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Sample records for cysteine desulfhydrase du

  1. L-Cysteine Desulfhydrase 1 modulates the generation of the signaling molecule sulfide in plant cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis C.; García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Consistent with data in animal systems, experimental evidence highlights sulfide as a signaling molecule of equal importance to NO and H2O2 in plant systems. In mammals, two cytosolic enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), have been shown to be responsible for the endogenous production of sulfide. L-cysteine desulfhydrase 1 (DES1) has been recently established as the only enzyme that is involved in the generation of hydrogen sulfide in plant cytosol. Although plants have an available source of sulfide within chloroplasts, the basic stromal pH prevents sulfide release into the cytosol. Therefore, DES1 is essential for the production of sulfide for signaling purposes. PMID:23428891

  2. Cystalysin, a 46-kilodalton cysteine desulfhydrase from Treponema denticola, with hemolytic and hemoxidative activities.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, L; Ebersole, J L; Kurzban, G P; Holt, S C

    1997-01-01

    A 46-kDa hemolytic protein, referred to as cystalysin, from Treponema denticola ATCC 35404 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli LC-67. Both the native and recombinant 46-kDa proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins expressed identical biological and functional characteristics. In addition to its biological function of lysing erythrocytes and hemoxidizing the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, cystalysin was also capable of removing the sulfhydryl and amino groups from selected S-containing compounds (e.g., cysteine) producing H2S, NH3, and pyruvate. This cysteine desulfhydrase resulted in the following Michaelis-Menten kinetics: Km = 3.6 mM and k(cat) = 12 s(-1). Cystathionine and S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine were also substrates for the protein. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the end products revealed NH3, pyruvate, homocysteine (from cystathionine), and cysteamine (from S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine). The enzyme was active over a broad pH range, with highest activity at pH 7.8 to 8.0. The enzymatic activity was increased by beta-mercaptoethanol. It was not inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor TLCK (N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone), pronase, or proteinase K, suggesting that the functional site was physically protected or located in a small fragment of the polypeptide. We hypothesize that cystalysin is a pyridoxal-5-phosphate-containing enzyme, with activity of an alphaC-N and betaC-S lyase (cystathionase) type. Since large amounts of H2S have been reported in deep periodontal pockets, cystalysin may also function in vivo as an important virulence molecule. PMID:9234780

  3. Assessing the transcriptional regulation of L-cysteine desulfhydrase 1 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M.; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C.; Gotor, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important signaling molecule that functions as a physiological gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO in mammalian systems. In plants, numerous studies have shown that sulfide increases tolerance/resistance to stress conditions and regulates essential processes. The endogenous production of hydrogen sulfide in the cytosol of Arabidopsis thaliana occurs by the enzymatic desulfuration of L-cysteine, which is catalyzed by the L-cysteine desulfhydrase enzyme DES1. To define the functional role of DES1 and the role that the sulfide molecule may play in the regulation of physiological processes in plants, we studied the localization of the expression of this gene at the tissue level. Transcriptional data reveal that DES1 is expressed at all developmental stages and is more abundant at the seedling stage and in mature plants. At the tissue level, we analyzed the expression of a GFP reporter gene fused to promoter of DES1. The GFP fluorescent signal was detected in the cytosol of both epidermal and mesophyll cells, including the guard cells. GFP fluorescence was highly abundant around the hydathode pores and inside the trichomes. In mature plants, fluorescence was detected in floral tissues; a strong GFP signal was detected in sepals, petals, and pistils. When siliques were examined, the highest GFP fluorescence was observed at the bases of the siliques and the seeds. The location of GFP expression, together with the identification of regulatory elements within the DES1 promoter, suggests that DES1 is hormonally regulated. An increase in DES1 expression in response to ABA was recently demonstrated; in the present work, we observe that in vitro auxin treatment significantly repressed the expression of DES1. PMID:25538717

  4. Assessing the transcriptional regulation of L-cysteine desulfhydrase 1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important signaling molecule that functions as a physiological gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO in mammalian systems. In plants, numerous studies have shown that sulfide increases tolerance/resistance to stress conditions and regulates essential processes. The endogenous production of hydrogen sulfide in the cytosol of Arabidopsis thaliana occurs by the enzymatic desulfuration of L-cysteine, which is catalyzed by the L-cysteine desulfhydrase enzyme DES1. To define the functional role of DES1 and the role that the sulfide molecule may play in the regulation of physiological processes in plants, we studied the localization of the expression of this gene at the tissue level. Transcriptional data reveal that DES1 is expressed at all developmental stages and is more abundant at the seedling stage and in mature plants. At the tissue level, we analyzed the expression of a GFP reporter gene fused to promoter of DES1. The GFP fluorescent signal was detected in the cytosol of both epidermal and mesophyll cells, including the guard cells. GFP fluorescence was highly abundant around the hydathode pores and inside the trichomes. In mature plants, fluorescence was detected in floral tissues; a strong GFP signal was detected in sepals, petals, and pistils. When siliques were examined, the highest GFP fluorescence was observed at the bases of the siliques and the seeds. The location of GFP expression, together with the identification of regulatory elements within the DES1 promoter, suggests that DES1 is hormonally regulated. An increase in DES1 expression in response to ABA was recently demonstrated; in the present work, we observe that in vitro auxin treatment significantly repressed the expression of DES1. PMID:25538717

  5. Hydrogen sulfide is a novel potential virulence factor of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: characterization of the unusual cysteine desulfurase/desulfhydrase HapE.

    PubMed

    Großhennig, Stephanie; Ischebeck, Till; Gibhardt, Johannes; Busse, Julia; Feussner, Ivo; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing atypical pneumonia with a minimalized and highly streamlined genome. So far, hydrogen peroxide production, cytadherence, and the ADP-ribosylating CARDS toxin have been identified as pathogenicity determinants. We have studied haemolysis caused by M. pneumoniae, and discovered that hydrogen peroxide is responsible for the oxidation of heme, but not for lysis of erythrocytes. This feature could be attributed to hydrogen sulfide, a compound that has previously not been identified as virulence factor in lung pathogens. Indeed, we observed hydrogen sulfide production by M. pneumoniae. The search for a hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme identified HapE, a protein with similarity to cysteine desulfurases. In contrast to typical cysteine desulfurases, HapE is a bifunctional enzyme: it has both the cysteine desulfurase activity to produce alanine and the cysteine desulfhydrase activity to produce pyruvate and hydrogen sulfide. Experiments with purified HapE showed that the enzymatic activity of the protein is responsible for haemolysis, demonstrating that HapE is a novel potential virulence factor of M. pneumoniae. PMID:26711628

  6. Hydrogen sulfide generated by L-cysteine desulfhydrase acts upstream of nitric oxide to modulate abscisic acid-dependent stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Scuffi, Denise; Álvarez, Consolación; Laspina, Natalia; Gotor, Cecilia; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mata, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a well-studied regulator of stomatal movement. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a small signaling gas molecule involved in key physiological processes in mammals, has been recently reported as a new component of the ABA signaling network in stomatal guard cells. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), H2S is enzymatically produced in the cytosol through the activity of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES1). In this work, we used DES1 knockout Arabidopsis mutant plants (des1) to study the participation of DES1 in the cross talk between H2S and nitric oxide (NO) in the ABA-dependent signaling network in guard cells. The results show that ABA did not close the stomata in isolated epidermal strips of des1 mutants, an effect that was restored by the application of exogenous H2S. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that ABA induces DES1 expression in guard cell-enriched RNA extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Furthermore, stomata from isolated epidermal strips of Arabidopsis ABA receptor mutant pyrabactin-resistant1 (pyr1)/pyrabactin-like1 (pyl1)/pyl2/pyl4 close in response to exogenous H2S, suggesting that this gasotransmitter is acting downstream, although acting independently of the ABA receptor cannot be ruled out with this data. However, the Arabidopsis clade-A PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE2C mutant abscisic acid-insensitive1 (abi1-1) does not close the stomata when epidermal strips were treated with H2S, suggesting that H2S required a functional ABI1. Further studies to unravel the cross talk between H2S and NO indicate that (1) H2S promotes NO production, (2) DES1 is required for ABA-dependent NO production, and (3) NO is downstream of H2S in ABA-induced stomatal closure. Altogether, data indicate that DES1 is a unique component of ABA signaling in guard cells. PMID:25266633

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Generated by l-Cysteine Desulfhydrase Acts Upstream of Nitric Oxide to Modulate Abscisic Acid-Dependent Stomatal Closure1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Scuffi, Denise; Álvarez, Consolación; Laspina, Natalia; Gotor, Cecilia; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mata, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a well-studied regulator of stomatal movement. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a small signaling gas molecule involved in key physiological processes in mammals, has been recently reported as a new component of the ABA signaling network in stomatal guard cells. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), H2S is enzymatically produced in the cytosol through the activity of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES1). In this work, we used DES1 knockout Arabidopsis mutant plants (des1) to study the participation of DES1 in the cross talk between H2S and nitric oxide (NO) in the ABA-dependent signaling network in guard cells. The results show that ABA did not close the stomata in isolated epidermal strips of des1 mutants, an effect that was restored by the application of exogenous H2S. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that ABA induces DES1 expression in guard cell-enriched RNA extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Furthermore, stomata from isolated epidermal strips of Arabidopsis ABA receptor mutant pyrabactin-resistant1 (pyr1)/pyrabactin-like1 (pyl1)/pyl2/pyl4 close in response to exogenous H2S, suggesting that this gasotransmitter is acting downstream, although acting independently of the ABA receptor cannot be ruled out with this data. However, the Arabidopsis clade-A PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE2C mutant abscisic acid-insensitive1 (abi1-1) does not close the stomata when epidermal strips were treated with H2S, suggesting that H2S required a functional ABI1. Further studies to unravel the cross talk between H2S and NO indicate that (1) H2S promotes NO production, (2) DES1 is required for ABA-dependent NO production, and (3) NO is downstream of H2S in ABA-induced stomatal closure. Altogether, data indicate that DES1 is a unique component of ABA signaling in guard cells. PMID:25266633

  8. Sulforaphane-cysteine suppresses invasion via downregulation of galectin-1 in human prostate cancer DU145 and PC3 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Gaoxiang; Geng, Yang; Wu, Sai; Hu, Yabin; Lin, Kai; Wu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study showed that sulforaphane (SFN) inhibits invasion in human prostate cancer DU145 cells; however, the underlying mechanisms were not profoundly investigated. In the present study, we found that sulforaphane-cysteine (SFN-Cys), as a metabolite of SFN, inhibits invasion and possesses a novel mechanism in prostate cancer DU145 and PC3 cells. The scratch and Transwell assays showed that SFN-Cys (15 µM) inhibited both migration and invasion, with cell morphological changes, such as cell shrinkage and pseudopodia shortening. The cell proliferation (MTS) assay indicated that cell viability was markedly suppressed with increasing concentrations of SFN‑Cys. Furthermore, the Transwell assay showed that inhibition of SFN‑Cys‑triggered invasion was tightly linked to the sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Western blot analysis revealed that SFN-Cys downregulated galectin-1 protein, an invasion‑related protein, and that the galectin‑1 reduction could be blocked by ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 (25 µM). Moreover, immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression level of galectin-1 protein was significantly reduced in the cells treated with SFN‑Cys. Hence, SFN‑Cys‑inhibited invasion resulted from the sustained ERK1/2 phosphorylation and ERK1/2‑triggered galectin-1 downregulation, suggesting that galectin-1 is a new SFN-Cys target inhibiting invasion apart from ERK1/2, in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:27430422

  9. Cysteine-Generated Sulfide in the Cytosol Negatively Regulates Autophagy and Modulates the Transcriptional Profile in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Consolación; García, Irene; Moreno, Inmaculada; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Crespo, José L.; Romero, Luis C.; Gotor, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, DES1 is the only identified l-Cysteine desulfhydrase located in the cytosol, and it is involved in the degradation of cysteine and the concomitant production of H2S in this cell compartment. Detailed characterization of the T-DNA insertion mutants des1-1 and des1-2 has provided insight into the role of sulfide metabolically generated in the cytosol as a signaling molecule. Mutations of L-CYS DESULFHYDRASE 1 (DES1) impede H2S generation in the Arabidopsis cytosol and strongly affect plant metabolism. Senescence-associated vacuoles are detected in mesophyll protoplasts of des1 mutants. Additionally, DES1 deficiency promotes the accumulation and lipidation of the ATG8 protein, which is associated with the process of autophagy. The transcriptional profile of the des1-1 mutant corresponds to its premature senescence and autophagy-induction phenotypes, and restoring H2S generation has been shown to eliminate the phenotypic defects of des1 mutants. Moreover, sulfide is able to reverse ATG8 accumulation and lipidation, even in wild-type plants when autophagy is induced by carbon starvation, suggesting a general effect of sulfide on autophagy regulation that is unrelated to sulfur or nitrogen limitation stress. Our results suggest that cysteine-generated sulfide in the cytosol negatively regulates autophagy and modulates the transcriptional profile of Arabidopsis. PMID:23144183

  10. Mechanisms of H2S Production from Cysteine and Cystine by Microorganisms Isolated from Soil by Selective Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Matthew J.; Dick, Warren A.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a major component of biogenic gaseous sulfur emissions from terrestrial environments. However, little is known concerning the pathways for H2S production from the likely substrates, cysteine and cystine. A mixed microbial culture obtained from cystine-enriched soils was used in assays (50 min, 37°C) with 0.05 M Tris-HCl (pH 8.5), 25 μmol of l-cysteine, 25 μmol of l-cystine, and 0.04 μmol of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate. Sulfide was trapped in a center well containing zinc acetate, while pyruvate was measured by derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Sulfide and total pyruvate production were 17.6 and 17.2 nmol mg of protein-1 min-1, respectively. Dithiothreitol did not alter reaction stoichiometry or the amount of H2S and total pyruvate, whereas N-ethylmaleimide reduced both H2S and total pyruvate production equally. The amount of H2S produced was reduced by 96% when only l-cystine was included as the substrate in the assay and by 15% with the addition of propargylglycine, a specific suicide inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase. These data indicate that the substrate for the reaction was cysteine and the enzyme responsible for H2S and pyruvate production was cysteine desulfhydrase (EC 4.4.1.1). The enzyme had a Km of 1.32 mM and was inactivated by temperatures greater than 60°C. Because cysteine is present in soil and cysteine desulfhydrase is an inducible enzyme, the potential for H2S production by this mechanism exists in terrestrial environments. The relative importance of this mechanism compared with other processes involved in H2S production from soil is unknown. PMID:16348483

  11. Mechanisms of H sub 2 S production from cysteine and cystine by microorganisms isolated from soil by selective enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Morra, M.J.; Dick, W.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a major component of biogenic gaseous sulfur emissions from terrestrial environments. However, little is known concerning the pathways for H{sub 2}S production from the likely substrates, cysteine and cystine. A mixed microbial culture obtained from Cystine-enriched soils was used in assays (50 min, 37C) with 0.05 M Tris-HCI (pH 8.5), 25 {mu}mol of L-cysteine, 25 {mu}mol of L-cystine, and 0.04 {mu}mol of pyridoxal 5 feet-phosphate. Sulfide and total pyruvate production were 17.6 and 17.2 nmol mg of protein{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Dithiothreitol did not alter reaction stoichiometry or the amount of H{sub 2}S and total pyruvate, whereas N-ethylmaleimide reduced both H{sub 2}S and total pyruvate production in the assay and by 15% with the addition of propargylglycine, a specific suicide inhibitor of cystathionine {gamma}-lyase. These data indicate that the substrate for the reaction was cysteine and the enzyme responsible for H{sub 2}S and pyruvate production was cysteine desulfhydrase. The enzyme had a K{sub m} of 1.32 mM and was inactivated by temperatures greater that 60C. Because cysteine is present in soil and cysteine desulfhydrase is an inducible enzyme, the potential for H{sub 2}S production by this mechanism exists in terrestrial environments.

  12. Endogenous Synthesis of 2-Aminoacrylate Contributes to Cysteine Sensitivity in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Dustin C.; Lambrecht, Jennifer A.; Schomer, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    RidA, the archetype member of the widely conserved RidA/YER057c/UK114 family of proteins, prevents reactive enamine/imine intermediates from accumulating in Salmonella enterica by catalyzing their hydrolysis to stable keto acid products. In the absence of RidA, endogenous 2-aminoacrylate persists in the cellular environment long enough to damage a growing list of essential metabolic enzymes. Prior studies have focused on the dehydration of serine by the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent serine/threonine dehydratases, IlvA and TdcB, as sources of endogenous 2-aminoacrylate. The current study describes an additional source of endogenous 2-aminoacrylate derived from cysteine. The results of in vivo analysis show that the cysteine sensitivity of a ridA strain is contingent upon CdsH, the predominant cysteine desulfhydrase in S. enterica. The impact of cysteine on 2-aminoacrylate accumulation is shown to be unaffected by the presence of serine/threonine dehydratases, revealing another mechanism of endogenous 2-aminoacrylate production. Experiments in vitro suggest that 2-aminoacrylate is released from CdsH following cysteine desulfhydration, resulting in an unbound aminoacrylate substrate for RidA. This work expands our understanding of the role played by RidA in preventing enamine stress resulting from multiple normal metabolic processes. PMID:25002544

  13. Signaling in the plant cytosol: cysteine or sulfide?

    PubMed

    Gotor, Cecilia; Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Aroca, Ángeles; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C

    2015-10-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is the first organic compound containing reduced sulfur that is synthesized in the last stage of plant photosynthetic assimilation of sulfate. It is a very important metabolite not only because it is crucial for the structure, function and regulation of proteins but also because it is the precursor molecule of an enormous number of sulfur-containing metabolites essential for plant health and development. The biosynthesis of Cys is accomplished by the sequential reaction of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine(thiol)synthase (OASTL). In Arabidopsis thaliana, the analysis of specific mutants of members of the SAT and OASTL families has demonstrated that the cytosol is the compartment where the bulk of Cys synthesis takes place and that the cytosolic OASTL enzyme OAS-A1 is the responsible enzyme. Another member of the OASTL family is DES1, a novel L-cysteine desulfhydrase that catalyzes the desulfuration of Cys to produce sulfide, thus acting in a manner opposite to that of OAS-A1. Detailed studies of the oas-a1 and des1 null mutants have revealed the involvement of the DES1 and OAS-A1 proteins in coordinate regulation of Cys homeostasis and the generation of sulfide in the cytosol for signaling purposes. Thus, the levels of Cys in the cytosol strongly affect plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress conditions, while sulfide specifically generated from the degradation of Cys negatively regulates autophagy induced in different situations. In conclusion, modulation of the levels of Cys and sulfide is likely critical for plant performance. PMID:24990521

  14. The Cysteine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Chandler, Joshua D.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine (Cys) proteome is a major component of the adaptive interface between the genome and the exposome. The thiol moiety of Cys undergoes a range of biologic modifications enabling biological switching of structure and reactivity. These biological modifications include sulfenylation and disulfide formation, formation of higher oxidation states, S-nitrosylation, persulfidation, metallation, and other modifications. Extensive knowledge about these systems and their compartmentalization now provides a foundation to develop advanced integrative models of Cys proteome regulation. In particular, detailed understanding of redox signaling pathways and sensing networks is becoming available to discriminate network structures. This research focuses attention on the need for atlases of Cys modifications to develop systems biology models. Such atlases will be especially useful for integrative studies linking the Cys proteome to imaging and other omics platforms, providing a basis for improved redox-based therapeutics. Thus, a framework is emerging to place the Cys proteome as a complement to the quantitative proteome in the omics continuum connecting the genome to the exposome. PMID:25843657

  15. Evolutionary lines of cysteine peptidases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A J; Rawlings, N D

    2001-05-01

    The proteolytic enzymes that depend upon a cysteine residue for activity have come from at least seven different evolutionary origins, each of which has produced a group of cysteine peptidases with distinctive structures and properties. We show here that the characteristic molecular topologies of the peptidases in each evolutionary line can be seen not only in their three-dimensional structures, but commonly also in the two-dimensional structures. Clan CA contains the families of papain (C1), calpain (C2), streptopain (C10) and the ubiquitin-specific peptidases (C12, C19), as well as many families of viral cysteine endopeptidases. Clan CD contains the families of clostripain (C11), gingipain R (C25), legumain (C13), caspase-1 (C14) and separin (C50). These enzymes have specificities dominated by the interactions of the S1 subsite. Clan CE contains the families of adenain (C5) from adenoviruses, the eukaryotic Ulp1 protease (C48) and the bacterial YopJ proteases (C55). Clan CF contains only pyroglutamyl peptidase I (C15). The picornains (C3) in clan PA have probably evolved from serine peptidases, which still form the majority of enzymes in the clan. The cysteine peptidase activities in clans PB and CH are autolytic only. In conclusion, we suggest that although almost all the cysteine peptidases depend for activity on catalytic dyads of cysteine and histidine, it is worth noting some important differences that they have inherited from their distant ancestral peptidases. PMID:11517925

  16. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  17. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5271 Cysteine. (a) Product. Cysteine...

  18. Cysteine Cathepsins in Human Carious Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, F.D.; Minciotti, C.L.; Geraldeli, S.; Carrilho, M.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.; Nader, H.B.; Salo, T.; Tjäderhane, L.; Tersariol, I.L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in dentinal caries, and analysis of recent data demonstrates the presence of other collagen-degrading enzymes, cysteine cathepsins, in human dentin. This study aimed to examine the presence, source, and activity of cysteine cathepsins in human caries. Cathepsin B was detected with immunostaining. Saliva and dentin cysteine cathepsin and MMP activities on caries lesions were analyzed spectrofluorometrically. Immunostaining demonstrated stronger cathepsins B in carious than in healthy dentin. In carious dentin, cysteine cathepsin activity increased with increasing depth and age in chronic lesions, but decreased with age in active lesions. MMP activity decreased with age in both active and chronic lesions. Salivary MMP activities were higher in patients with active than chronic lesions and with increasing lesion depth, while cysteine cathepsin activities showed no differences. The results indicate that, along with MMPs, cysteine cathepsins are important, especially in active and deep caries. PMID:21248362

  19. Plasma cysteine, cystine, and glutathione in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, R K; Lewis, F W; Kutner, M H; Bate, D M; Roy, R G; Rudman, D

    1984-10-01

    Plasma contains three forms of cyst(e)ine: cysteine, cystine, and protein-bound cysteine. The former is a thiol and the latter two are disulfides. The levels of all three types of cyst(e)ine, as well as the cysteinyl tripeptide glutathione, were measured in the plasma of 14 normal and 10 cirrhotic individuals. All subjects ate mixed foods. Some cirrhotic patients were studied during nasogastric hyperalimentation with Vivonex (Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Norwich, N.Y.) as well as during total parenteral nutrition with FreAmine III (American McGaw, Irvine, Calif.); neither formula contains cyst(e)ine. Regardless of the nature of the diet, cirrhotic patients had significantly subnormal values for cysteine, glutathione, and albumin. In addition, the following significant changes were found to be diet-dependent: (a) elevated methionine during Vivonex, (b) subnormal taurine during mixed foods and total parenteral nutrition, (c) depressed protein-bound cysteine during total parenteral nutrition, (d) depressed cyst(e)ine thiol/disulfide ratio during mixed foods, and (e) depressed total thiol during Vivonex and total parenteral nutrition. The data indicate multiple abnormalities in sulfur metabolism in cirrhosis. PMID:6468868

  20. Cysteine sensing by plasmons of silver nanocubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfassy, Eitan; Mastai, Yitzhak; Salomon, Adi

    2016-09-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are considered to be valuable nanostructures in the field of sensors due to their spectral response sensitivity to small changes in the surrounding refractive index which enables them to detect a small amount of molecules. In this research, we use silver nanocubes of about 50 nm length to detect low concentrations of cysteine, a semi-essential amino acid. Following cysteine adsorption onto the nanocubes, a redshift in the plasmonic modes was observed, enabling the detection of cysteine down to 10 μM and high sensitivity of about 125 nm/RIU (refractive index units). Furthermore, we found that multilayer adsorption of cysteine leads to the stabilization of the silver nanocubes. The cysteine growth onto the nanocubes was also characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM).

  1. Covalent targeting of acquired cysteines in cancer.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marieke; Arkin, Michelle R; Dansen, Tobias B

    2016-02-01

    The thiolate side chain of cysteine has a unique functionality that drug hunters and chemical biologists have begun to exploit. For example, targeting cysteine residues in the ATP-binding pockets of kinases with thiol-reactive molecules has afforded increased selectivity and potency to drugs like imbrutinib, which inhibits the oncogene BTK, and CO-1686 and AZD9291 that target oncogenic mutant EGFR. Recently, disulfide libraries and targeted GDP-mimetics have been used to selectively label the G12C oncogenic mutation in KRAS. We reasoned that other oncogenes contain mutations to cysteine, and thus screened the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer for frequently acquired cysteines. Here, we describe the most common mutations and discuss how these mutations could be potential targets for cysteine-directed personalized therapeutics. PMID:26629855

  2. Detection of Homocysteine and Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weihua; Xu, Xiangyang; Kim, Kyu Kwang; Escobedo, Jorge O.; Fakayode, Sayo O.; Fletcher, Kristin A.; Lowry, Mark; Schowalter, Corin M.; Lawrence, Candace M.; Fronczek, Frank R.; Warner, Isiah M.

    2012-01-01

    At elevated levels, homocysteine (Hcy, 1) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, neural tube defects, and osteoporosis. Both 1 and cysteine (Cys, 3) are linked to neurotoxicity. The biochemical mechanisms by which 1 and 3 are involved in disease states are relatively unclear. Herein, we describe simple methods for detecting either Hcy or Cys in the visible spectral region with the highest selectivity reported to date without using biochemical techniques or preparative separations. Simple methods and readily available reagents allow for the detection of Cys and Hcy in the range of their physiologically relevant levels. New HPLC postcolumn detection methods for biological thiols are reported. The potential biomedical relevance of the chemical mechanisms involved in the detection of 1 is described. PMID:16277539

  3. Rat liver cysteine dioxygenase (cysteine oxidase). Further purification, characterization, and analysis of the activation and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Hosokawa, Y; Kohashi, N; Kori, Y; Sakakibara, S; Ueda, I

    1978-02-01

    Rat liver cysteine dioxygenase has been purified to homogeneity. It is a single subunit protein having a molecular weight of 22,500 +/- 1,000, with a pI of 5.5. The enzyme purified was catalytically inactive and activated by anaerobic incubation with either L-cysteine or its analogues such as carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, carboxyethyl-L-cysteine, S-methyl-L-cysteine, D-cysteine, cysteamine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, and DL-homocysteine. The enzyme thus activated with L-cysteine was rapidly inactivated under aerobic condition. This rapid inactivation was observed at 0 degrees C where no formation of either the reaction product cysteine sulfinate or the autoxidation product of cysteine, cystine, was detected. Further analysis shows that the inactivation of the activated enzyme was due to oxygen but unrelated to either the presence of substrate, enzyme turnover or accumulation of inhibitor produced during assay. A distinct rat liver cytoplasmic protein, called protein-A, could completely prevented the enzyme from the aerobic inactivation. The loss of activity during assay in the absence of protein-A was shown to be a first order decay process. From the plots of log(deltaproduct/min) versus time, the initial velocity (VO) and the velocity at 7 min (V7) were obtained. The apparent Km value for L-cysteine in the absence of protein-A was calculated from the initial velocity as 4.5 X 10(-4)M. Protein-A did not alter the apparent Km value for L-cysteine. The chelating agents such as o-phenanthroline, alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl, bathophenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, EGTA, and EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme activity when these chelating agents were added before preactivation. The purified cystein dioxygenase contains 1 atom of iron per mol of enzyme protein. By the activation procedure, the enzyme became less susceptible to the heat denaturation, the inhibitory effects of chelating agents and the tryptic digestion. PMID:632231

  4. Blends of cysteine-containing proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Justin

    2005-03-01

    Many agricultural wastes are made of proteins such as keratin, lactalbumin, gluten, and albumin. These proteins contain the amino acid cysteine. Cysteine allows for the formation of inter-and intra-molecular sulfur-sulfur bonds. Correlations are made between the properties of films made from the proteins and the amino acid sequence. Blends of cysteine-containing proteins show possible synergies in physical properties at intermediate concentrations. FT-IR spectroscopy shows increased hydrogen bonding at intermediate concentrations suggesting that this contributes to increased physical properties. DSC shows limited miscibility and the formation of new crystalline phases in the blends suggesting that this too contributes.

