; Xu, Xiangyang; Kim, Kyu Kwang; Escobedo, Jorge O.; Fakayode, Sayo O.; Fletcher, Kristin A.; Lowry, Mark; Schowalter, Corin M.; Lawrence, Candace M.; Fronczek, Frank R.; Warner, Isiah M.

    2012-01-01

    At elevated levels, homocysteine (Hcy, 1) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, neural tube defects, and osteoporosis. Both 1 and cysteine (Cys, 3) are linked to neurotoxicity. The biochemical mechanisms by which 1 and 3 are involved in disease states are relatively unclear. Herein, we describe simple methods for detecting either Hcy or Cys in the visible spectral region with the highest selectivity reported to date without using biochemical techniques or preparative separations. Simple methods and readily available reagents allow for the detection of Cys and Hcy in the range of their physiologically relevant levels. New HPLC postcolumn detection methods for biological thiols are reported. The potential biomedical relevance of the chemical mechanisms involved in the detection of 1 is described. PMID:16277539

  3. Rat liver cysteine dioxygenase (cysteine oxidase). Further purification, characterization, and analysis of the activation and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Hosokawa, Y; Kohashi, N; Kori, Y; Sakakibara, S; Ueda, I

    1978-02-01

    Rat liver cysteine dioxygenase has been purified to homogeneity. It is a single subunit protein having a molecular weight of 22,500 +/- 1,000, with a pI of 5.5. The enzyme purified was catalytically inactive and activated by anaerobic incubation with either L-cysteine or its analogues such as carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, carboxyethyl-L-cysteine, S-methyl-L-cysteine, D-cysteine, cysteamine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, and DL-homocysteine. The enzyme thus activated with L-cysteine was rapidly inactivated under aerobic condition. This rapid inactivation was observed at 0 degrees C where no formation of either the reaction product cysteine sulfinate or the autoxidation product of cysteine, cystine, was detected. Further analysis shows that the inactivation of the activated enzyme was due to oxygen but unrelated to either the presence of substrate, enzyme turnover or accumulation of inhibitor produced during assay. A distinct rat liver cytoplasmic protein, called protein-A, could completely prevented the enzyme from the aerobic inactivation. The loss of activity during assay in the absence of protein-A was shown to be a first order decay process. From the plots of log(deltaproduct/min) versus time, the initial velocity (VO) and the velocity at 7 min (V7) were obtained. The apparent Km value for L-cysteine in the absence of protein-A was calculated from the initial velocity as 4.5 X 10(-4)M. Protein-A did not alter the apparent Km value for L-cysteine. The chelating agents such as o-phenanthroline, alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl, bathophenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, EGTA, and EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme activity when these chelating agents were added before preactivation. The purified cystein dioxygenase contains 1 atom of iron per mol of enzyme protein. By the activation procedure, the enzyme became less susceptible to the heat denaturation, the inhibitory effects of chelating agents and the tryptic digestion. PMID:632231

  4. Blends of cysteine-containing proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Justin

    2005-03-01

    Many agricultural wastes are made of proteins such as keratin, lactalbumin, gluten, and albumin. These proteins contain the amino acid cysteine. Cysteine allows for the formation of inter-and intra-molecular sulfur-sulfur bonds. Correlations are made between the properties of films made from the proteins and the amino acid sequence. Blends of cysteine-containing proteins show possible synergies in physical properties at intermediate concentrations. FT-IR spectroscopy shows increased hydrogen bonding at intermediate concentrations suggesting that this contributes to increased physical properties. DSC shows limited miscibility and the formation of new crystalline phases in the blends suggesting that this too contributes.

  5. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  6. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Song, Dong-Keun

    2016-09-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca(2+) signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca(2+)-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca(2+) influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na(+)-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na(+)-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca(2+)]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca(2+)]i increase through Ca(2+) influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  7. Nonfouling property of zwitterionic cysteine surface.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter; Ding, Ling; Lin, Chii-Wann; Gu, Frank

    2014-06-10

    Applications of implantable bioelectronics for analytical and curative purposes are currently limited by their poor long-term biofunctionality in physiological media and nonspecific interactions with biomolecules. In an attempt to prolong in vivo functionality, recent advances in surface modifications have demonstrated that zwitterionic coatings can rival the performance of conventional poly(ethylene glycol) polymers in reducing nonspecific protein fouling. Herein, we report the fabrication of a very thin layer of nonfouling zwitterionic cysteine surface capable of protecting implantable bioelectronics from nonspecific adsorption of plasma proteins. This work is the first of its kind to fabricate, through solution chemistry, a cysteine surface exhibiting zwitterionic state as high as 88% and to demonstrate antibiofouling under the exposure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum. The fabricated surface utilized a minimal amount of gold substrate, approximately 10 nm, and an extremely thin antifouling layer at 1.14 nm verified by ellipsometry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy assessment of the nitrogen (N1s) and carbon (C1s) spectra conclude that 87.8% of the fabricated cysteine surface is zwitterionic, 2.5% is positively charged, and 9.6% is noncharged. Antibiofouling performance of the cysteine surface is quantitatively determined by bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay as well as qualitatively confirmed using scanning electron spectroscopy. Cysteine surfaces demonstrated a BSA fouling of 3.9 ± 4.84% μg/cm(2), which is 93.6% and 98.5% lower than stainless steel and gold surfaces, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis returned similar results and suggest that a thinner cysteine coating will enhance performance. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the results of BCA assay and suggested that the cysteine surface demonstrated a 69% reduction to serum fouling. The results reported in this paper demonstrate that it is possible to achieve

  8. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  9. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  10. π-Clamp Mediated Cysteine Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is a grand challenge in chemistry. Protecting groups or catalysts must be used to selectively modify one site among many that are similarly reactive. General strategies are rare such the local chemical environment around the target site is tuned for selective transformation. Here we show a four amino acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the “π-clamp”, tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for the site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We used the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues (e.g. antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes), which was impossible with prior cysteine modification methods. The modified π-clamp antibodies retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach for site-selective chemistry and provides opportunities to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics. PMID:26791894

  11. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  12. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2327970

  13. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. PMID:2327970

  14. Influence of cysteine 164 on active site structure in rat cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Matthias; Siakkou, Eleni; Faponle, Abayomi S; Tchesnokov, Egor P; de Visser, Sam P; Wilbanks, Sigurd M; Jameson, Guy N L

    2016-07-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a non-heme mononuclear iron enzyme with unique structural features, namely an intramolecular thioether cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157, and a disulfide bond between substrate L-cysteine and cysteine 164 in the entrance channel to the active site. We investigated how these posttranslational modifications affect catalysis through a kinetic, crystallographic and computational study. The enzyme kinetics of a C164S variant are identical to WT, indicating that disulfide formation at C164 does not significantly impair access to the active site at physiological pH. However, at high pH, the cysteine-tyrosine cross-link formation is enhanced in C164S. This supports the view that disulfide formation at position 164 can limit access to the active site. The C164S variant yielded crystal structures of unusual clarity in both resting state and with cysteine bound. Both show that the iron in the cysteine-bound complex is a mixture of penta- and hexa-coordinate with a water molecule taking up the final site (60 % occupancy), which is where dioxygen is believed to coordinate during turnover. The serine also displays stronger hydrogen bond interactions to a water bound to the amine of the substrate cysteine. However, the interactions between cysteine and iron appear unchanged. DFT calculations support this and show that WT and C164S have similar binding energies for the water molecule in the final site. This variant therefore provides evidence that WT also exists in an equilibrium between penta- and hexa-coordinate forms and the presence of the sixth ligand does not strongly affect dioxygen binding. PMID:27193596

  15. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  19. Cysteine Prevents Menopausal Syndromes in Ovariectomized Mouse.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Na-Rae; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-05-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is well known to be involved in oxidation-reduction reactions, serving as a source of sulfides in the body. Amino acids are known to improve menopausal symptoms and significantly reduce morbidity. This study aims to find an unrevealed effect of Cys with estrogenic and osteogenic actions. Ovariectomized (OVX) mice were treated with Cys daily for 8 weeks. Estrogen-related and osteoporosis-related factors were analyzed in the vagina, serum, and tibia. Cys was treated in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells and ER-positive human breast cancer Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. Cysteine administration ameliorated overweightness of the body and vaginal atrophy in the OVX mice. Cysteine increased the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 17β-estradiol in the serum of the OVX mice and improved the bone mineral density in the OVX mice. In MG-63 cells, Cys increased the proliferation, ERβ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, and estrogen response element (ERE) activity. Cysteine increased the ALP activity and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In MCF-7 cells, Cys also increased the proliferation, ERβ mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Cys has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. The novel insights gained here strongly imply the potential use of Cys as a new agent for postmenopausal women. PMID:26494699

  20. "Cirque du Freak."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivett, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    Considers the marketing strategies that underpin the success of the "Cirque du Freak" series. Describes how "Cirque du Freak" is an account of events in the life of schoolboy Darren Shan. Notes that it is another reworking of the vampire narrative, a sub-genre of horror writing that has proved highly popular with both adult and child readers. (SG)

  1. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  2. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-08-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  3. Determining cysteine oxidation status using differential alkylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Birgit; Yoo, Chris B.; Collins, Christopher J.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins plays a major role in aging and in the pathology of many degenerative diseases. Under conditions of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can modify key redox sensitive amino acid side chains leading to altered biological activities or structures of the targeted proteins. This in turn can affect signaling or regulatory control pathways as well as protein turnover and degradation efficiency in the proteasome. Cysteine residues are particularly susceptible to oxidation, primarily through reversible modifications (e.g., thiolation and nitrosylation), although irreversible oxidation can lead to products that cannot be repaired in vivo such as sulfonic acid. This report describes a strategy to determine the overall level of reversible cysteine oxidation using a stable isotope differential alkylation approach in combination with mass spectrometric analysis. This method employs 13C-labeled alkylating reagents, such as N-ethyl-[1,4-13C2]-maleimide, bromo-[1,2-13C2]-acetic acid and their non-labeled counterparts to quantitatively assess the level of cysteine oxidation at specific sites in oxidized proteins. The differential alkylation protocol was evaluated using standard peptides and proteins, and then applied to monitor and determine the level of oxidative damage induced by diamide, a mild oxidant. The formation and mass spectrometric analysis of irreversible cysteine acid modification will also be discussed as several such modifications have been identified in subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. This strategy will hopefully contribute to our understanding of the role that cysteine oxidation plays in such chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease, where studies in animal and cell models have shown oxidative damage to mitochondrial Complex I to be a specific and early target.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine monohydrochloride is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid monohydrochloride monohydrate (C3H7O2NS HCl...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine monohydrochloride is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid monohydrochloride monohydrate (C3H7O2NS HCl...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine monohydrochloride is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid monohydrochloride monohydrate (C3H7O2NS HCl...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine monohydrochloride is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid monohydrochloride monohydrate (C3H7O2NS HCl...

  8. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M.; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B.D.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here, we describe a proteomics method to quantitatively profile the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyperreactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyperreactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and involved in iron-sulfur protein biogenesis. Finally, we demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can also form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs. PMID:21085121

  9. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes.

    PubMed

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B D; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-12-01

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here we describe a proteomics method to profile quantitatively the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyper-reactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and it was found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyper-reactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and is involved in iron-sulphur protein biogenesis. We also demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs. PMID:21085121

  10. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  11. Cysteine Cathepsin Activity Regulation by Glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Lenarčič, Brigita

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are a group of enzymes normally found in the endolysosomes where they are primarily involved in intracellular protein turnover but also have a critical role in MHC II-mediated antigen processing and presentation. However, in a number of pathologies cysteine cathepsins were found to be heavily upregulated and secreted into extracellular milieu, where they were found to degrade a number of extracellular proteins. A major role in modulating cathepsin activities play glycosaminoglycans, which were found not only to facilitate their autocatalytic activation including at neutral pH, but also to critically modulate their activities such as in the case of the collagenolytic activity of cathepsin K. The interaction between cathepsins and glycosaminoglycans will be discussed in more detail. PMID:25587532

  12. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively. PMID:23790889

  13. The du Bois sign.

    PubMed

    Voelpel, James H; Muehlberger, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    According to the current literature, the term "du Bois sign" characterizes the condition of a shortened fifth finger as a symptom of congenital syphilis, Down syndrome, dyscrania, and encephalic malformation. Modern medical dictionaries and text books attribute the eponym to the French gynecologist Paul Dubois (1795-1871). Yet, a literature analysis revealed incorrect references to the person and unclear definitions of the term. Our findings showed that the origin of the term is based on observations made by the Swiss dermatologist Charles du Bois (1874-1947) in connection with congenital syphilis. In addition, a further eponymical fifth finger sign is closely associated with the du Bois sign. In conclusion, the du Bois sign has only limited diagnostic value and is frequently occurring in the normal healthy population. PMID:21263293

  14. The reactions of nitrosyl complexes with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Roncaroli, Federico; Olabe, José A

    2005-06-27

    The reaction kinetics of a set of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes, {(X)5MNO}n, containing different coligands X (polypyridines, NH3, EDTA, pz, and py) with cysteine (excess conditions), were studied by UV-vis spectrophotometry, using stopped-flow techniques, at an appropriate pH, in the range 3-10, and T = 25 degrees C. The selection of coligands afforded a redox-potential range from -0.3 to +0.5 V (vs Ag/AgCl) for the NO+/NO bound couples. Two intermediates were detected. The first one, I1, appears in the range 410-470 nm for the different complexes and is proposed to be a 1:1 adduct, with the S atom of the cysteinate nucleophile bound to the N atom of nitrosyl. The adduct formation step of I1 is an equilibrium, and the kinetic rate constants for the formation and dissociation of the corresponding adducts were determined by studying the cysteine-concentration dependence of the formation rates. The second intermediate, I2, was detected through the decay of I1, with a maximum absorbance at ca. 380 nm. From similar kinetic results and analyses, we propose that a second cysteinate adds to I1 to form I2. By plotting ln k1(RS-) and ln k2(RS-) for the first and second adduct formation steps, respectively, against the redox potentials of the NO+/NO couples, linear free energy plots are obtained, as previously observed with OH- as a nucleophile. The addition rates for both processes increase with the nitrosyl redox potentials, and this reflects a more positive charge at the electrophilic N atom. In a third step, the I2 adducts decay to form the corresponding Ru-aqua complexes, with the release of N2O and formation of cystine, implying a two-electron process for the overall nitrosyl reduction. This is in contrast with the behavior of nitroprusside ([Fe(CN)5NO]2-; NP), which always yields the one-electron reduction product, [Fe(CN)5NO]3-, either under substoichiometric or in excess-cysteine conditions. PMID:15962980

  15. Identification of non-peptidic cysteine reactive fragments as inhibitors of cysteine protease rhodesain.

    PubMed

    McShan, Danielle; Kathman, Stefan; Lowe, Brittiney; Xu, Ziyang; Zhan, Jennifer; Statsyuk, Alexander; Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor

    2015-10-15

    Rhodesain, the major cathepsin L-like cysteine protease in the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is a well-validated drug target. In this work, we used a fragment-based approach to identify inhibitors of this cysteine protease, and identified inhibitors of T. brucei. To discover inhibitors active against rhodesain and T. brucei, we screened a library of covalent fragments against rhodesain and conducted preliminary SAR studies. We envision that in vitro enzymatic assays will further expand the use of the covalent tethering method, a simple fragment-based drug discovery technique to discover covalent drug leads. PMID:26342866

  16. Differential expression of cysteine desulfurases in soybean

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are prosthetic groups required to sustain fundamental life processes including electron transfer, metabolic reactions, sensing, signaling, gene regulation and stabilization of protein structures. In plants, the biogenesis of Fe-S protein is compartmentalized and adapted to specific needs of the cell. Many environmental factors affect plant development and limit productivity and geographical distribution. The impact of these limiting factors is particularly relevant for major crops, such as soybean, which has worldwide economic importance. Results Here we analyze the transcriptional profile of the soybean cysteine desulfurases NFS1, NFS2 and ISD11 genes, involved in the biogenesis of [Fe-S] clusters, by quantitative RT-PCR. NFS1, ISD11 and NFS2 encoding two mitochondrial and one plastid located proteins, respectively, are duplicated and showed distinct transcript levels considering tissue and stress response. NFS1 and ISD11 are highly expressed in roots, whereas NFS2 showed no differential expression in tissues. Cold-treated plants showed a decrease in NFS2 and ISD11 transcript levels in roots, and an increased expression of NFS1 and ISD11 genes in leaves. Plants treated with salicylic acid exhibited increased NFS1 transcript levels in roots but lower levels in leaves. In silico analysis of promoter regions indicated the presence of different cis-elements in cysteine desulfurase genes, in good agreement with differential expression of each locus. Our data also showed that increasing of transcript levels of mitochondrial genes, NFS1/ISD11, are associated with higher activities of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, two cytosolic Fe-S proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest a relationship between gene expression pattern, biochemical effects, and transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of cysteine desulfurase genes. Moreover, data show proportionality between NFS1 and ISD11 genes expression. PMID:22099069

  17. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2009-10-13

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  18. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false L-Cysteine. 184.1271 Section 184.1271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the...

  20. Factors Supporting Cysteine Tolerance and Sulfite Production in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity. PMID:23417561

  1. Cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags for enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Giron, Priscille; Dayon, Loïc; Mihala, Nikolett; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Rose, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Considering the tremendous complexity and the wide dynamic range of protein samples from biological origin and their proteolytic peptide mixtures, proteomics largely requires simplification strategies. One common approach to reduce sample complexity is to target a particular amino acid in proteins or peptides, such as cysteine (Cys), with chemical tags in order to reduce the analysis to a subset of the whole proteome. The present work describes the synthesis and the use of two new cysteinyl tags, so-called cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags (C3T), for the isolation of Cys-containing peptides. These bifunctional molecules were specifically designed to react with cysteines through iodoacetyl and acryloyl moieties and permit efficient selection of the tagged peptides. To do so, a thioproline was chosen as the isolating group to form, after a deprotection/activation step, a thiazolidine with an aldehyde resin by the covalent capture (CC) method. The applicability of the enrichment strategy was demonstrated on small synthetic peptides as well as on peptides derived from digested proteins. Mass spectrometric (MS) analysis and tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) sequencing confirmed the efficient and straightforward selection of the cysteine-containing peptides. The combination of C3T and CC methods provides an effective alternative to reduce sample complexity and access low abundance proteins. PMID:19813279

  2. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid (C3H7O2NS). (b) The ingredient meets the appropriate part of the specification set forth...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid (C3H7O2NS). (b) The ingredient meets the appropriate part of the specification set forth...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid (C3H7O2NS). (b) The ingredient meets the appropriate part of the specification set forth...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid (C3H7O2NS). (b) The ingredient meets the appropriate part of the specification set forth...

  7. A novel cysteine desulfurase influencing organosulfur compounds in Lentinula edodes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Lei, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Lian-Fu; Bian, Yin-Bing; Yang, Hong; Ibrahim, Salam A.; Huang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are the basis for the unique aroma of Lentinula edodes, and cysteine sulfoxide lyase (C-S lyase) is the key enzyme in this trait. The enzyme from Alliium sativum has been crystallized and well-characterized; however, there have been no reports of the characterization of fungi C-S lyase at the molecular level. We identified a L. edodes C-S lyase (Lecsl), cloned a gene of Csl encoded Lecsl and then combined modeling, simulations, and experiments to understand the molecular basis of the function of Lecsl. Our analysis revealed Lecsl to be a novel cysteine desulfurase and not a type of cysteine sulfoxide lyase. The pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP) molecule bonded tightly to Lecsl to form a Lecsl-PLP complex. Moreover, the Lecsl had one active center that served to bind two kinds of substrates, S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and L-cysteine, and had both cysteine sulfoxide lyase and cysteine desulfurase activity. We found that the amino acid residue Asn393 was essential for the catalytic activity of Lecsl and that the gene Csl encoded a novel cysteine desulfurase to influence organosulfur compounds in L. edodes. Our results provide a new insight into understanding the formation of the unique aroma of L. edodes. PMID:26054293

  8. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26947058

  9. Cysteine Modification: Probing Channel Structure, Function and Conformational Change.

    PubMed

    Akabas, Myles H

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine substitution has been a powerful tool to investigate the structure and function of proteins. It has been particularly useful for studies of membrane proteins in their native environment, embedded in phospholipid membranes. Among the 20 amino acids, cysteine is uniquely reactive. This reactivity has motivated the synthesis of a wide array of sulfhydryl reactive chemicals. The commercially available array of sulfhydryl reactive reagents has allowed investigators to probe the local steric and electrostatic environment around engineered cysteines and to position fluorescent, paramagnetic and mass probes at specific sites within proteins and for distance measurements between pairs of sites. Probing the reactivity and accessibility of engineered cysteines has been extensively used in Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Method (SCAM) investigations of ion channels, membrane transporters and receptors. These studies have successfully identified the residues lining ion channels, agonist/antagonist and allosteric modulator binding sites, and regions whose conformation changes as proteins transition between different functional states. The thousands of cysteine-substitution mutants reported in the literature demonstrate that, in general, mutation to cysteine is well tolerated. This has allowed systematic studies of residues in transmembrane segments and in other parts of membrane proteins. Finally, by inserting pairs of cysteines and assaying their ability to form disulfide bonds, changes in proximity and mobility relationships between specific positions within a protein can be inferred. Thus, cysteine mutagenesis has provided a wealth of data on the structure of membrane proteins in their functional environment. This data can complement the structural insights obtained from the burgeoning number of crystal structures of detergent solubilized membrane proteins whose functional state is often uncertain. This article will review the use of cysteine mutagenesis to probe

  10. Simultaneous electrochemical determination of L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide at carbon ionic liquid electrode.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Ahmadi, Raheleh; Mahyari, Farzaneh Aghakhani

    2014-04-01

    A linear sweep voltammetric method is used for direct simultaneous determination of L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide (cystine) based on carbon ionic liquid electrode. With carbon ionic liquid electrode as a high performance electrode, two oxidation peaks for L-cysteine (0.62 V) and L-cysteine disulfide (1.3 V) were observed with a significant separation of about 680 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0). The linear ranges were obtained as 1.0-450 and 5.0-700 μM and detection limits were estimated to be 0.298 and 4.258 μM for L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide, respectively. This composite electrode was applied for simultaneous determination of L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide in two real samples, artificial urine and nutrient broth. Satisfactory results were obtained which clearly indicate the applicability of the proposed electrode for simultaneous determination of these compounds in complex matrices. PMID:24459003

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF DANSYLATED CYSTEINE, GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE, CYSTEINE AND CYSTINE BY NARROW BORE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric (RP-LC/ESI-MS) method has been developed to confirm the identity of dansylated derivatives of cysteine and glutathione, and their respective dimers. Cysteine, GSH, CSSC...

  12. A simple isotopic labeling method to study cysteine oxidation in Alzheimer's disease: oxidized cysteine-selective dimethylation (OxcysDML).

    PubMed

    Gu, Liqing; Robinson, Renã A S

    2016-04-01

    Cysteine is widely involved in redox signaling pathways through a number of reversible and irreversible modifications. Reversible modifications (e.g., S-glutathionylation, S-nitrosylation, disulfide bonds, and sulfenic acid) are used to protect proteins from oxidative attack and maintain cellular homeostasis, while irreversible oxidations (e.g., sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid) serve as hallmarks of oxidative stress. Proteomic analysis of cysteine-enriched peptides coupled with reduction of oxidized thiols can be used to measure the oxidation states of cysteine, which is helpful for elucidating the role that oxidative stress plays in biology and disease. As an extension of our previously reported cysDML method, we have developed oxidized cysteine-selective dimethylation (OxcysDML), to investigate the site-specific total oxidation of cysteine residues in biologically relevant samples. OxcysDML employs (1) blocking of free thiols by a cysteine-reactive reagent, (2) enrichment of peptides containing reversibly oxidized cysteine by a solid phase resin, and (3) isotopic labeling of peptide amino groups to quantify cysteine modifications arising from different biological conditions. On-resin enrichment and labeling minimizes sample handing time and improves efficiency in comparison with other redox proteomic methods. OxcysDML is also inexpensive and flexible, as it can accommodate the exploration of various cysteine modifications. Here, we applied the method to liver tissues from a late-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model and wild-type (WT) controls. Because we have previously characterized this proteome using the cysDML approach, we are able here to probe deeper into the redox status of cysteine in AD. OxcysDML identified 1129 cysteine sites (from 527 proteins), among which 828 cysteine sites underwent oxidative modifications. Nineteen oxidized cysteine sites had significant alteration levels in AD and represent proteins involved in metabolic processes. Overall

  13. L-Cysteine metabolism and its nutritional implications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Ren, Wenkai; Yang, Guan; Duan, Jielin; Huang, Xingguo; Fang, Rejun; Li, Chongyong; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong; Hou, Yongqing; Kim, Sung Woo; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    L-Cysteine is a nutritionally semiessential amino acid and is present mainly in the form of L-cystine in the extracellular space. With the help of a transport system, extracellular L-cystine crosses the plasma membrane and is reduced to L-cysteine within cells by thioredoxin and reduced glutathione (GSH). Intracellular L-cysteine plays an important role in cellular homeostasis as a precursor for protein synthesis, and for production of GSH, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), and taurine. L-Cysteine-dependent synthesis of GSH has been investigated in many pathological conditions, while the pathway for L-cysteine metabolism to form H(2)S has received little attention with regard to prevention and treatment of disease in humans. The main objective of this review is to highlight the metabolic pathways of L-cysteine catabolism to GSH, H(2)S, and taurine, with special emphasis on therapeutic and nutritional use of L-cysteine to improve the health and well-being of animals and humans. PMID:25929483

  14. Cysteine peptidases from Phytomonas serpens: biochemical and immunological approaches.

    PubMed

    Elias, Camila G R; Aor, Ana Carolina; Valle, Roberta S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2009-12-01

    Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate trypanosomatid, shares common antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present work, we compared the hydrolytic capability of cysteine peptidases in both trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes presented a 10-fold higher efficiency in hydrolyzing the cysteine peptidase substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC than P. serpens promastigotes. Moreover, two weak cysteine-type gelatinolytic activities were detected in P. serpens, while a strong 50-kDa cysteine peptidase was observed in T. cruzi. Cysteine peptidase activities were detected at twofold higher levels in the cytoplasmic fraction when compared with the membrane-rich or the content released from P. serpens. The cysteine peptidase secreted by P. serpens cleaved several proteinaceous substrates. Corroborating these findings, the cellular distribution of the cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens was attested through immunocytochemistry analysis. Gold particles were observed in all cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, flagellum, flagellar membrane and flagellar pocket. Interestingly, some gold particles were visualized free in the flagellar pocket, suggesting the release of the cruzipain-like molecule. The antigenic properties of the cruzipain-like molecules of P. serpens were also analyzed. Interestingly, sera from chagasic patients recognized both cellular and extracellular antigens of P. serpens, including the cruzipain-like molecule. These results point to the use of P. serpens antigens, especially the cruzipain-like cysteine-peptidases, as an alternative vaccination approach to T. cruzi infection. PMID:19780820

  15. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B.; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L.; Whelan, Stephen A.; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A.; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E.; Cohen, Richard A.; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S.; McComb, Mark E.; Bachschmid, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a ‘Tandem Mass Tag’ (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation. PMID:26642319

  16. Probes of the Catalytic Site of Cysteine Dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chai,S.; Bruyere, J.; Maroney, M.

    2006-01-01

    The first major step of cysteine catabolism, the oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). In the present work, we utilize recombinant rat liver CDO and cysteine derivatives to elucidate structural parameters involved in substrate recognition and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to probe the interaction of the active site iron center with cysteine. Kinetic studies using cysteine structural analogs show that most are inhibitors and that a terminal functional group bearing a negative charge (e.g. a carboxylate) is required for binding. The substrate-binding site has no stringent restrictions with respect to the size of the amino acid. Lack of the amino or carboxyl groups at the a-carbon does not prevent the molecules from interacting with the active site. In fact, cysteamine is shown to be a potent activator of the enzyme without being a substrate. CDO was also rendered inactive upon complexation with the metal-binding inhibitors azide and cyanide. Unlike many non-heme iron dioxygenases that employ a-keto acids as cofactors, CDO was shown to be the only dioxygenase known to be inhibited by {alpha}-ketoglutarate.

  17. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to identify in vitro and in vivo. In this study, model peptides with cysteine, lysine, and histidine residues were used to examine the reactivity of acrolein. Results from these experiments show that acrolein reacts rapidly with cysteine residues through Michael addition to form M+56 Da adducts. These M+56 adducts are, however, not stable, even though spontaneous dissociation of the adduct is slow. Further studies demonstrated that when acrolein and model peptides are incubated at physiological pH and temperature, the M+56 adducts decreased gradually accompanied by the increase of M+38 adducts, which are formed from intra-molecular Schiff base formation. Adduct formation with the side chains of other amino acid residues (lysine and histidine) was much slower than cysteine and required higher acrolein concentration. When cysteine residues were blocked by reaction with iodoacetamide and higher concentrations of acrolein were used, adducts of the N-terminal amino group or histidyl residues were formed but lysine adducts were not detected. Collectively, these data demonstrate that acrolein reacts avidly with protein cysteine residues and that the apparent loss of protein-acrolein Michael adducts over time may be related to the appearance of a novel (M+38) adduct. These findings may be important in identification of in vivo adducts of acrolein with protein cysteine residues. PMID:19231900

  18. Effect of (L)-cysteine on acetaldehyde self-administration.

    PubMed

    Peana, Alessandra T; Muggironi, Giulia; Fois, Giulia R; Zinellu, Manuel; Sirca, Donatella; Diana, Marco

    2012-08-01

    Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first metabolite of ethanol, has been implicated in several behavioural actions of alcohol, including its reinforcing effects. Recently, we reported that l-cysteine, a sequestrating agent of ACD, reduced oral ethanol self-administration and that ACD was orally self-administered. This study examined the effects of l-cysteine pre-treatment during the acquisition and maintenance phases of ACD (0.2%) self-administration as well as on the deprivation effect after ACD extinction and on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. In a separate PR schedule of reinforcement, the effect of l-cysteine was assessed on the break-point produced by ethanol (10%). Furthermore, we tested the effect of l-cysteine on saccharin (0.2%) reinforcement. Wistar rats were trained to self-administer ACD by nose poking on a fixed ratio (FR1) schedule in 30-min daily sessions. Responses on an active nose-poke caused delivery of ACD solution, whereas responses on an inactive nose-poke had no consequences. l-cysteine reduced the acquisition (40 mg/kg), the maintenance and the deprivation effect (100 mg/kg) of ACD self-administration. Furthermore, at the same dose, l-cysteine (120 mg/kg) decreased both ACD and ethanol break point. In addition, l-cysteine was unable to suppress the different responses for saccharin, suggesting that its effect did not relate to an unspecific decrease in a general motivational state. Compared to saline, l-cysteine did not modify responses on inactive nose-pokes, suggesting an absence of a non-specific behavioural activation. Taken together, these results could support the hypotheses that ACD possesses reinforcing properties and l-cysteine reduces motivation to self-administer ACD. PMID:22440691

  19. On methylene-bridged cysteine and lysine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Cysteine residues ubiquitously stabilize tertiary and quaternary protein structure by formation of disulfide bridges. Here we investigate another linking interaction that involves sulfhydryl groups of cysteines, namely intra- and intermolecular methylene-bridges between cysteine and lysine residues. A number of crystal structures possessing such a linkage were identified in the Protein Data Bank. Inspection of the electron density maps and re-refinement of the nominated structures unequivocally confirmed the presence of Lys-CH2 -Cys bonds in several cases. PMID:27261771

  20. Organometallic Palladium Reagents for Cysteine Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal based reactions have found wide use in organic synthesis and are used frequently to functionalize small molecules.1,2 However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal based reactions to modify complex biomolecules3,4, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature, and mild pH) and the existence of multiple, reactive functional groups found in biopolymers. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation reactions. The bioconjugation reaction is rapid and robust under a range of biocompatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants, and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the new bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as a new set of benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications. PMID:26511579

  1. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M; Pentelute, Bradley L; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-10-29

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications. PMID:26511579

  2. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  3. Developing novel anthelmintics from plant cysteine proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Jerzy M; Buttle, David J; Stepek, Gillian; Lowe, Ann; Duce, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal helminth infections of livestock and humans are predominantly controlled by treatment with three classes of synthetic drugs, but some livestock nematodes have now developed resistance to all three classes and there are signs that human hookworms are becoming less responsive to the two classes (benzimidazoles and the nicotinic acetylcholine agonists) that are licensed for treatment of humans. New anthelmintics are urgently needed, and whilst development of new synthetic drugs is ongoing, it is slow and there are no signs yet that novel compounds operating through different modes of action, will be available on the market in the current decade. The development of naturally-occurring compounds as medicines for human use and for treatment of animals is fraught with problems. In this paper we review the current status of cysteine proteinases from fruits and protective plant latices as novel anthelmintics, we consider some of the problems inherent in taking laboratory findings and those derived from folk-medicine to the market and we suggest that there is a wealth of new compounds still to be discovered that could be harvested to benefit humans and livestock. PMID:18761736

  4. Cathepsin K: a unique collagenolytic cysteine peptidase.

    PubMed

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2013-09-01

    Cathepsin K has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Initially identified as a papain-like cysteine peptidase expressed in high levels in osteoclasts, the important role of this enzyme in bone metabolism was highlighted by the finding that mutations in the CTSK gene cause the rare recessive disorder pycnodysostosis, which is characterized by severe bone anomalies. At the molecular level, the physiological role of cathepsin K is reflected by its unique cleavage pattern of type I collagen molecules, which is fundamentally different from that of other endogenous collagenases. Several cathepsin K inhibitors have been developed to reduce the excessive bone matrix degradation associated with osteoporosis, with the frontrunner odanacatib about to successfully conclude Phase 3 clinical trials. Apart from osteoclasts, cathepsin K is expressed in different cell types throughout the body and is involved in processes of adipogenesis, thyroxine liberation and peptide hormone regulation. Elevated activity of cathepsin K has been associated with arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity, schizophrenia, and tumor metastasis. Accordingly, its activity is tightly regulated via multiple mechanisms, including competitive inhibition by endogenous macromolecular inhibitors and allosteric regulation by glycosaminoglycans. This review provides a state-of-the-art description of the activity of cathepsin K at the molecular level, its biological functions and the mechanisms involved in its regulation. PMID:23629523

  5. Reactivity of C-terminal cysteines with HNO.

    PubMed

    Keceli, Gizem; Toscano, John P

    2014-06-10

    Nitroxyl (HNO), a potential heart failure therapeutic, is known to target cysteine residues to form sulfinamides and/or disulfides. Because HNO-derived modifications may depend on their local environment, we have investigated the reactivity of HNO with cysteine derivatives and C-terminal cysteine-containing peptides at physiological pH and temperature. Our findings indicate that the nature of HNO-derived modifications of C-terminal cysteines is affected by the C-terminal carboxylate. Apart from the lack of sulfinamide formation, these studies have revealed the presence of new products, a sulfohydroxamic acid derivative (RS(O)2NHOH) and a thiosulfonate (RS(O)2SR), presumably produced under our experimental conditions via the intermediacy of a cyclic structure that is hydrolyzed to give a sulfenic acid (RSOH). Moreover, these modifications are formed independent of oxygen. PMID:24869490

  6. Metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulfinate in rat and cat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, J; Drake, M R; Stipanuk, M H

    1987-03-01

    The metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulfinate was studied in freshly isolated hepatocytes from fed rats and cats. In incubations of rat hepatocytes with cysteinesulfinate, the rate of hypotaurine plus taurine production was approximately the same as the rate of conversion of the 1-carbon of cysteinesulfinate to CO2. In contrast, no significant production of hypotaurine plus taurine occurred in incubations of cat hepatocytes with cysteinesulfinate. These data are consistent with the species difference in the activity of hepatic cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase, which converts cysteinesulfinate to hypotaurine. In incubations of either rat or cat hepatocytes with cysteine, no hypotaurine plus taurine production was detected. However, the 1-carbon of cysteine was converted to CO2 and the production of urea plus ammonia nitrogen was significantly increased over the rates observed in incubations of cells without substrate. Our results suggest that most cysteine oxidation by hepatocytes occurs by pathways that do not involve formation of cysteinesulfinate. PMID:3106599

  7. Role of cysteine residues in regulation of p53 function.

    PubMed

    Rainwater, R; Parks, D; Anderson, M E; Tegtmeyer, P; Mann, K

    1995-07-01

    Previous studies of p53 have implicated cysteine residues in site-specific DNA binding via zinc coordination and redox regulation (P. Hainaut and J. Milner, Cancer Res. 53:4469-4473, 1993; T. R. Hupp, D. W. Meek, C. A. Midgley, and D. P. Lane, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:3167-3174, 1993). We show here that zinc binding and redox regulation are, at least in part, distinct determinants of the binding of p53 to DNA. Moreover, by substituting serine for each cysteine in murine p53, we have investigated the roles of individual cysteines in the regulation of p53 function. Substitution of serine for cysteine at position 40, 179, 274, 293, or 308 had little or no effect on p53 function. In contrast, replacement of cysteine at position 173, 235, or 239 markedly reduced in vitro DNA binding, completely blocked transcriptional activation, and led to a striking enhancement rather than a suppression of transformation by p53. These three cysteines have been implicated in zinc binding by X-ray diffraction studies (Y. Cho, S. Gorina, P.D. Jeffrey, and N.P. Pavletich, Science 265:346-355, 1994); our studies demonstrate the functional consequences of the inability of the central DNA-binding domain of p53 to studies demonstrate the functional consequences of the inability of the central DNA-binding domain of p53 to bind zinc. Lastly, substitutions for cysteines at position 121, 132, 138, or 272 partially blocked both transactivation and the suppression of transformation by p53. These four cysteines are located in the loop-sheet-helix region of the site-specific DNA-binding domain of p53. Like the cysteines in the zinc-binding region, therefore, these cysteines may cooperate to modulate the structure of the DNA-binding domain. Our findings argue that p53 is subject to more than one level of conformational modulation through oxidation-reduction of cysteines at or near the p53-DNA interface. PMID:7791795

  8. Methionine-to-Cysteine Recycling in Klebsiella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Seiflein, Thomas A.; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.

    2001-01-01

    In the enteric bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, sulfate is reduced to sulfide and assimilated into the amino acid cysteine; in turn, cysteine provides the sulfur atom for other sulfur-bearing molecules in the cell, including methionine. These organisms cannot use methionine as a sole source of sulfur. Here we report that this constraint is not shared by many other enteric bacteria, which can use either cysteine or methionine as the sole source of sulfur. The enteric bacterium Klebsiella aerogenes appears to use at least two pathways to allow the reduced sulfur of methionine to be recycled into cysteine. In addition, the ability to recycle methionine on solid media, where cys mutants cannot use methionine as a sulfur source, appears to be different from that in liquid media, where they can. One pathway likely uses a cystathionine intermediate to convert homocysteine to cysteine and is induced under conditions of sulfur starvation, which is likely sensed by low levels of the sulfate reduction intermediate adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate. The CysB regulatory proteins appear to control activation of this pathway. A second pathway may use a methanesulfonate intermediate to convert methionine-derived methanethiol to sulfite. While the transsulfurylation pathway may be directed to recovery of methionine, the methanethiol pathway likely represents a general salvage mechanism for recovery of alkane sulfide and alkane sulfonates. Therefore, the relatively distinct biosyntheses of cysteine and methionine in E. coli and Salmonella appear to be more intertwined in Klebsiella. PMID:11114934

  9. Measurement of Cysteine Dioxygenase Activity and Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Stipanuk, Martha H.; Dominy, John E.; Ueki, Iori; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is an iron (Fe2+)-dependent thiol dioxygenase that uses molecular oxygen to oxidize the sulfhydryl group of cysteine to generate 3-sulfinoalanine (commonly called cysteinesulfinic acid). Cysteine dioxygenase activity is routinely assayed by measuring cysteinesulfinate formation from substrate L-cysteine at pH 6.1 in the presence of ferrous ions to saturate the enzyme with metal cofactor, a copper chelator to diminish substrate oxidation, and hydroxylamine to inhibit pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent degradation of product. The amount of cysteine dioxygenase may be measured by immunoblotting. Upon SDS-PAGE, cysteine dioxygenase can be separated into two major bands, with the upper band representing the 23-kDa protein and the lower band representing the mature enzyme that has undergone formation of an internal thioether cross link in the active site. Formation of this cross link is dependent upon the catalytic turnover of substrate and produces an enzyme with a higher catalytic efficiency and catalytic half-life. PMID:19885389

  10. Bovine superoxide dismutase and copper ions potentiate the bactericidal effect of autoxidizing cysteine.

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, G K; Granberg, G P; Carlsson, J

    1979-01-01

    When cysteine is oxidized by oxygen, hydrogen peroxide is formed, and hydrogen peroxide is very toxic to Peptostreptococcus anaerobius VPI 4330-1. Native and inactivated superoxide dismutase increased the rate of oxidation of cysteine and thereby potentiated the toxic effect of cysteine. A similar increase in the rate of oxidation of cysteine and in the toxicity of cysteine was obtained with Cu2+. PMID:573589

  11. Cysteines under ROS attack in plants: a proteomics view.

    PubMed

    Akter, Salma; Huang, Jingjing; Waszczak, Cezary; Jacques, Silke; Gevaert, Kris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2015-05-01

    Plants generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as part of their metabolism and in response to various external stress factors, potentially causing significant damage to biomolecules and cell structures. During the course of evolution, plants have adapted to ROS toxicity, and use ROS as signalling messengers that activate defence responses. Cysteine (Cys) residues in proteins are one of the most sensitive targets for ROS-mediated post-translational modifications, and they have become key residues for ROS signalling studies. The reactivity of Cys residues towards ROS, and their ability to react to different oxidation states, allow them to appear at the crossroads of highly dynamic oxidative events. As such, a redox-active cysteine can be present as S-glutathionylated (-SSG), disulfide bonded (S-S), sulfenylated (-SOH), sulfinylated (-SO2H), and sulfonylated (-SO3H). The sulfenic acid (-SOH) form has been considered as part of ROS-sensing pathways, as it leads to further modifications which affect protein structure and function. Redox proteomic studies are required to understand how and why cysteines undergo oxidative post-translational modifications and to identify the ROS-sensor proteins. Here, we update current knowledge of cysteine reactivity with ROS. Further, we give an overview of proteomic techniques that have been applied to identify different redox-modified cysteines in plants. There is a particular focus on the identification of sulfenylated proteins, which have the potential to be involved in plant signal transduction. PMID:25750420

  12. THE ROLE OF CYSTEINE PROTEASE IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Hasanbasic, Samra; Jahic, Alma; Karahmet, Emina; Sejranic, Asja; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cysteine protease are biological catalysts which play a pivotal role in numerous biological reactions in organism. Much of the literature is inscribed to their biochemical significance, distribution and mechanism of action. Many diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, develop due to enzyme balance disruption. Understanding of cysteine protease’s disbalance is therefor a key to unravel the new possibilities of treatment. Cysteine protease are one of the most important enzymes for protein disruption during programmed cell death. Whether protein disruption is part of cell deaths is not enough clear in any cases. Thereafter, any tissue disruption, including proteolysis, generate more or less inflammation appearance. Review: This review briefly summarizes the current knowledge about pathological mechanism’s that results in AD, with significant reference to the role of cysteine protease in it. Based on the summary, new pharmacological approach and development of novel potent drugs with selective toxicity targeting cysteine protease will be a major challenge in years to come. PMID:27482169

  13. Cysteine-dependent inactivation of hepatic ornithine decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Kameji, T; Hayashi, S

    1984-01-01

    When rat liver homogenate or its postmitochondrial supernatant was incubated with L-cysteine, but not D-cysteine, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) lost more than half of its catalytic activity within 30 min and, at a slower rate, its immunoreactivity. The inactivation correlated with production of H2S during the incubation. These changes did not occur in liver homogenates from vitamin B6-deficient rats. A heat-stable inactivating factor was found in both dialysed cytosol and washed microsomes obtained from the postmitochondrial supernatant incubated with cysteine. The microsomal inactivating factor was solubilized into Tris/HCl buffer, pH 7.4, containing dithiothreitol. Its absorption spectrum in the visible region resembled that of Fe2+ X dithiothreitol in Tris/HCl buffer. On the other hand FeSO4 inactivated partially purified ODC in a similar manner to the present inactivating factor. During the incubation of postmitochondrial supernatant with cysteine, there was a marked increase in the contents of Fe2+ loosely bound to cytosolic and microsomal macromolecules. Furthermore, the content of such reactive iron in the inactivating factor preparations was enough to account for their inactivating activity. These data suggested that H2S produced from cysteine by some vitamin B6-dependent enzyme(s) converted cytosolic and microsomal iron into a reactive loosely bound form that inactivated ODC. PMID:6696745

  14. Kyste hydatique primitif du sein

    PubMed Central

    Mouslik, Rabii; Settaf, Abdellatif; Elalami, Yacir; Lahnini, Hicham; Lahlou, Khalid; Chad, Bouziane

    2012-01-01

    Le kyste hydatique du sein est une parasitose rare même dans les pays endémiques. Nous rapportons une nouvelle observation d'une patiente de 30 ans qui présentait une masse du sein gauche. Le diagnostic de kyste hydatique du sein a été évoqué devant les données de l'examen clinique et de la mammographie couplée à l’échographie. Le geste chirurgical a consisté en une kystectomie. L'examen anatomopathologique de la pièce opératoire a confirmé le diagnostic. PMID:23133704

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Cysteine Adducts of Deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Stanic, Ana; Uhlig, Silvio; Solhaug, Anita; Rise, Frode; Wilkins, Alistair L; Miles, Christopher O

    2016-06-15

    Conjugation with the biologically relevant thiol glutathione is one of the metabolic pathways for the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) in wheat. The occurrence of putative DON-cysteine conjugates has also been shown in wheat, likely in part as a result of degradation of the glutathione conjugates. It was reported that thiols react in vitro with DON at two positions: reversibly at C-10 of the α,β-unsaturated ketone and irreversibly at C-13 of the epoxy group. We synthesized pure DON-cysteine adducts and made analytical standards using quantitative NMR experiments. Compounds were characterized using NMR and LC-HRMS/MS and tested in vitro for toxicity. Cysteine conjugates were much less toxic than DON at the same concentration, and LC-HRMS analysis demonstrated that there was no detectable metabolism of the conjugates in human monocytes or human macrophages. PMID:27229448

  16. Development of nitrile-based peptidic inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Frizler, Maxim; Stirnberg, Marit; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that several papain-like cysteine cathepsins are involved in the pathophysiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Therefore, the development of potent and selective cathepsin inhibitors is an attractive subject for medicinal chemists. New advances have been made for nitrile-based inhibitors, leading to the identification of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib and other candidates with potential for therapeutic use. This review summarizes the development of peptidic and peptidomimetic compounds with an electrophilic nitrile 'warhead' as inhibitors of the cysteine cathepsins B, S, L, C, and K. Peptide nitriles have been shown to reversibly react with the active site cysteine under formation of a covalent thioimidate adduct. The structural optimization with respect to the positions P3, P2, P1, P1', and P2' resulted in the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the corresponding cathepsins. The underlying structure-activity relationships are discussed herein. PMID:20166952

  17. Chemical Protein Ubiquitylation with Preservation of the Native Cysteine Residues.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Li, Guorui; Gong, Ping; Gui, Weijun; Yuan, Libo; Zhuang, Zhihao

    2016-06-01

    We report a cysteine-based ligation strategy for generating a monoubiquitylated protein while preserving the native cysteine residues on the acceptor protein. In monoubiquitylation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) this method circumvents the need to mutate the native cysteine residues on PCNA. The chemically ubiquitylated PCNA contains a noncleavable linkage of the same length as the native isopeptide linkage. It also retains the normal function of the native Ub-PCNA in stimulating the ATPase activity of replication factor C (RFC) and lesion bypass synthesis by Polη. This method may be adapted for chemical ubiquitylation of other proteins and for site-specific modification of a target protein at a specific site through sulfhydryl chemistry. PMID:27113245

  18. Density functional study of the cysteine adsorption on Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, L. A.; López-Lozano, X.; Garzón, I. L.

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption of the cysteine amino acid (H-SCβH2-CαH-NH2-COOH) on the Au55 cluster is investigated through density functional theory calculations. Two isomers, with icosahedral (Ih) and chiral (C1) geometries, of the Au55 cluster are used to calculate the adsorption energy of the cysteine on different facets of these isomers. Results, only involving the S(thiolate)-Au bonding show that the higher adsorption energies are obtained when the sulfur atom is bonded to an asymmetrical bridge site at the facet containing Au atoms with the lowest coordination of the C1 cluster isomer.

  19. Hypohomocysteinemic effect of cysteine is associated with increased plasma cysteine concentration in rats fed diets low in protein and methionine levels.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yoshiko; Ohuchi, Seiya; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2009-02-01

    Rats were fed diets with and without 0.5% L-cysteine supplement for 14 d or shorter periods to clarify the mechanism by which dietary cysteine elicits its hypohomocysteinemic effect. Cysteine supplementation significantly decreased plasma homocysteine concentration with an increase in plasma cysteine concentration in rats fed 10% casein diet (10C) or 15% soybean protein diet (15S) but not in rats fed 25% casein diet (25C) or 25% soybean protein diet. Cysteine supplementation also significantly suppressed hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline-deprived 10C with an increase in plasma cysteine concentration but not that induced by 25C+0.65% methionine or 25C+0.4% guanidinoacetic acid. Hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and homocysteine concentrations were significantly decreased by cysteine supplementation of 15S. These decreases in plasma homocysteine concentration and hepatic SAM and homocysteine concentrations due to cysteine supplementation disappeared when 15S was fortified with 0.3% methionine. The plasma homocysteine concentration significantly decreased with an increase in plasma cysteine concentration only 1 d after diet change from 15S to cysteine-supplemented 15S, while hepatic cystathionine beta-synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase activities were not altered. Unlike cysteine, cysteic acid and 2-mercaptoethylamine did not decrease plasma homocysteine concentration. These results indicate that cysteine markedly decreases plasma homocysteine concentration only when added to diets low in both protein and methionine levels and suggest that increased plasma cysteine concentration and decreased flow of methionine toward homocysteine formation, but not alteration of homocysteine-metabolizing enzyme activities, are associated with the hypohomocysteinemic effect of cysteine. PMID:19352065

  20. Modulation of cysteine biosynthesis in chloroplasts of transgenic tobacco overexpressing cysteine synthase [O-acetylserine(thiol)-lyase].

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Kurosawa, M; Tatsuguchi, K; Takagi, Y; Murakoshi, I

    1994-11-01

    Cysteine synthase [O-acetyl-L-serine(thiol)-lyase, EC 4.2.99.8] (CSase), which is responsible for the terminal step of cysteine biosynthesis, catalyzes the formation of L-cysteine from O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) and hydrogen sulfide. Three T-DNA vectors carrying a spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cytoplasmic CSase A cDNA (K. Saito, N. Miura, M. Yamazaki, H. Horano, I. Murakoshi [1992] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89: 8078-8082) were constructed as follows: pCSK3F, cDNA driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA promoter with a sense orientation; pCSK3R, cDNA driven by the CaMV 355 promoter with an antisense orientation; pCSK4F, cDNA fused with the sequence for chloroplast-targeting transit peptide of pea ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase small subunit driven by the CaMV 35S promoter with a sense orientation. These chimeric genes were transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and self-fertilized progeny were obtained. CSase activities in cell-free extracts of pCSK3F and pCSK4F transformants were 2- to 3-fold higher than those of control and pCSK3R plants. CSase activities in chloroplasts of pCSK4F transformants were severalfold higher than those of control and pCSK3F plants, indicating that the foreign CSase protein is transported and accumulated in a functionally active form in chloroplasts of pCSK4F plants. Isolated chloroplasts of a pCSK4F transformant had a more pronounced ability to form cysteine in response to addition of OAS and sulfur compounds than those of a control plant. In particular, feeding of OAS and sulfite resulted in enhanced cysteine formation, which required photoreduction of sulfite in chloroplasts. The enhanced cysteine formation in a pCSK4F plant responding to sulfite was also observed in leaf discs. In addition, these leaf discs were partially resistant to sulfite toxicity, possibly due to metabolic detoxification of sulfite by fixing into cysteine. These results suggested that overaccumulated

  1. DISULFIND: a disulfide bonding state and cysteine connectivity prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Ceroni, Alessio; Passerini, Andrea; Vullo, Alessandro; Frasconi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    DISULFIND is a server for predicting the disulfide bonding state of cysteines and their disulfide connectivity starting from sequence alone. Optionally, disulfide connectivity can be predicted from sequence and a bonding state assignment given as input. The output is a simple visualization of the assigned bonding state (with confidence degrees) and the most likely connectivity patterns. The server is available at . PMID:16844986

  2. Unfolding the fold of cyclic cysteine-rich peptides

    PubMed Central

    Shehu, Amarda; Kavraki, Lydia E.; Clementi, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    We propose a method to extensively characterize the native state ensemble of cyclic cysteine-rich peptides. The method uses minimal information, namely, amino acid sequence and cyclization, as a topological feature that characterizes the native state. The method does not assume a specific disulfide bond pairing for cysteines and allows the possibility of unpaired cysteines. A detailed view of the conformational space relevant for the native state is obtained through a hierarchic multi-resolution exploration. A crucial feature of the exploration is a geometric approach that efficiently generates a large number of distinct cyclic conformations independently of one another. A spatial and energetic analysis of the generated conformations associates a free-energy landscape to the explored conformational space. Application to three long cyclic peptides of different folds shows that the conformational ensembles and cysteine arrangements associated with free energy minima are fully consistent with available experimental data. The results provide a detailed analysis of the native state features of cyclic peptides that can be further tested in experiment. PMID:18287281

  3. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184.1272 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272...

  4. DNA cleavage by oxymyoglobin and cysteine-introduced metmyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Megha Subhash; Junedi, Sendy; Prakash, Halan; Nagao, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Masaru; Hirota, Shun

    2014-12-11

    Double stranded DNA was cleaved oxidatively by incubation with oxygenated myoglobin, and Lys96Cys sperm whale myoglobin in its stable ferric form functioned as an artificial nuclease under air by formation of an oxygenated species, owing to electron transfer from the SH group of the introduced cysteine to the heme. PMID:25327831

  5. Measuring Cysteine Cathepsin Activity to Detect Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Urška; Česen, Maruša Hafner; Turk, Boris

    2016-01-01

    During lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), lysosomal lumenal contents can be released into the cytosol. Small molecules are more likely to be released, and cysteine cathepsins, with mature forms possessing a mass of 25-30 kDa, are among the smallest lumenal lysosomal enzymes. In addition, specific substrates for cysteine cathepsins are available to investigators, and therefore the measurement of the cathepsin activity as a hallmark of LMP works well. Here, we present a protocol for measuring the activity of these enzymes after selective plasma membrane permeabilization with a low concentration of digitonin and after total cell membrane lysis with a high concentration of digitonin. A fluorogenic substrate can be added either directly to the well with lysed cells to show LMP or to the cell-free extract to show that the lysosomal membrane has been sufficiently destabilized to allow the translocation of lysosomal enzymes. Although the content of lysosomal cysteine cathepsins differs between cell lines, this method has general applicability, is sensitive, and has high throughput. The presented protocol shows how to measure cysteine cathepsin activity in the presence of lysed cells and also in cell-free extracts. Depending on the aim of the study, one or both types of measurements can be performed. PMID:27140915

  6. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cysteine Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Chay, Kee-Oh; Kwon, Joseph; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Park, Young-Kyu; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes damage to cellular proteins, lipids, membranes and DNA, and plays a key role in the development of cancer. Reactive oxygen species disrupt redox homeostasis and promote tumor formation by initiating aberrant activation of signaling pathways that lead to tumorigenesis. We used shotgun proteomics to identify proteins containing oxidation-sensitive cysteines in tissue specimens from colorectal cancer patients. We then compared the patterns of cysteine oxidation in the membrane fractions between the tumor and non-tumor tissues. Using nano-UPLC-MSE proteomics, we identified 31 proteins containing 37 oxidation-sensitive cysteines. These proteins were observed with IAM-binding cysteines in non-tumoral region more than tumoral region of CRC patients. Then using the Ingenuity pathway program, we evaluated the cellular canonical networks connecting those proteins. Within the networks, proteins with multiple connections were related with organ morphology, cellular metabolism, and various disorders. We have thus identified networks of proteins whose redox status is altered by oxidative stress, perhaps leading to changes in cellular functionality that promotes tumorigenesis. PMID:23677378

  7. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  8. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  9. Cysteine Racemization on IgG Heavy and Light Chains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingchun; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Under basic pH conditions, the heavy chain 220-light chain 214 (H220-L214) disulfide bond, found in the flexible hinge region of an IgG1, can convert to a thioether. Similar conditions also result in racemization of the H220 cysteine. Here, we report that racemization occurs on both H220 and L214 on an IgG1 with a λ light chain (IgG1λ) but almost entirely on H220 of an IgGl with a κ light chain (IgG1κ) under similar conditions. Likewise, racemization was detected at significant levels on H220 and L214 on endogenous human IgG1λ but only at the H220 position on IgG1κ. Low but measurable levels of d-cysteines were found on IgG2 cysteines in the hinge region, both with monoclonal antibodies incubated under basic pH conditions and on antibodies isolated from human serum. A simplified reaction mechanism involving reversible β-elimination on the cysteine is presented that accounts for both base-catalyzed racemization and thioether formation at the hinge disulfide. PMID:24142697

  10. Synthesis of Protein Bioconjugates via Cysteine-maleimide Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mason, Alexander F; Thordarson, Pall

    2016-01-01

    The chemical linking or bioconjugation of proteins to fluorescent dyes, drugs, polymers and other proteins has a broad range of applications, such as the development of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) and nanomedicine, fluorescent microscopy and systems chemistry. For many of these applications, specificity of the bioconjugation method used is of prime concern. The Michael addition of maleimides with cysteine(s) on the target proteins is highly selective and proceeds rapidly under mild conditions, making it one of the most popular methods for protein bioconjugation. We demonstrate here the modification of the only surface-accessible cysteine residue on yeast cytochrome c with a ruthenium(II) bisterpyridine maleimide. The protein bioconjugation is verified by gel electrophoresis and purified by aqueous-based fast protein liquid chromatography in 27% yield of isolated protein material. Structural characterization with MALDI-TOF MS and UV-Vis is then used to verify that the bioconjugation is successful. The protocol shown here is easily applicable to other cysteine - maleimide coupling of proteins to other proteins, dyes, drugs or polymers. PMID:27501061

  11. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  12. IDENTIFYING CRITICAL CYSTEINE RESIDUES IN ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic to mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. Orthologous AS3MT genes in genomes ranging from simple echinoderm to human predict a protein with five conserved cysteine (C) residues. In ...

