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  1. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » Cystic Fibrosis Explore Cystic Fibrosis What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Bronchiectasis ...

  2. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease that ... quality of life has improved. Learn About Cystic Fibrosis Cystic fibrosis is a genetic (inherited) condition that ...

  3. Genetics of Cystic Fibrosis: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Egan, Marie E

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Almost 2000 variants in the CFTR gene have been identified. The mutational classes are based on the functional consequences on CFTR. New therapies are being developed to target mutant CFTR and restore CFTR function. Understanding specific CF genotypes is essential for providing state-of-the art care to patients. In addition to the variation in CFTR genotype, there are several modifier genes that contribute to the respiratory phenotype. PMID:26857764

  4. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000107.htm Cystic fibrosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystic fibrosis is a disease that causes thick, sticky mucus ...

  5. Clinical monitoring of steatorrhoea in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M P; Kelleher, J; Gilbert, J; Littlewood, J M

    1990-01-01

    In 100 patients with cystic fibrosis the severity of steatorrhoea was assessed by three separate methods. Using chemical faecal fat assay as the gold standard, two other rapid and inexpensive methods were compared with it. The steatocrit method proved unreliable in our hands and gave little indication of the presence or severity of steatorrhoea. The more simple microscopy method was highly sensitive (97%) and only three of 80 patients with steatorrhoea were missed. All patients with severe steatorrhoea (greater than 60 mmol fat/day) were clearly demonstrated. The method is applicable to spot faecal samples and can readily be carried out on an outpatient basis. In centres where faecal fat assays are not available, the simple and cheap microscopic examination will give some indication of the response to enzyme treatment and may also help to identify non-compliant individuals. PMID:2301990

  6. Clinical Significance of Microbial Infection and Adaptation in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Alan R.; Jain, Manu; Bar-Meir, Maskit; McColley, Susanna A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: A select group of microorganisms inhabit the airways of individuals with cystic fibrosis. Once established within the pulmonary environment in these patients, many of these microbes adapt by altering aspects of their structure and physiology. Some of these microbes and adaptations are associated with more rapid deterioration in lung function and overall clinical status, whereas others appear to have little effect. Here we review current evidence supporting or refuting a role for the different microbes and their adaptations in contributing to poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis. PMID:21233507

  7. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or three times each week. Swimming, jogging, and cycling are good options. Clearing or bringing up mucus ... cannot be prevented. Screening those with a family history of the disease may detect the cystic fibrosis ...

  8. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  9. Clinical Practice Guidelines From the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation for Preschoolers With Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Thomas; Hempstead, Sarah E; Brady, Cynthia; Cannon, Carolyn L; Clark, Kelli; Condren, Michelle E; Guill, Margaret F; Guillerman, R Paul; Leone, Christina G; Maguiness, Karen; Monchil, Lisa; Powers, Scott W; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Tompkins, Connie L; Zemanick, Edith T; Davis, Stephanie D

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) clinical care guidelines exist for the care of infants up to age 2 years and for individuals ≥6 years of age. An important gap exists for preschool children between the ages of 2 and 5 years. This period marks a time of growth and development that is critical to achieve optimal nutritional status and maintain lung health. Given that disease often progresses in a clinically silent manner, objective and sensitive tools that detect and track early disease are important in this age group. Several challenges exist that may impede the delivery of care for these children, including adherence to therapies. A multidisciplinary committee was convened by the CF Foundation to develop comprehensive evidence-based and consensus recommendations for the care of preschool children, ages 2 to 5 years, with CF. This document includes recommendations in the following areas: routine surveillance for pulmonary disease, therapeutics, and nutritional and gastrointestinal care. PMID:27009033

  10. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. The mucus clogs the lungs, causing breathing problems ...

  11. Cystic Fibrosis Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  12. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  13. Novel Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiddens, Harm AWM; Puderbach, Michael; Venegas, Jose G; Ratjen, Felix; Donaldson, Scott H; Davis, Stephanie D; Rowe, Steven M; Sagel, Scott D; Higgins, Mark; Waltz, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common inherited condition caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane regulator protein. With increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying CF and the development of new therapies there comes the need to develop new outcome measures to assess the disease, its progression and response to treatment. As there are limitations to the current endpoints accepted for regulatory purposes, a workshop to discuss novel endpoints for clinical trials in CF was held in Anaheim, California in November 2011. The pros and cons of novel outcome measures with potential utility for evaluation of novel treatments in CF were critically evaluated. The highlights of the 2011 workshop and subsequent advances in technologies and techniques that could be used to inform the development of clinical trial endpoints are summarized in this review. Pediatr Pulmonol. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Pulmonology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25641878