  5. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  6. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Song, Dong-Keun

    2016-09-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca(2+) signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca(2+)-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca(2+) influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na(+)-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na(+)-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca(2+)]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca(2+)]i increase through Ca(2+) influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  7. Nonfouling property of zwitterionic cysteine surface.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter; Ding, Ling; Lin, Chii-Wann; Gu, Frank

    2014-06-10

    Applications of implantable bioelectronics for analytical and curative purposes are currently limited by their poor long-term biofunctionality in physiological media and nonspecific interactions with biomolecules. In an attempt to prolong in vivo functionality, recent advances in surface modifications have demonstrated that zwitterionic coatings can rival the performance of conventional poly(ethylene glycol) polymers in reducing nonspecific protein fouling. Herein, we report the fabrication of a very thin layer of nonfouling zwitterionic cysteine surface capable of protecting implantable bioelectronics from nonspecific adsorption of plasma proteins. This work is the first of its kind to fabricate, through solution chemistry, a cysteine surface exhibiting zwitterionic state as high as 88% and to demonstrate antibiofouling under the exposure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum. The fabricated surface utilized a minimal amount of gold substrate, approximately 10 nm, and an extremely thin antifouling layer at 1.14 nm verified by ellipsometry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy assessment of the nitrogen (N1s) and carbon (C1s) spectra conclude that 87.8% of the fabricated cysteine surface is zwitterionic, 2.5% is positively charged, and 9.6% is noncharged. Antibiofouling performance of the cysteine surface is quantitatively determined by bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay as well as qualitatively confirmed using scanning electron spectroscopy. Cysteine surfaces demonstrated a BSA fouling of 3.9 ± 4.84% μg/cm(2), which is 93.6% and 98.5% lower than stainless steel and gold surfaces, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis returned similar results and suggest that a thinner cysteine coating will enhance performance. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the results of BCA assay and suggested that the cysteine surface demonstrated a 69% reduction to serum fouling. The results reported in this paper demonstrate that it is possible to achieve

  8. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  9. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  10. π-Clamp Mediated Cysteine Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is a grand challenge in chemistry. Protecting groups or catalysts must be used to selectively modify one site among many that are similarly reactive. General strategies are rare such the local chemical environment around the target site is tuned for selective transformation. Here we show a four amino acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the “π-clamp”, tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for the site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We used the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues (e.g. antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes), which was impossible with prior cysteine modification methods. The modified π-clamp antibodies retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach for site-selective chemistry and provides opportunities to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics. PMID:26791894

  11. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  12. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2327970

  13. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. PMID:2327970

  14. Influence of cysteine 164 on active site structure in rat cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Matthias; Siakkou, Eleni; Faponle, Abayomi S; Tchesnokov, Egor P; de Visser, Sam P; Wilbanks, Sigurd M; Jameson, Guy N L

    2016-07-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a non-heme mononuclear iron enzyme with unique structural features, namely an intramolecular thioether cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157, and a disulfide bond between substrate L-cysteine and cysteine 164 in the entrance channel to the active site. We investigated how these posttranslational modifications affect catalysis through a kinetic, crystallographic and computational study. The enzyme kinetics of a C164S variant are identical to WT, indicating that disulfide formation at C164 does not significantly impair access to the active site at physiological pH. However, at high pH, the cysteine-tyrosine cross-link formation is enhanced in C164S. This supports the view that disulfide formation at position 164 can limit access to the active site. The C164S variant yielded crystal structures of unusual clarity in both resting state and with cysteine bound. Both show that the iron in the cysteine-bound complex is a mixture of penta- and hexa-coordinate with a water molecule taking up the final site (60 % occupancy), which is where dioxygen is believed to coordinate during turnover. The serine also displays stronger hydrogen bond interactions to a water bound to the amine of the substrate cysteine. However, the interactions between cysteine and iron appear unchanged. DFT calculations support this and show that WT and C164S have similar binding energies for the water molecule in the final site. This variant therefore provides evidence that WT also exists in an equilibrium between penta- and hexa-coordinate forms and the presence of the sixth ligand does not strongly affect dioxygen binding. PMID:27193596

  15. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  19. Cysteine Prevents Menopausal Syndromes in Ovariectomized Mouse.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Na-Rae; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-05-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is well known to be involved in oxidation-reduction reactions, serving as a source of sulfides in the body. Amino acids are known to improve menopausal symptoms and significantly reduce morbidity. This study aims to find an unrevealed effect of Cys with estrogenic and osteogenic actions. Ovariectomized (OVX) mice were treated with Cys daily for 8 weeks. Estrogen-related and osteoporosis-related factors were analyzed in the vagina, serum, and tibia. Cys was treated in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells and ER-positive human breast cancer Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. Cysteine administration ameliorated overweightness of the body and vaginal atrophy in the OVX mice. Cysteine increased the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 17β-estradiol in the serum of the OVX mice and improved the bone mineral density in the OVX mice. In MG-63 cells, Cys increased the proliferation, ERβ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, and estrogen response element (ERE) activity. Cysteine increased the ALP activity and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In MCF-7 cells, Cys also increased the proliferation, ERβ mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Cys has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. The novel insights gained here strongly imply the potential use of Cys as a new agent for postmenopausal women. PMID:26494699

  20. "Cirque du Freak."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivett, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    Considers the marketing strategies that underpin the success of the "Cirque du Freak" series. Describes how "Cirque du Freak" is an account of events in the life of schoolboy Darren Shan. Notes that it is another reworking of the vampire narrative, a sub-genre of horror writing that has proved highly popular with both adult and child readers. (SG)

  1. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-08-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  2. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  3. Determining cysteine oxidation status using differential alkylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Birgit; Yoo, Chris B.; Collins, Christopher J.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins plays a major role in aging and in the pathology of many degenerative diseases. Under conditions of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can modify key redox sensitive amino acid side chains leading to altered biological activities or structures of the targeted proteins. This in turn can affect signaling or regulatory control pathways as well as protein turnover and degradation efficiency in the proteasome. Cysteine residues are particularly susceptible to oxidation, primarily through reversible modifications (e.g., thiolation and nitrosylation), although irreversible oxidation can lead to products that cannot be repaired in vivo such as sulfonic acid. This report describes a strategy to determine the overall level of reversible cysteine oxidation using a stable isotope differential alkylation approach in combination with mass spectrometric analysis. This method employs 13C-labeled alkylating reagents, such as N-ethyl-[1,4-13C2]-maleimide, bromo-[1,2-13C2]-acetic acid and their non-labeled counterparts to quantitatively assess the level of cysteine oxidation at specific sites in oxidized proteins. The differential alkylation protocol was evaluated using standard peptides and proteins, and then applied to monitor and determine the level of oxidative damage induced by diamide, a mild oxidant. The formation and mass spectrometric analysis of irreversible cysteine acid modification will also be discussed as several such modifications have been identified in subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. This strategy will hopefully contribute to our understanding of the role that cysteine oxidation plays in such chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease, where studies in animal and cell models have shown oxidative damage to mitochondrial Complex I to be a specific and early target.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine monohydrochloride is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid monohydrochloride monohydrate (C3H7O2NS HCl...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine monohydrochloride is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid monohydrochloride monohydrate (C3H7O2NS HCl...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine monohydrochloride is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid monohydrochloride monohydrate (C3H7O2NS HCl...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine monohydrochloride is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid monohydrochloride monohydrate (C3H7O2NS HCl...

  8. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M.; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B.D.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here, we describe a proteomics method to quantitatively profile the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyperreactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyperreactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and involved in iron-sulfur protein biogenesis. Finally, we demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can also form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs. PMID:21085121

  9. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes.

    PubMed

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B D; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-12-01

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here we describe a proteomics method to profile quantitatively the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyper-reactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and it was found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyper-reactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and is involved in iron-sulphur protein biogenesis. We also demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs. PMID:21085121

  10. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  11. Cysteine Cathepsin Activity Regulation by Glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Lenarčič, Brigita

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are a group of enzymes normally found in the endolysosomes where they are primarily involved in intracellular protein turnover but also have a critical role in MHC II-mediated antigen processing and presentation. However, in a number of pathologies cysteine cathepsins were found to be heavily upregulated and secreted into extracellular milieu, where they were found to degrade a number of extracellular proteins. A major role in modulating cathepsin activities play glycosaminoglycans, which were found not only to facilitate their autocatalytic activation including at neutral pH, but also to critically modulate their activities such as in the case of the collagenolytic activity of cathepsin K. The interaction between cathepsins and glycosaminoglycans will be discussed in more detail. PMID:25587532

  12. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively. PMID:23790889

  13. The du Bois sign.

    PubMed

    Voelpel, James H; Muehlberger, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    According to the current literature, the term "du Bois sign" characterizes the condition of a shortened fifth finger as a symptom of congenital syphilis, Down syndrome, dyscrania, and encephalic malformation. Modern medical dictionaries and text books attribute the eponym to the French gynecologist Paul Dubois (1795-1871). Yet, a literature analysis revealed incorrect references to the person and unclear definitions of the term. Our findings showed that the origin of the term is based on observations made by the Swiss dermatologist Charles du Bois (1874-1947) in connection with congenital syphilis. In addition, a further eponymical fifth finger sign is closely associated with the du Bois sign. In conclusion, the du Bois sign has only limited diagnostic value and is frequently occurring in the normal healthy population. PMID:21263293

  14. The reactions of nitrosyl complexes with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Roncaroli, Federico; Olabe, José A

    2005-06-27

    The reaction kinetics of a set of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes, {(X)5MNO}n, containing different coligands X (polypyridines, NH3, EDTA, pz, and py) with cysteine (excess conditions), were studied by UV-vis spectrophotometry, using stopped-flow techniques, at an appropriate pH, in the range 3-10, and T = 25 degrees C. The selection of coligands afforded a redox-potential range from -0.3 to +0.5 V (vs Ag/AgCl) for the NO+/NO bound couples. Two intermediates were detected. The first one, I1, appears in the range 410-470 nm for the different complexes and is proposed to be a 1:1 adduct, with the S atom of the cysteinate nucleophile bound to the N atom of nitrosyl. The adduct formation step of I1 is an equilibrium, and the kinetic rate constants for the formation and dissociation of the corresponding adducts were determined by studying the cysteine-concentration dependence of the formation rates. The second intermediate, I2, was detected through the decay of I1, with a maximum absorbance at ca. 380 nm. From similar kinetic results and analyses, we propose that a second cysteinate adds to I1 to form I2. By plotting ln k1(RS-) and ln k2(RS-) for the first and second adduct formation steps, respectively, against the redox potentials of the NO+/NO couples, linear free energy plots are obtained, as previously observed with OH- as a nucleophile. The addition rates for both processes increase with the nitrosyl redox potentials, and this reflects a more positive charge at the electrophilic N atom. In a third step, the I2 adducts decay to form the corresponding Ru-aqua complexes, with the release of N2O and formation of cystine, implying a two-electron process for the overall nitrosyl reduction. This is in contrast with the behavior of nitroprusside ([Fe(CN)5NO]2-; NP), which always yields the one-electron reduction product, [Fe(CN)5NO]3-, either under substoichiometric or in excess-cysteine conditions. PMID:15962980

  15. Identification of non-peptidic cysteine reactive fragments as inhibitors of cysteine protease rhodesain.

    PubMed

    McShan, Danielle; Kathman, Stefan; Lowe, Brittiney; Xu, Ziyang; Zhan, Jennifer; Statsyuk, Alexander; Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor

    2015-10-15

    Rhodesain, the major cathepsin L-like cysteine protease in the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is a well-validated drug target. In this work, we used a fragment-based approach to identify inhibitors of this cysteine protease, and identified inhibitors of T. brucei. To discover inhibitors active against rhodesain and T. brucei, we screened a library of covalent fragments against rhodesain and conducted preliminary SAR studies. We envision that in vitro enzymatic assays will further expand the use of the covalent tethering method, a simple fragment-based drug discovery technique to discover covalent drug leads. PMID:26342866

  16. Differential expression of cysteine desulfurases in soybean

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are prosthetic groups required to sustain fundamental life processes including electron transfer, metabolic reactions, sensing, signaling, gene regulation and stabilization of protein structures. In plants, the biogenesis of Fe-S protein is compartmentalized and adapted to specific needs of the cell. Many environmental factors affect plant development and limit productivity and geographical distribution. The impact of these limiting factors is particularly relevant for major crops, such as soybean, which has worldwide economic importance. Results Here we analyze the transcriptional profile of the soybean cysteine desulfurases NFS1, NFS2 and ISD11 genes, involved in the biogenesis of [Fe-S] clusters, by quantitative RT-PCR. NFS1, ISD11 and NFS2 encoding two mitochondrial and one plastid located proteins, respectively, are duplicated and showed distinct transcript levels considering tissue and stress response. NFS1 and ISD11 are highly expressed in roots, whereas NFS2 showed no differential expression in tissues. Cold-treated plants showed a decrease in NFS2 and ISD11 transcript levels in roots, and an increased expression of NFS1 and ISD11 genes in leaves. Plants treated with salicylic acid exhibited increased NFS1 transcript levels in roots but lower levels in leaves. In silico analysis of promoter regions indicated the presence of different cis-elements in cysteine desulfurase genes, in good agreement with differential expression of each locus. Our data also showed that increasing of transcript levels of mitochondrial genes, NFS1/ISD11, are associated with higher activities of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, two cytosolic Fe-S proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest a relationship between gene expression pattern, biochemical effects, and transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of cysteine desulfurase genes. Moreover, data show proportionality between NFS1 and ISD11 genes expression. PMID:22099069

  17. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2009-10-13

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  18. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false L-Cysteine. 184.1271 Section 184.1271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the...

  20. Factors Supporting Cysteine Tolerance and Sulfite Production in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity. PMID:23417561

  1. Cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags for enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Giron, Priscille; Dayon, Loïc; Mihala, Nikolett; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Rose, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Considering the tremendous complexity and the wide dynamic range of protein samples from biological origin and their proteolytic peptide mixtures, proteomics largely requires simplification strategies. One common approach to reduce sample complexity is to target a particular amino acid in proteins or peptides, such as cysteine (Cys), with chemical tags in order to reduce the analysis to a subset of the whole proteome. The present work describes the synthesis and the use of two new cysteinyl tags, so-called cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags (C3T), for the isolation of Cys-containing peptides. These bifunctional molecules were specifically designed to react with cysteines through iodoacetyl and acryloyl moieties and permit efficient selection of the tagged peptides. To do so, a thioproline was chosen as the isolating group to form, after a deprotection/activation step, a thiazolidine with an aldehyde resin by the covalent capture (CC) method. The applicability of the enrichment strategy was demonstrated on small synthetic peptides as well as on peptides derived from digested proteins. Mass spectrometric (MS) analysis and tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) sequencing confirmed the efficient and straightforward selection of the cysteine-containing peptides. The combination of C3T and CC methods provides an effective alternative to reduce sample complexity and access low abundance proteins. PMID:19813279

  2. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid (C3H7O2NS). (b) The ingredient meets the appropriate part of the specification set forth...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid (C3H7O2NS). (b) The ingredient meets the appropriate part of the specification set forth...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid (C3H7O2NS). (b) The ingredient meets the appropriate part of the specification set forth...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3-mercaptopropanoic acid (C3H7O2NS). (b) The ingredient meets the appropriate part of the specification set forth...

  7. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26947058

  8. A novel cysteine desulfurase influencing organosulfur compounds in Lentinula edodes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Lei, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Lian-Fu; Bian, Yin-Bing; Yang, Hong; Ibrahim, Salam A.; Huang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are the basis for the unique aroma of Lentinula edodes, and cysteine sulfoxide lyase (C-S lyase) is the key enzyme in this trait. The enzyme from Alliium sativum has been crystallized and well-characterized; however, there have been no reports of the characterization of fungi C-S lyase at the molecular level. We identified a L. edodes C-S lyase (Lecsl), cloned a gene of Csl encoded Lecsl and then combined modeling, simulations, and experiments to understand the molecular basis of the function of Lecsl. Our analysis revealed Lecsl to be a novel cysteine desulfurase and not a type of cysteine sulfoxide lyase. The pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP) molecule bonded tightly to Lecsl to form a Lecsl-PLP complex. Moreover, the Lecsl had one active center that served to bind two kinds of substrates, S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and L-cysteine, and had both cysteine sulfoxide lyase and cysteine desulfurase activity. We found that the amino acid residue Asn393 was essential for the catalytic activity of Lecsl and that the gene Csl encoded a novel cysteine desulfurase to influence organosulfur compounds in L. edodes. Our results provide a new insight into understanding the formation of the unique aroma of L. edodes. PMID:26054293

  9. Cysteine Modification: Probing Channel Structure, Function and Conformational Change.

    PubMed

    Akabas, Myles H

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine substitution has been a powerful tool to investigate the structure and function of proteins. It has been particularly useful for studies of membrane proteins in their native environment, embedded in phospholipid membranes. Among the 20 amino acids, cysteine is uniquely reactive. This reactivity has motivated the synthesis of a wide array of sulfhydryl reactive chemicals. The commercially available array of sulfhydryl reactive reagents has allowed investigators to probe the local steric and electrostatic environment around engineered cysteines and to position fluorescent, paramagnetic and mass probes at specific sites within proteins and for distance measurements between pairs of sites. Probing the reactivity and accessibility of engineered cysteines has been extensively used in Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Method (SCAM) investigations of ion channels, membrane transporters and receptors. These studies have successfully identified the residues lining ion channels, agonist/antagonist and allosteric modulator binding sites, and regions whose conformation changes as proteins transition between different functional states. The thousands of cysteine-substitution mutants reported in the literature demonstrate that, in general, mutation to cysteine is well tolerated. This has allowed systematic studies of residues in transmembrane segments and in other parts of membrane proteins. Finally, by inserting pairs of cysteines and assaying their ability to form disulfide bonds, changes in proximity and mobility relationships between specific positions within a protein can be inferred. Thus, cysteine mutagenesis has provided a wealth of data on the structure of membrane proteins in their functional environment. This data can complement the structural insights obtained from the burgeoning number of crystal structures of detergent solubilized membrane proteins whose functional state is often uncertain. This article will review the use of cysteine mutagenesis to probe

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF DANSYLATED CYSTEINE, GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE, CYSTEINE AND CYSTINE BY NARROW BORE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric (RP-LC/ESI-MS) method has been developed to confirm the identity of dansylated derivatives of cysteine and glutathione, and their respective dimers. Cysteine, GSH, CSSC...

  11. Simultaneous electrochemical determination of L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide at carbon ionic liquid electrode.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Ahmadi, Raheleh; Mahyari, Farzaneh Aghakhani

    2014-04-01

    A linear sweep voltammetric method is used for direct simultaneous determination of L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide (cystine) based on carbon ionic liquid electrode. With carbon ionic liquid electrode as a high performance electrode, two oxidation peaks for L-cysteine (0.62 V) and L-cysteine disulfide (1.3 V) were observed with a significant separation of about 680 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0). The linear ranges were obtained as 1.0-450 and 5.0-700 μM and detection limits were estimated to be 0.298 and 4.258 μM for L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide, respectively. This composite electrode was applied for simultaneous determination of L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide in two real samples, artificial urine and nutrient broth. Satisfactory results were obtained which clearly indicate the applicability of the proposed electrode for simultaneous determination of these compounds in complex matrices. PMID:24459003

  12. A simple isotopic labeling method to study cysteine oxidation in Alzheimer's disease: oxidized cysteine-selective dimethylation (OxcysDML).

    PubMed

    Gu, Liqing; Robinson, Renã A S

    2016-04-01

    Cysteine is widely involved in redox signaling pathways through a number of reversible and irreversible modifications. Reversible modifications (e.g., S-glutathionylation, S-nitrosylation, disulfide bonds, and sulfenic acid) are used to protect proteins from oxidative attack and maintain cellular homeostasis, while irreversible oxidations (e.g., sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid) serve as hallmarks of oxidative stress. Proteomic analysis of cysteine-enriched peptides coupled with reduction of oxidized thiols can be used to measure the oxidation states of cysteine, which is helpful for elucidating the role that oxidative stress plays in biology and disease. As an extension of our previously reported cysDML method, we have developed oxidized cysteine-selective dimethylation (OxcysDML), to investigate the site-specific total oxidation of cysteine residues in biologically relevant samples. OxcysDML employs (1) blocking of free thiols by a cysteine-reactive reagent, (2) enrichment of peptides containing reversibly oxidized cysteine by a solid phase resin, and (3) isotopic labeling of peptide amino groups to quantify cysteine modifications arising from different biological conditions. On-resin enrichment and labeling minimizes sample handing time and improves efficiency in comparison with other redox proteomic methods. OxcysDML is also inexpensive and flexible, as it can accommodate the exploration of various cysteine modifications. Here, we applied the method to liver tissues from a late-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model and wild-type (WT) controls. Because we have previously characterized this proteome using the cysDML approach, we are able here to probe deeper into the redox status of cysteine in AD. OxcysDML identified 1129 cysteine sites (from 527 proteins), among which 828 cysteine sites underwent oxidative modifications. Nineteen oxidized cysteine sites had significant alteration levels in AD and represent proteins involved in metabolic processes. Overall

  13. L-Cysteine metabolism and its nutritional implications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Ren, Wenkai; Yang, Guan; Duan, Jielin; Huang, Xingguo; Fang, Rejun; Li, Chongyong; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong; Hou, Yongqing; Kim, Sung Woo; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    L-Cysteine is a nutritionally semiessential amino acid and is present mainly in the form of L-cystine in the extracellular space. With the help of a transport system, extracellular L-cystine crosses the plasma membrane and is reduced to L-cysteine within cells by thioredoxin and reduced glutathione (GSH). Intracellular L-cysteine plays an important role in cellular homeostasis as a precursor for protein synthesis, and for production of GSH, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), and taurine. L-Cysteine-dependent synthesis of GSH has been investigated in many pathological conditions, while the pathway for L-cysteine metabolism to form H(2)S has received little attention with regard to prevention and treatment of disease in humans. The main objective of this review is to highlight the metabolic pathways of L-cysteine catabolism to GSH, H(2)S, and taurine, with special emphasis on therapeutic and nutritional use of L-cysteine to improve the health and well-being of animals and humans. PMID:25929483

  14. Cysteine peptidases from Phytomonas serpens: biochemical and immunological approaches.

    PubMed

    Elias, Camila G R; Aor, Ana Carolina; Valle, Roberta S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2009-12-01

    Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate trypanosomatid, shares common antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present work, we compared the hydrolytic capability of cysteine peptidases in both trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes presented a 10-fold higher efficiency in hydrolyzing the cysteine peptidase substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC than P. serpens promastigotes. Moreover, two weak cysteine-type gelatinolytic activities were detected in P. serpens, while a strong 50-kDa cysteine peptidase was observed in T. cruzi. Cysteine peptidase activities were detected at twofold higher levels in the cytoplasmic fraction when compared with the membrane-rich or the content released from P. serpens. The cysteine peptidase secreted by P. serpens cleaved several proteinaceous substrates. Corroborating these findings, the cellular distribution of the cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens was attested through immunocytochemistry analysis. Gold particles were observed in all cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, flagellum, flagellar membrane and flagellar pocket. Interestingly, some gold particles were visualized free in the flagellar pocket, suggesting the release of the cruzipain-like molecule. The antigenic properties of the cruzipain-like molecules of P. serpens were also analyzed. Interestingly, sera from chagasic patients recognized both cellular and extracellular antigens of P. serpens, including the cruzipain-like molecule. These results point to the use of P. serpens antigens, especially the cruzipain-like cysteine-peptidases, as an alternative vaccination approach to T. cruzi infection. PMID:19780820

  15. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B.; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L.; Whelan, Stephen A.; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A.; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E.; Cohen, Richard A.; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S.; McComb, Mark E.; Bachschmid, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a ‘Tandem Mass Tag’ (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation. PMID:26642319

  16. Probes of the Catalytic Site of Cysteine Dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chai,S.; Bruyere, J.; Maroney, M.

    2006-01-01

    The first major step of cysteine catabolism, the oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). In the present work, we utilize recombinant rat liver CDO and cysteine derivatives to elucidate structural parameters involved in substrate recognition and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to probe the interaction of the active site iron center with cysteine. Kinetic studies using cysteine structural analogs show that most are inhibitors and that a terminal functional group bearing a negative charge (e.g. a carboxylate) is required for binding. The substrate-binding site has no stringent restrictions with respect to the size of the amino acid. Lack of the amino or carboxyl groups at the a-carbon does not prevent the molecules from interacting with the active site. In fact, cysteamine is shown to be a potent activator of the enzyme without being a substrate. CDO was also rendered inactive upon complexation with the metal-binding inhibitors azide and cyanide. Unlike many non-heme iron dioxygenases that employ a-keto acids as cofactors, CDO was shown to be the only dioxygenase known to be inhibited by {alpha}-ketoglutarate.