  13. Dealing with methionine/homocysteine sulfur: cysteine metabolism to taurine and inorganic sulfur

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Iori

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of cysteine as a product of the transsulfuration pathway can be viewed as part of methionine or homocysteine degradation, with cysteine being the vehicle for sulfur conversion to end products (sulfate, taurine) that can be excreted in the urine. Transsulfuration is regulated by stimulation of cystathionine β-synthase and inhibition of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase in response to changes in the level of S-adenosylmethionine, and this promotes homocysteine degradation when methionine availability is high. Cysteine is catabolized by several desulfuration reactions that release sulfur in a reduced oxidation state, generating sulfane sulfur or hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which can be further oxidized to sulfate. Cysteine desulfuration is accomplished by alternate reactions catalyzed by cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. Cysteine is also catabolized by pathways that require the initial oxidation of the cysteine thiol by cysteine dioxygenase to form cysteinesulfinate. The oxidative pathway leads to production of taurine and sulfate in a ratio of approximately 2:1. Relative metabolism of cysteine by desulfuration versus oxidative pathways is influenced by cysteine dioxygenase activity, which is low in animals fed low-protein diets and high in animals fed excess sulfur amino acids. Thus, desulfuration reactions dominate when cysteine is deficient, whereas oxidative catabolism dominates when cysteine is in excess. In rats consuming a diet with an adequate level of sulfur amino acids, about two thirds of cysteine catabolism occurs by oxidative pathways and one third by desulfuration pathways. Cysteine dioxygenase is robustly regulated in response to cysteine availability and may function to provide a pathway to siphon cysteine to less toxic metabolites than those produced by cysteine desulfuration reactions. PMID:20162368

  14. Intrinsic membrane association of Drosophila cysteine string proteins.

    PubMed

    Mastrogiacomo, A; Kohan, S A; Whitelegge, J P; Gundersen, C B

    1998-09-25

    Cysteine string proteins (csps) are highly conserved constituents of vertebrate and invertebrate secretory organelles. Biochemical and immunoprecipitation experiments implied that vertebrate csps were integral membrane proteins that were tethered to the outer leaflet of secretory vesicles via the fatty acyl residues of their extensively acylated cysteine string. Independently, work of others suggested that Drosophila csps were peripheral membrane proteins that were anchored to membranes by a mechanism that was independent of the cysteine string and its fatty acyl residues. We extended these investigation and found first that sodium carbonate treatment partially stripped both csps and the integral membrane protein, synaptotagmin, from Drosophila membranes. Concomitantly, carbonate released fatty acids into the medium, arguing that it has a mild, solubilizing effect on these membranes. Second, we observed that Drosophila csps behaved like integral membrane proteins in Triton X-114 partitioning experiments. Third, we found that when membrane-bound csps were deacylated, they remained membrane bound. Moreover, it appeared that hydrophobic interactions were necessary for this persistent membrane association of csps. Thus, neither reducing conditions, urea, nor chaotropic agents displaced deacylated csps from membranes. Only detergents were effective in solubilizing deacylated csps. Finally, by virtue of the inaccessibility of deacylated csps to thiol alkylation by the membrane-impermeant alkylating reagent, iodoacetic acid, we inferred that it was the cysteine string domain that mediated the membrane association of deacylated csps. Thus, we conclude that under physiological conditions csps are integral membrane proteins of secretory organelles, and that the cysteine string domain plays a vital role in the membrane association of these proteins. PMID:9771899

  15. Specific Prenylation of Tomato Rab Proteins by Geranylgeranyl Type-II Transferase Requires a Conserved Cysteine-Cysteine Motif.

    PubMed Central

    Yalovsky, S.; Loraine, A. E.; Gruissem, W.

    1996-01-01

    Posttranslational isoprenylation of some small GTP-binding proteins is required for their biological activity. Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (Rab GGTase) uses geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to modify Rab proteins, its only known substrates. Geranylgeranylation of Rabs is believed to promote their association with target membranes and interaction with other proteins. Plants, like other eukaryotes, contain Rab-like proteins that are associated with intracellular membranes. However, to our knowledge, the geranylgeranylation of Rab proteins has not yet been characterized from any plant source. This report presents an activity assay that allows the characterization of prenylation of Rab-like proteins in vitro, by protein extracts prepared from plants. Tomato Rab1 proteins and mammalian Rab1a were modified by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by farnesyl pyrophosphate. This modification required a conserved cysteine-cysteine motif. A mutant form lacking the cysteine-cysteine motif could not be modified, but inhibited the geranylgeranylation of its wild-type homolog. The tomato Rab proteins were modified in vitro by protein extract prepared from yeast, but failed to become modified when the protein extract was prepared from a yeast strain containing a mutant allele for the [alpha] subunit of yeast Rab GGTase (bet4 ts). These results demonstrate that plant cells, like other eukaryotes, contain Rab GGTase-like activity. PMID:12226265

  16. Bioactivation of cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides by cysteine conjugate beta-lyase purified from Peptostreptococcus magnus.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Kinouchi, T; Akimoto, S; Ohnishi, Y

    1995-01-01

    To determine the role of cysteine conjugate beta-lyase (beta-lyase) in the metabolism of mutagenic nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we determined the effect of beta-lyase on the mutagenicities and DNA binding of cysteine conjugates of 4,5-epoxy-4,5-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 4,5-oxide) and 9,10-epoxy-9,10-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 9,10-oxide), which are detoxified metabolites of the mutagenic compound 1-nitropyrene. We purified beta-lyase from Peptostreptococcus magnus GAI0663, since P. magnus is one of the constituents of the intestinal microflora and exhibits high levels of degrading activity with cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides (1-NP oxide-Cys). The activity of purified beta-lyase was optimal at pH 7.5 to 8.0, was completely inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid and hydroxylamine, and was eliminated by heating the enzyme at 55 degrees C for 5 min. The molecular weight of beta-lyase was 150,000, as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography. S-Arylcysteine conjugates were good substrates for this enzyme. As determined by the Salmonella mutagenicity test, 5 ng of beta-lyase protein increased the mutagenicity of the cysteine conjugate of 1-NP 9,10-oxide (10 nmol per plate) 4.5-fold in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and 4.1-fold in strain TA100. However, beta-lyase had little effect on the cysteine conjugate of 1-NP 4,5-oxide (10 nmol per plate). Both conjugates exhibited only low levels of mutagenicity with nitroreductase-deficient strain TA98NR. In vitro binding of 1-NP oxide-Cys to calf thymus DNA was increased by adding purified beta-lyase or xanthine oxidase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8526486

  17. Nonvolatile S-alk(en)ylthio-L-cysteine derivatives in fresh onion (Allium cepa L. cultivar).

    PubMed

    Starkenmann, Christian; Niclass, Yvan; Troccaz, Myriam

    2011-09-14

    The L-cysteine derivatives (R)-2-amino-3-(methyldisulfanyl)propanoic acid (S-methylthio-L-cysteine), (R)-2-amino-3-(propyldisulfanyl)propanoic acid (S-propylthio-L-cysteine), (R)-2-amino-3-(1-propenyldisulfanyl)propanoic acid (S-(1-propenylthio)-L-cysteine), and (R)-2-amino-3-(2-propenyldisulfanyl)propanoic acid (S-allylthio-L-cysteine) were prepared from 3-[(methoxycarbonyl)dithio]-L-alanine, obtained from the reaction of L-cysteine with methoxycarbonylsulfenyl chloride. The occurrence of these S-(+)-alk(en)ylthio-L-cysteine derivatives in onion (Allium cepa L.) was proven by using UPLC-MS-ESI(+) in SRM mode. Their concentrations in fresh onion were estimated to be 0.19 mg/kg S-methylthio-L-cysteine, 0.01 mg/kg S-propylthio-L-cysteine, and 0.56 mg/kg (S-(1-propenyllthio)-L-cysteine, concentrations that are about 3000 times lower than that of isoalliin (S-(1-propenyl-S-oxo-L-cysteine). These compounds were treated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, a microorganism responsible for the formation of mouth malodor. These L-cysteine disulfides were demonstrated to predominantly produce tri- and tetrasulfides. Isoalliin is almost entirely consumed by the plant enzyme alliin lyase (EC 4.4.1.4 S-alk(en)yl-S-oxo-L-cysteine lyase) in a few seconds, but it is not transformed by F. nucleatum. This example of flavor modulation shows that the plant produces different precursors, leading to the formation of the same types of volatile sulfur compounds. Whereas the plant enzyme efficiently transforms S-alk(en)yl-S-oxo-L-cysteine, mouth bacteria are responsible for the transformation of S-alk(en)ylthio-L-cysteine. PMID:21854077

  18. Cri du Chat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cerruti Mainardi, Paola

    2006-01-01

    The Cri du Chat syndrome (CdCS) is a genetic disease resulting from a deletion of variable size occurring on the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-). The incidence ranges from 1:15,000 to 1:50,000 live-born infants. The main clinical features are a high-pitched monochromatic cry, microcephaly, broad nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Malformations, although not very frequent, may be present: cardiac, neurological and renal abnormalities, preauricular tags, syndactyly, hypospadias, and cryptorchidism. Molecular cytogenetic analysis has allowed a cytogenetic and phenotypic map of 5p to be defined, even if results from the studies reported up to now are not completely in agreement. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies showed a clinical and cytogenetic variability. The identification of phenotypic subsets associated with a specific size and type of deletion is of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. Specific growth and psychomotor development charts have been established. Two genes, Semaphorin F (SEMAF) and δ-catenin (CTNND2), which have been mapped to the "critical regions", are potentially involved in cerebral development and their deletion may be associated with mental retardation in CdCS patients. Deletion of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, localised to 5p15.33, could contribute to the phenotypic changes in CdCS. The critical regions were recently refined by using array comparative genomic hybridisation. The cat-like cry critical region was further narrowed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and three candidate genes were characterised in this region. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical manifestations. Karyotype analysis and, in doubtful cases, FISH analysis will confirm the diagnosis. There is no specific therapy for CdCS but early rehabilitative and educational interventions improve the prognosis and considerable progress has been made in

  19. L'Aventure du LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Cette présentation s?adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l?engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  20. L'Aventure du LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  1. New method for effectively and quantitatively labeling cysteine residues on chicken eggshell membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Li, Qian; Yuan, Yue; Mei, Bin; Huang, Rui; Tian, Ying; Sun, Jing; Cao, Chunyan; Lu, Guangming; Liang, Gaolin

    2012-10-28

    Using maleimidoethylmonoamide cysteine (Fmoc)(StBu) (1) as a medium, cysteine residues on proteins of chicken eggshell membrane (ESM) were successfully converted into N-terminal cysteines. After a biocompatible condensation reaction between the N-terminal cysteine and fluorescent probe 2-cyanobenzothiazole-Gly-Gly-Gly-fluorescein isothiocyanate (2), a new fluorogenic structure luciferin-Gly-Gly-Gly-FITC (3) was obtained, which exhibits a 2-fold fluorescence emission increase compared to that of 2. Thus, a new method for effectively labeling cysteine residues on ESMs was developed. Enhanced fluorescence images of ESMs were directly observed under a microscope and a small animal imaging machine. PMID:22961406

  2. A conserved cysteine motif essential for ceramide kinase function.

    PubMed

    Lidome, Emilie; Graf, Christine; Jaritz, Markus; Schanzer, Andrea; Rovina, Philipp; Nikolay, Rainer; Bornancin, Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    Ceramide kinase (CerK) is a sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme very sensitive to oxidation; however, the determinants are unknown. We show here that the thiol-modifying agent N-ethyl-maleimide abrogates CerK activity in vitro and in a cell based assay, implying that important cysteine residues are accessible in purified as well as endogenous CerK. We replaced every 22 residues in human CerK, by an alanine, and measured activity in the resulting mutant proteins. This led to identification of a cluster of cysteines, C(347)XXXC(351)XXC(354), essential for CerK function. These findings are discussed based on homology modeling of the catalytic domain of CerK. PMID:18662741

  3. Light-Mediated Sulfenic Acid Generation from Photocaged Cysteine Sulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jia; Carroll, Kate S

    2015-12-18

    S-Sulfenylation is a post-translational modification with a crucial role in regulating protein function. However, its analysis has remained challenging due to the lack of facile sulfenic acid models. We report the first photocaged cysteine sulfenic acid with efficient photodeprotection and demonstrate its utility by generating sulfenic acid in a thiol peroxidase after illumination in vitro. These caged sulfoxides should be promising for site-specific incorporation of Cys sulfenic acid in living cells via genetic code expansion. PMID:26641493

  4. Cysteine cathepsins as digestive enzymes in the spider Nephilengys cruentata.

    PubMed

    Fuzita, Felipe J; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Lopes, Adriana R

    2015-05-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are widely spread on living organisms associated to protein degradation in lysosomes, but some groups of Arthropoda (Heteroptera, Coleoptera, Crustacea and Acari) present these enzymes related to digestion of the meal proteins. Although spiders combine a mechanism of extra-oral with intracellular digestion, the sporadic studies on this subject were mainly concerned with the digestive fluid (DF) analysis. Thus, a more complete scenario of the digestive process in spiders is still lacking in the literature. In this paper we describe the identification and characterization of cysteine cathepsins in the midgut diverticula (MD) and DF of the spider Nephilengys cruentata by using enzymological assays. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative data from transcriptomic followed by proteomic experiments were used together with biochemical assays for results interpretation. Five cathepsins L, one cathepsin F and one cathepsin B were identified by mass spectrometry, with cathepsins L1 (NcCTSL1) and 2 (NcCTSL2) as the most abundant enzymes. The native cysteine cathepsins presented acidic characteristics such as pH optima of 5.5, pH stability in acidic range and zymogen conversion to the mature form after in vitro acidification. NcCTSL1 seems to be a lysosomal enzyme with its recombinant form displaying acidic characteristics as the native ones and being inhibited by pepstatin. Evolutionarily, arachnid cathepsin L may have acquired different roles but its use for digestion is a common feature to studied taxa. Now a more elucidative picture of the digestive process in spiders can be depicted, with trypsins and astacins acting extra-orally under alkaline conditions whereas cysteine cathepsins will act in an acidic environment, likely in the digestive vacuoles or lysosome-like vesicles. PMID:25818482

  5. Cysteine Peptidases as Schistosomiasis Vaccines with Inbuilt Adjuvanticity

    PubMed Central

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem; Selim, Sahar; Donnelly, Sheila; Cotton, Sophie; Gonzales Santana, Bibiana; Dalton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is caused by several worm species of the genus Schistosoma and afflicts up to 600 million people in 74 tropical and sub-tropical countries in the developing world. Present disease control depends on treatment with the only available drug praziquantel. No vaccine exists despite the intense search for molecular candidates and adjuvant formulations over the last three decades. Cysteine peptidases such as papain and Der p 1 are well known environmental allergens that sensitize the immune system driving potent Th2-responses. Recently, we showed that the administration of active papain to mice induced significant protection (P<0.02, 50%) against an experimental challenge infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Since schistosomes express and secrete papain-like cysteine peptidases we reasoned that these could be employed as vaccines with inbuilt adjuvanticity to protect against these parasites. Here we demonstrate that sub-cutaneous injection of functionally active S. mansoni cathepsin B1 (SmCB1), or a cathepsin L from a related parasite Fasciola hepatica (FhCL1), elicits highly significant (P<0.0001) protection (up to 73%) against an experimental challenge worm infection. Protection and reduction in worm egg burden were further increased (up to 83%) when the cysteine peptidases were combined with other S. mansoni vaccine candidates, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SG3PDH) and peroxiredoxin (PRX-MAP), without the need to add chemical adjuvants. These studies demonstrate the capacity of helminth cysteine peptidases to behave simultaneously as immunogens and adjuvants, and offer an innovative approach towards developing schistosomiasis vaccines PMID:24465551

  6. Copper Inhibits the Protease from Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 by Both Cysteine-Dependent and Cysteine-Independent Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Anders R.; Levine, Rodney L.

    1991-07-01

    The protease of the human immunodeficiency virus is essential for replication of the virus, and the enzyme is therefore an attractive target for antiviral action. We have found that the viral protease is inhibited by approximately stoichiometric concentrations of copper or mercury ions. Inactivation by Cu2+ was rapid and not reversed by subsequent exposure to EDTA or dithiothreitol. Direct inhibition by Cu2+ required the presence of cysteine residue(s) in the protease. Thus, a synthetic protease lacking cysteine residues was not inhibited by exposure to copper. However, addition of dithiothreitol as an exogenous thiol rendered even the synthetic protease susceptible to inactivation by copper. Oxygen was not required for inactivation of either the wild-type or the synthetic protease. These results provide the basis for the design of novel types of protease inhibitors.

  7. A mechanistic model of the cysteine synthase complex.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Salit, Anna; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Ruediger; Wade, Rebecca C

    2009-02-13

    Plants and bacteria assimilate and incorporate inorganic sulfur into organic compounds such as the amino acid cysteine. Cysteine biosynthesis involves a bienzyme complex, the cysteine synthase (CS) complex. The CS complex is composed of the enzymes serine acetyl transferase (SAT) and O-acetyl-serine-(thiol)-lyase (OAS-TL). Although it is experimentally known that formation of the CS complex influences cysteine production, the exact biological function of the CS complex, the mechanism of reciprocal regulation of the constituent enzymes and the structure of the complex are still poorly understood. Here, we used docking techniques to construct a model of the CS complex from mitochondrial Arabidopsis thaliana. The three-dimensional structures of the enzymes were modeled by comparative techniques. The C-termini of SAT, missing in the template structures but crucial for CS formation, were modeled de novo. Diffusional encounter complexes of SAT and OAS-TL were generated by rigid-body Brownian dynamics simulation. By incorporating experimental constraints during Brownian dynamics simulation, we identified complexes consistent with experiments. Selected encounter complexes were refined by molecular dynamics simulation to generate structures of bound complexes. We found that although a stoichiometric ratio of six OAS-TL dimers to one SAT hexamer in the CS complex is geometrically possible, binding energy calculations suggest that, consistent with experiments, a ratio of only two OAS-TL dimers to one SAT hexamer is more likely. Computational mutagenesis of residues in OAS-TL that are experimentally significant for CS formation hindered the association of the enzymes due to a less-favorable electrostatic binding free energy. Since the enzymes from A. thaliana were expressed in Escherichia coli, the cross-species binding of SAT and OAS-TL from E. coli and A. thaliana was explored. The results showed that reduced cysteine production might be due to a cross-binding of A. thaliana

  8. The IRC7 gene encodes cysteine desulphydrase activity and confers on yeast the ability to grow on cysteine as a nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Margarita; Gardner, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    Although cysteine desulphydrase activity has been purified and characterized from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene encoding this activity in vivo has never been defined. We show that the full-length IRC7 gene, encoded by the YFR055W open reading frame, encodes a protein with cysteine desulphydrase activity. Irc7p purified to homogeneity is able to utilize l-cysteine as a substrate, producing pyruvate and hydrogen sulphide as products of the reaction. Purified Irc7p also utilized l-cystine and some other cysteine conjugates, but not l-cystathionine or l-methionine, as substrates. We further show that, in vivo, the IRC7 gene is both necessary and sufficient for yeast to grow on l-cysteine as a nitrogen source, and that overexpression of the gene results in increased H2 S production. Strains overexpressing IRC7 are also hypersensitive to a toxic analogue, S-ethyl-l-cysteine. While IRC7 has been identified as playing a critical role in converting cysteine conjugates to volatile thiols that are important in wine aroma, its biological role in yeast cells is likely to involve regulation of cysteine and redox homeostasis. PMID:25871637

  9. Identification of papain-like cysteine proteases from the bovine piroplasm Babesia bigemina and evolutionary relationship of piroplasms C1 family of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Martins, Tiago M; do Rosário, Virgílio E; Domingos, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases have been shown to have essential roles in parasitic protozoa and are under study as promising drug targets. Five genes were identified by sequence similarity search to be homologous to the cysteine protease family in the ongoing Babesia bigemina genome sequencing project database and were compared with the annotated genes from the complete bovine piroplasm genomes of Babesia bovis, Theileria annulata, and Theileria parva. Multiple genome alignments and sequence analysis were used to evaluate the molecular evolution events that occurred in the C1 family of cysteine proteases in these piroplasms of veterinary importance. BbiCPL1, one of the newly identified cysteine protease genes in the B. bigemina genome was expressed in Escherichia coli and shows activity against peptide substrates. Considerable differences were observed in the cysteine protease family between Babesia and Theileria genera, and this may partially explain the diverse infection mechanisms of these tick-borne diseases. PMID:20655912

  10. Accessibility of cysteines in the native bovine rod cGMP-gated channel.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Paul J; Krause, Eberhard

    2005-02-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels of photoreceptors and olfactory sensory neurons are tetramers consisting of A and B subunits. Here, the accessibility of the cysteines of the bovine rod cyclic nucleotide-gated channel is examined as a function of ligand binding. N-Ethylmaleimide-modified cysteines of both subunits were identified by mass spectrometry after trypsin digestion. In the absence of ligand, the intracellular carboxy-terminal cysteines of both subunits were accessible to N-ethylmaleimide. Activation of the channel abolished the accessibility of Cys505 of the A subunit and Cys1104 of the B subunit, with both being conserved cysteines of the cyclic nucleotide-binding sites. The cysteine of the pore loop of the B subunit was also found to be modified by this reagent in the absence of ligand. The total number of accessible cysteines of each subunit was determined by mass shifting upon modification with polyethylene glycol maleimide. In the absence of cyclic nucleotides, this hydrophilic reagent only weakly labeled cysteines of the A subunit but readily labeled at least three cysteines of the B subunit. Ligand binding exposed two cysteines of the A subunit and one cysteine of the B subunit to chemical modification. Double-modification experiments suggest that some of these cysteines are in or close to membrane-spanning domains. However, these cysteines could not yet be identified. Together, the cysteine accessibility of the native rod cyclic nucleotide-gated channel varies markedly upon ligand binding, thus indicating major structural rearrangements, which are of functional importance for channel activation. PMID:15683246

  11. Prediction of reversibly oxidized protein cysteine thiols using protein structure properties

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ricardo; Riddle, Megan; Woo, Jongwook; Momand, Jamil

    2008-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols can be divided into four groups based on their reactivities: those that form permanent structural disulfide bonds, those that coordinate with metals, those that remain in the reduced state, and those that are susceptible to reversible oxidation. Physicochemical parameters of oxidation-susceptible protein thiols were organized into a database named the Balanced Oxidation Susceptible Cysteine Thiol Database (BALOSCTdb). BALOSCTdb contains 161 cysteine thiols that undergo reversible oxidation and 161 cysteine thiols that are not susceptible to oxidation. Each cysteine was represented by a set of 12 parameters, one of which was a label (1/0) to indicate whether its thiol moiety is susceptible to oxidation. A computer program (the C4.5 decision tree classifier re-implemented as the J48 classifier) segregated cysteines into oxidation-susceptible and oxidation-non-susceptible classes. The classifier selected three parameters critical for prediction of thiol oxidation susceptibility: (1) distance to the nearest cysteine sulfur atom, (2) solvent accessibility, and (3) pKa. The classifier was optimized to correctly predict 136 of the 161 cysteine thiols susceptible to oxidation. Leave-one-out cross-validation analysis showed that the percent of correctly classified cysteines was 80.1% and that 16.1% of the oxidation-susceptible cysteine thiols were incorrectly classified. The algorithm developed from these parameters, named the Cysteine Oxidation Prediction Algorithm (COPA), is presented here. COPA prediction of oxidation-susceptible sites can be utilized to locate protein cysteines susceptible to redox-mediated regulation and identify possible enzyme catalytic sites with reactive cysteine thiols. PMID:18287280

  12. Cadmium(II) Complex Formation with Cysteine and Penicillamine

    PubMed Central

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O.; Mah, Vicky

    2009-01-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H2Cys) or penicillamine (H2Pen = 3, 3′-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, containing CCd(II) ∼ 0.1 mol dm-3 and CH2L = 0.2 – 2 mol dm-3, was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of 113Cd-NMR and Cd K- and L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine mole ratios the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52 – 2.54 Å and 2.27 – 2.35 Å, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50 – 2.53 Å, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28 – 2.33 Å. For the mole ratio CH2L / CCd(II) = 2, the 113Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509 – 527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS2N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (mole ratios CH2Cys / CCd(II) ≥ 10) complexes with CdS4 coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the 113Cd NMR chemical shifts, δ ∼ 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636 - 658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances of 2.53 ± 0.02 Å. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)4]n-, while at higher pH the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation, and at pH 11.0 a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)3]4- complex with CdS3N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with mole ratios CH2Pen / CCd(II) ≥ 10, the 113Cd-NMR chemical shifts, δ ∼ 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances Cd-S 2.53 ± 0.02 Å and Cd-O 2.30 – 2.33 Å, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)3]n- complexes with chelating CdS3(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5, and become mixed with CdS2N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the cadmium(II) ion that can explain why cysteine-rich metallothionines

  13. Cadmium(II) complex formation with cysteine and penicillamine.

    PubMed

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O; Mah, Vicky

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H(2)Cys) and penicillamine (H(2)Pen = 3,3'-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, having C(Cd(II)) approximately 0.1 mol dm(-3) and C(H(2)L) = 0.2-2 mol dm(-3), was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of (113)Cd NMR and Cd K- and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine molar ratios, the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52-2.54 and 2.27-2.35 A, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50-2.53 A, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28-2.33 A. For the molar ratio C(H(2)L)/C(Cd(II)) = 2, the (113)Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509-527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS(2)N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (molar ratios C(H(2)Cys)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10), complexes with CdS(4) coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636-658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances were 2.53 +/- 0.02 A. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)(4)](n-), while at higher pH, the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation. At pH 11.0, a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)(3)](4-) complex with CdS(3)N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with molar ratios C(H(2)Pen)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10, the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances, Cd-S 2.53 +/- 0.02 A and Cd-(N/O) 2.30-2.33 A, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)(3)](n-) complexes with chelating CdS(3)(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5 and become mixed with CdS(2)N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the

  14. Biosynthesis and Reactivity of Cysteine Persulfides in Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pramod K; Martinov, Michael; Vitvitsky, Victor; Seravalli, Javier; Wedmann, Rudolf; Filipovic, Milos R; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-01-13

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) elicits pleiotropic physiological effects ranging from modulation of cardiovascular to CNS functions. A dominant method for transmission of sulfide-based signals is via posttranslational modification of reactive cysteine thiols to persulfides. However, the source of the persulfide donor and whether its relationship to H2S is as a product or precursor is controversial. The transsulfuration pathway enzymes can synthesize cysteine persulfide (Cys-SSH) from cystine and H2S from cysteine and/or homocysteine. Recently, Cys-SSH was proposed as the primary product of the transsulfuration pathway with H2S representing a decomposition product of Cys-SSH. Our detailed kinetic analyses demonstrate a robust capacity for Cys-SSH production by the human transsulfuration pathway enzymes, cystathionine beta-synthase and γ-cystathionase (CSE) and for homocysteine persulfide synthesis from homocystine by CSE only. However, in the reducing cytoplasmic milieu where the concentration of reduced thiols is significantly higher than of disulfides, substrate level regulation favors the synthesis of H2S over persulfides. Mathematical modeling at physiologically relevant hepatic substrate concentrations predicts that H2S rather than Cys-SSH is the primary product of the transsulfuration enzymes with CSE being the dominant producer. The half-life of the metastable Cys-SSH product is short and decomposition leads to a mixture of polysulfides (Cys-S-(S)n-S-Cys). These in vitro data, together with the intrinsic reactivity of Cys-SSH for cysteinyl versus sulfur transfer, are consistent with the absence of an observable increase in protein persulfidation in cells in response to exogenous cystine and evidence for the formation of polysulfides under these conditions. PMID:26667407

  15. Rational design of reversible and irreversible cysteine sulfenic acid-targeted linear C-nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-02-16

    Concerns about off-target effects has motivated the development of reversible covalent inhibition strategies for targeting cysteine. However, such strategies have not been reported for the unique cysteine oxoform, sulfenic acid. Herein, we have designed and identified linear C-nucleophiles that react selectively with cysteine sulfenic acid. The resulting thioether adducts exhibit reversibility ranging from minutes to days under reducing conditions, showing the feasibility of tuning C-nucleophile reactivity across a wide range of time scales. PMID:26878905

  16. Predicting the Reactivity of Nitrile-Carrying Compounds with Cysteine: A Combined Computational and Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report on a mechanistic investigation based on DFT calculations and kinetic measures aimed at determining the energetics related to the cysteine nucleophilic attack on nitrile-carrying compounds. Activation energies were found to correlate well with experimental kinetic measures of reactivity with cysteine in phosphate buffer. The agreement between computations and experiments points to this DFT-based approach as a tool for predicting both nitrile reactivity toward cysteines and the toxicity of nitriles as electrophile agents. PMID:24900869

  17. Influence of cysteine doping on photoluminescence intensity from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes can be applied for detection of cysteine. It is shown that cysteine doping (from 10-8 to 10-3 M) into aqueous suspension of nanotubes with adsorbed DNA leads to increase of PL intensity. The PL intensity was enhanced by 27% at 10-3 M cysteine concentration in suspension. Most likely, the PL intensity increases due to the passivation of p-defects on the nanotube by the cysteine containing reactive thiol group. The effect of doping with other amino acids without this group (methionine, serine, aspartic acid, lysine, proline) on the PL intensity is essentially weaker.

  18. Enzymatic synthesis of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin hydrolysis industries wastewater with tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lisheng; Wang, Zhiyuan; Mao, Pingting; Liu, Junzhong; Zhang, Hongjuan; Liu, Qian; Jiao, Qing-Cai

    2013-04-01

    An economical method for production of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin acid hydrolysis wastewater (KHW) containing L-serine was developed by recombinant tryptophan synthase. This study provides us with an alternative KHW utilization strategy to synthesize S-phenyl-L-cysteine. Tryptophan synthase could efficiently convert L-serine contained in KHW to S-phenyl-L-cysteine at pH 9.0, 40°C and Trion X-100 of 0.02%. In a scale up study, L-serine conversion rate reach 97.1% with a final S-phenyl-L-cysteine concentration of 38.6 g l(-1). PMID:23478091

  19. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E.; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M.; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis. PMID:26308073

  20. Cysteine Prevents the Reduction in Keratin Synthesis Induced by Iron Deficiency in Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Irace, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonella; Piccolo, Marialuisa; Di Pascale, Antonio; Russo, Annapina; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Lepre, Fabio; Russo, Giulia; Santamaria, Rita

    2016-02-01

    L-cysteine is currently recognized as a conditionally essential sulphur amino acid. Besides contributing to many biological pathways, cysteine is a key component of the keratin protein by its ability to form disulfide bridges that confer strength and rigidity to the protein. In addition to cysteine, iron represents another critical factor in regulating keratins expression in epidermal tissues, as well as in hair follicle growth and maturation. By focusing on human keratinocytes, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cysteine supplementation as nutraceutical on keratin biosynthesis, as well as to get an insight on the interplay of cysteine availability and cellular iron status in regulating keratins expression in vitro. Herein we demonstrate that cysteine promotes a significant up-regulation of keratins expression as a result of de novo protein synthesis, while the lack of iron impairs keratin expression. Interestingly, cysteine supplementation counteracts the adverse effect of iron deficiency on cellular keratin expression. This effect was likely mediated by the up-regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin, the main cellular proteins involved in iron homeostasis, at last affecting the labile iron pool. In this manner, cysteine may also enhance the metabolic iron availability for DNA synthesis without creating a detrimental condition of iron overload. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first study in an in vitro keratinocyte model providing evidence that cysteine and iron cooperate for keratins expression, indicative of their central role in maintaining healthy epithelia. PMID:26212225

  1. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process. PMID:26764487

  2. Metabolism of cysteine in rat hepatocytes. Evidence for cysteinesulphinate-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Drake, M R; De La Rosa, J; Stipanuk, M H

    1987-06-01

    The metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulphinate was studied in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Over 80% of the 14CO2 formed from [1-14C]cysteinesulphinate could be accounted for by production of hypotaurine plus taurine in incubations of rat hepatocytes with either 1 mM- or 25 mM-cysteinesulphinate. In similar incubations with 1 mM- or 25 mM-cysteine, less than 10% of 14CO2 evolution from [1-14C]cysteine could be accounted for by production of hypotaurine plus taurine. In incubations with cysteine, but not with cysteinesulphinate, the production of urea and ammonia was substantially increased above that observed in incubations without substrate. Addition of unlabelled cysteinesulphinate did not affect 14CO2 production from [1-14C]cysteine. Addition of 2-oxoglutarate resulted in a marked increase in cysteinesulphinate catabolism via the transamination pathway, but addition of neither 2-oxoglutarate nor pyruvate to the incubation system had any effect on cysteine catabolism. Inhibition of cystathionase with propargylglycine decreased 14CO2 production from [1-14C]cysteine about 50% and markedly decreased production of ammonia plus urea N; cysteinesulphinate catabolism by cysteinesulphinate-independent pathways in the rat hepatocyte and, furthermore, that cleavage of cyst(e)ine by cystathionase may be an important physiological pathway for cysteine catabolism in rat liver. PMID:3117038

  3. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Menger, Katja E; James, Andrew M; Cochemé, Helena M; Harbour, Michael E; Chouchani, Edward T; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-06-30

    Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  4. Cysteine-independent inhibition of the CFTR chloride channel by the cysteine-reactive reagent sodium (2-sulphonatoethyl) methanethiosulphonate

    PubMed Central

    Li, M-S; Demsey, AFA; Qi, J; Linsdell, P

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Methanethiosulphonate (MTS) reagents are used extensively to modify covalently cysteine side chains in ion channel structure-function studies. We have investigated the interaction between a widely used negatively charged MTS reagent, (2-sulphonatoethyl) methanethiosulphonate (MTSES), and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. Experimental approach: Patch clamp recordings were used to study a ‘cys-less’ variant of human CFTR, in which all 18 endogenous cysteine residues have been removed by mutagenesis, expressed in mammalian cell lines. Use of excised inside–out membrane patches allowed MTS reagents to be applied to the cytoplasmic face of active channels. Key results: Intracellular application of MTSES, but not the positively charged MTSET, inhibited the function of cys-less CFTR. Inhibition was voltage dependent, with a Kd of 1.97 mmol·L−1 at −80 mV increasing to 36 mmol·L−1 at +80 mV. Inhibition was completely reversed on washout of MTSES, inconsistent with covalent modification of the channel protein. At the single channel level, MTSES caused a concentration-dependent reduction in unitary current amplitude. This inhibition was strengthened when extracellular Cl− concentration was decreased. Conclusions and implications: Our results indicate that MTSES inhibits the function of CFTR in a manner that is independent of its ability to modify cysteine residues covalently. Instead, we suggest that MTSES functions as an open channel blocker that enters the CFTR channel pore from its cytoplasmic end to physically occlude Cl− permeation. Given the very widespread use of MTS reagents in functional studies, our findings offer a broadly applicable caveat to the interpretation of results obtained from such studies. PMID:19466983

  5. Cysteine string protein (CSP) and its role in preventing neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Robert D; Morgan, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a member of the DnaJ/Hsp40 family of co-chaperones that localises to neuronal synaptic vesicles. Its name derives from the possession of a string of 12-15 cysteine residues, palmitoylation of which is required for targeting to post-Golgi membranes. The DnaJ domain of CSP enables it to bind client proteins and recruit Hsc70 chaperones, thereby contributing to the maintenance of protein folding in the presynaptic compartment. Mutation of CSP in flies, worms and mice reduces lifespan and causes synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the neurodegenerative disease, adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is caused by mutations in the human CSPα-encoding DNAJC5 gene. Accumulating evidence suggests that the major mechanism by which CSP prevents neurodegeneration is by maintaining the conformation of SNAP-25, thereby facilitating its entry into the membrane-fusing SNARE complex. In this review, we focus on the role of CSP in preventing neurodegeneration and discuss how recent studies of this universal neuroprotective chaperone are being translated into potential novel therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25800794

  6. Enzyme structure captures four cysteines aligned for disulfide relay

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Yair; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Grossman, Iris; Major, Dan Thomas; Fass, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin superfamily proteins introduce disulfide bonds into substrates, catalyze the removal of disulfides, and operate in electron relays. These functions rely on one or more dithiol/disulfide exchange reactions. The flavoenzyme quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX), a catalyst of disulfide bond formation with an interdomain electron transfer step in its catalytic cycle, provides a unique opportunity for exploring the structural environment of enzymatic dithiol/disulfide exchange. Wild-type Rattus norvegicus QSOX1 (RnQSOX1) was crystallized in a conformation that juxtaposes the two redox-active di-cysteine motifs in the enzyme, presenting the entire electron-transfer pathway and proton-transfer participants in their native configurations. As such a state cannot generally be enriched and stabilized for analysis, RnQSOX1 gives unprecedented insight into the functional group environments of the four cysteines involved in dithiol/disulfide exchange and provides the framework for analysis of the energetics of electron transfer in the presence of the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor. Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) free energy simulations based on the X-ray crystal structure suggest that formation of the interdomain disulfide intermediate is highly favorable and secures the flexible enzyme in a state from which further electron transfer via the flavin can occur. PMID:24888638

  7. S-sulfhydration: a cysteine posttranslational modification in plant systems.

    PubMed

    Aroca, Ángeles; Serna, Antonio; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a highly reactive molecule that is currently accepted as a signaling compound. This molecule is as important as carbon monoxide in mammals and hydrogen peroxide in plants, as well as nitric oxide in both eukaryotic systems. Although many studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of hydrogen sulfide, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. One of the proposed mechanisms involves the posttranslational modification of protein cysteine residues, a process called S-sulfhydration. In this work, a modified biotin switch method was used for the detection of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) proteins modified by S-sulfhydration under physiological conditions. The presence of an S-sulfhydration-modified cysteine residue on cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase was demonstrated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and a total of 106 S-sulfhydrated proteins were identified. Immunoblot and enzyme activity analyses of some of these proteins showed that the sulfide added through S-sulfhydration reversibly regulates the functions of plant proteins in a manner similar to that described in mammalian systems. PMID:25810097

  8. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify. PMID:27172378

  9. Mechanical Strength of 17 134 Model Proteins and Cysteine Slipknots

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A new theoretical survey of proteins' resistance to constant speed stretching is performed for a set of 17 134 proteins as described by a structure-based model. The proteins selected have no gaps in their structure determination and consist of no more than 250 amino acids. Our previous studies have dealt with 7510 proteins of no more than 150 amino acids. The proteins are ranked according to the strength of the resistance. Most of the predicted top-strength proteins have not yet been studied experimentally. Architectures and folds which are likely to yield large forces are identified. New types of potent force clamps are discovered. They involve disulphide bridges and, in particular, cysteine slipknots. An effective energy parameter of the model is estimated by comparing the theoretical data on characteristic forces to the corresponding experimental values combined with an extrapolation of the theoretical data to the experimental pulling speeds. These studies provide guidance for future experiments on single molecule manipulation and should lead to selection of proteins for applications. A new class of proteins, involving cystein slipknots, is identified as one that is expected to lead to the strongest force clamps known. This class is characterized through molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:19876372

  10. Copper oxide assisted cysteine hierarchical structures for immunosensor application

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Sumana, Gajjala; Tiwari, Ida

    2014-09-08

    The present work describes the promising electrochemical immunosensing strategy based on copper (II) assisted hierarchical cysteine structures (CuCys) varying from star to flower like morphology. The CuCys having average size of 10 μm have been synthesised using L-Cysteine as initial precursor in presence of copper oxide under environmentally friendly conditions in aqueous medium. To delineate the synthesis mechanism, detailed structural investigations have been carried out using characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviour of self-assembled CuCys on gold electrode shows surface controlled electrode reaction with an apparent electron transfer rate constant of 3.38 × 10{sup −4 }cm s{sup −1}. This innovative platform has been utilized to fabricate an immunosensor by covalently immobilizing monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli). Under the optimal conditions, the fabricated immunosensor is found to be sensitive and specific for the detection of E. coli with a detection limit of 10 cfu/ml.

  11. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  12. Emission of hydrogen sulfide by leaf tissue in response to L-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, J.; Schmidt, A.; Wilson, L.G.; Filner, P.

    1982-08-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to L-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H/sub 2/S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to L-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H/sub 2/S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar L-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar L-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar L-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H/sub 2/S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to L-cysteine; neither D-cysteine nor L-cysteine elicited H/sub 2/S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H/sub 2/S formation and its release occurred in response to L-cysteine. Feeding experiments with (/sup 35/S)t-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H/sub 2/S was derived from sulfur in the L-cysteine supplied.

  13. Identification and characterization of cysteine proteinases of Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S C; Kumar, R; Kumar, S; Tatu, U; Singh, R K; Gupta, A K

    2011-09-01

    Trypanosoma evansi is a causative agent of 'surra', a common haemoprotozoan disease of livestock in India causing high morbidity and mortality in disease endemic areas. The proteinases released by live and dead trypanosomes entail immunosuppression in the infected host, which immensely contribute in disease pathogenesis. Cysteine proteinases are identified in the infectious cycle of trypanosomes such as cruzain from Trypanosoma cruzi, rhodesain or brucipain from Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and congopain from Trypanosoma congelense. These enzymes localised in lysosome-like organelles, flagellar pocket and on cell surface, which play a critical role in the life cycle of protozoan parasites, viz. in host invasion, nutrition and alteration of the host immune response. The paper describes the identification of cysteine proteinases of T. evansi lysate, activity profile at different pH optima and inhibition pattern using a specific inhibitor, besides the polypeptide profile of an antigen. Eight proteinases of T. evansi were identified in the molecular weight (MW) ranges of 28-170 kDa using gelatin substrate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (GS-PAGE), and of these proteinases, six were cysteine proteinases, as they were inhibited by L-3-carboxy-2,3-transepoxypropionyl-lecuylamido (4-guanidino)-butane (E-64), a specific inhibitor. These proteolytic enzymes were most reactive in acidic pH between 3.0 and 5.5 in the presence of dithiothreitol and completely inactive at alkaline pH 10.0. Similarly, the GS-PAGE profile of the serum samples of rats infected with T. evansi revealed strong proteolytic activity only at the 28-kDa zone at pH 5.5, while no proteolytic activity was observed in serum samples of uninfected rats. Further, the other zones of clearance, which were evident in T. evansi antigen zymogram, could not be observed in the serum samples of rats infected with T. evansi. The polypeptide pattern of the whole cell lysate antigen revealed 12-15 polypeptide bands

  14. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cysteine peptidases are important in many biological processes. In this study, we describe the design, synthesis and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family. The structure of the proposed substrates can be expressed by the general formula Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y, wh...

  15. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  16. Nitric oxide-generating l-cysteine-grafted graphene film as a blood-contacting biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhen; Dou, Ruixia; Zu, Mian; Liu, Xueying; Yin, Wenyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Jingbo; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun

    2016-06-24

    By using polyethylenimine molecules as the linker, l-cysteine was immobilized onto graphene nanosheets, endowing the biocompatible l-cysteine-functionalized graphene film with the ability for catalytic decomposition of exogenous or endogenous donors to generate nitric oxide, and thus inhibiting the platelet activation and aggregation and reducing platelet adhesion. PMID:27111404

  17. Kinetics of splanchnic 13C-cysteine metabolism in infant pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cysteine is a conditionally essential amino acid in neonates that can be synthesized from methionine by transsulfuration. We previously showed that methionine transsulfuration occurs in the GI tract of young pigs. Cysteine use by the gut epithelial cells may be important for maintenance of glutath...

  18. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in children with severe childhood undernutrition: cysteine kinetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with edematous but not nonedematous severe childhood undernutrition (SCU) have lower plasma and erythrocyte-free concentrations of cysteine, the rate-limiting precursor of glutathione synthesis. We propose that these lower cysteine concentrations are due to reduced production secondary to s...

  19. First-pass splanchnic metabolism of dietary cysteine in weanling pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cysteine is a semi-indispensable amino acid in neonates and is synthesized from the essential amino acid methionine by transsulfuration. We previously showed that the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of methionine transsulfuration to cysteine, yet the metabolic fate o...

  20. Targeted expression of cystatin restores fertility in cysteine protease induced male sterile tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pawan; Subhashini, Mranu; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Ahmed, Israr; Trishla, Shalibhadra; Kirti, P B

    2016-05-01

    Fertility restoration in male sterile plants is an essential requirement for their utilization in hybrid seed production. In an earlier investigation, we have demonstrated that the targeted expression of a cysteine protease in tapetal cell layer resulted in complete male sterility in tobacco transgenic plants. In the present investigation, we have used a cystatin gene, which encodes for a cysteine protease inhibitor, from a wild peanut, Arachis diogoi and developed a plant gene based restoration system for cysteine protease induced male sterile transgenic tobacco plants. We confirmed the interaction between the cysteine protease and a cystatin of the wild peanut, A. diogoi through in silico modeling and yeast two-hybrid assay. Pollen from primary transgenic tobacco plants expressing cystatin gene under the tapetum specific promoter- TA29 restored fertility on cysteine protease induced male sterile tobacco plants developed earlier. This has confirmed the in vivo interaction of cysteine protease and cystatin in the tapetal cells, and the inactivation of cysteine protease and modulation of its negative effects on pollen fertility. Both the cysteine protease and cystatin genes are of plant origin in contrast to the analogous barnase-barstar system that deploys genes of prokaryotic origin. Because of the deployment of genes of plant origin, this system might not face biosafety problems in developing hybrids in food crops. PMID:26993235

  1. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  2. α-Ketoheterocycles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB

    PubMed Central

    Steert, Koen; Berg, Maya; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Coombs, Graham H.; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Haemers, Achiel; Augustyns, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes and also play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites. Inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Inspired by the in vivo antiparasitic activity of the vinyl sulfone based cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs), a series of α-ketoheterocycles 1-15 has been developed as reversible inhibitors of a recombinant L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8. The isoxazoles 1-3 and especially the oxadiazole 15 are potent reversible inhibitors of CPB2.8, however, in vitro whole-organism screening against a panel of protozoan parasites did not fully correlate with the observed inhibition of the cysteine protease. PMID:20799311

  3. Cysteine decrease following acute Levodopa intake in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Muhlack, Siegfried

    2012-07-11

    The thiol homeostasis determines the redox milieu and thus scavenging of free radicals by antioxidants like glutathione (GSH). GSH is formed out of cysteine in combination with l-glycine and glutamine acid. An up regulation of free radical occurrence is looked upon as one key feature of chronic neurodegeneration. Levodopa (LD) is under suspicion to support synthesis of free radicals via the degradation of its derivative dopamine in abundant mitochondria. Objectives were to investigate the impact of LD on free cysteine turnover in plasma. 200mg LD/50mg carbidopa (CD) were administered to 13 patients with Parkinson's disease under standardised conditions. Plasma levels of LD and free cysteine were measured before, 60- and 80-min after the LD/CD application. Cysteine concentrations decayed, expectedly LD levels increased. Cysteine decrease may result from an up regulation of GSH synthesis to encounter augmented appearance of free radicals associated with LD turnover via mitochondrial monoaminooxidase. PMID:22641055

  4. A fluorescence enhancement probe based on BODIPY for the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Gong, Deyan; Tian, Yuejun; Yang, Chengduan; Iqbal, Anam; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu; Zhu, Xiangtao; Guo, Huichen

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a fluorescent probe BODIPY-based glyoxal hydrazone (BODIPY-GH) (1) for cysteine based on inhibiting of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) quenching process upon reaction with the unsaturated aldehyde has been synthesized, which exhibits longer excitation wavelength, selective and sensitive colorimetric and fluorimetric response toward cysteine in natural media. The probe shows highly selectivity towards cysteine over homocysteine and glutathione as well as other amino acids with a significant fluorescence enhancement response within 15min In the presence of 50 equiv. of homocysteine, the emission increased slightly within 15min and completed in 2.5h to reach its maximum intensity. Therefore, the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione can be achieved through detection of probe 1. It shows low cytotoxicity and excellent membrane permeability toward living cells, which was successfully applied to detect and image intracellular cysteine effectively by confocal fluorescence imaging. PMID:27176916

  5. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  6. Causes and Consequences of Cysteine S-Glutathionylation*

    PubMed Central

    Grek, Christina L.; Zhang, Jie; Manevich, Yefim; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational S-glutathionylation occurs through the reversible addition of a proximal donor of glutathione to thiolate anions of cysteines in target proteins, where the modification alters molecular mass, charge, and structure/function and/or prevents degradation from sulfhydryl overoxidation or proteolysis. Catalysis of both the forward (glutathione S-transferase P) and reverse (glutaredoxin) reactions creates a functional cycle that can also regulate certain protein functional clusters, including those involved in redox-dependent cell signaling events. For translational application, S-glutathionylated serum proteins may be useful as biomarkers in individuals (who may also have polymorphic expression of glutathione S-transferase P) exposed to agents that cause oxidative or nitrosative stress. PMID:23861399

  7. Nitric oxide inhibits falcipain, the Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Colasanti, M; Salvati, L; Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pluripotent regulatory molecule possessing, among others, an antiparasitic activity. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of NO on the catalytic activity of falcipain, the papain-like cysteine protease involved in Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite hemoglobin degradation, is reported. In particular, NO donors S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), (+/-)-(E)-p6ethyl-2-[(E)-hydroxyimino]-5-nitro-3-hexenami de (NOR-3), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibit dose-dependently the falcipain activity present in the P. falciparum trophozoite extract, this effect likely attributable to S-nitrosylation of the Cys25 catalytic residue. The results represent a new insight into the modulation mechanism of falcipain activity, thereby being relevant in developing new strategies for inhibition of the P. falciparum life cycle. PMID:10623597

  8. Fighting an enemy within: cytoplasmic inhibitors of bacterial cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Jan; Golonka, Ewa; Filipek, Renata; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2005-08-01

    The genes encoding secreted, broad-spectrum activity cysteine proteases of Staphylococcus spp. (staphopains) and Streptococcus pyogenes (streptopain, SpeB) are genetically linked to genes encoding cytoplasmic inhibitors. While staphopain inhibitors have lipocalin-like folds, streptopain is inhibited by a protein bearing the scaffold of the enzyme profragment. Bioinformatic analysis of other prokaryotic genomes has revealed that two more species may utilize this same genetic arrangement to control streptopain-like proteases with lipocalin-like inhibitors, while three other species may employ a C-terminally located domain that resembles the profragment. This apparently represents a novel system that bacteria use to control the intracellular activity of their proteases. PMID:16045606

  9. A viable synthesis of N-methyl cysteine.

    PubMed

    Ruggles, Erik L; Flemer, Stevenson; Hondal, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    While a number of methods exist for the production of N-methyl amino acid derivatives, the methods for the production of N-methyl cysteine (MeCys) derivatives are suboptimal as they either have low yields or lead to significant sulfhydryl deprotection during the synthetic protocol. This article focuses on the generation of MeCys and its subsequent use in Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis for the generation of N-methyl cystine containing peptides. Various methods for amino methylation of cysteine, in the presence of acid labile or acid stable sulfhydryl protecting groups, are compared and contrasted. Production of MeCys is best attained through formation of an oxazolidinone precursor obtained via cyclization of Fmoc--Cys(StBu)--OH. Following oxazolidinone ring opening, iminium ion reduction generates Fmoc--MeCys(StBu)--OH with an overall yield of 91%. The key to this procedure is using an electronically neutral Cys-derivative, as other polar Cys-derivatives gave poor results using the oxazolidinone procedure. Subsequently, the Fmoc--MeCys(StBu)--OH building block was used to replace a Cys residue with a MeCys residue in two peptide fragments that correspond to the active sites of glutaredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. The examples used here highlight the use of a MeCys(StBu) derivative, which allows for facile on-resin conversion to a MeCys(5-Npys) residue that can be subsequently used for intramolecular disulfide bond formation with concomitant cleavage of the peptide from the solid support. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 90: 61-68, 2008. This article was originally published online as an accepted preprint. The "Published Online" date corresponds to the preprint version. You can request a copy of the preprint by emailing the Biopolymers editorial office at biopolymers@wiley.com. PMID:18008337

  10. Deconstructing the catalytic efficiency of peroxiredoxin-5 peroxidatic cysteine.

    PubMed

    Portillo-Ledesma, Stephanie; Sardi, Florencia; Manta, Bruno; Tourn, María Victoria; Clippe, André; Knoops, Bernard; Alvarez, Beatriz; Coitiño, E Laura; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo

    2014-09-30

    Human peroxiredoxin-5 (PRDX5) is a thiol peroxidase that reduces H2O2 10(5) times faster than free cysteine. To assess the influence of two conserved residues on the reactivity of the critical cysteine (C47), we determined the reaction rate constants of PRDX5, wild type (WT), T44V and R127Q with one substrate electrophile (H2O2) and a nonspecific electrophile (monobromobimane). We also studied the corresponding reactions of low molecular weight (LMW) thiolates in order to construct a framework against which we could compare our proteins. To obtain a detailed analysis of the structural and energetic changes involved in the reaction between WT PRDX5 and H2O2, we performed ONIOM quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations with a QM region including 60 atoms of substrate and active site described by the B3LYP density functional and the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set; the rest of the protein was included in the MM region. Brønsted correlations reveal that the absence of T44 can increase the general nucleophilicity of the C47 but decreases the specific reactivity toward H2O2 by a factor of 10(3). The R127Q mutation causes C47 to behave like a LMW thiolate in the two studied reactions. QM/MM results with WT PRDX5 showed that hydrogen bonds in the active site are the cornerstone of two effects that make catalysis possible: the enhancement of thiolate nucleophilicity upon substrate ingress and the stabilization of the transition state. In both effects, T44 has a central role. These effects occur in a precise temporal sequence that ensures that the selective nucleophilicity of C47 is available only for peroxide substrates. PMID:25184942

  11. Quercetin Targets Cysteine String Protein (CSPα) and Impairs Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fenglian; Proft, Juliane; Gibbs, Sarah; Winkfein, Bob; Johnson, Jadah N.; Syed, Naweed; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a synaptic vesicle protein that displays unique anti-neurodegenerative properties. CSPα is a member of the conserved J protein family, also called the Hsp40 (heat shock protein of 40 kDa) protein family, whose importance in protein folding has been recognized for many years. Deletion of the CSPα in mice results in knockout mice that are normal for the first 2–3 weeks of life followed by an unexplained presynaptic neurodegeneration and premature death. How CSPα prevents neurodegeneration is currently not known. As a neuroprotective synaptic vesicle protein, CSPα represents a promising therapeutic target for the prevention of neurodegenerative disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we demonstrate that the flavonoid quercetin promotes formation of stable CSPα-CSPα dimers and that quercetin-induced dimerization is dependent on the unique cysteine string region. Furthermore, in primary cultures of Lymnaea neurons, quercetin induction of CSPα dimers correlates with an inhibition of synapse formation and synaptic transmission suggesting that quercetin interfers with CSPα function. Quercetin's action on CSPα is concentration dependent and does not promote dimerization of other synaptic proteins or other J protein family members and reduces the assembly of CSPα:Hsc70 units (70kDa heat shock cognate protein). Conclusions/Significance Quercetin is a plant derived flavonoid and popular nutritional supplement proposed to prevent memory loss and altitude sickness among other ailments, although its precise mechanism(s) of action has been unclear. In view of the therapeutic promise of upregulation of CSPα and the undesired consequences of CSPα dysfunction, our data establish an essential proof of principle that pharmaceutical agents can selectively target the neuroprotective J protein CSPα. PMID:20548785

  12. Characterization of cysteine proteases in Malian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Bah, Sékou; Paulsen, Berit S; Diallo, Drissa; Johansen, Harald T

    2006-09-19

    Extracts form 10 different Malian medicinal plants with a traditional use against schistosomiasis were investigated for their possible content of proteolytic activity. The proteolytic activity was studied by measuring the hydrolysis of two synthetic peptide substrates Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec and Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec. Legumain- and papain-like activities were found in all tested crude extracts except those from Entada africana, with the papain-like activity being the strongest. Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longepedunculata and Stylosanthes erecta extracts showed high proteolytic activities towards both substrates. After gel filtration the proteolytic activity towards the substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec in root extract of Securidaca longepedunculata appeared to have Mr of 30 and 97kDa, while the activity in extracts from Cissus quadrangularis was at 39kDa. Enzymatic activity cleaving the substrate Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec showed apparent Mr of 97 and 26kDa in extracts from roots and leaves of Securidaca longepedunculata, while in Cissus quadrangularis extracts the activity eluted at 39 and 20kDa, with the highest activity in the latter. All Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec activities were inhibited by E-64 but unaffected by PMSF. The legumain activity was unaffected by E-64 and PMSF. The SDS-PAGE analysis exhibited five distinct gelatinolytic bands for Cissus quadrangularis extracts (115, 59, 31, 22 and 20kDa), while two bands (59 and 30kDa) were detected in Securidaca longepedunculata extracts. The inhibition profile of the gelatinolytic bands and that of the hydrolysis of the synthetic substrates indicate the cysteine protease class of the proteolytic activities. Several cysteine protease activities with different molecular weights along with a strong variability of these activities between species as well as between plant parts from the same species were observed. PMID:16621376

  13. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yslas, Edith I; Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F; Barbero, César A; Rivarola, Viviana A

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using l-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86°±1 to 90°±1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. PMID:25842107

  14. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesús Pelayo, José; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by G. Delgado Barrio, A. Solov'Yov, P. Villarreal, R. Prosmiti.

  15. Approche de prise en charge du trouble du spectre de l’autisme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick F.; Thomas, Roger E.; Lee, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Se pencher sur les critères diagnostiques du trouble du spectre de l’autisme (TSA) comme les définit le Manuel diagnostique et statistique des troubles mentaux, cinquième édition (DSM-V), et concevoir une approche de prise en charge du TSA à l’aide du cadre CanMEDS–Médecine familiale (CanMEDS-MF). Sources d’information Le DSM-V, publié par l’American Psychiatric Association en mai 2013, énonce de nouveaux critères diagnostiques du TSA. Le cadre CanMEDS-MF du Collège des médecins de famille du Canada fournit un plan d’orientation pour la prise en charge complexe du TSA. Nous avons utilisé des données recueillies par le Centers for Disease Control and Prevention afin de déterminer la prévalence du TSA, ainsi que la revue systématique et méta-analyse détaillée effectuée par le National Institute for Health and Care Excellence du R.-U. pour ses lignes directrices sur le TSA dans le but d’évaluer les données probantes issues de plus de 100 interventions. Message principal Selon les données du Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, la prévalence du TSA se chiffrait à 1 sur 88 en 2008 aux États-Unis. La classification du TSA dans la quatrième édition du DSM incluait l’autisme, le syndrome d’Asperger, le trouble envahissant du développement et le trouble désintégratif de l’enfance. La dernière révision du DSM-V réunit tous ces troubles sous la mention TSA, avec différents niveaux de sévérité. La prise en charge du TSA est complexe; elle exige les efforts d’une équipe multidisciplinaire ainsi que des soins continus. Les rôles CanMEDS-MF fournissent un cadre de prise en charge. Conclusion Les médecins de famille sont au cœur de l’équipe de soins multidisciplinaire pour le TSA, et le cadre CanMEDS-MF tient lieu de plan détaillé pour guider la prise en charge d’un enfant atteint de TSA et aider la famille de cet enfant.