  17. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to identify in vitro and in vivo. In this study, model peptides with cysteine, lysine, and histidine residues were used to examine the reactivity of acrolein. Results from these experiments show that acrolein reacts rapidly with cysteine residues through Michael addition to form M+56 Da adducts. These M+56 adducts are, however, not stable, even though spontaneous dissociation of the adduct is slow. Further studies demonstrated that when acrolein and model peptides are incubated at physiological pH and temperature, the M+56 adducts decreased gradually accompanied by the increase of M+38 adducts, which are formed from intra-molecular Schiff base formation. Adduct formation with the side chains of other amino acid residues (lysine and histidine) was much slower than cysteine and required higher acrolein concentration. When cysteine residues were blocked by reaction with iodoacetamide and higher concentrations of acrolein were used, adducts of the N-terminal amino group or histidyl residues were formed but lysine adducts were not detected. Collectively, these data demonstrate that acrolein reacts avidly with protein cysteine residues and that the apparent loss of protein-acrolein Michael adducts over time may be related to the appearance of a novel (M+38) adduct. These findings may be important in identification of in vivo adducts of acrolein with protein cysteine residues. PMID:19231900

  18. Effect of (L)-cysteine on acetaldehyde self-administration.

    PubMed

    Peana, Alessandra T; Muggironi, Giulia; Fois, Giulia R; Zinellu, Manuel; Sirca, Donatella; Diana, Marco

    2012-08-01

    Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first metabolite of ethanol, has been implicated in several behavioural actions of alcohol, including its reinforcing effects. Recently, we reported that l-cysteine, a sequestrating agent of ACD, reduced oral ethanol self-administration and that ACD was orally self-administered. This study examined the effects of l-cysteine pre-treatment during the acquisition and maintenance phases of ACD (0.2%) self-administration as well as on the deprivation effect after ACD extinction and on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. In a separate PR schedule of reinforcement, the effect of l-cysteine was assessed on the break-point produced by ethanol (10%). Furthermore, we tested the effect of l-cysteine on saccharin (0.2%) reinforcement. Wistar rats were trained to self-administer ACD by nose poking on a fixed ratio (FR1) schedule in 30-min daily sessions. Responses on an active nose-poke caused delivery of ACD solution, whereas responses on an inactive nose-poke had no consequences. l-cysteine reduced the acquisition (40 mg/kg), the maintenance and the deprivation effect (100 mg/kg) of ACD self-administration. Furthermore, at the same dose, l-cysteine (120 mg/kg) decreased both ACD and ethanol break point. In addition, l-cysteine was unable to suppress the different responses for saccharin, suggesting that its effect did not relate to an unspecific decrease in a general motivational state. Compared to saline, l-cysteine did not modify responses on inactive nose-pokes, suggesting an absence of a non-specific behavioural activation. Taken together, these results could support the hypotheses that ACD possesses reinforcing properties and l-cysteine reduces motivation to self-administer ACD. PMID:22440691

  19. On methylene-bridged cysteine and lysine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Cysteine residues ubiquitously stabilize tertiary and quaternary protein structure by formation of disulfide bridges. Here we investigate another linking interaction that involves sulfhydryl groups of cysteines, namely intra- and intermolecular methylene-bridges between cysteine and lysine residues. A number of crystal structures possessing such a linkage were identified in the Protein Data Bank. Inspection of the electron density maps and re-refinement of the nominated structures unequivocally confirmed the presence of Lys-CH2 -Cys bonds in several cases. PMID:27261771

  20. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  1. Organometallic Palladium Reagents for Cysteine Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal based reactions have found wide use in organic synthesis and are used frequently to functionalize small molecules.1,2 However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal based reactions to modify complex biomolecules3,4, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature, and mild pH) and the existence of multiple, reactive functional groups found in biopolymers. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation reactions. The bioconjugation reaction is rapid and robust under a range of biocompatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants, and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the new bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as a new set of benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications. PMID:26511579

  2. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M; Pentelute, Bradley L; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-10-29

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications. PMID:26511579

  3. Developing novel anthelmintics from plant cysteine proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Jerzy M; Buttle, David J; Stepek, Gillian; Lowe, Ann; Duce, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal helminth infections of livestock and humans are predominantly controlled by treatment with three classes of synthetic drugs, but some livestock nematodes have now developed resistance to all three classes and there are signs that human hookworms are becoming less responsive to the two classes (benzimidazoles and the nicotinic acetylcholine agonists) that are licensed for treatment of humans. New anthelmintics are urgently needed, and whilst development of new synthetic drugs is ongoing, it is slow and there are no signs yet that novel compounds operating through different modes of action, will be available on the market in the current decade. The development of naturally-occurring compounds as medicines for human use and for treatment of animals is fraught with problems. In this paper we review the current status of cysteine proteinases from fruits and protective plant latices as novel anthelmintics, we consider some of the problems inherent in taking laboratory findings and those derived from folk-medicine to the market and we suggest that there is a wealth of new compounds still to be discovered that could be harvested to benefit humans and livestock. PMID:18761736

  4. Cathepsin K: a unique collagenolytic cysteine peptidase.

    PubMed

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2013-09-01

    Cathepsin K has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Initially identified as a papain-like cysteine peptidase expressed in high levels in osteoclasts, the important role of this enzyme in bone metabolism was highlighted by the finding that mutations in the CTSK gene cause the rare recessive disorder pycnodysostosis, which is characterized by severe bone anomalies. At the molecular level, the physiological role of cathepsin K is reflected by its unique cleavage pattern of type I collagen molecules, which is fundamentally different from that of other endogenous collagenases. Several cathepsin K inhibitors have been developed to reduce the excessive bone matrix degradation associated with osteoporosis, with the frontrunner odanacatib about to successfully conclude Phase 3 clinical trials. Apart from osteoclasts, cathepsin K is expressed in different cell types throughout the body and is involved in processes of adipogenesis, thyroxine liberation and peptide hormone regulation. Elevated activity of cathepsin K has been associated with arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity, schizophrenia, and tumor metastasis. Accordingly, its activity is tightly regulated via multiple mechanisms, including competitive inhibition by endogenous macromolecular inhibitors and allosteric regulation by glycosaminoglycans. This review provides a state-of-the-art description of the activity of cathepsin K at the molecular level, its biological functions and the mechanisms involved in its regulation. PMID:23629523

  5. Reactivity of C-terminal cysteines with HNO.

    PubMed

    Keceli, Gizem; Toscano, John P

    2014-06-10

    Nitroxyl (HNO), a potential heart failure therapeutic, is known to target cysteine residues to form sulfinamides and/or disulfides. Because HNO-derived modifications may depend on their local environment, we have investigated the reactivity of HNO with cysteine derivatives and C-terminal cysteine-containing peptides at physiological pH and temperature. Our findings indicate that the nature of HNO-derived modifications of C-terminal cysteines is affected by the C-terminal carboxylate. Apart from the lack of sulfinamide formation, these studies have revealed the presence of new products, a sulfohydroxamic acid derivative (RS(O)2NHOH) and a thiosulfonate (RS(O)2SR), presumably produced under our experimental conditions via the intermediacy of a cyclic structure that is hydrolyzed to give a sulfenic acid (RSOH). Moreover, these modifications are formed independent of oxygen. PMID:24869490

  6. Metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulfinate in rat and cat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, J; Drake, M R; Stipanuk, M H

    1987-03-01

    The metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulfinate was studied in freshly isolated hepatocytes from fed rats and cats. In incubations of rat hepatocytes with cysteinesulfinate, the rate of hypotaurine plus taurine production was approximately the same as the rate of conversion of the 1-carbon of cysteinesulfinate to CO2. In contrast, no significant production of hypotaurine plus taurine occurred in incubations of cat hepatocytes with cysteinesulfinate. These data are consistent with the species difference in the activity of hepatic cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase, which converts cysteinesulfinate to hypotaurine. In incubations of either rat or cat hepatocytes with cysteine, no hypotaurine plus taurine production was detected. However, the 1-carbon of cysteine was converted to CO2 and the production of urea plus ammonia nitrogen was significantly increased over the rates observed in incubations of cells without substrate. Our results suggest that most cysteine oxidation by hepatocytes occurs by pathways that do not involve formation of cysteinesulfinate. PMID:3106599

  7. Role of cysteine residues in regulation of p53 function.

    PubMed

    Rainwater, R; Parks, D; Anderson, M E; Tegtmeyer, P; Mann, K

    1995-07-01

    Previous studies of p53 have implicated cysteine residues in site-specific DNA binding via zinc coordination and redox regulation (P. Hainaut and J. Milner, Cancer Res. 53:4469-4473, 1993; T. R. Hupp, D. W. Meek, C. A. Midgley, and D. P. Lane, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:3167-3174, 1993). We show here that zinc binding and redox regulation are, at least in part, distinct determinants of the binding of p53 to DNA. Moreover, by substituting serine for each cysteine in murine p53, we have investigated the roles of individual cysteines in the regulation of p53 function. Substitution of serine for cysteine at position 40, 179, 274, 293, or 308 had little or no effect on p53 function. In contrast, replacement of cysteine at position 173, 235, or 239 markedly reduced in vitro DNA binding, completely blocked transcriptional activation, and led to a striking enhancement rather than a suppression of transformation by p53. These three cysteines have been implicated in zinc binding by X-ray diffraction studies (Y. Cho, S. Gorina, P.D. Jeffrey, and N.P. Pavletich, Science 265:346-355, 1994); our studies demonstrate the functional consequences of the inability of the central DNA-binding domain of p53 to studies demonstrate the functional consequences of the inability of the central DNA-binding domain of p53 to bind zinc. Lastly, substitutions for cysteines at position 121, 132, 138, or 272 partially blocked both transactivation and the suppression of transformation by p53. These four cysteines are located in the loop-sheet-helix region of the site-specific DNA-binding domain of p53. Like the cysteines in the zinc-binding region, therefore, these cysteines may cooperate to modulate the structure of the DNA-binding domain. Our findings argue that p53 is subject to more than one level of conformational modulation through oxidation-reduction of cysteines at or near the p53-DNA interface. PMID:7791795

  8. Methionine-to-Cysteine Recycling in Klebsiella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Seiflein, Thomas A.; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.

    2001-01-01

    In the enteric bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, sulfate is reduced to sulfide and assimilated into the amino acid cysteine; in turn, cysteine provides the sulfur atom for other sulfur-bearing molecules in the cell, including methionine. These organisms cannot use methionine as a sole source of sulfur. Here we report that this constraint is not shared by many other enteric bacteria, which can use either cysteine or methionine as the sole source of sulfur. The enteric bacterium Klebsiella aerogenes appears to use at least two pathways to allow the reduced sulfur of methionine to be recycled into cysteine. In addition, the ability to recycle methionine on solid media, where cys mutants cannot use methionine as a sulfur source, appears to be different from that in liquid media, where they can. One pathway likely uses a cystathionine intermediate to convert homocysteine to cysteine and is induced under conditions of sulfur starvation, which is likely sensed by low levels of the sulfate reduction intermediate adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate. The CysB regulatory proteins appear to control activation of this pathway. A second pathway may use a methanesulfonate intermediate to convert methionine-derived methanethiol to sulfite. While the transsulfurylation pathway may be directed to recovery of methionine, the methanethiol pathway likely represents a general salvage mechanism for recovery of alkane sulfide and alkane sulfonates. Therefore, the relatively distinct biosyntheses of cysteine and methionine in E. coli and Salmonella appear to be more intertwined in Klebsiella. PMID:11114934

  9. Measurement of Cysteine Dioxygenase Activity and Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Stipanuk, Martha H.; Dominy, John E.; Ueki, Iori; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is an iron (Fe2+)-dependent thiol dioxygenase that uses molecular oxygen to oxidize the sulfhydryl group of cysteine to generate 3-sulfinoalanine (commonly called cysteinesulfinic acid). Cysteine dioxygenase activity is routinely assayed by measuring cysteinesulfinate formation from substrate L-cysteine at pH 6.1 in the presence of ferrous ions to saturate the enzyme with metal cofactor, a copper chelator to diminish substrate oxidation, and hydroxylamine to inhibit pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent degradation of product. The amount of cysteine dioxygenase may be measured by immunoblotting. Upon SDS-PAGE, cysteine dioxygenase can be separated into two major bands, with the upper band representing the 23-kDa protein and the lower band representing the mature enzyme that has undergone formation of an internal thioether cross link in the active site. Formation of this cross link is dependent upon the catalytic turnover of substrate and produces an enzyme with a higher catalytic efficiency and catalytic half-life. PMID:19885389

  10. Bovine superoxide dismutase and copper ions potentiate the bactericidal effect of autoxidizing cysteine.

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, G K; Granberg, G P; Carlsson, J

    1979-01-01

    When cysteine is oxidized by oxygen, hydrogen peroxide is formed, and hydrogen peroxide is very toxic to Peptostreptococcus anaerobius VPI 4330-1. Native and inactivated superoxide dismutase increased the rate of oxidation of cysteine and thereby potentiated the toxic effect of cysteine. A similar increase in the rate of oxidation of cysteine and in the toxicity of cysteine was obtained with Cu2+. PMID:573589

  11. Cysteine-dependent inactivation of hepatic ornithine decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Kameji, T; Hayashi, S

    1984-01-01

    When rat liver homogenate or its postmitochondrial supernatant was incubated with L-cysteine, but not D-cysteine, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) lost more than half of its catalytic activity within 30 min and, at a slower rate, its immunoreactivity. The inactivation correlated with production of H2S during the incubation. These changes did not occur in liver homogenates from vitamin B6-deficient rats. A heat-stable inactivating factor was found in both dialysed cytosol and washed microsomes obtained from the postmitochondrial supernatant incubated with cysteine. The microsomal inactivating factor was solubilized into Tris/HCl buffer, pH 7.4, containing dithiothreitol. Its absorption spectrum in the visible region resembled that of Fe2+ X dithiothreitol in Tris/HCl buffer. On the other hand FeSO4 inactivated partially purified ODC in a similar manner to the present inactivating factor. During the incubation of postmitochondrial supernatant with cysteine, there was a marked increase in the contents of Fe2+ loosely bound to cytosolic and microsomal macromolecules. Furthermore, the content of such reactive iron in the inactivating factor preparations was enough to account for their inactivating activity. These data suggested that H2S produced from cysteine by some vitamin B6-dependent enzyme(s) converted cytosolic and microsomal iron into a reactive loosely bound form that inactivated ODC. PMID:6696745

  12. Cysteines under ROS attack in plants: a proteomics view.

    PubMed

    Akter, Salma; Huang, Jingjing; Waszczak, Cezary; Jacques, Silke; Gevaert, Kris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2015-05-01

    Plants generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as part of their metabolism and in response to various external stress factors, potentially causing significant damage to biomolecules and cell structures. During the course of evolution, plants have adapted to ROS toxicity, and use ROS as signalling messengers that activate defence responses. Cysteine (Cys) residues in proteins are one of the most sensitive targets for ROS-mediated post-translational modifications, and they have become key residues for ROS signalling studies. The reactivity of Cys residues towards ROS, and their ability to react to different oxidation states, allow them to appear at the crossroads of highly dynamic oxidative events. As such, a redox-active cysteine can be present as S-glutathionylated (-SSG), disulfide bonded (S-S), sulfenylated (-SOH), sulfinylated (-SO2H), and sulfonylated (-SO3H). The sulfenic acid (-SOH) form has been considered as part of ROS-sensing pathways, as it leads to further modifications which affect protein structure and function. Redox proteomic studies are required to understand how and why cysteines undergo oxidative post-translational modifications and to identify the ROS-sensor proteins. Here, we update current knowledge of cysteine reactivity with ROS. Further, we give an overview of proteomic techniques that have been applied to identify different redox-modified cysteines in plants. There is a particular focus on the identification of sulfenylated proteins, which have the potential to be involved in plant signal transduction. PMID:25750420

  13. THE ROLE OF CYSTEINE PROTEASE IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Hasanbasic, Samra; Jahic, Alma; Karahmet, Emina; Sejranic, Asja; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cysteine protease are biological catalysts which play a pivotal role in numerous biological reactions in organism. Much of the literature is inscribed to their biochemical significance, distribution and mechanism of action. Many diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, develop due to enzyme balance disruption. Understanding of cysteine protease’s disbalance is therefor a key to unravel the new possibilities of treatment. Cysteine protease are one of the most important enzymes for protein disruption during programmed cell death. Whether protein disruption is part of cell deaths is not enough clear in any cases. Thereafter, any tissue disruption, including proteolysis, generate more or less inflammation appearance. Review: This review briefly summarizes the current knowledge about pathological mechanism’s that results in AD, with significant reference to the role of cysteine protease in it. Based on the summary, new pharmacological approach and development of novel potent drugs with selective toxicity targeting cysteine protease will be a major challenge in years to come. PMID:27482169

  14. Kyste hydatique primitif du sein

    PubMed Central

    Mouslik, Rabii; Settaf, Abdellatif; Elalami, Yacir; Lahnini, Hicham; Lahlou, Khalid; Chad, Bouziane

    2012-01-01

    Le kyste hydatique du sein est une parasitose rare même dans les pays endémiques. Nous rapportons une nouvelle observation d'une patiente de 30 ans qui présentait une masse du sein gauche. Le diagnostic de kyste hydatique du sein a été évoqué devant les données de l'examen clinique et de la mammographie couplée à l’échographie. Le geste chirurgical a consisté en une kystectomie. L'examen anatomopathologique de la pièce opératoire a confirmé le diagnostic. PMID:23133704

  15. Development of nitrile-based peptidic inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Frizler, Maxim; Stirnberg, Marit; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that several papain-like cysteine cathepsins are involved in the pathophysiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Therefore, the development of potent and selective cathepsin inhibitors is an attractive subject for medicinal chemists. New advances have been made for nitrile-based inhibitors, leading to the identification of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib and other candidates with potential for therapeutic use. This review summarizes the development of peptidic and peptidomimetic compounds with an electrophilic nitrile 'warhead' as inhibitors of the cysteine cathepsins B, S, L, C, and K. Peptide nitriles have been shown to reversibly react with the active site cysteine under formation of a covalent thioimidate adduct. The structural optimization with respect to the positions P3, P2, P1, P1', and P2' resulted in the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the corresponding cathepsins. The underlying structure-activity relationships are discussed herein. PMID:20166952

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Cysteine Adducts of Deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Stanic, Ana; Uhlig, Silvio; Solhaug, Anita; Rise, Frode; Wilkins, Alistair L; Miles, Christopher O

    2016-06-15

    Conjugation with the biologically relevant thiol glutathione is one of the metabolic pathways for the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) in wheat. The occurrence of putative DON-cysteine conjugates has also been shown in wheat, likely in part as a result of degradation of the glutathione conjugates. It was reported that thiols react in vitro with DON at two positions: reversibly at C-10 of the α,β-unsaturated ketone and irreversibly at C-13 of the epoxy group. We synthesized pure DON-cysteine adducts and made analytical standards using quantitative NMR experiments. Compounds were characterized using NMR and LC-HRMS/MS and tested in vitro for toxicity. Cysteine conjugates were much less toxic than DON at the same concentration, and LC-HRMS analysis demonstrated that there was no detectable metabolism of the conjugates in human monocytes or human macrophages. PMID:27229448

  17. Chemical Protein Ubiquitylation with Preservation of the Native Cysteine Residues.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Li, Guorui; Gong, Ping; Gui, Weijun; Yuan, Libo; Zhuang, Zhihao

    2016-06-01

    We report a cysteine-based ligation strategy for generating a monoubiquitylated protein while preserving the native cysteine residues on the acceptor protein. In monoubiquitylation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) this method circumvents the need to mutate the native cysteine residues on PCNA. The chemically ubiquitylated PCNA contains a noncleavable linkage of the same length as the native isopeptide linkage. It also retains the normal function of the native Ub-PCNA in stimulating the ATPase activity of replication factor C (RFC) and lesion bypass synthesis by Polη. This method may be adapted for chemical ubiquitylation of other proteins and for site-specific modification of a target protein at a specific site through sulfhydryl chemistry. PMID:27113245

  18. Density functional study of the cysteine adsorption on Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, L. A.; López-Lozano, X.; Garzón, I. L.

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption of the cysteine amino acid (H-SCβH2-CαH-NH2-COOH) on the Au55 cluster is investigated through density functional theory calculations. Two isomers, with icosahedral (Ih) and chiral (C1) geometries, of the Au55 cluster are used to calculate the adsorption energy of the cysteine on different facets of these isomers. Results, only involving the S(thiolate)-Au bonding show that the higher adsorption energies are obtained when the sulfur atom is bonded to an asymmetrical bridge site at the facet containing Au atoms with the lowest coordination of the C1 cluster isomer.

  19. Hypohomocysteinemic effect of cysteine is associated with increased plasma cysteine concentration in rats fed diets low in protein and methionine levels.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yoshiko; Ohuchi, Seiya; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2009-02-01

    Rats were fed diets with and without 0.5% L-cysteine supplement for 14 d or shorter periods to clarify the mechanism by which dietary cysteine elicits its hypohomocysteinemic effect. Cysteine supplementation significantly decreased plasma homocysteine concentration with an increase in plasma cysteine concentration in rats fed 10% casein diet (10C) or 15% soybean protein diet (15S) but not in rats fed 25% casein diet (25C) or 25% soybean protein diet. Cysteine supplementation also significantly suppressed hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline-deprived 10C with an increase in plasma cysteine concentration but not that induced by 25C+0.65% methionine or 25C+0.4% guanidinoacetic acid. Hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and homocysteine concentrations were significantly decreased by cysteine supplementation of 15S. These decreases in plasma homocysteine concentration and hepatic SAM and homocysteine concentrations due to cysteine supplementation disappeared when 15S was fortified with 0.3% methionine. The plasma homocysteine concentration significantly decreased with an increase in plasma cysteine concentration only 1 d after diet change from 15S to cysteine-supplemented 15S, while hepatic cystathionine beta-synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase activities were not altered. Unlike cysteine, cysteic acid and 2-mercaptoethylamine did not decrease plasma homocysteine concentration. These results indicate that cysteine markedly decreases plasma homocysteine concentration only when added to diets low in both protein and methionine levels and suggest that increased plasma cysteine concentration and decreased flow of methionine toward homocysteine formation, but not alteration of homocysteine-metabolizing enzyme activities, are associated with the hypohomocysteinemic effect of cysteine. PMID:19352065

  20. Modulation of cysteine biosynthesis in chloroplasts of transgenic tobacco overexpressing cysteine synthase [O-acetylserine(thiol)-lyase].

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Kurosawa, M; Tatsuguchi, K; Takagi, Y; Murakoshi, I

    1994-11-01

    Cysteine synthase [O-acetyl-L-serine(thiol)-lyase, EC 4.2.99.8] (CSase), which is responsible for the terminal step of cysteine biosynthesis, catalyzes the formation of L-cysteine from O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) and hydrogen sulfide. Three T-DNA vectors carrying a spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cytoplasmic CSase A cDNA (K. Saito, N. Miura, M. Yamazaki, H. Horano, I. Murakoshi [1992] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89: 8078-8082) were constructed as follows: pCSK3F, cDNA driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA promoter with a sense orientation; pCSK3R, cDNA driven by the CaMV 355 promoter with an antisense orientation; pCSK4F, cDNA fused with the sequence for chloroplast-targeting transit peptide of pea ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase small subunit driven by the CaMV 35S promoter with a sense orientation. These chimeric genes were transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and self-fertilized progeny were obtained. CSase activities in cell-free extracts of pCSK3F and pCSK4F transformants were 2- to 3-fold higher than those of control and pCSK3R plants. CSase activities in chloroplasts of pCSK4F transformants were severalfold higher than those of control and pCSK3F plants, indicating that the foreign CSase protein is transported and accumulated in a functionally active form in chloroplasts of pCSK4F plants. Isolated chloroplasts of a pCSK4F transformant had a more pronounced ability to form cysteine in response to addition of OAS and sulfur compounds than those of a control plant. In particular, feeding of OAS and sulfite resulted in enhanced cysteine formation, which required photoreduction of sulfite in chloroplasts. The enhanced cysteine formation in a pCSK4F plant responding to sulfite was also observed in leaf discs. In addition, these leaf discs were partially resistant to sulfite toxicity, possibly due to metabolic detoxification of sulfite by fixing into cysteine. These results suggested that overaccumulated

  1. Measuring Cysteine Cathepsin Activity to Detect Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Urška; Česen, Maruša Hafner; Turk, Boris

    2016-01-01

    During lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), lysosomal lumenal contents can be released into the cytosol. Small molecules are more likely to be released, and cysteine cathepsins, with mature forms possessing a mass of 25-30 kDa, are among the smallest lumenal lysosomal enzymes. In addition, specific substrates for cysteine cathepsins are available to investigators, and therefore the measurement of the cathepsin activity as a hallmark of LMP works well. Here, we present a protocol for measuring the activity of these enzymes after selective plasma membrane permeabilization with a low concentration of digitonin and after total cell membrane lysis with a high concentration of digitonin. A fluorogenic substrate can be added either directly to the well with lysed cells to show LMP or to the cell-free extract to show that the lysosomal membrane has been sufficiently destabilized to allow the translocation of lysosomal enzymes. Although the content of lysosomal cysteine cathepsins differs between cell lines, this method has general applicability, is sensitive, and has high throughput. The presented protocol shows how to measure cysteine cathepsin activity in the presence of lysed cells and also in cell-free extracts. Depending on the aim of the study, one or both types of measurements can be performed. PMID:27140915

  2. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cysteine Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Chay, Kee-Oh; Kwon, Joseph; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Park, Young-Kyu; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes damage to cellular proteins, lipids, membranes and DNA, and plays a key role in the development of cancer. Reactive oxygen species disrupt redox homeostasis and promote tumor formation by initiating aberrant activation of signaling pathways that lead to tumorigenesis. We used shotgun proteomics to identify proteins containing oxidation-sensitive cysteines in tissue specimens from colorectal cancer patients. We then compared the patterns of cysteine oxidation in the membrane fractions between the tumor and non-tumor tissues. Using nano-UPLC-MSE proteomics, we identified 31 proteins containing 37 oxidation-sensitive cysteines. These proteins were observed with IAM-binding cysteines in non-tumoral region more than tumoral region of CRC patients. Then using the Ingenuity pathway program, we evaluated the cellular canonical networks connecting those proteins. Within the networks, proteins with multiple connections were related with organ morphology, cellular metabolism, and various disorders. We have thus identified networks of proteins whose redox status is altered by oxidative stress, perhaps leading to changes in cellular functionality that promotes tumorigenesis. PMID:23677378

  3. DISULFIND: a disulfide bonding state and cysteine connectivity prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Ceroni, Alessio; Passerini, Andrea; Vullo, Alessandro; Frasconi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    DISULFIND is a server for predicting the disulfide bonding state of cysteines and their disulfide connectivity starting from sequence alone. Optionally, disulfide connectivity can be predicted from sequence and a bonding state assignment given as input. The output is a simple visualization of the assigned bonding state (with confidence degrees) and the most likely connectivity patterns. The server is available at . PMID:16844986

  4. Unfolding the fold of cyclic cysteine-rich peptides

    PubMed Central

    Shehu, Amarda; Kavraki, Lydia E.; Clementi, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    We propose a method to extensively characterize the native state ensemble of cyclic cysteine-rich peptides. The method uses minimal information, namely, amino acid sequence and cyclization, as a topological feature that characterizes the native state. The method does not assume a specific disulfide bond pairing for cysteines and allows the possibility of unpaired cysteines. A detailed view of the conformational space relevant for the native state is obtained through a hierarchic multi-resolution exploration. A crucial feature of the exploration is a geometric approach that efficiently generates a large number of distinct cyclic conformations independently of one another. A spatial and energetic analysis of the generated conformations associates a free-energy landscape to the explored conformational space. Application to three long cyclic peptides of different folds shows that the conformational ensembles and cysteine arrangements associated with free energy minima are fully consistent with available experimental data. The results provide a detailed analysis of the native state features of cyclic peptides that can be further tested in experiment. PMID:18287281

  5. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184.1272 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272...

  6. DNA cleavage by oxymyoglobin and cysteine-introduced metmyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Megha Subhash; Junedi, Sendy; Prakash, Halan; Nagao, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Masaru; Hirota, Shun

    2014-12-11

    Double stranded DNA was cleaved oxidatively by incubation with oxygenated myoglobin, and Lys96Cys sperm whale myoglobin in its stable ferric form functioned as an artificial nuclease under air by formation of an oxygenated species, owing to electron transfer from the SH group of the introduced cysteine to the heme. PMID:25327831

  7. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  8. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  9. Cysteine Racemization on IgG Heavy and Light Chains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingchun; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Under basic pH conditions, the heavy chain 220-light chain 214 (H220-L214) disulfide bond, found in the flexible hinge region of an IgG1, can convert to a thioether. Similar conditions also result in racemization of the H220 cysteine. Here, we report that racemization occurs on both H220 and L214 on an IgG1 with a λ light chain (IgG1λ) but almost entirely on H220 of an IgGl with a κ light chain (IgG1κ) under similar conditions. Likewise, racemization was detected at significant levels on H220 and L214 on endogenous human IgG1λ but only at the H220 position on IgG1κ. Low but measurable levels of d-cysteines were found on IgG2 cysteines in the hinge region, both with monoclonal antibodies incubated under basic pH conditions and on antibodies isolated from human serum. A simplified reaction mechanism involving reversible β-elimination on the cysteine is presented that accounts for both base-catalyzed racemization and thioether formation at the hinge disulfide. PMID:24142697

  10. Synthesis of Protein Bioconjugates via Cysteine-maleimide Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mason, Alexander F; Thordarson, Pall

    2016-01-01

    The chemical linking or bioconjugation of proteins to fluorescent dyes, drugs, polymers and other proteins has a broad range of applications, such as the development of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) and nanomedicine, fluorescent microscopy and systems chemistry. For many of these applications, specificity of the bioconjugation method used is of prime concern. The Michael addition of maleimides with cysteine(s) on the target proteins is highly selective and proceeds rapidly under mild conditions, making it one of the most popular methods for protein bioconjugation. We demonstrate here the modification of the only surface-accessible cysteine residue on yeast cytochrome c with a ruthenium(II) bisterpyridine maleimide. The protein bioconjugation is verified by gel electrophoresis and purified by aqueous-based fast protein liquid chromatography in 27% yield of isolated protein material. Structural characterization with MALDI-TOF MS and UV-Vis is then used to verify that the bioconjugation is successful. The protocol shown here is easily applicable to other cysteine - maleimide coupling of proteins to other proteins, dyes, drugs or polymers. PMID:27501061

  11. IDENTIFYING CRITICAL CYSTEINE RESIDUES IN ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic to mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. Orthologous AS3MT genes in genomes ranging from simple echinoderm to human predict a protein with five conserved cysteine (C) residues. In ...

  12. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  13. Dealing with methionine/homocysteine sulfur: cysteine metabolism to taurine and inorganic sulfur

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Iori

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of cysteine as a product of the transsulfuration pathway can be viewed as part of methionine or homocysteine degradation, with cysteine being the vehicle for sulfur conversion to end products (sulfate, taurine) that can be excreted in the urine. Transsulfuration is regulated by stimulation of cystathionine β-synthase and inhibition of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase in response to changes in the level of S-adenosylmethionine, and this promotes homocysteine degradation when methionine availability is high. Cysteine is catabolized by several desulfuration reactions that release sulfur in a reduced oxidation state, generating sulfane sulfur or hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which can be further oxidized to sulfate. Cysteine desulfuration is accomplished by alternate reactions catalyzed by cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. Cysteine is also catabolized by pathways that require the initial oxidation of the cysteine thiol by cysteine dioxygenase to form cysteinesulfinate. The oxidative pathway leads to production of taurine and sulfate in a ratio of approximately 2:1. Relative metabolism of cysteine by desulfuration versus oxidative pathways is influenced by cysteine dioxygenase activity, which is low in animals fed low-protein diets and high in animals fed excess sulfur amino acids. Thus, desulfuration reactions dominate when cysteine is deficient, whereas oxidative catabolism dominates when cysteine is in excess. In rats consuming a diet with an adequate level of sulfur amino acids, about two thirds of cysteine catabolism occurs by oxidative pathways and one third by desulfuration pathways. Cysteine dioxygenase is robustly regulated in response to cysteine availability and may function to provide a pathway to siphon cysteine to less toxic metabolites than those produced by cysteine desulfuration reactions. PMID:20162368

  14. Intrinsic membrane association of Drosophila cysteine string proteins.

    PubMed

    Mastrogiacomo, A; Kohan, S A; Whitelegge, J P; Gundersen, C B

    1998-09-25

    Cysteine string proteins (csps) are highly conserved constituents of vertebrate and invertebrate secretory organelles. Biochemical and immunoprecipitation experiments implied that vertebrate csps were integral membrane proteins that were tethered to the outer leaflet of secretory vesicles via the fatty acyl residues of their extensively acylated cysteine string. Independently, work of others suggested that Drosophila csps were peripheral membrane proteins that were anchored to membranes by a mechanism that was independent of the cysteine string and its fatty acyl residues. We extended these investigation and found first that sodium carbonate treatment partially stripped both csps and the integral membrane protein, synaptotagmin, from Drosophila membranes. Concomitantly, carbonate released fatty acids into the medium, arguing that it has a mild, solubilizing effect on these membranes. Second, we observed that Drosophila csps behaved like integral membrane proteins in Triton X-114 partitioning experiments. Third, we found that when membrane-bound csps were deacylated, they remained membrane bound. Moreover, it appeared that hydrophobic interactions were necessary for this persistent membrane association of csps. Thus, neither reducing conditions, urea, nor chaotropic agents displaced deacylated csps from membranes. Only detergents were effective in solubilizing deacylated csps. Finally, by virtue of the inaccessibility of deacylated csps to thiol alkylation by the membrane-impermeant alkylating reagent, iodoacetic acid, we inferred that it was the cysteine string domain that mediated the membrane association of deacylated csps. Thus, we conclude that under physiological conditions csps are integral membrane proteins of secretory organelles, and that the cysteine string domain plays a vital role in the membrane association of these proteins. PMID:9771899

  15. Specific Prenylation of Tomato Rab Proteins by Geranylgeranyl Type-II Transferase Requires a Conserved Cysteine-Cysteine Motif.

    PubMed Central

    Yalovsky, S.; Loraine, A. E.; Gruissem, W.

    1996-01-01

    Posttranslational isoprenylation of some small GTP-binding proteins is required for their biological activity. Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (Rab GGTase) uses geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to modify Rab proteins, its only known substrates. Geranylgeranylation of Rabs is believed to promote their association with target membranes and interaction with other proteins. Plants, like other eukaryotes, contain Rab-like proteins that are associated with intracellular membranes. However, to our knowledge, the geranylgeranylation of Rab proteins has not yet been characterized from any plant source. This report presents an activity assay that allows the characterization of prenylation of Rab-like proteins in vitro, by protein extracts prepared from plants. Tomato Rab1 proteins and mammalian Rab1a were modified by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by farnesyl pyrophosphate. This modification required a conserved cysteine-cysteine motif. A mutant form lacking the cysteine-cysteine motif could not be modified, but inhibited the geranylgeranylation of its wild-type homolog. The tomato Rab proteins were modified in vitro by protein extract prepared from yeast, but failed to become modified when the protein extract was prepared from a yeast strain containing a mutant allele for the [alpha] subunit of yeast Rab GGTase (bet4 ts). These results demonstrate that plant cells, like other eukaryotes, contain Rab GGTase-like activity. PMID:12226265

  16. Bioactivation of cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides by cysteine conjugate beta-lyase purified from Peptostreptococcus magnus.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Kinouchi, T; Akimoto, S; Ohnishi, Y

    1995-01-01

    To determine the role of cysteine conjugate beta-lyase (beta-lyase) in the metabolism of mutagenic nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we determined the effect of beta-lyase on the mutagenicities and DNA binding of cysteine conjugates of 4,5-epoxy-4,5-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 4,5-oxide) and 9,10-epoxy-9,10-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 9,10-oxide), which are detoxified metabolites of the mutagenic compound 1-nitropyrene. We purified beta-lyase from Peptostreptococcus magnus GAI0663, since P. magnus is one of the constituents of the intestinal microflora and exhibits high levels of degrading activity with cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides (1-NP oxide-Cys). The activity of purified beta-lyase was optimal at pH 7.5 to 8.0, was completely inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid and hydroxylamine, and was eliminated by heating the enzyme at 55 degrees C for 5 min. The molecular weight of beta-lyase was 150,000, as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography. S-Arylcysteine conjugates were good substrates for this enzyme. As determined by the Salmonella mutagenicity test, 5 ng of beta-lyase protein increased the mutagenicity of the cysteine conjugate of 1-NP 9,10-oxide (10 nmol per plate) 4.5-fold in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and 4.1-fold in strain TA100. However, beta-lyase had little effect on the cysteine conjugate of 1-NP 4,5-oxide (10 nmol per plate). Both conjugates exhibited only low levels of mutagenicity with nitroreductase-deficient strain TA98NR. In vitro binding of 1-NP oxide-Cys to calf thymus DNA was increased by adding purified beta-lyase or xanthine oxidase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8526486

  17. Nonvolatile S-alk(en)ylthio-L-cysteine derivatives in fresh onion (Allium cepa L. cultivar).

    PubMed

    Starkenmann, Christian; Niclass, Yvan; Troccaz, Myriam

    2011-09-14

    The L-cysteine derivatives (R)-2-amino-3-(methyldisulfanyl)propanoic acid (S-methylthio-L-cysteine), (R)-2-amino-3-(propyldisulfanyl)propanoic acid (S-propylthio-L-cysteine), (R)-2-amino-3-(1-propenyldisulfanyl)propanoic acid (S-(1-propenylthio)-L-cysteine), and (R)-2-amino-3-(2-propenyldisulfanyl)propanoic acid (S-allylthio-L-cysteine) were prepared from 3-[(methoxycarbonyl)dithio]-L-alanine, obtained from the reaction of L-cysteine with methoxycarbonylsulfenyl chloride. The occurrence of these S-(+)-alk(en)ylthio-L-cysteine derivatives in onion (Allium cepa L.) was proven by using UPLC-MS-ESI(+) in SRM mode. Their concentrations in fresh onion were estimated to be 0.19 mg/kg S-methylthio-L-cysteine, 0.01 mg/kg S-propylthio-L-cysteine, and 0.56 mg/kg (S-(1-propenyllthio)-L-cysteine, concentrations that are about 3000 times lower than that of isoalliin (S-(1-propenyl-S-oxo-L-cysteine). These compounds were treated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, a microorganism responsible for the formation of mouth malodor. These L-cysteine disulfides were demonstrated to predominantly produce tri- and tetrasulfides. Isoalliin is almost entirely consumed by the plant enzyme alliin lyase (EC 4.4.1.4 S-alk(en)yl-S-oxo-L-cysteine lyase) in a few seconds, but it is not transformed by F. nucleatum. This example of flavor modulation shows that the plant produces different precursors, leading to the formation of the same types of volatile sulfur compounds. Whereas the plant enzyme efficiently transforms S-alk(en)yl-S-oxo-L-cysteine, mouth bacteria are responsible for the transformation of S-alk(en)ylthio-L-cysteine. PMID:21854077

  18. Cri du Chat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cerruti Mainardi, Paola

    2006-01-01

    The Cri du Chat syndrome (CdCS) is a genetic disease resulting from a deletion of variable size occurring on the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-). The incidence ranges from 1:15,000 to 1:50,000 live-born infants. The main clinical features are a high-pitched monochromatic cry, microcephaly, broad nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Malformations, although not very frequent, may be present: cardiac, neurological and renal abnormalities, preauricular tags, syndactyly, hypospadias, and cryptorchidism. Molecular cytogenetic analysis has allowed a cytogenetic and phenotypic map of 5p to be defined, even if results from the studies reported up to now are not completely in agreement. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies showed a clinical and cytogenetic variability. The identification of phenotypic subsets associated with a specific size and type of deletion is of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. Specific growth and psychomotor development charts have been established. Two genes, Semaphorin F (SEMAF) and δ-catenin (CTNND2), which have been mapped to the "critical regions", are potentially involved in cerebral development and their deletion may be associated with mental retardation in CdCS patients. Deletion of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, localised to 5p15.33, could contribute to the phenotypic changes in CdCS. The critical regions were recently refined by using array comparative genomic hybridisation. The cat-like cry critical region was further narrowed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and three candidate genes were characterised in this region. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical manifestations. Karyotype analysis and, in doubtful cases, FISH analysis will confirm the diagnosis. There is no specific therapy for CdCS but early rehabilitative and educational interventions improve the prognosis and considerable progress has been made in

  19. L'Aventure du LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Cette présentation s?adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l?engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  20. L'Aventure du LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  1. New method for effectively and quantitatively labeling cysteine residues on chicken eggshell membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Li, Qian; Yuan, Yue; Mei, Bin; Huang, Rui; Tian, Ying; Sun, Jing; Cao, Chunyan; Lu, Guangming; Liang, Gaolin

    2012-10-28

    Using maleimidoethylmonoamide cysteine (Fmoc)(StBu) (1) as a medium, cysteine residues on proteins of chicken eggshell membrane (ESM) were successfully converted into N-terminal cysteines. After a biocompatible condensation reaction between the N-terminal cysteine and fluorescent probe 2-cyanobenzothiazole-Gly-Gly-Gly-fluorescein isothiocyanate (2), a new fluorogenic structure luciferin-Gly-Gly-Gly-FITC (3) was obtained, which exhibits a 2-fold fluorescence emission increase compared to that of 2. Thus, a new method for effectively labeling cysteine residues on ESMs was developed. Enhanced fluorescence images of ESMs were directly observed under a microscope and a small animal imaging machine. PMID:22961406

  2. A conserved cysteine motif essential for ceramide kinase function.

    PubMed

    Lidome, Emilie; Graf, Christine; Jaritz, Markus; Schanzer, Andrea; Rovina, Philipp; Nikolay, Rainer; Bornancin, Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    Ceramide kinase (CerK) is a sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme very sensitive to oxidation; however, the determinants are unknown. We show here that the thiol-modifying agent N-ethyl-maleimide abrogates CerK activity in vitro and in a cell based assay, implying that important cysteine residues are accessible in purified as well as endogenous CerK. We replaced every 22 residues in human CerK, by an alanine, and measured activity in the resulting mutant proteins. This led to identification of a cluster of cysteines, C(347)XXXC(351)XXC(354), essential for CerK function. These findings are discussed based on homology modeling of the catalytic domain of CerK. PMID:18662741

  3. Cysteine Peptidases as Schistosomiasis Vaccines with Inbuilt Adjuvanticity

    PubMed Central

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem; Selim, Sahar; Donnelly, Sheila; Cotton, Sophie; Gonzales Santana, Bibiana; Dalton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is caused by several worm species of the genus Schistosoma and afflicts up to 600 million people in 74 tropical and sub-tropical countries in the developing world. Present disease control depends on treatment with the only available drug praziquantel. No vaccine exists despite the intense search for molecular candidates and adjuvant formulations over the last three decades. Cysteine peptidases such as papain and Der p 1 are well known environmental allergens that sensitize the immune system driving potent Th2-responses. Recently, we showed that the administration of active papain to mice induced significant protection (P<0.02, 50%) against an experimental challenge infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Since schistosomes express and secrete papain-like cysteine peptidases we reasoned that these could be employed as vaccines with inbuilt adjuvanticity to protect against these parasites. Here we demonstrate that sub-cutaneous injection of functionally active S. mansoni cathepsin B1 (SmCB1), or a cathepsin L from a related parasite Fasciola hepatica (FhCL1), elicits highly significant (P<0.0001) protection (up to 73%) against an experimental challenge worm infection. Protection and reduction in worm egg burden were further increased (up to 83%) when the cysteine peptidases were combined with other S. mansoni vaccine candidates, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SG3PDH) and peroxiredoxin (PRX-MAP), without the need to add chemical adjuvants. These studies demonstrate the capacity of helminth cysteine peptidases to behave simultaneously as immunogens and adjuvants, and offer an innovative approach towards developing schistosomiasis vaccines PMID:24465551

  4. Light-Mediated Sulfenic Acid Generation from Photocaged Cysteine Sulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jia; Carroll, Kate S

    2015-12-18

    S-Sulfenylation is a post-translational modification with a crucial role in regulating protein function. However, its analysis has remained challenging due to the lack of facile sulfenic acid models. We report the first photocaged cysteine sulfenic acid with efficient photodeprotection and demonstrate its utility by generating sulfenic acid in a thiol peroxidase after illumination in vitro. These caged sulfoxides should be promising for site-specific incorporation of Cys sulfenic acid in living cells via genetic code expansion. PMID:26641493

  5. Cysteine cathepsins as digestive enzymes in the spider Nephilengys cruentata.

    PubMed

    Fuzita, Felipe J; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Lopes, Adriana R

    2015-05-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are widely spread on living organisms associated to protein degradation in lysosomes, but some groups of Arthropoda (Heteroptera, Coleoptera, Crustacea and Acari) present these enzymes related to digestion of the meal proteins. Although spiders combine a mechanism of extra-oral with intracellular digestion, the sporadic studies on this subject were mainly concerned with the digestive fluid (DF) analysis. Thus, a more complete scenario of the digestive process in spiders is still lacking in the literature. In this paper we describe the identification and characterization of cysteine cathepsins in the midgut diverticula (MD) and DF of the spider Nephilengys cruentata by using enzymological assays. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative data from transcriptomic followed by proteomic experiments were used together with biochemical assays for results interpretation. Five cathepsins L, one cathepsin F and one cathepsin B were identified by mass spectrometry, with cathepsins L1 (NcCTSL1) and 2 (NcCTSL2) as the most abundant enzymes. The native cysteine cathepsins presented acidic characteristics such as pH optima of 5.5, pH stability in acidic range and zymogen conversion to the mature form after in vitro acidification. NcCTSL1 seems to be a lysosomal enzyme with its recombinant form displaying acidic characteristics as the native ones and being inhibited by pepstatin. Evolutionarily, arachnid cathepsin L may have acquired different roles but its use for digestion is a common feature to studied taxa. Now a more elucidative picture of the digestive process in spiders can be depicted, with trypsins and astacins acting extra-orally under alkaline conditions whereas cysteine cathepsins will act in an acidic environment, likely in the digestive vacuoles or lysosome-like vesicles. PMID:25818482

  6. Copper Inhibits the Protease from Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 by Both Cysteine-Dependent and Cysteine-Independent Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Anders R.; Levine, Rodney L.

    1991-07-01

    The protease of the human immunodeficiency virus is essential for replication of the virus, and the enzyme is therefore an attractive target for antiviral action. We have found that the viral protease is inhibited by approximately stoichiometric concentrations of copper or mercury ions. Inactivation by Cu2+ was rapid and not reversed by subsequent exposure to EDTA or dithiothreitol. Direct inhibition by Cu2+ required the presence of cysteine residue(s) in the protease. Thus, a synthetic protease lacking cysteine residues was not inhibited by exposure to copper. However, addition of dithiothreitol as an exogenous thiol rendered even the synthetic protease susceptible to inactivation by copper. Oxygen was not required for inactivation of either the wild-type or the synthetic protease. These results provide the basis for the design of novel types of protease inhibitors.

  7. A mechanistic model of the cysteine synthase complex.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Salit, Anna; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Ruediger; Wade, Rebecca C

    2009-02-13

    Plants and bacteria assimilate and incorporate inorganic sulfur into organic compounds such as the amino acid cysteine. Cysteine biosynthesis involves a bienzyme complex, the cysteine synthase (CS) complex. The CS complex is composed of the enzymes serine acetyl transferase (SAT) and O-acetyl-serine-(thiol)-lyase (OAS-TL). Although it is experimentally known that formation of the CS complex influences cysteine production, the exact biological function of the CS complex, the mechanism of reciprocal regulation of the constituent enzymes and the structure of the complex are still poorly understood. Here, we used docking techniques to construct a model of the CS complex from mitochondrial Arabidopsis thaliana. The three-dimensional structures of the enzymes were modeled by comparative techniques. The C-termini of SAT, missing in the template structures but crucial for CS formation, were modeled de novo. Diffusional encounter complexes of SAT and OAS-TL were generated by rigid-body Brownian dynamics simulation. By incorporating experimental constraints during Brownian dynamics simulation, we identified complexes consistent with experiments. Selected encounter complexes were refined by molecular dynamics simulation to generate structures of bound complexes. We found that although a stoichiometric ratio of six OAS-TL dimers to one SAT hexamer in the CS complex is geometrically possible, binding energy calculations suggest that, consistent with experiments, a ratio of only two OAS-TL dimers to one SAT hexamer is more likely. Computational mutagenesis of residues in OAS-TL that are experimentally significant for CS formation hindered the association of the enzymes due to a less-favorable electrostatic binding free energy. Since the enzymes from A. thaliana were expressed in Escherichia coli, the cross-species binding of SAT and OAS-TL from E. coli and A. thaliana was explored. The results showed that reduced cysteine production might be due to a cross-binding of A. thaliana

  8. The IRC7 gene encodes cysteine desulphydrase activity and confers on yeast the ability to grow on cysteine as a nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Margarita; Gardner, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    Although cysteine desulphydrase activity has been purified and characterized from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene encoding this activity in vivo has never been defined. We show that the full-length IRC7 gene, encoded by the YFR055W open reading frame, encodes a protein with cysteine desulphydrase activity. Irc7p purified to homogeneity is able to utilize l-cysteine as a substrate, producing pyruvate and hydrogen sulphide as products of the reaction. Purified Irc7p also utilized l-cystine and some other cysteine conjugates, but not l-cystathionine or l-methionine, as substrates. We further show that, in vivo, the IRC7 gene is both necessary and sufficient for yeast to grow on l-cysteine as a nitrogen source, and that overexpression of the gene results in increased H2 S production. Strains overexpressing IRC7 are also hypersensitive to a toxic analogue, S-ethyl-l-cysteine. While IRC7 has been identified as playing a critical role in converting cysteine conjugates to volatile thiols that are important in wine aroma, its biological role in yeast cells is likely to involve regulation of cysteine and redox homeostasis. PMID:25871637

  9. Identification of papain-like cysteine proteases from the bovine piroplasm Babesia bigemina and evolutionary relationship of piroplasms C1 family of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Martins, Tiago M; do Rosário, Virgílio E; Domingos, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases have been shown to have essential roles in parasitic protozoa and are under study as promising drug targets. Five genes were identified by sequence similarity search to be homologous to the cysteine protease family in the ongoing Babesia bigemina genome sequencing project database and were compared with the annotated genes from the complete bovine piroplasm genomes of Babesia bovis, Theileria annulata, and Theileria parva. Multiple genome alignments and sequence analysis were used to evaluate the molecular evolution events that occurred in the C1 family of cysteine proteases in these piroplasms of veterinary importance. BbiCPL1, one of the newly identified cysteine protease genes in the B. bigemina genome was expressed in Escherichia coli and shows activity against peptide substrates. Considerable differences were observed in the cysteine protease family between Babesia and Theileria genera, and this may partially explain the diverse infection mechanisms of these tick-borne diseases. PMID:20655912

  10. Accessibility of cysteines in the native bovine rod cGMP-gated channel.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Paul J; Krause, Eberhard

    2005-02-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels of photoreceptors and olfactory sensory neurons are tetramers consisting of A and B subunits. Here, the accessibility of the cysteines of the bovine rod cyclic nucleotide-gated channel is examined as a function of ligand binding. N-Ethylmaleimide-modified cysteines of both subunits were identified by mass spectrometry after trypsin digestion. In the absence of ligand, the intracellular carboxy-terminal cysteines of both subunits were accessible to N-ethylmaleimide. Activation of the channel abolished the accessibility of Cys505 of the A subunit and Cys1104 of the B subunit, with both being conserved cysteines of the cyclic nucleotide-binding sites. The cysteine of the pore loop of the B subunit was also found to be modified by this reagent in the absence of ligand. The total number of accessible cysteines of each subunit was determined by mass shifting upon modification with polyethylene glycol maleimide. In the absence of cyclic nucleotides, this hydrophilic reagent only weakly labeled cysteines of the A subunit but readily labeled at least three cysteines of the B subunit. Ligand binding exposed two cysteines of the A subunit and one cysteine of the B subunit to chemical modification. Double-modification experiments suggest that some of these cysteines are in or close to membrane-spanning domains. However, these cysteines could not yet be identified. Together, the cysteine accessibility of the native rod cyclic nucleotide-gated channel varies markedly upon ligand binding, thus indicating major structural rearrangements, which are of functional importance for channel activation. PMID:15683246

  11. Prediction of reversibly oxidized protein cysteine thiols using protein structure properties

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ricardo; Riddle, Megan; Woo, Jongwook; Momand, Jamil

    2008-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols can be divided into four groups based on their reactivities: those that form permanent structural disulfide bonds, those that coordinate with metals, those that remain in the reduced state, and those that are susceptible to reversible oxidation. Physicochemical parameters of oxidation-susceptible protein thiols were organized into a database named the Balanced Oxidation Susceptible Cysteine Thiol Database (BALOSCTdb). BALOSCTdb contains 161 cysteine thiols that undergo reversible oxidation and 161 cysteine thiols that are not susceptible to oxidation. Each cysteine was represented by a set of 12 parameters, one of which was a label (1/0) to indicate whether its thiol moiety is susceptible to oxidation. A computer program (the C4.5 decision tree classifier re-implemented as the J48 classifier) segregated cysteines into oxidation-susceptible and oxidation-non-susceptible classes. The classifier selected three parameters critical for prediction of thiol oxidation susceptibility: (1) distance to the nearest cysteine sulfur atom, (2) solvent accessibility, and (3) pKa. The classifier was optimized to correctly predict 136 of the 161 cysteine thiols susceptible to oxidation. Leave-one-out cross-validation analysis showed that the percent of correctly classified cysteines was 80.1% and that 16.1% of the oxidation-susceptible cysteine thiols were incorrectly classified. The algorithm developed from these parameters, named the Cysteine Oxidation Prediction Algorithm (COPA), is presented here. COPA prediction of oxidation-susceptible sites can be utilized to locate protein cysteines susceptible to redox-mediated regulation and identify possible enzyme catalytic sites with reactive cysteine thiols. PMID:18287280

  12. Cadmium(II) Complex Formation with Cysteine and Penicillamine

    PubMed Central

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O.; Mah, Vicky

    2009-01-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H2Cys) or penicillamine (H2Pen = 3, 3′-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, containing CCd(II) ∼ 0.1 mol dm-3 and CH2L = 0.2 – 2 mol dm-3, was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of 113Cd-NMR and Cd K- and L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine mole ratios the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52 – 2.54 Å and 2.27 – 2.35 Å, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50 – 2.53 Å, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28 – 2.33 Å. For the mole ratio CH2L / CCd(II) = 2, the 113Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509 – 527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS2N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (mole ratios CH2Cys / CCd(II) ≥ 10) complexes with CdS4 coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the 113Cd NMR chemical shifts, δ ∼ 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636 - 658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances of 2.53 ± 0.02 Å. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)4]n-, while at higher pH the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation, and at pH 11.0 a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)3]4- complex with CdS3N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with mole ratios CH2Pen / CCd(II) ≥ 10, the 113Cd-NMR chemical shifts, δ ∼ 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances Cd-S 2.53 ± 0.02 Å and Cd-O 2.30 – 2.33 Å, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)3]n- complexes with chelating CdS3(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5, and become mixed with CdS2N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the cadmium(II) ion that can explain why cysteine-rich metallothionines

  13. Cadmium(II) complex formation with cysteine and penicillamine.

    PubMed

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O; Mah, Vicky

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H(2)Cys) and penicillamine (H(2)Pen = 3,3'-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, having C(Cd(II)) approximately 0.1 mol dm(-3) and C(H(2)L) = 0.2-2 mol dm(-3), was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of (113)Cd NMR and Cd K- and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine molar ratios, the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52-2.54 and 2.27-2.35 A, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50-2.53 A, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28-2.33 A. For the molar ratio C(H(2)L)/C(Cd(II)) = 2, the (113)Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509-527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS(2)N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (molar ratios C(H(2)Cys)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10), complexes with CdS(4) coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636-658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances were 2.53 +/- 0.02 A. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)(4)](n-), while at higher pH, the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation. At pH 11.0, a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)(3)](4-) complex with CdS(3)N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with molar ratios C(H(2)Pen)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10, the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances, Cd-S 2.53 +/- 0.02 A and Cd-(N/O) 2.30-2.33 A, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)(3)](n-) complexes with chelating CdS(3)(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5 and become mixed with CdS(2)N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the

  14. Biosynthesis and Reactivity of Cysteine Persulfides in Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pramod K; Martinov, Michael; Vitvitsky, Victor; Seravalli, Javier; Wedmann, Rudolf; Filipovic, Milos R; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-01-13

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) elicits pleiotropic physiological effects ranging from modulation of cardiovascular to CNS functions. A dominant method for transmission of sulfide-based signals is via posttranslational modification of reactive cysteine thiols to persulfides. However, the source of the persulfide donor and whether its relationship to H2S is as a product or precursor is controversial. The transsulfuration pathway enzymes can synthesize cysteine persulfide (Cys-SSH) from cystine and H2S from cysteine and/or homocysteine. Recently, Cys-SSH was proposed as the primary product of the transsulfuration pathway with H2S representing a decomposition product of Cys-SSH. Our detailed kinetic analyses demonstrate a robust capacity for Cys-SSH production by the human transsulfuration pathway enzymes, cystathionine beta-synthase and γ-cystathionase (CSE) and for homocysteine persulfide synthesis from homocystine by CSE only. However, in the reducing cytoplasmic milieu where the concentration of reduced thiols is significantly higher than of disulfides, substrate level regulation favors the synthesis of H2S over persulfides. Mathematical modeling at physiologically relevant hepatic substrate concentrations predicts that H2S rather than Cys-SSH is the primary product of the transsulfuration enzymes with CSE being the dominant producer. The half-life of the metastable Cys-SSH product is short and decomposition leads to a mixture of polysulfides (Cys-S-(S)n-S-Cys). These in vitro data, together with the intrinsic reactivity of Cys-SSH for cysteinyl versus sulfur transfer, are consistent with the absence of an observable increase in protein persulfidation in cells in response to exogenous cystine and evidence for the formation of polysulfides under these conditions. PMID:26667407

  15. Rational design of reversible and irreversible cysteine sulfenic acid-targeted linear C-nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-02-16

    Concerns about off-target effects has motivated the development of reversible covalent inhibition strategies for targeting cysteine. However, such strategies have not been reported for the unique cysteine oxoform, sulfenic acid. Herein, we have designed and identified linear C-nucleophiles that react selectively with cysteine sulfenic acid. The resulting thioether adducts exhibit reversibility ranging from minutes to days under reducing conditions, showing the feasibility of tuning C-nucleophile reactivity across a wide range of time scales. PMID:26878905

  16. Predicting the Reactivity of Nitrile-Carrying Compounds with Cysteine: A Combined Computational and Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report on a mechanistic investigation based on DFT calculations and kinetic measures aimed at determining the energetics related to the cysteine nucleophilic attack on nitrile-carrying compounds. Activation energies were found to correlate well with experimental kinetic measures of reactivity with cysteine in phosphate buffer. The agreement between computations and experiments points to this DFT-based approach as a tool for predicting both nitrile reactivity toward cysteines and the toxicity of nitriles as electrophile agents. PMID:24900869

  17. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E.; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M.; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis. PMID:26308073

  18. Cysteine Prevents the Reduction in Keratin Synthesis Induced by Iron Deficiency in Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Irace, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonella; Piccolo, Marialuisa; Di Pascale, Antonio; Russo, Annapina; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Lepre, Fabio; Russo, Giulia; Santamaria, Rita

    2016-02-01

    L-cysteine is currently recognized as a conditionally essential sulphur amino acid. Besides contributing to many biological pathways, cysteine is a key component of the keratin protein by its ability to form disulfide bridges that confer strength and rigidity to the protein. In addition to cysteine, iron represents another critical factor in regulating keratins expression in epidermal tissues, as well as in hair follicle growth and maturation. By focusing on human keratinocytes, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cysteine supplementation as nutraceutical on keratin biosynthesis, as well as to get an insight on the interplay of cysteine availability and cellular iron status in regulating keratins expression in vitro. Herein we demonstrate that cysteine promotes a significant up-regulation of keratins expression as a result of de novo protein synthesis, while the lack of iron impairs keratin expression. Interestingly, cysteine supplementation counteracts the adverse effect of iron deficiency on cellular keratin expression. This effect was likely mediated by the up-regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin, the main cellular proteins involved in iron homeostasis, at last affecting the labile iron pool. In this manner, cysteine may also enhance the metabolic iron availability for DNA synthesis without creating a detrimental condition of iron overload. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first study in an in vitro keratinocyte model providing evidence that cysteine and iron cooperate for keratins expression, indicative of their central role in maintaining healthy epithelia. PMID:26212225

  19. Influence of cysteine doping on photoluminescence intensity from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes can be applied for detection of cysteine. It is shown that cysteine doping (from 10-8 to 10-3 M) into aqueous suspension of nanotubes with adsorbed DNA leads to increase of PL intensity. The PL intensity was enhanced by 27% at 10-3 M cysteine concentration in suspension. Most likely, the PL intensity increases due to the passivation of p-defects on the nanotube by the cysteine containing reactive thiol group. The effect of doping with other amino acids without this group (methionine, serine, aspartic acid, lysine, proline) on the PL intensity is essentially weaker.