  16. Emission of Hydrogen Sulfide by Leaf Tissue in Response to l-Cysteine 1

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Jiro; Schmidt, Ahlert; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Filner, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to l-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H2S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to l-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H2S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar l-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar l-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar l-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H2S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to l-cysteine; neither d-cysteine nor l-cystine elicited H2S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H2S formation and its release occurred in response to l-cysteine. Feeding experiments with [35S]l-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H2S was derived from sulfur in the l-cysteine supplied and that the H2S emitted for 9 hours accounted for 7 to 10% of l-cysteine taken up. 35S-labeled SO32− and SO42− were found in the tissue extract in addition to internal soluble S2−. These findings

  17. 75 FR 31790 - Determination That Cysteine Hydrochloride Injection, USP, 7.25%, Was Not Withdrawn From Sale for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing its determination that Cysteine Hydrochloride Injection, USP, 7.25% (Cysteine HCl), was not withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety or effectiveness. This determination will allow FDA to approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for Cysteine HCl if all other legal and regulatory requirements are...

  18. Knockout of the murine cysteine dioxygenase gene results in severe impairment in ability to synthesize taurine and an increased catabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Iori; Roman, Heather B.; Valli, Alessandro; Fieselmann, Krista; Lam, Jimmy; Peters, Rachel; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine homeostasis is dependent on the regulation of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) in response to changes in sulfur amino acid intake. CDO oxidizes cysteine to cysteinesulfinate, which is further metabolized to either taurine or to pyruvate plus sulfate. To gain insight into the physiological function of CDO and the consequence of a loss of CDO activity, mice carrying a null CDO allele (CDO+/− mice) were crossed to generate CDO−/−, CDO+/−, and CDO+/+ mice. CDO−/− mice exhibited postnatal mortality, growth deficit, and connective tissue pathology. CDO−/− mice had extremely low taurine levels and somewhat elevated cysteine levels, consistent with the lack of flux through CDO-dependent catabolic pathways. However, plasma sulfate levels were slightly higher in CDO−/− mice than in CDO+/− or CDO+/+ mice, and tissue levels of acid-labile sulfide were elevated, indicating an increase in cysteine catabolism by cysteine desulfhydration pathways. Null mice had lower hepatic cytochrome c oxidase levels, suggesting impaired electron transport capacity. Supplementation of mice with taurine improved survival of male pups but otherwise had little effect on the phenotype of the CDO−/− mice. H2S has been identified as an important gaseous signaling molecule as well as a toxicant, and pathology may be due to dysregulation of H2S production. Control of cysteine levels by regulation of CDO may be necessary to maintain low H2S/sulfane sulfur levels and facilitate the use of H2S as a signaling molecule. PMID:21693692

  19. Les plaies du tendon patellaire

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mardy, Abdelhak; Elayoubi, Abdelghni; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les plaies du tendon patellaire sont peu fréquentes et sont peu rapportés dans la littérature, contrairement aux ruptures sous cutanées. Les sections du tendon patellaire nécessitent une réparation immédiate afin de rétablir l'appareil extenseur et de permettre une récupération fonctionnelle précoce. A travers ce travail rétrospectif sur 13 cas, nous analysons les aspects épidémiologiques, thérapeutiques et pronostiques de ce type de pathologie en comparant différents scores. L’âge moyen est de 25 ans avec une prédominance masculine. Les étiologies sont dominées par les accidents de la voie publique (68%) et les agressions par agent tranchant (26%) et contendant (6 %). Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un parage chirurgical avec suture tendineuse direct protégée par un laçage au fils d'aciers en légère flexion. La rééducation est débutée après sédation des phénomènes inflammatoires. Au dernier recul les résultats sont excellents et bon à 92%. Nous n'avons pas noté de différence de force musculaire et d'amplitude articulaire entre le genou sain et le genou lésé. Les lésions ouvertes du tendon patellaire est relativement rare. La prise en charge chirurgicale rapide donne des résultats assez satisfaisants. La réparation est généralement renforcée par un semi-tendineux, synthétique ou métallique en forme de cadre de renfort pour faciliter la réadaptation et réduire le risque de récidive après la fin de l'immobilisation. PMID:25170379

  20. A Sensitive Ratiometric Long-Wavelength Fluorescent Probe for Selective Determination of Cysteine/Homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Manibalan, Kesavan; Chen, Sin-Ming; Mani, Veerappan; Huang, Tsung-Tao; Huang, Sheng-Tung

    2016-07-01

    The development of sensitive fluorescence probes to detect biothiols such as cysteine and homocysteine has attracted great attention in recent times. Herein, we described the design and synthesis of coumarin based long-wavelength fluorescence probe, Bromo-2-benzothiazolyl-3-cyano-7-hydroxy coumarin (BBCH, 2) for selective detections of cysteine and homocysteine. The probe is rationally designed in such a way that both sulfhydryl and adjacent amino groups of thiols are involved in sensing process. Only cysteine/homocysteine able to react with BBCH to release fluorescence reporter (BCH, 1); while, glutathione and other amino acids unable to react with BBCH due to the absence of adjacent amino groups. In presence of cysteine, the color of BBCH is turns from colorless to red and thus BBCH is a naked eye fluorescence indicator for cysteine. Besides, BBCH can discriminate cysteine and homocysteine based on color changes and different reaction rates. The described sensing platform showed good sensing performances to detect cysteine and homocysteine with detection limits of 0.87 and 0.19 μM, respectively. Practical applicability was verified in biological and pharmaceutical samples. PMID:27290640

  1. A Caged Electrophilic Probe for Global Analysis of Cysteine Reactivity in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Abo, Masahiro; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2015-06-10

    Cysteine residues are subject to diverse modifications, such as oxidation, nitrosation, and lipidation. The resulting loss in cysteine reactivity can be measured using electrophilic chemical probes, which importantly provide the stoichiometry of modification. An iodoacetamide (IA)-based chemical probe has been used to concurrently quantify reactivity changes in hundreds of cysteines within cell lysates. However, the cytotoxicity of the IA group precludes efficient live-cell labeling, which is important for preserving transient cysteine modifications. To overcome this limitation, a caged bromomethyl ketone (BK) electrophile was developed, which shows minimal cytotoxicity and provides spatial and temporal control of electrophile activation through irradiation. The caged-BK probe was utilized to monitor cysteine reactivity changes in A431 cells upon epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated release of cellular reactive oxygen species. Decreased reactivity was observed for cysteines known to form sulfenic acids and redox-active disulfides. Importantly, the caged-BK platform provided the first quantification of intracellular disulfide bond formation upon EGF stimulation. In summary, the caged-BK probe is a powerful tool to identify reactivity changes associated with diverse cysteine modifications, including oxidation, metal chelation, and inhibitor binding, within a physiologically relevant context. PMID:26020833

  2. Mapping of the local environmental changes in proteins by cysteine scanning

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Yoichi; Nagata, Tomoko; Terakita, Akihisa; Kandori, Hideki; Shichida, Yoshinori; Imamoto, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Protein conformational changes, which regulate the activity of proteins, are induced by the alternation of intramolecular interactions. Therefore, the detection of the local environmental changes around the key amino acid residues is essential to understand the activation mechanisms of functional proteins. Here we developed the methods to scan the local environmental changes using the vibrational band of cysteine S-H group. We validated the sensitivity of this method using bathorhodopsin, a photoproduct of rhodopsin trapped at liquid nitrogen temperature, which undergoes little conformational changes from the dark state as shown by the X-ray crystallography. The cysteine residues were individually introduced into 15 positions of Helix III, which contains several key amino acid residues for the light-induced conformational changes of rhodopsin. The shifts of S-H stretching modes of these cysteine residues and native cysteine residues upon the formation of bathorhodopsin were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. While most of cysteine residues demonstrated no shift of S-H stretching mode, cysteine residues introduced at positions 117, 118, and 122, which are in the vicinity of the chromophore, demonstrated the significant changes. The current results are consistent with the crystal structure of bathorhodopsin, implying that the cysteine scanning is sensitive enough to detect the tiny conformational changes.

  3. Hierarchical effect behind the supramolecular chirality of silver(I)-cysteine coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Rosalba; Di Mauro, Alessandro; D'Urso, Alessandro; Messina, Gabriele C; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Purrello, Roberto; Fragalà, Maria Elena

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine is a sulfur-containing amino acid that easily coordinates to soft metal ions and grafts to noble metal surfaces. Recently, chiroptical activity of Ag(+)/cysteine coordination polymers has been widely studied, while, on the other hand, the appearance of a plasmon-enhanced circular dichroic signal (PECD) at the plasmonic spectral region (λ > 400 nm) has been observed for AgNPs capped with chiral sulfur-containing amino acids. These two events are both potentially exploited for sensing applications. However, the presence of Ag(+) ions in AgNP colloidal solution deals with the competition of cysteine grafting at the metal NP surface and/or metal ion coordination. Herein we demonstrate that the chiroptical activity observed by adding cysteine to AgNP colloids prepared by pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) is mainly related to the formation of CD-active Ag(+)/cysteine supramolecular polymers. The strict correlation between supramolecular chirality and hierarchical effects, driven by different chemical environments experienced by cysteine when different titration modalities are used, is pivotal to validate cysteine as a fast and reliable probe to characterize the surface oxidation of AgNPs prepared by pulsed laser ablation in liquids by varying the laser wavelengths. PMID:25781213

  4. Development of Cysteine-Free Fluorescent Proteins for the Oxidative Environment

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Arai, Seisuke; Takeuchi, Mayumi; Sakurai, Chiye; Ebana, Hideaki; Higashi, Tsunehito; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka; Wada, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging employing fluorescent proteins has been widely used to highlight specific reactions or processes in various fields of the life sciences. Despite extensive improvements of the fluorescent tag, this technology is still limited in the study of molecular events in the extracellular milieu. This is partly due to the presence of cysteine in the fluorescent proteins. These proteins almost cotranslationally form disulfide bonded oligomers when expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although single molecule photobleaching analysis showed that these oligomers were not fluorescent, the fluorescent monomer form often showed aberrant behavior in folding and motion, particularly when fused to cysteine-containing cargo. Therefore we investigated whether it was possible to eliminate the cysteine without losing the brightness. By site-saturated mutagenesis, we found that the cysteine residues in fluorescent proteins could be replaced with specific alternatives while still retaining their brightness. cf(cysteine-free)SGFP2 showed significantly reduced restriction of free diffusion in the ER and marked improvement of maturation when fused to the prion protein. We further applied this approach to TagRFP family proteins and found a set of mutations that obtains the same level of brightness as the cysteine-containing proteins. The approach used in this study to generate new cysteine-free fluorescent tags should expand the application of molecular imaging to the extracellular milieu and facilitate its usage in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:22649538

  5. Mapping of the local environmental changes in proteins by cysteine scanning.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoichi; Nagata, Tomoko; Terakita, Akihisa; Kandori, Hideki; Shichida, Yoshinori; Imamoto, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Protein conformational changes, which regulate the activity of proteins, are induced by the alternation of intramolecular interactions. Therefore, the detection of the local environmental changes around the key amino acid residues is essential to understand the activation mechanisms of functional proteins. Here we developed the methods to scan the local environmental changes using the vibrational band of cysteine S-H group. We validated the sensitivity of this method using bathorhodopsin, a photoproduct of rhodopsin trapped at liquid nitrogen temperature, which undergoes little conformational changes from the dark state as shown by the X-ray crystallography. The cysteine residues were individually introduced into 15 positions of Helix III, which contains several key amino acid residues for the light-induced conformational changes of rhodopsin. The shifts of S-H stretching modes of these cysteine residues and native cysteine residues upon the formation of bathorhodopsin were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. While most of cysteine residues demonstrated no shift of S-H stretching mode, cysteine residues introduced at positions 117, 118, and 122, which are in the vicinity of the chromophore, demonstrated the significant changes. The current results are consistent with the crystal structure of bathorhodopsin, implying that the cysteine scanning is sensitive enough to detect the tiny conformational changes. PMID:27493492

  6. Development of cysteine-free fluorescent proteins for the oxidative environment.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Arai, Seisuke; Takeuchi, Mayumi; Sakurai, Chiye; Ebana, Hideaki; Higashi, Tsunehito; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka; Wada, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging employing fluorescent proteins has been widely used to highlight specific reactions or processes in various fields of the life sciences. Despite extensive improvements of the fluorescent tag, this technology is still limited in the study of molecular events in the extracellular milieu. This is partly due to the presence of cysteine in the fluorescent proteins. These proteins almost cotranslationally form disulfide bonded oligomers when expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although single molecule photobleaching analysis showed that these oligomers were not fluorescent, the fluorescent monomer form often showed aberrant behavior in folding and motion, particularly when fused to cysteine-containing cargo. Therefore we investigated whether it was possible to eliminate the cysteine without losing the brightness. By site-saturated mutagenesis, we found that the cysteine residues in fluorescent proteins could be replaced with specific alternatives while still retaining their brightness. cf(cysteine-free)SGFP2 showed significantly reduced restriction of free diffusion in the ER and marked improvement of maturation when fused to the prion protein. We further applied this approach to TagRFP family proteins and found a set of mutations that obtains the same level of brightness as the cysteine-containing proteins. The approach used in this study to generate new cysteine-free fluorescent tags should expand the application of molecular imaging to the extracellular milieu and facilitate its usage in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:22649538

  7. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling system. Its association is reversible, rendering the first enzyme of cysteine synthesis active and the second one inactive, and vice-versa. Complex formation is triggered by the reaction intermediates of cysteine synthesis in response to supply and demand and gives rise to regulation of genes of sulfur metabolism to adjust cellular sulfur homeostasis. Combinations of biochemistry, forward and reverse genetics, structural- and cell-biology approaches using Arabidopsis have revealed new enzyme functions and the unique pattern of spatial distribution of cysteine metabolism in plant cells. These findings place the synthesis of cysteine in the centre of the network of primary metabolism. PMID:22303278

  8. Hydrogen sulfide regulates abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Han, Ning; Bian, Hongwu; Liu, Xiaodong; Chan, Zhulong

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous molecule in various plant developmental processes and plant stress responses. In this study, the transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with modulated expressions of two cysteine desulfhydrases, and exogenous H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) and H2S scavenger (hypotaurine, HT) pre-treated plants were used to dissect the involvement of H2S in plant stress responses. The cysteine desulfhydrases overexpressing plants and NaHS pre-treated plants exhibited higher endogenous H2S level and improved abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, while cysteine desulfhydrases knockdown plants and HT pre-treated plants displayed lower endogenous H2S level and decreased stress resistance. Moreover, H2S upregulated the transcripts of multiple abiotic and biotic stress-related genes, and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Interestingly, MIR393-mediated auxin signaling including MIR393a/b and their target genes (TIR1, AFB1, AFB2, and AFB3) was transcriptionally regulated by H2S, and was related with H2S-induced antibacterial resistance. Moreover, H2S regulated 50 carbon metabolites including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, sugar alcohols, and aromatic amines. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine desulfhydrase and H2S conferred abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, via affecting the stress-related gene expressions, ROS metabolism, metabolic homeostasis, and MIR393-targeted auxin receptors. PMID:25329496

  9. The Significance of Hydrogen Sulfide for Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, Emmanuel; Poilevey, Aurélie; Hewage, Nishodi Indiketi; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently emerged as an important gaseous signaling molecule in plants. In this study, we investigated the possible functions of H2S in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination. NaHS treatments delayed seed germination in a dose-dependent manner and were ineffective in releasing seed dormancy. Interestingly, endogenous H2S content was enhanced in germinating seeds. This increase was correlated with higher activity of three enzymes (L-cysteine desulfhydrase, D-cysteine desulfhydrase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase) known as sources of H2S in plants. The H2S scavenger hypotaurine and the D/L cysteine desulfhydrase inhibitor propargylglycine significantly delayed seed germination. We analyzed the germinative capacity of des1 seeds mutated in Arabidopsis cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase. Although the mutant seeds do not exhibit germination-evoked H2S formation, they retained similar germination capacity as the wild-type seeds. In addition, des1 seeds responded similarly to temperature and were as sensitive to ABA as wild type seeds. Taken together, these data suggest that, although its metabolism is stimulated upon seed imbibition, H2S plays, if any, a marginal role in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination under standard conditions. PMID:27446159

  10. Cysteine oxidation impairs systemic glucocorticoid responsiveness in children with difficult-to-treat asthma

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Susan T.; Brown, Lou Ann S.; Helms, My N.; Qu, Hongyan; Brown, Sheena D.; Brown, Milton R.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid responsiveness are largely unknown. Although redox regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been reported, it has not been studied in asthma. Objective We characterized systemic cysteine oxidation and its association with inflammatory and clinical features in healthy children and children with difficult-to-treat asthma. We hypothesized that cysteine oxidation would be associated with increased markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, increased features of asthma severity, decreased clinically defined glucocorticoid responsiveness, and impaired GR function. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from healthy children (n = 16) and children with asthma (n = 118) age 6-17 years. Difficult-to-treat asthmatic children underwent glucocorticoid responsiveness testing with intramuscular triamcinolone. Cysteine, cystine, and inflammatory chemokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were quantified and expression and activity of the GR was assessed. Results Cysteine oxidation was present in children with difficult-to-treat asthma and was accompanied by increased ROS generation and increased CCL3 and CXCL1 mRNA expression. Children with the greatest extent of cysteine oxidation had more features of asthma severity including poorer symptom control, greater medication usage and less glucocorticoid responsiveness despite inhaled glucocorticoid therapy. Cysteine oxidation also modified the GR protein by decreasing available sulfhydryl groups and decreasing nuclear GR expression and activity. Conclusions A highly oxidized cysteine redox state promotes a post-translational modification of the GR that may inhibit its function. Given that cysteine oxidation is prevalent in children with difficult-to-treat asthma, the cysteine redox state may represent a potential therapeutic target for the restoration of glucocorticoid responsiveness in this population. PMID:25748343

  11. A process for the preparation of cysteine from cystine

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Liu, David K.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Littlejohn, David

    1989-01-01

    The present invention in one aspect relates to a process for the simultaneous removal of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 from a fluid stream comprising mixtures thereof and in another aspect relates to the separation, use and/or regeneration of various chemicals contaminated or spent in the process and which includes the steps of: (A) contacting the fluid stream at a temperature of between about 105.degree. and 180.degree. C. with a liquid aqueous slurry or solution comprising an effective amount of an iron chelate of an amino acid moiety having at least one --SH group; (B) separating the fluid stream from the particulates formed in step (A) comprising the chelate of the amino acid moiety and fly ash; (C) washing and separating the particulates of step (B) with an aqeous solution having a pH value of between about 5 to 8; (D) subsequently washing and separating the particulates of step (C) with a strongly acidic aqueous solution having a pH value of between about 1 to 3; (E) washing and separating the particulates of step (D) with an basic aqueous solution having a pH value of between about 9 to 12; (F) optionally adding additional amino acid moiety, iron (II) and alkali to the aqueous liquid from step (D) to produce an aqueous solution or slurry similar to that in step (A) having a pH value of between about 4 to 12; and (G) recycling the aqueous slurry of step (F) to the contacting zone of step (A). Steps (D) and (E) can be carried out in the reverse sequence, however the preferred order is (D) and then (E). In a preferred embodiment the present invention provides an improved process for the preparation (regeneration) of cysteine from cystine, which includes reacting an aqueous solution of cystine at a pH of between about 9 to 13 with a reducing agent selected from hydrogen sulfide or alkali metal sulfides, sulfur dioxide, an alkali metal sulfite or mixtures thereof for a time and at a temperature effective to cleave and reduce the cystine to cysteine with subsequent

  12. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine.

    PubMed

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Saitornuang, Sawanan; Sillapee, Pornpan; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzyme reaction proceeding through a cysteine/histidine catalytic dyad. We performed structure-function studies on the chikungunya nsP2 protease and show that the enzyme is not papain-like. Characterization of the catalytic dyad cysteine residue enabled us to identify a nearby serine that is catalytically interchangeable with the dyad cysteine residue. The enzyme retains activity upon alanine replacement of either residue but a replacement of both cysteine and serine residues results in no detectable activity. Protein dynamics appears to allow the use of either the cysteine or the serine residue in catalysis. This switchable dyad residue has not been previously reported for alphavirus nsP2 proteases and would have a major impact on the nsP2 protease as an anti-viral target. PMID:26597768

  13. Serine substitution for cysteine residues in levansucrase selectively abolishes levan forming activity.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Busby, Stephen J W; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Senthikumar, Velusamy; Bushby, Stephen J W

    2003-10-01

    Levansucrase is responsible for levan formation during sucrose fermentation of Zymomonas mobilis, and this decreases the efficiency of ethanol production. As thiol modifying agents decrease levan formation, a role for cysteine residues in levansucrase activity has been examined using derivatives of Z. mobilis levansucrase that carry serine substitutions of cysteine at positions 121, 151 or 244. These substitutions abolished the levan forming activity of levansucrase whilst only halving its activity in sucrose hydrolysis. Thus, polymerase and hydrolase activities of Z. mobilis levansucrase are separate and have different requirements for the enzyme's cysteine residues. PMID:14584923

  14. Learning about Cri du Chat Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chat syndrome - also known as 5p- syndrome and cat cry syndrome - is a rare genetic condition that ... du chat syndrome usually include a high-pitched cat-like cry, mental retardation, delayed development, distinctive facial ...

  15. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensors for selective detecting cysteine with upconversion luminescence.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yunlong; Qu, Songnan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Ligong

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent sensors based on upconversion (UC) luminescence have been considered as a promising strategy to detect bio-analyte due to their advantages in deep penetration, minimum autofluorescence, and ratiometric fluorescent output. A prototype of nanosensors combined with mesoporous silica coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and a fluorescein-based fluorescent probe loaded in pores was therefore designed to detect cysteine (Cys). The silica shell provided loading space for the probe and enabled the nanosensors to disperse in water. In the presence of Cys, the fluorescent probe was transformed into 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein with an emission band centering at 518 nm which was secondarily excited by the light at around 475 nm from NaYF4:Yb(3+), Tm(3+) UCNPs driven by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) laser. The intensity ratio between green and blue luminescence (I518/I475) grew exponentially with increasing concentrations of Cys over a range of 20-200 μmolL(-1). The response of the nanosensors towards Cys was recognizable with naked eyes by luminescence color change. Evidences suggest that these nanosensors are capable of sensing Cys in aqueous solution and distinguishing Cys from homocysteine (Hcy) with kinetically-controlled selectivity. The system was further employed to detect Cys in human serum and the result was in agreement with it tested by high performance liquid chromatography with acceptable recovery. PMID:26402589

  16. Nuclear cysteine cathepsin variants in thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tedelind, Sofia; Poliakova, Kseniia; Valeta, Amanda; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Yemanaberhan, Eyoel Lemma; Heldin, Nils-Erik; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Weber, Ekkehard; Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša; Turk, Boris; Bogyo, Matthew; Brix, Klaudia

    2010-08-01

    The cysteine peptidase cathepsin B is important in thyroid physiology by being involved in thyroid prohormone processing initiated in the follicular lumen and completed in endo-lysosomal compartments. However, cathepsin B has also been localized to the extrafollicular space and is therefore suggested to promote invasiveness and metastasis in thyroid carcinomas through, e.g., ECM degradation. In this study, immunofluorescence and biochemical data from subcellular fractionation revealed that cathepsin B, in its single- and two-chain forms, is localized to endo-lysosomes in the papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line KTC-1 and in the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines HTh7 and HTh74. This distribution is not affected by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) incubation of HTh74, the only cell line that expresses a functional TSH-receptor. Immunofluorescence data disclosed an additional nuclear localization of cathepsin B immunoreactivity. This was supported by biochemical data showing a proteolytically active variant slightly smaller than the cathepsin B proform in nuclear fractions. We also demonstrate that immunoreactions specific for cathepsin V, but not cathepsin L, are localized to the nucleus in HTh74 in peri-nucleolar patterns. As deduced from co-localization studies and in vitro degradation assays, we suggest that nuclear variants of cathepsins are involved in the development of thyroid malignancies through modification of DNA-associated proteins. PMID:20536394

  17. Phosphorylation of Cysteine String Protein Triggers a Major Conformational Switch.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pryank; Prescott, Gerald R; Burgoyne, Robert D; Lian, Lu-Yun; Morgan, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a member of the DnaJ/Hsp40 chaperone family that localizes to neuronal synaptic vesicles. Impaired CSP function leads to neurodegeneration in humans and model organisms as a result of misfolding of client proteins involved in neurotransmission. Mammalian CSP is phosphorylated in vivo on Ser10, and this modulates its protein interactions and effects on neurotransmitter release. However, there are no data on the structural consequences of CSP phosphorylation to explain these functional effects. We show that Ser10 phosphorylation causes an order-to-disorder transition that disrupts CSP's extreme N-terminal α helix. This triggers the concomitant formation of a hairpin loop stabilized by ionic interactions between phosphoSer10 and the highly conserved J-domain residue, Lys58. These phosphorylation-induced effects result in significant changes to CSP conformation and surface charge distribution. The phospho-switch revealed here provides structural insight into how Ser10 phosphorylation modulates CSP function and also has potential implications for other DnaJ phosphoproteins. PMID:27452402

  18. Extracellular Cysteine in Connexins: Role as Redox Sensors.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Mauricio A; García, Isaac E; Pinto, Bernardo I; Pupo, Amaury; Báez, David; Stehberg, Jimmy; Del Rio, Rodrigo; González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteines could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression. PMID:26858649

  19. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30–60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  20. Extracellular Cysteine in Connexins: Role as Redox Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo I.; Pupo, Amaury; Báez, David; Stehberg, Jimmy; Del Rio, Rodrigo; González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteines could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression. PMID:26858649

  1. Formation scheme and antioxidant activity of a novel Maillard pigment, pyrrolothiazolate, formed from cysteine and glucose.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kyoko; Terasawa, Naoko; Murata, Masatsune

    2016-06-15

    We recently identified 6-hydroxy-3[R],7a[S]-dimethyl-7-oxo-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b]thiazole-3-calboxylic acid, a novel pyrrolothiazole derivative carrying a carboxy group and named pyrrolothiazolate, as a Mallard pigment formed from l-cysteine and d-glucose. Here we described the formation of its enantiomer, the plausible formation scheme of pyrrolothiazolate, and its antioxidant activity. When d-cysteine was used instead of l-cysteine in the reaction mixture, the enantiomer of pyrrolothiazolate was obtained. The carbon at position 1 of glucose was incorporated into two methyl groups of pyrrolothiazolate. The pigment was considered to be formed through 1-deoxyglucosone (1-DG). The dehydrated isomer of 1-DG would be condensed with the thiol and amino groups of cysteine. This condensate was dehydrated and cyclized to form pyrrolothiazolate. This compound was an antioxidant showing radical scavenging activity. PMID:26987433

  2. Quantitative Mapping of Reversible Mitochondrial Complex I Cysteine Oxidation in a Parkinson Disease Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Steven R.; Held, Jason M.; Oo, May; Riley, Rebeccah; Gibson, Bradford W.; Andersen, Julie K.

    2011-01-01

    Differential cysteine oxidation within mitochondrial Complex I has been quantified in an in vivo oxidative stress model of Parkinson disease. We developed a strategy that incorporates rapid and efficient immunoaffinity purification of Complex I followed by differential alkylation and quantitative detection using sensitive mass spectrometry techniques. This method allowed us to quantify the reversible cysteine oxidation status of 34 distinct cysteine residues out of a total 130 present in murine Complex I. Six Complex I cysteine residues were found to display an increase in oxidation relative to controls in brains from mice undergoing in vivo glutathione depletion. Three of these residues were found to reside within iron-sulfur clusters of Complex I, suggesting that their redox state may affect electron transport function. PMID:21196577

  3. Participation of cysteine and cystine in inactivation of tyrosine aminotransferase in rat liver homogenates.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, W T; Milligan, L P

    1978-01-01

    1. Inactivation of tyrosine aminotransferase was studied in rat liver homogenates. Under an O2 atmosphere with cysteine added, inactivation was rapid after a lag period of approx. 1h, whereas a N2 atmosphere extended the lag period to approx. 3h. 2. Replacement of cysteine with cystine resulted in rapid inactivation both aerobically and anaerobically. 3. Removal of the particulate fraction by centrifuging rat liver homogenates at 13,000g for 9min resulted in an aerobic lag period of 0.5h in the presence of cystine and approx. 3h in the presence of cysteine. 4. It is proposed that the stimulatory effect of cysteine on tyrosine aminotransferase inactivation occurs largely as a result of oxidation to cystine, which appears to be a more directly effective agent. PMID:33669

  4. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:23295243

  5. Protein topology determines cysteine oxidation fate: the case of sulfenyl amide formation among protein families.

    PubMed

    Defelipe, Lucas A; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián G

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  6. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  7. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-01

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  8. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  9. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-01-01

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3138971

  10. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-05-15

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. PMID:3138971

  11. Comparative study of abiogenesis of cysteine and other amino acids catalyzed by various metal ions.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, K; Sen, P

    1975-01-01

    The present work pertains to the study of the influence of nickel, cobalt, thorium, vanadium, molybdate, ferrous ions on the formation of cysteine which is synthesized abiogenically together with other amino acids in sterilized aqueous mixtures of ammonium thiocyanate, formaldehyde, potassium dihydrogen phosphate, calcium acetate, and biological minerals after irradiating by artificial light. The effect of these catalysts on cysteine formation was of the order: Fe++ greater than Mo++ greater than Th++++ greater than V++ greater than Co++ greater than Ni. PMID:1189468

  12. A squaraine and Hg(2+)-based colorimetric and "turn on" fluorescent probe for cysteine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Huang, Yangwei; Fan, Juan; Wang, Ruyong; Fu, Nanyan

    2013-09-30

    A novel squaraine derivative (SQ-1) was synthesized and characterized for the determination of cysteine. Binding with Hg(2+) as a fluorescent quencher to SQ-1 leads to absorption and emission turn-off. More significantly, the SQ-1-Hg(2+) complex exhibits a dual-channel chromofluorogenic responses to biologically important cysteine with a high sensitivity and selectivity over other natural amino acids, along with a low detection limit of 36.7 nM. PMID:23953443

  13. Adjunctive N-acetyl-L-cysteine in treatment of murine pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Högen, Tobias; Demel, Cornelia; Giese, Armin; Angele, Barbara; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Koedel, Uwe; Klein, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    Despite antibiotic therapy, acute and long-term complications are still frequent in pneumococcal meningitis. One important trigger of these complications is oxidative stress, and adjunctive antioxidant treatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine was suggested to be protective in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. However, studies of effects on neurological long-term sequelae are limited. Here, we investigated the impact of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine on long-term neurological deficits in a mouse model of meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Eighteen hours after infection, mice were treated with a combination of ceftriaxone and placebo or ceftriaxone and N-acetyl-l-cysteine, respectively. Two weeks after infection, neurologic deficits were assessed using a clinical score, an open field test (explorative activity), a t-maze test (memory function), and auditory brain stem responses (hearing loss). Furthermore, cochlear histomorphological correlates of hearing loss were assessed. Adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine reduced hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis, but the effect was minor. There was no significant benefit of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine treatment in regard to other long-term complications of pneumococcal meningitis. Cochlear morphological correlates of meningitis-associated hearing loss were not reduced by adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine. In conclusion, adjunctive therapy with N-acetyl-l-cysteine at a dosage of 300 mg/kg of body weight intraperitoneally for 4 days reduced hearing loss but not other neurologic deficits after pneumococcal meningitis in mice. These results make a clinical therapeutic benefit of N-acetyl-l-cysteine in the treatment of patients with pneumococcal meningitis questionable. PMID:23877681

  14. Pru du 2S albumin or Pru du vicilin?

    PubMed

    Garino, Cristiano; De Paolis, Angelo; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2015-06-01

    A short partial sequence of 28 amino acids is all the information we have so far about the putative allergen 2S albumin from almond. The aim of this work was to analyze this information using mainly bioinformatics tools, in order to verify its rightness. Based on the results reported in the paper describing this allergen from almond, we analyzed the original data of amino acids sequencing through available software. The degree of homology of the almond 12kDa protein with any other known 2S albumin appears to be much lower than the one reported in the paper that firstly described it. In a publicly available cDNA library we discovered an expressed sequence tag which translation generates a protein that perfectly matches both of the sequencing outputs described in the same paper. A further analysis indicated that the latter protein seems to belong to the vicilin superfamily rather than to the prolamin one. The fact that also vicilins are seed storage proteins known to be highly allergenic would explain the IgE reactivity originally observed. Based on our observations we suggest that the IgE reactive 12kDa protein from almond currently known as Pru du 2S albumin is in reality the cleaved N-terminal region of a 7S vicilin like protein. PMID:25854802

  15. Biokinetics and dosimetry of depleted uranium (DU) in rats implanted with DU fragments.

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, Ray A.; Hahn, Fletcher F.; Durbin, P. W.

    2004-01-01

    A number of U. S. veterans of the Persian Gulf War were wounded with depleted uranium (DU) metal fragments as a result of 'friendly fire' incidents, in which Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles were struck by DU anti-armor munitions. Some of the crew members who survived were left with multiple small fragments of DU in their muscles and soft tissues. The number, size and location of the fragments made them inoperable in general, and therefore subject to long-term retention. Because there was inadequate data to predict the potential carcinogenicity of DU fragments in soft tissues, Hahn et al. (2003) conducted a lifespan cancer study in rats. As part of that study, a number of rats were maintained to study the biokinetics and dosimetry of DU implanted intramuscularly in male Wistar rats. Typically, four metal fragments, either as cylindrical pellets or square wafers were implanted into the biceps femoris muscles of the rats. Urine samples were collected periodically during their lifespans, and DU was analyzed in kidneys and eviscerated carcass (minus the implant sites) at death. The daily DU urinary excretion rate increased steeply during the first 30 d after implantation peaking at about 90 d at 3-10 x 10{sup -3}%/d. During the first 150 d, the average excretion rate was 2.4 x 10{sup -3}%/d, decreasing thereafter to about 1 x 10{sup -3}%/d. Serial radiographs were made of the wound sites to monitor gross morphologic changes in the DU implant and the surrounding tissue. As early as 1 w after implantation, radiographs showed the presence of surface corrosion and small, dense bodies near the original implant, presumably DU. This corrosion from the surface of the implant continued with time, but did not result in an increasing amount of DU reaching the blood and urine after the first 3 mo. During this 3-mo period, connective tissue capsules formed around the implants, and are hypothesized to have reduced the access of DU to tissue fluids by limiting the diffusion

  16. The cysteine releasing pattern of some antioxidant thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Önen Bayram, F Esra; Sipahi, Hande; Acar, Ebru Türköz; Kahveci Ulugöl, Reyhan; Buran, Kerem; Akgün, Hülya

    2016-05-23

    Oxidative stress that corresponds to a significant increase in free radical concentration in cells can cause considerable damage to crucial biological macromolecules if not prevented by cellular defense mechanisms. The low-molecular-weight thiol glutathione (GSH) constitutes one of the main intracellular antioxidants. It is synthesized via cysteine, an amino acid found only in limited amounts in cells because of its neurotoxicity. Thus, to ensure an efficient GSH synthesis in case of an oxidative stress, cysteine should be provided extracellularly. Yet, given its nucleophilic properties and its rapid conversion into cystine, its corresponding disulfide, cysteine presents some toxicity and therefore is usually supplemented in a prodrug approach. Here, some thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids were synthesized and evaluated for their antioxidant properties via the DDPH and CUPRAC assays. Then, the cysteine releasing capacity of the obtained compounds was investigated in aqueous and organic medium in order to correlate the relevant antioxidant properties of the molecules with their cysteine releasing pattern. As a result, the structures' antioxidative properties were not only attributed to cysteine release but also to the thiazolidine cycle itself. PMID:27017266

  17. Versatility and differential roles of cysteine residues in human prostacyclin receptor structure and function.

    PubMed

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Gleim, Scott R; Douville, Karen; Arehart, Eric; Hwa, John

    2006-12-01

    Prostacyclin plays important roles in vascular homeostasis, promoting vasodilatation and inhibiting platelet thrombus formation. Previous studies have shown that three of six cytoplasmic cysteines, particularly those within the C-terminal tail, serve as important lipidation sites and are differentially conjugated to palmitoyl and isoprenyl groups (Miggin, S. M., Lawler, O. A., and Kinsella, B. T. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 6947-6958). Here we report distinctive roles for extracellular- and transmembrane-located cysteine residues in human prostacyclin receptor structure-function. Within the extracellular domain, all cysteines (4 of 4) appear to be involved in disulfide bonding interactions (i.e. a highly conserved Cys-92-Cys-170 bond and a putative non-conserved Cys-5-Cys-165 bond), and within the transmembrane (TM) region there are several cysteines (3 of 8) that maintain critical hydrogen bonding interactions (Cys-118 (TMIII), Cys-251 (TMVI), and Cys-202 (TMV)). This study highlights the necessity of sulfhydryl (SH) groups in maintaining the structural integrity of the human prostacyclin receptor, as 7 of 12 extracellular and transmembrane cysteines studied were found to be differentially indispensable for receptor binding, activation, and/or trafficking. Moreover, these results also demonstrate the versatility and reactivity of these cysteine residues within different receptor environments, that is, extracellular (disulfide bonds), transmembrane (H-bonds), and cytoplasmic (lipid conjugation). PMID:17015447

  18. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs

    PubMed Central

    Driggers, Camden M; Hartman, Steven J; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ∼15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases. PMID:25307852

  19. Rapid synthesis of DNA-cysteine conjugates for expressed protein ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Lovrinovic, Marina; Niemeyer, Christof M. . E-mail: christof.niemeyer@uni-dortmund.de

    2005-09-30

    We report a rapid method for the covalent modification of commercially available amino-modified DNA oligonucleotides with a cysteine moiety. The resulting DNA-cysteine conjugates are versatile reagents for the efficient preparation of covalent DNA-protein conjugates by means of expressed protein ligation (EPL). The EPL method allows for the site-specific coupling of cysteine-modified DNA oligomers with recombinant intein-fusion proteins, the latter of which contain a C-terminal thioester enabling the mild and highly specific reaction with N-terminal cysteine compounds. We prepared a cysteine-modifier reagent in a single-step reaction which allows for the rapid and near quantitative synthesis of cysteine-DNA conjugates. The latter were ligated with the green fluorescent protein mutant EYFP, recombinantly expressed as an intein-fusion protein, allowing for the mild and selective formation of EYFP-DNA conjugates in high yields of about 60%. We anticipate many applications of our approach, ranging from protein microarrays to the arising field of nanobiotechnology.

  20. Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Qian; Li, Zhi-Feng; Yang, Bin

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Cadmium sulfide polycrystalline nanotubes have been successfully synthesized by microwave-assisted transformation method using Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires as the source material and template in ethylene glycol at 160 °C or ethanol at 60 °C. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires were successfully synthesized in alkaline solution. ► CdS nanotubes were prepared by templated microwave-assisted transformation method. ► CdS nanotubes can well duplicate the size and morphology of precursor nanowires. ► This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost. -- Abstract: We report the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes. In this method, the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are synthesized using CdCl{sub 2}·2.5H{sub 2}O, L-cysteine and ethanolamine in water at room temperature. The Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are used as the source material and template for the subsequent preparation of CdS nanotubes by a microwave-assisted transformation method using ethylene glycol or ethanol as the solvent. This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost, and may be extended to the synthesis of nanotubes of other compounds. The products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  1. ROSics: chemistry and proteomics of cysteine modifications in redox biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Sura; Lee, Hee Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring in proteins determine their functions and regulations. Proteomic tools are available to identify PTMs and have proved invaluable to expanding the inventory of these tools of nature that hold the keys to biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), the least abundant (1-2%) of amino acid residues, are unique in that they play key roles in maintaining stability of protein structure, participating in active sites of enzymes, regulating protein function and binding to metals, among others. Cys residues are major targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators and modulators of various biological processes. It is therefore necessary to identify the Cys-containing ROS target proteins, as well as the sites and species of their PTMs. Cutting edge proteomic tools which have helped identify the PTMs at reactive Cys residues, have also revealed that Cys residues are modified in numerous ways. These modifications include formation of disulfide, thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate, oxidation to sulfenic, sulfinic, sulfonic acids and thiosulfonic acid, transformation to dehydroalanine (DHA) and serine, palmitoylation and farnesylation, formation of chemical adducts with glutathione, 4-hydroxynonenal and 15-deoxy PGJ2, and various other chemicals. We present here, a review of relevant ROS biology, possible chemical reactions of Cys residues and details of the proteomic strategies employed for rapid, efficient and sensitive identification of diverse and novel PTMs involving reactive Cys residues of redox-sensitive proteins. We propose a new name, "ROSics," for the science which describes the principles of mode of action of ROS at molecular levels. PMID:24916017

  2. Factors affecting urinary excretion of testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Marcos, Josep; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Pozo, Oscar J

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of the athlete steroidal passport in doping control analysis aims to detect intra-individual changes in the steroid profile related to the abuse of anabolic steroids. In this context, the study of intrinsic variations associated with each marker is of utmost importance. In the present work, the influence of several factors in the excretion of the recently reported testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine (Δ(1) -AED; 1,4-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -AED; 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -T; 4,6-androstadien-17β-ol-3-one, and Δ(15) -AD; 15-androsten-3,17-dione) is evaluated for the first time. Degradation experiments at 37 °C proved that, although the cysteinyl moiety is released, the variation for urinary Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -AED, Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -T ratios is less than 30%. Moreover, freeze/thaw cycle testing resulted in RSDs values below 15% for all the analytes. Regarding infradian variability, moderate variations (below 40%) were observed. Additionally, notable alterations in the excretion of these compounds have been observed in the earliest stages of pregnancy. UGT2B17 polymorphism, responsible for the low T/E ratio found in some population, does not influence the excretion of cysteinyl compounds whereas the intake of exogenous substances (alcohol or 5α-reductase inhibitors) dramatically affects their excretion. The urinary concentrations of Δ(1) -AED, Δ(6) -AED, and Δ(15) -AD decreased (<50 %) after the ethanol intake, whereas after the administration of dutasteride, an important increase was observed for the concentrations of Δ(6) -AED, Δ(6) -T and Δ(15) -AD. Overall, the presented data describes the stability of the urinary cysteinyl steroids under the influence of many factors, proving their potential as suitable parameters to be included in the steroidal module of the athlete's biological passport. PMID:25917157

  3. Oxidation of hypotaurine and cysteine sulphinic acid by peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the sulphinic group of both HTAU (hypotaurine) and CSA (cysteine sulphinic acid), producing the respective sulphonates, TAU (taurine) and CA (cysteic acid). The reaction is associated with extensive oxygen uptake, suggesting that HTAU and CSA are oxidized by the one-electron transfer mechanism to sulphonyl radicals, which may initiate an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction with the sulphonates as final products. Besides the one-electron mechanism, HTAU and CSA can be oxidized by the two-electron pathway, leading directly to sulphonate formation without oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the direct reaction of peroxynitrite with HTAU and CSA at pH 7.4 and 25 °C are 77.4±5 and 76.4±9 M−1·s−1 respectively. For both sulphinates, the apparent second-order rate constants increase sharply with decrease in pH, and the sigmoidal curves obtained are consistent with peroxynitrous acid as the species responsible for sulphinate oxidation. The kinetic data, together with changes in oxygen uptake, sulphinate depletion, sulphonate production, and product distribution of nitrite and nitrate, suggest that oxidation of sulphinates by peroxynitrite may take place by the two reaction pathways whose relative importance depends on reagent concentrations and pH value. In the presence of bicarbonate, the direct reaction of sulphinates with peroxynitrite is inhibited and the oxidative reaction probably involves only the radicals •NO2 and CO3•−, generated by decomposition of the peroxynitrite-CO2 adduct. PMID:15740460

  4. ROSICS: CHEMISTRY AND PROTEOMICS OF CYSTEINE MODIFICATIONS IN REDOX BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Sura; Lee, Hee Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring in proteins determine their functions and regulations. Proteomic tools are available to identify PTMs and have proved invaluable to expanding the inventory of these tools of nature that hold the keys to biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), the least abundant (1–2%) of amino acid residues, are unique in that they play key roles in maintaining stability of protein structure, participating in active sites of enzymes, regulating protein function and binding to metals, among others. Cys residues are major targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators and modulators of various biological processes. It is therefore necessary to identify the Cys-containing ROS target proteins, as well as the sites and species of their PTMs. Cutting edge proteomic tools which have helped identify the PTMs at reactive Cys residues, have also revealed that Cys residues are modified in numerous ways. These modifications include formation of disulfide, thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate, oxidation to sulfenic, sulfinic, sulfonic acids and thiosulfonic acid, transformation to dehydroalanine (DHA) and serine, palmitoylation and farnesylation, formation of chemical adducts with glutathione, 4-hydroxynonenal and 15-deoxy PGJ2, and various other chemicals. We present here, a review of relevant ROS biology, possible chemical reactions of Cys residues and details of the proteomic strategies employed for rapid, efficient and sensitive identification of diverse and novel PTMs involving reactive Cys residues of redox-sensitive proteins. We propose a new name, “ROSics,” for the science which describes the principles of mode of action of ROS at molecular levels. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:184–208, 2015. PMID:24916017

  5. Clitocypin, a fungal cysteine protease inhibitor, exerts its insecticidal effect on Colorado potato beetle larvae by inhibiting their digestive cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Šmid, Ida; Rotter, Ana; Gruden, Kristina; Brzin, Jože; Buh Gašparič, Meti; Kos, Janko; Žel, Jana; Sabotič, Jerica

    2015-07-01

    Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, CPB) is a major potato pest that adapts readily to insecticides. Several types of protease inhibitors have previously been investigated as potential control agents, but with limited success. Recently, cysteine protease inhibitors from parasol mushroom, the macrocypins, were reported to inhibit growth of CPB larvae. To further investigate the insecticidal potential and mode of action of cysteine protease inhibitors of fungal origin, clitocypin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from clouded agaric (Clitocybe nebularis), was evaluated for its lethal effects on CPB larvae. Clitocypin isolated from fruiting bodies and recombinant clitocypin produced in Escherichia coli slowed growth and reduced survival of CPB larvae in a concentration dependent manner. Clitocypin was also expressed by transgenic potato, but only at low levels. Nevertheless, it reduced larval weight gain and delayed development. We have additionally shown that younger larvae are more susceptible to the action of clitocypin. The inhibition of digestive cysteine proteases, intestains, by clitocypin was shown to be the underlying mode of action. Protease inhibitors from mushrooms are confirmed as promising candidates for biopesticides. PMID:26071808

  6. Cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase genes of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum: possible involvement in hypotaurine synthesis and adaptation to hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Toshihiro; Hongo, Yuki; Koito, Tomoko; Nakamura-Kusakabe, Ikumi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that invertebrates inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vent areas use the sulfinic acid hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine, to protect against the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide contained in the seawater from the vent. In this protective system, hypotaurine is accumulated in the gill, the primary site of sulfide exposure. However, the pathway for hypotaurine synthesis in mollusks has not been identified. In this study, we screened for the mRNAs of enzymes involved in hypotaurine synthesis in the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum and cloned cDNAs encoding cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase. As mRNAs encoding cysteamine dioxygenase and cysteine lyase were not detected, the cysteine sulfinate pathway is suggested to be the major pathway of hypotaurine and taurine synthesis. The two genes were found to be expressed in all the tissues examined, but the gill exhibited the highest expression. The mRNA level in the gill was not significantly changed by exposure to sulfides or thiosulfate. These results suggests that the gill of B. septemdierum maintains high levels of expression of the two genes regardless of ambient sulfide level and accumulates hypotaurine continuously to protect against sudden exposure to high level of sulfide. PMID:25501502

  7. Global regulation of gene expression in response to cysteine availability in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cysteine has a crucial role in cellular physiology and its synthesis is tightly controlled due to its reactivity. However, little is known about the sulfur metabolism and its regulation in clostridia compared with other firmicutes. In Clostridium perfringens, the two-component system, VirR/VirS, controls the expression of the ubiG operon involved in methionine to cysteine conversion in addition to the expression of several toxin genes. The existence of links between the C. perfringens virulence regulon and sulfur metabolism prompted us to analyze this metabolism in more detail. Results We first performed a tentative reconstruction of sulfur metabolism in C. perfringens and correlated these data with the growth of strain 13 in the presence of various sulfur sources. Surprisingly, C. perfringens can convert cysteine to methionine by an atypical still uncharacterized pathway. We further compared the expression profiles of strain 13 after growth in the presence of cystine or homocysteine that corresponds to conditions of cysteine depletion. Among the 177 genes differentially expressed, we found genes involved in sulfur metabolism and controlled by premature termination of transcription via a cysteine specific T-box system (cysK-cysE, cysP1 and cysP2) or an S-box riboswitch (metK and metT). We also showed that the ubiG operon was submitted to a triple regulation by cysteine availability via a T-box system, by the VirR/VirS system via the VR-RNA and by the VirX regulatory RNA. In addition, we found that expression of pfoA (theta-toxin), nagL (one of the five genes encoding hyaluronidases) and genes involved in the maintenance of cell redox status was differentially expressed in response to cysteine availability. Finally, we showed that the expression of genes involved in [Fe-S] clusters biogenesis and of the ldh gene encoding the lactate dehydrogenase was induced during cysteine limitation. Conclusion Several key functions for the cellular physiology of this

  8. Résultats du traitement du synovialosarcome des members

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Ismail, Farid; Kharmaz, Mohammed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Les synovialosarcomes, sarcomes de haut grade, sont de diagnostic tardif et le traitement est complexe et onéreux, nécessitant la mise en œuvre d'une équipe pluridisciplinaire. Le but de ce travail était d'apprécier les résultats de l'association de la chirurgie à la radio chimiothérapie des synovialosarcomes des membres. Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective portant sur des patients présentant de synovialosarcomes des membres pris en charge dans le service de chirurgie orthopédique et traumatologique du CHU Ibn SINA de Rabat allant de Janvier 2006 à Décembre 2011 (6 ans). Nous avons inclus les malades présentant de synovialosarcomes des membres dont la clinique et l'imagerie médicale étaient en faveur, confirmés par l'examen anatomopathologique et la prise en charge effectuée dans le service. Les patients ont été revus avec un recul moyen de 3 ans. Nous n'avons pas retenu les patients dont les dossiers étaient incomplets, perdus de vue. Nous avons apprécié les résultats selon les critères carcinologiques et le score MSTS (Musculoskeletal Tumor Society). La saisie et l'analyse des données ont été faites sur le logiciel SPSS Stastic 17.0 Nous avons colligé 20 cas de synovialosarcome des membres dans le Service de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique au CHU Ibn SINA de Rabat Le sexe masculin a prédominé avec 65% (n = 13) avec un sex ratio 1,85. L’âge moyen a été de 42,6 ans avec des extrêmes allant de 20 ans et 70 ans. Notre délai moyen de consultation était de 14,42 mois. Tous les malades ont consulté pour une tuméfaction dans 100% (localisée au membre inférieur dans 65% (n = 13), membre supérieur dans 35% (n = 7). La douleur était associée à la tuméfaction dans 55% (n = 11), quant à l'altération de l’état général et l'ulcération de la masse, elles ont été notées dans 3 cas chacune. Nous avons réalisé un bilan d'imagerie médicale comprenant: radiographie standard, échographie, écho doppler

  9. Polarized spectroscopic elucidation of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, L-cysteine, L-cystine, L-ascorbic acid and a tool for their determination in solid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael; Kolev, Tsonko

    2010-01-01

    Method of linear polarized vibrational (both IR- and Raman) spectroscopy of oriented colloids in nematic host is applied on N-acetyl-L-cysteine, L-cysteine, L-cystine and L-ascorbic acid with a view to obtain experimental bands assignment and local structural elucidation in solid-state. Structural results are compared with available crystallographic data for all of the systems studied. Scopes and limitations of the polarized method are shown. Discussion on the correlation between polarized spectroscopic data and the space group type as well as the number of the molecules in the unit cell (Z) is performed. Compounds with monoclinic space group P2(1), containing Z = 1 (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) and 2 (L-cysteine and L-ascorbic acid) are elucidated. One of the rare for organic molecules, hexagonal P6(1)22 space group and Z = 6 (L: -cystine) is also elucidated. Experimental assignment of the characteristics frequencies is obtained, explaining the typical for the crystals Fermi-resonance, Fermy-Davydov and Davydov splitting effects. For first time in the literature we are reported the orientation of the solid-mixture in nematic host, using the trade product ACC (Hexal, Germany), containing mainly N-acetyl-L-cysteine and L-ascorbic acid. Quantitative IR-spectroscopic approach for determination of solid mixtures is presented as well. The intensity ratio between 1,716 cm(-1) (characteristic for N-acetyl-L-cysteine) and 990 cm(-1), (attributed N-acethyl-cysteine and vitamin C) is used. Linear regression analysis between content and the peak ratio data for ten solid-binary mixtures, leads to straight-line plot y = 1.08(2) (+/-0.04(9)) + (-0.11(4) +/- 0.01(1))x, where x = 1/X ( i ). Factor r of 0.9641 and a reliability of 98.85% are obtained. The analysis of ACC 200 (Hexal, Germany) show that the IR measurements leads to standard deviation of 0.010 and 0.011 at P about 0.0500 for the systems and a confidence of >98.77(1)%. PMID:19212805

  10. Binding modes of a new epoxysuccinyl-peptide inhibitor of cysteine proteases. Where and how do cysteine proteases express their selectivity?