  20. Enzymatic synthesis of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin hydrolysis industries wastewater with tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lisheng; Wang, Zhiyuan; Mao, Pingting; Liu, Junzhong; Zhang, Hongjuan; Liu, Qian; Jiao, Qing-Cai

    2013-04-01

    An economical method for production of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin acid hydrolysis wastewater (KHW) containing L-serine was developed by recombinant tryptophan synthase. This study provides us with an alternative KHW utilization strategy to synthesize S-phenyl-L-cysteine. Tryptophan synthase could efficiently convert L-serine contained in KHW to S-phenyl-L-cysteine at pH 9.0, 40°C and Trion X-100 of 0.02%. In a scale up study, L-serine conversion rate reach 97.1% with a final S-phenyl-L-cysteine concentration of 38.6 g l(-1). PMID:23478091

  1. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process. PMID:26764487

  2. Metabolism of cysteine in rat hepatocytes. Evidence for cysteinesulphinate-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Drake, M R; De La Rosa, J; Stipanuk, M H

    1987-06-01

    The metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulphinate was studied in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Over 80% of the 14CO2 formed from [1-14C]cysteinesulphinate could be accounted for by production of hypotaurine plus taurine in incubations of rat hepatocytes with either 1 mM- or 25 mM-cysteinesulphinate. In similar incubations with 1 mM- or 25 mM-cysteine, less than 10% of 14CO2 evolution from [1-14C]cysteine could be accounted for by production of hypotaurine plus taurine. In incubations with cysteine, but not with cysteinesulphinate, the production of urea and ammonia was substantially increased above that observed in incubations without substrate. Addition of unlabelled cysteinesulphinate did not affect 14CO2 production from [1-14C]cysteine. Addition of 2-oxoglutarate resulted in a marked increase in cysteinesulphinate catabolism via the transamination pathway, but addition of neither 2-oxoglutarate nor pyruvate to the incubation system had any effect on cysteine catabolism. Inhibition of cystathionase with propargylglycine decreased 14CO2 production from [1-14C]cysteine about 50% and markedly decreased production of ammonia plus urea N; cysteinesulphinate catabolism by cysteinesulphinate-independent pathways in the rat hepatocyte and, furthermore, that cleavage of cyst(e)ine by cystathionase may be an important physiological pathway for cysteine catabolism in rat liver. PMID:3117038

  3. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Menger, Katja E; James, Andrew M; Cochemé, Helena M; Harbour, Michael E; Chouchani, Edward T; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-06-30

    Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  4. Cysteine-independent inhibition of the CFTR chloride channel by the cysteine-reactive reagent sodium (2-sulphonatoethyl) methanethiosulphonate

    PubMed Central

    Li, M-S; Demsey, AFA; Qi, J; Linsdell, P

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Methanethiosulphonate (MTS) reagents are used extensively to modify covalently cysteine side chains in ion channel structure-function studies. We have investigated the interaction between a widely used negatively charged MTS reagent, (2-sulphonatoethyl) methanethiosulphonate (MTSES), and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. Experimental approach: Patch clamp recordings were used to study a ‘cys-less’ variant of human CFTR, in which all 18 endogenous cysteine residues have been removed by mutagenesis, expressed in mammalian cell lines. Use of excised inside–out membrane patches allowed MTS reagents to be applied to the cytoplasmic face of active channels. Key results: Intracellular application of MTSES, but not the positively charged MTSET, inhibited the function of cys-less CFTR. Inhibition was voltage dependent, with a Kd of 1.97 mmol·L−1 at −80 mV increasing to 36 mmol·L−1 at +80 mV. Inhibition was completely reversed on washout of MTSES, inconsistent with covalent modification of the channel protein. At the single channel level, MTSES caused a concentration-dependent reduction in unitary current amplitude. This inhibition was strengthened when extracellular Cl− concentration was decreased. Conclusions and implications: Our results indicate that MTSES inhibits the function of CFTR in a manner that is independent of its ability to modify cysteine residues covalently. Instead, we suggest that MTSES functions as an open channel blocker that enters the CFTR channel pore from its cytoplasmic end to physically occlude Cl− permeation. Given the very widespread use of MTS reagents in functional studies, our findings offer a broadly applicable caveat to the interpretation of results obtained from such studies. PMID:19466983

  5. S-sulfhydration: a cysteine posttranslational modification in plant systems.

    PubMed

    Aroca, Ángeles; Serna, Antonio; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a highly reactive molecule that is currently accepted as a signaling compound. This molecule is as important as carbon monoxide in mammals and hydrogen peroxide in plants, as well as nitric oxide in both eukaryotic systems. Although many studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of hydrogen sulfide, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. One of the proposed mechanisms involves the posttranslational modification of protein cysteine residues, a process called S-sulfhydration. In this work, a modified biotin switch method was used for the detection of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) proteins modified by S-sulfhydration under physiological conditions. The presence of an S-sulfhydration-modified cysteine residue on cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase was demonstrated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and a total of 106 S-sulfhydrated proteins were identified. Immunoblot and enzyme activity analyses of some of these proteins showed that the sulfide added through S-sulfhydration reversibly regulates the functions of plant proteins in a manner similar to that described in mammalian systems. PMID:25810097

  6. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify. PMID:27172378

  7. Cysteine string protein (CSP) and its role in preventing neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Robert D; Morgan, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a member of the DnaJ/Hsp40 family of co-chaperones that localises to neuronal synaptic vesicles. Its name derives from the possession of a string of 12-15 cysteine residues, palmitoylation of which is required for targeting to post-Golgi membranes. The DnaJ domain of CSP enables it to bind client proteins and recruit Hsc70 chaperones, thereby contributing to the maintenance of protein folding in the presynaptic compartment. Mutation of CSP in flies, worms and mice reduces lifespan and causes synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the neurodegenerative disease, adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is caused by mutations in the human CSPα-encoding DNAJC5 gene. Accumulating evidence suggests that the major mechanism by which CSP prevents neurodegeneration is by maintaining the conformation of SNAP-25, thereby facilitating its entry into the membrane-fusing SNARE complex. In this review, we focus on the role of CSP in preventing neurodegeneration and discuss how recent studies of this universal neuroprotective chaperone are being translated into potential novel therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25800794

  8. Enzyme structure captures four cysteines aligned for disulfide relay

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Yair; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Grossman, Iris; Major, Dan Thomas; Fass, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin superfamily proteins introduce disulfide bonds into substrates, catalyze the removal of disulfides, and operate in electron relays. These functions rely on one or more dithiol/disulfide exchange reactions. The flavoenzyme quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX), a catalyst of disulfide bond formation with an interdomain electron transfer step in its catalytic cycle, provides a unique opportunity for exploring the structural environment of enzymatic dithiol/disulfide exchange. Wild-type Rattus norvegicus QSOX1 (RnQSOX1) was crystallized in a conformation that juxtaposes the two redox-active di-cysteine motifs in the enzyme, presenting the entire electron-transfer pathway and proton-transfer participants in their native configurations. As such a state cannot generally be enriched and stabilized for analysis, RnQSOX1 gives unprecedented insight into the functional group environments of the four cysteines involved in dithiol/disulfide exchange and provides the framework for analysis of the energetics of electron transfer in the presence of the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor. Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) free energy simulations based on the X-ray crystal structure suggest that formation of the interdomain disulfide intermediate is highly favorable and secures the flexible enzyme in a state from which further electron transfer via the flavin can occur. PMID:24888638

  9. Copper oxide assisted cysteine hierarchical structures for immunosensor application

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Sumana, Gajjala; Tiwari, Ida

    2014-09-08

    The present work describes the promising electrochemical immunosensing strategy based on copper (II) assisted hierarchical cysteine structures (CuCys) varying from star to flower like morphology. The CuCys having average size of 10 μm have been synthesised using L-Cysteine as initial precursor in presence of copper oxide under environmentally friendly conditions in aqueous medium. To delineate the synthesis mechanism, detailed structural investigations have been carried out using characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviour of self-assembled CuCys on gold electrode shows surface controlled electrode reaction with an apparent electron transfer rate constant of 3.38 × 10{sup −4 }cm s{sup −1}. This innovative platform has been utilized to fabricate an immunosensor by covalently immobilizing monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli). Under the optimal conditions, the fabricated immunosensor is found to be sensitive and specific for the detection of E. coli with a detection limit of 10 cfu/ml.

  10. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  11. Mechanical Strength of 17 134 Model Proteins and Cysteine Slipknots

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A new theoretical survey of proteins' resistance to constant speed stretching is performed for a set of 17 134 proteins as described by a structure-based model. The proteins selected have no gaps in their structure determination and consist of no more than 250 amino acids. Our previous studies have dealt with 7510 proteins of no more than 150 amino acids. The proteins are ranked according to the strength of the resistance. Most of the predicted top-strength proteins have not yet been studied experimentally. Architectures and folds which are likely to yield large forces are identified. New types of potent force clamps are discovered. They involve disulphide bridges and, in particular, cysteine slipknots. An effective energy parameter of the model is estimated by comparing the theoretical data on characteristic forces to the corresponding experimental values combined with an extrapolation of the theoretical data to the experimental pulling speeds. These studies provide guidance for future experiments on single molecule manipulation and should lead to selection of proteins for applications. A new class of proteins, involving cystein slipknots, is identified as one that is expected to lead to the strongest force clamps known. This class is characterized through molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:19876372

  12. Emission of hydrogen sulfide by leaf tissue in response to L-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, J.; Schmidt, A.; Wilson, L.G.; Filner, P.

    1982-08-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to L-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H/sub 2/S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to L-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H/sub 2/S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar L-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar L-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar L-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H/sub 2/S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to L-cysteine; neither D-cysteine nor L-cysteine elicited H/sub 2/S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H/sub 2/S formation and its release occurred in response to L-cysteine. Feeding experiments with (/sup 35/S)t-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H/sub 2/S was derived from sulfur in the L-cysteine supplied.

  13. Identification and characterization of cysteine proteinases of Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S C; Kumar, R; Kumar, S; Tatu, U; Singh, R K; Gupta, A K

    2011-09-01

    Trypanosoma evansi is a causative agent of 'surra', a common haemoprotozoan disease of livestock in India causing high morbidity and mortality in disease endemic areas. The proteinases released by live and dead trypanosomes entail immunosuppression in the infected host, which immensely contribute in disease pathogenesis. Cysteine proteinases are identified in the infectious cycle of trypanosomes such as cruzain from Trypanosoma cruzi, rhodesain or brucipain from Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and congopain from Trypanosoma congelense. These enzymes localised in lysosome-like organelles, flagellar pocket and on cell surface, which play a critical role in the life cycle of protozoan parasites, viz. in host invasion, nutrition and alteration of the host immune response. The paper describes the identification of cysteine proteinases of T. evansi lysate, activity profile at different pH optima and inhibition pattern using a specific inhibitor, besides the polypeptide profile of an antigen. Eight proteinases of T. evansi were identified in the molecular weight (MW) ranges of 28-170 kDa using gelatin substrate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (GS-PAGE), and of these proteinases, six were cysteine proteinases, as they were inhibited by L-3-carboxy-2,3-transepoxypropionyl-lecuylamido (4-guanidino)-butane (E-64), a specific inhibitor. These proteolytic enzymes were most reactive in acidic pH between 3.0 and 5.5 in the presence of dithiothreitol and completely inactive at alkaline pH 10.0. Similarly, the GS-PAGE profile of the serum samples of rats infected with T. evansi revealed strong proteolytic activity only at the 28-kDa zone at pH 5.5, while no proteolytic activity was observed in serum samples of uninfected rats. Further, the other zones of clearance, which were evident in T. evansi antigen zymogram, could not be observed in the serum samples of rats infected with T. evansi. The polypeptide pattern of the whole cell lysate antigen revealed 12-15 polypeptide bands

  14. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in children with severe childhood undernutrition: cysteine kinetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with edematous but not nonedematous severe childhood undernutrition (SCU) have lower plasma and erythrocyte-free concentrations of cysteine, the rate-limiting precursor of glutathione synthesis. We propose that these lower cysteine concentrations are due to reduced production secondary to s...

  15. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cysteine peptidases are important in many biological processes. In this study, we describe the design, synthesis and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family. The structure of the proposed substrates can be expressed by the general formula Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y, wh...

  16. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  17. Nitric oxide-generating l-cysteine-grafted graphene film as a blood-contacting biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhen; Dou, Ruixia; Zu, Mian; Liu, Xueying; Yin, Wenyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Jingbo; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun

    2016-06-24

    By using polyethylenimine molecules as the linker, l-cysteine was immobilized onto graphene nanosheets, endowing the biocompatible l-cysteine-functionalized graphene film with the ability for catalytic decomposition of exogenous or endogenous donors to generate nitric oxide, and thus inhibiting the platelet activation and aggregation and reducing platelet adhesion. PMID:27111404

  18. First-pass splanchnic metabolism of dietary cysteine in weanling pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cysteine is a semi-indispensable amino acid in neonates and is synthesized from the essential amino acid methionine by transsulfuration. We previously showed that the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of methionine transsulfuration to cysteine, yet the metabolic fate o...

  19. Targeted expression of cystatin restores fertility in cysteine protease induced male sterile tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pawan; Subhashini, Mranu; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Ahmed, Israr; Trishla, Shalibhadra; Kirti, P B

    2016-05-01

    Fertility restoration in male sterile plants is an essential requirement for their utilization in hybrid seed production. In an earlier investigation, we have demonstrated that the targeted expression of a cysteine protease in tapetal cell layer resulted in complete male sterility in tobacco transgenic plants. In the present investigation, we have used a cystatin gene, which encodes for a cysteine protease inhibitor, from a wild peanut, Arachis diogoi and developed a plant gene based restoration system for cysteine protease induced male sterile transgenic tobacco plants. We confirmed the interaction between the cysteine protease and a cystatin of the wild peanut, A. diogoi through in silico modeling and yeast two-hybrid assay. Pollen from primary transgenic tobacco plants expressing cystatin gene under the tapetum specific promoter- TA29 restored fertility on cysteine protease induced male sterile tobacco plants developed earlier. This has confirmed the in vivo interaction of cysteine protease and cystatin in the tapetal cells, and the inactivation of cysteine protease and modulation of its negative effects on pollen fertility. Both the cysteine protease and cystatin genes are of plant origin in contrast to the analogous barnase-barstar system that deploys genes of prokaryotic origin. Because of the deployment of genes of plant origin, this system might not face biosafety problems in developing hybrids in food crops. PMID:26993235

  20. Kinetics of splanchnic 13C-cysteine metabolism in infant pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cysteine is a conditionally essential amino acid in neonates that can be synthesized from methionine by transsulfuration. We previously showed that methionine transsulfuration occurs in the GI tract of young pigs. Cysteine use by the gut epithelial cells may be important for maintenance of glutath...

  1. Cysteine decrease following acute Levodopa intake in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Muhlack, Siegfried

    2012-07-11

    The thiol homeostasis determines the redox milieu and thus scavenging of free radicals by antioxidants like glutathione (GSH). GSH is formed out of cysteine in combination with l-glycine and glutamine acid. An up regulation of free radical occurrence is looked upon as one key feature of chronic neurodegeneration. Levodopa (LD) is under suspicion to support synthesis of free radicals via the degradation of its derivative dopamine in abundant mitochondria. Objectives were to investigate the impact of LD on free cysteine turnover in plasma. 200mg LD/50mg carbidopa (CD) were administered to 13 patients with Parkinson's disease under standardised conditions. Plasma levels of LD and free cysteine were measured before, 60- and 80-min after the LD/CD application. Cysteine concentrations decayed, expectedly LD levels increased. Cysteine decrease may result from an up regulation of GSH synthesis to encounter augmented appearance of free radicals associated with LD turnover via mitochondrial monoaminooxidase. PMID:22641055

  2. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  3. α-Ketoheterocycles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB

    PubMed Central

    Steert, Koen; Berg, Maya; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Coombs, Graham H.; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Haemers, Achiel; Augustyns, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes and also play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites. Inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Inspired by the in vivo antiparasitic activity of the vinyl sulfone based cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs), a series of α-ketoheterocycles 1-15 has been developed as reversible inhibitors of a recombinant L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8. The isoxazoles 1-3 and especially the oxadiazole 15 are potent reversible inhibitors of CPB2.8, however, in vitro whole-organism screening against a panel of protozoan parasites did not fully correlate with the observed inhibition of the cysteine protease. PMID:20799311

  4. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  5. A fluorescence enhancement probe based on BODIPY for the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Gong, Deyan; Tian, Yuejun; Yang, Chengduan; Iqbal, Anam; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu; Zhu, Xiangtao; Guo, Huichen

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a fluorescent probe BODIPY-based glyoxal hydrazone (BODIPY-GH) (1) for cysteine based on inhibiting of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) quenching process upon reaction with the unsaturated aldehyde has been synthesized, which exhibits longer excitation wavelength, selective and sensitive colorimetric and fluorimetric response toward cysteine in natural media. The probe shows highly selectivity towards cysteine over homocysteine and glutathione as well as other amino acids with a significant fluorescence enhancement response within 15min In the presence of 50 equiv. of homocysteine, the emission increased slightly within 15min and completed in 2.5h to reach its maximum intensity. Therefore, the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione can be achieved through detection of probe 1. It shows low cytotoxicity and excellent membrane permeability toward living cells, which was successfully applied to detect and image intracellular cysteine effectively by confocal fluorescence imaging. PMID:27176916

  6. Nitric oxide inhibits falcipain, the Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Colasanti, M; Salvati, L; Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pluripotent regulatory molecule possessing, among others, an antiparasitic activity. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of NO on the catalytic activity of falcipain, the papain-like cysteine protease involved in Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite hemoglobin degradation, is reported. In particular, NO donors S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), (+/-)-(E)-p6ethyl-2-[(E)-hydroxyimino]-5-nitro-3-hexenami de (NOR-3), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibit dose-dependently the falcipain activity present in the P. falciparum trophozoite extract, this effect likely attributable to S-nitrosylation of the Cys25 catalytic residue. The results represent a new insight into the modulation mechanism of falcipain activity, thereby being relevant in developing new strategies for inhibition of the P. falciparum life cycle. PMID:10623597

  7. Causes and Consequences of Cysteine S-Glutathionylation*

    PubMed Central

    Grek, Christina L.; Zhang, Jie; Manevich, Yefim; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational S-glutathionylation occurs through the reversible addition of a proximal donor of glutathione to thiolate anions of cysteines in target proteins, where the modification alters molecular mass, charge, and structure/function and/or prevents degradation from sulfhydryl overoxidation or proteolysis. Catalysis of both the forward (glutathione S-transferase P) and reverse (glutaredoxin) reactions creates a functional cycle that can also regulate certain protein functional clusters, including those involved in redox-dependent cell signaling events. For translational application, S-glutathionylated serum proteins may be useful as biomarkers in individuals (who may also have polymorphic expression of glutathione S-transferase P) exposed to agents that cause oxidative or nitrosative stress. PMID:23861399

  8. Fighting an enemy within: cytoplasmic inhibitors of bacterial cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Jan; Golonka, Ewa; Filipek, Renata; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2005-08-01

    The genes encoding secreted, broad-spectrum activity cysteine proteases of Staphylococcus spp. (staphopains) and Streptococcus pyogenes (streptopain, SpeB) are genetically linked to genes encoding cytoplasmic inhibitors. While staphopain inhibitors have lipocalin-like folds, streptopain is inhibited by a protein bearing the scaffold of the enzyme profragment. Bioinformatic analysis of other prokaryotic genomes has revealed that two more species may utilize this same genetic arrangement to control streptopain-like proteases with lipocalin-like inhibitors, while three other species may employ a C-terminally located domain that resembles the profragment. This apparently represents a novel system that bacteria use to control the intracellular activity of their proteases. PMID:16045606

  9. A viable synthesis of N-methyl cysteine.

    PubMed

    Ruggles, Erik L; Flemer, Stevenson; Hondal, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    While a number of methods exist for the production of N-methyl amino acid derivatives, the methods for the production of N-methyl cysteine (MeCys) derivatives are suboptimal as they either have low yields or lead to significant sulfhydryl deprotection during the synthetic protocol. This article focuses on the generation of MeCys and its subsequent use in Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis for the generation of N-methyl cystine containing peptides. Various methods for amino methylation of cysteine, in the presence of acid labile or acid stable sulfhydryl protecting groups, are compared and contrasted. Production of MeCys is best attained through formation of an oxazolidinone precursor obtained via cyclization of Fmoc--Cys(StBu)--OH. Following oxazolidinone ring opening, iminium ion reduction generates Fmoc--MeCys(StBu)--OH with an overall yield of 91%. The key to this procedure is using an electronically neutral Cys-derivative, as other polar Cys-derivatives gave poor results using the oxazolidinone procedure. Subsequently, the Fmoc--MeCys(StBu)--OH building block was used to replace a Cys residue with a MeCys residue in two peptide fragments that correspond to the active sites of glutaredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. The examples used here highlight the use of a MeCys(StBu) derivative, which allows for facile on-resin conversion to a MeCys(5-Npys) residue that can be subsequently used for intramolecular disulfide bond formation with concomitant cleavage of the peptide from the solid support. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 90: 61-68, 2008. This article was originally published online as an accepted preprint. The "Published Online" date corresponds to the preprint version. You can request a copy of the preprint by emailing the Biopolymers editorial office at biopolymers@wiley.com. PMID:18008337

  10. Characterization of cysteine proteases in Malian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Bah, Sékou; Paulsen, Berit S; Diallo, Drissa; Johansen, Harald T

    2006-09-19

    Extracts form 10 different Malian medicinal plants with a traditional use against schistosomiasis were investigated for their possible content of proteolytic activity. The proteolytic activity was studied by measuring the hydrolysis of two synthetic peptide substrates Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec and Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec. Legumain- and papain-like activities were found in all tested crude extracts except those from Entada africana, with the papain-like activity being the strongest. Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longepedunculata and Stylosanthes erecta extracts showed high proteolytic activities towards both substrates. After gel filtration the proteolytic activity towards the substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec in root extract of Securidaca longepedunculata appeared to have Mr of 30 and 97kDa, while the activity in extracts from Cissus quadrangularis was at 39kDa. Enzymatic activity cleaving the substrate Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec showed apparent Mr of 97 and 26kDa in extracts from roots and leaves of Securidaca longepedunculata, while in Cissus quadrangularis extracts the activity eluted at 39 and 20kDa, with the highest activity in the latter. All Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec activities were inhibited by E-64 but unaffected by PMSF. The legumain activity was unaffected by E-64 and PMSF. The SDS-PAGE analysis exhibited five distinct gelatinolytic bands for Cissus quadrangularis extracts (115, 59, 31, 22 and 20kDa), while two bands (59 and 30kDa) were detected in Securidaca longepedunculata extracts. The inhibition profile of the gelatinolytic bands and that of the hydrolysis of the synthetic substrates indicate the cysteine protease class of the proteolytic activities. Several cysteine protease activities with different molecular weights along with a strong variability of these activities between species as well as between plant parts from the same species were observed. PMID:16621376

  11. Deconstructing the catalytic efficiency of peroxiredoxin-5 peroxidatic cysteine.

    PubMed

    Portillo-Ledesma, Stephanie; Sardi, Florencia; Manta, Bruno; Tourn, María Victoria; Clippe, André; Knoops, Bernard; Alvarez, Beatriz; Coitiño, E Laura; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo

    2014-09-30

    Human peroxiredoxin-5 (PRDX5) is a thiol peroxidase that reduces H2O2 10(5) times faster than free cysteine. To assess the influence of two conserved residues on the reactivity of the critical cysteine (C47), we determined the reaction rate constants of PRDX5, wild type (WT), T44V and R127Q with one substrate electrophile (H2O2) and a nonspecific electrophile (monobromobimane). We also studied the corresponding reactions of low molecular weight (LMW) thiolates in order to construct a framework against which we could compare our proteins. To obtain a detailed analysis of the structural and energetic changes involved in the reaction between WT PRDX5 and H2O2, we performed ONIOM quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations with a QM region including 60 atoms of substrate and active site described by the B3LYP density functional and the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set; the rest of the protein was included in the MM region. Brønsted correlations reveal that the absence of T44 can increase the general nucleophilicity of the C47 but decreases the specific reactivity toward H2O2 by a factor of 10(3). The R127Q mutation causes C47 to behave like a LMW thiolate in the two studied reactions. QM/MM results with WT PRDX5 showed that hydrogen bonds in the active site are the cornerstone of two effects that make catalysis possible: the enhancement of thiolate nucleophilicity upon substrate ingress and the stabilization of the transition state. In both effects, T44 has a central role. These effects occur in a precise temporal sequence that ensures that the selective nucleophilicity of C47 is available only for peroxide substrates. PMID:25184942

  12. Quercetin Targets Cysteine String Protein (CSPα) and Impairs Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fenglian; Proft, Juliane; Gibbs, Sarah; Winkfein, Bob; Johnson, Jadah N.; Syed, Naweed; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a synaptic vesicle protein that displays unique anti-neurodegenerative properties. CSPα is a member of the conserved J protein family, also called the Hsp40 (heat shock protein of 40 kDa) protein family, whose importance in protein folding has been recognized for many years. Deletion of the CSPα in mice results in knockout mice that are normal for the first 2–3 weeks of life followed by an unexplained presynaptic neurodegeneration and premature death. How CSPα prevents neurodegeneration is currently not known. As a neuroprotective synaptic vesicle protein, CSPα represents a promising therapeutic target for the prevention of neurodegenerative disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we demonstrate that the flavonoid quercetin promotes formation of stable CSPα-CSPα dimers and that quercetin-induced dimerization is dependent on the unique cysteine string region. Furthermore, in primary cultures of Lymnaea neurons, quercetin induction of CSPα dimers correlates with an inhibition of synapse formation and synaptic transmission suggesting that quercetin interfers with CSPα function. Quercetin's action on CSPα is concentration dependent and does not promote dimerization of other synaptic proteins or other J protein family members and reduces the assembly of CSPα:Hsc70 units (70kDa heat shock cognate protein). Conclusions/Significance Quercetin is a plant derived flavonoid and popular nutritional supplement proposed to prevent memory loss and altitude sickness among other ailments, although its precise mechanism(s) of action has been unclear. In view of the therapeutic promise of upregulation of CSPα and the undesired consequences of CSPα dysfunction, our data establish an essential proof of principle that pharmaceutical agents can selectively target the neuroprotective J protein CSPα. PMID:20548785

  13. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yslas, Edith I; Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F; Barbero, César A; Rivarola, Viviana A

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using l-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86°±1 to 90°±1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. PMID:25842107

  14. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesús Pelayo, José; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by G. Delgado Barrio, A. Solov'Yov, P. Villarreal, R. Prosmiti.