    PubMed

    Czaplewski, C; Grzonka, Z; Jaskólski, M; Kasprzykowski, F; Kozak, M; Politowska, E; Ciarkowski, J

    1999-05-18

    Papain from Carica papaya, an easily available cysteine protease, is the best-studied representative of this family of enzymes. The three dimensional structure of papain is very similar to that of other cysteine proteases of either plant (actinidin, caricain, papaya protease IV) or animal (cathepsins B, K, L, H) origin. As abnormalities in the activities of mammalian cysteine proteases accompany a variety of diseases, there has been a long-lasting interest in the development of potent and selective inhibitors for these enzymes. A covalent inhibitor of cysteine proteases, designed as a combination of epoxysuccinyl and peptide moieties, has been modeled in the catalytic pocket of papain. A number of its configurations have been generated and relaxed by constrained simulated annealing-molecular dynamics in water. A clear conformational variability of this inhibitor is discussed in the context of a conspicuous conformational diversity observed earlier in several solid-state structures of other complexes between cysteine proteases and covalent inhibitors. The catalytic pockets S2 and even more so S3, as defined by the pioneering studies on the papain-ZPACK, papain-E64c and papain-leupeptin complexes, appear elusive in view of the evident flexibility of the present inhibitor and in confrontation with the obvious conformational scatter seen in other examples. This predicts limited chances for the development of selective structure-based inhibitors of thiol proteases, designed to exploit the minute differences in the catalytic pockets of various members of this family. A simultaneous comparison of the three published proenzyme structures suggests the enzyme's prosegment binding loop-prosegment interface as a new potential target for selective inhibitors of papain-related thiol proteases. PMID:10350606

  11. A cysteine protease encoded by the baculovirus Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, T; Majima, K; Maeda, S

    1994-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the BamHI F fragment of the genome of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) revealed an open reading frame whose deduced amino acid sequence had homology to those of cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily. The putative cysteine protease sequence (BmNPV-CP) was 323 amino acids long and showed 35% identity to a cysteine proteinase precursor from Trypanosoma brucei. Of 36 residues conserved among cathepsins B, H, L, and S and papain, 31 were identical in BmNPV-CP. In order to determine the activity and function of the putative cysteine protease, a BmNPV mutant (BmCysPD) was constructed by homologous recombination of the protease gene with a beta-galactosidase gene cassette. BmCysPD-infected BmN cell extracts were significantly reduced in acid protease activity compared with wild-type virus-infected cell extracts. The cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 [trans-epoxysuccinylleucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane] inhibited wild-type virus-expressed protease activity. Deletion of the cysteine protease gene had no significant effect on viral growth or polyhedron production in BmN cells, indicating that the cysteine protease was not essential for viral replication in vitro. However, B. mori larvae infected with BmCysPD showed symptoms different from those of wild-type BmNPV-infected larvae, e.g., less degradation of the body, including fat body cells, white body surface color due presumably to undegraded epidermal cells, and an increase in the number of polyhedra released into the hemolymph. This is the first report of (i) a virus-encoded protease with activity on general substrates and (ii) evidence that a virus-encoded protease may play a role in degradation of infected larvae to facilitate horizontal transmission of the virus. Images PMID:8083997

  12. Cysteine conjugate toxicity, metabolism, and binding to macromolecules in isolated rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hayden, P J; Stevens, J L

    1990-03-01

    The 14C-labeled, 35S-labeled, and unlabeled nephrotoxic cysteine conjugates S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, S-(2-chloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethyl)- L-cysteine, S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine, S-(1,2,3,4,4-pentachlorobutadienyl)-L- cysteine (PCBC), and S-(1,1,2,3,3,3-hexafluoropropyl)-L-cysteine were synthesized and their toxicities were compared in isolated rat renal mitochondria. Inhibition of respiration, covalent binding to macromolecules, metabolism by mitochondria, metabolism by a purified cysteine conjugate beta-lyase (beta-lyase), and octanol/water partition coefficients were studied. All of the conjugates inhibited mitochondrial state 3 respiration. Only PCBC was found to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation. (Aminooxy)acetic acid, a beta-lyase inhibitor, blocked the effects of the conjugates on state 3 respiration except for the uncoupling effect of PCBC, which was not blocked. Binding of 35S label to macromolecules was observed after treatment with each of the 35S-labeled conjugates, and (aminooxy)acetic acid blocked the binding. The relative amounts of metabolism of the conjugates did not correlate well with their relative binding and toxicities, indicating some differential reactivity of metabolites and/or selectivity for binding targets. Some of the binding from 35S-labeled conjugates was removed by treatment with the disulfide-reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting that some of the binding was via mixed disulfides. The amount of dithiothreitol-sensitive binding differed among the conjugates. The metabolism of PCBC by permeabilized mitochondria, but not by a purified beta-lyase, was consistent with its relative toxicity and covalent binding, suggesting the involvement of other beta-lyase enzymes in the activation of PCBC to toxic species in mitochondria. PMID:2314393

  13. Glutathione and cysteine enhance porcine preimplantation embryo development in vitro after intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Xia; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Keun Jung; Kim, Eun Young; Han, Kil-Woo; Park, Kang-Sun; Yu, Jung; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-01-15

    Because intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) had been introduced to animal science, not only reproductive biology of domestic animals, but also medicine to treat infertility has been developed. This assisted reproductive technology is beneficial for generating transgenic animals, especially pigs, because polyspermy is the greatest hurdle in porcine IVF when researchers make highly qualified preimplantation embryos. However, ICSI-derived embryos expressed high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are known to cause serious dysfunction during preimplantation development. The objective of this study was to investigate the developmental competence, ROS level, and apoptosis index when glutathione (GSH) or cysteine was supplemented into the in vitro culture medium for ICSI-derived porcine embryos. First, we evaluated the effect of different concentrations of GSH or cysteine on developmental ability of porcine ICSI-derived embryos. The cleavage rate (79.6%) and the blastocyst formation rate (20.9%) were significantly improved in culture medium supplemented with 1 mmol/L GSH compared with other concentrations or no supplementation. Also, 1.71 mmol/L cysteine showed a significantly higher proportion of cleavage (80.7%) and blastocyst formation (22.5%) than other cysteine-supplemented groups. Next, we confirmed that intracellular ROS level was significantly reduced in the group of blastocysts cultured with GSH or cysteine after ICSI compared with the no supplementation group. Finally, we found that terminal uridine nick-end labeling index, fragmentation, and total apoptosis were significantly decreased and the total cell number was significantly increased in blastocysts when ICSI-derived embryos were cultured with supplementation of 1.71 mmol/L cysteine or 1 mmol/L GSH. Taken together, these results strongly indicate that GSH or cysteine can improve the developmental competence of porcine ICSI-derived embryos by reducing intracellular ROS level and the apoptosis

  14. Quantification of free cysteines in membrane and soluble proteins using a fluorescent dye and thermal unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Naismith, James H

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine is an extremely useful site for selective attachment of labels to proteins for many applications, including the study of protein structure in solution by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence spectroscopy and medical imaging. The demand for quantitative data for these applications means that it is important to determine the extent of the cysteine labeling. The efficiency of labeling is sensitive to the 3D context of cysteine within the protein. Where the label or modification is not directly measurable by optical or magnetic spectroscopy, for example, in cysteine modification to dehydroalanine, assessing labeling efficiency is difficult. We describe a simple assay for determining the efficiency of modification of cysteine residues, which is based on an approach previously used to determine membrane protein stability. The assay involves a reaction between the thermally unfolded protein and a thiol-specific coumarin fluorophore that is only fluorescent upon conjugation with thiols. Monitoring fluorescence during thermal denaturation of the protein in the presence of the dye identifies the temperature at which the maximum fluorescence occurs; this temperature differs among proteins. Comparison of the fluorescence intensity at the identified temperature between modified, unmodified (positive control) and cysteine-less protein (negative control) allows for the quantification of free cysteine. We have quantified both site-directed spin labeling and dehydroalanine formation. The method relies on a commonly available fluorescence 96-well plate reader, which rapidly screens numerous samples within 1.5 h and uses <100 μg of material. The approach is robust for both soluble and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. PMID:24091556

  15. Effect of Copper on l-Cysteine/l-Cystine Influx in Normal Human Erythrocytes and Erythrocytes of Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Nabarun; Bhattacharjee, Debojyoti; Rout, Jayanta Kumar; Dasgupta, Anindya; Bhattacharya, Gorachand; Sarkar, Chandan; Gangopadhyaya, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Wilson's disease is a disease of abnormal copper metabolism in which free serum copper level is raised. The objective of the study was to determine, whether in Wilson disease, l-cysteine/l-cystine influx into RBC was decreased or not and the specific amino acid transporter affected by copper in normal human RBC. For l-cysteine/l-cystine influx, ten untreated cases, ten treated cases and ten age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited. To study the effect of copper on l-cysteine/l-cystine influx in RBC, 15 healthy subjects were selected. RBC GSH and l-cysteine/l-cystine influx were estimated by Beautler's and Yildiz's method respectively. In untreated cases, l-cysteine/l-cystine influx and erythrocyte GSH level were decreased showing that elevated level of free copper in serum or media decreased l-cysteine/l-cystine influx in human RBC. Copper treatment inhibited L amino acid transporter in normal RBC specifically. PMID:27605746

  16. Cure of Hookworm Infection with a Cysteine Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Jon J.; Lantz, Lorine D.; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hookworm disease is a major global health problem and principal among a number of soil-transmitted helminthiases (STHs) for the chronic disability inflicted that impacts both personal and societal productivity. Mass drug administration most often employs single-dose therapy with just two drugs of the same chemical class to which resistance is a growing concern. New chemical entities with the appropriate single-dose efficacy are needed. Methods and Findings Using various life-cycle stages of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum in vitro and a hamster model of infection, we report the potent, dose-dependent cidal activities of the peptidyl cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs) K11002 (4-mopholino-carbonyl-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl- vinyl sulfone phenyl) and K11777 (N-methylpiperazine-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl-vinylsulfone phenyl). The latter is in late pre-clinical testing for submission as an Investigational New Drug (IND) with the US Federal Drug Administration as an anti-chagasic. In vitro, K11002 killed hookworm eggs but was without activity against first-stage larvae. The reverse was true for K11777 with a larvicidal potency equal to that of the current anti-hookworm drug, albendazole (ABZ). Both CPIs produced morbidity in ex vivo adult hookworms with the activity of K11777 again being at least the equivalent of ABZ. Combinations of either CPI with ABZ enhanced morbidity compared to single compounds. Strikingly, oral treatment of infected hamsters with 100 mg/kg K11777 b.i.d. (i.e., a total daily dose of 200 mg/kg) for one day cured infection: a single 100 mg/kg treatment removed >90% of worms. Treatment also reversed the otherwise fatal decrease in blood hemoglobin levels and body weights of hosts. Consistent with its mechanism of action, K11777 decreased by >95% the resident CP activity in parasites harvested from hamsters 8 h post-treatment with a single 100 mg/kg oral dose. Conclusion A new, oral single-dose anthelmintic that is active in an

  17. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Semashko, Tatiana A; Vorotnikova, Elena A; Sharikova, Valeriya F; Vinokurov, Konstantin S; Smirnova, Yulia A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Oppert, Brenda; Elpidina, Elena N; Filippova, Irina Y

    2014-03-15

    This study describes the design, synthesis, and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family, important in many biological processes. The structure of the newly synthesized substrates is Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y (where Glp=pyroglutamyl; Xaa=Phe or Val; and Y=pNA [p-nitroanilide], AMC [4-amino-7-methylcoumaride], or AFC [4-amino-7-trifluoromethyl-coumaride]). Substrates were synthesized enzymatically to guarantee selectivity of the reaction and optical purity of the target compounds, simplifying the scheme of synthesis and isolation of products. The hydrolysis of the synthesized substrates was evaluated by C1 cysteine peptidases from different organisms and with different functions, including plant enzymes papain, bromelain, ficin, and mammalian lysosomal cathepsins B and L. The new substrates were selective for C1 cysteine peptidases and were not hydrolyzed by serine, aspartic, or metallo peptidases. We demonstrated an application of the selectivity of the synthesized substrates during the chromatographic separation of a multicomponent set of digestive peptidases from a beetle, Tenebrio molitor. Used in combination with the cysteine peptidase inhibitor E-64, these substrates were able to differentiate cysteine peptidases from peptidases of other classes in midgut extracts from T. molitor larvae and larvae of the genus Tribolium; thus, they are useful in the analysis of complex mixtures containing peptidases from different classes. PMID:24388866

  18. Acceleration of Anaerobic Cysteine Transformations to Sulfane Sulfur Consequent to γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecień, Inga; Iciek, Małgorzata; Włodek, Lidia

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity of drugs and radiation in the cells is largely dependent on the level of thiols. In the present studies, an attempt has been made to inhibit γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γGT) activity in EAT-bearing animals tissue. We have expected that administration of γGT inhibitors: acivicin and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (TIQ) may influence GSH/γ–glutamyl transpeptidase (γGT) system in the regulation of cysteine concentration and anaerobic cysteine metabolism in normal and cancer cells. Development of Ehrlich ascites tumor in mice enhances peroxidative processes, diminishes levels of nonprotein thiols (NPSH) and sulfane sulfur, and lowers activities of enzymes involved in its formation and transfer in the liver and kidney. Although γGT inhibitors further decrease NPSH level, they increase cysteine and sulfane sulfur levels. This means that upon γGT inhibition, cysteine can be efficiently acquired by normal liver and kidney cells via another pathway, that is so productive that sulfane sulfur level and intensity of anaerobic cysteine metabolism even rise. PMID:22629124

  19. A triticale water-deficit-inducible phytocystatin inhibits endogenous cysteine proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Magdalena; Szewińska, Joanna; Mielecki, Marcin; Nykiel, Małgorzata; Imai, Ryozo; Bielawski, Wiesław; Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Water-deficit is accompanied by an increase in proteolysis. Phytocystatins are plant inhibitors of cysteine proteinases that belong to the papain and legumain family. A cDNA encoding the protein inhibitor TrcC-8 was identified in the vegetative organs of triticale. In response to water-deficit, increases in the mRNA levels of TrcC-8 were observed in leaf and root tissues. Immunoblot analysis indicated that accumulation of the TrcC-8 protein occurred after 72h of water-deficit in the seedlings. Using recombinant protein, inhibitory activity of TrcC-8 against cysteine proteases from triticale and wheat tissues was analyzed. Under water-deficit conditions, there are increases in cysteine proteinase activities in both plant tissues. The cysteine proteinase activities were inhibited by addition of the recombinant TrcC-8 protein. These results suggest a potential role for the triticale phytocystatin in modulating cysteine proteinase activities during water-deficit conditions. PMID:25462979

  20. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  1. Identification of Semicarbazones, Thiosemicarbazones and Triazine Nitriles as Inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana Cysteine Protease CPB

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Jörg; Noack, Sandra; Marhöfer, Richard J.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Coombs, Graham H.; Selzer, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput screening of a compound library against this enzyme and bovine cathepsin B in a counter assay identified four novel inhibitors, containing the warhead-types semicarbazone, thiosemicarbazone and triazine nitrile, that can be used as leads for antiparasite drug design. Covalent docking experiments confirmed the SARs of these lead compounds in an effort to understand the structural elements required for specific inhibition of CPB2.8. This study has provided starting points for the design of selective and highly potent inhibitors of L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB that may also have useful efficacy against other important cysteine proteases. PMID:24146999

  2. Genes encoding farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Y; Davey, J; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, M; Yamamoto, M

    1997-01-01

    The mam4 mutation of Schizosaccharomyces pombe causes mating deficiency in h- cells but not in h+ cells. h- cells defective in mam4 do not secrete active mating pheromone M-factor. We cloned mam4 by complementation. The mam4 gene encodes a protein of 236 amino acids, with several potential membrane-spanning domains, which is 44% identical with farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase encoded by STE14 and required for the modification of a-factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of membrane fractions revealed that mam4 is responsible for the methyltransferase activity in S. pombe. Cells defective in mam4 produced farnesylated but unmethylated cysteine and small peptides but no intact M-factor. These observations strongly suggest that the mam4 gene product is farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase that modifies M-factor. Furthermore, transcomplementation of S. pombe mam4 allowed us to isolate an apparent homolog of mam4 from Xenopus laevis (Xmam4). In addition to its sequence similarity to S. pombe mam4, the product of Xmam4 was shown to have a farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase activity in S. pombe cells. The isolation of a vertebrate gene encoding farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase opens the way to in-depth studies of the role of methylation in a large body of proteins, including Ras superfamily proteins. PMID:9032282

  3. Cysteines 208 and 241 in Ero1α are required for maximal catalytic turnover.

    PubMed

    Ramming, Thomas; Kanemura, Shingo; Okumura, Masaki; Inaba, Kenji; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) oxidoreductin 1α (Ero1α) is a disulfide producer in the ER of mammalian cells. Besides four catalytic cysteines (Cys(94), Cys(99), Cys(394), Cys(397)), Ero1α harbors four regulatory cysteines (Cys(104), Cys(131), Cys(208), Cys(241)). These cysteines mediate the formation of inhibitory intramolecular disulfide bonds, which adapt the activation state of the enzyme to the redox environment in the ER through feedback signaling. Accordingly, disulfide production by Ero1α is accelerated by reducing conditions, which minimize the formation of inhibitory disulfides, or by mutations of regulatory cysteines. Here we report that reductive stimulation enhances Ero1α activity more potently than the mutation of cysteines. Specifically, mutation of Cys(208)/Cys(241) does not mechanistically mimic reductive stimulation, as it lowers the turnover rate of Ero1α in presence of a reducing agent. The Cys(208)/Cys(241) pair therefore fulfills a function during catalysis that reaches beyond negative regulation. In agreement, we identify a reciprocal crosstalk between the stabilities of the Cys(208)-Cys(241) disulfide and the inhibitory disulfide bonds involving Cys(104) and Cys(131), which also controls the recruitment of the H2O2 scavenger GPx8 to Ero1α. Two possible mechanisms by which thiol-disulfide exchange at the Cys(208)/Cys(241) pair stimulates the catalytic turnover under reducing conditions are discussed. PMID:26609561

  4. Determination of DNA damage in experimental liver intoxication and role of N-acetyl cysteine.

    PubMed

    Aksit, Hasan; Bildik, Aysegül

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed at detecting DNA damage and fragmentation as well as histone acetylation depending on oxidative stress caused by CCl4 intoxication. Also, the protective role of N-acetyl cysteine, a precursor for GSH, in DNA damage is investigated. Sixty rats were used in this study. In order to induce liver toxicity, CCl4 in was dissolved in olive oil (1/1) and injected intraperitoneally as a single dose (2 ml/kg). N-acetyl cysteine application (intraperitoneal, 50 mg/kg/day) was started 3 days prior to CCl4 injection and continued during the experimental period. Control groups were given olive oil and N-acetyl cysteine. After 6 and 72 h of CCl4 injection, blood and liver tissue were taken under ether anesthesia. Nuclear extracts were prepared from liver. Changes in serum AST and ALT activities as well as MDA, TAS, and TOS levels showed that CCl4 caused lipid peroxidation and liver damage. However, lipid peroxidation and liver damage were reduced in the N-acetyl cysteine group. Increased levels in 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy guanosine and histone acetyltransferase activities, decreased histone deacetylase activities, and DNA breakage detected in nuclear extracts showed that CCl4 intoxication induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that N-acetyl cysteine has a protective effect on CCl4-induced DNA damage. PMID:24819310

  5. Ga2O3 photocatalyzed on-line tagging of cysteine to facilitate peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Su, Fangzheng; Bi, Hongyan; Girault, Hubert H; Liu, Baohong

    2011-09-01

    β-Ga(2)O(3) is a wide-band-gap semiconductor having strong oxidation ability under light irradiation. Herein, the steel target plates modified with β-Ga(2)O(3) nanoparticles have been developed to carry out in-source photo-catalytic oxidative reactions for online peptide tagging during laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) analysis. Under UV laser irradiation, β-Ga(2)O(3) can catalyze the photo-oxidation of 2-methoxyhydroquinone added to a sample mixture to 2-methoxy benzoquinone that can further react with the thiol groups of cysteine residues by Michael addition reaction. The tagging process leads to appearance of pairs of peaks with an m/z shift of 138.1Th. This online labelling strategy is demonstrated to be sensitive and efficient with a detection-limit at femtomole level. Using the strategy, the information on cysteine content in peptides can be obtained together with peptide mass, therefore constraining the database searching for an advanced identification of cysteine-containing proteins from protein mixtures. The current peptide online tagging method can be important for specific analysis of cysteine-containing proteins especially the low-abundant ones that cannot be completely isolated from other high-abundant non-cysteine-proteins. PMID:21751383

  6. Mechanism of Thiosulfate Oxidation in the SoxA Family of Cysteine-ligated Cytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Grabarczyk, Daniel B.; Chappell, Paul E.; Eisel, Bianca; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M.; Berks, Ben C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiosulfate dehydrogenase (TsdA) catalyzes the oxidation of two thiosulfate molecules to form tetrathionate and is predicted to use an unusual cysteine-ligated heme as the catalytic cofactor. We have determined the structure of Allochromatium vinosum TsdA to a resolution of 1.3 Å. This structure confirms the active site heme ligation, identifies a thiosulfate binding site within the active site cavity, and reveals an electron transfer route from the catalytic heme, through a second heme group to the external electron acceptor. We provide multiple lines of evidence that the catalytic reaction proceeds through the intermediate formation of a S-thiosulfonate derivative of the heme cysteine ligand: the cysteine is reactive and is accessible to electrophilic attack; cysteine S-thiosulfonate is formed by the addition of thiosulfate or following the reverse reaction with tetrathionate; the S-thiosulfonate modification is removed through catalysis; and alkylating the cysteine blocks activity. Active site amino acid residues required for catalysis were identified by mutagenesis and are inferred to also play a role in stabilizing the S-thiosulfonate intermediate. The enzyme SoxAX, which catalyzes the first step in the bacterial Sox thiosulfate oxidation pathway, is homologous to TsdA and can be inferred to use a related catalytic mechanism. PMID:25673696

  7. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  8. Comparison of cysteine peptidase activities in Trichobilharzia regenti and Schistosoma mansoni cercariae.

    PubMed

    Kasný, M; Mikes, L; Dalton, J P; Mountford, A P; Horák, P

    2007-10-01

    Cercariae of the bird schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti and of the human schistosome Schistosoma mansoni employ proteases to invade the skin of their definitive hosts. To investigate whether a similar proteolytic mechanism is used by both species, cercarial extracts of T. regenti and S. mansoni were biochemically characterized, with the primary focus on cysteine peptidases. A similar pattern of cysteine peptidase activities was detected by zymography of cercarial extracts and their chromatographic fractions from T. regenti and S. mansoni. The greatest peptidase activity was recorded in both species against the fluorogenic peptide substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC, commonly used to detect cathepsins B and L, and was markedly inhibited (> 96%) by Z-Phe-Ala-CHN2 at pH 4.5. Cysteine peptidases of 33 kDa and 33-34 kDa were identified in extracts of T. regenti and S. mansoni cercariae employing a biotinylated Clan CA cysteine peptidase-specific inhibitor (DCG-04). Finally, cercarial extracts from both T. regenti and S. mansoni were able to degrade native substrates present in skin (collagen II and IV, keratin) at physiological pH suggesting that cysteine peptidases are important in the pentration of host skin. PMID:17517170

  9. Effect of Group A Streptococcal Cysteine Protease on Invasion of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Pei-Jane; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Kuei-Yuan; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lei, Huan-Yao; Chen, Fen-Fen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    1998-01-01

    Cysteine protease of group A streptococci (GAS) is considered an important virulence factor. However, its role in invasiveness of GAS has not been investigated. We demonstrated in this study that two strains of protease-producing GAS had the ability to invade A-549 human respiratory epithelial cells. Isogenic protease mutants were constructed by using integrational plasmids to disrupt the speB gene and confirmed by Southern hybridization and Western immunoblot analyses. No extracellular protease activity was produced by the mutants. The mutants had growth rates similar to those of the wild-type strains and produced normal levels of other extracellular proteins. When invading A-549 cells, the mutants had a two- to threefold decrease in activity compared to that of the wild-type strains. The invasion activity increased when the A-549 cells were incubated with purified cysteine protease and the mutant. However, blockage of the cysteine protease with a specific cysteine protease inhibitor, E-64, decreased the invasion activity of GAS. Intracellular growth of GAS was not found in A-549 cells. The presence or absence of protease activity did not affect the adhesive ability of GAS. These results suggested that streptococcal cysteine protease can enhance the invasion ability of GAS in human respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:9529068

  10. A new autocatalytic activation mechanism for cysteine proteases revealed by Prevotella intermedia interpain A

    PubMed Central

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Noemí; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Usón, Isabel; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Solà, Maria; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F.Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a major periodontopathogen contributing to human gingivitis and periodontitis. Such pathogens release proteases as virulence factors that cause deterrence of host defences and tissue destruction. A new cysteine protease from the cysteine-histidine-dyad class, interpain A, was studied in its zymogenic and its self-processed mature form. The latter consists of a bivalved moiety made up by two subdomains. In the structure of a catalytic cysteine-to-alanine zymogen variant, the right subdomain interacts with an unusual prodomain, thus contributing to latency. Unlike the catalytic cysteine residue, already in its competent conformation in the zymogen, the catalytic histidine is swung out from its active conformation and trapped in a cage shaped by a backing helix, a zymogenic hairpin and a latency flap in the zymogen. Dramatic rearrangement of up to 20Å of these elements triggered by a tryptophan switch occurs during activation and accounts for a new activation mechanism for proteolytic enzymes. These findings can be extrapolated to related potentially pathogenic cysteine proteases such as Streprococcus pyogenes SpeB and Porphyromonas gingivalis periodontain. PMID:17993455

  11. Effect of group A streptococcal cysteine protease on invasion of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, P J; Kuo, C F; Lin, K Y; Lin, Y S; Lei, H Y; Chen, F F; Wang, J R; Wu, J J

    1998-04-01

    Cysteine protease of group A streptococci (GAS) is considered an important virulence factor. However, its role in invasiveness of GAS has not been investigated. We demonstrated in this study that two strains of protease-producing GAS had the ability to invade A-549 human respiratory epithelial cells. Isogenic protease mutants were constructed by using integrational plasmids to disrupt the speB gene and confirmed by Southern hybridization and Western immunoblot analyses. No extracellular protease activity was produced by the mutants. The mutants had growth rates similar to those of the wild-type strains and produced normal levels of other extracellular proteins. When invading A-549 cells, the mutants had a two- to threefold decrease in activity compared to that of the wild-type strains. The invasion activity increased when the A-549 cells were incubated with purified cysteine protease and the mutant. However, blockage of the cysteine protease with a specific cysteine protease inhibitor, E-64, decreased the invasion activity of GAS. Intracellular growth of GAS was not found in A-549 cells. The presence or absence of protease activity did not affect the adhesive ability of GAS. These results suggested that streptococcal cysteine protease can enhance the invasion ability of GAS in human respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:9529068

  12. Novel residues lining the CFTR chloride channel pore identified by functional modification of introduced cysteines.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM) has been used widely to identify pore-lining amino acid side chains in ion channel proteins. However, functional effects on permeation and gating can be difficult to separate, leading to uncertainty concerning the location of reactive cysteine side chains. We have combined SCAM with investigation of the charge-dependent effects of methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents on the functional permeation properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. We find that cysteines substituted for seven out of 21 continuous amino acids in the eleventh and twelfth transmembrane (TM) regions can be modified by external application of positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS bromide (MTSET) and negatively charged sodium [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS (MTSES). Modification of these cysteines leads to changes in the open channel current-voltage relationship at both the macroscopic and single-channel current levels that reflect specific, charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation through the channel from the external solution. This approach therefore identifies amino acid side chains that lie within the permeation pathway. Cysteine mutagenesis of pore-lining residues also affects intrapore anion binding and anion selectivity, giving more information regarding the roles of these residues. Our results demonstrate a straightforward method of screening for pore-lining amino acids in ion channels. We suggest that TM11 contributes to the CFTR pore and that the extracellular loop between TMs 11 and 12 lies close to the outer mouth of the pore. PMID:19381710

  13. Characterizations of Three Major Cysteine Sensors of Keap1 in Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Ryota; Hiramoto, Keiichiro; Asami, Soichiro; Naganuma, Eriko; Suda, Hiromi; Iso, Tatsuro; Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Morita, Masanobu; Baird, Liam; Furusawa, Yuki; Negishi, Takaaki; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2 system plays a central role in cytoprotection against electrophilic/oxidative stresses. Although Cys151, Cys273, and Cys288 of Keap1 are major sensor cysteine residues for detecting these stresses, it has not been technically feasible to evaluate the functionality of Cys273 or Cys288, since Keap1 mutants that harbor substitutions in these residues and maintain the ability to repress Nrf2 accumulation do not exist. To overcome this problem, we systematically introduced amino acid substitutions into Cys273/Cys288 and finally identified Cys273Trp and Cys288Glu mutations that do not affect Keap1's ability to repress Nrf2 accumulation. Utilizing these Keap1 mutants, we generated stable murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines and knock-in mouse lines. Our analyses with the MEFs and peritoneal macrophages from the knock-in mice revealed that three major cysteine residues, Cys151, Cys273, and Cys288, individually and/or redundantly act as sensors. Based on the functional necessity of these three cysteine residues, we categorized chemical inducers of Nrf2 into four classes. Class I and II utilizes Cys151 and Cys288, respectively, while class III requires all three residues (Cys151/Cys273/Cys288), while class IV inducers function independently of all three of these cysteine residues. This study thus demonstrates that Keap1 utilizes multiple cysteine residues specifically and/or collaboratively as sensors for the detection of a wide range of environmental stresses. PMID:26527616

  14. Detection, synthesis and characterization of metabolites of steroid hormones conjugated with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Marcos, Josep; Joglar, Jesús; Alfonso, Ignacio; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Pozo, Oscar J

    2013-03-01

    The occurrence of several polyunsaturated testosterone related compounds (including 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione and 4,6-androstadien-17β-ol-3-one) in urine after alkaline treatment of the sample has been recently reported. Although several experiments seem to indicate that they are testosterone metabolites, their origin is still unknown. In this study, it is demonstrated that these metabolites are produced from the degradation of cysteine conjugates. Several testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine have been synthesized and characterized by NMR techniques. Their detection in human urine has been performed by LC-MS/MS. The acquisition of several transitions in the SRM mode and the comparison between ion ratios and retention times allowed for the unequivocal confirmation of the presence of cysteine conjugates in urine. The analysis of urine samples collected after testosterone administration confirmed that synthesized cysteine conjugates are testosterone metabolites. The fact that these conjugates result in polyunsaturated compounds in urine after alkaline treatment was demonstrated by fraction collection and alkaline treatment of each fraction. Besides, the presence of these metabolites was also confirmed in human plasma. The formation of these metabolites implies an unreported metabolic biotransformation: 6,7-dehydrogenation as phase I metabolism followed by conjugation with glutathione and subsequent transformation to cysteine conjugates. Finally, the existence of similar metabolites for cortisol and progesterone was also confirmed by LC-MS/MS indicating that the presented metabolic pathway is not exclusively active in androgens, but common to progestagens and glucocorticoids. PMID:23261958

  15. Cysteine Cathepsins as Regulators of the Cytotoxicity of NK and T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perišić Nanut, Milica; Sabotič, Jerica; Jewett, Anahid; Kos, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are lysosomal peptidases involved at different levels in the processes of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Some, such as cathepsins B, L, and H are expressed constitutively in most immune cells. In cells of innate immunity they play a role in cell adhesion and phagocytosis. Other cysteine cathepsins are expressed more specifically. Cathepsin X promotes dendritic cell maturation, adhesion of macrophages, and migration of T cells. Cathepsin S is implicated in major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation, whereas cathepsin C, expressed in cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, is involved in processing pro-granzymes into proteolytically active forms, which trigger cell death in their target cells. The activity of cysteine cathepsins is controlled by endogenous cystatins, cysteine protease inhibitors. Of these, cystatin F is the only cystatin that is localized in endosomal/lysosomal vesicles. After proteolytic removal of its N-terminal peptide, cystatin F becomes a potent inhibitor of cathepsin C with the potential to regulate pro-granzyme processing and cell cytotoxicity. This review is focused on the role of cysteine cathepsins and their inhibitors in the molecular mechanisms leading to the cytotoxic activity of T lymphocytes and NK cells in order to address new possibilities for regulation of their function in pathological processes. PMID:25520721

  16. X-ray structures of Nfs2, the plastidial cysteine desulfurase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Roret, Thomas; Pégeot, Henri; Couturier, Jérémy; Mulliert, Guillermo; Rouhier, Nicolas; Didierjean, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplastic Arabidopsis thaliana Nfs2 (AtNfs2) is a group II pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent cysteine desulfurase that is involved in the initial steps of iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis. The group II cysteine desulfurases require the presence of sulfurtransferases such as SufE proteins for optimal activity. Compared with group I cysteine desulfurases, proteins of this group contains a smaller extended lobe harbouring the catalytic cysteine and have a β-hairpin constraining the active site. Here, two crystal structures of AtNfs2 are reported: a wild-type form with the catalytic cysteine in a persulfide-intermediate state and a C384S variant mimicking the resting state of the enzyme. In both structures the well conserved Lys241 covalently binds pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, forming an internal aldimine. Based on available homologous bacterial complexes, a model of a complex between AtNfs2 and the SufE domain of its biological partner AtSufE1 is proposed, revealing the nature of the binding sites. PMID:25195888

  17. Redox Sensitivities of Global Cellular Cysteine Residues under Reductive and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kazutaka; Kusano, Hidewo; Sasaki, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Riko; Hatta, Tomohisa; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Natsume, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The protein cysteine residue is one of the amino acids most susceptible to oxidative modifications, frequently caused by oxidative stress. Several applications have enabled cysteine-targeted proteomics analysis with simultaneous detection and quantitation. In this study, we employed a quantitative approach using a set of iodoacetyl-based cysteine reactive isobaric tags (iodoTMT) and evaluated the transient cellular oxidation ratio of free and reversibly modified cysteine thiols under DTT and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. DTT treatment (1 mM for 5 min) reduced most cysteine thiols, irrespective of their cellular localizations. It also caused some unique oxidative shifts, including for peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), and thioredoxin (TXN), proteins reportedly affected by cellular reactive oxygen species production. Modest H2O2 treatment (50 μM for 5 min) did not cause global oxidations but instead had apparently reductive effects. Moreover, with H2O2, significant oxidative shifts were observed only in redox active proteins, like PRDX2, peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), TXN, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Overall, our quantitative data illustrated both H2O2- and reduction-mediated cellular responses, whereby while redox homeostasis is maintained, highly reactive thiols can potentiate the specific, rapid cellular signaling to counteract acute redox stress. PMID:27350002

  18. Paired natural cysteine mutation mapping: aid to constraining models of protein tertiary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kreisberg, R.; Buchner, V.; Arad, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefit of mapping paired cysteine mutation patterns as a guide to identifying the positions of protein disulfide bonds. This information can facilitate the computer modeling of protein tertiary structure. First, a simple, paired natural-cysteine-mutation map is presented that identifies the positions of putative disulfide bonds in protein families. The method is based on the observation that if, during the process of evolution, a disulfide-bonded cysteine residue is not conserved, then it is likely that its counterpart will also be mutated. For each target protein, protein databases were searched for the primary amino acid sequences of all known members of distinct protein families. Primary sequence alignment was carried out using PileUp algorithms in the GCG package. To search for correlated mutations, we listed only the positions where cysteine residues were highly conserved and emphasized the mutated residues. In proteins of known three-dimensional structure, a striking pattern of paired cysteine mutations correlated with the positions of known disulfide bridges. For proteins of unknown architecture, the mutation maps showed several positions where disulfide bridging might occur. PMID:8563638

  19. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Katja E.; James, Andrew M.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Harbour, Michael E.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  20. Cysteine Is Not the Sulfur Source for Iron-Sulfur Cluster and Methionine Biosynthesis in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuchen; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Whitman, William B.; White, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Three multiprotein systems are known for iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes as follows: the NIF (nitrogen fixation), the ISC (iron-sulfur cluster), and the SUF (mobilization of sulfur) systems. In all three, cysteine is the physiological sulfur source, and the sulfur is transferred from cysteine desulfurase through a persulfidic intermediate to a scaffold protein. However, the biochemical nature of the sulfur source for Fe-S cluster assembly in archaea is unknown, and many archaea lack homologs of cysteine desulfurases. Methanococcus maripaludis is a methanogenic archaeon that contains a high amount of protein-bound Fe-S clusters (45 nmol/mg protein). Cysteine in this archaeon is synthesized primarily via the tRNA-dependent SepRS/SepCysS pathway. When a ΔsepS mutant (a cysteine auxotroph) was grown with 34S-labeled sulfide and unlabeled cysteine, <8% of the cysteine, >92% of the methionine, and >87% of the sulfur in the Fe-S clusters in proteins were labeled, suggesting that the sulfur in methionine and Fe-S clusters was derived predominantly from exogenous sulfide instead of cysteine. Therefore, this investigation challenges the concept that cysteine is always the sulfur source for Fe-S cluster biosynthesis in vivo and suggests that Fe-S clusters are derived from sulfide in those organisms, which live in sulfide-rich habitats. PMID:20709756

  1. Cysteine Oxidation Reactions Catalyzed by a Mononuclear Non-heme Iron Enzyme (OvoA) in Ovothiol Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    OvoA in ovothiol biosynthesis is a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme catalyzing the oxidative coupling between histidine and cysteine. It can also catalyze the oxidative coupling between hercynine and cysteine, yet with a different regio-selectivity. Due to the potential application of this reaction for industrial ergothioneine production, in this study, we systematically characterized OvoA by a combination of three different assays. Our studies revealed that OvoA can also catalyze the oxidation of cysteine to either cysteine sulfinic acid or cystine. Remarkably, these OvoA-catalyzed reactions can be systematically modulated by a slight modification of one of its substrates, histidine. PMID:24684381

  2. Cysteine protease of the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis preferentially evokes an IgE/IgG1 antibody response in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, I; Yamada, M; Uchikawa, R; Matsuda, S; Arizono, N

    1995-01-01

    Some cysteine proteases such as papain and those of mites and schistosomes have potent allergenic properties. To clarify the allergenicity of nematode cysteine proteases, the enzyme was purified from the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis using cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protease, of 16 kD and pI 8.5, showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 5.5 and substrate preference for Z-Phe-Arg-MCA. The specific inhibitors of cysteine protease leupeptin, iodoacetic acid, and E-64, completely suppressed the activity, indicating that the purified enzyme belongs to the cysteine protease family. Cysteine protease activity was found not only in somatic extract, but also in the excretory-secretory (ES) product of the nematode. When anti-cysteine protease immunoglobulin isotypes were examined in sera from rats infected with N. brasiliensis, a high level of IgG1 and a lower level of IgE antibody were detected. Depletion of IgG antibodies from the sera using protein G affinity columns resulted in a marked increase in reactivity of anti-cysteine protease IgE with the antigen, possibly due to the removal of competing IgG antibodies. In contrast to IgE and IgG1, production of anti-cysteine protease IgG2a was negligible. These results indicate that the nematode cysteine protease preferentially evokes an IgE/IgG1 antibody response. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7554403

  3. A DNA-gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric competition assay for the detection of cysteine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Ulmann, Pirmin A; Han, Min Su; Mirkin, Chad A

    2008-02-01

    We report the development of a highly sensitive and selective colorimetric detection method for cysteine based upon oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticle probes that contain strategically placed thymidine-thymidine (T-T) mismatches complexed with Hg2+. This assay relies upon the distance-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles, the sharp melting transition of oligonucleotide-linked nanoparticle aggregates, and the very selective coordination of Hg2+ with cysteine. The concentration of cysteine can be determined by monitoring with the naked eye or a UV-vis spectrometer the temperature at which the purple-to-red color change associated with aggregate dissociation takes place. This assay does not utilize organic cosolvents, enzymatic reactions, light-sensitive dye molecules, lengthy protocols, or sophisticated instrumentation thereby overcoming some of the limitations of more conventional methods. PMID:18205426

  4. The Basics of Thiols and Cysteines in Redox Biology and Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Leslie B.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the least abundant amino acids, yet it is frequently found as a highly conserved residue within functional (regulatory, catalytic or binding) sites in proteins. It is the unique chemistry of the thiol or thiolate group of cysteine that imparts functional sites with their specialized properties (e.g., nucleophilicity, high affinity metal binding, and/or ability to form disulfide bonds). Highlighted in this review are some of the basic biophysical and biochemical properties of cysteine groups and the equations that apply to them, particularly with respect to pKa and redox potential. Also summarized are the types of low molecular weight thiols present in high concentrations in most cells, as well as the ways in which modifications of cysteinyl residues can impart or regulate molecular functions important to cellular processes including signal transduction. PMID:25433365

  5. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alternative substrate of the enzyme, providing a product that was tentatively suggested to be either a spiroepoxy cyclopropanone or a gamma-lactone. Thus, a single family of compounds exhibits an unusual variety of activities, being reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors and alternative substrates towards enzymes of the same family. PMID:23553793

  6. Structural characterization of the papaya cysteine proteinases at low pH.

    PubMed

    Huet, Joëlle; Looze, Yvan; Bartik, Kristin; Raussens, Vincent; Wintjens, René; Boussard, Paule

    2006-03-10

    Current control of gastrointestinal nematodes relies primarily on the use of synthetic drugs and encounters serious problems of resistance. Oral administration of plant cysteine proteinases, known to be capable of damaging nematode cuticles, has recently been recommended to overcome these problems. This prompted us to examine if plant cysteine proteinases like the four papaya proteinases papain, caricain, chymopapain, and glycine endopeptidase that have been investigated here can survive acidic pH conditions and pepsin degradation. The four papaya proteinases have been found to undergo, at low pH, a conformational transition that instantaneously converts their native forms into molten globules that are quite unstable and rapidly degraded by pepsin. As shown by activity measurements, the denatured state of these proteinases which finally results from acid treatment is completely irreversible. It is concluded that cysteine proteinases from plant origin may require to be protected against both acid denaturation and proteolysis to be effective in the gut after oral administration. PMID:16434027

  7. The anthelmintic efficacy of natural plant cysteine proteinases against Hymenolepis microstoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mansur, F; Luoga, W; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Lowe, A; Behnke, J M

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the efficacy of cysteine proteinases (CP) as anthelmintics for cestode infections in vivo. Hymenolepis microstoma is a natural parasite of house mice, and provides a convenient model system for the assessment of novel drugs for anthelmintic activity against cestodes. The experiments described in this paper indicate that treatment of H. microstoma infections in mice with the supernatant of papaya latex (PLS), containing active cysteine proteinases, is only minimally efficacious. The statistically significant effects seen on worm burden and biomass showed little evidence of dose dependency, were temporary and the role of cysteine proteinases as the active principles in PLS was not confirmed by specific inhibition with E-64. Worm fecundity was not affected by treatment at the doses used. We conclude also that this in vivo host-parasite system is not sensitive enough to be used reliably for the detection of cestocidal activity of compounds being screened as potential, novel anthelmintics. PMID:25226116

  8. Leishmania aethiopica: identification and characterization of cathepsin L-like cysteine protease genes.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Teklu; Jirata, Dagim; Genetu, Abebe; Barr, Stephen; Mengistu, Yohannes; Aseffa, Abraham; Gedamu, Lashitew

    2007-03-01

    There is limited information on the biology and pathogenesis of Leishmania aethiopica, causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Ethiopia. In this study we have identified and characterized two cathepsin L-like cysteine protease genes, Laecpa and Laecpb, from L. aethiopica. The predicted amino acid sequence of Laecpa and Laecpb is more than 75% identical with homologous cathepsin L-like cysteine protease genes of other Leishmania species and less than 50% identical with human cathepsin L. Laecpa is expressed predominantly in the stationary, and to a lower level, during the amastigote stage while Laecpb is specifically expressed in the stationary stage of L. aethiopica development. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the two genes are grouped into separate clades which are the result of gene duplication. The isolation of these genes will be useful in developing Leishmania species specific diagnostics for molecular epidemiological studies and serves as a first step to study the role of cysteine proteases in L. aethiopica pathogenesis. PMID:17083936

  9. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with cysteine in solution: reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Monti, Susanna; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Ågren, Hans

    2016-07-14

    The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption. PMID:27305447

  10. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal-Cysteine Complexes From X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, B.O.; Jalilehvand, F.; Szilagyi, R.K.

    2009-05-19

    The electronic structures of Hg{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, Cr{sup III}, and Mo{sup V} complexes with cysteine were investigated by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and density functional theory. The covalency in the metal-sulfur bond was determined by analyzing the intensities of the electric-dipole allowed pre-edge features appearing in the XANES spectra below the ionization threshold. Because of the well-defined structures of the selected cysteine complexes, the current work provides a reference set for further sulfur K-edge XAS studies of bioinorganic active sites with transition metal-sulfur bonds from cysteine residues as well as more complex coordination compounds with thiolate ligands.

  11. Surface functionalization of silica nanoparticles with cysteine: a low-fouling zwitterionic surface.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Joshua E; Gu, Frank X

    2011-09-01

    Herein, we report on the functionalization of silica nanoparticles with a small molecule, the amino acid cysteine, in order to create a low-fouling zwitterionic surface for nanomedicine applications. The cysteine functionalization was shown to impart the particles with excellent stability in both salt and single-protein solutions of lysozyme (positively charged) and bovine serum albumin (negatively charged). Bare silica particles precipitated immediately in a lysozyme solution, while cysteine-functionalized particles were stable for 20 h. Furthermore, the particles displayed excellent long-term stability in solutions of human serum showing no aggregation over a period of 14 days. The functionalized particles also possess multiple reactive surface groups for further coupling reactions. We believe that the surface functionalization schemes described in this report represent a versatile and effective method of stabilizing nanoparticle systems in biological media for their use in a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:21761888

  12. Prejudice: From Allport to DuBois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Stanley O., Jr.; Reed, Edward S.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the differences between Gordon Allport's and W. E. B. DuBois's theories on the origins of prejudice and the impact of discrimination on the personality and social development of blacks. The article argues that prejudice is a historically developed process, not a universal feature of human psychology. Implications for U.S. race relations…

  13. Sign Communication in Cri du Chat Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlenkamp, Sonja; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a study on the use of sign supported Norwegian (SSN) in two individuals with Cri du chat syndrome (CCS). The study gives a first account of some selected aspects of production and intelligibility of SSN in CCS. Possible deviance in manual parameters, in particular inter- and/or intra-subject variation in the use…

  14. Phytomonas serpens: cysteine peptidase inhibitors interfere with growth, ultrastructure and host adhesion.

    PubMed

    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Dias, Felipe A; Ribeiro, Rachel O; Pereira, Fernanda M; Elias, Camila G R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Lopes, Angela H C S; Alviano, Celuta S; Branquinha, Marta H; Soares, Rosangela M A

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the ultrastructural and growth alterations caused by cysteine peptidase inhibitors on the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. We showed that the cysteine peptidase inhibitors at 10 microM were able to arrest cellular growth as well as promote alterations in the cell morphology, including the parasites becoming short and round. Additionally, iodoacetamide induced ultrastructural alterations, such as disintegration of cytoplasmic organelles, swelling of the nucleus and kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, which culminated in parasite death. Leupeptin and antipain induced the appearance of microvillar extensions and blebs on the cytoplasmic membrane, resembling a shedding process. A 40 kDa cysteine peptidase was detected in hydrophobic and hydrophilic phases of P. serpens cells after Triton X-114 extraction. Additionally, we have shown through immunoblotting that anti-cruzipain polyclonal antibodies recognised two major polypeptides in P. serpens, including a 40 kDa component. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that this cruzipain-like protein has a location on the cell surface. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the cruzipain-like protein on the surface and in small membrane fragments released from leupeptin-treated parasites. Furthermore, the involvement of cysteine peptidases of P. serpens in the interaction with explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was also investigated. When P. serpens cells were pre-treated with either cysteine peptidase inhibitors or anti-cruzipain antibody, a significant reduction of the interaction process was observed. Collectively, these results suggest that cysteine peptidases participate in several biological processes in P. serpens including cell growth and interaction with the invertebrate vector. PMID:16310789

  15. Comparative efficacies of 2 cysteine prodrugs and a glutathione delivery agent in a colitis model.

    PubMed

    Oz, Helieh S; Chen, Theresa S; Nagasawa, Herbert

    2007-08-01

    Oxidant-mediated injury plays an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recently, antioxidants were shown to modulate colitis in mice. In this study, the protective effects of L-cysteine and glutathione (GSH) prodrugs are further evaluated against progression of colitis in a murine model. ICR mice were fed compounds incorporated into chow as follows: Group (A) received chow supplemented with vehicle. Group (B) was provided 2-(RS)-n-propylthiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic-acid (PTCA), a cysteine prodrug. Group (C) received D-ribose-L-cysteine (RibCys), another cysteine prodrug that releases L-cysteine. Group (D) was fed L-cysteine-glutathione mixed sulfide (CySSG), a ubiquitous GSH derivative present in mammalian cells. After 3 days, the animals were further provided with normal drinking water or water supplemented with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Mice administered DSS developed severe colitis and suffered weight loss. Colonic lesions significantly improved in animals treated with PTCA and RibCys and, to a lesser extent, with CySSG therapy. Hepatic GSH levels were depleted in colitis animals (control vs DSS, P < 0.001), and normalized with prodrug therapies (control vs treatments, P > 0.05). Protein expressions of serum amyloid A and inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), osteopontin (OPN)] were significantly increased in colitis animals and improved with therapies. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses showed significant upregulation of the macrophage-specific markers, COX-2 and CD68, which suggests macrophage activation and infiltration in the colonic lamina propria in colitis animals. These abnormalities were attenuated in prodrug-treated mice. In conclusion, these data strongly support the novel action of the PTCA against colitis, which further supports a possible therapeutic application for IBD patients. PMID:17656332

  16. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with cysteine in solution: reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Susanna; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Ågren, Hans

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption.The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Different views of the AuNP surface coverage. Distance map describing the position of each molecule in relation to the others on the AuNP (alpha carbon distances). See DOI: 10.1039/C

  17. CFTR: Temperature-dependent cysteine reactivity suggests different stable conformers of the conduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuehong; Dawson, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine scanning has been widely used to identify pore-lining residues in mammalian ion channels, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). These studies, however, have been typically conducted at room temperature rather than human body temperature. Reports of substantial effects of temperature on gating and anion conduction in CFTR channels as well as an unexpected pattern of cysteine reactivity in the sixth transmembrane segment (TM6), prompted us to investigate the effect of temperature on the reactivity of cysteines engineered into TM6 of CFTR. We compared reaction rates at temperatures ranging from 22°C to 37°C for cysteines placed on either side of an apparent size-selective, accessibility barrier previously defined by comparing reactivity toward channel-permeant and channel-impermeant, thiol-directed reagents. The results indicate that reactivity of cysteines at three positions extracellular to the position of the accessibility barrier, 334, 336 and 337, is highly temperature dependent, such that at 37°C cysteines at these positions were highly reactive toward MTSES−, whereas at 22°C the reaction rates ranged from two to six-fold slower to undetectable. An activation energy of 157 kJ/mole for the reaction at 337 is consistent with the hypothesis that, at physiological temperature, the extracellular portion of the CFTR pore can adopt conformations that differ significantly from those accessible at room temperature. However, the position of the accessibility barrier defined empirically by applying channel-permeant and channel-impermeant reagents to the extracellular aspect of the pore is not altered. The results illuminate previous scanning results and indicate that assay temperature is a critical variable in studies designed to use chemical modification to test structural models for the CFTR anion conduction pathway. PMID:22014307

  18. Mutagenicity of the Cysteine S-Conjugate Sulfoxides of Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene in the Ames Test

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Roy M.; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2013-01-01

    The nephrotoxicity and nephrocarcinogenicity of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are believed to be mediated primarily through the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase-dependent bioactivation of the corresponding cysteine S-conjugate metabolites S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (TCVC), respectively. DCVC and TCVC have previously been demonstrated to be mutagenic by the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, and reduction in mutagenicity was observed upon treatment with the β-lyase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Because DCVC and TCVC can also be bioactivated through sulfoxidation to yield the potent nephrotoxicants S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (DCVCS) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (TCVCS), respectively, the mutagenic potential of these two sulfoxides was investigated using the Ames S. typhimuriumTA100 mutagenicity assay. The results show both DCVCS and TCVCS were mutagenic, and TCVCS exhibited 3-fold higher mutagenicity than DCVCS. However, DCVCS and TCVCS mutagenic activity was approximately 700-fold and 30-fold lower than DCVC and TCVC, respectively. DCVC and DCVCS appeared to induce toxicity in TA100, as evidenced by increased microcolony formation and decreased mutant frequency above threshold concentrations. TCVC and TCVCS were not toxic in TA100. The toxic effects of DCVC limited the sensitivity of TA100 to DCVC mutagenic effects and rendered it difficult to investigate the effects of AOAA on DCVC mutagenic activity. Collectively, these results suggest that DCVCS and TCVCS exerted a definite but weak mutagenicity in the TA100 strain. Therefore, despite their potent nephrotoxicity, DCVCS and TCVCS are not likely to play a major role in DCVC or TCVC mutagenicity in this strain. PMID:23416178

  19. The x-ray absorption spectroscopy model of solvation about sulfur in aqueous L-cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Ritimukta; Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Morante, Silvia; Minicozzi, Velia; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2012-01-01

    The environment of sulfur in dissolved aqueous L-cysteine has been examined using K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), extended continuum multiple scattering (ECMS) theory, and density functional theory (DFT). For the first time, bound-state and continuum transitions representing the entire XAS spectrum of L-cysteine sulfur are accurately reproduced by theory. Sulfur K-edge absorption features at 2473.3 eV and 2474.2 eV represent transitions to LUMOs that are mixtures of S–C and S–H σ* orbitals significantly delocalized over the entire L-cysteine molecule. Continuum features at 2479, 2489, and 2530 eV were successfully reproduced using extended continuum theory. The full L-cysteine sulfur K-edge XAS spectrum could not be reproduced without addition of a water-sulfur hydrogen bond. Density functional theory analysis shows that although the Cys(H)S⋯H–OH hydrogen bond is weak (∼2 kcal) the atomic charge on sulfur is significantly affected by this water. MXAN analysis of hydrogen-bonding structures for L-cysteine and water yielded a best fit model featuring a tandem of two water molecules, 2.9 Å and 5.8 Å from sulfur. The model included a Scys⋯H–Ow1H hydrogen-bond of 2.19 Å and of 2.16 Å for H2Ow1⋯H–Ow2H. One hydrogen-bonding water-sulfur interaction alone was insufficient to fully describe the continuum XAS spectrum. However, density functional theoretical results are convincing that the water-sulfur interaction is weak and should be only transient in water solution. The durable water-sulfur hydrogen bond in aqueous L-cysteine reported here therefore represents a break with theoretical studies indicating its absence. Reconciling the apparent disparity between theory and result remains the continuing challenge. PMID:23206038

  20. Preparation and application of L-cysteine-doped Keggin polyoxometalate microtubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yan; Peng Jun; Zhang Huanqiu; Meng Cuili; Zhang Fang

    2012-01-15

    L-cysteine-doped tungstosilicate (Lcys-SiW{sub 12}) microtubes are prepared, and the amount of L-cysteine doped in the microtubes can be tuned to some extent. The as-prepared Lcys-SiW{sub 12} microtubes are sensitive to ammonia gas exhibited through the distinct color change of the microtubes from light purple to dark blue after exposing to ammonia gas. A possible mechanism of the coloration is that the adsorbed ammonia molecules increase the basicity of the Lcys-SiW{sub 12} microtubes and promote the redox reaction between L-cysteine and polyoxometalate. This is a pH-dependent solid-solid redox reaction, which is triggered by proton capture agent. The Lcys-SiW{sub 12} microtubes show application in chemical sensors for alkaline gases. - Graphical abstract: The Lcys-SiW{sub 12} microtubes were formed during transformation of the monolacunary Keggin-type [{alpha}-SiW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sup 8-} to the saturated Keggin-type [{alpha}-SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 4-}, meanwhile L-cysteine molecules were doped during the growth of the microtubes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-cysteine-doped polyoxometalate microtubes are prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amount of L-cysteine doped in the microtubes can be tuned to some extent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lcys-SiW{sub 12} microtubes can be applied as a sensor for detecting alkaline gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is a proton capture agent-triggered solid-solid redox reaction.

  1. Sample Multiplexing with Cysteine-Selective Approaches: cysDML and cPILOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liqing; Evans, Adam R.; Robinson, Renã A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine-selective proteomics approaches simplify complex protein mixtures and improve the chance of detecting low abundant proteins. It is possible that cysteinyl-peptide/protein enrichment methods could be coupled to isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging methods for quantitative proteomics analyses in as few as two or up to 10 samples, respectively. Here we present two novel cysteine-selective proteomics approaches: cysteine-selective dimethyl labeling (cysDML) and cysteine-selective combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT). CysDML is a duplex precursor quantification technique that couples cysteinyl-peptide enrichment with on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling. Cysteine-selective cPILOT is a novel 12-plex workflow based on cysteinyl-peptide enrichment, on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling, and iodoTMT tagging on cysteine residues. To demonstrate the broad applicability of the approaches, we applied cysDML and cPILOT methods to liver tissues from an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model and wild-type (WT) controls. From the cysDML experiments, an average of 850 proteins were identified and 594 were quantified, whereas from the cPILOT experiment, 330 and 151 proteins were identified and quantified, respectively. Overall, 2259 unique total proteins were detected from both cysDML and cPILOT experiments. There is tremendous overlap in the proteins identified and quantified between both experiments, and many proteins have AD/WT fold-change values that are within ~20% error. A total of 65 statistically significant proteins are differentially expressed in the liver proteome of AD mice relative to WT. The performance of cysDML and cPILOT are demonstrated and advantages and limitations of using multiple duplex experiments versus a single 12-plex experiment are highlighted.

  2. The x-ray absorption spectroscopy model of solvation about sulfur in aqueous L-cysteine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Ritimukta; Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Morante, Silvia; Minicozzi, Velia; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2012-11-01

    The environment of sulfur in dissolved aqueous L-cysteine has been examined using K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), extended continuum multiple scattering (ECMS) theory, and density functional theory (DFT). For the first time, bound-state and continuum transitions representing the entire XAS spectrum of L-cysteine sulfur are accurately reproduced by theory. Sulfur K-edge absorption features at 2473.3 eV and 2474.2 eV represent transitions to LUMOs that are mixtures of S-C and S-H σ* orbitals significantly delocalized over the entire L-cysteine molecule. Continuum features at 2479, 2489, and 2530 eV were successfully reproduced using extended continuum theory. The full L-cysteine sulfur K-edge XAS spectrum could not be reproduced without addition of a water-sulfur hydrogen bond. Density functional theory analysis shows that although the Cys(H)S⋯H-OH hydrogen bond is weak (˜2 kcal) the atomic charge on sulfur is significantly affected by this water. MXAN analysis of hydrogen-bonding structures for L-cysteine and water yielded a best fit model featuring a tandem of two water molecules, 2.9 Å and 5.8 Å from sulfur. The model included a Scys⋯H-Ow1H hydrogen-bond of 2.19 Å and of 2.16 Å for H2Ow1⋯H-Ow2H. One hydrogen-bonding water-sulfur interaction alone was insufficient to fully describe the continuum XAS spectrum. However, density functional theoretical results are convincing that the water-sulfur interaction is weak and should be only transient in water solution. The durable water-sulfur hydrogen bond in aqueous L-cysteine reported here therefore represents a break with theoretical studies indicating its absence. Reconciling the apparent disparity between theory and result remains the continuing challenge.

  3. Synthesis of ultra-small cysteine-capped gold nanoparticles by pH switching of the Au(I)-cysteine polymer.

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Paula S; Buceta, David; Morales, Gustavo M; Barbero, Cesar A; Sergio Moreno, M; Giovanetti, Lisandro J; Ramallo-López, José Martín; Requejo, Felix G; Craievich, Aldo F; Planes, Gabriel A

    2015-03-01

    We report a synthetic approach for the production of ultra-small (0.6 nm) gold nanoparticles soluble in water with a precise control of the nanoparticle size. Our synthetic approach utilizes a pH-depending Au-cysteine polymer as a quencher for the AuNPs grown. The method extends the synthetic capabilities of nanoparticles with sizes down to 1 nm. In addition to the strict pH control, the existence of free -SH groups present in the mixture of reaction has been observed as a key requirement for the synthesis of small nanoparticles in mild conditions. UV-Vis, SAXS, XANES, EXAFS and HR-TEM, has been used to determinate the particle size, characterization of the gold precursor and gold-cysteine interaction. PMID:25485807

  4. New cysteine-S-conjugate precursors of volatile sulfur compounds in bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L. cultivar).

    PubMed

    Starkenmann, Christian; Niclass, Yvan

    2011-04-13

    The objective of this study was to verify whether the volatile organic sulfur compounds recently discovered in bell pepper (Capsicum annuum, L. cultivars), such as the mercapto-ketones: 4-sulfanyl-2-heptanone and 2-sulfanyl-4-heptanone, the mercapto-alcohols: 4-sulfanyl-2-heptanol and 2-sulfanyl-4-heptanol, and heptane-2,4-dithiol, originate from their corresponding cysteine-S-conjugates. Analysis of aqueous extracts of red and green bell pepper by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive mode (UPLC-MS ESI(+)) displayed masses corresponding to the expected cysteine-S-conjugates. To confirm this observation, four cysteine-S-conjugates were prepared as authentic samples: S-(3-hydroxy-1-methylhexyl)-L-cysteine, S-(3-hydroxy-1-propylbutyl)-L-cysteine, S-(3-oxo-1-propylbutyl)-L-cysteine, and (2R,2'R)-3,3'-(4-hydroxyheptane-2,6-diyl)bis(sulfanediyl) bis(2-aminopropanoic acid). By comparison with the fragmentation patterns and retention times of synthetic mixtures of cysteine-S-conjugate diastereoisomers, the natural occurrence of cysteine conjugates was confirmed in bell peppers. In addition, the cysteine-S-conjugates from red and green bell pepper extracts were concentrated by ion exchange chromatography and the fractions incubated with a β-lyase (apotryptophanase). The liberated thiols were concentrated by affinity chromatography, and their occurrence, detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, confirmed our predictions. Moreover, 3-sulfanyl-1-hexanol was also detected and the occurrence of S-(1(2-hydroxyethyl)butyl)-L-cysteine confirmed. A quantitative estimation based on external calibration curves, established by UPLC-MS ESI(+) in selected reaction monitoring mode, showed that cysteine-S-conjugates were present at concentrations in the range of 1 to 100 μg/kg (±20%). PMID:21375341

  5. Formation of Hg(II) Tetrathiolate Complexes with Cysteine at Neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Thomas; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2015-01-01

    Mercury(II) ions precipitate from aqueous cysteine (H2Cys) solutions containing H2Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 2.0 as Hg(S-HCys)2. In absence of additional cysteine, the precipitate dissolves at pH ~12 with the [Hg(S,N-Cys)2]2− complex dominating. With excess cysteine (H2Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 4.0), higher complexes form and the precipitate dissolves at lower pH values. Previously, we found that tetrathiolate [Hg(S-Cys)4]6− complexes form at pH = 11.0; in this work we extend the investigation to pH values of physiological interest. We examined two series of Hg(II)-cysteine solutions in which CHg(II) varied between 8 – 9 mM and 80 – 100 mM, respectively, with H2Cys/Hg(II) mole ratios from 4 to ~20. The solutions were prepared in the pH range 7.1 – 8.8, at the pH at which the initial Hg(S-HCys)2 precipitate dissolved. The variations in the Hg(II) speciation were followed by 199Hg NMR, X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Our results show that in the dilute solutions (CHg(II) = 8 – 9 mM), mixtures of di-, tri- (major) and tetrathiolate complexes exist at moderate cysteine excess (CH2Cys ~ 0.16 M) at pH 7.1. In the more concentrated solutions (CHg(II) = 80 – 100 mM) with high cysteine excess (CH2Cys > 0.9 M), tetrathiolate [Hg(S-cysteinate)4]m-6 (m = 0 – 4) complexes dominate in the pH range 7.3 – 7.8, with lower charge than for the [Hg(S-Cys)4]6− complex due to protonation of some (m) of the amino groups of the coordinated cysteine ligands. The results of this investigation could provide a key to the mechanism of biosorption and accumulation of Hg(II) ions in biological / environmental systems. PMID:27064521

  6. Effects of E-64, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor, on cowpea weevil growth, development, and fecundity

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, L.L.; Shade, R.E.; Pomeroy, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    E-64, a specific inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, was incorporated into artificial seeds at low levels (0.01-0.25% by weight). It prolonged developmental time and increased mortality of the larval cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.), in direct proportion to its concentration in the artificial seeds. The fecundity of females emerging from the artificial seeds was significantly decreased by E-64 concentrations of 0.06% and higher. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis that the midgut cysteine proteinase in C. maculatus is essential for normal growth and development.

  7. Flavone-Based ESIPT Ratiometric Chemodosimeter for Detection of Cysteine in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a novel ratiometric fluorescent chemodosimeter MHF-based ESIPT process for specific detection of cysteine among the biological thiols. The probe MHF shows very weak blue fluorescence under UV excitation. Upon addition of cysteine (Cys), the reaction of Cys with MHF induces acrylate hydrolysis, thereby enabling the ESIPT process to shift the weak blue emission to a strong green emission with about 20-fold enhancement. We utilized 1H NMR spectra to elucidate the fluorescence sensing mechanism. Moreover, the cellular imaging experiment indicated the MHF possessed excellent selectivity, low cytotoxicity, and desirable cell permeability for biological applications. PMID:24571859

  8. IdeS and SpeB: immunoglobulin-degrading cysteine proteinases of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Björck, Lars

    2003-02-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes is a major human pathogen causing substantial morbidity and mortality in society. S. pyogenes has evolved numerous molecular mechanisms to avoid the various actions of the human immune system and has established means to modulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. S. pyogenes produces and secretes proteolytic enzymes, which have an important impact on the ability of the bacteria to survive in the human host. Prominent among these are two immunoglobulin-degrading enzymes: the newly discovered streptococcal cysteine proteinase, IdeS, and the classical cysteine proteinase of S. pyogenes, SpeB. PMID:12615219

  9. Structure-function and pathogenesis studies of Streptococcus pyogenes extracellular cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Burns, E H; Marciel, A M; Musser, J M

    1997-01-01

    Replacement of the single cysteine residue (C192) with serine in the Streptococcus pyogenes extracellular cysteine protease (SCP) prevented auto-catalytic processing of the 40-kDa zymogen to the 28-kDa mature form and eliminated proteolytic activity. SCP incubated with human endothelial cells induced a time- and concentration-dependent increase in a 66-kDa gelatinase/type IV collagenase in culture supernatants. Activation of this gelatinase/collagenase may contribute to endothelial cell damage, tissue destruction, and hemodynamic derangement observed in some patients with severe, invasive S. pyogenes infection. PMID:9331720

  10. Hg(2+) mediated quinazoline ensemble for highly selective recognition of Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Anand, Thangaraj; Sivaraman, Gandhi; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2014-04-01

    A fluorimetric sensor for Hg(2+) ion and Cysteine based on quinazoline platform was designed and synthesized by one step reaction and characterized by using common spectroscopic methods. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory calculations shows that probe behaves as "ON-OFF" fluorescent quenching sensor via electron transfer/heavy atom effect. Receptor was found to exhibit selective fluorescence quenching behavior over the other competitive metal ions, and also the receptor-Hg(2+) ensemble act as an efficient "OFF-ON" sensor for Cysteine. Moreover this sensor has also been successfully applied to detection of Hg(2+) in natural water samples with good recovery. PMID:24384358

  11. DFT study on cysteine adsorption mechanism on Au(111) and Au(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Floare, Calin G.; Calborean, Adrian; Turcu, Ioan

    2013-11-13

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were used to investigate relevant aspects of adsorption mechanisms of cysteine dimers in protonated form on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces. The projected densities of states are explicitly discussed for all main chemical groups of cysteine, i.e. the amino group (NH2), the thiol group (SH) and the carboxylic group (COOH) to identify differences in adsorption mechanism. Special emphasis is put on the analysis of changes in the electronic structure of molecules adsorbed on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces as well as the accompanying charge transfer mechanisms at molecule-substrate interaction.

  12. 3-Cyano-3-aza-β-amino Acid Derivatives as Inhibitors of Human Cysteine Cathepsins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nitrile-type inhibitors are known to interact with cysteine proteases in a covalent-reversible manner. The chemotype of 3-cyano-3-aza-β-amino acid derivatives was designed in which the N-cyano group is centrally arranged in the molecule to allow for interactions with the nonprimed and primed binding regions of the target enzymes. These compounds were evaluated as inhibitors of the human cysteine cathepsins K, S, B, and L. They exhibited slow-binding behavior and were found to be exceptionally potent, in particular toward cathepsin K, with second-order rate constants up to 52 900 × 103 M–1 s–1. PMID:25313316

  13. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, a Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hummelen, Ruben; Hemsworth, Jaimie; Reid, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics has considerable potential, but the evidence needs to be further substantiated. Vitamin A, iron, and zinc have been associated with adverse effects and caution is warranted for their use. PMID:22254046

  14. Amino acid sequences around the cysteine residues of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Janet C.; Waley, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    1. The nature of the subunits in rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase has been investigated. 2. Amino acid analyses show that there are five cysteine residues and two methionine residues/subunit. 3. The amino acid sequences around the cysteine residues have been determined; these account for about 75 residues. 4. Cleavage at the methionine residues with cyanogen bromide gave three fragments. 5. These results show that the subunits correspond to polypeptide chains, containing about 230 amino acid residues. The chains in triose phosphate isomerase seem to be shorter than those of other glycolytic enzymes. PMID:5165707

  15. A Fragment-Based Method to Discover Irreversible Covalent Inhibitors of Cysteine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A novel fragment-based drug discovery approach is reported which irreversibly tethers drug-like fragments to catalytic cysteines. We attached an electrophile to 100 fragments without significant alterations in the reactivity of the electrophile. A mass spectrometry assay discovered three nonpeptidic inhibitors of the cysteine protease papain. The identified compounds display the characteristics of irreversible inhibitors. The irreversible tethering system also displays specificity: the three identified papain inhibitors did not covalently react with UbcH7, USP08, or GST-tagged human rhinovirus 3C protease. PMID:24870364

  16. Two Japanese CADASIL families exhibiting Notch3 mutation R75P not involving cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Toshiki; Muranishi, Manabu; Torugun, Torusunjian; Tango, Hiromi; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Kudeken, Tukasa; Kawase, Yuji; Kawabe, Kiyokazu; Oshima, Fumiko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Fushiki, Shinji; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Most previously reported mutations in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) result in an odd number of cysteine residues within the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats in Notch3. We report here R75P mutation in two Japanese CADASIL families not directly involving cysteine residues located within the first EGF-like repeats. Probands in both families had repeated episodes of stroke, depression, dementia as well as T2 high-intensity lesions in the basal ganglia and periventricular white matter, but fewer white matter lesions in the temporal pole on MRI. These families provide new insights into the diagnosis and pathomechanisms of CADASIL. PMID:19043263

  17. Role of cysteine-58 and cysteine-95 residues in the thiol di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is the first human cytokine reported and was thought to have a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Homologs of this molecule have been reported in bacteria, invertebrates and plants. Apart from cytokine activity, it also has two catalytic activities viz., tautomerase and di-sulfide oxidoreductase, which appear to be involved in immunological functions. The CXXC catalytic site is responsible for di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of MIF. We have recently reported thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wba-MIF-2), although it lacks the CXXC motif. We hypothesized that three conserved cysteine residues might be involved in the formation of di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic site. Homology modeling of Wba-MIF-2 showed that among the three cysteine residues, Cys58 and Cys95 residues came in close proximity (3.23Å) in the tertiary structure with pKa value 9, indicating that these residues might play a role in the di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic activity. We carried out site directed mutagenesis of these residues (Cys58Ser & Cys95Ser) and expressed mutant proteins in Escherichia coli. The mutant proteins did not show any oxidoreductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, thus indicating that these two cysteine residues are vital for the catalytic activity of Wba-MIF-2. PMID:26432350

  18. Dealing with the sulfur part of cysteine: four enzymatic steps degrade l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Höfler, Saskia; Lorenz, Christin; Busch, Tjorven; Brinkkötter, Mascha; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2016-07-01

    Amino acid catabolism is essential for adjusting pool sizes of free amino acids and takes part in energy production as well as nutrient remobilization. The carbon skeletons are generally converted to precursors or intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In the case of cysteine, the reduced sulfur derived from the thiol group also has to be oxidized in order to prevent accumulation to toxic concentrations. Here we present a mitochondrial sulfur catabolic pathway catalyzing the complete oxidation of l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate. After transamination to 3-mercaptopyruvate, the sulfhydryl group from l-cysteine is transferred to glutathione by sulfurtransferase 1 and oxidized to sulfite by the sulfur dioxygenase ETHE1. Sulfite is then converted to thiosulfate by addition of a second persulfide group by sulfurtransferase 1. This pathway is most relevant during early embryo development and for vegetative growth under light-limiting conditions. Characterization of a double mutant produced from Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion lines for ETHE1 and sulfurtransferase 1 revealed that an intermediate of the ETHE1 dependent pathway, most likely a persulfide, interferes with amino acid catabolism and induces early senescence. PMID:27105581

  19. Bone marrow and renal injury associated with haloalkene cysteine conjugates in calves.

    PubMed

    Lock, E A; Sani, Y; Moore, R B; Finkelstein, M B; Anders, M W; Seawright, A A

    1996-01-01

    Almost 40 years ago, it was reported that cattle-feed which had been extracted with hot trichloroethylene and then fed to calves produced renal injury and a fatal aplastic anaemia. The toxic factor was subsequently identified as S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC). These original findings have been confirmed, a single intravenous dose of DCVC at 4 mg/kg, or 0.4 mg/kg intravenously per day administered for 10 days to calves produced aplastic anaemia, and renal injury after a single dose of 4 mg/kg. The toxicity to calves of a number of other haloalkene cysteine conjugates has been examined to ascertain whether, like DCVC, they produce bone marrow and renal injury. Intravenous administration of the N-acetyl cysteine conjugate of DCVC produced renal but not bone marrow injury at a molar equivalent dose to DCVC, indicating that the calf can deacetylate the mercapturic acid and further that sufficient chemical had reached the kidney to be a substrate for the enzyme cysteine conjugate beta-lyase. However, intravenous administration of the alpha-methyl analogue of DCVC, which cannot undergo metabolism via the enzyme cysteine conjugate beta-lyase, was without toxicity at doses about five-fold higher than DCVC. These latter findings provide strong evidence that metabolism of DCVC via the enzyme beta-lyase is necessary for bone marrow and renal injury to occur. The cysteine conjugates of perchloroethylene and hexachloro-1,3-butadiene(HCBD) when given intravenously to calves at molar equivalent doses to DCVC, or above, did not produce either bone marrow or renal injury. In contrast, intravenous administration of the cysteine conjugate of tetrafluoroethylene (TFEC) produced severe renal tubular injury in calves without affecting the bone marrow. In vitro studies with these haloalkene cysteine conjugates showed, like DCVC, that they were good substrates for calf renal cysteine conjugate beta-lyase and toxic to renal cells as judged by their ability to reduce organic anion

  20. ASSESSMENT OF CYSTEINE SYNTHESIS IN VERY LOW-BIRTH WEIGHT NEONATES USING A [13C6] GLUCOSE TRACER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cysteine is an amino acid necessary for the synthesis of all proteins, the antioxidant glutathione, and the neuromodulator taurine. Whether cysteine is an essential amino acid for premature neonates remains controversial. Using a [13C6]glucose precursor in very-low-birth weight (VLBW) premature neon...

  1. L-Cysteine inhibits root elongation through auxin/PLETHORA and SCR/SHR pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Mao, Jie-Li; Zhao, Ying-Jun; Li, Chuan-You; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2015-02-01

    L-Cysteine plays a prominent role in sulfur metabolism of plants. However, its role in root development is largely unknown. Here, we report that L-cysteine reduces primary root growth in a dosage-dependent manner. Elevating cellular L-cysteine level by exposing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to high L-cysteine, buthionine sulphoximine, or O-acetylserine leads to altered auxin maximum in root tips, the expression of quiescent center cell marker as well as the decrease of the auxin carriers PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, and PIN7 of primary roots. We also show that high L-cysteine significantly reduces the protein level of two sets of stem cell specific transcription factors PLETHORA1/2 and SCR/SHR. However, L-cysteine does not downregulate the transcript level of PINs, PLTs, or SCR/SHR, suggesting that an uncharacterized post-transcriptional mechanism may regulate the accumulation of PIN, PLT, and SCR/SHR proteins and auxin transport in the root tips. These results suggest that endogenous L-cysteine level acts to maintain root stem cell niche by regulating basal- and auxin-induced expression of PLT1/2 and SCR/SHR. L-Cysteine may serve as a link between sulfate assimilation and auxin in regulating root growth. PMID:24798139

  2. 2,2'-Dithiobis(5-nitropyridine) (DTNP) as an effective and gentle deprotectant for common cysteine protecting groups.

    PubMed

    Schroll, Alayne L; Hondal, Robert J; Flemer, Stevenson

    2012-01-01

    Of all the commercially available amino acid derivatives for solid phase peptide synthesis, none has a greater abundance of side-chain protection diversity than cysteine. The high reactivity of the cysteine thiol necessitates its attenuation during peptide construction. Moreover, the propensity of cysteine residues within a peptide or protein sequence to form disulfide connectivity allows the opportunity for the peptide chemist to install these disulfides iteratively as a post-synthetic manipulation through the judicious placement of orthogonal pairs of cysteine S-protection within the peptide's architecture. It is important to continuously discover new vectors of deprotection for these different blocking protocols in order to achieve the highest degree of orthogonality between the removal of one species in the presence of another. We report here a complete investigation of the scope and limitations of the deprotective potential of 2,2'-dithiobis(5-nitropyridine) (DTNP) on a selection of commercially available Cys S-protecting groups. The gentle conditions of DTNP in a TFA solvent system show a remarkable ability to deprotect some cysteine blocking functionality traditionally removable only by more harsh or forcing conditions. Beyond illustrating the deprotective ability of this reagent cocktail within a cysteine-containing peptide sequence, the utility of this method was further demonstrated through iterative disulfide formation in oxytocin and apamin test peptides. It is shown that this methodology has high potential as a stand-alone cysteine deprotection technique or in further manipulation of disulfide architecture within a more complex cysteine-containing peptide template. PMID:22083608

  3. Cysteine protease and its inhibitor in experimentally produced squamous cell carcinomas in hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Alidina, R; Kikuchi, M; Kashima, M; Epstein, J H; Fukuyama, K

    1988-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) were experimentally produced in hairless mouse skin, and cysteine protease and its inhibitor were simultaneously purified from extracts of 1 g of tissue of SCC and normal skin. Activity of cysteine proteinases, Mr greater than 50,000 and Mr 28,000, increased in SCC compared to those in normal skin. SCC also showed elevation of cysteine proteinase inhibitor activity and Mr 13,000 and Mr 82,000 inhibitors were purified. Mr 13,000 inhibitor was found to have biochemical properties which were the same as those of the inhibitor present in normal skin. Mr 82,000 inhibitor was not detectable in normal skin and it differed from a serum inhibitor with a similar Mr in terms of activity and stability at acidic pH. The findings suggest that the increased activity of both cysteine proteases and endogenous inhibitors may be involved in the regulatory mechanisms of malignant cell metabolism and tissue remodeling associated with SCC development. PMID:3396664

  4. Cysteine and glutathione concentrations in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after treatment with N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed Central

    Bridgeman, M. M.; Marsden, M.; MacNee, W.; Flenley, D. C.; Ryle, A. P.

    1991-01-01

    N-acetylcysteine (600 mg/day) was given to patients by mouth for five days before bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage to determine whether N-acetylcysteine could increase the concentrations of the antioxidant reduced glutathione in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed 1-3 hours (group 2, n = 9) and 16-20 hours (group 3, n = 10) after the last dose of N-acetylcysteine and the values were compared with those in a control group receiving no N-acetylcysteine (group 1, n = 8). N-acetylcysteine was not detected in plasma or lavage fluid. Plasma concentrations of cysteine, the main metabolite of N-acetylcysteine and a precursor of reduced glutathione, were greater in the groups receiving treatment (groups 2 and 3) than in group 1. Cysteine concentrations in lavage fluid were similar in the three groups. Concentrations of reduced glutathione were greater in both plasma and lavage fluid in group 2 than in group 1. These data suggest that N-acetylcysteine given by mouth is rapidly deacetylated to cysteine, with resulting increases in the concentrations of cysteine in plasma and of reduced glutathione in plasma and the airways, which thus temporarily increase the antioxidant capacity of the lung. Images PMID:1871695

  5. Palladium-Catalyzed Chemoselective and Biocompatible Functionalization of Cysteine-Containing Molecules at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Al-Shuaeeb, Riyadh Ahmed Atto; Kolodych, Sergii; Koniev, Oleksandr; Delacroix, Sébastien; Erb, Stéphane; Nicolaÿ, Stéphanie; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Brion, Jean-Daniel; Cianférani, Sarah; Alami, Mouâd; Wagner, Alain; Messaoudi, Samir

    2016-08-01

    The third generation of aminobiphenyl palladacycle pre-catalyst "G3-Xantphos" enables functionalization of peptides containing cysteine in high yields. The conjugation (bioconjugation) occurs chemoselectively at room temperature under biocompatible conditions. Extension of the method to protein functionalization allows selective bioconjugation of the trastuzumab antibody. PMID:27362372

  6. Microarray analysis reveals strategies of Tribolium castaneum larvae to compensate for cysteine and serine protease inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays containing Tribolium castaneum whole-genome sequences were developed to study the transcriptome response of T. castaneum larvae to dietary protease inhibitors. In larvae fed diets containing 0.1% of the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 alone or in combination with 5.0% of the serine pro...

  7. Dependence of the structure and mechanics of metaphase chromosomes on oxidized cysteines.

    PubMed

    Eastland, Adrienne; Hornick, Jessica; Kawamura, Ryo; Nanavati, Dhaval; Marko, John F

    2016-09-01

    We have found that reagents that reduce oxidized cysteines lead to destabilization of metaphase chromosome folding, suggesting that chemically linked cysteine residues may play a structural role in mitotic chromosome organization, in accord with classical studies by Dounce et al. (J Theor Biol 42:275-285, 1973) and Sumner (J Cell Sci 70:177-188, 1984a). Human chromosomes isolated into buffer unfold when exposed to dithiothreitol (DTT) or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP). In micromanipulation experiments which allow us to examine the mechanics of individual metaphase chromosomes, we have found that the gel-like elastic stiffness of native metaphase chromosomes is dramatically suppressed by DTT and TCEP, even before the chromosomes become appreciably unfolded. We also report protein labeling experiments on human metaphase chromosomes which allow us to tag oxidized and reduction-sensitive cysteine residues. PAGE analysis using fluorescent labels shows a small number of labeled bands. Mass spectrometry analysis of similarly labeled proteins provides a list of candidates for proteins with oxidized cysteines involved in chromosome organization, notably including components of condensin I, cohesin, the nucleosome-interacting proteins RCC1 and RCC2, as well as the RNA/DNA-binding protein NONO/p54NRB. PMID:27145786

  8. Posttranslational Modification of Cysteine in Redox Signaling and Oxidative Stress: Focus on S-Glutathionylation

    PubMed Central

    Chock, P. Boon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have become recognized as second messengers for initiating and/or regulating vital cellular signaling pathways, and they are known also as deleterious mediators of cellular stress and cell death. ROS and RNS, and their cross products like peroxynitrite, react primarily with cysteine residues whose oxidative modification leads to functional alterations in the proteins. In this Forum, the collection of six review articles presents a perspective on the broad biological impact of cysteine modifications in health and disease from the molecular to the cellular and organismal levels, focusing in particular on reversible protein-S-glutathionylation and its central role in transducing redox signals as well as protecting proteins from irreversible cysteine oxidation. The Forum review articles consider the role of S-glutationylation in regulation of the peroxiredoxin enzymes, the special redox environment of the mitochondria, redox regulation pertinent to the function of the cardiovascular system, mechanisms of redox-activated apoptosis in the pulmonary system, and the role of glutathionylation in the initiation, propagation, and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Several common themes emerge from these reviews; notably, the probability of crosstalk between signaling/regulation mechanisms involving protein-S-nitrosylation and protein-S-glutathionylation, and the need for quantitative analysis of the relationship between specific cysteine modifications and corresponding functional changes in various cellular contexts. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 471–475. PMID:22136616

  9. Competition of charge- versus radical-directed fragmentation of gas-phase protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Love, Chasity B; Tan, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-24

    The fragmentation behavior of various cysteine sulfinyl ions (intact, N-acetylated, and O-methylated), new members of the gas-phase amino acid radical ion family, was investigated by low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). The dominant fragmentation channel for the protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals ((SO•)Cys) was the radical-directed Cα-Cβ homolytic cleavage, resulting in the formation of glycyl radical ions and loss of CH2SO. This channel, however, was not observed for protonated N-acetylated cysteine sulfinyl radicals (Ac-(SO•)Cys); instead, charge-directed H2O loss followed immediately by SH loss prevailed. Counterintuitively, the H2O loss did not derive from the carboxyl group but involved the sulfinyl oxygen, a proton, and a Cβ hydrogen atom. Theoretical calculations suggested that N-acetylation significantly increases the barrier (~14 kcal mol(-1)) for the radical-directed fragmentation channel because of its reduced capability to stabilize the thus-formed glycyl radical ions via the captodative effect. N-Acetylation also assists in moving the proton to the sulfinyl site, which reduces the barrier for H2O loss. Our studies demonstrate that for cysteine sulfinyl radical ions, the stability of the product ions (glycyl radical ions) and the location of the charge (proton) can significantly modulate the competition between radical- and charge-directed fragmentation. PMID:23527556

  10. Role of conserved cysteine residues in Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA activity.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marco A S; Baura, Valter A; Aquino, Bruno; Huergo, Luciano F; Kadowaki, Marco A S; Chubatsu, Leda S; Souza, Emanuel M; Dixon, Ray; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Wassem, Roseli; Monteiro, Rose A

    2009-01-01

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae is an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium that associates with economically important crops. NifA protein, the transcriptional activator of nif genes in H. seropedicae, binds to nif promoters and, together with RNA polymerase-sigma(54) holoenzyme, catalyzes the formation of open complexes to allow transcription initiation. The activity of H. seropedicae NifA is controlled by ammonium and oxygen levels, but the mechanisms of such control are unknown. Oxygen sensitivity is attributed to a conserved motif of cysteine residues in NifA that spans the central AAA+ domain and the interdomain linker that connects the AAA+ domain to the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Here we mutagenized this conserved motif of cysteines and assayed the activity of mutant proteins in vivo. We also purified the mutant variants of NifA and tested their capacity to bind to the nifB promoter region. Chimeric proteins between H. seropedicae NifA, an oxygen-sensitive protein, and Azotobacter vinelandii NifA, an oxygen-tolerant protein, were constructed and showed that the oxygen response is conferred by the central AAA+ and C-terminal DNA binding domains of H. seropedicae NifA. We conclude that the conserved cysteine motif is essential for NifA activity, although single cysteine-to-serine mutants are still competent at binding DNA. PMID:19573596

  11. Nitric oxide inhibits cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Salvati, L; Muolo, M; Colasanti, M; Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2000-04-13

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pluripotent regulatory molecule showing, among others, an antiparasitic activity. Moreover, NO inhibits cysteine proteinase action by nitrosylating the Cys catalytic residue. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of the substrate N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-(7-amino-4-methyl coumarin) and of NO on the catalytic activity of cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi (the hemoflagellate protozoan parasite which causes the American trypanosomiasis), is reported. In particular, NO-donors S-nitroso-glutathione (GSNO), (+/-)-(E)-4-ethyl-2-[(E)-hydroxyimino]-5-nitro-3-hexenamide (NOR-3), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) dose-dependently inhibited cruzipain, this effect being likely attributable to the S-nitrosylation of the Cys25 catalytic residue. These results were analyzed in parallel with those concerning the inhibitory effect of the substrate and of NO on the catalytic activity of falcipain, the cruzipain-homologous cysteine proteinase from Plasmodium falciparum. The modulation of the cruzipain and falcipain activity by NO may be relevant in developing new strategies against T. cruzi and P. falciparum in human host. As a whole, the NO-mediated S-nitrosylation of pathogenic viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic cysteine proteinases may represent a general mechanism of antimicrobial and antiparasitic host defences. PMID:10753643

  12. Assembly of the Cysteine Synthase Complex and the Regulatory Role of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macromolecular assemblies play critical roles in regulating cellular functions. The cysteine synthase complex (CSC), which is formed by association of serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), functions as a multienzyme complex that responds to changes in intracellul...

  13. A Novel Cysteine-Sparing NOTCH3 Mutation in a Chinese Family with CADASIL

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bin; Bo, Le; Xu, Zhice; Xu, Xingshun; Geng, Deqin; Sun, Miao

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an adult onset cerebral small vessel disorder caused by the mutations of the neurogenic locus notch homolog protein 3 (NOTCH3) gene. The extracellular part of NOTCH3 is composed of 34 epidermal growth factor-like (EGF-like) repeat domains. Each EGF-like domain is rich of cysteine and glycine to produce three loops that are essential for high-affinity binding to its ligand. Nearly all reported CADASIL-associated mutations result in gain or loss of a cysteine residue within the EGF-like domains. Only a few cysteine-sparing NOTCH3 mutations have been documented in the patients with CADASIL to date. Here, we reported a Chinese CADASIL family with a cysteine-sparing NOTCH3 mutation. In this family, affected patients had dizziness, memory loss, gait instability, or hemiplegia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse leukoencephalopathy with confluent signal abnormalities in the periventricular white matter, basal ganglia, and centrum semiovale bilaterally. By screening the entire coding region of NOTCH3, a novel missense mutation p.G149V (c.446G>T) was found. This mutation was not detected in 400 normal controls. Considering the critical position of glycine within the C-loop of EGF-like domain and its high conservation through evolution, p.G149V mutation could be a potential pathogenic cause for CADASIL. PMID:25098330

  14. The Spectrum of a Dissociation Intermediate of Cysteine. A Biophysical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, A. G.; Chinander, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a laboratory exercise that makes use of Beer's Law plots of cysteine constructed at several pH values over a broad range of wavelengths to estimate the tautomeric ratio (R) of two singly charged ionic forms, calculate the microscopic constants, and construct ultraviolet spectra for both light absorbing species. (CW)

  15. Chromatographic methods for determination of S-substituted cysteine derivatives--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kubec, Roman; Dadáková, Eva

    2009-10-01

    A novel HPLC method for determination of a wide variety of S-substituted cysteine derivatives in Allium species has been developed and validated. This method allows simultaneous separation and quantification of S-alk(en)ylcysteine S-oxides, gamma-glutamyl-S-alk(en)ylcysteines and gamma-glutamyl-S-alk(en)ylcysteine S-oxides in a single run. The procedure is based on extraction of these amino acids and dipeptides by methanol, their derivatization by dansyl chloride and subsequent separation by reversed phase HPLC. The main advantages of the new method are simplicity, excellent stability of derivatives, high sensitivity, specificity and the ability to simultaneously analyze the whole range of S-substituted cysteine derivatives. This method was critically compared with other chromatographic procedures used for quantification of S-substituted cysteine derivatives, namely with two other HPLC methods (derivatization by o-phthaldialdehyde/tert-butylthiol and fluorenylmethyl chloroformate), and with determination by gas chromatography or capillary electrophoresis. Major advantages and drawbacks of these analytical procedures are discussed. Employing these various chromatographic methods, the content and relative proportions of individual S-substituted cysteine derivatives were determined in four most frequently consumed alliaceous vegetables (garlic, onion, shallot, and leek). PMID:19733357

  16. Characterization of iduronate sulphatase mutants affecting N-glycosylation sites and the cysteine-84 residue.

    PubMed

    Millat, G; Froissart, R; Maire, I; Bozon, D

    1997-08-15

    Iduronate sulphatase (IDS) is responsible for mucopolysaccharidosis type II, a rare recessive X-linked lysosomal storage disease. The aim of this work was to evaluate the functional importance of each N-glycosylation site, and of the cysteine-84 residue. IDS mutant cDNAs, lacking one of the eight potential N-glycosylation sites, were expressed in COS cells. Although each of the potential sites was used, none of the eight glycosylation sites appeared to be essential for lysosomal targeting. Another important sulphatase co- or post-translational modification for generating catalytic activity involves the conversion of a cysteine residue surrounded by a conserved sequence C-X-P-S-R into a 2-amino-3-oxopropionic acid residue [Schmidt, Selmer, Ingendoh and von Figura (1995) Cell 82, 271-278]. This conserved cysteine, located at amino acid position 84 in IDS, was replaced either by an alanine (C84A) or by a threonine (C84T) using site-directed mutagenesis. C84A and C84T mutant cDNAs were expressed either in COS cells or in human lymphoblastoid cells deleted for the IDS gene. C84A had a drastic effect both for IDS processing and for catalytic activity. The C84T mutation produced a small amount of mature forms but also abolished enzyme activity, confirming that the cysteine residue at position 84 is required for IDS activity. PMID:9337875

  17. Regulatory Protein-Protein Interactions in Primary Metabolism: The Case of the Cysteine Synthase Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an essential nutrient for plant growth and development. In plant sulfur assimilation, cysteine biosynthesis plays a central role in fixing inorganic sulfur from the environment into the metabolic precursor for cellular thiol-containing compounds. A key regulatory feature of this process ...

  18. Signal transduction in light–oxygen–voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Estella F.; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Borbat, Peter P.; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H.; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications. PMID:26648256

  19. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  20. Chemical introduction of the green fluorescence: imaging of cysteine cathepsins by an irreversibly locked GFP fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Frizler, Maxim; Yampolsky, Ilia V; Baranov, Mikhail S; Stirnberg, Marit; Gütschow, Michael

    2013-09-21

    An activity-based probe, containing an irreversibly locked GFP-like fluorophore, was synthesized and evaluated as an inhibitor of human cathepsins and, as exemplified with cathepsin K, it proved to be suitable for ex vivo imaging and quantification of cysteine cathepsins by SDS-PAGE. PMID:23912233

  1. Proteome-Wide Profiling of Targets of Cysteine reactive Small Molecules by Using Ethynyl Benziodoxolone Reagents.

    PubMed

    Abegg, Daniel; Frei, Reto; Cerato, Luca; Prasad Hari, Durga; Wang, Chao; Waser, Jerome; Adibekian, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present a highly efficient method for proteomic profiling of cysteine residues in complex proteomes and in living cells. Our method is based on alkynylation of cysteines in complex proteomes using a "clickable" alkynyl benziodoxolone bearing an azide group. This reaction proceeds fast, under mild physiological conditions, and with a very high degree of chemoselectivity. The formed azide-capped alkynyl-cysteine adducts are readily detectable by LC-MS/MS, and can be further functionalized with TAMRA or biotin alkyne via CuAAC. We demonstrate the utility of alkynyl benziodoxolones for chemical proteomics applications by identifying the proteomic targets of curcumin, a diarylheptanoid natural product that was and still is part of multiple human clinical trials as anticancer agent. Our results demonstrate that curcumin covalently modifies several key players of cellular signaling and metabolism, most notably the enzyme casein kinase I gamma. We anticipate that this new method for cysteine profiling will find broad application in chemical proteomics and drug discovery. PMID:26211368

  2. HIGH-THROUGHPUT IDENTIFICATION OF CATALYTIC REDOX-ACTIVE CYSTEINE RESIDUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cysteine (Cys) residues often play critical roles in proteins; however, identification of their specific functions has been limited to case-by-case experimental approaches. We developed a procedure for high-throughput identification of catalytic redox-active Cys in proteins by se...

  3. Formation of elemental sulfur by Chlorella fusca during growth on L-cysteine ethylester

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, F.; Schafer, W.; Schmidt, A.

    1984-01-01

    During growth on L-cysteine ethylester, Chlorella fusca (211-8b) accumulated a substance which contained bound sulfide, which could be liberated by reduction with dithioerythritol (DTE) as inorganic sulfide. This substance was extracted with hot methanol and purified by thin layer chromatography. This substance liberated free sulfide when incubated with mono- and dithiols, and thiocyanate was formed after heating with KCN. The isolated substance cochromatographed with authentic sulfur flower using different solvent systems for thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, and the identical spectrum with a relative ..beta..max at 263 nm was found. The chemical structure was confirmed by mass spectrometry showing a molecular weight of 256 m/e for the S/sub 8/ configuration. No labeled elemental sulfur was detected when the cells were grown on (/sup 35/S)sulfate and L-cysteine ethylester. C. fusca seems to have enzymes for the metabolism of elemental sulfur, since it disappeared after prolonged growth into the stationary phase. Cysteine was formed from O-acetyl-L-serine and elemental sulfur in the presence of thiol groups and purified cysteine synthase from spinach or Chlorella.

  4. SMALL CYSTEINE-RICH PEPTIDES RESEMBLING ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES HAVE BEEN UNDER-PREDICTED IN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multicellular organisms produce small cysteine-rich anti-microbial peptides as an innate defense against pathogens. While defensins, a well-known class of such peptides, are common among eukaryotes, there are classes restricted to the plant kingdom. These include thionins, lipid transfer proteins,...

  5. Hydrogen exchange of the glycyl radical of pyruvate formate-lyase is catalyzed by cysteine 419.

    PubMed

    Parast, C V; Wong, K K; Lewisch, S A; Kozarich, J W; Peisach, J; Magliozzo, R S

    1995-02-28

    Pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) catalyzes the reversible conversion of CoA and pyruvate into acetyl-CoA and formate. Active enzyme contains a glycyl radical whose alpha-hydrogen undergoes rapid exchange with solvent (t1/2 approximately 5 min at 0 degree C). We have investigated this exchange using site-directed mutagenesis and mechanism-based inactivation. Mutation of the active-site cysteine 419 into a serine, which renders the enzyme catalytically inactive, abolishes alpha-hydrogen exchange in the radical. This suggests that the exchange process is not an intrinsic property of the glycyl radical but is a consequence of its interaction with cysteine 419. This residue is also demonstrated to be involved in the transfer of the radical to acetylphosphinate, a mechanism-based inactivator of the enzyme. In contrast, mutation of the other essential cysteine 418 to a serine has no effect on the hydrogen exchange or the transfer of the radical to acetylphosphinate. A mechanism for the hydrogen exchange catalyzed by cysteine 419 consistent with a redox role for this residue in the normal catalytic reaction is proposed. PMID:7873518

  6. Cysteine sulfur chemistry in transcriptional regulators at the host-bacterial pathogen interface.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Justin L; Giedroc, David P

    2015-06-01

    Hosts employ myriad weapons to combat invading microorganisms as an integral feature of the host-bacterial pathogen interface. This interface is dominated by highly reactive small molecules that collectively induce oxidative stress. Successful pathogens employ transcriptional regulatory proteins that sense these small molecules directly or indirectly via a change in the ratio of reduced to oxidized low-molecular weight (LMW) thiols that collectively comprise the redox buffer in the cytoplasm. These transcriptional regulators employ either a prosthetic group or reactive cysteine residue(s) to effect changes in the transcription of genes that encode detoxification and repair systems that is driven by regulator conformational switching between high-affinity and low-affinity DNA-binding states. Cysteine harbors a highly polarizable sulfur atom that readily undergoes changes in oxidation state in response to oxidative stress to produce a range of regulatory post-translational modifications (PTMs), including sulfenylation (S-hydroxylation), mixed disulfide bond formation with LMW thiols (S-thiolation), di- and trisulfide bond formation, S-nitrosation, and S-alkylation. Here we discuss several examples of structurally characterized cysteine thiol-specific transcriptional regulators that sense changes in cellular redox balance, focusing on the nature of the cysteine PTM itself and the interplay of small molecule oxidative stressors in mediating a specific transcriptional response. PMID:25946648

  7. The role of cysteine in the alteration of bovine liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Nanjo, H; Adachi, H; Aketa, M; Mizoguchi, T; Nishihara, T; Terada, T

    1995-01-01

    Bovine liver NADP(+)-dependent dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DD3) is extremely sensitive to SH reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). NEM produced time- and concentration-dependent inactivation of DD3 in a pseudo-first-order reaction manner. This inactivation was prevented by NADP+, 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide phosphate, 2',5'-ADP and 2'-AMP but not by substrates, NAD+, nicotinamide mononucleotide or 5'-ADP.DD3 was absorbed by an affinity column of thiopropyl-Sepharose 6B, but enzyme incubated with both NEM and NADP+ was not. Moreover, one [14C]NEM molecule was incorporated into a cysteine of DD3 in the presence, and two cysteines of DD3 in the absence, of NADP+. These results suggested that two cysteine residues were modified per enzyme molecule by NEM, one was protected by NADP+ and the other had no significant function for the enzyme activity. Two radiolabelled peptides (P1 and P2) produced by the digestion with lysyl endopeptidase of [14C]NEM-modified DD3 could be separated by reverse-phase HPLC. P1, which was radiolabelled by [14C]NEM only in the absence of NADP+, showed the following sequence; H2N-Tyr-Lys-Pro-Val-Xaa-Asn-Gln-Val-Glu- NEM.Cys-His-Pro-Tyr-Phe-Asn-Gln-Ser-Lys-COOH (Xaa indicates a possible cysteine residue). This sequence was very similar to that of rat liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (3 alpha-HSD/DD) (residues 184 to 201) and was also highly conserved in the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. The sequence of P2, which had radioactivity in both the absence and presence of NADP+, also contained an NEM-modified cysteine and was similar in sequence to the regions located in loop A of rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD. The present study suggests that P1, which may have a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys-193 of rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD, functions in the alteration of DD3 activity depending on the modulation of NADP(+)-binding ability through a thiol/disulphide exchange reaction similar to that of

  8. [Brief discussion on "Sanli acupoint for du-fu diseases"].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; He, Quan; Xin, Yu; Zhang, Hongxing

    2015-07-01

    The connotations of "du-fu" and "Sanli" in "Sanli acupoint for du-fu diseases" are discussed in this paper, which can provide theoretical foundation for the clinical application of "Sanli acupoint for du-fu diseases". Based on ancient literature combined with related theories in the Huangdi Neijing (Yellow Emperor's Canon of Internal Classic), a deep discussion is performed through the relationship between Zusanli (ST 36) and stomach, indication and mechanism of Zusanli (ST 36) on du-fu diseases and comparison between Zusanli (ST 36) and Shousanli (LI 10). It is believed that "du" should be pronounced as "dŭ", meaning stomach, and it indicates that Zusanli (ST 36) is closely related to stomach and spleen when it is used for du-fu diseases; "fu" means abdomen area, including liver-gallbladder, spleen, stomach-intestine, kidney, uterus, triple energizer; "sanli' means exclusively the acupoint of Zusanli (ST 36). PMID:26521594

  9. Substrate and Cofactor Range Differences of Two Cysteine Dioxygenases from Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    Wenning, Leonie; Stöveken, Nadine; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenases (Cdos), which catalyze the sulfoxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA), have been extensively studied in eukaryotes because of their roles in several diseases. In contrast, only a few prokaryotic enzymes of this type have been investigated. In Ralstonia eutropha H16, two Cdo homologues (CdoA and CdoB) have been identified previously. In vivo studies showed that Escherichia coli cells expressing CdoA could convert 3-mercaptopropionate (3MP) to 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), whereas no 3SP could be detected in cells expressing CdoB. The objective of this study was to confirm these findings and to study both enzymes in detail by performing an in vitro characterization. The proteins were heterologously expressed and purified to apparent homogeneity by immobilized metal chelate affinity chromatography (IMAC). Subsequent analysis of the enzyme activities revealed striking differences with regard to their substrate ranges and their specificities for the transition metal cofactor, e.g., CdoA catalyzed the sulfoxidation of 3MP to a 3-fold-greater extent than the sulfoxidation of cysteine, whereas CdoB converted only cysteine. Moreover, the dependency of the activities of the Cdos from R. eutropha H16 on the metal cofactor in the active center could be demonstrated. The importance of CdoA for the metabolism of the sulfur compounds 3,3′-thiodipropionic acid (TDP) and 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) by further converting their degradation product, 3MP, was confirmed. Since 3MP can also function as a precursor for polythioester (PTE) synthesis in R. eutropha H16, deletion of cdoA might enable increased synthesis of PTEs. PMID:26590284

  10. A Methionine Residue Promotes Hyperoxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine of Mouse Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geumsoo; Levine, Rodney L

    2016-06-28

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (msrA) reduces methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. Its catalytic cysteine (Cys72-SH) has a low pKa that facilitates oxidation by methionine sulfoxide to cysteine sulfenic acid. If the catalytic cycle proceeds efficiently, the sulfenic acid is reduced back to cysteine at the expense of thioredoxin. However, the sulfenic acid is vulnerable to "irreversible" oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid that inactivates msrA (hyperoxidation). We observed that human msrA is resistant to hyperoxidation while mouse msrA is readily hyperoxidized by micromolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. We investigated the basis of this difference in susceptibility to hyperoxidation and established that it is controlled by the presence or absence of a Met residue in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the enzyme, Met229. This residue is Val in human msrA, and when it was mutated to Met, human msrA became sensitive to hyperoxidation. Conversely, mouse msrA was rendered insensitive to hyperoxidation when Met229 was mutated to Val or one of five other residues. Positioning of the methionine at residue 229 is not critical, as hyperoxidation occurred as long as the methionine was located within the group of 14 carboxyl-terminal residues. The carboxyl domain of msrA is known to be flexible and to have access to the active site, and Met residues are known to form stable, noncovalent bonds with aromatic residues through interaction of the sulfur atom with the aromatic ring. We propose that Met229 forms such a bond with Trp74 at the active site, preventing formation of a protective sulfenylamide with Cys72 sulfenic acid. As a consequence, the sulfenic acid is available for facile, irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid. PMID:27259041

  11. Cysteine could change the transport mechanism of PVP-coated silver nanoparticles in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Lin, S.; Wiesner, M.

    2012-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can hardly be removed by wastewater treatment plant and have big potential to enter groundwater, jeopardizing the water quality & aquatic ecosystem. Most AgNPs have surface coatings such as polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) which dominate their transport in porous media. Our previous study shows that PVP may promote the deposition of AgNPs on silica surface by a bridging mechanism. This study further explored how cysteine, a natural organic matter type, may influence the role of the PVP coating on AgNP translocation. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurement (Figure 1A) shows that the PVP coating rendered the AgNP dispersion high stability during the measuring period (3hrs). Addition of 100 ppm cysteine to the dispersion resulted in a rapid decrease in particle size from 100nm to 52nm within one hour, following which no further decline in particle size occurred. Column experiment results (Figure 1B) show that corresponding to the particle size change was a substantial decrease in particle deposition rates: introduction of 100 ppm cysteine into the particle dispersion resulted in a decrease in AgNP attenuation by the porous medium from 67% to 26%. The decline in particle size suggested that cysteine may have displaced the macromolecular PVP from the particle surface. Desorption of PVP resulted in a weakening or vanish of polymer bridging effect which in turn lowered the deposition rates substantially. This study demonstrated an implication of environmental transformation of coated AgNPs to their mobility in saturated sand aquifers. Acknowledgment Xinyao Yang appreciates the Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.:41101475) for covering the registration fee and traveling costs.igure 1 Particle size measurement (A) and breakthrough curves (B) of PVP-coated silver nanoparticle in the absence and presence of cysteine: pH=7.0, ionic strength=1mM, flow rate=1ml/min.

  12. Analysis of the glucagon receptor first extracellular loop by the substituted cysteine accessibility method.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Vertongen, Pascale; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2011-08-01

    Glucagon is an important hormone for the prevention of hypoglycemia, and contributes to the hyperglycemia observed in diabetic patients, yet very little is known about its receptor structure and the receptor-glucagon interaction. In related receptors, the first extracellular loop, ECL1, is highly variable in length and sequence, suggesting that it might participate in ligand recognition. We applied a variant of the SCAM (Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Method) to the glucagon receptor ECL1 and sequentially mutated positions 197 to 223 to cysteine. Most of the mutations (15/27) affected the glucagon potency, due either to a modification of the glucagon binding site, or to the destabilization of the active receptor conformation. We reasoned that side chains accessible to glucagon must also be accessible to large, hydrophilic cysteine reagents. We therefore evaluated the accessibility of the introduced cysteines to maleimide-PEO(2)-biotin ((+)-biotinyl-3-maleimido-propionamidyl-3,6-dioxa-octanediamine), and tested the effect of pretreatment of intact cells with a large cationic cysteine reagent, MTSET ([2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide), on glucagon potency. Our results suggest that the second and third transmembrane helices (TM2 and TM3) are extended to position 202 and from position 215, respectively, and separated by a short β stretch (positions 203-209). Glucagon binding induced a conformational change close to TM2: L198C was accessible to the biotin reagent only in the presence of glucagon. Most other mutations affected the receptor activation rather than glucagon recognition, but S217 and D218 (at the top of TM3) were good candidates for glucagon recognition and V221 was very close to the binding site. PMID:21704096

  13. Hormonal regulation, processing, and secretion of cysteine proteinases in barley aleurone layers.

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, S M; Ho, T H

    1990-01-01

    Barley aleurone layers synthesize and secrete several proteases in response to gibberellic acid (GA3). Two major cysteine proteinases designated EP-A (37,000 M(r)) and EP-B (30,000 M(r)) have been described [Koehler and Ho (1988). Plant Physiol. 87, 95-103]. We now report the cDNA cloning of EP-B and describe the post-translational processing and hormonal regulation of both cysteine proteinases. Three cDNAs for cysteine proteinases were cloned from GA3-induced barley aleurone layers. Genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated that these are members of a small gene family with no more than four to five different genes. The proteins encoded by two of these clones, pHVEP1 and 4, are 98% similar to each other and are isozymes of EP-B. The proteins contain large preprosequences followed by the amino acid sequence described as the mature N terminus of purified EP-B, and are antigenic to EP-B antiserum. The results of pulse-chase experiments indicated that the post-translational processing of large prosequences proceeds in a multistep fashion to produce the mature enzymes. Processing intermediates for EP-B are observed both in the aleurone layers and surrounding incubation medium, but only mature EP-A is secreted. The regulation of synthesis of EP-A, EP-B, and other aleurone cysteine proteinases was compared at the protein and mRNA levels. We conclude that barley aleurone cysteine proteinases are differentially regulated with respect to their temporal and hormonally induced expression. PMID:2152126

  14. Sustainable growth, the DuPont way.

    PubMed

    Holliday, C

    2001-09-01

    Like many manufacturers, DuPont traditionally has grown by making more and more "stuff." And its business growth has been proportional to the amount of raw materials and energy used--as well as the resulting waste and emissions from operations. Over the years, though, DuPont became aware that cheap supplies of nonrenewable resources wouldn't be endlessly available and that the earth's ecosystems couldn't indefinitely absorb the waste and emissions of production and consumption. Chad Holliday, chairman and CEO of DuPont, believes strongly in the challenge of sustainable growth and makes the business case for it: By using creativity and scientific knowledge effectively, he says, companies can provide strong returns for shareholders and grow their businesses--while also meeting the human needs of societies around the world and reducing the environmental footprint of their operations and products. In fact, a focus on sustainability can help identify new products, markets, partnerships, and intellectual property and lead to substantial business growth. Holliday describes how DuPont developed a three-pronged strategy to translate the concept of sustainability into nuts-and-bolts business practices. Focusing on integrated science, knowledge intensity, and productivity improvement, the strategy was accompanied by a new way to measure progress quantitatively. Sustainable growth should be viewed not as a program for stepped-up environmental performance but as a comprehensive way of doing business, one that delivers tremendous economic value and opens up new opportunities. Ultimately, companies will find that they can generate substantial business value through sustainability while both enhancing the quality of life around the world and protecting the environment. PMID:11550629

  15. Du Pont Classifications of 6 Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, N.; Shappee, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    We report optical spectroscopy (range 370-910 nm) of six supernovae from the Backyard Observatory Supernova Search (BOSS) and the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) using the du Pont 2.5-m telescope (+ WFCCD) at Las Campanas Observatory on June 17 2016 UT. We performed a cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  16. Chromium speciation in human blood samples based on acetyl cysteine by dispersive liquid-liquid biomicroextraction and in-vitro evaluation of acetyl cysteine/cysteine for decreasing of hexavalent chromium concentration.

    PubMed

    Shirkhanloo, Hamid; Ghazaghi, Mehri; Mousavi, Hassan Z

    2016-01-25

    A rapid and efficient method based on ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid biomicroextraction (IL-DLLBME) was used for speciation and preconcentration of Chromium (III, VI) in human blood samples before determination by electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ET-AAS). In this method, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate as a ionic liquid was dissolved in acetone as a dispersant solvent and then the binary solution was rapidly injected by a syringe into the blood samples containing Cr(III), which have already complexed by acetyl cysteine (NAC) at optimized pH. Under the optimal conditions, the linear range (LR), limit of detection (LOD) and preconcentration factor (PF) were obtained 0.03-4.4 μg L(-1), 0.005 μg L(-1) and 10 respectively (RSD <5%). In vitro study show us, the cysteine (Cys) as a prodrug of NAC can decrease the concentration of Cr(VI) in blood samples and human body. Validation of methodology was confirmed by standard reference material (SRM). PMID:26512993

  17. Cloning and sequencing of Duck circovirus (DuCV).

    PubMed

    Hattermann, K; Schmitt, C; Soike, D; Mankertz, A

    2003-12-01

    The genome of Duck circovirus (DuCV) is circular and 1996 nts in size. Two major open reading frames were identified, encoding the replicase (V1) and the capsid protein (C1). A stem-loop structure comprising the nonamer 5'-TATTATTAC, conserved in all circo-, nano- and geminiviruses, was found. Unique to DuCV, the region between the 3'-ends of the rep and cap gene contains four repeats of a 44-bp sequence. Phylogenetic analysis shows close relation of DuCV with Goose circovirus and suggests classification of DuCV as a new member of the genus Circovirus of the virus family Circoviridae. PMID:14648300

  18. MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF CYSTEINE AND TRYPSIN PROTEASE, EFFECT OF DIFFERENT HOSTS ON PROTEASE EXPRESSION, AND RNAI MEDIATED SILENCING OF CYSTEINE PROTEASE GENE IN THE SUNN PEST.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Azam; Bandani, Ali Reza; Alizadeh, Houshang

    2016-04-01

    Sunn pest, Eurygaster integriceps, is a serious pest of cereals in the wide area of the globe from Near and Middle East to East and South Europe and North Africa. This study described for the first time, identification of E. integriceps trypsin serine protease and cathepsin-L cysteine, transcripts involved in digestion, which might serve as targets for pest control management. A total of 478 and 500 base pair long putative trypsin and cysteine gene sequences were characterized and named Tryp and Cys, respectively. In addition, the tissue-specific relative gene expression levels of these genes as well as gluten hydrolase (Gl) were determined under different host kernels feeding conditions. Result showed that mRNA expression of Cys, Tryp, and Gl was significantly affected after feeding on various host plant species. Transcript levels of these genes were most abundant in the wheat-fed E. integriceps larvae compared to other hosts. The Cys transcript was detected exclusively in the gut, whereas the Gl and Tryp transcripts were detectable in both salivary glands and gut. Also possibility of Sunn pest gene silencing was studied by topical application of cysteine double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The results indicated that topically applied dsRNA on fifth nymphal stage can penetrate the cuticle of the insect and induce RNA interference. The Cys gene mRNA transcript in the gut was reduced to 83.8% 2 days posttreatment. Also, it was found that dsRNA of Cys gene affected fifth nymphal stage development suggesting the involvement of this protease in the insect growth, development, and molting. PMID:26609789

  19. A novel electrochemical sensor based on metal-organic framework for electro-catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Hadi; Ahmar, Hamid; Dehghani, Ali; Bagheri, Akbar; Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2013-04-15

    A novel electrochemical sensor based on Au-SH-SiO₂ nanoparticles supported on metal-organic framework (Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF) has been developed for electrocatalytic oxidation and determination of L-cysteine. The Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical behavior of L-cysteine at the Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF showed a very efficient electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of L-cysteine in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (pH 5.0). The oxidation overpotentials of L-cysteine decreased significantly and their oxidation peak currents increased dramatically at Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF. The potential utility of the sensor was demonstrated by applying it to the analytical determination of L-cysteine concentration. The results showed that the electrocatalytic current increased linearly with the L-cysteine concentration in the range of 0.02-300 μM and the detection limit was 0.008 μM. Finally, the sensor was applied to determine L-cysteine in water and biological samples. PMID:23228494

  20. Extrahepatic tissues compensate for loss of hepatic taurine synthesis in mice with liver-specific knockout of cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Iori; Roman, Heather B; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Junior, Carolyn; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2012-05-01

    Because hepatic cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) appears to play the major role in controlling cysteine catabolism in the intact rat, we characterized the effect of a lack of hepatic CDO on the regulation of cysteine and its metabolites at the whole body level. In mice with liver-specific deletion of CDO expression, hepatic and plasma cysteine levels increased. In addition, in mice with liver-specific deletion of CDO expression, the abundance of CDO and the proportion of CDO existing as the mature, more active isoform increased in extrahepatic tissues that express CDO (kidney, brown fat, and gonadal fat). CDO abundance was also increased in the pancreas, where most of the enzyme in both control and liver CDO-knockout mice was in the more active isoform. This upregulation of CDO concentration and active-site cofactor formation were not associated with an increase in CDO mRNA and thus presumably were due to a decrease in CDO degradation and an increase in CDO cofactor formation in association with increased exposure of extrahepatic tissues to cysteine in mice lacking hepatic CDO. Extrahepatic tissues of liver CDO-knockout mice also had higher levels of hypotaurine, consistent with increased metabolism of cysteine by the CDO/cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase pathway. The hepatic CDO-knockout mice were able to maintain normal levels of glutathione, taurine, and sulfate. The maintenance of taurine concentrations in liver as well as in extrahepatic tissues is particularly notable, since mice were fed a taurine-free diet and liver is normally considered the major site of taurine biosynthesis. This redundant capacity for regulation of cysteine concentrations and production of hypotaurine/taurine is additional support for the body's robust mechanisms for control of body cysteine levels and indicates that extrahepatic tissues are able to compensate for a lack of hepatic capacity for cysteine catabolism. PMID:22414809

  1. Stereochemical Configuration of 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal-Cysteine Adducts and Their Stereoselective Formation in a Redox-regulated Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wakita, Chika; Maeshima, Takuya; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Shibata, Takahiro; Ito, Sohei; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Ojika, Makoto; Yodoi, Junji; Uchida, Koji

    2009-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major racemic product of lipid peroxidation, preferentially reacts with cysteine residues to form a stable HNE-cysteine Michael addition adduct possessing three chiral centers. Here, to gain more insight into sulfhydryl modification by HNE, we characterized the stereochemical configuration of the HNE-cysteine adducts and investigated their stereoselective formation in redox-regulated proteins. To characterize the HNE-cysteine adducts by NMR, the authentic (R)-HNE- and (S)-HNE-cysteine adducts were prepared by incubating N-acetylcysteine with each HNE enantiomer, both of which provided two peaks in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The NMR analysis revealed that each peak was a mixture of anomeric isomers. In addition, mutarotation at the anomeric center was also observed in the analysis of the nuclear Overhauser effect. To analyze these adducts in proteins, we adapted a pyridylamination-based approach, using 2-aminopyridine in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride, which enabled analyzing the individual (R)-HNE- and (S)-HNE-cysteine adducts by reversed-phase HPLC following acid hydrolysis. Using the pyridylamination method along with mass spectrometry, we characterized the stereoselective formation of the HNE-cysteine adducts in human thioredoxin and found that HNE preferentially modifies Cys73 and, to the lesser extent, the active site Cys32. More interestingly, the (R)-HNE- and (S)-HNE-cysteine adducts were almost equally formed at Cys73, whereas Cys32 exhibited a remarkable preference for the adduct formation with (R)-HNE. Finally, the utility of the method for the determination of the HNE-cysteine adducts was confirmed by an in vitro study using HeLa cells. The present results not only offer structural insight into sulfhydryl modification by lipid peroxidation products but also provide a platform for the chemical analysis of protein S-associated aldehydes in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19692331

  2. Structural and functional aspects of papain-like cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turk, B; Turk, V; Turk, D

    1997-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are widely distributed among living organisms. According to the most recent classifications (Rawlings and Barrett, 1993, 1994), they can be subdivided on the basis of sequence homology into 14 or even 20 different families, the most important being the papain and the calpain families. The papain-like cysteine proteinases are the most abundant among the cysteine proteinases. The family consists of papain and related plant proteinases such as chymopapain, caricain, bromelain, actinidin, ficin, and aleurain, and the lysosomal cathepsins B, H, L, S, C and K. Most of these enzymes are relatively small proteins with Mr values in the range 20000-35000 (reviewed in Brocklehurst et al., 1987; Polgar, 1989; Rawlings and Barrett, 1994; Berti and Storer, 1995), with the exception of cathepsin C, which is an oligomeric enzyme with Mr approximately 200000 (Metrione et al., 1970; Dolenc et al., 1995). A number of cysteine proteinases are located within lysosomes. Four of them, cathepsins B, C, H and L, are ubiquitous in lysosomes of animals, whereas cathepsin S has a more restricted localisation (Barrett and Kirschke, 1981; Kirschke and Wiederanders, 1994). The enzymes, except cathepsin C, are endopeptidases (reviewed in Kirschke et al., 1995), although cathepsin B was found also to be a dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (Aronson and Barrett, 1978) and cathepsin H also an aminopeptidase (Koga et al., 1992). Cathepsin C is a dipeptidyl aminopeptidase, but at higher pH it exhibits also dipeptidyl transferase activity (reviewed in Kirschke et al., 1995). Among the lysosomal cysteine proteinases, cathepsin L was found to be the most active in degradation of protein substrates, such as collagen, elastin and azocasein (Barrett and Kirschke, 1981; Maciewicz et al., 1987; Mason et al., 1989), arid cathepsin B the most abundant (Kirschke and Barrett, 1981). All the enzymes are optimally active at slightly acidic pH, although their pH optima for degradation of synthetic

  3. The significance of cysteine synthesis for acclimation to high light conditions.

    PubMed

    Speiser, Anna; Haberland, Stefan; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Wirtz, Markus; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Saito, Kazuki; Hell, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Situations of excess light intensity are known to result in the emergence of reactive oxygen species that originate from the electron transport chain in chloroplasts. The redox state of glutathione and its biosynthesis contribute importantly to the plant's response to this stress. In this study we analyzed the significance of cysteine synthesis for long-term acclimation to high light conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Emphasis was put on the rate-limiting step of cysteine synthesis, the formation of the precursor O-acetylserine (OAS) that is catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SERAT). Wild type Arabidopsis plants responded to the high light condition (800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for 10 days) with synthesis of photo-protective anthocyanins, induction of total SERAT activity and elevated glutathione levels when compared to the control condition (100 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). The role of cysteine synthesis in chloroplasts was probed in mutant plants lacking the chloroplast isoform SERAT2;1 (serat2;1) and two knock-out alleles of CYP20-3, a positive interactor of SERAT in the chloroplast. Acclimation to high light resulted in a smaller growth enhancement than wild type in the serat2;1 and cyp20-3 mutants, less induction of total SERAT activity and OAS levels but similar cysteine and glutathione concentrations. Expression analysis revealed no increase in mRNA of the chloroplast SERAT2;1 encoding SERAT2;1 gene but up to 4.4-fold elevated SERAT2;2 mRNA levels for the mitochondrial SERAT isoform. Thus, lack of chloroplast SERAT2;1 activity or its activation by CYP20-3 prevents the full growth response to high light conditions, but the enhanced demand for glutathione is likely mediated by synthesis of OAS in the mitochondria. In conclusion, cysteine synthesis in the chloroplast is important for performance but is dispensable for survival under long-term exposure to high light and can be partially complemented by cysteine synthesis in mitochondria. PMID:25653656