  15. Approche de prise en charge du trouble du spectre de l’autisme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick F.; Thomas, Roger E.; Lee, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Se pencher sur les critères diagnostiques du trouble du spectre de l’autisme (TSA) comme les définit le Manuel diagnostique et statistique des troubles mentaux, cinquième édition (DSM-V), et concevoir une approche de prise en charge du TSA à l’aide du cadre CanMEDS–Médecine familiale (CanMEDS-MF). Sources d’information Le DSM-V, publié par l’American Psychiatric Association en mai 2013, énonce de nouveaux critères diagnostiques du TSA. Le cadre CanMEDS-MF du Collège des médecins de famille du Canada fournit un plan d’orientation pour la prise en charge complexe du TSA. Nous avons utilisé des données recueillies par le Centers for Disease Control and Prevention afin de déterminer la prévalence du TSA, ainsi que la revue systématique et méta-analyse détaillée effectuée par le National Institute for Health and Care Excellence du R.-U. pour ses lignes directrices sur le TSA dans le but d’évaluer les données probantes issues de plus de 100 interventions. Message principal Selon les données du Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, la prévalence du TSA se chiffrait à 1 sur 88 en 2008 aux États-Unis. La classification du TSA dans la quatrième édition du DSM incluait l’autisme, le syndrome d’Asperger, le trouble envahissant du développement et le trouble désintégratif de l’enfance. La dernière révision du DSM-V réunit tous ces troubles sous la mention TSA, avec différents niveaux de sévérité. La prise en charge du TSA est complexe; elle exige les efforts d’une équipe multidisciplinaire ainsi que des soins continus. Les rôles CanMEDS-MF fournissent un cadre de prise en charge. Conclusion Les médecins de famille sont au cœur de l’équipe de soins multidisciplinaire pour le TSA, et le cadre CanMEDS-MF tient lieu de plan détaillé pour guider la prise en charge d’un enfant atteint de TSA et aider la famille de cet enfant.

  16. Emission of Hydrogen Sulfide by Leaf Tissue in Response to l-Cysteine 1

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Jiro; Schmidt, Ahlert; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Filner, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to l-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H2S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to l-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H2S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar l-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar l-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar l-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H2S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to l-cysteine; neither d-cysteine nor l-cystine elicited H2S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H2S formation and its release occurred in response to l-cysteine. Feeding experiments with [35S]l-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H2S was derived from sulfur in the l-cysteine supplied and that the H2S emitted for 9 hours accounted for 7 to 10% of l-cysteine taken up. 35S-labeled SO32− and SO42− were found in the tissue extract in addition to internal soluble S2−. These findings

  17. 75 FR 31790 - Determination That Cysteine Hydrochloride Injection, USP, 7.25%, Was Not Withdrawn From Sale for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing its determination that Cysteine Hydrochloride Injection, USP, 7.25% (Cysteine HCl), was not withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety or effectiveness. This determination will allow FDA to approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for Cysteine HCl if all other legal and regulatory requirements are...

  18. Knockout of the murine cysteine dioxygenase gene results in severe impairment in ability to synthesize taurine and an increased catabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Iori; Roman, Heather B.; Valli, Alessandro; Fieselmann, Krista; Lam, Jimmy; Peters, Rachel; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine homeostasis is dependent on the regulation of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) in response to changes in sulfur amino acid intake. CDO oxidizes cysteine to cysteinesulfinate, which is further metabolized to either taurine or to pyruvate plus sulfate. To gain insight into the physiological function of CDO and the consequence of a loss of CDO activity, mice carrying a null CDO allele (CDO+/− mice) were crossed to generate CDO−/−, CDO+/−, and CDO+/+ mice. CDO−/− mice exhibited postnatal mortality, growth deficit, and connective tissue pathology. CDO−/− mice had extremely low taurine levels and somewhat elevated cysteine levels, consistent with the lack of flux through CDO-dependent catabolic pathways. However, plasma sulfate levels were slightly higher in CDO−/− mice than in CDO+/− or CDO+/+ mice, and tissue levels of acid-labile sulfide were elevated, indicating an increase in cysteine catabolism by cysteine desulfhydration pathways. Null mice had lower hepatic cytochrome c oxidase levels, suggesting impaired electron transport capacity. Supplementation of mice with taurine improved survival of male pups but otherwise had little effect on the phenotype of the CDO−/− mice. H2S has been identified as an important gaseous signaling molecule as well as a toxicant, and pathology may be due to dysregulation of H2S production. Control of cysteine levels by regulation of CDO may be necessary to maintain low H2S/sulfane sulfur levels and facilitate the use of H2S as a signaling molecule. PMID:21693692

  19. Les plaies du tendon patellaire

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mardy, Abdelhak; Elayoubi, Abdelghni; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les plaies du tendon patellaire sont peu fréquentes et sont peu rapportés dans la littérature, contrairement aux ruptures sous cutanées. Les sections du tendon patellaire nécessitent une réparation immédiate afin de rétablir l'appareil extenseur et de permettre une récupération fonctionnelle précoce. A travers ce travail rétrospectif sur 13 cas, nous analysons les aspects épidémiologiques, thérapeutiques et pronostiques de ce type de pathologie en comparant différents scores. L’âge moyen est de 25 ans avec une prédominance masculine. Les étiologies sont dominées par les accidents de la voie publique (68%) et les agressions par agent tranchant (26%) et contendant (6 %). Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un parage chirurgical avec suture tendineuse direct protégée par un laçage au fils d'aciers en légère flexion. La rééducation est débutée après sédation des phénomènes inflammatoires. Au dernier recul les résultats sont excellents et bon à 92%. Nous n'avons pas noté de différence de force musculaire et d'amplitude articulaire entre le genou sain et le genou lésé. Les lésions ouvertes du tendon patellaire est relativement rare. La prise en charge chirurgicale rapide donne des résultats assez satisfaisants. La réparation est généralement renforcée par un semi-tendineux, synthétique ou métallique en forme de cadre de renfort pour faciliter la réadaptation et réduire le risque de récidive après la fin de l'immobilisation. PMID:25170379

  20. Mapping of the local environmental changes in proteins by cysteine scanning

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Yoichi; Nagata, Tomoko; Terakita, Akihisa; Kandori, Hideki; Shichida, Yoshinori; Imamoto, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Protein conformational changes, which regulate the activity of proteins, are induced by the alternation of intramolecular interactions. Therefore, the detection of the local environmental changes around the key amino acid residues is essential to understand the activation mechanisms of functional proteins. Here we developed the methods to scan the local environmental changes using the vibrational band of cysteine S-H group. We validated the sensitivity of this method using bathorhodopsin, a photoproduct of rhodopsin trapped at liquid nitrogen temperature, which undergoes little conformational changes from the dark state as shown by the X-ray crystallography. The cysteine residues were individually introduced into 15 positions of Helix III, which contains several key amino acid residues for the light-induced conformational changes of rhodopsin. The shifts of S-H stretching modes of these cysteine residues and native cysteine residues upon the formation of bathorhodopsin were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. While most of cysteine residues demonstrated no shift of S-H stretching mode, cysteine residues introduced at positions 117, 118, and 122, which are in the vicinity of the chromophore, demonstrated the significant changes. The current results are consistent with the crystal structure of bathorhodopsin, implying that the cysteine scanning is sensitive enough to detect the tiny conformational changes.

  1. Hierarchical effect behind the supramolecular chirality of silver(I)-cysteine coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Rosalba; Di Mauro, Alessandro; D'Urso, Alessandro; Messina, Gabriele C; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Purrello, Roberto; Fragalà, Maria Elena

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine is a sulfur-containing amino acid that easily coordinates to soft metal ions and grafts to noble metal surfaces. Recently, chiroptical activity of Ag(+)/cysteine coordination polymers has been widely studied, while, on the other hand, the appearance of a plasmon-enhanced circular dichroic signal (PECD) at the plasmonic spectral region (λ > 400 nm) has been observed for AgNPs capped with chiral sulfur-containing amino acids. These two events are both potentially exploited for sensing applications. However, the presence of Ag(+) ions in AgNP colloidal solution deals with the competition of cysteine grafting at the metal NP surface and/or metal ion coordination. Herein we demonstrate that the chiroptical activity observed by adding cysteine to AgNP colloids prepared by pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) is mainly related to the formation of CD-active Ag(+)/cysteine supramolecular polymers. The strict correlation between supramolecular chirality and hierarchical effects, driven by different chemical environments experienced by cysteine when different titration modalities are used, is pivotal to validate cysteine as a fast and reliable probe to characterize the surface oxidation of AgNPs prepared by pulsed laser ablation in liquids by varying the laser wavelengths. PMID:25781213

  2. A Sensitive Ratiometric Long-Wavelength Fluorescent Probe for Selective Determination of Cysteine/Homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Manibalan, Kesavan; Chen, Sin-Ming; Mani, Veerappan; Huang, Tsung-Tao; Huang, Sheng-Tung

    2016-07-01

    The development of sensitive fluorescence probes to detect biothiols such as cysteine and homocysteine has attracted great attention in recent times. Herein, we described the design and synthesis of coumarin based long-wavelength fluorescence probe, Bromo-2-benzothiazolyl-3-cyano-7-hydroxy coumarin (BBCH, 2) for selective detections of cysteine and homocysteine. The probe is rationally designed in such a way that both sulfhydryl and adjacent amino groups of thiols are involved in sensing process. Only cysteine/homocysteine able to react with BBCH to release fluorescence reporter (BCH, 1); while, glutathione and other amino acids unable to react with BBCH due to the absence of adjacent amino groups. In presence of cysteine, the color of BBCH is turns from colorless to red and thus BBCH is a naked eye fluorescence indicator for cysteine. Besides, BBCH can discriminate cysteine and homocysteine based on color changes and different reaction rates. The described sensing platform showed good sensing performances to detect cysteine and homocysteine with detection limits of 0.87 and 0.19 μM, respectively. Practical applicability was verified in biological and pharmaceutical samples. PMID:27290640

  3. A Caged Electrophilic Probe for Global Analysis of Cysteine Reactivity in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Abo, Masahiro; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2015-06-10

    Cysteine residues are subject to diverse modifications, such as oxidation, nitrosation, and lipidation. The resulting loss in cysteine reactivity can be measured using electrophilic chemical probes, which importantly provide the stoichiometry of modification. An iodoacetamide (IA)-based chemical probe has been used to concurrently quantify reactivity changes in hundreds of cysteines within cell lysates. However, the cytotoxicity of the IA group precludes efficient live-cell labeling, which is important for preserving transient cysteine modifications. To overcome this limitation, a caged bromomethyl ketone (BK) electrophile was developed, which shows minimal cytotoxicity and provides spatial and temporal control of electrophile activation through irradiation. The caged-BK probe was utilized to monitor cysteine reactivity changes in A431 cells upon epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated release of cellular reactive oxygen species. Decreased reactivity was observed for cysteines known to form sulfenic acids and redox-active disulfides. Importantly, the caged-BK platform provided the first quantification of intracellular disulfide bond formation upon EGF stimulation. In summary, the caged-BK probe is a powerful tool to identify reactivity changes associated with diverse cysteine modifications, including oxidation, metal chelation, and inhibitor binding, within a physiologically relevant context. PMID:26020833

  4. Mapping of the local environmental changes in proteins by cysteine scanning.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoichi; Nagata, Tomoko; Terakita, Akihisa; Kandori, Hideki; Shichida, Yoshinori; Imamoto, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Protein conformational changes, which regulate the activity of proteins, are induced by the alternation of intramolecular interactions. Therefore, the detection of the local environmental changes around the key amino acid residues is essential to understand the activation mechanisms of functional proteins. Here we developed the methods to scan the local environmental changes using the vibrational band of cysteine S-H group. We validated the sensitivity of this method using bathorhodopsin, a photoproduct of rhodopsin trapped at liquid nitrogen temperature, which undergoes little conformational changes from the dark state as shown by the X-ray crystallography. The cysteine residues were individually introduced into 15 positions of Helix III, which contains several key amino acid residues for the light-induced conformational changes of rhodopsin. The shifts of S-H stretching modes of these cysteine residues and native cysteine residues upon the formation of bathorhodopsin were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. While most of cysteine residues demonstrated no shift of S-H stretching mode, cysteine residues introduced at positions 117, 118, and 122, which are in the vicinity of the chromophore, demonstrated the significant changes. The current results are consistent with the crystal structure of bathorhodopsin, implying that the cysteine scanning is sensitive enough to detect the tiny conformational changes. PMID:27493492

  5. Development of cysteine-free fluorescent proteins for the oxidative environment.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Arai, Seisuke; Takeuchi, Mayumi; Sakurai, Chiye; Ebana, Hideaki; Higashi, Tsunehito; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka; Wada, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging employing fluorescent proteins has been widely used to highlight specific reactions or processes in various fields of the life sciences. Despite extensive improvements of the fluorescent tag, this technology is still limited in the study of molecular events in the extracellular milieu. This is partly due to the presence of cysteine in the fluorescent proteins. These proteins almost cotranslationally form disulfide bonded oligomers when expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although single molecule photobleaching analysis showed that these oligomers were not fluorescent, the fluorescent monomer form often showed aberrant behavior in folding and motion, particularly when fused to cysteine-containing cargo. Therefore we investigated whether it was possible to eliminate the cysteine without losing the brightness. By site-saturated mutagenesis, we found that the cysteine residues in fluorescent proteins could be replaced with specific alternatives while still retaining their brightness. cf(cysteine-free)SGFP2 showed significantly reduced restriction of free diffusion in the ER and marked improvement of maturation when fused to the prion protein. We further applied this approach to TagRFP family proteins and found a set of mutations that obtains the same level of brightness as the cysteine-containing proteins. The approach used in this study to generate new cysteine-free fluorescent tags should expand the application of molecular imaging to the extracellular milieu and facilitate its usage in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:22649538

  6. Development of Cysteine-Free Fluorescent Proteins for the Oxidative Environment

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Arai, Seisuke; Takeuchi, Mayumi; Sakurai, Chiye; Ebana, Hideaki; Higashi, Tsunehito; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka; Wada, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging employing fluorescent proteins has been widely used to highlight specific reactions or processes in various fields of the life sciences. Despite extensive improvements of the fluorescent tag, this technology is still limited in the study of molecular events in the extracellular milieu. This is partly due to the presence of cysteine in the fluorescent proteins. These proteins almost cotranslationally form disulfide bonded oligomers when expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although single molecule photobleaching analysis showed that these oligomers were not fluorescent, the fluorescent monomer form often showed aberrant behavior in folding and motion, particularly when fused to cysteine-containing cargo. Therefore we investigated whether it was possible to eliminate the cysteine without losing the brightness. By site-saturated mutagenesis, we found that the cysteine residues in fluorescent proteins could be replaced with specific alternatives while still retaining their brightness. cf(cysteine-free)SGFP2 showed significantly reduced restriction of free diffusion in the ER and marked improvement of maturation when fused to the prion protein. We further applied this approach to TagRFP family proteins and found a set of mutations that obtains the same level of brightness as the cysteine-containing proteins. The approach used in this study to generate new cysteine-free fluorescent tags should expand the application of molecular imaging to the extracellular milieu and facilitate its usage in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:22649538

  7. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling system. Its association is reversible, rendering the first enzyme of cysteine synthesis active and the second one inactive, and vice-versa. Complex formation is triggered by the reaction intermediates of cysteine synthesis in response to supply and demand and gives rise to regulation of genes of sulfur metabolism to adjust cellular sulfur homeostasis. Combinations of biochemistry, forward and reverse genetics, structural- and cell-biology approaches using Arabidopsis have revealed new enzyme functions and the unique pattern of spatial distribution of cysteine metabolism in plant cells. These findings place the synthesis of cysteine in the centre of the network of primary metabolism. PMID:22303278

  8. Hydrogen sulfide regulates abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Han, Ning; Bian, Hongwu; Liu, Xiaodong; Chan, Zhulong

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous molecule in various plant developmental processes and plant stress responses. In this study, the transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with modulated expressions of two cysteine desulfhydrases, and exogenous H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) and H2S scavenger (hypotaurine, HT) pre-treated plants were used to dissect the involvement of H2S in plant stress responses. The cysteine desulfhydrases overexpressing plants and NaHS pre-treated plants exhibited higher endogenous H2S level and improved abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, while cysteine desulfhydrases knockdown plants and HT pre-treated plants displayed lower endogenous H2S level and decreased stress resistance. Moreover, H2S upregulated the transcripts of multiple abiotic and biotic stress-related genes, and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Interestingly, MIR393-mediated auxin signaling including MIR393a/b and their target genes (TIR1, AFB1, AFB2, and AFB3) was transcriptionally regulated by H2S, and was related with H2S-induced antibacterial resistance. Moreover, H2S regulated 50 carbon metabolites including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, sugar alcohols, and aromatic amines. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine desulfhydrase and H2S conferred abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, via affecting the stress-related gene expressions, ROS metabolism, metabolic homeostasis, and MIR393-targeted auxin receptors. PMID:25329496

  9. The Significance of Hydrogen Sulfide for Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, Emmanuel; Poilevey, Aurélie; Hewage, Nishodi Indiketi; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently emerged as an important gaseous signaling molecule in plants. In this study, we investigated the possible functions of H2S in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination. NaHS treatments delayed seed germination in a dose-dependent manner and were ineffective in releasing seed dormancy. Interestingly, endogenous H2S content was enhanced in germinating seeds. This increase was correlated with higher activity of three enzymes (L-cysteine desulfhydrase, D-cysteine desulfhydrase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase) known as sources of H2S in plants. The H2S scavenger hypotaurine and the D/L cysteine desulfhydrase inhibitor propargylglycine significantly delayed seed germination. We analyzed the germinative capacity of des1 seeds mutated in Arabidopsis cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase. Although the mutant seeds do not exhibit germination-evoked H2S formation, they retained similar germination capacity as the wild-type seeds. In addition, des1 seeds responded similarly to temperature and were as sensitive to ABA as wild type seeds. Taken together, these data suggest that, although its metabolism is stimulated upon seed imbibition, H2S plays, if any, a marginal role in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination under standard conditions. PMID:27446159

  10. Cysteine oxidation impairs systemic glucocorticoid responsiveness in children with difficult-to-treat asthma

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Susan T.; Brown, Lou Ann S.; Helms, My N.; Qu, Hongyan; Brown, Sheena D.; Brown, Milton R.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid responsiveness are largely unknown. Although redox regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been reported, it has not been studied in asthma. Objective We characterized systemic cysteine oxidation and its association with inflammatory and clinical features in healthy children and children with difficult-to-treat asthma. We hypothesized that cysteine oxidation would be associated with increased markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, increased features of asthma severity, decreased clinically defined glucocorticoid responsiveness, and impaired GR function. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from healthy children (n = 16) and children with asthma (n = 118) age 6-17 years. Difficult-to-treat asthmatic children underwent glucocorticoid responsiveness testing with intramuscular triamcinolone. Cysteine, cystine, and inflammatory chemokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were quantified and expression and activity of the GR was assessed. Results Cysteine oxidation was present in children with difficult-to-treat asthma and was accompanied by increased ROS generation and increased CCL3 and CXCL1 mRNA expression. Children with the greatest extent of cysteine oxidation had more features of asthma severity including poorer symptom control, greater medication usage and less glucocorticoid responsiveness despite inhaled glucocorticoid therapy. Cysteine oxidation also modified the GR protein by decreasing available sulfhydryl groups and decreasing nuclear GR expression and activity. Conclusions A highly oxidized cysteine redox state promotes a post-translational modification of the GR that may inhibit its function. Given that cysteine oxidation is prevalent in children with difficult-to-treat asthma, the cysteine redox state may represent a potential therapeutic target for the restoration of glucocorticoid responsiveness in this population. PMID:25748343

  11. A process for the preparation of cysteine from cystine

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Liu, David K.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Littlejohn, David

    1989-01-01

    The present invention in one aspect relates to a process for the simultaneous removal of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 from a fluid stream comprising mixtures thereof and in another aspect relates to the separation, use and/or regeneration of various chemicals contaminated or spent in the process and which includes the steps of: (A) contacting the fluid stream at a temperature of between about 105.degree. and 180.degree. C. with a liquid aqueous slurry or solution comprising an effective amount of an iron chelate of an amino acid moiety having at least one --SH group; (B) separating the fluid stream from the particulates formed in step (A) comprising the chelate of the amino acid moiety and fly ash; (C) washing and separating the particulates of step (B) with an aqeous solution having a pH value of between about 5 to 8; (D) subsequently washing and separating the particulates of step (C) with a strongly acidic aqueous solution having a pH value of between about 1 to 3; (E) washing and separating the particulates of step (D) with an basic aqueous solution having a pH value of between about 9 to 12; (F) optionally adding additional amino acid moiety, iron (II) and alkali to the aqueous liquid from step (D) to produce an aqueous solution or slurry similar to that in step (A) having a pH value of between about 4 to 12; and (G) recycling the aqueous slurry of step (F) to the contacting zone of step (A). Steps (D) and (E) can be carried out in the reverse sequence, however the preferred order is (D) and then (E). In a preferred embodiment the present invention provides an improved process for the preparation (regeneration) of cysteine from cystine, which includes reacting an aqueous solution of cystine at a pH of between about 9 to 13 with a reducing agent selected from hydrogen sulfide or alkali metal sulfides, sulfur dioxide, an alkali metal sulfite or mixtures thereof for a time and at a temperature effective to cleave and reduce the cystine to cysteine with subsequent

  12. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine.

    PubMed

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Saitornuang, Sawanan; Sillapee, Pornpan; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzyme reaction proceeding through a cysteine/histidine catalytic dyad. We performed structure-function studies on the chikungunya nsP2 protease and show that the enzyme is not papain-like. Characterization of the catalytic dyad cysteine residue enabled us to identify a nearby serine that is catalytically interchangeable with the dyad cysteine residue. The enzyme retains activity upon alanine replacement of either residue but a replacement of both cysteine and serine residues results in no detectable activity. Protein dynamics appears to allow the use of either the cysteine or the serine residue in catalysis. This switchable dyad residue has not been previously reported for alphavirus nsP2 proteases and would have a major impact on the nsP2 protease as an anti-viral target. PMID:26597768

  13. Serine substitution for cysteine residues in levansucrase selectively abolishes levan forming activity.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Busby, Stephen J W; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Senthikumar, Velusamy; Bushby, Stephen J W

    2003-10-01

    Levansucrase is responsible for levan formation during sucrose fermentation of Zymomonas mobilis, and this decreases the efficiency of ethanol production. As thiol modifying agents decrease levan formation, a role for cysteine residues in levansucrase activity has been examined using derivatives of Z. mobilis levansucrase that carry serine substitutions of cysteine at positions 121, 151 or 244. These substitutions abolished the levan forming activity of levansucrase whilst only halving its activity in sucrose hydrolysis. Thus, polymerase and hydrolase activities of Z. mobilis levansucrase are separate and have different requirements for the enzyme's cysteine residues. PMID:14584923

  14. Learning about Cri du Chat Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chat syndrome - also known as 5p- syndrome and cat cry syndrome - is a rare genetic condition that ... du chat syndrome usually include a high-pitched cat-like cry, mental retardation, delayed development, distinctive facial ...

  15. Extracellular Cysteine in Connexins: Role as Redox Sensors.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Mauricio A; García, Isaac E; Pinto, Bernardo I; Pupo, Amaury; Báez, David; Stehberg, Jimmy; Del Rio, Rodrigo; González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteines could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression. PMID:26858649

  16. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensors for selective detecting cysteine with upconversion luminescence.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yunlong; Qu, Songnan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Ligong

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent sensors based on upconversion (UC) luminescence have been considered as a promising strategy to detect bio-analyte due to their advantages in deep penetration, minimum autofluorescence, and ratiometric fluorescent output. A prototype of nanosensors combined with mesoporous silica coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and a fluorescein-based fluorescent probe loaded in pores was therefore designed to detect cysteine (Cys). The silica shell provided loading space for the probe and enabled the nanosensors to disperse in water. In the presence of Cys, the fluorescent probe was transformed into 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein with an emission band centering at 518 nm which was secondarily excited by the light at around 475 nm from NaYF4:Yb(3+), Tm(3+) UCNPs driven by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) laser. The intensity ratio between green and blue luminescence (I518/I475) grew exponentially with increasing concentrations of Cys over a range of 20-200 μmolL(-1). The response of the nanosensors towards Cys was recognizable with naked eyes by luminescence color change. Evidences suggest that these nanosensors are capable of sensing Cys in aqueous solution and distinguishing Cys from homocysteine (Hcy) with kinetically-controlled selectivity. The system was further employed to detect Cys in human serum and the result was in agreement with it tested by high performance liquid chromatography with acceptable recovery. PMID:26402589

  17. Nuclear cysteine cathepsin variants in thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tedelind, Sofia; Poliakova, Kseniia; Valeta, Amanda; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Yemanaberhan, Eyoel Lemma; Heldin, Nils-Erik; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Weber, Ekkehard; Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša; Turk, Boris; Bogyo, Matthew; Brix, Klaudia

    2010-08-01

    The cysteine peptidase cathepsin B is important in thyroid physiology by being involved in thyroid prohormone processing initiated in the follicular lumen and completed in endo-lysosomal compartments. However, cathepsin B has also been localized to the extrafollicular space and is therefore suggested to promote invasiveness and metastasis in thyroid carcinomas through, e.g., ECM degradation. In this study, immunofluorescence and biochemical data from subcellular fractionation revealed that cathepsin B, in its single- and two-chain forms, is localized to endo-lysosomes in the papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line KTC-1 and in the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines HTh7 and HTh74. This distribution is not affected by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) incubation of HTh74, the only cell line that expresses a functional TSH-receptor. Immunofluorescence data disclosed an additional nuclear localization of cathepsin B immunoreactivity. This was supported by biochemical data showing a proteolytically active variant slightly smaller than the cathepsin B proform in nuclear fractions. We also demonstrate that immunoreactions specific for cathepsin V, but not cathepsin L, are localized to the nucleus in HTh74 in peri-nucleolar patterns. As deduced from co-localization studies and in vitro degradation assays, we suggest that nuclear variants of cathepsins are involved in the development of thyroid malignancies through modification of DNA-associated proteins. PMID:20536394

  18. Phosphorylation of Cysteine String Protein Triggers a Major Conformational Switch.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pryank; Prescott, Gerald R; Burgoyne, Robert D; Lian, Lu-Yun; Morgan, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a member of the DnaJ/Hsp40 chaperone family that localizes to neuronal synaptic vesicles. Impaired CSP function leads to neurodegeneration in humans and model organisms as a result of misfolding of client proteins involved in neurotransmission. Mammalian CSP is phosphorylated in vivo on Ser10, and this modulates its protein interactions and effects on neurotransmitter release. However, there are no data on the structural consequences of CSP phosphorylation to explain these functional effects. We show that Ser10 phosphorylation causes an order-to-disorder transition that disrupts CSP's extreme N-terminal α helix. This triggers the concomitant formation of a hairpin loop stabilized by ionic interactions between phosphoSer10 and the highly conserved J-domain residue, Lys58. These phosphorylation-induced effects result in significant changes to CSP conformation and surface charge distribution. The phospho-switch revealed here provides structural insight into how Ser10 phosphorylation modulates CSP function and also has potential implications for other DnaJ phosphoproteins. PMID:27452402

  19. Extracellular Cysteine in Connexins: Role as Redox Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo I.; Pupo, Amaury; Báez, David; Stehberg, Jimmy; Del Rio, Rodrigo; González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteines could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression. PMID:26858649

  20. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30–60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  1. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:23295243

  2. Quantitative Mapping of Reversible Mitochondrial Complex I Cysteine Oxidation in a Parkinson Disease Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Steven R.; Held, Jason M.; Oo, May; Riley, Rebeccah; Gibson, Bradford W.; Andersen, Julie K.