  4. The significance of cysteine synthesis for acclimation to high light conditions

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Anna; Haberland, Stefan; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Wirtz, Markus; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Saito, Kazuki; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Situations of excess light intensity are known to result in the emergence of reactive oxygen species that originate from the electron transport chain in chloroplasts. The redox state of glutathione and its biosynthesis contribute importantly to the plant's response to this stress. In this study we analyzed the significance of cysteine synthesis for long-term acclimation to high light conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Emphasis was put on the rate-limiting step of cysteine synthesis, the formation of the precursor O-acetylserine (OAS) that is catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SERAT). Wild type Arabidopsis plants responded to the high light condition (800 μmol m−2 s−1 for 10 days) with synthesis of photo-protective anthocyanins, induction of total SERAT activity and elevated glutathione levels when compared to the control condition (100 μmol m−2 s−1). The role of cysteine synthesis in chloroplasts was probed in mutant plants lacking the chloroplast isoform SERAT2;1 (serat2;1) and two knock-out alleles of CYP20-3, a positive interactor of SERAT in the chloroplast. Acclimation to high light resulted in a smaller growth enhancement than wild type in the serat2;1 and cyp20-3 mutants, less induction of total SERAT activity and OAS levels but similar cysteine and glutathione concentrations. Expression analysis revealed no increase in mRNA of the chloroplast SERAT2;1 encoding SERAT2;1 gene but up to 4.4-fold elevated SERAT2;2 mRNA levels for the mitochondrial SERAT isoform. Thus, lack of chloroplast SERAT2;1 activity or its activation by CYP20-3 prevents the full growth response to high light conditions, but the enhanced demand for glutathione is likely mediated by synthesis of OAS in the mitochondria. In conclusion, cysteine synthesis in the chloroplast is important for performance but is dispensable for survival under long-term exposure to high light and can be partially complemented by cysteine synthesis in mitochondria. PMID:25653656

  5. Flavan-3-ol-cysteine and acetylcysteine conjugates from edible reagents and the stems of Cynomorium songaricum as potent antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hao-Cong; Ma, Chao-Mei

    2013-12-01

    Flavan-3-ol derivatives, including 3 cysteine conjugates and 3 acetylcysteine conjugates, were prepared using Cynomorium songaricum and edible reagents. The structures were determined, based on NMR and MS spectra. All compounds had stronger radical-scavenging activity than catechin and epicatechin. Moreover, the cysteine conjugates were active against α-glucosidase, whereas catechin and epicatechin were not. Two acetylcysteine flavan-3-ol conjugates, 4β-(L-acetylcysteinyl)-epicatechin 3-O-gallate and 4β-(L-acetylcysteinyl)-epiafzelechin, are novel compounds with better logP values than their cysteine counterparts. These conjugates can be prepared from purified flavan-3-ol polymers or directly from herbal material. PMID:23871012

  6. Post-Intake of S-Ethyl Cysteine and S-Methyl Cysteine Improved LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of S-ethyl cysteine (SEC) and S-methyl cysteine (SMC) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in mice were examined. Eight hours after LPS challenge, SEC or SMC was supplied in drinking water at 0.5% or 1% for 3 days. LPS increased lung myeloperoxidase activity, neutrophil counts and edema. SEC or SMC post-intake attenuated these events. SEC or SMC suppressed LPS-induced lung expression of cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase, and lowered the generation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prostaglandin E₂. LPS enhanced the expression of p47(phox), gp91(phox), Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in the lung. SEC or SMC post-intake reversed these alterations. These findings suggest that these agents could protect the lung through their anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic activities. PMID:27548215

  7. Structural characterization of gas-phase cysteine and cysteine methyl ester complexes with zinc and cadmium dications by infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Coates, Rebecca A; McNary, Christopher P; Boles, Georgia C; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Armentrout, P B

    2015-10-21

    Structural characterization of gas-phase ions of cysteine (Cys) and cysteine methyl ester (CysOMe) complexed to zinc and cadmium is investigated by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy using a free electron laser in combination with density functional theory calculations. IRMPD spectra are measured for [Zn(Cys-H)](+), [Cd(Cys-H)](+), [Zn(CysOMe-H)](+), [Cd(CysOMe-H)](+) and CdCl(+)(CysOMe) and are accompanied by quantum mechanical calculations of the predicted linear absorption spectra at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) (Zn(2+) complexes) and B3LYP/def2TZVP levels (Cd(2+) complexes). On the basis of these experiments and calculations, the conformation that best reproduces the IRMPD spectra for the complexes of the deprotonated amino acids, [M(Cys-H)](+) and [M(CysOMe-H)](+), is a charge-solvated (CS) tridentate structure where the metal dication binds to the amine and carbonyl groups of the amino acid backbone and the deprotonated sulfur atom of the side chain, [N,CO,S(-)]. The intact amino acid complex, CdCl(+)(CysOMe) binds in the equivalent motif [N,CO,S]. These binding motifs are in agreement with the predicted ground structures of these complexes at the B3LYP, B3LYP-GD3BJ (with empirical dispersion corrections), B3P86, and MP2(full) levels. PMID:25880327

  8. Post-Intake of S-Ethyl Cysteine and S-Methyl Cysteine Improved LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Te-chun; Yin, Mei-chin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of S-ethyl cysteine (SEC) and S-methyl cysteine (SMC) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in mice were examined. Eight hours after LPS challenge, SEC or SMC was supplied in drinking water at 0.5% or 1% for 3 days. LPS increased lung myeloperoxidase activity, neutrophil counts and edema. SEC or SMC post-intake attenuated these events. SEC or SMC suppressed LPS-induced lung expression of cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase, and lowered the generation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prostaglandin E2. LPS enhanced the expression of p47phox, gp91phox, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in the lung. SEC or SMC post-intake reversed these alterations. These findings suggest that these agents could protect the lung through their anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic activities. PMID:27548215

  9. La reconstruction du sourcil par greffon composite du cuir chevelu: une astuce pour faciliter la technique

    PubMed Central

    El Omari, Mounia; El Mazouz, Samir; Gharib, Noureddine; EL Abbassi, Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Les sourcils jouent un rôle important dans l’équilibre esthétique du visage. Leur reconstruction ou ophriopoïése, après séquelle de brûlure fait partie intégrante du programme de réhabilitation de la face brûlée. Plusieurs techniques ont été décrites. Nous insistons ici sur l'intérêt d'une technique simple, à la portée de tous les chirurgiens, et dont la méthode et les résultats peuvent être améliorés par un dessin bien planifié des zones donneuse et receveuse: la greffe composite prélevée au niveau du cuir chevelu dessinée à l'aide d'un calque du sourcil controlatéral. PMID:26401195

  10. Toxic tau oligomer formation blocked by capping of cysteine residues with 1,2-dihydroxybenzene groups

    PubMed Central

    Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Misato; Almeida, Osborne F. X.; Sumioka, Akio; Maeda, Sumihiro; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Saito, Akiko; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko; Yoshiike, Yuji; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Ihara, Yasuo; Takashima, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated tau fibrils, are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; the neurofibrillary tangle load correlates strongly with clinical progression of the disease. A growing body of evidence indicates that tau oligomer formation precedes the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and contributes to neuronal loss. Here we show that tau oligomer formation can be inhibited by compounds whose chemical backbone includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Specifically, we demonstrate that 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-containing compounds bind to and cap cysteine residues of tau and prevent its aggregation by hindering interactions between tau molecules. Further, we show that orally administered DL-isoproterenol, an adrenergic receptor agonist whose skeleton includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene and which penetrates the brain, reduces the levels of detergent-insoluble tau, neuronal loss and reverses neurofibrillary tangle-associated brain dysfunction. Thus, compounds that target the cysteine residues of tau may prove useful in halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. PMID:26671725

  11. A functional fragment of Tau forms fibers without the need for an intermolecular cysteine bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Huvent, Isabelle; Kamah, Amina; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Barois, Nicolas; Slomianny, Christian; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • A functional fragment of Tau forms bundled ribbon-like fibrils. • Nucleation of its fibril formation is faster than for full-length Tau. • In contrast to full-length Tau, without cysteines, the fragment still forms fibers. - Abstract: We study the aggregation of a fragment of the neuronal protein Tau that contains part of the proline rich domain and of the microtubule binding repeats. When incubated at 37 °C with heparin, the fragment readily forms fibers as witnessed by Thioflavin T fluorescence. Electron microscopy and NMR spectroscopy show bundled ribbon like structures with most residues rigidly incorporated in the fibril. Without its cysteines, this fragment still forms fibers of a similar morphology, but with lesser Thioflavin T binding sites and more mobility for the C-terminal residues.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the cysteine protease inhibitor clitocypin

    SciTech Connect

    Galeša, Katja; Brzin, Jože; Sabotič, Jerica; Turk, Dušan

    2006-01-01

    Clitocypin is a cysteine protease inhibitor from the mushroom Clitocybe nebularis. The protein has been purified from natural sources and crystallized in a variety of non-isomorphous forms belonging to monoclinic and triclinic space groups. Clitocypin is a cysteine protease inhibitor from the mushroom Clitocybe nebularis. The protein has been purified from natural sources and crystallized in a variety of non-isomorphous forms belonging to monoclinic and triclinic space groups. A diffraction data set to 1.55 Å resolution was obtained from a crystal belonging to space group P2, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.326, b = 33.597, c = 55.568 Å, β = 104°. An inability to achieve isomorphism forced the use of MAD and SAD phasing methods. Phasing is in progress.

  13. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Oligo(L-cysteine) for Use as a Thermostable Bio-Based Material.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yinan; Sato, Ryota; Li, Zhibo; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization of thiol-unprotected L-cysteine ethyl ester (Cys-OEt) catalyzed by proteinase K in aqueous solution has been used to synthesize oligo(L-cysteine) (OligoCys) with a well-defined chemical structure and relatively large degree of polymerization (DP) up to 16-17 (average 8.8). By using a high concentration of Cys-OEt, 78.0% free thiol content was achieved. The thermal properties of OligoCys are stable, with no glass transition until 200 °C, and the decomposition temperature could be increased by oxidation. Chemoenzymatically synthesized OligoCys has great potential for use as a thermostable bio-based material with resistance to oxidation. PMID:26388290

  14. CPDadh: A new peptidase family homologous to the cysteine protease domain in bacterial MARTX toxins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Lupardus, Patrick J; Garcia, K Christopher; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-01-01

    A cysteine protease domain (CPD) has been recently discovered in a group of multifunctional, autoprocessing RTX toxins (MARTX) and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B. These CPDs (referred to as CPDmartx) autocleave the toxins to release domains with toxic effects inside host cells. We report identification and computational analysis of CPDadh, a new cysteine peptidase family homologous to CPDmartx. CPDadh and CPDmartx share a Rossmann-like structural core and conserved catalytic residues. In bacteria, domains of the CPDadh family are present at the N-termini of a diverse group of putative cell-cell interaction proteins and at the C-termini of some RHS (recombination hot spot) proteins. In eukaryotes, catalytically inactive members of the CPDadh family are found in cell surface protein NELF (nasal embryonic LHRH factor) and some putative signaling proteins. PMID:19309740

  15. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löser, Reik; Pietzsch, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging. After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge towards their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes.

  16. Effects of mechanical wounding on Carica papaya cysteine endopeptidases accumulation and activity.

    PubMed

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Dibiani, Rachid; Baulard, Céline; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle

    2006-05-30

    The mechanical wounding impact on the Carica papaya latex protein pattern was investigated by analyzing three latexes. A first one commercially available, a second harvested from unripe but fully grown fruits, both obtained from regularly tapped fruits. A third one was collected from similar fruits but wounded for the first time. The results demonstrated both quantitative and qualitative changes in the protein content and in the enzymatic activity. Repeated wounding results in either, accumulation or activation (or both of them) of papain, chymopapain and caricain. Furthermore, new cysteine protease activity was found to transiently accumulate in the latex collected from newly wounded fruits. The possible implication of this enzymatic material in the papaya cysteine endopeptidases pro-forms activation is discussed. PMID:16580724

  17. In vivo N-acetyl cysteine reduce hepatocyte death by induced acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Ju; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wang, Sheng-Shun; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the famous drug in global, and taking overdose Acetaminophen will intake hepatic cell injure. Desptie substantial progress in our understanding of the mechanism of hepatocellular injury during the last 40 years, many aspects of the pathophysiology are still unknown or controversial.1 In this study, mice are injected APAP overdose to damage hepatocyte. APAP deplete glutathione and ATP of cell, N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) plays an important role to protect hepatocytes be injury. N-Acetyl Cysteine provides mitochondrial to produce glutathione to release drug effect hepatocyte. By 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6-CFDA) metabolism in vivo, glutathione keep depleting to observe the hepatocyte morphology in time. Without NAC, cell necrosis increase to plasma membrane damage to release 6-CFDA, that's rupture. After 6-CFDA injection, fluorescence will be retained in hepatocyte. For cell retain with NAC and without NAC are almost the same. With NAC, the number of cell rupture decreases about 75%.

  18. The oxidation of cyst(e)ine by mast-cell tumour P815 in culture

    PubMed Central

    Wheldrake, J. F.; Pasternak, C. A.

    1968-01-01

    1. Mast-cell tumour P815 cells oxidize [35S]cyst(e)ine to 35SO42−. 2. Addition of cysteinesulphinate or sulphite decreases the formation of 35SO42−; at the same time [35S]cysteinesulphinate or 35SO32− accumulates. 3. Extracts of P815 cells form sulphite from cysteinesulphinate and 2-oxoglutarate. The Km for cysteinesulphinate is 6·35mm and that for 2-oxoglutarate is 0·165mm. 4. Extracts oxidize sulphite to sulphate. 5. No formation of hydrogen sulphide from cyst(e)ine was detectable. 6. It is concluded that P815 cells oxidize cyst(e)ine to sulphate solely via cysteinesulphinate and sulphite. 7. The concentration of the enzymes catalysing this sequence is unaltered by several variations in the conditions of growth. PMID:4966082

  19. The oxidation of cyst(e)ine by mast-cell tumour P815 in culture.

    PubMed

    Wheldrake, J F; Pasternak, C A

    1968-01-01

    1. Mast-cell tumour P815 cells oxidize [(35)S]cyst(e)ine to (35)SO(4) (2-). 2. Addition of cysteinesulphinate or sulphite decreases the formation of (35)SO(4) (2-); at the same time [(35)S]cysteinesulphinate or (35)SO(3) (2-) accumulates. 3. Extracts of P815 cells form sulphite from cysteinesulphinate and 2-oxoglutarate. The K(m) for cysteinesulphinate is 6.35mm and that for 2-oxoglutarate is 0.165mm. 4. Extracts oxidize sulphite to sulphate. 5. No formation of hydrogen sulphide from cyst(e)ine was detectable. 6. It is concluded that P815 cells oxidize cyst(e)ine to sulphate solely via cysteinesulphinate and sulphite. 7. The concentration of the enzymes catalysing this sequence is unaltered by several variations in the conditions of growth. PMID:4966082

  20. Cysteine Usage in Sulfolobus Spindle-Shaped Virus 1 And Extension to Hyperthermophilic Viruses in General

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, S.K.; Maaty, W.S.; Corn, G.J.; Kwok, S.C.; Eilers, B.J.; Kraft, P.; Gillitzer, E.; Young, M.J.; Bothner, B.; Lawrence, C.M.

    2009-05-26

    Fuselloviridae are ubiquitous crenarchaeal viruses found in high-temperature acidic hot springs worldwide. The type virus, Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), has a double-stranded DNA genome that contains 34 open reading frames (ORFs). Fuselloviral genomes show little similarity to other organisms, generally precluding functional predictions. However, tertiary protein structure can provide insight into protein function. We have thus undertaken a systematic investigation of the SSV1 proteome and report here on the F112 gene product. Biochemical, proteomic and structural studies reveal a monomeric intracellular protein that adopts a winged helix DNA binding fold. Notably, the structure contains an intrachain disulfide bond, prompting analysis of cysteine usage in this and other hyperthermophilic viral genomes. The analysis supports a general abundance of disulfide bonds in the intracellular proteins of hyperthermophilic viruses, and reveals decreased cysteine content in the membrane proteins of hyperthermophilic viruses infecting Sulfolobales. The evolutionary implications of the SSV1 distribution are discussed.

  1. Toxic tau oligomer formation blocked by capping of cysteine residues with 1,2-dihydroxybenzene groups.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Misato; Almeida, Osborne F X; Sumioka, Akio; Maeda, Sumihiro; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Saito, Akiko; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko; Yoshiike, Yuji; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Ihara, Yasuo; Takashima, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated tau fibrils, are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; the neurofibrillary tangle load correlates strongly with clinical progression of the disease. A growing body of evidence indicates that tau oligomer formation precedes the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and contributes to neuronal loss. Here we show that tau oligomer formation can be inhibited by compounds whose chemical backbone includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Specifically, we demonstrate that 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-containing compounds bind to and cap cysteine residues of tau and prevent its aggregation by hindering interactions between tau molecules. Further, we show that orally administered DL-isoproterenol, an adrenergic receptor agonist whose skeleton includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene and which penetrates the brain, reduces the levels of detergent-insoluble tau, neuronal loss and reverses neurofibrillary tangle-associated brain dysfunction. Thus, compounds that target the cysteine residues of tau may prove useful in halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. PMID:26671725

  2. Study of protein complexes via homology modeling, applied to cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tastan Bishop, Ozlem; Kroon, Matthys

    2011-12-01

    This paper develops and evaluates large-scale calculation of 3D structures of protein complexes by homology modeling as a promising new approach for protein docking. The complexes investigated were papain-like cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors, which play numerous roles in human and parasitic metabolisms. The structural modeling was performed in two parts. For the first part (evaluation set), nine crystal structure complexes were selected, 1325 homology models of known complexes were rebuilt by various templates including hybrids, allowing an analysis of the factors influencing the accuracy of the models. The important considerations for modeling the interface were protease coverage and inhibitor sequence identity. In the second part (study set), the findings of the evaluation set were used to select appropriate templates to model novel cysteine protease-inhibitor complexes from human and malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The energy scores, considering the evaluation set, indicate that the models are of high accuracy. PMID:21365221

  3. N-acetylcysteine - a safe antidote for cysteine/glutathione deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Atkuri, Kondala R.; Mantovani, John J.; Herzenberg, Leonard A.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) deficiency is associated with numerous pathlogical conditions. Administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a cysteine prodrug, replenishes intracellular GSH levels. NAC, best known for it ability to counter acetaminophen toxicity, is a safe well-tolerated antidote for cysteine/GSH deficiency. NAC has been used successfully to treat GSH deficiency in a wide range of infections, genetics defects and metabolic disorders, including HIV infection and COPD. Over two-thirds of 46 placebo-controlled clinical trials with orally administered NAC have indicated beneficial effects of NAC measured either as trial end-points or as general measures of improvement in quality of life and well being of the patients. PMID:17602868

  4. Decrease in the acrylamide content in canned coffee by heat treatment with the addition of cysteine.

    PubMed

    Narita, Yusaku; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2014-12-17

    Acrylamide (AA) is classified as a Group 2A carcinogen according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Although coffee contains a small amount of AA, it is a popular beverage worldwide. Approximately 10 billion canned coffees are consumed each year in Japan. In this study, we investigated how to decrease AA contained in canned coffee by modifying the heat treatment used for sterilization during the manufacturing process. The AA content of both types of canned coffee (black and milk) was decreased by approximately 95% by heat treatment with adding cysteine at 121 °C for 6 min. The content was also decreased by heat treatment with dithiothreitol, although that with cystine had no effect. Therefore, it is shown that thiol groups in cysteine and dithiothreitol might play an important role in decreasing the AA content. PMID:25420187

  5. Chemical Synthesis of Proteins with Non-Strategically Placed Cysteines Using Selenazolidine and Selective Deselenization.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Post Sai; Dery, Shahar; Metanis, Norman

    2016-01-18

    Although native chemical ligation has enabled the synthesis of hundreds of proteins, not all proteins are accessible through typical ligation conditions. The challenging protein, 125-residue human phosphohistidine phosphatase 1 (PHPT1), has three cysteines near the C-terminus, which are not strategically placed for ligation. Herein, we report the first sequential native chemical ligation/deselenization reaction. PHPT1 was prepared from three unprotected peptide segments using two ligation reactions at cysteine and alanine junctions. Selenazolidine was utilized as a masked precursor for N-terminal selenocysteine in the middle segment, and, following ligation, deselenization provided the native alanine residue. This approach was used to synthesize both the wild-type PHPT1 and an analogue in which the active-site histidine was substituted with the unnatural and isosteric amino acid β-thienyl-l-alanine. The activity of both proteins was studied and compared, providing insights into the enzyme active site. PMID:26636774

  6. Facile synthesis of cysteine and triethanolamine capped CdTe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mntungwa, Nhlakanipho; Pullabhotla, Viswanadha Srirama Rajasekhar; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine and triethanolamine capped CdTe nanoparticles have been synthesized using a simple aqueous solution based method. This method involves the reaction of tellurium powder with sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) in water to produce telluride ions (Te(2-)), followed by the simultaneous addition of an aqueous solution of cadmium chloride or other cadmium source (acetate, carbonate and nitrate) and solution of L-cysteine ethyl ester hydrochloride or triethanolamine. The effect of capping agent on the size, structure and morphology of the as-synthesized nanoparticles was investigated. The particles were characterized using optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. PMID:23010054

  7. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Löser, Reik; Pietzsch, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging. After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge toward their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes. PMID:26157794

  8. A Covalent Cysteine-Targeting Kinase Inhibitor of Ire1 Permits Allosteric Control of Endoribonuclease Activity.

    PubMed

    Waller, Daniel D; Jansen, Gregor; Golizeh, Makan; Martel-Lorion, Chloe; Dejgaard, Kurt; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Mancuso, John; Tsantrizos, Youla S; Roy, René; Sebag, Michael; Sleno, Lekha; Thomas, David Y

    2016-05-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) initiated by the transmembrane kinase/ribonuclease Ire1 has been implicated in a variety of diseases. Ire1, with its unique position in the UPR, is an ideal target for the development of therapies; however, the identification of specific kinase inhibitors is challenging. Recently, the development of covalent inhibitors has gained great momentum because of the irreversible deactivation of the target. We identified and determined the mechanism of action of the Ire1-inhibitory compound UPRM8. MS analysis revealed that UPRM8 inhibition occurs by covalent adduct formation at a conserved cysteine at the regulatory DFG+2 position in the Ire1 kinase activation loop. Mutational analysis of the target cysteine residue identified both UPRM8-resistant and catalytically inactive Ire1 mutants. We describe a novel covalent inhibition mechanism of UPRM8, which can serve as a lead for the rational design and optimization of inhibitors of human Ire1. PMID:26792008

  9. 76 FR 68124 - Television Broadcasting Services; Fond du Lac, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... reconsideration of an August 12, 2009 Report and Order changing the allotted channel for station WWAZ-TV, Fond du... 5 for channel 44 at Fond du Lac ] because it permitted WLS-TV, an ABC network affiliate in Chicago... network service to numerous viewers that had lost service after the transition of WLS-TV to...

  10. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  11. Contribution of cysteine aminotransferase and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase to hydrogen sulfide production in peripheral neurons.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ryo; Otsuguro, Ken-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) is a gaseous neuromodulator produced from L-cysteine. H2 S is generated by three distinct enzymatic pathways mediated by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) coupled with cysteine aminotransferase (CAT). This study investigated the relative contributions of these three pathways to H2 S production in PC12 cells (rat pheochromocytoma-derived cells) and the rat dorsal root ganglion. CBS, CAT, and MPST, but not CSE, were expressed in the cells and tissues, and appreciable amounts of H2 S were produced from L-cysteine in the presence of α-ketoglutarate, together with dithiothreitol. The production of H2 S was inhibited by a CAT inhibitor (aminooxyacetic acid), competitive CAT substrates (L-aspartate and oxaloacetate), and RNA interference (RNAi) against MPST. Immunocytochemistry revealed a mitochondrial localization of MPST in PC12 cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons, and the amount of H2 S produced by CAT/MPST at pH 8.0, a physiological mitochondrial matrix pH, was comparable to that produced by CSE and CBS in the liver and the brain, respectively. Furthermore, H2 S production was markedly increased by alkalization. These results indicate that CAT and MPST are primarily responsible for H2 S production in peripheral neurons, and that the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism may influence neuronal H2 S generation. In the peripheral nervous system, hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) has been implicated in neurogenic pain or hyperalgesia. This study provides evidence that H2 S is synthesized in peripheral neurons through two mitochondrial enzymes, cysteine aminotransferase (CAT) and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST). We propose that mitochondrial metabolism plays key roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the peripheral nervous system via regulation of neuronal H2 S production. PMID:24611772

  12. Mechanism of the cysteine sulfenic acid O-sulfenylation of 1,3-cyclohexanedione.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Fillmore

    2014-04-21

    The density functionals B3LYP, B3PW91, M062X, and CAM-B3LYP with the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set predict the cysteine sulfenic acid O-sulfenylation of the s-cis-ketoenol tautomer of 1,3-cyclohexanedione proceeds through a cyclic 14-membered transition state structure containing three water molecules. PMID:24619216

  13. Significance of redox-active cysteines in human FAD synthase isoform 2.

    PubMed

    Miccolis, Angelica; Galluccio, Michele; Nitride, Chiara; Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Ferranti, Pasquale; Iametti, Stefania; Indiveri, Cesare; Bonomi, Francesco; Barile, Maria

    2014-12-01

    FAD synthase (FMN:ATP adenylyl transferase, FMNAT or FADS, EC 2.7.7.2) is the last enzyme in the pathway converting riboflavin into FAD. In humans, FADS is localized in different subcellular compartments and exists in different isoforms. Isoform 2 (490-amino acids) is organized in two domains: the 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase domain, that is the FAD-forming catalytic domain, and one resembling a molybdopterin-binding (MPTb) domain, with a hypothetical regulatory role. hFADS2 contains ten Cys residues, seven of which located in the PAPS reductase domain, with a possible involvement either in FAD synthesis or in FAD delivery to cognate apo-flavoproteins. A homology model of the PAPS reductase domain of hFADS2 revealed a co-ordinated network among the Cys residues in this domain. In this model, C312 and C303 are very close to the flavin substrate, consistent with a significantly lowered FAD synthesis rate in C303A and C312A mutants. FAD synthesis is also inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents, suggesting the involvement of free cysteines in the hFADS2 catalytic cycle. Mass spectrometry measurements and titration with thiol reagents on wt hFADS2 and on several individual cysteine/alanine mutants allowed us to detect two stably reduced cysteines (C139 and C241, one for each protein domain), two stable disulfide bridges (C399-C402, C303-C312, both in the PAPS domain), and two unstable disulfides (C39-C50; C440-C464). Whereas the C39-C50 unstable disulfide is located in the MPTb domain and appears to have no catalytic relevance, a cysteine-based redox switch may involve formation and breakdown of a disulfide between C440 and C464 in the PAPS domain. PMID:25135855

  14. Optimized deep-targeted proteotranscriptomic profiling reveals unexplored Conus toxin diversity and novel cysteine frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Vincent; Harliwong, Ivon; Jones, Alun; Miller, David; Taft, Ryan J.; Alewood, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    Cone snails are predatory marine gastropods characterized by a sophisticated venom apparatus responsible for the biosynthesis and delivery of complex mixtures of cysteine-rich toxin peptides. These conotoxins fold into small highly structured frameworks, allowing them to potently and selectively interact with heterologous ion channels and receptors. Approximately 2,000 toxins from an estimated number of >70,000 bioactive peptides have been identified in the genus Conus to date. Here, we describe a high-resolution interrogation of the transcriptomes (available at www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) and proteomes of the diverse compartments of the Conus episcopatus venom apparatus. Using biochemical and bioinformatic tools, we found the highest number of conopeptides yet discovered in a single Conus specimen, with 3,305 novel precursor toxin sequences classified into 9 known superfamilies (A, I1, I2, M, O1, O2, S, T, Z), and identified 16 new superfamilies showing unique signal peptide signatures. We were also able to depict the largest population of venom peptides containing the pharmacologically active C-C-CC-C-C inhibitor cystine knot and CC-C-C motifs (168 and 44 toxins, respectively), as well as 208 new conotoxins displaying odd numbers of cysteine residues derived from known conotoxin motifs. Importantly, six novel cysteine-rich frameworks were revealed which may have novel pharmacology. Finally, analyses of codon usage bias and RNA-editing processes of the conotoxin transcripts demonstrate a specific conservation of the cysteine skeleton at the nucleic acid level and provide new insights about the origin of sequence hypervariablity in mature toxin regions. PMID:26150494

  15. Sweet potato cysteine proteases SPAE and SPCP2 participate in sporamin degradation during storage root sprouting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsien-Jung; Liang, Shu-Hao; Huang, Guan-Jhong; Lin, Yaw-Huei

    2015-08-15

    Sweet potato sporamins are trypsin inhibitors and exhibit strong resistance to digestion by pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin. In addition, they constitute the major storage proteins in the sweet potato and, after degradation, provide nitrogen as a nutrient for seedling regrowth in sprouting storage roots. In this report, four cysteine proteases-one asparaginyl endopeptidase (SPAE), two papain-like cysteine proteases (SPCP1 and SPCP2), and one granulin-containing cysteine protease (SPCP3)-were studied to determine their association with sporamin degradation in sprouting storage roots. Sporamin degradation became significant in the flesh of storage roots starting from week 4 after sprouting and this correlated with expression levels of SPAE and SPCP2, but not of SPCP1 and SPCP3. In the outer flesh near the skin, sporamin degradation was more evident and occurred earlier than in the inner flesh of storage roots. Degradation of sporamins in the outer flesh was inversely correlated with the distance of the storage root from the sprout. Exogenous application of SPAE and SPCP2, but not SPCP3, fusion proteins to crude extracts of the outer flesh (i.e., extracted from a depth of 0.3cm and within 2cm of one-week-old sprouts) promoted in vitro sporamin degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of SPAE and SPCP2 fusion proteins at 95°C for 5min prior to their application to the crude extracts reduced sporamin degradation. These data show that sweet potato asparaginyl endopeptidase SPAE and papain-like cysteine protease SPCP2 participate in sporamin degradation during storage root sprouting. PMID:26363719

  16. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Thomas, Paul V.; Chen, Lei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; McLellan, Jason S.; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhou, Tongqing; Baxa, Ulrich; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which comprised the fusion (F) glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by “DS-Cav1” mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or “foldon” from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide “rings”, with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen. PMID:26098893

  17. Digestion of human immunoglobulin G by the major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Cazzulo, J J

    1990-08-01

    The major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi was able to digest human IgG, as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS, and by gel filtration on a Superose 12 column, in a FPLC system. The Fab fragment of IgG was only slightly degraded, but Fc was extensively hydrolyzed to small peptides. The results suggest that cruzipain might be involved in the defense mechanisms of the parasite against the immune response of the host. PMID:2227369

  18. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  19. Natural cysteine protease inhibitors in protozoa: Fifteen years of the chagasin family.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tatiana F R; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2016-03-01

    Chagasin-type inhibitors comprise natural inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases that are distributed among Protist, Bacteria and Archaea. Chagasin was identified in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi as an approximately 11 kDa protein that is a tight-binding and highly thermostable inhibitor of papain, cysteine cathepsins and endogenous parasite cysteine proteases. It displays an Imunoglobulin-like fold with three exposed loops to one side of the molecule, where amino acid residues present in conserved motifs at the tips of each loop contact target proteases. Differently from cystatins, the loop 2 of chagasin enters the active-site cleft, making direct contact with the catalytic residues, while loops 4 and 6 embrace the enzyme from the sides. Orthologues of chagasin are named Inhibitors of Cysteine Peptidases (ICP), and share conserved overall tri-dimensional structure and mode of binding to proteases. ICPs are tentatively distributed in three families: in family I42 are grouped chagasin-type inhibitors that share conserved residues at the exposed loops; family I71 contains Plasmodium ICPs, which are large proteins having a chagasin-like domain at the C-terminus, with lower similarity to chagasin in the conserved motif at loop 2; family I81 contains Toxoplasma ICP. Recombinant ICPs tested so far can inactivate protozoa cathepsin-like proteases and their mammalian counterparts. Studies on their biological roles were carried out in a few species, mainly using transgenic protozoa, and the conclusions vary. However, in all cases, alterations in the levels of expression of chagasin/ICPs led to substantial changes in one or more steps of parasite biology, with higher incidence in influencing their interaction with the hosts. We will cover most of the findings on chagasin/ICP structural and functional properties and overview the current knowledge on their roles in protozoa. PMID:26546840

  20. Solution oxygen-17 NMR application for observing a peroxidized cysteine residue in oxidized human SOD1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Eguchi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-12-01

    NMR active nuclei, 1H, 13C and 15N, are usually used for determination of protein structure. However, solution 17O-NMR application to proteins is extremely limited although oxygen is an essential element in biomolecules. Proteins are oxidized through cysteine residues by two types of oxidation. One is reversible oxidation such as disulphide bonding (Cys-S-S-Cys) and the other is irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO 2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO 3H). Copper,Zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a key enzyme in the protection of cells from the superoxide anion radical. The SH group at Cys 111 residue in human SOD1 is selectively oxidized to -SO 2H and -SO 3H with atmospheric oxygen, and this oxidized human SOD1 is also suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases, probably mainly via protein aggregation. Therefore, information on the structural and the dynamics of the oxidized cysteine residue would be crucial for the understanding of protein aggregation mechanism. Although the -SO 3H group on proteins cannot be directly detected by conventional NMR techniques, we successfully performed the site-specific 17O-labeling of Cys 111 in SOD1 using ^{17}it {O}2 gas and the 17O-NMR analysis for the first time. We observed clear 17O signal derived from a protein molecule and show that 17O-NMR is a sensitive probe for studying the structure and dynamics of the 17O-labeled protein molecule. This novel and unique strategy can have great impact on many research fields in biology and chemistry.

  1. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Thomas, Paul V; Chen, Man; Druz, Aliaksandr; Joyce, M Gordon; Kong, Wing-Pui; Sastry, Mallika; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S; McLellan, Jason S; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhou, Tongqing; Baxa, Ulrich; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which comprised the fusion (F) glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or "foldon" from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide "rings", with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen. PMID:26098893

  2. Cysteine-specific ubiquitination protects the peroxisomal import receptor Pex5p against proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzkopff, Benjamin; Platta, Harald W.; Hasan, Sohel; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomal matrix protein import is mediated by dynamic import receptors, which cycle between the peroxisomal membrane and the cytosol. Proteins with a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) are bound by the import receptor Pex5p in the cytosol and guided to the peroxisomal membrane. After cargo translocation into the peroxisomal matrix, the receptor is released from the membrane back to the cytosol in an ATP-dependent manner by the AAA-type ATPases Pex1p and Pex6p. These mechanoenzymes recognize ubiquitinated Pex5p-species as substrates for membrane extraction. The PTS1-receptor is either polyubiquitinated via peptide bonds at two certain lysines and results in proteasomal degradation or monoubiquitinated via a thioester-bond at a conserved cysteine, which enables the recycling of Pex5p and further rounds of matrix protein import. To investigate the physiological relevance of the conserved N-terminal cysteine of Pex5p, the known target amino acids for ubiquitination were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis. In contrast with Pex5pC6A, Pex5pC6K turned out to be functional in PTS1 import and utilization of oleic acid, independent of the lysines at position 18 and 24. In contrast with wild-type Pex5p, Pex5pC6K displays an ubiquitination pattern, similar to the polyubiquitination pattern of Pex4p or Pex22p mutant strains. Moreover, Pex5pC6K displays a significantly reduced steady-state level when the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp15p is missing. Thus, our results indicate that not the cysteine residue but the position of ubiquitination is important for Pex5p function. The presence of the cysteine prevents polyubiquitination and rapid degradation of Pex5p. PMID:26182377

  3. Formation of dehydroalanine from mimosine and cysteine: artifacts in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry based metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Hu, Zeping; Wiedner, Susan D.; Kim, Jong Seo; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

    2011-08-15

    Trimethylsilyation is a chemical derivatization procedure routinely applied in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics. In this report, through de novo structural elucidation and comparison with authentic standards, we demonstrate that mimosine can be completely converted into dehydroalanine and 3,4-dihydroxypyridine during the trimethylsilyating process. Similarly, dehydroalanine can be formed from derivatization of cysteine. This conversion is a potential interference in GC-MS-based global metabolomics, as well as in analysis of amino acids.

  4. Evaluation of trypanocidal activity of combinations of anti-sleeping sickness drugs with cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steverding, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is unsatisfactory because only a few drugs, with serious side effects and poor efficacy, are available. As drug combination regimes often achieve greater therapeutic efficacy than monotherapies, here the trypanocidal activity of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 in combination with current anti-HAT drugs using bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine the interaction between cysteine protease inhibitors (K11777, CA-074Me and CAA0225) and anti-HAT drugs (suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol and eflornithine). Bloodstream forms of T. brucei were incubated in culture medium containing cysteine protease inhibitors or anti-HAT drugs alone or in combination at a 1:1 fixed-dose ratio. After 48 h incubation, live cells were counted, the 50% growth inhibition values determined and combination indices calculated. The general cytotoxicity of drug combinations was evaluated with human leukaemia HL-60 cells. Combinations of K11777 with suramin, pentamidine and melarsoprol showed antagonistic effects while with eflornithine a synergistic effect was observed. Whereas eflornithine antagonises with CA-074Me, an inhibitor inactivating the targeted TbCATL only under reducing conditions, it synergises with CAA0255, an inhibitor structurally related to CA-074Me which inactivates TbCATL independently of thiols. These findings indicate an essential role of thiols for the synergistic interaction between K11777 and eflornithine. Encouragingly, the K11777/eflornithine combination displayed higher trypanocidal than cytotoxic activity. The results of this study suggest that the combination of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 and eflornithine display promising synergistic trypanocidal activity that warrants further investigation of the drug combination as possible alternative treatment of HAT. PMID:25662707

  5. Assembly of the cysteine synthase complex and the regulatory role of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, Sangaralingam; Yi, Hankuil; Krishnan, Hari B; Jez, Joseph M

    2009-04-10

    Macromolecular assemblies play critical roles in regulating cellular functions. The cysteine synthase complex (CSC), which is formed by association of serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), acts as a sensor and modulator of thiol metabolism by responding to changes in nutrient conditions. Here we examine the oligomerization and energetics of formation of the soybean CSC. Biophysical examination of the CSC by size exclusion chromatography and sedimentation ultracentrifugation indicates that this assembly (complex M(r) approximately 330,000) consists of a single SAT trimer (trimer M(r) approximately 110,000) and three OASS dimers (dimer M(r) approximately 70,000). Analysis of the SAT-OASS interaction by isothermal titration calorimetry reveals negative cooperativity with three distinct binding events during CSC formation with K(d) values of 0.3, 7.5, and 78 nm. The three binding events are also observed using surface plasmon resonance with comparable affinities. The stability of the CSC derives from rapid association and extremely slow dissociation of OASS with SAT and requires the C terminus of SAT for the interaction. Steady-state kinetic analysis shows that CSC formation enhances SAT activity and releases SAT from substrate inhibition and feedback inhibition by cysteine, the final product of the biosynthesis pathway. Cysteine inhibits SAT and the CSC with K(i) values of 2 and 70 microm, respectively. These results suggest a new model for the architecture of this regulatory complex and additional control mechanisms for biochemically controlling plant cysteine biosynthesis. Based on previous work and our results, we suggest that OASS acts as an enzyme chaperone of SAT in the CSC. PMID:19213732

  6. A role for cysteine 3635 of RYR1 in redox modulation and calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Moore, C.; Zhang, J. Z.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca(2+) release channel (RYR1) increases its activity, produces intersubunit disulfide bonds, and blocks its interaction with calmodulin. Conversely, bound calmodulin protects RYR1 from the effects of oxidants (Zhang, J.-Z., Wu, Y., Williams, B. Y., Rodney, G., Mandel, F., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Am. J. Physiol. 276, Cell Physiol. C46-C53). In addition, calmodulin protects RYR1 from trypsin cleavage at amino acids 3630 and 3637 (Moore, C. P., Rodney, G., Zhang, J.-Z., Santacruz-Toloza, L., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 8532-8537). The sequence between these two tryptic sites is AVVACFR. Alkylation of RYR1 with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) blocks both (35)S-apocalmodulin binding and oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-linking. In the current work, we demonstrate that both cysteines needed for the oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-link are protected from alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide by bound calmodulin. We also show, using N-terminal amino acid sequencing together with analysis of the distribution of [(3)H]NEM labeling with each sequencing cycle, that cysteine 3635 of RYR1 is rapidly labeled by NEM and that this labeling is blocked by bound calmodulin. We propose that cysteine 3635 is located at an intersubunit contact site that is close to or within a calmodulin binding site. These findings suggest that calmodulin and oxidation modulate RYR1 activity by regulating intersubunit interactions in a mutually exclusive manner and that these interactions involve cysteine 3635.

  7. Potential involvement of Brugia malayi cysteine proteases in the maintenance of the endosymbiotic relationship with Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Lustigman, Sara; Melnikow, Elena; Anand, Setty Balakrishnan; Contreras, Aroha; Nandi, Vijay; Liu, Jing; Bell, Aaron; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Rogers, Mathew B.; Ghedin, Elodie

    2014-01-01

    Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode that causes lymphatic filariasis, harbors endosymbiotic intracellular bacteria, Wolbachia, that are required for the development and reproduction of the worm. The essential nature of this endosymbiosis led to the development of anti-Wolbachia chemotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of human filarial infections. Our study is aimed at identifying specific proteins that play a critical role in this endosymbiotic relationship leading to the identification of potential targets in the adult worms. Filarial cysteine proteases are known to be involved in molting and embryogenesis, processes shown to also be Wolbachia dependent. Based on the observation that cysteine protease transcripts are differentially regulated in response to tetracycline treatment, we focused on defining their role in symbiosis. We observe a bimodal regulation pattern of transcripts encoding cysteine proteases when in vitro tetracycline treated worms were examined. Using tetracycline-treated infertile female worms and purified embryos we established that the first peak of the bimodal pattern corresponds to embryonic transcripts while the second takes place within the hypodermis of the adult worms. Localization studies of the native proteins corresponding to Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 indicate that they are present in the area surrounding Wolbachia, and, in some cases, the proteins appear localized within the bacteria. Both proteins were also found in the inner bodies of microfilariae. The possible role of these cysteine proteases during development and endosymbiosis was further characterized using RNAi. Reduction in Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 transcript levels was accompanied by hindered microfilarial development and release, and reduced Wolbachia DNA levels, making these enzymes strong drug target candidates. PMID:25516837

  8. Substrate-Assisted Cysteine Deprotonation in the Mechanism of Dimethylargininase (DDAH) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Stone,E.; Costello, A.; Tierney, D.; Fast, W.

    2006-01-01

    The enzyme dimethylargininase (also known as dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase or DDAH; EC 3.5.3.18) catalyzes the hydrolysis of endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, N{sup {omega}}-methyl-L-arginine and N{sup {omega}},N{sup {omega}}-dimethyl-L-arginine. Understanding the mechanism and regulation of DDAH activity is important for developing ways to control nitric oxide production during angiogenesis and in many cases of vascular endothelial pathobiology. Several possible physiological regulation mechanisms of DDAH depend upon the presence of an active-site cysteine residue, Cys249 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) DDAH, which is proposed to serve as a nucleophile in the catalytic mechanism. Through the use of pH-dependent ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) difference spectroscopy and inactivation kinetics, the pK{sub a} of the active-site Cys249 in the resting enzyme was found to be unperturbed from pK{sub a} values of typical noncatalytic cysteine residues. In contrast, the pH dependence of k{sub cat} values indicates a much lower apparent pKa value. UV-vis difference spectroscopy between wild-type and C249S DDAH shows absorbance changes consistent with Cys249 deprotonation to the anionic thiolate upon binding positively charged ligands. The proton from Cys249 is lost either to the solvent or to an unidentified general base. A mutation of the active-site histidine residue, H162G, does not eliminate cysteine nucleophilicity, further arguing against a pre-formed ion pair with Cys249. Finally, UV-vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that inhibitory metal ions can bind at these two active-site residues, Cys249 and His162, and also stabilize the anionic form of Cys249. These results support a proposed substrate-assisted mechanism for Pa DDAH in which ligand binding modulates the reactivity of the active-site cysteine.

  9. Oncoplastie avec conservation mammaire dans le traitement du cancer du sein: à propos de 16 cas

    PubMed Central

    Bouzoubaa, Wail; Laadioui, Meryam; Jayi, Sofia; Alaoui, Fatime Zahra Fdili; Bouguern, Hakima; Chaara, Hikmat; Melhouf, Moulay Abdelilah

    2015-01-01

    Le cancer du sein est actuellement le cancer le plus fréquent chez la femme, et pose un véritable problème diagnostique et thérapeutique. Le dépistage des lésions à un stade de plus en plus précoce, a permis une extension des indications du traitement conservateur radiochirurgical, qui était initialement limitées aux tumeurs de moins de 3 cm, unifocales, non inflammatoires. Par ailleurs, l'utilisation de traitements préopératoires permet d’étendre les indications du traitement conservateur à des tumeurs plus volumineuses. Parallèlement à cette extension des indications de conservation mammaire, on a observé le développement de nouvelles approches thérapeutiques notamment la chirurgie oncoplastique, technique du ganglion sentinelle et chirurgie stéréotaxique, dont les résultats initiaux sont très encouragent. A travers cette étude réalisée dans le service de gynécologie et obstétrique II du CHU HASSAN II de FES au MAROC, après l'analyse rétrospective de 16 patientes traitées par traitement conservateur et oncoplastie, nous avons voulus montrer notre aptitude a réalisé ses techniques chirurgicales et a bien prendre en charge ces patientes, mais aussi évaluer ces techniques en termes de résultat carcinologique et de résultat esthétique, aussi en terme de survie globale, survie sans métastase et en termes de récidive locale entre les plasties mammaires et les traitements usuels: mastectomie et traitement conservateur classique. PMID:26430477

  10. Modelisation par elements finis du muscle strie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Mathieu

    Ce present projet de recherche a permis. de creer un modele par elements finis du muscle strie humain dans le but d'etudier les mecanismes engendrant les lesions musculaires traumatiques. Ce modele constitue une plate-forme numerique capable de discerner l'influence des proprietes mecaniques des fascias et de la cellule musculaire sur le comportement dynamique du muscle lors d'une contraction excentrique, notamment le module de Young et le module de cisaillement de la couche de tissu conjonctif, l'orientation des fibres de collagene de cette membrane et le coefficient de poisson du muscle. La caracterisation experimentale in vitro de ces parametres pour des vitesses de deformation elevees a partir de muscles stries humains actifs est essentielle pour l'etude de lesions musculaires traumatiques. Le modele numerique developpe est capable de modeliser la contraction musculaire comme une transition de phase de la cellule musculaire par un changement de raideur et de volume a l'aide des lois de comportement de materiau predefinies dans le logiciel LS-DYNA (v971, Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA, USA). Le present projet de recherche introduit donc un phenomene physiologique qui pourrait expliquer des blessures musculaires courantes (crampes, courbatures, claquages, etc.), mais aussi des maladies ou desordres touchant le tissu conjonctif comme les collagenoses et la dystrophie musculaire. La predominance de blessures musculaires lors de contractions excentriques est egalement exposee. Le modele developpe dans ce projet de recherche met ainsi a l'avant-scene le concept de transition de phase ouvrant la porte au developpement de nouvelles technologies pour l'activation musculaire chez les personnes atteintes de paraplegie ou de muscles artificiels compacts pour l'elaboration de protheses ou d'exosquelettes. Mots-cles Muscle strie, lesion musculaire, fascia, contraction excentrique, modele par elements finis, transition de phase

  11. One-pot non-enzymatic formation of firefly luciferin in a neutral buffer from p-benzoquinone and cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Kanie, Shusei; Nishikawa, Toshio; Ojika, Makoto; Oba, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Firefly luciferin, the substrate for the bioluminescence reaction of luminous beetles, possesses a benzothiazole ring, which is rare in nature. Here, we demonstrate a novel one-pot reaction to give firefly luciferin in a neutral buffer from p-benzoquinone and cysteine without any synthetic reagents or enzymes. The formation of firefly luciferin was low in yield in various neutral buffers, whereas it was inhibited or completely prevented in acidic or basic buffers, in organic solvents, or under a nitrogen atmosphere. Labelling analysis of the firefly luciferin using stable isotopic cysteines showed that the benzothiazole ring was formed via the decarboxylation and carbon-sulfur bond rearrangement of cysteine. These findings imply that the biosynthesis of firefly luciferin can be developed/evolved from the non-enzymatic production of firefly luciferin using common primary biosynthetic units, p-benzoquinone and cysteine. PMID:27098929

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of L-cysteine by using polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles in the presence of barium ions.

    PubMed

    Bamdad, Farzad; Khorram, Fateme; Samet, Maryam; Bamdad, Kourosh; Sangi, Mohammad Reza; Allahbakhshi, Fateme

    2016-05-15

    In this article a simple and selective colorimetric probe for cysteine determination using silver nano particles (AgNPS) is described. The determination process was based upon the surface plasmon resonance properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized AgNPS. Interaction of AgNPS with cysteine molecules in the presence of barium ions induced a red shift in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) maximum of AgNPs, as a result of nanoparticle aggregation. Consequently, yellow color of AgNP solution was changed to pink. The linear range for the determination of cysteine was 3.2-8.2 μM (R=0.9965) with a limit of detection equal to 2.8 μM (3σ). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of cysteine in human plasma samples. Acceptable recovery results of the spiked samples confirmed the validity of the proposed method. PMID:26950501

  13. A simple and rapid flow injection chemiluminescence determination of cysteine with Ru(phen) 32+-Ce(IV) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, B.; Mokhtari, A.

    2007-02-01

    A new chemiluminescence system was developed for the determination of cysteine by flow injection system. This method is based on the reaction of L-cysteine with Ru(phen) 32+ and Ce(IV) to produce chemiluminescence. The calibration curve was linear over the range 8.0 × 10 -7 to 4.0 × 10 -5 and 4.0 × 10 -5 to 1.0 × 10 -3 M with a detection limit of 7.0 × 10 -7 M (S/N = 3). The relative standard deviation of 4.0 × 10 -6 M cysteine was found 3.5% ( n = 10). The influence of potential interfering substances was studied. The proposed method was successfully applied for the flow injection determination of cysteine in the real samples with minimum sampling rate of 90 sample/h.

  14. Functional analysis of C1 family cysteine peptidases in the larval gut of Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied protein digestion the tenebrionids Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum, pests of stored grains and grain products, to identify potential targets for biopesticide development. Tenebrionid larvae have highly compartmentalized guts, with primarily cysteine peptidases in the acidic anter...

  15. Improved identification of wheat gluten proteins through alkylation of cysteine residues and peptide-based mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Brunnbauer, Markus; Delcour, Jan A.; Koehler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The concentration and composition of wheat gluten proteins and the presence, concentration and location of cysteine residues therein are important for wheat flour quality. However, it is difficult to identify gluten proteins, as they are an extremely polymorphic mixture of prolamins. We here present methods for cysteine labeling of wheat prolamins with 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) and iodoacetamide (IDAM) which, as compared to label-free analysis, substantially improve identification of cysteine-containing peptides in enzymic prolamin digests by electrospray ionization - tandem mass spectrometry. Both chymotrypsin and thermolysin yielded cysteine-containing peptides from different gluten proteins, but more proteins could be identified after chymotryptic digestion. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, we were the first to label prolamins with isotope coded affinity tags (ICAT), which are commonly used for quantitative proteomics. However, more peptides were detected after labeling gluten proteins with 4-VP and IDAM than with ICAT. PMID:23880742

  16. Mitochondria-Targeting Chromogenic and Fluorescence Turn-On Probe for the Selective Detection of Cysteine by Caged Oxazolidinoindocyanine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chae Yeong; Kang, Hyo Jin; Chung, Sang J; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Na, Sang-Yun; Kim, Hae-Jo

    2016-07-19

    We report a chromogenic and fluorescence turn-on probe based on crotonoyl ester-functionalized oxazolidinoindole for the selective detection of cysteine in neutral buffer. The probe rapidly formed indocyanophenolate through the Michael addition and a subsequent cyclization reaction of cysteine, inducing both a dramatic bathochromic shift (>130 nm) and a large fluorescence turn-on response (F/F0 12) in the UV-vis and fluorescence spectra and affording a micromolar limit of detection (LOD = 5.0 μM) of cysteine in HEPES buffer. When cysteine was added, the probe exhibited a dual optical change with strong green fluorescence and dramatic red color by the oxazolidinoindole-to-hydroxyethylindolium transformation. Further cellular application of the probe was successfully performed for the mitochondrial imaging of HeLa cells. PMID:27367584

  17. Spectrophotometric determination of L-cysteine by using polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles in the presence of barium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamdad, Farzad; Khorram, Fateme; Samet, Maryam; Bamdad, Kourosh; Sangi, Mohammad Reza; Allahbakhshi, Fateme

    2016-05-01

    In this article a simple and selective colorimetric probe for cysteine determination using silver nano particles (AgNPS) is described. The determination process was based upon the surface plasmon resonance properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized AgNPS. Interaction of AgNPS with cysteine molecules in the presence of barium ions induced a red shift in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) maximum of AgNPs, as a result of nanoparticle aggregation. Consequently, yellow color of AgNP solution was changed to pink. The linear range for the determination of cysteine was 3.2-8.2 μM (R = 0.9965) with a limit of detection equal to 2.8 μM (3σ). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of cysteine in human plasma samples. Acceptable recovery results of the spiked samples confirmed the validity of the proposed method.

  18. One-pot non-enzymatic formation of firefly luciferin in a neutral buffer from p-benzoquinone and cysteine.

    PubMed

    Kanie, Shusei; Nishikawa, Toshio; Ojika, Makoto; Oba, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Firefly luciferin, the substrate for the bioluminescence reaction of luminous beetles, possesses a benzothiazole ring, which is rare in nature. Here, we demonstrate a novel one-pot reaction to give firefly luciferin in a neutral buffer from p-benzoquinone and cysteine without any synthetic reagents or enzymes. The formation of firefly luciferin was low in yield in various neutral buffers, whereas it was inhibited or completely prevented in acidic or basic buffers, in organic solvents, or under a nitrogen atmosphere. Labelling analysis of the firefly luciferin using stable isotopic cysteines showed that the benzothiazole ring was formed via the decarboxylation and carbon-sulfur bond rearrangement of cysteine. These findings imply that the biosynthesis of firefly luciferin can be developed/evolved from the non-enzymatic production of firefly luciferin using common primary biosynthetic units, p-benzoquinone and cysteine. PMID:27098929

  19. Serum albumin as a probe for testing the selectivity of irreversible cysteine protease inhibitors: The case of vinyl sulfones.

    PubMed

    Regazzoni, Luca; Colombo, Simone; Mazzolari, Angelica; Vistoli, Giulio; Carini, Marina

    2016-05-30

    Vinyl sulfones are used for drug design of irreversible inhibitors of cysteine proteases since they are able to alkylate cysteine thiols inside the catalytic pocket of this class of enzymes. Some authors have reported the lack of reactivity towards glutathione as sufficient evidence of the selectivity of such a mechanism. Herein, we demonstrate that some simple molecules containing a vinyl sulfone moiety are not thiol-specific alkylants since they react with some albumin nucleophiles including side chains of Cys34 and His146. Such side-reactions are not desirable for any drug candidate since they limit serum stability, bioavailability and they possibly trigger toxicity mechanisms. In silico predictions, indicate that the compounds tested share similar structural features with reported inhibitors of cysteine proteases, as well as similar poses around the main albumin nucleophiles. Altogether, the data suggest that albumin is better than glutathione for the setup of early in vitro tests probing the selectivity of cysteine protease inhibitors. PMID:26970985

  20. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a Library of Thiocarbazates and their Activity as Cysteine Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuqing; Myers, Michael C.; Shah, Parag P.; Beavers, Mary Pat; Benedetti, Phillip A.; Diamond, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel class of potent cathepsin L inhibitors, characterized by a thiocarbazate warhead. Given the potential of these compounds to inhibit other cysteine proteases, we designed and synthesized a library of thiocarbazates containing diversity elements at three positions. Biological characterization of this library for activity against a panel proteases indicated a significant preference for members of the papain family of cysteine proteases over serine, metallo-, and certain classes of cysteine proteases, such as caspases. Several very potent inhibitors of Cathepsin L and S were identified. The SAR data was employed in docking studies in an effort to understand the structural elements required for Cathepsin S inhibition. This study provides the basis for the design of highly potent and selective inhibitors of the papain family of cysteine proteases. PMID:20438448

  1. The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin C, a disintegrin-like/cysteine-rich protein isolated from Crotalus atrox venom.