    2011-01-01

    Differential cysteine oxidation within mitochondrial Complex I has been quantified in an in vivo oxidative stress model of Parkinson disease. We developed a strategy that incorporates rapid and efficient immunoaffinity purification of Complex I followed by differential alkylation and quantitative detection using sensitive mass spectrometry techniques. This method allowed us to quantify the reversible cysteine oxidation status of 34 distinct cysteine residues out of a total 130 present in murine Complex I. Six Complex I cysteine residues were found to display an increase in oxidation relative to controls in brains from mice undergoing in vivo glutathione depletion. Three of these residues were found to reside within iron-sulfur clusters of Complex I, suggesting that their redox state may affect electron transport function. PMID:21196577

  3. Formation scheme and antioxidant activity of a novel Maillard pigment, pyrrolothiazolate, formed from cysteine and glucose.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kyoko; Terasawa, Naoko; Murata, Masatsune

    2016-06-15

    We recently identified 6-hydroxy-3[R],7a[S]-dimethyl-7-oxo-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b]thiazole-3-calboxylic acid, a novel pyrrolothiazole derivative carrying a carboxy group and named pyrrolothiazolate, as a Mallard pigment formed from l-cysteine and d-glucose. Here we described the formation of its enantiomer, the plausible formation scheme of pyrrolothiazolate, and its antioxidant activity. When d-cysteine was used instead of l-cysteine in the reaction mixture, the enantiomer of pyrrolothiazolate was obtained. The carbon at position 1 of glucose was incorporated into two methyl groups of pyrrolothiazolate. The pigment was considered to be formed through 1-deoxyglucosone (1-DG). The dehydrated isomer of 1-DG would be condensed with the thiol and amino groups of cysteine. This condensate was dehydrated and cyclized to form pyrrolothiazolate. This compound was an antioxidant showing radical scavenging activity. PMID:26987433

  4. Participation of cysteine and cystine in inactivation of tyrosine aminotransferase in rat liver homogenates.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, W T; Milligan, L P

    1978-01-01

    1. Inactivation of tyrosine aminotransferase was studied in rat liver homogenates. Under an O2 atmosphere with cysteine added, inactivation was rapid after a lag period of approx. 1h, whereas a N2 atmosphere extended the lag period to approx. 3h. 2. Replacement of cysteine with cystine resulted in rapid inactivation both aerobically and anaerobically. 3. Removal of the particulate fraction by centrifuging rat liver homogenates at 13,000g for 9min resulted in an aerobic lag period of 0.5h in the presence of cystine and approx. 3h in the presence of cysteine. 4. It is proposed that the stimulatory effect of cysteine on tyrosine aminotransferase inactivation occurs largely as a result of oxidation to cystine, which appears to be a more directly effective agent. PMID:33669

  5. Adjunctive N-acetyl-L-cysteine in treatment of murine pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Högen, Tobias; Demel, Cornelia; Giese, Armin; Angele, Barbara; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Koedel, Uwe; Klein, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    Despite antibiotic therapy, acute and long-term complications are still frequent in pneumococcal meningitis. One important trigger of these complications is oxidative stress, and adjunctive antioxidant treatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine was suggested to be protective in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. However, studies of effects on neurological long-term sequelae are limited. Here, we investigated the impact of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine on long-term neurological deficits in a mouse model of meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Eighteen hours after infection, mice were treated with a combination of ceftriaxone and placebo or ceftriaxone and N-acetyl-l-cysteine, respectively. Two weeks after infection, neurologic deficits were assessed using a clinical score, an open field test (explorative activity), a t-maze test (memory function), and auditory brain stem responses (hearing loss). Furthermore, cochlear histomorphological correlates of hearing loss were assessed. Adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine reduced hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis, but the effect was minor. There was no significant benefit of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine treatment in regard to other long-term complications of pneumococcal meningitis. Cochlear morphological correlates of meningitis-associated hearing loss were not reduced by adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine. In conclusion, adjunctive therapy with N-acetyl-l-cysteine at a dosage of 300 mg/kg of body weight intraperitoneally for 4 days reduced hearing loss but not other neurologic deficits after pneumococcal meningitis in mice. These results make a clinical therapeutic benefit of N-acetyl-l-cysteine in the treatment of patients with pneumococcal meningitis questionable. PMID:23877681

  6. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  7. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-01

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  8. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  9. Protein topology determines cysteine oxidation fate: the case of sulfenyl amide formation among protein families.

    PubMed

    Defelipe, Lucas A; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián G

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  10. A squaraine and Hg(2+)-based colorimetric and "turn on" fluorescent probe for cysteine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Huang, Yangwei; Fan, Juan; Wang, Ruyong; Fu, Nanyan

    2013-09-30

    A novel squaraine derivative (SQ-1) was synthesized and characterized for the determination of cysteine. Binding with Hg(2+) as a fluorescent quencher to SQ-1 leads to absorption and emission turn-off. More significantly, the SQ-1-Hg(2+) complex exhibits a dual-channel chromofluorogenic responses to biologically important cysteine with a high sensitivity and selectivity over other natural amino acids, along with a low detection limit of 36.7 nM. PMID:23953443

  11. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-01-01

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3138971

  12. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-05-15

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. PMID:3138971

  13. Comparative study of abiogenesis of cysteine and other amino acids catalyzed by various metal ions.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, K; Sen, P

    1975-01-01

    The present work pertains to the study of the influence of nickel, cobalt, thorium, vanadium, molybdate, ferrous ions on the formation of cysteine which is synthesized abiogenically together with other amino acids in sterilized aqueous mixtures of ammonium thiocyanate, formaldehyde, potassium dihydrogen phosphate, calcium acetate, and biological minerals after irradiating by artificial light. The effect of these catalysts on cysteine formation was of the order: Fe++ greater than Mo++ greater than Th++++ greater than V++ greater than Co++ greater than Ni. PMID:1189468

  14. Pru du 2S albumin or Pru du vicilin?

    PubMed

    Garino, Cristiano; De Paolis, Angelo; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2015-06-01

    A short partial sequence of 28 amino acids is all the information we have so far about the putative allergen 2S albumin from almond. The aim of this work was to analyze this information using mainly bioinformatics tools, in order to verify its rightness. Based on the results reported in the paper describing this allergen from almond, we analyzed the original data of amino acids sequencing through available software. The degree of homology of the almond 12kDa protein with any other known 2S albumin appears to be much lower than the one reported in the paper that firstly described it. In a publicly available cDNA library we discovered an expressed sequence tag which translation generates a protein that perfectly matches both of the sequencing outputs described in the same paper. A further analysis indicated that the latter protein seems to belong to the vicilin superfamily rather than to the prolamin one. The fact that also vicilins are seed storage proteins known to be highly allergenic would explain the IgE reactivity originally observed. Based on our observations we suggest that the IgE reactive 12kDa protein from almond currently known as Pru du 2S albumin is in reality the cleaved N-terminal region of a 7S vicilin like protein. PMID:25854802

  15. Biokinetics and dosimetry of depleted uranium (DU) in rats implanted with DU fragments.

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, Ray A.; Hahn, Fletcher F.; Durbin, P. W.

    2004-01-01

    A number of U. S. veterans of the Persian Gulf War were wounded with depleted uranium (DU) metal fragments as a result of 'friendly fire' incidents, in which Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles were struck by DU anti-armor munitions. Some of the crew members who survived were left with multiple small fragments of DU in their muscles and soft tissues. The number, size and location of the fragments made them inoperable in general, and therefore subject to long-term retention. Because there was inadequate data to predict the potential carcinogenicity of DU fragments in soft tissues, Hahn et al. (2003) conducted a lifespan cancer study in rats. As part of that study, a number of rats were maintained to study the biokinetics and dosimetry of DU implanted intramuscularly in male Wistar rats. Typically, four metal fragments, either as cylindrical pellets or square wafers were implanted into the biceps femoris muscles of the rats. Urine samples were collected periodically during their lifespans, and DU was analyzed in kidneys and eviscerated carcass (minus the implant sites) at death. The daily DU urinary excretion rate increased steeply during the first 30 d after implantation peaking at about 90 d at 3-10 x 10{sup -3}%/d. During the first 150 d, the average excretion rate was 2.4 x 10{sup -3}%/d, decreasing thereafter to about 1 x 10{sup -3}%/d. Serial radiographs were made of the wound sites to monitor gross morphologic changes in the DU implant and the surrounding tissue. As early as 1 w after implantation, radiographs showed the presence of surface corrosion and small, dense bodies near the original implant, presumably DU. This corrosion from the surface of the implant continued with time, but did not result in an increasing amount of DU reaching the blood and urine after the first 3 mo. During this 3-mo period, connective tissue capsules formed around the implants, and are hypothesized to have reduced the access of DU to tissue fluids by limiting the diffusion

  16. The cysteine releasing pattern of some antioxidant thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Önen Bayram, F Esra; Sipahi, Hande; Acar, Ebru Türköz; Kahveci Ulugöl, Reyhan; Buran, Kerem; Akgün, Hülya

    2016-05-23

    Oxidative stress that corresponds to a significant increase in free radical concentration in cells can cause considerable damage to crucial biological macromolecules if not prevented by cellular defense mechanisms. The low-molecular-weight thiol glutathione (GSH) constitutes one of the main intracellular antioxidants. It is synthesized via cysteine, an amino acid found only in limited amounts in cells because of its neurotoxicity. Thus, to ensure an efficient GSH synthesis in case of an oxidative stress, cysteine should be provided extracellularly. Yet, given its nucleophilic properties and its rapid conversion into cystine, its corresponding disulfide, cysteine presents some toxicity and therefore is usually supplemented in a prodrug approach. Here, some thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids were synthesized and evaluated for their antioxidant properties via the DDPH and CUPRAC assays. Then, the cysteine releasing capacity of the obtained compounds was investigated in aqueous and organic medium in order to correlate the relevant antioxidant properties of the molecules with their cysteine releasing pattern. As a result, the structures' antioxidative properties were not only attributed to cysteine release but also to the thiazolidine cycle itself. PMID:27017266

  17. Versatility and differential roles of cysteine residues in human prostacyclin receptor structure and function.

    PubMed

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Gleim, Scott R; Douville, Karen; Arehart, Eric; Hwa, John

    2006-12-01

    Prostacyclin plays important roles in vascular homeostasis, promoting vasodilatation and inhibiting platelet thrombus formation. Previous studies have shown that three of six cytoplasmic cysteines, particularly those within the C-terminal tail, serve as important lipidation sites and are differentially conjugated to palmitoyl and isoprenyl groups (Miggin, S. M., Lawler, O. A., and Kinsella, B. T. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 6947-6958). Here we report distinctive roles for extracellular- and transmembrane-located cysteine residues in human prostacyclin receptor structure-function. Within the extracellular domain, all cysteines (4 of 4) appear to be involved in disulfide bonding interactions (i.e. a highly conserved Cys-92-Cys-170 bond and a putative non-conserved Cys-5-Cys-165 bond), and within the transmembrane (TM) region there are several cysteines (3 of 8) that maintain critical hydrogen bonding interactions (Cys-118 (TMIII), Cys-251 (TMVI), and Cys-202 (TMV)). This study highlights the necessity of sulfhydryl (SH) groups in maintaining the structural integrity of the human prostacyclin receptor, as 7 of 12 extracellular and transmembrane cysteines studied were found to be differentially indispensable for receptor binding, activation, and/or trafficking. Moreover, these results also demonstrate the versatility and reactivity of these cysteine residues within different receptor environments, that is, extracellular (disulfide bonds), transmembrane (H-bonds), and cytoplasmic (lipid conjugation). PMID:17015447

  18. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs

    PubMed Central

    Driggers, Camden M; Hartman, Steven J; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ∼15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases. PMID:25307852

  19. Rapid synthesis of DNA-cysteine conjugates for expressed protein ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Lovrinovic, Marina; Niemeyer, Christof M. . E-mail: christof.niemeyer@uni-dortmund.de

    2005-09-30

    We report a rapid method for the covalent modification of commercially available amino-modified DNA oligonucleotides with a cysteine moiety. The resulting DNA-cysteine conjugates are versatile reagents for the efficient preparation of covalent DNA-protein conjugates by means of expressed protein ligation (EPL). The EPL method allows for the site-specific coupling of cysteine-modified DNA oligomers with recombinant intein-fusion proteins, the latter of which contain a C-terminal thioester enabling the mild and highly specific reaction with N-terminal cysteine compounds. We prepared a cysteine-modifier reagent in a single-step reaction which allows for the rapid and near quantitative synthesis of cysteine-DNA conjugates. The latter were ligated with the green fluorescent protein mutant EYFP, recombinantly expressed as an intein-fusion protein, allowing for the mild and selective formation of EYFP-DNA conjugates in high yields of about 60%. We anticipate many applications of our approach, ranging from protein microarrays to the arising field of nanobiotechnology.

  20. Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Qian; Li, Zhi-Feng; Yang, Bin

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Cadmium sulfide polycrystalline nanotubes have been successfully synthesized by microwave-assisted transformation method using Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires as the source material and template in ethylene glycol at 160 °C or ethanol at 60 °C. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires were successfully synthesized in alkaline solution. ► CdS nanotubes were prepared by templated microwave-assisted transformation method. ► CdS nanotubes can well duplicate the size and morphology of precursor nanowires. ► This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost. -- Abstract: We report the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes. In this method, the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are synthesized using CdCl{sub 2}·2.5H{sub 2}O, L-cysteine and ethanolamine in water at room temperature. The Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are used as the source material and template for the subsequent preparation of CdS nanotubes by a microwave-assisted transformation method using ethylene glycol or ethanol as the solvent. This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost, and may be extended to the synthesis of nanotubes of other compounds. The products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  1. Factors affecting urinary excretion of testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Marcos, Josep; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Pozo, Oscar J

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of the athlete steroidal passport in doping control analysis aims to detect intra-individual changes in the steroid profile related to the abuse of anabolic steroids. In this context, the study of intrinsic variations associated with each marker is of utmost importance. In the present work, the influence of several factors in the excretion of the recently reported testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine (Δ(1) -AED; 1,4-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -AED; 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -T; 4,6-androstadien-17β-ol-3-one, and Δ(15) -AD; 15-androsten-3,17-dione) is evaluated for the first time. Degradation experiments at 37 °C proved that, although the cysteinyl moiety is released, the variation for urinary Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -AED, Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -T ratios is less than 30%. Moreover, freeze/thaw cycle testing resulted in RSDs values below 15% for all the analytes. Regarding infradian variability, moderate variations (below 40%) were observed. Additionally, notable alterations in the excretion of these compounds have been observed in the earliest stages of pregnancy. UGT2B17 polymorphism, responsible for the low T/E ratio found in some population, does not influence the excretion of cysteinyl compounds whereas the intake of exogenous substances (alcohol or 5α-reductase inhibitors) dramatically affects their excretion. The urinary concentrations of Δ(1) -AED, Δ(6) -AED, and Δ(15) -AD decreased (<50 %) after the ethanol intake, whereas after the administration of dutasteride, an important increase was observed for the concentrations of Δ(6) -AED, Δ(6) -T and Δ(15) -AD. Overall, the presented data describes the stability of the urinary cysteinyl steroids under the influence of many factors, proving their potential as suitable parameters to be included in the steroidal module of the athlete's biological passport. PMID:25917157

  2. ROSics: chemistry and proteomics of cysteine modifications in redox biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Sura; Lee, Hee Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring in proteins determine their functions and regulations. Proteomic tools are available to identify PTMs and have proved invaluable to expanding the inventory of these tools of nature that hold the keys to biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), the least abundant (1-2%) of amino acid residues, are unique in that they play key roles in maintaining stability of protein structure, participating in active sites of enzymes, regulating protein function and binding to metals, among others. Cys residues are major targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators and modulators of various biological processes. It is therefore necessary to identify the Cys-containing ROS target proteins, as well as the sites and species of their PTMs. Cutting edge proteomic tools which have helped identify the PTMs at reactive Cys residues, have also revealed that Cys residues are modified in numerous ways. These modifications include formation of disulfide, thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate, oxidation to sulfenic, sulfinic, sulfonic acids and thiosulfonic acid, transformation to dehydroalanine (DHA) and serine, palmitoylation and farnesylation, formation of chemical adducts with glutathione, 4-hydroxynonenal and 15-deoxy PGJ2, and various other chemicals. We present here, a review of relevant ROS biology, possible chemical reactions of Cys residues and details of the proteomic strategies employed for rapid, efficient and sensitive identification of diverse and novel PTMs involving reactive Cys residues of redox-sensitive proteins. We propose a new name, "ROSics," for the science which describes the principles of mode of action of ROS at molecular levels. PMID:24916017

  3. Oxidation of hypotaurine and cysteine sulphinic acid by peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the sulphinic group of both HTAU (hypotaurine) and CSA (cysteine sulphinic acid), producing the respective sulphonates, TAU (taurine) and CA (cysteic acid). The reaction is associated with extensive oxygen uptake, suggesting that HTAU and CSA are oxidized by the one-electron transfer mechanism to sulphonyl radicals, which may initiate an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction with the sulphonates as final products. Besides the one-electron mechanism, HTAU and CSA can be oxidized by the two-electron pathway, leading directly to sulphonate formation without oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the direct reaction of peroxynitrite with HTAU and CSA at pH 7.4 and 25 °C are 77.4±5 and 76.4±9 M−1·s−1 respectively. For both sulphinates, the apparent second-order rate constants increase sharply with decrease in pH, and the sigmoidal curves obtained are consistent with peroxynitrous acid as the species responsible for sulphinate oxidation. The kinetic data, together with changes in oxygen uptake, sulphinate depletion, sulphonate production, and product distribution of nitrite and nitrate, suggest that oxidation of sulphinates by peroxynitrite may take place by the two reaction pathways whose relative importance depends on reagent concentrations and pH value. In the presence of bicarbonate, the direct reaction of sulphinates with peroxynitrite is inhibited and the oxidative reaction probably involves only the radicals •NO2 and CO3•−, generated by decomposition of the peroxynitrite-CO2 adduct. PMID:15740460

  4. ROSICS: CHEMISTRY AND PROTEOMICS OF CYSTEINE MODIFICATIONS IN REDOX BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Sura; Lee, Hee Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring in proteins determine their functions and regulations. Proteomic tools are available to identify PTMs and have proved invaluable to expanding the inventory of these tools of nature that hold the keys to biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), the least abundant (1–2%) of amino acid residues, are unique in that they play key roles in maintaining stability of protein structure, participating in active sites of enzymes, regulating protein function and binding to metals, among others. Cys residues are major targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators and modulators of various biological processes. It is therefore necessary to identify the Cys-containing ROS target proteins, as well as the sites and species of their PTMs. Cutting edge proteomic tools which have helped identify the PTMs at reactive Cys residues, have also revealed that Cys residues are modified in numerous ways. These modifications include formation of disulfide, thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate, oxidation to sulfenic, sulfinic, sulfonic acids and thiosulfonic acid, transformation to dehydroalanine (DHA) and serine, palmitoylation and farnesylation, formation of chemical adducts with glutathione, 4-hydroxynonenal and 15-deoxy PGJ2, and various other chemicals. We present here, a review of relevant ROS biology, possible chemical reactions of Cys residues and details of the proteomic strategies employed for rapid, efficient and sensitive identification of diverse and novel PTMs involving reactive Cys residues of redox-sensitive proteins. We propose a new name, “ROSics,” for the science which describes the principles of mode of action of ROS at molecular levels. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:184–208, 2015. PMID:24916017

  5. Cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase genes of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum: possible involvement in hypotaurine synthesis and adaptation to hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Toshihiro; Hongo, Yuki; Koito, Tomoko; Nakamura-Kusakabe, Ikumi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that invertebrates inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vent areas use the sulfinic acid hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine, to protect against the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide contained in the seawater from the vent. In this protective system, hypotaurine is accumulated in the gill, the primary site of sulfide exposure. However, the pathway for hypotaurine synthesis in mollusks has not been identified. In this study, we screened for the mRNAs of enzymes involved in hypotaurine synthesis in the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum and cloned cDNAs encoding cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase. As mRNAs encoding cysteamine dioxygenase and cysteine lyase were not detected, the cysteine sulfinate pathway is suggested to be the major pathway of hypotaurine and taurine synthesis. The two genes were found to be expressed in all the tissues examined, but the gill exhibited the highest expression. The mRNA level in the gill was not significantly changed by exposure to sulfides or thiosulfate. These results suggests that the gill of B. septemdierum maintains high levels of expression of the two genes regardless of ambient sulfide level and accumulates hypotaurine continuously to protect against sudden exposure to high level of sulfide. PMID:25501502

  6. Clitocypin, a fungal cysteine protease inhibitor, exerts its insecticidal effect on Colorado potato beetle larvae by inhibiting their digestive cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Šmid, Ida; Rotter, Ana; Gruden, Kristina; Brzin, Jože; Buh Gašparič, Meti; Kos, Janko; Žel, Jana; Sabotič, Jerica

    2015-07-01

    Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, CPB) is a major potato pest that adapts readily to insecticides. Several types of protease inhibitors have previously been investigated as potential control agents, but with limited success. Recently, cysteine protease inhibitors from parasol mushroom, the macrocypins, were reported to inhibit growth of CPB larvae. To further investigate the insecticidal potential and mode of action of cysteine protease inhibitors of fungal origin, clitocypin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from clouded agaric (Clitocybe nebularis), was evaluated for its lethal effects on CPB larvae. Clitocypin isolated from fruiting bodies and recombinant clitocypin produced in Escherichia coli slowed growth and reduced survival of CPB larvae in a concentration dependent manner. Clitocypin was also expressed by transgenic potato, but only at low levels. Nevertheless, it reduced larval weight gain and delayed development. We have additionally shown that younger larvae are more susceptible to the action of clitocypin. The inhibition of digestive cysteine proteases, intestains, by clitocypin was shown to be the underlying mode of action. Protease inhibitors from mushrooms are confirmed as promising candidates for biopesticides. PMID:26071808

  7. Global regulation of gene expression in response to cysteine availability in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cysteine has a crucial role in cellular physiology and its synthesis is tightly controlled due to its reactivity. However, little is known about the sulfur metabolism and its regulation in clostridia compared with other firmicutes. In Clostridium perfringens, the two-component system, VirR/VirS, controls the expression of the ubiG operon involved in methionine to cysteine conversion in addition to the expression of several toxin genes. The existence of links between the C. perfringens virulence regulon and sulfur metabolism prompted us to analyze this metabolism in more detail. Results We first performed a tentative reconstruction of sulfur metabolism in C. perfringens and correlated these data with the growth of strain 13 in the presence of various sulfur sources. Surprisingly, C. perfringens can convert cysteine to methionine by an atypical still uncharacterized pathway. We further compared the expression profiles of strain 13 after growth in the presence of cystine or homocysteine that corresponds to conditions of cysteine depletion. Among the 177 genes differentially expressed, we found genes involved in sulfur metabolism and controlled by premature termination of transcription via a cysteine specific T-box system (cysK-cysE, cysP1 and cysP2) or an S-box riboswitch (metK and metT). We also showed that the ubiG operon was submitted to a triple regulation by cysteine availability via a T-box system, by the VirR/VirS system via the VR-RNA and by the VirX regulatory RNA. In addition, we found that expression of pfoA (theta-toxin), nagL (one of the five genes encoding hyaluronidases) and genes involved in the maintenance of cell redox status was differentially expressed in response to cysteine availability. Finally, we showed that the expression of genes involved in [Fe-S] clusters biogenesis and of the ldh gene encoding the lactate dehydrogenase was induced during cysteine limitation. Conclusion Several key functions for the cellular physiology of this

  8. Résultats du traitement du synovialosarcome des members

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Ismail, Farid; Kharmaz, Mohammed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Les synovialosarcomes, sarcomes de haut grade, sont de diagnostic tardif et le traitement est complexe et onéreux, nécessitant la mise en œuvre d'une équipe pluridisciplinaire. Le but de ce travail était d'apprécier les résultats de l'association de la chirurgie à la radio chimiothérapie des synovialosarcomes des membres. Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective portant sur des patients présentant de synovialosarcomes des membres pris en charge dans le service de chirurgie orthopédique et traumatologique du CHU Ibn SINA de Rabat allant de Janvier 2006 à Décembre 2011 (6 ans). Nous avons inclus les malades présentant de synovialosarcomes des membres dont la clinique et l'imagerie médicale étaient en faveur, confirmés par l'examen anatomopathologique et la prise en charge effectuée dans le service. Les patients ont été revus avec un recul moyen de 3 ans. Nous n'avons pas retenu les patients dont les dossiers étaient incomplets, perdus de vue. Nous avons apprécié les résultats selon les critères carcinologiques et le score MSTS (Musculoskeletal Tumor Society). La saisie et l'analyse des données ont été faites sur le logiciel SPSS Stastic 17.0 Nous avons colligé 20 cas de synovialosarcome des membres dans le Service de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique au CHU Ibn SINA de Rabat Le sexe masculin a prédominé avec 65% (n = 13) avec un sex ratio 1,85. L’âge moyen a été de 42,6 ans avec des extrêmes allant de 20 ans et 70 ans. Notre délai moyen de consultation était de 14,42 mois. Tous les malades ont consulté pour une tuméfaction dans 100% (localisée au membre inférieur dans 65% (n = 13), membre supérieur dans 35% (n = 7). La douleur était associée à la tuméfaction dans 55% (n = 11), quant à l'altération de l’état général et l'ulcération de la masse, elles ont été notées dans 3 cas chacune. Nous avons réalisé un bilan d'imagerie médicale comprenant: radiographie standard, échographie, écho doppler

  9. Polarized spectroscopic elucidation of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, L-cysteine, L-cystine, L-ascorbic acid and a tool for their determination in solid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael; Kolev, Tsonko

    2010-01-01

    Method of linear polarized vibrational (both IR- and Raman) spectroscopy of oriented colloids in nematic host is applied on N-acetyl-L-cysteine, L-cysteine, L-cystine and L-ascorbic acid with a view to obtain experimental bands assignment and local structural elucidation in solid-state. Structural results are compared with available crystallographic data for all of the systems studied. Scopes and limitations of the polarized method are shown. Discussion on the correlation between polarized spectroscopic data and the space group type as well as the number of the molecules in the unit cell (Z) is performed. Compounds with monoclinic space group P2(1), containing Z = 1 (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) and 2 (L-cysteine and L-ascorbic acid) are elucidated. One of the rare for organic molecules, hexagonal P6(1)22 space group and Z = 6 (L: -cystine) is also elucidated. Experimental assignment of the characteristics frequencies is obtained, explaining the typical for the crystals Fermi-resonance, Fermy-Davydov and Davydov splitting effects. For first time in the literature we are reported the orientation of the solid-mixture in nematic host, using the trade product ACC (Hexal, Germany), containing mainly N-acetyl-L-cysteine and L-ascorbic acid. Quantitative IR-spectroscopic approach for determination of solid mixtures is presented as well. The intensity ratio between 1,716 cm(-1) (characteristic for N-acetyl-L-cysteine) and 990 cm(-1), (attributed N-acethyl-cysteine and vitamin C) is used. Linear regression analysis between content and the peak ratio data for ten solid-binary mixtures, leads to straight-line plot y = 1.08(2) (+/-0.04(9)) + (-0.11(4) +/- 0.01(1))x, where x = 1/X ( i ). Factor r of 0.9641 and a reliability of 98.85% are obtained. The analysis of ACC 200 (Hexal, Germany) show that the IR measurements leads to standard deviation of 0.010 and 0.011 at P about 0.0500 for the systems and a confidence of >98.77(1)%. PMID:19212805

  10. Binding modes of a new epoxysuccinyl-peptide inhibitor of cysteine proteases. Where and how do cysteine proteases express their selectivity?