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, J. J.; Moreno-Murciano, M. P.; Sanz, L.; Jürgens, M.; Schrader, M.; Raida, M.; Benjamin, D. C.; Fox, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin-C was determined by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. The N-terminal disintegrin-like domain is a compact structure including eight disulfide bonds, seven of them in the same pattern as the disintegrin bitistatin. The protein has two extra cysteine residues (XIII and XVI) that form an additional disulfide bond that is characteristically found in the disintegrin-like domains of cellular metalloproteinases (ADAMs) and PIII snake venom Zn-metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The C-terminal cysteine-rich domain of catrocollastatin-C contains five disulfide bonds between nearest-neighbor cysteines and a long range disulfide bridge between CysV and CysX. These results provide structural evidence for a redefinition of the disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domain boundaries. An evolutionary pathway for ADAMs, PIII, and PII SVMPs based on disulfide bond engineering is also proposed. PMID:10933502

  2. An effective real-time colorimeteric sensor for sensitive and selective detection of cysteine under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhengquan; Guang, Shanyi; Xu, Hongyao; Liu, Xiangyang

    2011-05-01

    In this contribution, a new, real-time and sensitive colorimetric sensor, di-N-methyl-N-hydroxyethylaniline squaraine (SQ), has been identified and synthesized for cysteine analysis based on its ΔA in neutral aqueous medium (pH ≈ 7.5). The proposed method was applied to analyse synthetic amino acid samples and human serum samples. The results show that the linear range of cysteine detection in aqueous medium at pH ≈ 7.5 is 10~700 nmol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.9984 and a limit of detection (3σ, n = 20) of 3.9 nmol L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for cysteine detection was lower than 4.1% (n = 5). The proposed method possesses the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, high selectivity and sensitivity. This makes it possible, for the first time, the real-time detection of cysteine under normal physiological conditions. PMID:21394346

  3. Purification and characterization of a digestive cysteine proteinase from the American lobster (Homarus americanus).

    PubMed

    Laycock, M V; Hirama, T; Hasnain, S; Watson, D; Storer, A C

    1989-10-15

    A new cysteine proteinase was isolated from the digestive juice of the American lobster (Homarus americanus). The enzyme was purified by a combination of affinity and ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The cysteine proteinase accounted for 80% of the proteolytic activity in the lumen of the hepatopancreas. The most potent heavy-metal inhibitors were Hg, Cu, and Ag ions. Inhibition by organic proteinase inhibitors, including E-64 [L-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane] and activation of the enzyme by 2-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol are characteristic of cysteine proteinases. Several similarities to papain are noted and include the N-terminal sequence, of which 22 of the first 28 amino acids are identical. Some notable differences are the higher Mr of 28,000 compared with 23,350 for papain, and the low isoelectric point (pI 4.5) of the lobster enzyme. The effects of pH and temperature on catalytic activity of the lobster proteinase were studied with benzyloxycarbonylalanine p-nitrophenyl ester as the substrate. The kcat./Km value was effectively temperature-independent between 10 and 60 degrees C. The pH-activity profile for the lobster enzyme revealed four apparent protonation states, of which only two are active. PMID:2597115

  4. Inhibitors of the Cysteine Synthase CysM with Antibacterial Potency against Dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Katharina; Maric, Selma; Reshma, Rudraraju Srilakshmi; Almqvist, Helena; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Gustavsson, Anna-Lena; Poyraz, Ömer; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Lundbäck, Thomas; Vallin, Michaela; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Schnell, Robert; Schneider, Gunter

    2016-07-28

    Cysteine is an important amino acid in the redox defense of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, primarily as a building block of mycothiol. Genetic studies have implicated de novo cysteine biosynthesis in pathogen survival in infected macrophages, in particular for persistent M. tuberculosis. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of potent inhibitors of CysM, a critical enzyme in cysteine biosynthesis during dormancy. A screening campaign of 17 312 compounds identified ligands that bind to the active site with micromolar affinity. These were characterized in terms of their inhibitory potencies and structure-activity relationships through hit expansion guided by three-dimensional structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes. The top compound binds to CysM with 300 nM affinity and displays selectivity over the mycobacterial homologues CysK1 and CysK2. Notably, two inhibitors show significant potency in a nutrient-starvation model of dormancy of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with little or no cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. PMID:27379713

  5. Copper(I) stabilization by cysteine/tryptophan motif in the extracellular domain of Ctr4.

    PubMed

    Okada, Mariko; Miura, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Copper transporter Ctr4 of fission yeast has a quasi-palindromic sequence rich in cysteine and aromatic amino acid residues, CX4YWNWYX4C (where X represents any amino acid), in the N-terminal extracellular domain. A 24-mer peptide comprising this sequence is bound to Cu(I) through the cysteine thiolate coordination. Luminescence, UV absorption and resonance Raman spectra of the Cu(I)-peptide complex show that at least one of the two tryptophan side chains is located in close proximity to the thiolate-Cu(I) center and interacts with the Cu(I) ion via π-electrons of the indole ring. Although the thiolates and Cu(I) are oxidized to disulfide and Cu(II), respectively, only very slowly in air-saturated solutions, replacements of the tryptophan residues to phenylalanine significantly accelerate the oxidation reactions. The results obtained indicate that the interaction between Cu(I) and tryptophan via π-electrons plays a significant role in protecting the thiolate-Cu(I) center against the oxidation. The cysteine- and tryptophan-rich quasi-palindromic sequence may be a metal binding motif that stabilizes Cu(I) in the oxidizing extracellular environment. PMID:26908286

  6. Unusual specific heat of almost dry L-cysteine and L-cystine amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, M S; Lima, T A; Ferreira, F F; Martinho, H S

    2015-03-01

    A detailed quantitative analysis of the specific heat in the 0.5- to 200-K temperature range for almost dry L-cysteine and its dimer, L-cystine, amino acids is presented. We report the occurrence of a sharp first-order transition at ∼76 K for L-cysteine associated with the thiol group ordering which was successfully modeled with the two-dimensional Ising model. We demonstrated that quantum rotors, two-level systems (TLS), Einstein oscillators, and acoustic phonons (the Debye model) are essential ingredients to correctly describe the overall experimental data. Our analysis pointed out the absence of the TLS contribution to the low temperature specific heat of L-cysteine. This result was similar to that found in other noncrystalline amorphous materials, e.g., amorphous silicon, low density amorphous water, and ultrastable glasses. L-cystine presented an unusual nonlinear acoustic dispersion relation ω(q)=vq0.95 and a Maxwell-Boltzmann-type distribution of tunneling barriers. The presence of Einstein oscillators with ΘE∼70 K was common in both systems and adequately modeled the boson peak contributions. PMID:25871146

  7. In vitro anthelmintic effects of cysteine proteinases from plants against intestinal helminths of rodents.

    PubMed

    Stepek, Gillian; Lowe, Ann E; Buttle, David J; Duce, Ian R; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2007-12-01

    Infections with gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes are amongst the most prevalent worldwide, especially in tropical climates. Control of these infections is primarily through treatment with anthelmintic drugs, but the rapid development of resistance to all the currently available classes of anthelmintic means that alternative treatments are urgently required. Cysteine proteinases from plants such as papaya, pineapple and fig are known to be substantially effective against three rodent GI nematodes, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Trichuris muris and Protospirura muricola, both in vitro and in vivo. Here, based on in vitro motility assays and scanning electron microscopy, we extend these earlier reports, demonstrating the potency of this anthelmintic effect of plant cysteine proteinases against two GI helminths from different taxonomic groups - the canine hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum, and the rodent cestode, Rodentolepis microstoma. In the case of hookworms, a mechanism of action targeting the surface layers of the cuticle indistinguishable from that reported earlier appears to be involved, and in the case of cestodes, the surface of the tegumental layers was also the principal location of damage. Hence, plant cysteine proteinases have a broad spectrum of activity against intestinal helminths (both nematodes and cestodes), a quality that reinforces their suitability for development as a much-needed novel treatment against GI helminths of humans and livestock. PMID:18005461

  8. Unusual specific heat of almost dry L-cysteine and L-cystine amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, M. S.; Lima, T. A.; Ferreira, F. F.; Martinho, H. S.

    2015-03-01

    A detailed quantitative analysis of the specific heat in the 0.5- to 200-K temperature range for almost dry L-cysteine and its dimer, L-cystine, amino acids is presented. We report the occurrence of a sharp first-order transition at ˜76 K for L-cysteine associated with the thiol group ordering which was successfully modeled with the two-dimensional Ising model. We demonstrated that quantum rotors, two-level systems (TLS), Einstein oscillators, and acoustic phonons (the Debye model) are essential ingredients to correctly describe the overall experimental data. Our analysis pointed out the absence of the TLS contribution to the low temperature specific heat of L-cysteine. This result was similar to that found in other noncrystalline amorphous materials, e.g., amorphous silicon, low density amorphous water, and ultrastable glasses. L-cystine presented an unusual nonlinear acoustic dispersion relation ω (q ) =v q0.95 and a Maxwell-Boltzmann-type distribution of tunneling barriers. The presence of Einstein oscillators with ΘE˜70 K was common in both systems and adequately modeled the boson peak contributions.

  9. Chemical proteomic map of dimethyl fumarate-sensitive cysteines in primary human T cells.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Megan M; Xie, Jiji; Zaro, Balyn W; Backus, Keriann M; Altman, Amnon; Teijaro, John R; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an electrophilic drug that is used to treat autoimmune conditions, including multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of DMF is unclear but may involve the covalent modification of proteins or DMF serving as a prodrug that is converted to monomethyl fumarate (MMF). We found that DMF, but not MMF, blocked the activation of primary human and mouse T cells. Using a quantitative, site-specific chemical proteomic platform, we determined the DMF sensitivity of >2400 cysteine residues in human T cells. Cysteines sensitive to DMF, but not MMF, were identified in several proteins with established biochemical or genetic links to T cell function, including protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ). DMF blocked the association of PKCθ with the costimulatory receptor CD28 by perturbing a CXXC motif in the C2 domain of this kinase. Mutation of these DMF-sensitive cysteines also impaired PKCθ-CD28 interactions and T cell activation, designating the C2 domain of PKCθ as a key functional, electrophile-sensing module important for T cell biology. PMID:27625306

  10. Identification of glutathione and related cysteine conjugates derived from reactive metabolites of methyleugenol in rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huina; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-06-25

    Methyleugenol (ME), an alkenylbenzene compound, is a constituent of many foods and is used as flavoring agent in foodstuffs and as fragrance in cosmetics. It has been reported that exposure to ME can cause carcinogenicity, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Metabolic activation is suggested to play an important role in ME-induced toxicities. Electrophilic metabolites of ME have been reported to covalently bind to proteins and nucleic acids. The objective of this study was to identify GSH and related cysteine conjugates derived from these reactive metabolites in vivo. Five biliary GSH (M1-M5) and four urinary cysteine conjugates (M6-M9) were detected in rats given ME. M1 and M2 were GSH conjugates derived from the epoxide of ME. M3, M4, and M5 were GSH conjugates possibly generated from the corresponding α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, carbonium ion, and quinone methide, respectively. The structures of the GSH conjugates were verified by chemical synthesis. Cysteine conjugates M6, M7, M8, and M9 were found to correspond to the respective M1/M2, M3, M4, and M5. The data obtained from the present in vivo work facilitate the understanding of mechanism action of ME toxicities and may provide information suitable for use as biomarkers of exposure to ME. PMID:27154494

  11. Techniques for the Analysis of Cysteine Sulfhydryls and Oxidative Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Sherma, Nisha D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Modification of cysteine thiols dramatically affects protein function and stability. Hence, the abilities to quantify specific protein sulfhydryl groups within complex biological samples and map disulfide bond structures are crucial to gaining greater insights into how proteins operate in human health and disease. Recent Advances: Many different molecular probes are now commercially available to label and track cysteine residues at great sensitivity. Coupled with mass spectrometry, stable isotope-labeled sulfhydryl-specific reagents can provide previously unprecedented molecular insights into the dynamics of cysteine modification. Likewise, the combined application of modern mass spectrometers with improved sample preparation techniques and novel data mining algorithms is beginning to routinize the analysis of complex protein disulfide structures. Critical Issues: Proper application of these modern tools and techniques, however, still requires fundamental understanding of sulfhydryl chemistry as well as the assumptions that accompany sample preparation and underlie effective data interpretation. Future Directions: The continued development of tools, technical approaches, and corresponding data processing algorithms will, undoubtedly, facilitate site-specific protein sulfhydryl quantification and disulfide structure analysis from within complex biological mixtures with ever-improving accuracy and sensitivity. Fully routinizing disulfide structure analysis will require an equal but balanced focus on sample preparation and corresponding mass spectral dataset reproducibility. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 511–531. PMID:24383618

  12. Facile fabrication and selective detection for cysteine of xylan/Au nanoparticles composite.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuqiong; Shen, Zuguang; Liu, Pai; Zhao, Lihong; Wang, Xiaoying

    2016-04-20

    This work reported a facile and green method to prepare highly stable and uniformly distributed Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), using biopolymer xylan as stabilizing and reducing agent. Full characterizations were performed and the results revealed that AuNPs were well dispersed with the diameters of 10-30nm. The optimal condition was as follows: the ratio of xylan to HAuCl4 was 150mg:15mg, reaction temperature was 80°C and reaction time was 40min. The xylan/AuNPs composite exhibited highly selective and sensitive sensing of cysteine in aqueous solution, it could distinguish cysteine among dozens kinds of amino acids, and the limit of detection (LOD) for cysteine was calculated as 0.57μM. Besides, the xylan/AuNPs composite was applied for Cys detection in human serum. This study provides a new way for high-value utilization of the rich biomass resource and a cheap, rapid and simple method for Cys detection in real biological samples. PMID:26876835

  13. Cysteine Sulfenylation Directs IRE-1 to Activate the SKN-1/Nrf2 Antioxidant Response.

    PubMed

    Hourihan, John M; Moronetti Mazzeo, Lorenza E; Fernández-Cárdenas, L Paulette; Blackwell, T Keith

    2016-08-18

    Emerging evidence suggests that many proteins may be regulated through cysteine modification, but the extent and functions of this signaling remain largely unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transmembrane protein IRE-1 maintains ER homeostasis by initiating the unfolded protein response (UPR(ER)). Here we show in C. elegans and human cells that IRE-1 has a distinct redox-regulated function in cytoplasmic homeostasis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated at the ER or by mitochondria sulfenylate a cysteine within the IRE-1 kinase activation loop. This inhibits the IRE-1-mediated UPR(ER) and initiates the p38/SKN-1(Nrf2) antioxidant response, thereby increasing stress resistance and lifespan. Many AGC-family kinases (AKT, p70S6K, PKC, ROCK1) seem to be regulated similarly. The data reveal that IRE-1 has an ancient function as a cytoplasmic sentinel that activates p38 and SKN-1(Nrf2) and indicate that cysteine modifications induced by ROS signals can direct proteins to adopt unexpected functions and may coordinate many cellular processes. PMID:27540856

  14. Synthesis and characterization of cysteine functionalized silver nanoparticles for biomolecule immobilization.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan; Verma, Nishant

    2014-11-01

    A facile method for the aqueous phase synthesis of cysteine-functionalized silver nanoparticles by potato extract has been reported in the present work. These functionalized nanoparticles were then used for the covalent immobilization of a biomolecule, alkaline phosphatase, on its surface through carbodiimide coupling. Different reaction parameters such as cysteine concentration, reducing agent concentration, temperature, pH and reaction time were varied during the nanoparticles' formation, and their effects on plasmon resonance were studied using Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the surface modification of silver nanoparticles by cysteine and the particle size analysis was done using particle size analyzer, which showed the average nanoparticles' size of 61 nm for bare silver nanoparticles and 201 nm for the enzyme-immobilized nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be highly efficient for the covalent immobilization of alkaline phosphatase on its surface and retained 67% of its initial enzyme activity (9.44 U/mg), with 75% binding efficiency. The shelf life of the enzyme-nanoparticle bioconjugates was found to be 60 days, with a 12% loss in the initial enzyme activity. With a simple synthesis strategy, high immobilization efficiency and enhanced stability, these enzyme-coated nanoparticles have the potential for further integration into the biosensor technology. PMID:24760173

  15. Cysteine Dioxygenase 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Silenced by Promoter Methylation in Multiple Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brait, Mariana; Ling, Shizhang; Nagpal, Jatin K.; Chang, Xiaofei; Park, Hannah Lui; Lee, Juna; Okamura, Jun; Yamashita, Keishi; Sidransky, David; Kim, Myoung Sook

    2012-01-01

    The human cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1) gene is a non-heme structured, iron-containing metalloenzyme involved in the conversion of cysteine to cysteine sulfinate, and plays a key role in taurine biosynthesis. In our search for novel methylated gene promoters, we have analyzed differential RNA expression profiles of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with or without treatment of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Among the genes identified, the CDO1 promoter was found to be differentially methylated in primary CRC tissues with high frequency compared to normal colon tissues. In addition, a statistically significant difference in the frequency of CDO1 promoter methylation was observed between primary normal and tumor tissues derived from breast, esophagus, lung, bladder and stomach. Downregulation of CDO1 mRNA and protein levels were observed in cancer cell lines and tumors derived from these tissue types. Expression of CDO1 was tightly controlled by promoter methylation, suggesting that promoter methylation and silencing of CDO1 may be a common event in human carcinogenesis. Moreover, forced expression of full-length CDO1 in human cancer cells markedly decreased the tumor cell growth in an in vitro cell culture and/or an in vivo mouse model, whereas knockdown of CDO1 increased cell growth in culture. Our data implicate CDO1 as a novel tumor suppressor gene and a potentially valuable molecular marker for human cancer. PMID:23028699

  16. Cysteine Protease Activity of Feline Tritrichomonas foetus Promotes Adhesion-Dependent Cytotoxicity to Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, M. K.; Stauffer, S. H.; Brand, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis. PMID:24752513

  17. Cysteine protease activity of feline Tritrichomonas foetus promotes adhesion-dependent cytotoxicity to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, M K; Stauffer, S H; Brand, M D; Gookin, J L

    2014-07-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis. PMID:24752513

  18. Cysteine protease gene expression and proteolytic activity during senescence of Alstroemeria petals.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Leverentz, Michael K; Griffiths, Gareth; Thomas, Brian; Chanasut, Usawadee; Stead, Anthony D; Rogers, Hilary J

    2002-02-01

    The functional life of the flower is terminated by senescence and/or abscission. Multiple processes contribute to produce the visible signs of petal wilting and inrolling that typify senescence, but one of the most important is that of protein degradation and remobilization. This is mediated in many species through protein ubiquitination and the action of specific protease enzymes. This paper reports the changes in protein and protease activity during development and senescence of Alstroemeria flowers, a Liliaceous species that shows very little sensitivity to ethylene during senescence and which shows perianth abscission 8-10 d after flower opening. Partial cDNAs of ubiquitin (ALSUQ1) and a putative cysteine protease (ALSCYP1) were cloned from Alstroemeria using degenerate PCR primers and the expression pattern of these genes was determined semi-quantitatively by RT-PCR. While the levels of ALSUQ1 only fluctuated slightly during floral development and senescence, there was a dramatic increase in the expression of ALSCYP1 indicating that this gene may encode an important enzyme for the proteolytic process in this species. Three papain class cysteine protease enzymes showing different patterns of activity during flower development were identified on zymograms, one of which showed a similar expression pattern to the cysteine protease cDNA. PMID:11807127

  19. To study the recovery of L-Cysteine using halloysite nanotubes after heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Juhi

    2016-04-01

    Industrial wastes are a major source of soil and water pollution that originate from mining industries, chemical industries, metal processing industries, etc. These wastes consist of a variety of chemicals including phenolics, heavy metals, etc. Use of industrial effluent and sewage sludge on agricultural land has become a common practice in the world which results in these toxic metals being transferred and ultimately concentrate in plant tissues from water and the soil. The metals that get accumulated, prove detrimental to plants themselves and may also cause damage to the healths of animals as well as man. This is because the heavy metals become toxins above certain concentrations, over a narrow range. As a further matter, these metals negatively affect the natural microbial populations as well, that leads to the disruption of fundamental ecological processes. However, many techniques and methods have been advanced to clear the heavy metal polluted soils and waters. One important method is by removing heavy metals with the help of amino acids like L-Cysteine and L-Penicillamine. But also, economy of removal of pollutant heavy metals from soils and waters is a major concern. Present study helps in decreasing the cost for large-scale removal of heavy metals from polluted water by recovering the amino acid (L-Cysteine) after removal of nickel (Ni+2) at a fixed pH, by binding the Ni+2 with halloysite nanotubes(HNT), so that L-Cysteine can be reused again for removal of heavy metals.

  20. Homogenous Phase Enrichment of Cysteine-Containing Peptides for Improved Proteome Coverage.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Pruś, Gabriela

    2015-07-01

    We describe a proteomic reactor-based homogeneous phase enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides in a filter aided sample preparation (FASP) format. In this approach thiol-reduced proteins are derivatized with thiol-activated polyethylene glycol (TAPEG) before protein cleavage. Consecutive digestion with endoproteinase LysC and trypsin allows isolation of two fractions of nonderivatized peptides. After reduction of disulfide bonds between cysteine-containing peptides and the polyethylene glycol moieties, a third fraction of peptides is collected. LC-MS/MS analyses revealed that on average this fraction consists of 95% cysteine-containing peptides. Since 85-93% of all peptides are unique to a single subfraction, the combination of TAPEG and FASP offers an efficient peptide separation strategy. Analysis of whole cell lysates of mouse brain, liver, red muscle fibers, and CaCo-2 cells using the TAPEG FASP approach allowed identification of 6,900, 5,800, 4,200 and 7,900 proteins, 10-30% more than were identified using two-step digestion without isolation of Cys-containing peptides. The fractionation also increased the protein sequence coverage by 10-30%. PMID:26028250

  1. Photothermal Techniques Applied to the Thermal Characterization of l-Cysteine Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, E. Maldonado; Ramón-Gallegos, E.; Jiménez Pérez, J. L.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Hernández Rosas, J.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal-diffusivity ( D) and thermal-effusivity ( e) measurements were carried out in l-cysteine nanoliquids l-cysteine in combination with Au nanoparticles and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) nanofluid) by using thermal lens spectrometry (TLS) and photopyroelectric (PPE) techniques. The TLS technique was used in the two mismatched mode experimental configuration to obtain the thermal-diffusivity of the samples. On the other hand, the sample thermal effusivity ( e) was obtained by using the PPE technique where the temperature variation of a sample, exposed to modulated radiation, is measured with a pyrolectric sensor. From the obtained thermal-diffusivity and thermal-effusivity values, the thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of the sample were calculated. The obtained thermal parameters were compared with the thermal parameters of water. The results of this study could be applied to the detection of tumors by using the l-cysteine in combination with Au nanoparticles and PpIX nanofluid, called conjugated in this study.

  2. Cysteine proteases from the Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited thrombin and plasmin like activities.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, H V; Riyaz, M; Venkatesh Kumar, R; Dharmappa, K K; Tarannum, Shaista; Siddesha, J M; Rajesh, R; Vishwanath, B S

    2009-10-01

    In the present study we evaluated the presence of cysteine protease from the latex of four plants Asclepias curassavica L., Calotropis gigantea R.Br., Pergularia extensa R.Br. and Cynanchum puciflorum R.Br. belongs to the family Asclepiadaceae. Cysteine proteases from these plants latex exhibited both thrombin and plasmin like activities. Latex enzyme fraction in a concentration dependent manner induced the formation of clot in citrated blood plasma. Direct incubation of fibrinogen with latex enzyme fraction resulted in the formation of fibrin clot similar to thrombin enzyme. However prolonged incubation resulted in degradation of the formed fibrin clot suggesting plasmin like activity. Latex enzyme fraction preferentially hydrolyzed Aalpha and Bbeta chains of fibrinogen to form fibrin clot. Latex enzyme fraction also hydrolyzed the subunits of fully cross linked fibrin efficiently, the order of hydrolysis was alpha-polymer > alpha-chains > beta-chain and gamma-gamma dimer. Cysteine proteases from all the four Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited similar action on fibrinogen and fibrin. This study scientifically validate the use of plant latex in stop bleeding and wound healing by traditional healers all over the world. PMID:18979066

  3. S-nitroso-l-cysteine releases norepinephrine in rat spinal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Rose, G; Dongre, N; Pan, H L; Tobin, J R; Eisenach, J C

    2000-07-28

    Although nitric oxide (NO) participates in development of hypersensitivity states in the spinal cord thought to underlie chronic pain, it also participates in analgesia produced by various drugs. In rats with a hypersensitivity state following peripheral nerve injury, spinal administration of an NO donor or l-cysteine alone produced no effect, whereas their combination, which yields s-nitroso-l-cysteine (SNC) powerfully reduced hypersensitivity. In the current study, we examined the ability of SNC to stimulate release of a known spinal analgesic neurotransmitter, norepinephrine (NE), as a possible mechanism of analgesic action of NO in the spinal cord. SNC (but not the NO donor alone or decomposed SNC) produced a concentration-dependent release of NE from rat spinal cord synaptosomes. The d-isomer of SNC was less potent than the l-isomer, and the effect of SNC was partially blocked by l-, but not d-leucine, implicating an interaction with the l-amino acid transporter. SNC-induced NE release was partially Na(+) dependent, but largely Ca(2+) independent. NE uptake inhibitors partially antagonized the effect of SNC, but guanylate cyclase inhibitors were without effect. These data are therefore consistent with NO stimulating NE release in the spinal cord via reaction with thiol containing compounds, such as cysteine, entry into NE terminals via active transport, and production of both exocytotic and carrier mediated release. PMID:10924712

  4. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport.

    PubMed Central

    Hempe, J M; Cousins, R J

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of zinc absorption has not been delineated, but kinetic studies show that both passive and carrier-mediated processes are involved. We have identified a low molecular mass zinc-binding protein in the soluble fraction of rat intestinal mucosa that could function as an intracellular zinc carrier. The protein was not detected in liver or pancreas, suggesting a role specific to the intestine. The protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport and shows signs of saturation at higher luminal zinc concentrations, characteristics consistent with a role in carrier-mediated zinc absorption. Microsequence analysis of the protein purified by gel-filtration HPLC and SDS/PAGE showed complete identity within the first 41 N-terminal amino acids with the deduced protein sequence of cysteine-rich intestinal protein [Birkenmeier, E. H. & Gordon, J. I. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 2516-2520]. These investigators showed that the gene for this protein is developmentally regulated in neonates during the suckling period, conserved in many vertebrate species, and predominantly expressed in the small intestine. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein contains a recently identified conserved sequence of histidine and cysteine residues, the LIM motif, which our results suggest confers metal-binding properties that are important for zinc transport and/or functions of this micronutrient. Images PMID:1946385

  5. Expression and deletion analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense cysteine protease in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pamer, E G; Davis, C E; So, M

    1991-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the cause of African sleeping sickness, differentiates in the mammalian bloodstream from a long, slender trypanosome into a short, stumpy trypanosome. This event is necessary for infection of the tsetse fly and maintenance of the life cycle. We have previously shown that the stumpy form contains 10- to 15-fold-greater cysteine protease activity than either the slender form or the insect midgut procyclic, and we have isolated a cDNA encoding the protease. In order to determine whether the cDNA encodes the developmentally regulated cysteine protease, we have purified the protease from trypanosomes and have made a polyclonal antiserum against it. The trypanosomal protease gene was then expressed in Escherichia coli with three different methionines within the pre- and propeptides acting as initiation sites. In each case, a protein was synthesized that was recognized by an antiserum specific for the developmentally regulated trypanosomal cysteine protease. The protein synthesized from the more upstream initiation site within the propeptide was proteolytically active. The recombinant protease and the trypanosomal enzyme were identical with respect to peptide substrates and protease inhibitors. The protein remained active when synthesized in a truncated form lacking the nine consecutive prolines and carboxy-terminus extension, indicating that the terminal 108 amino acids are not necessary for proteolytic activity. Images PMID:1997411

  6. Intriguing manipulation of metal-enhanced fluorescence for the detection of Cu(II) and cysteine.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Pal, Jaya; Mondal, Chanchal; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-09-22

    Commercially available salicylaldehyde, in alkaline medium, exhibits strong fluorescence after one hour of UV exposure in the presence of Ag(I) . The phenolic group of salicylaldehyde is converted into the quinone form under alkaline conditions in the presence of AgNO3 , resulting in aggregated Ag(0), which causes approximately 250 times fluorescence enhancement of the in situ produced quinone. Such high silver-enhanced-fluorescence (SEF) is selectively quenched by cysteine, arginine, histidine, methionine, and tryptophan. In contrast to the other amino acids, ageing brings selectivity of the cysteine-induced quenching effect. Interestingly, Cu(II) is found to be the only metal ion that exclusively regenerates the lost fluorescence. Thus, quenching and recovery of fluorescence (Turn Off/On) can be used for the selective and sensitive detection of cysteine as well as Cu(II) ions in one pot. Alteration of the electric field density around the fluorophore (lightening rod effect) and scattering/absorption cross-section have been proposed to account for the Off/On fluorescence. PMID:25124795

  7. Evidence for a cysteine-mediated mechanism of excitation energy regulation in a photosynthetic antenna complex.

    PubMed

    Orf, Gregory S; Saer, Rafael G; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Zhang, Hao; McIntosh, Chelsea L; Schultz, Jason W; Mirica, Liviu M; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    Light-harvesting antenna complexes not only aid in the capture of solar energy for photosynthesis, but regulate the quantity of transferred energy as well. Light-harvesting regulation is important for protecting reaction center complexes from overexcitation, generation of reactive oxygen species, and metabolic overload. Usually, this regulation is controlled by the association of light-harvesting antennas with accessory quenchers such as carotenoids. One antenna complex, the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) antenna protein from green sulfur bacteria, completely lacks carotenoids and other known accessory quenchers. Nonetheless, the FMO protein is able to quench energy transfer in aerobic conditions effectively, indicating a previously unidentified type of regulatory mechanism. Through de novo sequencing MS, chemical modification, and mutagenesis, we have pinpointed the source of the quenching action to cysteine residues (Cys49 and Cys353) situated near two low-energy bacteriochlorophylls in the FMO protein from Chlorobaculum tepidum Removal of these cysteines (particularly removal of the completely conserved Cys353) through N-ethylmaleimide modification or mutagenesis to alanine abolishes the aerobic quenching effect. Electrochemical analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra suggest that in aerobic conditions the cysteine thiols are converted to thiyl radicals which then are capable of quenching bacteriochlorophyll excited states through electron transfer photochemistry. This simple mechanism has implications for the design of bio-inspired light-harvesting antennas and the redesign of natural photosynthetic systems. PMID:27335466

  8. The anthelmintic efficacy of natural plant cysteine proteinases against the rat tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mansur, F; Luoga, W; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Lowe, A; Behnke, J M

    2016-05-01

    Hymenolepis diminuta is a natural parasite of the common brown rat Rattus norvegicus, and provides a convenient model system for the assessment of the anthelmintic activity of novel drugs against cestodes. The experiments described in this paper indicate that treatment of rats infected with H. diminuta with a supernatant extract of papaya latex, containing a mixture of four cysteine proteinases, was moderately efficacious, resulting in a significant, but relatively small, reduction in worm burden and biomass. However, faecal egg output was not affected by treatment. In our experiments these effects were only partially dose-dependent, although specific inhibition by E-64 confirmed the role of cysteine proteinases as the active principles in papaya latex affecting worm growth but not statistically reducing worm burden. Data collected for a further 7 days after treatment indicated that the effects of papaya latex supernatant on worm loss and on worm growth were not enhanced. Our findings provide a starting point for further refinement in formulation and delivery, or assessment of alternative natural plant-derived cysteine proteinases in efforts to develop these naturally occurring enzymes into broad-spectrum anthelmintics, with efficacy against cestodes as well as nematodes. PMID:25761568

  9. Sterically hindered disulfide bridges in cystine diketopiperazine, cysteinyl-cysteine disulfide and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ottnad, M; Hartter, P; Jung, G

    1975-06-01

    L-Cystine diketopiperazine (1), L-cysteinyl-cysteine disulfide -HCl (2), L-cysteinyl-cysteine disulfide methyl ester -HCl (3), and t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-cysteinyl-cysteine disulfide methyl ester (4) are investigated by CD, ultraviolet, 13C NMR, infrared and laser Raman spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the 13C NMR signals of 1 reveals an exceptionally high energy barrier of deltaGNo. = 15.8 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol for the reversible change in helicity of the inherently dissymmetric disulfide bridge of 1. The P-helical diastereomer predominates in dimethyl-sulfoxide at 25 degrees C, with 80-85% of the molecules having this configuration. The Cotton effects of 1 are larger and show smaller temperature coefficients than the conformationally more mobile cystine compounds 2 and 3. After dissolving crystals of 1 in 95% ethanol there is a time-dependent decrease of the ellipticity of the negative Cotton effect at 225 nm, indicating a conformational change in going from crystal to solution. Besides 1, 2 and 3 are at present the only known examples of cystine derivatives with C-S-S-C torsional angles around 90 degrees, which do not exhibit optical activity in the long wavelength disulfide absorption, as is predicted for 1 from the Linderberg-Michl model. At 305 nm a new weak Cotton effect was discovered for 1. The solvent dependence of the CD spectra is discussed and the infrared and Raman spectra are assigned. PMID:1181260

  10. Refolding process of cysteine-rich proteins:Chitinase as a model

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Malihe; Ganji, Ali; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Falak, Reza; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recombinant proteins overexpressed in E. coli are usually deposited in inclusion bodies. Cysteines in the protein contribute to this process. Inter- and intra- molecular disulfide bonds in chitinase, a cysteine-rich protein, cause aggregation when the recombinant protein is overexpressed in E. coli. Hence, aggregated proteins should be solubilized and allowed to refold to obtain native- or correctly- folded recombinant proteins. Methods: Dilution method that allows refolding of recombinant proteins, especially at high protein concentrations, is to slowly add the soluble protein to refolding buffer. For this purpose: first, the inclusion bodies containing insoluble proteins were purified; second, the aggregated proteins were solubilized; finally, the soluble proteins were refolded using glutathione redox system, guanidinium chloride, dithiothreitol, sucrose, and glycerol, simultaneously. Results: After protein solubilization and refolding, SDS-PAGE showed a 32 kDa band that was recognized by an anti-chitin antibody on western blots. Conclusions: By this method, cysteine-rich proteins from E. coli inclusion bodies can be solubilized and correctly folded into active proteins. PMID:26989746

  11. Streptococcal cysteine proteinase releases biologically active fragments of streptococcal surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Berge, A; Björck, L

    1995-04-28

    Streptococcus pyogenes are important pathogenic bacteria which produce an extracellular cysteine proteinase contributing to their virulence and pathogenicity. S. pyogenes also express surface molecules, M proteins, that are major virulence determinants due to their antiphagocytic property. In the present work live S. pyogenes bacteria of the M1 serotype were incubated with purified cysteine proteinase. Several peptides were solubilized, and analysis of their protein-binding properties and amino acid sequences revealed two internal fibrinogen-binding fragments of M1 protein (17 and 21 kDa, respectively), and a 36-kDa IgG-binding NH2-terminal fragment of protein H, an IgGFc-binding surface molecule. M protein also plays a role in streptococcal adherence, and removal of this and other surface proteins could promote bacterial dissemination, whereas the generation of soluble complexes between immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin-binding streptococcal surface proteins could be an etiological factor in the development of glomerulonephritis and rheumatic fever. Thus, in these serious complications to S. pyogenes infections immune complexes are found in affected organs. The cysteine proteinase also solubilized a 116-kDa internal fragment of C5a peptidase, another streptococcal surface protein. Activation of the complement system generates C5a, a peptide stimulating leukocyte chemotaxis. C5a-mediated granulocyte migration was blocked by the 116-kDa fragment. This mechanism, by which phagocytes could be prevented from reaching the site of infection, may also contribute to the pathogenicity and virulence of S. pyogenes. PMID:7730368

  12. S-Nitrosation of Conserved Cysteines Modulates Activity and Stability of S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase (GSNOR).

    PubMed

    Guerra, Damian; Ballard, Keith; Truebridge, Ian; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO(•)) regulates diverse physiological processes from vasodilation in humans to gas exchange in plants. S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a principal nitroso reservoir due to its chemical stability. GSNO accumulation is attenuated by GSNO reductase (GSNOR), a cysteine-rich cytosolic enzyme. Regulation of protein nitrosation is not well understood since NO(•)-dependent events proceed without discernible changes in GSNOR expression. Because GSNORs contain evolutionarily conserved cysteines that could serve as nitrosation sites, we examined the effects of treating plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), mammalian (human), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GSNORs with nitrosating agents in vitro. Enzyme activity was sensitive to nitroso donors, whereas the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) restored activity, suggesting that catalytic impairment was due to S-nitrosation. Protein nitrosation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, by which mono-, di-, and trinitrosation were observed, and these signals were sensitive to DTT. GSNOR mutants in specific non-zinc-coordinating cysteines were less sensitive to catalytic inhibition by nitroso donors and exhibited reduced nitrosation signals by mass spectrometry. Nitrosation also coincided with decreased tryptophan fluorescence, increased thermal aggregation propensity, and increased polydispersity-properties reflected by differential solvent accessibility of amino acids important for dimerization and the shape of the substrate and coenzyme binding pockets as assessed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Collectively, these data suggest a mechanism for NO(•) signal transduction in which GSNOR nitrosation and inhibition transiently permit GSNO accumulation. PMID:27064847

  13. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hempe, J.M.; Cousins, R.J. )

    1991-11-01

    The mechanism of zinc absorption has not been delineated, but kinetic studies show that both passive and carrier-mediated processes are involved. The authors have identified a low molecular mass zinc-binding protein in the soluble fraction of rat intestinal mucosa that could function as an intracellular zinc carrier. The protein was not detected in liver or pancreas, suggesting a role specific to the intestine. The protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport and shows signs of saturation at higher luminal zinc concentrations, characteristics consistent with a role in carrier-mediated zinc absorption. Microsequence analysis of the protein purified by gel-filtration HPCL and SDS/PAGE showed complete identity within the first 41 N-terminal amino acids with the deduced protein sequence of cysteine-rich intestinal protein. These investigators showed that the gene for this protein is developmentally regulated in neonates during the suckling period, conserved in many vertebrate species, and predominantly expressed in the small intestine. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein contains a recently identified conserved sequence of histidine and cysteine residues, the LIM motif, which our results suggest confers metal-binding properties that are important for zinc transport and/or functions of this micronutrient.

  14. Differential effect of cysteine-to-serine substitutions in metallothionein on cadmium resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Chernaik, M.L.; Huang, P.C. )

    1991-04-15

    A set of mutant coding sequences for Chinese hamster metallothionein (MT) 2 in which codons for individual cysteines were replace by serine codons was cloned into a yeast expression system. MT gene expression was placed under control of a constitutive promoter on a multicopy Escherichia coli-yeast shuttle vector. MTs were expressed in a metal-sensitive host that lacks the endogenous MT gene. The expressed MTs conferred increased metal resistance to the yeast host. A sensitive assay for cadmium resistance was developed in which population doubling times were monitored in rich liquid medium supplemented with a sublethal dose of CdCl{sub 2}. Measurements on mutants with single cysteine replacements at 12 positions revealed two mutant classes. One class (Cys{r arrow}Ser at position 5, 13, 19, or 33) did not affect the detoxification capacity of MT. A second class (Cys{r arrow}Ser at position 7, 15, 26, 29, 44, 48, 50 or 60) conferred to the host markedly less resistance to cadmium. Mutations tend to be more detrimental in the {alpha} domain than in the {beta} domain in conveying cadmium restance, suggesting that the contribution of individual cysteine to the detoxification function of MT is site specific.

  15. Minicollagen cysteine-rich domains encode distinct modes of polymerization to form stable nematocyst capsules.

    PubMed

    Tursch, Anja; Mercadante, Davide; Tennigkeit, Jutta; Gräter, Frauke; Özbek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The stinging capsules of cnidarians, nematocysts, function as harpoon-like organelles with unusual biomechanical properties. The nanosecond discharge of the nematocyst requires a dense protein network of the capsule structure withstanding an internal pressure of up to 150 bar. Main components of the capsule are short collagens, so-called minicollagens, that form extended polymers by disulfide reshuffling of their cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). Although CRDs have identical cysteine patterns, they exhibit different structures and disulfide connectivity at minicollagen N and C-termini. We show that the structurally divergent CRDs have different cross-linking potentials in vitro and in vivo. While the C-CRD can participate in several simultaneous intermolecular disulfides and functions as a cystine knot after minicollagen synthesis, the N-CRD is monovalent. Our combined experimental and computational analyses reveal the cysteines in the C-CRD fold to exhibit a higher structural propensity for disulfide bonding and a faster kinetics of polymerization. During nematocyst maturation, the highly reactive C-CRD is instrumental in efficient cross-linking of minicollagens to form pressure resistant capsules. The higher ratio of C-CRD folding types evidenced in the medusozoan lineage might have fostered the evolution of novel, predatory nematocyst types in cnidarians with a free-swimming medusa stage. PMID:27166560

  16. Three-dimensional cultures modeling premalignant progression of human breast epithelial cells: role of cysteine cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Stefanie R; Sameni, Mansoureth; Blum, Galia; Bogyo, Matthew; Sloane, Bonnie F; Moin, Kamiar

    2012-12-01

    The expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B is increased in early stages of human breast cancer.To assess the potential role of cathepsin B in premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells, we employed a 3D reconstituted basement membrane overlay culture model of MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and isogenic variants that replicate the in vivo phenotypes of hyper plasia(MCF10AneoT) and atypical hyperplasia (MCF10AT1). MCF10A cells developed into polarized acinar structures with central lumens. In contrast, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells form larger structures in which the lumens are filled with cells. CA074Me, a cell-permeable inhibitor selective for the cysteine cathepsins B and L,reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of MCF10A, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells in 3D culture. We detected active cysteine cathepsins in the isogenic MCF10 variants in 3D culture with GB111, a cell-permeable activity based probe, and established differential inhibition of cathepsin B in our 3D cultures. We conclude that cathepsin B promotes proliferation and premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells. These findings are consistent with studies by others showing that deletion of cathepsin B in the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mice, a murine model that is predisposed to development of mammary cancer, reduces malignant progression. PMID:23667900

  17. Disulfide bond assignments by mass spectrometry of native natural peptides: cysteine pairing in disulfide bonded conotoxins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kallol; Kumar, Mukesh; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2010-10-01

    The critical, and often most difficult, step in structure elucidation of diverse classes of natural peptides is the determination of correct disulfide pairing between multiple cysteine residues. Here, we present a direct mass spectrometric analytical methodology for the determination of disulfide pairing. Protonated peptides, having multiple disulfide bonds, fragmented under collision induced dissociation (CID) conditions and preferentially cleave along the peptide backbone, with occasional disulfide fragmentation either by C(β)-S bond cleavage through H(α) abstraction to yield dehydroalanine and cysteinepersulfide, or by S-S bond cleavage through H(β) abstraction to yield the thioaldehyde and cysteine. Further fragmentation of the initial set of product ions (MS(n)) yields third and fourth generation fragment ions, permitting a distinction between the various possible disulfide bonded structures. This approach is illustrated by establishing cysteine pairing patterns in five conotoxins containing two disulfide bonds. The methodology is extended to the Conus araneosus peptides Ar1446 and Ar1430, two 14 residue sequences containing 3 disulfide bonds. A distinction between 15 possible disulfide pairing schemes becomes possible using direct mass spectral fragmentation of the native peptides together with fragmentation of enzymatically nicked peptides. PMID:20843009

  18. Lignin cross-links with cysteine- and tyrosine-containing peptides under biomimetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Brett G; Brown, Nicole R

    2014-10-22

    The work presented here investigates the cross-linking of various nucleophilic amino acids with lignin under aqueous conditions, thus providing insight as to which amino acids might cross-link with lignin in planta. Lignin dehydrogenation polymer (DHP) was prepared in aqueous solutions that contained tripeptides with the general structure XGG, where X represents an amino acid with a nucleophilic side chain. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that peptides containing cysteine and tyrosine were incorporated into the DHP to form DHP-CGG and DHP-YGG adducts, whereas peptides containing other nucleophilic amino acids were not incorporated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the physical morphology of DHP was altered by the presence of peptides in the aqueous solution, regardless of peptide incorporation into the DHP. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy showed that cysteine-containing peptide cross-linked with lignin at the lignin α-position, whereas in the case of the lignin-tyrosine adduct the exact cross-linking pathway could not be determined. This is the first study to use NMR to confirm cross-linking between lignin and peptides under biomimetic conditions. The results of this study may indicate the potential for lignin-protein linkage formation in planta, particularly between lignin and cysteine- and/or tyrosine-rich proteins. PMID:25275918

  19. N-helix and Cysteines Inter-regulate Human Mitochondrial VDAC-2 Function and Biochemistry*

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Svetlana Rajkumar; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Human voltage-dependent anion channel-2 (hVDAC-2) functions primarily as the crucial anti-apoptotic protein in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and additionally as a gated bidirectional metabolite transporter. The N-terminal helix (NTH), involved in voltage sensing, bears an additional 11-residue extension (NTE) only in hVDAC-2. In this study, we assign a unique role for the NTE as influencing the chaperone-independent refolding kinetics and overall thermodynamic stability of hVDAC-2. Our electrophysiology data shows that the N-helix is crucial for channel activity, whereas NTE sensitizes this isoform to voltage gating. Additionally, hVDAC-2 possesses the highest cysteine content, possibly for regulating reactive oxygen species content. We identify interdependent contributions of the N-helix and cysteines to channel function, and the measured stability in micellar environments with differing physicochemical properties. The evolutionary demand for the NTE in the presence of cysteines clearly emerges from our biochemical and functional studies, providing insight into factors that functionally demarcate hVDAC-2 from the other VDACs. PMID:26487717

  20. Respiratory chain cysteine and methionine usage indicate a causal role for thiyl radicals in aging.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The identification of longevity-related structural adaptations in biological macromolecules may yield relevant insights into the molecular mechanisms of aging. In screening fully sequenced animal proteomes for signals associated with longevity, it was found that cysteine depletion in respiratory chain complexes was the by far strongest predictor on the amino acid usage level to co-vary with lifespan. This association was though restricted to aerobic animals, whereas anaerobic animals showed variable cysteine accumulation. By contrast, methionine accumulation, a prominent feature of mitochondrially encoded proteins affording competitive antioxidant protection, was not predictive of longevity, but rather paralleled aerobic metabolic capacity. Hence, the easily oxidized sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine (a thiol) and methionine (a thioether) show doubly diametrical behaviour in two central paradigms of respiratory oxidative stress. From this comparison, it is concluded that only the one-electron oxidation of thiols to thiyl radicals contributes to aging, whereas other forms of sulfur oxidation, especially even-electron oxidation of both thiols and thioethers, are less critically involved, presumably as their consequences may be much more easily repaired. Thiyl radicals may yet act as chain-transfer agents to entail an irreversible intramembrane cross-linking ("plastination") of some of the a priori most hydrophobic and insoluble proteins known, the respiratory chain complexes. PMID:20850516

  1. CS-AMPPred: An Updated SVM Model for Antimicrobial Activity Prediction in Cysteine-Stabilized Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Porto, William F.; Pires, Állan S.; Franco, Octavio L.

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMP) have been proposed as an alternative to control resistant pathogens. However, due to multifunctional properties of several AMP classes, until now there has been no way to perform efficient AMP identification, except through in vitro and in vivo tests. Nevertheless, an indication of activity can be provided by prediction methods. In order to contribute to the AMP prediction field, the CS-AMPPred (Cysteine-Stabilized Antimicrobial Peptides Predictor) is presented here, consisting of an updated version of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) model for antimicrobial activity prediction in cysteine-stabilized peptides. The CS-AMPPred is based on five sequence descriptors: indexes of (i) α-helix and (ii) loop formation; and averages of (iii) net charge, (iv) hydrophobicity and (v) flexibility. CS-AMPPred was based on 310 cysteine-stabilized AMPs and 310 sequences extracted from PDB. The polynomial kernel achieves the best accuracy on 5-fold cross validation (85.81%), while the radial and linear kernels achieve 84.19%. Testing in a blind data set, the polynomial and radial kernels achieve an accuracy of 90.00%, while the linear model achieves 89.33%. The three models reach higher accuracies than previously described methods. A standalone version of CS-AMPPred is available for download at and runs on any Linux machine. PMID:23240023

  2. Minicollagen cysteine-rich domains encode distinct modes of polymerization to form stable nematocyst capsules

    PubMed Central

    Tursch, Anja; Mercadante, Davide; Tennigkeit, Jutta; Gräter, Frauke; Özbek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The stinging capsules of cnidarians, nematocysts, function as harpoon-like organelles with unusual biomechanical properties. The nanosecond discharge of the nematocyst requires a dense protein network of the capsule structure withstanding an internal pressure of up to 150 bar. Main components of the capsule are short collagens, so-called minicollagens, that form extended polymers by disulfide reshuffling of their cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). Although CRDs have identical cysteine patterns, they exhibit different structures and disulfide connectivity at minicollagen N and C-termini. We show that the structurally divergent CRDs have different cross-linking potentials in vitro and in vivo. While the C-CRD can participate in several simultaneous intermolecular disulfides and functions as a cystine knot after minicollagen synthesis, the N-CRD is monovalent. Our combined experimental and computational analyses reveal the cysteines in the C-CRD fold to exhibit a higher structural propensity for disulfide bonding and a faster kinetics of polymerization. During nematocyst maturation, the highly reactive C-CRD is instrumental in efficient cross-linking of minicollagens to form pressure resistant capsules. The higher ratio of C-CRD folding types evidenced in the medusozoan lineage might have fostered the evolution of novel, predatory nematocyst types in cnidarians with a free-swimming medusa stage. PMID:27166560

  3. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Revati; Nagata, Asako; Murray, Brion W.

    2014-01-01

    The perception of reactive oxygen species has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g., cancer). New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically distinct alterations to the protein (e.g., sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disulfides). These post-translational modifications (PTM) are shown to affect the protein structure and function. Because redox-sensitive proteins can traffic between subcellular compartments that have different redox environments, cysteine oxidation enables a spatio-temporal control to signaling. Understanding ramifications of these oxidative modifications to the functions of signaling proteins is crucial for understanding cellular regulation as well as for informed-drug discovery process. The effects of EGFR oxidation of Cys797 on inhibitor pharmacology are presented to illustrate the principle. Taken together, cysteine redox PTM can impact both cell biology and drug pharmacology. PMID:25339904

  4. S-nitrosation of conserved cysteines modulates activity and stability of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR)

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Damian; Ballard, Keith; Truebridge, Ian; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO•) regulates diverse physiological processes from vasodilation in humans to gas exchange in plants. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a principal nitroso reservoir due to its chemical stability. GSNO accumulation is attenuated by GSNO reductase (GSNOR), a cysteine-rich cytosolic enzyme. Regulation of protein nitrosation is not well understood since NO•-dependent events proceed without discernible changes in GSNOR expression. Because GSNORs contain evolutionarily-conserved cysteines that could serve as nitrosation sites, we examined the effects of treating plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), mammalian (human), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GSNORs with nitrosating agents in vitro. Enzyme activity was sensitive to nitroso donors, while the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) restored activity, suggesting catalytic impairment was due to S-nitrosation. Protein nitrosation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, by which mono-, di-, and tri-nitrosation were observed, and these signals were sensitive to DTT. GSNOR mutants in specific non-zinc coordinating cysteines were less sensitive to catalytic inhibition by nitroso donors and exhibited reduced nitrosation signals by mass spectrometry. Nitrosation also coincided with decreased tryptophan fluorescence, increased thermal aggregation propensity, and increased polydispersity—properties reflected by differential solvent accessibility of amino acids important for dimerization and the shape of the substrate and coenzyme binding pockets as assessed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Collectively, these data suggest a mechanism for NO• signal transduction in which GSNOR nitrosation and inhibition transiently permit GSNO accumulation. PMID:27064847

  5. Cysteines control the N- and C-linker-dependent gating of KCNH1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Nirakar; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2012-05-01

    KCNH1 (EAG1) is a member of the Kv family of voltage-gated potassium channels. However, KCNH1 channels also show some amino-acid sequence similarity to cyclic-nucleotide-regulated channels: they harbor an N-terminal PAS domain, a C-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding homology domain (cNBHD), and N- and C-terminal binding sites for calmodulin. Another notable feature is the channels' high sensitivity toward oxidative modification. Using human KCNH1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK 293 cells we investigated how oxidative modification alters channel function. Intracellular application of H(2)O(2) or cysteine-specific modifiers potently inhibited KCNH1 channels in two phases. Our systematic cysteine mutagenesis study showed that the rapid and dominant phase was attributed to a right-shift in the voltage dependence of activation, caused by chemical modification of residues C145 and C214. The slow component depended on the C-terminal residues C532 and C562. The cysteine pairs are situated at structural elements linking the transmembrane S1 segment with the PAS domain (N-linker) and the transmembrane channel gate S6 with the cNBH domain (C-linker), respectively. The functional state of KCNH1 channels is determined by the oxidative status of these linkers that provide an additional dimension of channel regulation. PMID:22310694

  6. Continuous improvement journey at Du Pont photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Robert K.

    1994-02-01

    This paper describes the history and experiences of Du Pont Photomasks in their efforts to integrate the continuous improvement philosophy and practices embodied in the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria into their way of doing business. A case study of key learnings in this almost four year long process is presented. Specific topics discussed include the process applied to achieve ISO 9000 certification, the quality systems deployed in this effort, and the use of a balanced set of business and quality metrics to assess and improve upon performance.

  7. La fin du jeûne?

    PubMed Central

    Naugler, Christopher; Sidhu, Davinder

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter une mise à jour sur l’utilité clinique de ne pas être à jeun par rapport à l’être pour l’analyse des lipides dans le but d’améliorer l’observance par les patients, leur sécurité et l’évaluation clinique dans les tests du cholestérol. Qualité des données Les recommandations sont classées comme étant fondées sur des données probantes fortes, acceptables ou faibles (conflictuelles ou insuffisantes), selon les classifications adoptées par le Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs. Message principal Le dépistage de la dyslipidémie comme facteur de risque de coronaropathie et la prescription de médicaments hypolipidémiants sont des activités importantes en soins primaires. De récentes données probantes remettent en question la nécessité d’être à jeun pour la mesure des lipides. Dans des études sur la population, le cholestérol total, le cholestérol à lipoprotéines de haute densité et le cholestérol à lipoprotéines autres qu’à haute densité variaient tous d’en moyenne 2 % à jeun. Pour un dépistage de routine, la mesure du cholestérol sans être à jeun est maintenant une option de rechange raisonnable à l’analyse à jeun. Pour les patients diabétiques, l’exigence d’être à jeun peut représenter un important problème de sécurité en raison des possibilités d’hypoglycémie. Pour la surveillance des triglycérides et du cholestérol à lipoprotéines de basse densité chez les patients qui prennent des médicaments hypolipidémiants, le jeûne devient important. Conclusion Être à jeun pour la détermination routinière des niveaux lipidiques est largement inutile et il est improbable que le jeûne influence la stratification du risque clinique chez le patient, tandis que la mesure sans être à jeun pourrait améliorer l’observance par le patient et sa sécurité.

  8. Shared-intermediates in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors: Mechanism and functions of cysteine desulfurases and sulfur acceptors.

    PubMed

    Black, Katherine A; Dos Santos, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Cysteine desulfurases utilize a PLP-dependent mechanism to catalyze the first step of sulfur mobilization in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cofactors. Sulfur activation and integration into thiocofactors involve complex mechanisms and intricate biosynthetic schemes. Cysteine desulfurases catalyze sulfur-transfer reactions from l-cysteine to sulfur acceptor molecules participating in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors, including Fe-S clusters, thionucleosides, thiamin, biotin, and molybdenum cofactor. The proposed mechanism of cysteine desulfurases involves the PLP-dependent cleavage of the C-S bond from l-cysteine via the formation of a persulfide enzyme intermediate, which is considered the hallmark step in sulfur mobilization. The subsequent sulfur transfer reaction varies with the class of cysteine desulfurase and sulfur acceptor. IscS serves as a mecca for sulfur incorporation into a network of intertwined pathways for the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors. The involvement of a single enzyme interacting with multiple acceptors, the recruitment of shared-intermediates partaking roles in multiple pathways, and the participation of Fe-S enzymes denote the interconnectivity of pathways involving sulfur trafficking. In Bacillus subtilis, the occurrence of multiple cysteine desulfurases partnering with dedicated sulfur acceptors partially deconvolutes the routes of sulfur trafficking and assigns specific roles for these enzymes. Understanding the roles of promiscuous vs. dedicated cysteine desulfurases and their partnership with shared-intermediates in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors will help to map sulfur transfer events across interconnected pathways and to provide insight into the hierarchy of sulfur incorporation into biomolecules. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25447671

  9. Selective determination of cysteines through precolumn double-labeling and liquid chromatography followed by detection of intramolecular FRET.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Makoto; Nohta, Hitoshi; Sejima, Naoko; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel approach for highly selective and sensitive analysis of cysteines (glutathione, cysteine, and homocysteine). This method is based on the detection of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in a liquid chromatography (LC) system after double-labeling of the amino and sulfhydryl groups of the cysteines. In this detection process, we monitored the FRET between the amine-derivatized and thiol-derivatized fluorophores. We screened 16 combinations of fluorescent reagents. As a result, FRET occurred most effectively when the sulfhydryl and amino groups of the cysteines were derivatized with 7-diethylamino-3-[{4'-(iodoacetyl)amino}phenyl]-4-methylcoumarin (DCIA, Ex/Em 390/480 nm) and 4-fluoro-7-nitrobenz-2-oxo-1,3-diazole (NBD-F, Ex/Em 480/540 nm), respectively, in this order. The double-labeled cysteines emitted NBD-F fluorescence (540 nm) through an intramolecular FRET process when they were excited at the wavelength of maximum excitation of DCIA (390 nm). The generation of FRET was confirmed by comparison with analysis of n-amylamine or tryptophan (amines without a sulfhydryl group) and 6-mercaptohexanol (thiol without an amino group) performed using LC and a three-dimensional fluorescence detection system. We were able to separate the double-labeled cysteines (DCIA and NBD-F) when performing LC on an ODS column with isocratic elution. The limits of quantification (signal-to-noise ratio = 10) and detection (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) for the cysteines, for a 20-μL injection volume, were in the range 150-670 fmol and 46-200 fmol, respectively. The sensitivity of the intramolecular FRET-forming derivatization method is higher than that of a system which takes advantage of conventional detection of the derivatives. Furthermore, this method provides sufficient selectivity and sensitivity to determine the total cysteines present in the plasma of healthy humans. PMID:21153590

  10. Structural Basis of Conserved Cysteine in the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family: Evidence for a Vestigial Half-Cystine

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2010-11-09

    The 22 members of the mouse/human fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of proteins contain a conserved cysteine residue at position 83 (numbering scheme of the 140-residue form of FGF-1). Sequence and structure information suggests that this position is a free cysteine in 16 members and participates as a half-cystine in at least 3 (and perhaps as many as 6) other members. While a structural role as a half-cystine provides a stability basis for possible selective pressure, it is less clear why this residue is conserved as a free cysteine (although free buried thiols can limit protein functional half-life). To probe the structural role of the free cysteine at position 83 in FGF-1, we constructed Ala, Ser, Thr, Val, and Ile mutations and determined their effects on structure and stability. These results show that position 83 in FGF-1 is thermodynamically optimized to accept a free cysteine. A second cysteine mutation was introduced into wild-type FGF-1 at adjacent position Ala66, which is known to participate as a half-cystine with position 83 in FGF-8, FGF-19, and FGF-23. Results show that, unlike position 83, a free cysteine at position 66 destabilizes FGF-1; however, upon oxidation, a near-optimal disulfide bond is formed between Cys66 and Cys83, resulting in {approx} 14 kJ/mol of increased thermostability. Thus, while the conserved free cysteine at position 83 in the majority of the FGF proteins may have a principal role in limiting functional half-life, evidence suggests that it is a vestigial half-cystine.