    PubMed

    Czaplewski, C; Grzonka, Z; Jaskólski, M; Kasprzykowski, F; Kozak, M; Politowska, E; Ciarkowski, J

    1999-05-18

    Papain from Carica papaya, an easily available cysteine protease, is the best-studied representative of this family of enzymes. The three dimensional structure of papain is very similar to that of other cysteine proteases of either plant (actinidin, caricain, papaya protease IV) or animal (cathepsins B, K, L, H) origin. As abnormalities in the activities of mammalian cysteine proteases accompany a variety of diseases, there has been a long-lasting interest in the development of potent and selective inhibitors for these enzymes. A covalent inhibitor of cysteine proteases, designed as a combination of epoxysuccinyl and peptide moieties, has been modeled in the catalytic pocket of papain. A number of its configurations have been generated and relaxed by constrained simulated annealing-molecular dynamics in water. A clear conformational variability of this inhibitor is discussed in the context of a conspicuous conformational diversity observed earlier in several solid-state structures of other complexes between cysteine proteases and covalent inhibitors. The catalytic pockets S2 and even more so S3, as defined by the pioneering studies on the papain-ZPACK, papain-E64c and papain-leupeptin complexes, appear elusive in view of the evident flexibility of the present inhibitor and in confrontation with the obvious conformational scatter seen in other examples. This predicts limited chances for the development of selective structure-based inhibitors of thiol proteases, designed to exploit the minute differences in the catalytic pockets of various members of this family. A simultaneous comparison of the three published proenzyme structures suggests the enzyme's prosegment binding loop-prosegment interface as a new potential target for selective inhibitors of papain-related thiol proteases. PMID:10350606

  11. A cysteine protease encoded by the baculovirus Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, T; Majima, K; Maeda, S

    1994-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the BamHI F fragment of the genome of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) revealed an open reading frame whose deduced amino acid sequence had homology to those of cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily. The putative cysteine protease sequence (BmNPV-CP) was 323 amino acids long and showed 35% identity to a cysteine proteinase precursor from Trypanosoma brucei. Of 36 residues conserved among cathepsins B, H, L, and S and papain, 31 were identical in BmNPV-CP. In order to determine the activity and function of the putative cysteine protease, a BmNPV mutant (BmCysPD) was constructed by homologous recombination of the protease gene with a beta-galactosidase gene cassette. BmCysPD-infected BmN cell extracts were significantly reduced in acid protease activity compared with wild-type virus-infected cell extracts. The cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 [trans-epoxysuccinylleucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane] inhibited wild-type virus-expressed protease activity. Deletion of the cysteine protease gene had no significant effect on viral growth or polyhedron production in BmN cells, indicating that the cysteine protease was not essential for viral replication in vitro. However, B. mori larvae infected with BmCysPD showed symptoms different from those of wild-type BmNPV-infected larvae, e.g., less degradation of the body, including fat body cells, white body surface color due presumably to undegraded epidermal cells, and an increase in the number of polyhedra released into the hemolymph. This is the first report of (i) a virus-encoded protease with activity on general substrates and (ii) evidence that a virus-encoded protease may play a role in degradation of infected larvae to facilitate horizontal transmission of the virus. Images PMID:8083997

  12. Cysteine conjugate toxicity, metabolism, and binding to macromolecules in isolated rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hayden, P J; Stevens, J L

    1990-03-01

    The 14C-labeled, 35S-labeled, and unlabeled nephrotoxic cysteine conjugates S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, S-(2-chloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethyl)- L-cysteine, S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine, S-(1,2,3,4,4-pentachlorobutadienyl)-L- cysteine (PCBC), and S-(1,1,2,3,3,3-hexafluoropropyl)-L-cysteine were synthesized and their toxicities were compared in isolated rat renal mitochondria. Inhibition of respiration, covalent binding to macromolecules, metabolism by mitochondria, metabolism by a purified cysteine conjugate beta-lyase (beta-lyase), and octanol/water partition coefficients were studied. All of the conjugates inhibited mitochondrial state 3 respiration. Only PCBC was found to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation. (Aminooxy)acetic acid, a beta-lyase inhibitor, blocked the effects of the conjugates on state 3 respiration except for the uncoupling effect of PCBC, which was not blocked. Binding of 35S label to macromolecules was observed after treatment with each of the 35S-labeled conjugates, and (aminooxy)acetic acid blocked the binding. The relative amounts of metabolism of the conjugates did not correlate well with their relative binding and toxicities, indicating some differential reactivity of metabolites and/or selectivity for binding targets. Some of the binding from 35S-labeled conjugates was removed by treatment with the disulfide-reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting that some of the binding was via mixed disulfides. The amount of dithiothreitol-sensitive binding differed among the conjugates. The metabolism of PCBC by permeabilized mitochondria, but not by a purified beta-lyase, was consistent with its relative toxicity and covalent binding, suggesting the involvement of other beta-lyase enzymes in the activation of PCBC to toxic species in mitochondria. PMID:2314393

  13. Glutathione and cysteine enhance porcine preimplantation embryo development in vitro after intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Xia; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Keun Jung; Kim, Eun Young; Han, Kil-Woo; Park, Kang-Sun; Yu, Jung; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-01-15

    Because intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) had been introduced to animal science, not only reproductive biology of domestic animals, but also medicine to treat infertility has been developed. This assisted reproductive technology is beneficial for generating transgenic animals, especially pigs, because polyspermy is the greatest hurdle in porcine IVF when researchers make highly qualified preimplantation embryos. However, ICSI-derived embryos expressed high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are known to cause serious dysfunction during preimplantation development. The objective of this study was to investigate the developmental competence, ROS level, and apoptosis index when glutathione (GSH) or cysteine was supplemented into the in vitro culture medium for ICSI-derived porcine embryos. First, we evaluated the effect of different concentrations of GSH or cysteine on developmental ability of porcine ICSI-derived embryos. The cleavage rate (79.6%) and the blastocyst formation rate (20.9%) were significantly improved in culture medium supplemented with 1 mmol/L GSH compared with other concentrations or no supplementation. Also, 1.71 mmol/L cysteine showed a significantly higher proportion of cleavage (80.7%) and blastocyst formation (22.5%) than other cysteine-supplemented groups. Next, we confirmed that intracellular ROS level was significantly reduced in the group of blastocysts cultured with GSH or cysteine after ICSI compared with the no supplementation group. Finally, we found that terminal uridine nick-end labeling index, fragmentation, and total apoptosis were significantly decreased and the total cell number was significantly increased in blastocysts when ICSI-derived embryos were cultured with supplementation of 1.71 mmol/L cysteine or 1 mmol/L GSH. Taken together, these results strongly indicate that GSH or cysteine can improve the developmental competence of porcine ICSI-derived embryos by reducing intracellular ROS level and the apoptosis

  14. Quantification of free cysteines in membrane and soluble proteins using a fluorescent dye and thermal unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Naismith, James H

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine is an extremely useful site for selective attachment of labels to proteins for many applications, including the study of protein structure in solution by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence spectroscopy and medical imaging. The demand for quantitative data for these applications means that it is important to determine the extent of the cysteine labeling. The efficiency of labeling is sensitive to the 3D context of cysteine within the protein. Where the label or modification is not directly measurable by optical or magnetic spectroscopy, for example, in cysteine modification to dehydroalanine, assessing labeling efficiency is difficult. We describe a simple assay for determining the efficiency of modification of cysteine residues, which is based on an approach previously used to determine membrane protein stability. The assay involves a reaction between the thermally unfolded protein and a thiol-specific coumarin fluorophore that is only fluorescent upon conjugation with thiols. Monitoring fluorescence during thermal denaturation of the protein in the presence of the dye identifies the temperature at which the maximum fluorescence occurs; this temperature differs among proteins. Comparison of the fluorescence intensity at the identified temperature between modified, unmodified (positive control) and cysteine-less protein (negative control) allows for the quantification of free cysteine. We have quantified both site-directed spin labeling and dehydroalanine formation. The method relies on a commonly available fluorescence 96-well plate reader, which rapidly screens numerous samples within 1.5 h and uses <100 μg of material. The approach is robust for both soluble and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. PMID:24091556

  15. Effect of Copper on l-Cysteine/l-Cystine Influx in Normal Human Erythrocytes and Erythrocytes of Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Nabarun; Bhattacharjee, Debojyoti; Rout, Jayanta Kumar; Dasgupta, Anindya; Bhattacharya, Gorachand; Sarkar, Chandan; Gangopadhyaya, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Wilson's disease is a disease of abnormal copper metabolism in which free serum copper level is raised. The objective of the study was to determine, whether in Wilson disease, l-cysteine/l-cystine influx into RBC was decreased or not and the specific amino acid transporter affected by copper in normal human RBC. For l-cysteine/l-cystine influx, ten untreated cases, ten treated cases and ten age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited. To study the effect of copper on l-cysteine/l-cystine influx in RBC, 15 healthy subjects were selected. RBC GSH and l-cysteine/l-cystine influx were estimated by Beautler's and Yildiz's method respectively. In untreated cases, l-cysteine/l-cystine influx and erythrocyte GSH level were decreased showing that elevated level of free copper in serum or media decreased l-cysteine/l-cystine influx in human RBC. Copper treatment inhibited L amino acid transporter in normal RBC specifically. PMID:27605746

  16. Cure of Hookworm Infection with a Cysteine Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Jon J.; Lantz, Lorine D.; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hookworm disease is a major global health problem and principal among a number of soil-transmitted helminthiases (STHs) for the chronic disability inflicted that impacts both personal and societal productivity. Mass drug administration most often employs single-dose therapy with just two drugs of the same chemical class to which resistance is a growing concern. New chemical entities with the appropriate single-dose efficacy are needed. Methods and Findings Using various life-cycle stages of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum in vitro and a hamster model of infection, we report the potent, dose-dependent cidal activities of the peptidyl cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs) K11002 (4-mopholino-carbonyl-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl- vinyl sulfone phenyl) and K11777 (N-methylpiperazine-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl-vinylsulfone phenyl). The latter is in late pre-clinical testing for submission as an Investigational New Drug (IND) with the US Federal Drug Administration as an anti-chagasic. In vitro, K11002 killed hookworm eggs but was without activity against first-stage larvae. The reverse was true for K11777 with a larvicidal potency equal to that of the current anti-hookworm drug, albendazole (ABZ). Both CPIs produced morbidity in ex vivo adult hookworms with the activity of K11777 again being at least the equivalent of ABZ. Combinations of either CPI with ABZ enhanced morbidity compared to single compounds. Strikingly, oral treatment of infected hamsters with 100 mg/kg K11777 b.i.d. (i.e., a total daily dose of 200 mg/kg) for one day cured infection: a single 100 mg/kg treatment removed >90% of worms. Treatment also reversed the otherwise fatal decrease in blood hemoglobin levels and body weights of hosts. Consistent with its mechanism of action, K11777 decreased by >95% the resident CP activity in parasites harvested from hamsters 8 h post-treatment with a single 100 mg/kg oral dose. Conclusion A new, oral single-dose anthelmintic that is active in an

  17. X-ray structures of Nfs2, the plastidial cysteine desulfurase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Roret, Thomas; Pégeot, Henri; Couturier, Jérémy; Mulliert, Guillermo; Rouhier, Nicolas; Didierjean, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplastic Arabidopsis thaliana Nfs2 (AtNfs2) is a group II pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent cysteine desulfurase that is involved in the initial steps of iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis. The group II cysteine desulfurases require the presence of sulfurtransferases such as SufE proteins for optimal activity. Compared with group I cysteine desulfurases, proteins of this group contains a smaller extended lobe harbouring the catalytic cysteine and have a β-hairpin constraining the active site. Here, two crystal structures of AtNfs2 are reported: a wild-type form with the catalytic cysteine in a persulfide-intermediate state and a C384S variant mimicking the resting state of the enzyme. In both structures the well conserved Lys241 covalently binds pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, forming an internal aldimine. Based on available homologous bacterial complexes, a model of a complex between AtNfs2 and the SufE domain of its biological partner AtSufE1 is proposed, revealing the nature of the binding sites. PMID:25195888

  18. Redox Sensitivities of Global Cellular Cysteine Residues under Reductive and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kazutaka; Kusano, Hidewo; Sasaki, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Riko; Hatta, Tomohisa; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Natsume, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The protein cysteine residue is one of the amino acids most susceptible to oxidative modifications, frequently caused by oxidative stress. Several applications have enabled cysteine-targeted proteomics analysis with simultaneous detection and quantitation. In this study, we employed a quantitative approach using a set of iodoacetyl-based cysteine reactive isobaric tags (iodoTMT) and evaluated the transient cellular oxidation ratio of free and reversibly modified cysteine thiols under DTT and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. DTT treatment (1 mM for 5 min) reduced most cysteine thiols, irrespective of their cellular localizations. It also caused some unique oxidative shifts, including for peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), and thioredoxin (TXN), proteins reportedly affected by cellular reactive oxygen species production. Modest H2O2 treatment (50 μM for 5 min) did not cause global oxidations but instead had apparently reductive effects. Moreover, with H2O2, significant oxidative shifts were observed only in redox active proteins, like PRDX2, peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), TXN, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Overall, our quantitative data illustrated both H2O2- and reduction-mediated cellular responses, whereby while redox homeostasis is maintained, highly reactive thiols can potentiate the specific, rapid cellular signaling to counteract acute redox stress. PMID:27350002

  19. Cysteine Cathepsins as Regulators of the Cytotoxicity of NK and T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perišić Nanut, Milica; Sabotič, Jerica; Jewett, Anahid; Kos, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are lysosomal peptidases involved at different levels in the processes of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Some, such as cathepsins B, L, and H are expressed constitutively in most immune cells. In cells of innate immunity they play a role in cell adhesion and phagocytosis. Other cysteine cathepsins are expressed more specifically. Cathepsin X promotes dendritic cell maturation, adhesion of macrophages, and migration of T cells. Cathepsin S is implicated in major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation, whereas cathepsin C, expressed in cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, is involved in processing pro-granzymes into proteolytically active forms, which trigger cell death in their target cells. The activity of cysteine cathepsins is controlled by endogenous cystatins, cysteine protease inhibitors. Of these, cystatin F is the only cystatin that is localized in endosomal/lysosomal vesicles. After proteolytic removal of its N-terminal peptide, cystatin F becomes a potent inhibitor of cathepsin C with the potential to regulate pro-granzyme processing and cell cytotoxicity. This review is focused on the role of cysteine cathepsins and their inhibitors in the molecular mechanisms leading to the cytotoxic activity of T lymphocytes and NK cells in order to address new possibilities for regulation of their function in pathological processes. PMID:25520721

  20. Genes encoding farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Y; Davey, J; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, M; Yamamoto, M

    1997-01-01

    The mam4 mutation of Schizosaccharomyces pombe causes mating deficiency in h- cells but not in h+ cells. h- cells defective in mam4 do not secrete active mating pheromone M-factor. We cloned mam4 by complementation. The mam4 gene encodes a protein of 236 amino acids, with several potential membrane-spanning domains, which is 44% identical with farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase encoded by STE14 and required for the modification of a-factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of membrane fractions revealed that mam4 is responsible for the methyltransferase activity in S. pombe. Cells defective in mam4 produced farnesylated but unmethylated cysteine and small peptides but no intact M-factor. These observations strongly suggest that the mam4 gene product is farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase that modifies M-factor. Furthermore, transcomplementation of S. pombe mam4 allowed us to isolate an apparent homolog of mam4 from Xenopus laevis (Xmam4). In addition to its sequence similarity to S. pombe mam4, the product of Xmam4 was shown to have a farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase activity in S. pombe cells. The isolation of a vertebrate gene encoding farnesyl cysteine carboxyl methyltransferase opens the way to in-depth studies of the role of methylation in a large body of proteins, including Ras superfamily proteins. PMID:9032282

  1. Cysteines 208 and 241 in Ero1α are required for maximal catalytic turnover.

    PubMed

    Ramming, Thomas; Kanemura, Shingo; Okumura, Masaki; Inaba, Kenji; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) oxidoreductin 1α (Ero1α) is a disulfide producer in the ER of mammalian cells. Besides four catalytic cysteines (Cys(94), Cys(99), Cys(394), Cys(397)), Ero1α harbors four regulatory cysteines (Cys(104), Cys(131), Cys(208), Cys(241)). These cysteines mediate the formation of inhibitory intramolecular disulfide bonds, which adapt the activation state of the enzyme to the redox environment in the ER through feedback signaling. Accordingly, disulfide production by Ero1α is accelerated by reducing conditions, which minimize the formation of inhibitory disulfides, or by mutations of regulatory cysteines. Here we report that reductive stimulation enhances Ero1α activity more potently than the mutation of cysteines. Specifically, mutation of Cys(208)/Cys(241) does not mechanistically mimic reductive stimulation, as it lowers the turnover rate of Ero1α in presence of a reducing agent. The Cys(208)/Cys(241) pair therefore fulfills a function during catalysis that reaches beyond negative regulation. In agreement, we identify a reciprocal crosstalk between the stabilities of the Cys(208)-Cys(241) disulfide and the inhibitory disulfide bonds involving Cys(104) and Cys(131), which also controls the recruitment of the H2O2 scavenger GPx8 to Ero1α. Two possible mechanisms by which thiol-disulfide exchange at the Cys(208)/Cys(241) pair stimulates the catalytic turnover under reducing conditions are discussed. PMID:26609561

  2. Determination of DNA damage in experimental liver intoxication and role of N-acetyl cysteine.

    PubMed

    Aksit, Hasan; Bildik, Aysegül

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed at detecting DNA damage and fragmentation as well as histone acetylation depending on oxidative stress caused by CCl4 intoxication. Also, the protective role of N-acetyl cysteine, a precursor for GSH, in DNA damage is investigated. Sixty rats were used in this study. In order to induce liver toxicity, CCl4 in was dissolved in olive oil (1/1) and injected intraperitoneally as a single dose (2 ml/kg). N-acetyl cysteine application (intraperitoneal, 50 mg/kg/day) was started 3 days prior to CCl4 injection and continued during the experimental period. Control groups were given olive oil and N-acetyl cysteine. After 6 and 72 h of CCl4 injection, blood and liver tissue were taken under ether anesthesia. Nuclear extracts were prepared from liver. Changes in serum AST and ALT activities as well as MDA, TAS, and TOS levels showed that CCl4 caused lipid peroxidation and liver damage. However, lipid peroxidation and liver damage were reduced in the N-acetyl cysteine group. Increased levels in 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy guanosine and histone acetyltransferase activities, decreased histone deacetylase activities, and DNA breakage detected in nuclear extracts showed that CCl4 intoxication induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that N-acetyl cysteine has a protective effect on CCl4-induced DNA damage. PMID:24819310

  3. Ga2O3 photocatalyzed on-line tagging of cysteine to facilitate peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Su, Fangzheng; Bi, Hongyan; Girault, Hubert H; Liu, Baohong

    2011-09-01

    β-Ga(2)O(3) is a wide-band-gap semiconductor having strong oxidation ability under light irradiation. Herein, the steel target plates modified with β-Ga(2)O(3) nanoparticles have been developed to carry out in-source photo-catalytic oxidative reactions for online peptide tagging during laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) analysis. Under UV laser irradiation, β-Ga(2)O(3) can catalyze the photo-oxidation of 2-methoxyhydroquinone added to a sample mixture to 2-methoxy benzoquinone that can further react with the thiol groups of cysteine residues by Michael addition reaction. The tagging process leads to appearance of pairs of peaks with an m/z shift of 138.1Th. This online labelling strategy is demonstrated to be sensitive and efficient with a detection-limit at femtomole level. Using the strategy, the information on cysteine content in peptides can be obtained together with peptide mass, therefore constraining the database searching for an advanced identification of cysteine-containing proteins from protein mixtures. The current peptide online tagging method can be important for specific analysis of cysteine-containing proteins especially the low-abundant ones that cannot be completely isolated from other high-abundant non-cysteine-proteins. PMID:21751383

  4. Mechanism of Thiosulfate Oxidation in the SoxA Family of Cysteine-ligated Cytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Grabarczyk, Daniel B.; Chappell, Paul E.; Eisel, Bianca; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M.; Berks, Ben C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiosulfate dehydrogenase (TsdA) catalyzes the oxidation of two thiosulfate molecules to form tetrathionate and is predicted to use an unusual cysteine-ligated heme as the catalytic cofactor. We have determined the structure of Allochromatium vinosum TsdA to a resolution of 1.3 Å. This structure confirms the active site heme ligation, identifies a thiosulfate binding site within the active site cavity, and reveals an electron transfer route from the catalytic heme, through a second heme group to the external electron acceptor. We provide multiple lines of evidence that the catalytic reaction proceeds through the intermediate formation of a S-thiosulfonate derivative of the heme cysteine ligand: the cysteine is reactive and is accessible to electrophilic attack; cysteine S-thiosulfonate is formed by the addition of thiosulfate or following the reverse reaction with tetrathionate; the S-thiosulfonate modification is removed through catalysis; and alkylating the cysteine blocks activity. Active site amino acid residues required for catalysis were identified by mutagenesis and are inferred to also play a role in stabilizing the S-thiosulfonate intermediate. The enzyme SoxAX, which catalyzes the first step in the bacterial Sox thiosulfate oxidation pathway, is homologous to TsdA and can be inferred to use a related catalytic mechanism. PMID:25673696

  5. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  6. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Semashko, Tatiana A; Vorotnikova, Elena A; Sharikova, Valeriya F; Vinokurov, Konstantin S; Smirnova, Yulia A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Oppert, Brenda; Elpidina, Elena N; Filippova, Irina Y

    2014-03-15

    This study describes the design, synthesis, and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family, important in many biological processes. The structure of the newly synthesized substrates is Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y (where Glp=pyroglutamyl; Xaa=Phe or Val; and Y=pNA [p-nitroanilide], AMC [4-amino-7-methylcoumaride], or AFC [4-amino-7-trifluoromethyl-coumaride]). Substrates were synthesized enzymatically to guarantee selectivity of the reaction and optical purity of the target compounds, simplifying the scheme of synthesis and isolation of products. The hydrolysis of the synthesized substrates was evaluated by C1 cysteine peptidases from different organisms and with different functions, including plant enzymes papain, bromelain, ficin, and mammalian lysosomal cathepsins B and L. The new substrates were selective for C1 cysteine peptidases and were not hydrolyzed by serine, aspartic, or metallo peptidases. We demonstrated an application of the selectivity of the synthesized substrates during the chromatographic separation of a multicomponent set of digestive peptidases from a beetle, Tenebrio molitor. Used in combination with the cysteine peptidase inhibitor E-64, these substrates were able to differentiate cysteine peptidases from peptidases of other classes in midgut extracts from T. molitor larvae and larvae of the genus Tribolium; thus, they are useful in the analysis of complex mixtures containing peptidases from different classes. PMID:24388866

  7. Acceleration of Anaerobic Cysteine Transformations to Sulfane Sulfur Consequent to γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecień, Inga; Iciek, Małgorzata; Włodek, Lidia

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity of drugs and radiation in the cells is largely dependent on the level of thiols. In the present studies, an attempt has been made to inhibit γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γGT) activity in EAT-bearing animals tissue. We have expected that administration of γGT inhibitors: acivicin and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (TIQ) may influence GSH/γ–glutamyl transpeptidase (γGT) system in the regulation of cysteine concentration and anaerobic cysteine metabolism in normal and cancer cells. Development of Ehrlich ascites tumor in mice enhances peroxidative processes, diminishes levels of nonprotein thiols (NPSH) and sulfane sulfur, and lowers activities of enzymes involved in its formation and transfer in the liver and kidney. Although γGT inhibitors further decrease NPSH level, they increase cysteine and sulfane sulfur levels. This means that upon γGT inhibition, cysteine can be efficiently acquired by normal liver and kidney cells via another pathway, that is so productive that sulfane sulfur level and intensity of anaerobic cysteine metabolism even rise. PMID:22629124

  8. A triticale water-deficit-inducible phytocystatin inhibits endogenous cysteine proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Magdalena; Szewińska, Joanna; Mielecki, Marcin; Nykiel, Małgorzata; Imai, Ryozo; Bielawski, Wiesław; Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Water-deficit is accompanied by an increase in proteolysis. Phytocystatins are plant inhibitors of cysteine proteinases that belong to the papain and legumain family. A cDNA encoding the protein inhibitor TrcC-8 was identified in the vegetative organs of triticale. In response to water-deficit, increases in the mRNA levels of TrcC-8 were observed in leaf and root tissues. Immunoblot analysis indicated that accumulation of the TrcC-8 protein occurred after 72h of water-deficit in the seedlings. Using recombinant protein, inhibitory activity of TrcC-8 against cysteine proteases from triticale and wheat tissues was analyzed. Under water-deficit conditions, there are increases in cysteine proteinase activities in both plant tissues. The cysteine proteinase activities were inhibited by addition of the recombinant TrcC-8 protein. These results suggest a potential role for the triticale phytocystatin in modulating cysteine proteinase activities during water-deficit conditions. PMID:25462979

  9. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  10. Identification of Semicarbazones, Thiosemicarbazones and Triazine Nitriles as Inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana Cysteine Protease CPB

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Jörg; Noack, Sandra; Marhöfer, Richard J.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Coombs, Graham H.; Selzer, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput screening of a compound library against this enzyme and bovine cathepsin B in a counter assay identified four novel inhibitors, containing the warhead-types semicarbazone, thiosemicarbazone and triazine nitrile, that can be used as leads for antiparasite drug design. Covalent docking experiments confirmed the SARs of these lead compounds in an effort to understand the structural elements required for specific inhibition of CPB2.8. This study has provided starting points for the design of selective and highly potent inhibitors of L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB that may also have useful efficacy against other important cysteine proteases. PMID:24146999