  11. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog ofmore » uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.« less

  12. One-Step Conjugation Method for Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugates through Reactive Cysteine-Engineered Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shinmi, Daisuke; Taguchi, Eri; Iwano, Junko; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Masuda, Kazuhiro; Enokizono, Junichi; Shiraishi, Yasuhisa

    2016-05-18

    Engineered cysteine residues are particularly convenient for site-specific conjugation of antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), because no cell engineering and additives are required. Usually, unpaired cysteine residues form mixed disulfides during fermentation in Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells; therefore, additional reduction and oxidization steps are required prior to conjugation. In this study, we prepared light chain (Lc)-Q124C variants in IgG and examined the conjugation efficiency. Intriguingly, Lc-Q124C exhibited high thiol reactivity and directly generated site-specific ADC without any pretreatment (named active thiol antibody: Actibody). Most of the cysteine-maleimide conjugates including Lc-Q124C showed retro-Michael reaction with cysteine 34 in albumin and were decomposed over time. In order to acquire resistance to a maleimide exchange reaction, the facile procedure for succinimide hydrolysis on anion exchange resin was employed. Hydrolyzed Lc-Q124C conjugate prepared with anion exchange procedure retained high stability in plasma. Recently, various stable linkage schemes for cysteine conjugation have been reported. The combination with direct conjugation by the use of Actibody and stable linker technology could enable the generation of stable site-specific ADC through a simple method. Actibody technology with Lc-Q124C at a less exposed position opens a new path for cysteine-based conjugation, and contributes to reducing entry barriers to the preparation and evaluation of ADC. PMID:27074832

  13. Cysteine as a green corrosion inhibitor for Cu37Zn brass in neutral and weakly alkaline sulphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Radovanović, Milan B; Petrović, Marija B; Simonović, Ana T; Milić, Snežana M; Antonijević, Milan M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate electrochemical properties of brass in neutral and weakly alkaline solutions in the presence of cysteine as a nontoxic and ecological corrosion inhibitor. Potentiodynamic measurements, open circuit potential measurements, as well as chronoamperometric measurements were the methods used during investigation of the inhibitory effect of cysteine on the corrosion behaviour of brass. Potentiodynamic measurements showed that cysteine behaves as a mixed-type inhibitor in the investigated media. Based on polarization curves for brass in a weakly alkaline solution of sodium sulphate at varying cysteine concentrations, an interaction occurs between Cu(+) ions and the inhibitor, resulting in the formation of a protective complex on the electrode surface. The results of chronoamperometric measurements confirm the results obtained by potentiodynamic measurements. Optical microphotography of the brass surface also confirms the formation of a protective film in the presence of a 1 × 10(-4) mol/dm(3) cysteine. Adsorption of cysteine on the brass surface proceeds according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. PMID:22836675

  14. Conserved cysteine residues in the mammalian lamin A tail are essential for cellular responses to ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Pekovic, Vanja; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Markiewicz, Ewa; Alzoghaibi, Fahad; Benham, Adam M; Edwards, Robert; Wenhert, Manfred; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2011-12-01

    Pre-lamin A and progerin have been implicated in normal aging, and the pathogenesis of age-related degenerative diseases is termed 'laminopathies'. Here, we show that mature lamin A has an essential role in cellular fitness and that oxidative damage to lamin A is involved in cellular senescence. Primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) aged replicatively or by pro-oxidants acquire a range of dysmorphic nuclear shapes. We observed that conserved cysteine residues in the lamin A tail domain become hyperoxidized in senescent fibroblasts, which inhibits the formation of lamin A inter- and intramolecular disulfide bonds. Both in the absence of lamin A and in the presence of a lamin A cysteine-to-alanine mutant, which eliminates these cysteine residues (522, 588, and 591), mild oxidative stress induced nuclear disorganization and led to premature senescence as a result of decreased tolerance to ROS stimulators. Human dermal fibroblasts lacking lamin A or expressing the lamin A cysteine-to-alanine mutant displayed a gene expression profile of ROS-responsive genes characteristic of chronic ROS stimulation. Our findings suggest that the conserved C-terminal cysteine residues are essential for lamin A function and that loss or oxidative damage to these cysteine residues promotes cellular senescence. PMID:21951640

  15. Evidence for a role of CETP in HDL remodeling and cholesterol efflux: role of cysteine 13 of CETP.

    PubMed

    Maugeais, Cyrille; Perez, Anne; von der Mark, Elisabeth; Magg, Christine; Pflieger, Philippe; Niesor, Eric J

    2013-11-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), a key regulator of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism, induces HDL remodeling by transferring lipids between apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and HDL, and/or by promoting lipid transfer between HDL subparticles. In this study, we investigated the mechanism as to how CETP induces the generation of lipid-poor particles (pre-β-HDL) from HDL, which increases ATP-binding cassette transporter 1-mediated cholesterol efflux. This CETP-dependent HDL remodeling is enhanced by the CETP modulator dalcetrapib both in plasma and isolated HDL. The interaction of dalcetrapib with cysteine 13 of CETP is required, since this effect was abolished when using mutant CETP in which cysteine 13 was substituted for a serine residue. Other thiol-containing compounds were identified as CETP modulators interacting with cysteine 13 of CETP. In order to mimic dalcetrapib-bound CETP, mutant CETP proteins were prepared by replacing cysteine 13 with the bulky amino acid tyrosine or tryptophan. The resultant mutants showed virtually no CETP-dependent lipid transfer activity but demonstrated preserved CETP-dependent pre-β-HDL generation. Overall, these data demonstrate that the two functions of CETP i.e., cholesteryl ester transfer and HDL remodeling can be uncoupled by interaction of thiol-containing compounds with cysteine 13 of CETP or by introducing large amino acid residues in place of cysteine 13. PMID:23872476

  16. Expression patterns of cysteine peptidase genes across the Tribolium castaneum life cycle provide clues to biological function

    PubMed Central

    Elpidina, Elena N.; Oppert, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is a major agricultural pest responsible for considerable loss of stored grain and cereal products worldwide. T. castaneum larvae have a highly compartmentalized gut, with cysteine peptidases mostly in the acidic anterior part of the midgut that are critical to the early stages of food digestion. In previous studies, we described 26 putative cysteine peptidase genes in T. castaneum (types B, L, O, F, and K) located mostly on chromosomes 3, 7, 8, and 10. In the present study, we hypothesized that specific cysteine peptidase genes could be associated with digestive functions for food processing based on comparison of gene expression profiles in different developmental stages, feeding and non-feeding. RNA-Seq was used to determine the relative expression of cysteine peptidase genes among four major developmental stages (egg, larvae, pupae, and adult) of T. castaneum. We also compared cysteine peptidase genes in T. castaneum to those in other model insects and coleopteran pests. By combining transcriptome expression, phylogenetic comparisons, response to dietary inhibitors, and other existing data, we identified key cysteine peptidases that T. castaneum larvae and adults use for food digestion, and thus new potential targets for biologically-based control products. PMID:26819843

  17. The Cysteine-rich Domain of the DHHC3 Palmitoyltransferase Is Palmitoylated and Contains Tightly Bound Zinc.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Colin D; Zhang, Sheng; Linder, Maurine E

    2015-12-01

    DHHC palmitoyltransferases catalyze the addition of the fatty acid palmitate to proteins on the cytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes. There are 23 members of the highly diverse mammalian DHHC protein family, all of which contain a conserved catalytic domain called the cysteine-rich domain (CRD). DHHC proteins transfer palmitate via a two-step catalytic mechanism in which the enzyme first modifies itself with palmitate in a process termed autoacylation. The enzyme then transfers palmitate from itself onto substrate proteins. The number and location of palmitoylated cysteines in the autoacylated intermediate is unknown. In this study, we present evidence using mass spectrometry that DHHC3 is palmitoylated at the cysteine in the DHHC motif. Mutation of highly conserved CRD cysteines outside the DHHC motif resulted in activity deficits and a structural perturbation revealed by limited proteolysis. Treatment of DHHC3 with chelating agents in vitro replicated both the specific structural perturbations and activity deficits observed in conserved cysteine mutants, suggesting metal ion-binding in the CRD. Using the fluorescent indicator mag-fura-2, the metal released from DHHC3 was identified as zinc. The stoichiometry of zinc binding was measured as 2 mol of zinc/mol of DHHC3 protein. Taken together, our data demonstrate that coordination of zinc ions by cysteine residues within the CRD is required for the structural integrity of DHHC proteins. PMID:26487721

  18. Interactions between N-acetyl-L-cysteine protected CdTe quantum dots and doxorubicin through spectroscopic method

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiupei; Lin, Jia; Liao, Xiulin; Zong, Yingying; Gao, Huanhuan

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • CdTe quantum dots with the diameter of 3–5 nm were synthesized in aqueous solution. • The modified CdTe quantum dots showed well fluorescence properties. • The interaction between the CdTe quantum dots and doxorubicin (DR) was investigated. - Abstract: N-acetyl-L-cysteine protected cadmium telluride quantum dots with a diameter of 3–5 nm were synthesized in aqueous solution. The interaction between N-acetyl-L-cysteine/cadmium telluride quantum dots and doxorubicin was investigated by ultraviolet–visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy at physiological conditions (pH 7.2, 37 °C). The results indicate that electron transfer has occurred between N-acetyl-L-cysteine/cadmium telluride quantum dots and doxorubicin under light illumination. The quantum dots react readily with doxorubicin to form a N-acetyl-L-cysteine/cadmium telluride-quantum dots/doxorubicin complex via electrostatic attraction between the −NH{sub 3}{sup +} moiety of doxorubicin and the −COO{sup −} moiety of N-acetyl-L-cysteine/cadmium telluride quantum dots. The interaction of N-acetyl-L-cysteine/cadmium telluride-quantum dots/doxorubicin complex with bovine serum albumin was studied as well, showing that the complex might induce the conformation change of bovine serum due to changes in microenvironment of bovine serum.

  19. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  20. Therapeutic NOTCH3 cysteine correction in CADASIL using exon skipping: in vitro proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Julie W; Dauwerse, Hans G; Peters, Dorien J M; Goldfarb, Andrew; Venselaar, Hanka; Haffner, Christof; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke M; Lesnik Oberstein, Saskia A J

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, or CADASIL, is a hereditary cerebral small vessel disease caused by characteristic cysteine altering missense mutations in theNOTCH3gene.NOTCH3mutations in CADASIL result in an uneven number of cysteine residues in one of the 34 epidermal growth factor like-repeat (EGFr) domains of the NOTCH3 protein. The consequence of an unpaired cysteine residue in an EGFr domain is an increased multimerization tendency of mutant NOTCH3, leading to toxic accumulation of the protein in the (cerebro)vasculature, and ultimately reduced cerebral blood flow, recurrent stroke and vascular dementia. There is no therapy to delay or alleviate symptoms in CADASIL. We hypothesized that exclusion of the mutant EGFr domain from NOTCH3 would abolish the detrimental effect of the unpaired cysteine and thus prevent toxic NOTCH3 accumulation and the negative cascade of events leading to CADASIL. To accomplish this NOTCH3 cysteine correction by EGFr domain exclusion, we used pre-mRNA antisense-mediated skipping of specificNOTCH3exons. Selection of these exons was achieved usingin silicostudies and based on the criterion that skipping of a particular exon or exon pair would modulate the protein in such a way that the mutant EGFr domain is eliminated, without otherwise corrupting NOTCH3 structure and function. Remarkably, we found that this strategy closely mimics evolutionary events, where the elimination and fusion of NOTCH EGFr domains led to the generation of four functional NOTCH homologues. We modelled a selection of exon skip strategies using cDNA constructs and show that the skip proteins retain normal protein processing, can bind ligand and be activated by ligand. We then determined the technical feasibility of targetedNOTCH3exon skipping, by designing antisense oligonucleotides targeting exons 2-3, 4-5 and 6, which together harbour the majority of distinct CADASIL-causing mutations. Transfection of

  1. First report on fish cysteine as a biomarker of contamination in the River Chenab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Bilal; Sultana, Tayyaba; Sultana, Salma; Mahboob, Shahid; Farooq, Muhammad; Al-Ghanim, Khalid; Nadeem, Shahid

    2016-08-01

    The eastern and southern parts of the Faisalabad city produce considerable quantities of industrial and municipal pollutants, much of which is drained into the River Chenab, reducing the productivity of fauna and flora in the river. This study was aimed to determine whether cysteine is useful as a biomarker of exposure to polluted fresh water. The amino acid profile of fish muscle was analyzed by paper chromatography in Cirrhinus mrigala and Labeo rohita from the River Chenab to determine habitat related variations due to the pollution from industrial and domestic sources. C. mrigala showed higher level of metal contamination in muscle tissues for Sn, Cr, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cu, and Cd when compared to L. rohita. Both fish species collected from polluted areas of the river Chenab showed significantly (P < 0.01) higher levels of metals in comparison to upstream and farmed fish. Farmed C. mrigala showed cysteine concentrations in the muscle tissue as 22 ± 1 mg/g dry weight, but concentrations increased to 45 ± 2 mg/g dry weight for fish from a mildly polluted section of the river, and further increased to 83 ± 2 mg/g dry weight in more heavily polluted sections. Cysteine concentration in farmed L. rohita was detected as 28 ± 2 and 25 ± 4 mg/g dry weight, respectively for farmed fish and fish from a mildly polluted section of the river, and then increased to 94 ± 3 mg/g dry weight for fish from highly polluted water. C. mrigala from a mildly polluted area of the river also had higher levels of cysteine in the muscle, along with increases in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and alanine. Elevated concentrations of cysteine seem to be associated with a threat to these fish species in polluted sections of the river, and thus may be used as a biomarker. PMID:27117257

  2. Mesure du taux de la capture radiative du muon par l'hydrogene liquide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkmans, Guy

    À basse énergie, l'interaction faible entre leptons et quarks est décrite par une interaction de la forme courant × courant de type V - A. La présence de l'interaction forte induit des couplages additionnels qui doivent être déterminés expérimentalement. De ceux-ci, le couplage pseudoscalaire induit, gp , est mesuré avec la plus grande incertitude et fait l'objet de la présente recherche. L'hypothèse du Courant Axial Partiellement Conservé (CAPC) et l'usage de la relation de Goldberger-Treiman relie gp au couplage axial ga . Cette relation a été vérifiée traditionnellement par la Capture Ordinaire du Muon (COM) à une valeur fixe du moment de transfert q. La Capture Radiative du Muon (CRM), m- p-->nnmg , est un meilleur outil pour l'étude de gp à cause de sa dépendance variable en q2 qui offre une plus grande sensibilité dans la partie à haute énergie du spectre des photons. Toutefois, le petit rapport d'embranchement (~10-8) de la CRM par rapport à la désintégration du muon a retardé cette mesure jusqu'à ce jour. La théorie et les difficultés expérimentales associées à la détection des photons de CRM sont présentées au deuxième chapitre. On décrit ensuite, au troisième chapitre, les composantes du système de détection. Ce détecteur est un spectromètre à paires de grand angle solide (~3p) et qui permet l'observation des photons par l'analyse des électrons et des positrons de photo-conversion. Ainsi, le bruit de fond important des neutrons de la COM ne constitue pas un problème pour cette mesure. Nous décrivons, au quatrième chapitre, toutes les étapes de l'analyse, nécessaires pour la réduction des multiples bruits de fond. Le cinquième chapitre présente le calcul des efficacités ainsi que l'estimation des erreurs systématiques. Le sixième chapitre démontre comment l'on extrait le rapport d'embranchement pour la CRM ainsi que la valeur ae gp . On insiste sur la dépendance de gp en fonction de la valeur de

  3. The Pic du Midi solar survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koechlin, L.

    2015-12-01

    We carry a long term survey of the solar activity with our coronagraphic system at Pic du Midi de Bigorre in the French Pyrenees (CLIMSO). It is a set of two solar telescopes and two coronagraphs, taking one frame per minute for each of the four channels : Solar disk in H-α (656.28 nm), prominences in H-α, disk in Ca II (393.3 nm), prominences in He I (1083 nm), all year long, weather permitting. Since 2015 we also take images of the FeXIII corona (1074.7 nm) at the rate of one every 10 minutes. These images cover a large field: 1.25 solar diameter, 2k*2K pixels, and are freely downloadable form a database. The improvements made since 2015 concern an autoguiding system for better centering of the solar disk behind the coronagraphic masks, and a new Fe XIII channel at λ=1074.7 nm. In the near future we plan to provide radial velocity maps of the disc and polarimetry maps of the disk and corona. This survey took its present form in 2007 and we plan to maintain image acquisition in the same or better experimental conditions for a long period: one or several solar cycles if possible. During the partial solar eclipse of March 20, 2015, the CLIMSO instruments and the staff at Pic du Midi operating it have provided several millions internet users with real time images of the Sun and Moon during all the phenomenon.

  4. Élimination du bore du silicium par plasma inductif sous champ électrique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, R.; Morvan, D.; Picard, G.; Amouroux, J.

    1993-05-01

    We analyzed purification mechanisms of silicon by inductive plasma with a fluoride slag. The aim is to study boron elimination from doped electronic grade silicon in function of the nature of the slag to obtain a photovoltaic grade silicon. The steady began with the calculation and the comparison of the stability diagram of boron compounds in presence of CaF2, BaF2 and MgF2. This study led us to conclude that BaF2 is the better slag for silicon purification. This has been confirmed by experience. In a second time, we made purifications under electric bias to enhance slag efficiency. We noticed that BaF2 is more sensitive to electric bias than other slags. Nous avons analysé le mécanisme de purification du silicium sous plasma inductif en présence d'un laitier fluoré. L'objectif principal est d'étudier l'élimination du bore du silicium électronique dopé en fonction de la nature du fluorure pour obtenir un silicium de qualité photovoltaïque. L'étude a commencé par l'établissement et la comparaison de diagrammes des composés du bore en présence de CaF2, de MgF2 et de BaF2. Nous avons déduit de cette première étude que BaF2 est le meilleur laitier pour la purification du silicium. Ceci a été corroboré par l'expérience. Nous avons ensuite opéré en présence d'un champ électrique dans le but d'améliorer encore l'efficacité des laitiers. Nous avons constaté que BaF2 est plus sensible au champ électrique que les deux autres laitiers utilisés.

  5. Wide distribution of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms: isolation and cloning of novel snake venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuo; Hyodo, Fumiko; Morita, Takashi

    2003-04-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are found in epididymis and granules of mammals, and they are thought to function in sperm maturation and in the immune system. Recently, we isolated and obtained clones for novel snake venom proteins that are classified as CRISP family proteins. To elucidate the distribution of snake venom CRISP family proteins, we evaluated a wide range of venoms for immuno-cross-reactivity. Then we isolated, characterized, and cloned genes for three novel CRISP family proteins (piscivorin, ophanin, and catrin) from the venom of eastern cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus piscivorus), king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). Our results show the wide distribution of snake venom CRISP family proteins among Viperidae and Elapidae from different continents, indicating that CRISP family proteins compose a new group of snake venom proteins. PMID:12646276

  6. Pharmacokinetics and N-acetylation metabolism of S-methyl-l-cysteine and trans-S-1-propenyl-l-cysteine in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hirotaka; Kazamori, Daichi; Itoh, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    1. Pharmacokinetics and N-acetylation metabolism of S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMC) and trans-S-1-propenyl-L-cysteine (S1PC) were examined in rats and dogs. SMC and S1PC (2-5 mg/kg) were well absorbed in both species with high bioavailability (88-100%). 2. SMC and S1PC were excreted only to a small extent in the urine of rats and dogs. The small renal clearance values (<0.03 l/h/kg) indicated the extensive renal reabsorption of SMC and S1PC, which potentially contributed to their long elimination half-lives (>5 h) in dogs. 3. S1PC, but not SMC, underwent N-acetylation extensively in vivo, which can be explained by the relative activities of N-acetylation of S1PC/SMC and deacetylation of their N-acetylated forms, N-acetyl-S1PC/N-acetyl-SMC, in the liver and kidney in vitro. The activities for S1PC N-acetylation were similar to or higher than those for N-acetyl-S1PC deacetylation in liver S9 fractions of rat and dog, whereas liver and kidney S9 fractions of rat and dog had little activity for SMC N-acetylation or considerably higher activities for N-acetyl-SMC deacetylation. 4. Our study demonstrated that the pharmacokinetics of SMC and S1PC in rats and dogs was characterized by high bioavailability and extensive renal reabsorption; however, the extent of undergoing the N-acetylation metabolism was extremely different between SMC and S1PC. PMID:26887651

  7. Annuaire du Bureau des longitudes - 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imcce; Bureau Des Longitudes

    2005-07-01

    This annual publication provides ephemerides and data to the use of professionnal and amateur astronomers. Divided in 11 chapters it covers concordance of various calendars, explanation of fondamental astronomy and various time scales, explanation for the use of ephemerides; tables provide ephemerides (positions, rise/set/passage) of the Sun and the Moon, planets, planetary satellites, asteroids, comets, bright stars; data and explanation for the physical observation of the surface of the Sun, the Moon, and planets; chart of the sky and a list of constellations and galaxies; prediction and ephemerides for astronomical phenomenon: occultation by the moon, stellar occultations by asteroids and appulses, solar eclipses and lunar eclipses; and an additional review about a hot scientific topic, this year: "Legendre et le méridien terrestre, 200 ans après". Cette publication annuelle fournit des éphémérides et des données à l'usage des astronomes professionnels et des astronomes amateurs. Composée de 11 chapitres elle comprend les rubriques sur les différents calendriers et leurs concordance, les fêtes légales en France, les dates et décrets sur les heures légales en France métropolitaine ; une introduction à l'astronomie fondamentale et aux différentes échelles de temps, des explications sur l'utilisation des éphémérides ; des tables fournissent les éphémérides (positions, heures de lever/coucher/passage) du Soleil et de la Lune, de planètes, de satellites naturels, d'astéroïdes, de comètes, d'étoiles brillantes ; des données pour l'observation de la surface du Soleil, de la Lune, et des planètes ; des cartes du ciel ainsi qu'une liste de constellations et de galaxies ; des prédictions des phénomènes astronomiques : occultation par la Lune, occultation stellaires par des astéroïdes et appulses, éclipses de Soleil et de la Lune; la liste et les coordonnées des observatoires astronomiques les plus connus ; et enfin un cahier th

  8. High oxygen modifies vasodilator effect of cysteine via enhanced oxidative stress and thromboxane production in the rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Feng, Guo-Gang; Li, Jiazheng; Nakamura, Emi; Hayashi, Hisaki; Sato, Motohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Whether high oxygen is harmful to the vascular function is unclear. The present study examined if high oxygen modifies vasodilator effect of cysteine via enhanced oxidative stress and thromboxane production. Rat mesenteric arteries with endothelium at 95 or 50 % oxygen were subjected to isometric force recordings, measurement of thromboxane B2 levels, determination of superoxide and peroxynitrite levels and evaluation of NADPH oxidase subunit protein expression, respectively. L-cysteine (0.01-3 mM) constricted or dilated arteries at 95 and 50 % oxygen, respectively. Thromboxane receptor antagonist SQ-29,548 (1 μM) abolished the constriction at 95 % oxygen. L-cysteine (3 mM) increased levels of thromboxane B2 in arteries upon 95 % oxygen application. L-cysteine relaxed arteries treated with superoxide inhibitor tiron (2 mM) or NADPH oxidase inhibitor gp91ds-tat (1 μM) irrespective of the oxygen concentration while ATP-sensitive K(+) channel inhibitor glibenclamide (1 μM) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) inhibitor DL-propargylglycine (10 mM) similarly abolished the relaxation. L-cysteine (3 mM) with 95 % oxygen augmented levels of superoxide as well as nitrotyrosine within the artery, concomitantly with enhanced membrane protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunit p47phox. The higher concentration of oxygen attenuates L-cysteine-induced vasodilation via superoxide production mediated by NADPH oxidase along with thromboxane A2 production, resulting in vasoconstriction. The increased levels of superoxide, as well as peroxynitrite, coexist with the impaired vasodilation related to ATP-sensitive K(+) channels and CSE. Higher oxygen with plasma cysteine may cause oxidative stress and vasoconstrictor prostanoid production in blood vessels. PMID:27389323

  9. Effect of cysteine and humic acids on bioavailability of Ag from Ag nanoparticles to a freshwater snail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Tasha Stoiber; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Isabelle Romer; Ruth Merrifeild; Jamie Lead

    2016-01-01

    Metal-based engineered nanoparticles (NPs) will undergo transformations that will affect their bioavailability, toxicity and ecological risk when released to the environment, including interactions with dissolved organic material. The purpose of this paper is to determine how interactions with two different types of organic material affect the bioavailability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Silver uptake rates by the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis were determined after exposure to 25 nmol l-1 of Ag as PVP AgNPs, PEG AgNPs or AgNO3, in the presence of either Suwannee River humic acid or cysteine, a high-affinity thiol-rich organic ligand. Total uptake rate of Ag from the two NPs was either increased or not strongly affected in the presence of 1 – 10 mg 1-1 humic acid. Humic substances contain relatively few strong ligands for Ag explaining their limited effects on Ag uptake rate. In contrast, Ag uptake rate was substantially reduced by cysteine. Three components of uptake from the AgNPs were quantified in the presence of cysteine using a biodynamic modeling approach: uptake of dissolved Ag released by the AgNPs, uptake of a polymer or large (>3kD) Ag-cysteine complex and uptake of the nanoparticle itself. Addition of 1:1 Ag:cysteine reduced concentrations of dissolved Ag, which contributed to, but did not fully explain the reductions in uptake. A bioavailable Ag-cysteine complex (> 3kD) appeared to be the dominant avenue of uptake from both PVP AgNPs and PEG AgNPs in the presence of cysteine. Quantifying the different avenues of uptake sets the stage for studies to assess toxicity unique to NPs.

  10. Identification of the reactive cysteine residue (Cys227) in human carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Tinguely, J N; Wermuth, B

    1999-02-01

    Carbonyl reductase is highly susceptible to inactivation by organomercurials suggesting the presence of a reactive cysteine residue in, or close to, the active site. This residue is also close to a site which binds glutathione. Structurally, carbonyl reductase belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family and contains five cysteine residues, none of which is conserved within the family. In order to identify the reactive residue and investigate its possible role in glutathione binding, alanine was substituted for each cysteine residue of human carbonyl reductase by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Four of the five mutants (C26A, C122A C150A and C226A) exhibited wild-type-like enzyme activity, although K(m) values of C226A for three structurally different substrates were increased threefold to 10-fold. The fifth mutant, C227A, showed a 10-15-fold decrease in kcat and a threefold to 40-fold increase in K(m), resulting in a 30-500-fold drop in kcat/K(m). NaCl (300 mM) increased the activity of C227A 16-fold, whereas the activity of the wild-type enzyme was only doubled. Substitution of serine rather than alanine for Cys227 similarly affected the kinetic constants with the exception that NaCl did not activate the enzyme. Both C227A and C227S mutants were insensitive to inactivation by 4-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Unlike the parent carbonyl compounds, the glutathione adducts of menadione and prostaglandin A1 were better substrates for the C227A and C227S mutants than the wild-type enzyme. Conversely, the binding of free glutathione to both mutants was reduced. Our findings indicate that Cys227 is the reactive residue and suggest that it is involved in the binding of both substrate and glutathione. PMID:10091578

  11. Can N-acetyl-L-cysteine affect zinc metabolism when used as a paracetamol antidote?

    PubMed

    Brumas, V; Hacht, B; Filella, M; Berthon, G

    1992-07-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) has long been used in the treatment of chronic lung diseases. Inhalation and oral administration of the drug are both effective in reducing mucus viscosity. In addition, NAC oral therapy allows to restore normal mucoprotein secretion in the long term. Although displaying heavy metal-complexing potential, NAC exerts no detectable influence on the metabolism of essential trace metals when used in the above context (i.e. at doses near 600 mg day-1). However, this may no longer be the case when NAC is used as an oxygen radical scavenger, like in the treatment of paracetamol poisoning. In the latter case, intravenous doses as high as 20 g day-1 are administered, which may induce excessive zinc urinary excretion. In order to allow a better appreciation of the risk of zinc depletion during NAC therapy, the present work addresses the role of this drug towards zinc metabolism at the molecular level. First, formation constants for zinc-NAC complexes have been determined under physiological conditions. Then, computer simulations for blood plasma and gastrointestinal fluid have been run to assess the influence of NAC and its metabolites (e.g. cysteine and glutathione) on zinc excretion and absorption. Blood plasma simulations reveal that NAC can effectively mobilise an important fraction of zinc into urinary excretable complexes as from concentrations of 10(-3) mol dm-3 (which corresponds to a dose of about 800 mg). This effect can still be enhanced by the action of NAC metabolites, among which cysteine is the most powerful zinc sequestering agent. In contrast, simulations relative to gastrointestinal conditions suggest that NAC should tend to increase zinc absorption, regardless of its dose. PMID:1529808

  12. Cysteine and Aspartyl Proteases Contribute to Protein Digestion in the Gut of Freshwater Planaria.

    PubMed

    Goupil, Louise S; Ivry, Sam L; Hsieh, Ivy; Suzuki, Brian M; Craik, Charles S; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; McKerrow, James H

    2016-08-01

    Proteases perform numerous vital functions in flatworms, many of which are likely to be conserved throughout the phylum Platyhelminthes. Within this phylum are several parasitic worms that are often poorly characterized due to their complex life-cycles and lack of responsiveness to genetic manipulation. The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea, or planaria, is an ideal model organism to study the complex role of protein digestion due to its simple life cycle and amenability to techniques like RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, we were interested in deconvoluting the digestive protease system that exists in the planarian gut. To do this, we developed an alcohol-induced regurgitation technique to enrich for the gut enzymes in S. mediterranea. Using a panel of fluorescent substrates, we show that this treatment produces a sharp increase in proteolytic activity. These enzymes have broad yet diverse substrate specificity profiles. Proteomic analysis of the gut contents revealed the presence of cysteine and metallo-proteases. However, treatment with class-specific inhibitors showed that aspartyl and cysteine proteases are responsible for the majority of protein digestion. Specific RNAi knockdown of the cathepsin B-like cysteine protease (SmedCB) reduced protein degradation in vivo. Immunohistochemistry and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) confirmed that the full-length and active forms of SmedCB are found in secretory cells surrounding the planaria intestinal lumen. Finally, we show that the knockdown of SmedCB reduces the speed of tissue regeneration. Defining the roles of proteases in planaria can provide insight to functions of conserved proteases in parasitic flatworms, potentially uncovering drug targets in parasites. PMID:27501047

  13. Conserved cysteine residues in the pore region are obligatory for human TRPM2 channel function

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Zhu-Zhong; Mao, Hong-Ju; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2006-01-01

    TRPM2 proteins belong to the melastatin-related transient receptor potential or TRPM subfamily and form Ca2+-permeable cationic channels activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphoribose (ADPR). The TRPM2 channel subunit, like all its close relatives, is structurally homologous to the well-characterized voltage-gated potassium channel subunits, each containing six transmembrane segments and a putative pore loop between the fifth and sixth segments. Nevertheless, the structural elements determining the TRPM2 channel functions are still not well understood. In this study, we investigated the functional role of two conserved cysteine residues (at positions 996 and 1008) in the putative pore region of the human TRPM2 by site-directed mutagenesis combined with electrophysiological and biochemical approaches. Expression of wild type hTRPM2 channels in HEK293 cells resulted in robust ADPR-evoked currents. Substitution of cysteine with alanine or serine generated mutant channels that failed to be activated by ADPR. Furthermore, experiments by Western blotting, immunocytochemistry, biotin labelling, and co-immunoprecipitation techniques showed no obvious changes in protein expression, trafficking or membrane localisation, and the ability of interacting with neighbouring subunits that is required for channel assembly. Co-expression of wild type and mutant subunits significantly reduced the ADPR-evoked currents; for combination of wild type and C996S mutant subunits, the reduction was approximately 95%, indicating that incorporation of one or more non-functional C996S subunits leads to the loss of channel function. These results taken together suggest that the cysteine residues in the pore region are obligatory for TRPM2 channel function. PMID:16822940

  14. Cysteine and Aspartyl Proteases Contribute to Protein Digestion in the Gut of Freshwater Planaria

    PubMed Central

    Goupil, Louise S.; Ivry, Sam L.; Hsieh, Ivy; Suzuki, Brian M.; Craik, Charles S.; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; McKerrow, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Proteases perform numerous vital functions in flatworms, many of which are likely to be conserved throughout the phylum Platyhelminthes. Within this phylum are several parasitic worms that are often poorly characterized due to their complex life-cycles and lack of responsiveness to genetic manipulation. The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea, or planaria, is an ideal model organism to study the complex role of protein digestion due to its simple life cycle and amenability to techniques like RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, we were interested in deconvoluting the digestive protease system that exists in the planarian gut. To do this, we developed an alcohol-induced regurgitation technique to enrich for the gut enzymes in S. mediterranea. Using a panel of fluorescent substrates, we show that this treatment produces a sharp increase in proteolytic activity. These enzymes have broad yet diverse substrate specificity profiles. Proteomic analysis of the gut contents revealed the presence of cysteine and metallo-proteases. However, treatment with class-specific inhibitors showed that aspartyl and cysteine proteases are responsible for the majority of protein digestion. Specific RNAi knockdown of the cathepsin B-like cysteine protease (SmedCB) reduced protein degradation in vivo. Immunohistochemistry and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) confirmed that the full-length and active forms of SmedCB are found in secretory cells surrounding the planaria intestinal lumen. Finally, we show that the knockdown of SmedCB reduces the speed of tissue regeneration. Defining the roles of proteases in planaria can provide insight to functions of conserved proteases in parasitic flatworms, potentially uncovering drug targets in parasites. PMID:27501047

  15. Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence Factor Gingipain RgpB Shows a Unique Zymogenic Mechanism for Cysteine Peptidases*

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Iñaki; Veillard, Florian T.; Guevara, Tibisay; Potempa, Barbara; Sztukowska, Maryta; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Zymogenicity is a regulatory mechanism that prevents inadequate catalytic activity in the wrong context. It plays a central role in maintaining microbial virulence factors in an inactive form inside the pathogen until secretion. Among these virulence factors is the cysteine peptidase gingipain B (RgpB), which is the major virulence factor secreted by the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis that attacks host vasculature and defense proteins. The structure of the complex between soluble mature RgpB, consisting of a catalytic domain and an immunoglobulin superfamily domain, and its 205-residue N-terminal prodomain, the largest structurally characterized to date for a cysteine peptidase, reveals a novel fold for the prodomain that is distantly related to sugar-binding lectins. It attaches laterally to the catalytic domain through a large concave surface. The main determinant for latency is a surface “inhibitory loop,” which approaches the active-site cleft of the enzyme on its non-primed side in a substrate-like manner. It inserts an arginine (Arg126) into the S1 pocket, thus matching the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Downstream of Arg126, the polypeptide leaves the cleft, thereby preventing cleavage. Moreover, the carbonyl group of Arg126 establishes a very strong hydrogen bond with the co-catalytic histidine, His440, pulling it away from the catalytic cysteine, Cys473, and toward Glu381, which probably plays a role in orienting the side chain of His440 during catalysis. The present results provide the structural determinants of zymogenic inhibition of RgpB by way of a novel inhibitory mechanism for peptidases in general and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies in the treatment of human periodontal disease. PMID:23558682

  16. Purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Elucidating the role of a conserved cysteine in adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danielle V; Brown, Anne M; Xu, Huimin; Bevan, David R; White, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Adenine deaminases (Ade) and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferases (Hpt) are widely distributed enzymes involved in purine salvage. Characterization of the previously uncharacterized Ade (MJ1459 gene product) and Hpt (MJ1655 gene product) are discussed here and provide insight into purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Ade was demonstrated to use either Fe(II) and/or Mn(II) as the catalytic metal. Hpt demonstrated no detectable activity with adenine, but was equally specific for hypoxanthine and guanine with a kcat /KM of 3.2 × 10(7) and 3.0 × 10(7) s(- 1) M(- 1) , respectively. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine and IMP are the central metabolites in purine salvage in M. jannaschii for AMP and GMP production. A conserved cysteine (C127, M. jannaschii numbering) was examined due to its high conservation in bacterial and archaeal homologues. To assess the role of this highly conserved cysteine in M. jannaschii Ade, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. It was determined that mutation to serine (C127S) completely abolished Ade activity and mutation to alanine (C127A) exhibited 10-fold decrease in kcat over the wild type Ade. To further investigate the role of C127, detailed molecular docking and dynamics studies were performed and revealed adenine was unable to properly orient in the active site in the C127A and C127S Ade model structures due to distinct differences in active site conformation and rotation of D261. Together this work illuminates purine salvage in M. jannaschii and the critical role of a cysteine residue in maintaining active site conformation of Ade. Proteins 2016; 84:828-840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990095

  17. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors. PMID:27165526

  18. Structure-Function Studies of Claudin Extracellular Domains by Cysteine-scanning Mutagenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Angelow, Susanne; Yu, Alan S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Claudins form size- and charge-selective pores in the tight junction that control the paracellular flux of inorganic ions and small molecules. However, the structural basis for ion selectivity of paracellular pores is poorly understood. Here we applied cysteine scanning to map the paracellular pathway of ion permeation across claudin-2-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney type I cells. Four potential pore-lining amino acid residues in the first extracellular loop were mutated to cysteine and screened for their accessibility to thiol-reactive reagents. All mutants were functional except D65C, which formed dimers by intermolecular disulfide bonding, leading to a loss of charge and size selectivity. This suggests that claudin-2 pores are multimeric and that Asp65 lies close to a protein-protein interface. Methanethiosulfonate reagents of different size and charge and the organic mercury derivate, p-(chloromercuri)benzenesulfonic acid, significantly decreased paracellular ion permeation across I66C-transfected cells by a mechanism that suggests steric blocking of the pore. The conductance of wild-type claudin-2 and the other cysteine mutants was only weakly affected. The rate of reaction with I66C decreased dramatically with increasing size of the reagent, suggesting that Ile66 is buried deep within a narrow segment of the pore with its side group facing into the lumen. Furthermore, labeling with N-biotinoylaminoethyl methanethiosulfonate showed that I66C was weakly reactive, whereas Y35C was strongly reactive, suggesting that Tyr35 is located at the protein surface outside of the pore. PMID:19690347

  19. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  20. Bmcystatin, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor characterized from the tick Boophilus microplus

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Cassia A.; Sasaki, Sergio D.; Tanaka, Aparecida S. . E-mail: Tanaka.bioq@epm.br

    2006-08-18

    The bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is a blood-sucking animal, which is responsible for Babesia spp and Anaplasma marginale transmission for cattle. From a B. microplus fat body cDNA library, 465 selected clones were sequenced randomly and resulted in 60 Contigs. An open reading frame (ORF) contains 98 amino acids named Bmcystatin, due to 70% amino acid identity to a classical type 1 cystatin from Ixodes scapularis tick (GenBank Accession No. DQ066227). The Bmcystatin amino acid sequence analysis showed two cysteine residues, theoretical pI of 5.92 and M{sub r} of 11kDa. Bmcystatin gene was cloned in pET 26b vector and the protein expressed using bacteria Escherichia coli BL21 SI. Recombinant Bmcystatin (rBmcystatin) purified by affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA-agarose column and ionic exchange chromatography on HiTrap Q column presented molecular mass of 11kDa, by SDS-PAGE and the N-terminal amino acid sequenced revealed unprocessed N-terminal containing part of pelB signal sequence. Purified rBmcystatin showed to be a C1 cysteine peptidase inhibitor with K{sub i} value of 0.1 and 0.6nM for human cathepsin L and VTDCE (vitellin degrading cysteine endopeptidase), respectively. The rBmcystatin expression analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the amplification of a specific DNA sequence (294bp) in the fat body and ovary cDNA preparation. On the other hand, a protein band was detected in the fat body, ovary, and the salivary gland extracts using anti-Bmcystatin antibody by Western blot. The present results suggest a possible role of Bmcystatin in the ovary, even though the gene was cloned from the fat body, which could be another site of this protein synthesis.

  1. Cysteine pK[subscript a] Depression by a Protonated Glutamic Acid in Human DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, Anna C.; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Remington, Benjamin C.; Hasim, Sahar; Pozharski, Edwin; Wilson, Mark A.

    2008-07-09

    Human DJ-1, a disease-associated protein that protects cells from oxidative stress, contains an oxidation-sensitive cysteine (C106) that is essential for its cytoprotective activity. The origin of C106 reactivity is obscure, due in part to the absence of an experimentally determined pK{sub a} value for this residue. We have used atomic-resolution X-ray crystallography and UV spectroscopy to show that C106 has a depressed pK{sub a} of 5.4 {+-} 0.1 and that the C106 thiolate accepts a hydrogen bond from a protonated glutamic acid side chain (E18). X-ray crystal structures and cysteine pK{sub a} analysis of several site-directed substitutions at residue 18 demonstrate that the protonated carboxylic acid side chain of E18 is required for the maximal stabilization of the C106 thiolate. A nearby arginine residue (R48) participates in a guanidinium stacking interaction with R28 from the other monomer in the DJ-1 dimer and elevates the pK{sub a} of C106 by binding an anion that electrostatically suppresses thiol ionization. Our results show that the ionizable residues (E18, R48, and R28) surrounding C106 affect its pK{sub a} in a way that is contrary to expectations based on the typical ionization behavior of glutamic acid and arginine. Lastly, a search of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) produces several candidate hydrogen-bonded aspartic/glutamic acid-cysteine interactions, which we propose are particularly common in the DJ-1 superfamily.

  2. Identification and characterization of a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease from Gnathostoma spinigerum.

    PubMed

    Kongkerd, Natthawan; Uparanukraw, Pichart; Morakote, Nimit; Sajid, Mohammed; McKerrow, James H

    2008-08-01

    Gnathostoma spinigerum is a causative agent of human gnathostomiasis, a common parasitic disease involving skin and visceral organs, especially the central nervous system. In this study, we identified a cDNA encoding a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease (GsCL1) from the lambdaZAP cDNA library of G. spinigerum advanced third-stage larva (aL3) and characterized the biochemical properties of the recombinant enzyme. The cloned cDNA of 1484bp encoded 398 amino acids which contained a typical signal peptide sequence (23 amino acids), a pro-domain (156 amino acids), and a mature domain (219 amino acids) with an approximate molecular weight of 24kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of GsCL1 gene showed 53-64% identity to cathepsin L proteases of various organisms including a cathepsin L family member (cpl-1) of Caenorhabditis elegans. Recombinant proGsCL1 expressed in Pichia pastoris showed typical biochemical characteristics of cysteine proteases. The expressed enzyme displayed optimal protease activity toward Z-Phe-Arg-AMC substrate at pH 6.0 but not toward Z-Arg-Arg-AMC. The activity was sensitive to cysteine protease inhibitors E-64 and K11777. The preference for large hydrophilic and aromatic residues in the P2 position (I, L, F, W, U, V) was typical of cathepsin L proteases. Mouse anti-GST-proGsCL1 serum showed reactivity with 35-, 38- and 45-kDa proteins in the aL3 extracts. These proteins were shown to localize inside the intestinal cells of aL3. PMID:18554733

  3. Desorption of Mercury(II) on Kaolinite in the Presence of Oxalate or Cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Senevirathna, W. U.; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of Hg(II) on clay minerals can impact the biogeochemical cycle and bio- uptake of Hg in aquatic systems. We studied the desorption of Hg(II) on kaolinite in the presence of oxalate or cysteine, representing the ligands with carboxylic and thiol groups of different affinities for Hg(II). The effects of pH (3, 5, 7), ligand concentration (0.25, 1.0 mM), and temperature (15, 25, 35 C) on the Hg(II) desorption were investigated through desorption kinetics. Our study showed that the Hg(II) desorption was pH-dependant. In the absence of any organic ligand, >90% of the previously adsorbed Hg(II) desorbed at pH 3 within 2 h, compared to <10% at pH 7. Similar results were observed in the presence of oxalate, showing that it hardly affected the Hg(II) desorption. Cysteine inhibited the Hg(II) desorption significantly at all the pH tested, especially in the first 80 min with the desorption less than 20%, but it appeared to enhance the Hg(II) desorption afterwards. The effect of ligand concentration on the Hg(II) desorption was small, especially in the presence of oxalate. The effect of temperature on the desorption was nearly insignificant. The effect of the organic acids on the Hg(II) sorption and desorption is explained by the formation of the ternary surface complexes involving the mineral, ligand, and Hg(II). The competition for Hg(II) between the cysteine molecules adsorbed on the particles and in the solution probably can also affect the Hg(II) desorption.

  4. Le mouvement du pôle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Les variations de la rotation terrestre. En conditionnant à la fois notre vie quotidienne, notre perception du ciel, et bon nombre de phénomènes géophysiques comme la formation des cyclones, la rotation de la Terre se trouve au croisement de plusieurs disciplines. Si le phenomena se faisait uniformément, le sujet serait vite discuté, mais c'est parce que la rotation terrestre varie, même imperceptiblement pour nos sens, dans sa vitesse angulaire comme dans la direction de son axe, qu'elle suscite un grand intérêt. D'abord pour des raisons pratiques : non seulement les aléas de la rotation terrestre modi_ent à la longue les pointés astrométriques à un instant donné de la journée mais in_uencent aussi les mesures opérées par les techniques spatiales ; en consequence l'exploitation de ces mesures, par exemple pour déterminer les orbites des satellites impliqués ou pratiquer le positionnement au sol, nécessite une connaissance précise de ces variations. Plus fondamentalement, elles traduisent les propriétés globales de la Terre comme les processus physiques qui s'y déroulent, si bien qu'en analysant les causes des fluctuations observées, on dispose d'un moyen de mieux connaître notre globe. La découverte progressive des fluctuations de la rotation de la Terre a une longue histoire. Sous l'angle des techniques d'observation, trois époques se pro-celle du pointé astrométrique à l'oeil nu, à l'aide d'instruments en bois ou métalliques (quart de cercle muraux par exemple). À partir du XVIIe siècle débute l'astrométrie télescopique dont les pointés sont complétés par des datations de plus en plus précises grâce à l'invention d'horloges régulées par balancier. Cette deuxième époque se termine vers 1960, avec l'avènement des techniques spatiales : les pointés astrométriques sont délaissés au profit de la mesure ultra-précise de durées ou de fréquences de signaux électromagnétiques, grâce à l'invention des horloges

  5. Carte du Ciel, San Fernando zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, C.

    2014-06-01

    An updated summary of a future large astrometric catalogue is presented, based on the two most important astrometric projects carried out by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada de San Fernando (ROA). The goal is to make a catalogue of positions and proper motions based on ROA's Cart du Ciel (CdC) and the Astrographic Catalogue (AC) San Fernando zone plates, and the HAMC2 meridian circle catalogue. The CdC and AC plates are being reduced together to provide first-epoch positions while HAMC2 will provide second-epoch ones. New techniques have been applied, that range from using a commercial flatbed scanner to the proper reduction schemes to avoid systematics from it. Only thirty plates (out of 540) remain to be processed, due to scanning problems that are being solved.

  6. Classification moléculaire du cancer du sein au Maroc

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Abbass; Yousra, Akasbi; Kaoutar, Znati; Omar, El Mesbahi; Afaf, Amarti; Sanae, Bennis

    2012-01-01

    Introduction La classification moléculaire des cancers du sein basée sur l'expression génique puis sur le profil protéique a permis de distinguer cinq groupes moléculaires: luminal A, luminal B, Her2/neu, basal-like et non-classées. L'objectif de cette étude réalisée au CHU Hassan II de Fès est de classer 335 cancers du sein infiltrant en groupes moléculaires, puis de les corréler avec les caractéristiques clinicopathologiques. Méthodes Etude rétrospective étalée sur 45 mois, comportant 335 patientes colligées au CHU pour le diagnostic et le suivi. Les tumeurs sont analysées histologiquement et classées après une étude immunohistochimique en groupes: luminal A, luminal B, Her2+, basal-like et non-classées. Résultats 54.3% des tumeurs sont du groupe luminal A, 16% luminal B, 11.3% Her2+, 11.3% basal-like et 7% non-classées. Le groupe luminal A renferme le plus faible taux de grade III, d'emboles vasculaires ainsi que de métastases; alors que le groupe des non-classées et basal-like représentent un taux élevé de grade III, une faible proportion d'emboles vasculaires et d'envahissement ganglionnaire. Ces facteurs sont significativement élevés dans les groupes luminal B et Her2+ avec un taux de survie globale de 78% et 76% respectivement. Dans le groupe luminal A, la survie globale des patientes est élevée (87%) alors qu'elle n'est que de 49% dans le groupe des triples négatifs (basal-like et non-classés). Conclusion Le groupe luminal B est différent du luminal A et il est de pronostic péjoratif vis à vis du groupe Her2+. Les caractéristiques clinicopathologiques concordent avec le profil moléculaire donc devraient être pris en considération comme facteurs pronostiques. PMID:23396646

  7. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-09-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake Ac

  8. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-01-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake Ac

  9. Identification of natural inhibitors of Entamoeba histolytica cysteine synthase from microbial secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Mihoko; Jeelani, Ghulam; Masuda, Yui; Sakai, Kazunari; Tsukui, Kumiko; Waluyo, Danang; Tarwadi; Watanabe, Yoshio; Nonaka, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shiomi, Kazuro

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis is a common worldwide diarrheal disease, caused by the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. Metronidazole has been a drug of choice against amebiasis for decades despite its known side effects and low efficacy against asymptomatic cyst carriers. E. histolytica is also capable of surviving sub-therapeutic levels of metronidazole in vitro. Novel drugs with different mode of action are therefore urgently needed. The sulfur assimilatory de novo L-cysteine biosynthetic pathway is essential for various cellular activities, including the proliferation and anti-oxidative defense of E. histolytica. Since the pathway, consisting of two reactions catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS, O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase), does not exist in humans, it is a rational drug target against amebiasis. To discover inhibitors against the CS of E. histolytica (EhCS), the compounds of Kitasato Natural Products Library were screened against two recombinant CS isozymes: EhCS1 and EhCS3. Nine compounds inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3 with IC50 values of 0.31–490 μM. Of those, seven compounds share a naphthoquinone moiety, indicating the structural importance of the moiety for binding to the active site of EhCS1 and EhCS3. We further screened >9,000 microbial broths for CS inhibition and purified two compounds, xanthofulvin and exophillic acid from fungal broths. Xanthofulvin inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3. Exophillic acid showed high selectivity against EhCS1, but exhibited no inhibition against EhCS3. In vitro anti-amebic activity of the 11 EhCS inhibitors was also examined. Deacetylkinamycin C and nanaomycin A showed more potent amebicidal activity with IC50 values of 18 and 0.8 μM, respectively, in the cysteine deprived conditions. The differential sensitivity of trophozoites against deacetylkinamycin C in the presence or absence of L-cysteine in the medium and the IC50 values against EhCS suggest the amebicidal effect of deacetylkinamycin C is due to

  10. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  11. The human SNARE protein Ykt6 mediates its own palmitoylation at C-terminal cysteine residues

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The yeast SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor) protein Ykt6 was shown to mediate palmitoylation of the fusion factor Vac8 in a reaction essential for the fusion of vacuoles. Here I present evidence that hYkt6 (human Ykt6) has self-palmitoylating activity. Incubation of recombinant hYkt6 with [3H]Pal-CoA ([3H]palmitoyl-CoA) leads to covalent attachment of palmitate to C-terminal cysteine residues. The N-terminal domain of human Ykt6 contains a Pal-CoA binding site and is required for the reaction. PMID:15479160

  12. Sclerostin binds and regulates the activity of cysteine-rich protein 61

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Theodore A.; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Kumar, Rajiv

    2010-01-29

    Sclerostin, a secreted glycoprotein, regulates osteoblast function. Using yeast two-hybrid and direct protein interaction analyses, we demonstrate that sclerostin binds the Wnt-modulating and Wnt-modulated, extracellular matrix protein, cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61, CCN1), which regulates mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation, osteoblast and osteoclast function, and angiogenesis. Sclerostin was shown to inhibit Cyr61-mediated fibroblast attachment, and Cyr61 together with sclerostin increases vascular endothelial cell migration and increases osteoblast cell division. The data show that sclerostin binds to and influences the activity of Cyr61.

  13. Multiple cysteine proteinase forms during the life cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum revealed by electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    North, M J; Scott, K I; Lockwood, B C

    1988-01-01

    Proteinases of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum have been analysed using electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels containing gelatin (gelatin/PAGE). Multiple proteinase forms were apparent in vegetative myxamoebae, but the presence of individual enzyme forms depended on the manner in which the cells were grown. Axenic cells had a characteristic A-pattern of proteinases consisting of six bands, the most active enzymes having apparent Mr values of 51,000 and 45,000 (these have been named ddCP51 and ddCP45, respectively). Some of the proteinases were also present in the medium, the major extracellular form was ddCP42, a 42,000-Mr enzyme. Cells grown in association with bacteria had a distinct B-pattern with three main enzymes that had apparent Mr values of 48,000, 43,000 and 38,000. All of the A- and B-pattern proteinases were most active at acid pH in the presence of dithiothreitol and were inhibited by various agents such as trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane (E64), leupeptin and chymostatin, which inactivate cysteine proteinases. One of the enzymes, ddCP30, was identified as cysteine proteinase B which had been purified and characterized previously [North, M.J. & Whyte, A. (1984) J. Gen. Microbiol. 130, 123-134]. During starvation of axenic cells in shaken suspensions some of the vegetative proteinases disappeared, ddCP42 was released from the cells and one new enzyme with an apparent Mr of 48,000 appeared. Addition of cyclic AMP had little effect on these changes. When the axenically grown myxamoebae underwent development on filters, similar changes in band pattern were observed and the aggregation stage was characterized by the presence of three cysteine proteinase bands (apparent Mr values of 48,000, 45,000 and 43,000). Proteinases, especially ddCP42, were released from the cells and could be collected from the buffer-saturated pads which supported the filters. The results demonstrate that cysteine proteinases are present

  14. Consideration of cysteine protease activity for serological M-typing of clinical Streptococcus pyogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masatomo; Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Watanabe, Haruo

    2004-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes were classified by serological typing of their surface M protein. Non-M typeable strains with the emm1 gene were characterized as the degradation of M protein caused by overproduction of the extracellular cysteine protease, SpeB. These events are dependent on the growth phase. M protein produced prior to expression of SpeB is degraded in the stationary phase when the active form of SpeB is detected. The proteolytic degradation of M protein should be considered for precise M typing analysis. PMID:15502412

  15. Cysteine mutagenesis to study the structure of claudin-2 paracellular pores.

    PubMed

    Angelow, Susanne; Yu, Alan S L

    2009-05-01

    The structure and transport mechanism of paracellular pores are only poorly understood. Here we describe for the first time how the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM), previously developed to study transmembrane transport, can be applied to analyze the pathway of paracellular ion permeation. Using stable transfected Madin Darby canine kidney type I cells, induced to express claudin-2, we show that paracellular cation transport can be blocked by sulfhydryl-specific methanethiosulfonate (MTS) and that SCAM can be used to identify residues that line paracellular pores. PMID:19538299

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, drawn by Pierre du Simitiere ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, drawn by Pierre du Simitiere (papers in Philadelphia Library) DRAWING OF REDWOOD LIBRARY IN 1768. - Redwood Library, 50 Bellevue Avenue, Newport, Newport County, RI

  17. Morphological and spectroscopic studies on enlargement of Pd nanoparticle in L-cysteine aqueous solution by AFM and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, C.; Ogawa, S.; Niwa, H.; Nomoto, T.; Kutluk, G.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Yagi, S.

    2013-02-01

    We have revealed the enlargement mechanism of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) on SiO2/Si by the AFM observation and the XPS measurement, when the Pd NPs react with the L-cysteine under water environment. Furthermore, the adsorbates on the Pd NPs/SiO2/Si have been confirmed by the XPS measurement. The Pd NPs with clean surface are fabricated and deposited on the SiO2/Si substrate by the gas evaporation method. In that aspect, the Pd NPs possess an interaction with the SiO2/Si surface. When the Pd NPs/SiO2/Si is reacted into the L-cysteine aqueous solution, the adsorbates originated from the L-cysteine exist on the Pd NPs surface. On the contrary, the L-cysteine hardly adsorb on the SiO2/Si. The enlargement of the Pd NPs is stimulated by the contributions of the H2O and/or the L-cysteine molecules because the Pd NPs can be more easily migrated on the SiO2/Si surface due to those contributions.

  18. Interaction of gold, mercury, silver, and other ligands with selenium during oxidation of cysteine: relation to arthritis therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, C.J.; Tappel, A.; Tappel, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    Au, Ag, and Hg are soft-acid metal ligands for Se that inhibit Se-GSH peroxidase. A model system consisting of 100 ..mu..M cysteine, 10..mu..M selenocystine ((SeCys)/sub 2/), 100 ..mu..M acetate-1 mM EDTA buffer, pH 5.8, and various concentrations of metals was used to investigate Se-ligand interactions during 2 h incubations at 37/sup 0/C in an oxygen atmosphere. Cysteine was measured with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). Se-ligand interaction inhibits the catalytic effect of Se on cysteine oxidation. The k/sub i/ for inhibition of Se-catalyzed oxidation of cysteine was 0.13, 0.46, 1.6, and 1.3 ..mu..M HgCl/sub 3/, silver acetate, aurothioglucose, and aurothiomalate, respectively. Cadmium acetate, CdCl/sub 2/, and cis-platinum were weak inhibitors; zinc acetate and CuCl/sub 2/ were ineffective. Seleno-methionine did not catalyze cysteine oxidation, and Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/ was twice as effective as (SeCys)/sub 2/. Au inhibited the oxidation of CysSe/sup -/, produced by NaBH/sub 4/ reduction of (CysSe)/sub 2/, and its oxidation in oxygen was first-order. Au-compound inhibition of Se-catalyzed functions may have important implications in human rheumatoid patients during chrysotherapy.

  19. Selective Gas-Phase Oxidation and Localization of Alkylated Cysteine Residues in Polypeptide Ions via Ion/Ion Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    The thiol group in cysteine residues is susceptible to several post-translational modifications (PTMs), including prenylation, nitrosylation, palmitoylation, and the formation of disulfide bonds. Additionally, cysteine residues involved in disulfide bonds are commonly reduced and alkylated prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Several of these cysteine modifications, specifically S-alkyl modifications, are susceptible to gas-phase oxidation via selective ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Multiply protonated peptides containing modified cysteine residues undergo complex formation upon ion/ion reaction with periodate anions. Activation of the ion/ion complexes results in oxygen transfer from the reagent to the modified sulfur residue to create a sulfoxide functionality. Further activation of the sulfoxide derivative yields abundant losses of the modification with the oxidized sulfur as a sulfenic acid (namely, XSOH) to generate a dehydroalanine residue. This loss immediately indicates the presence of an S-alkyl cysteine residue, and the mass of the loss can be used to easily deduce the type of modification. An additional step of activation can be used to localize the modification to a specific residue within the peptide. Selective cleavage to create c- and z-ions N-terminal to the dehydroalanine residue is often noted. As these types of ions are not typically observed upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), they can be used to immediately indicate where in the peptide the PTM was originally located. PMID:27476698

  20. Preparation of CuO/ZnO nanocomposite and its application as a cysteine/homocysteine colorimetric and fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Šimšíková, Michaela; Čechal, Jan; Zorkovská, Anna; Antalík, Marián; Šikola, Tomáš

    2014-11-01

    Cysteine and homocysteine play a crucial role in many biological functions but abnormal levels of these amino acids may lead to various forms of pathogenesis. Therefore, selective and easy-to-use methods for the detection of cysteine and homocysteine are essential for the early diagnosis of developing diseases. In this paper we report on a rapid, straightforward and highly selective method for the detection of cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy) which uses a CuO/ZnO nanocomposite as a dual colorimetric and fluorometric assay. The presence of Cys and Hcy in a solution of these nanorods (NRs) induces a change in its color from light blue to dark grey which is visible to the naked eye. This is accompanied by a blue shift in the absorption spectra from 725 nm to 650 nm and a decrease in the intensity of CuO/ZnO nanocomposite emission. These changes are ascribed to the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(0), and the oxidation of cysteine (homocysteine) and subsequent formation of the disulfide bond. This novel assay method does not respond to any other amino-acid which is present in living organisms; therefore the selective determination of cysteine (homocysteine) with a lower analyte limit of 40 μM (4.8 μg mL(-1)) can be carried out in aqueous solutions without the need for any sophisticated instrumentation, fluorophore molecules or complicated procedures. PMID:25465753