  14. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients. PMID:26895996

  15. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Garry R.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethalautosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the d iscove1y of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  16. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Cutting, Garry R

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethal autosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the discovery of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  17. Considerations for the Conduct of Clinical Trials with Antiinflammatory Agents in Cystic Fibrosis. A Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Torphy, Theodore J; Allen, Janet; Cantin, André M; Konstan, Michael W; Accurso, Frank J; Joseloff, Elizabeth; Ratjen, Felix A; Chmiel, James F

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation leads to lung destruction and loss of pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Drugs that modulate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have recently been approved. Although the impact of CFTR modulators on sweat chloride and lung function are exciting, they have not yet demonstrated an effect on inflammation. Therefore, CF antiinflammatory drug development must continue. Unfortunately, the lack of clarity with this process has left investigators and industry sponsors frustrated. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation established a working group in early 2014 to address this issue. There are many inflammatory processes disrupted in CF, and, therefore, there are many potential targets amenable to antiinflammatory therapy. Regardless of a drug's specific mechanism of action, it must ultimately affect the neutrophil or its products to impact CF. The working group concluded that before bringing new antiinflammatory drugs to clinical trial, preclinical safety studies must be conducted in disease-relevant models to assuage safety concerns. Furthermore, although studies of antiinflammatory therapies must first establish safety in adults, subsequent studies must involve children, as they are most likely to reap the most benefit. The working group also recommended that pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies and early-phase safety studies be performed before proceeding to larger studies of longer duration. In addition, innovative study designs may improve the likelihood of adequately assessing treatment response and mitigating risk before conducting multiyear studies. Learning from past experiences and incorporating this knowledge into new drug development programs will be instrumental in bringing new antiinflammatory therapies to patients. PMID:26146892

  18. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic fibrosis (CF). This gene makes ... and very salty sweat. Research suggests that the CFTR protein also affects the body in other ways. ...

  19. Physiologic endpoints for clinical studies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stanojevic, Sanja; Ratjen, Felix

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) drug development pipeline promises many exciting new treatments for patients with CF, all which will require clinical studies to prove their benefits on CF lung disease. Historically many pivotal CF studies have used the Forced Expiratory Volume in 1s (FEV1) as the primary outcome measure, and after demonstrating significant improvements in the treatment group relative to placebo have led to regulatory approval of therapies for routine clinical care. Widespread implementation of these therapies has subsequently led to significant improvements in outcomes for patients with CF. While preserving lung function has obvious benefits to CF patients, as more patients maintain FEV1 in the normal range, it has become increasingly difficult to conduct clinical trials using FEV1 as the primary outcome measure. With multiple concurrent trials competing to enroll from the same pool of patients, there is a need for novel approaches to study end points as well as new physiological outcomes for CF therapeutic trials. In this review we will discuss some of the limitations of FEV1 in the current era of CF care, describe alternative physiological endpoints and outline areas for further research. PMID:27316663

  20. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you ... about CF Care Centers, go to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's Care Center Network Web page. It's standard ...

  1. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... order to digest food. Cystic Fibrosis: A Single Gene Disease Mutations in a single gene - the Cystic ... the defective gene, or correcting the defective protein. Gene Therapy Research Offers Promise of a Cure for ...

  2. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed? Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) based on ... to see whether the baby has CF. Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Testing People who have one normal CFTR ...

  3. Epidemiology of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Spoonhower, Kimberly A; Davis, Pamela B

    2016-03-01

    Improved quality of care and rapidly emerging therapeutic strategies to restore chloride transport profoundly impact the epidemiology and pathobiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) in the twenty-first century. CF now serves as a model for chronic illness management, continuous quality improvement via registry data, and a seamless link between basic science research, translational studies, clinical trials, and outcomes research to enable rapid expansion of treatment options. PMID:26857763

  4. Uncertain diagnosis after newborn screening for cystic fibrosis: An ethics-based approach to a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Massie, John; Gillam, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    There is uncertainty about the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis after newborn screening (NBS) for some babies, either because of an intermediate sweat chloride test or inconclusive gene mutation analysis. There is considerable difficulty knowing how best to manage these babies, some of whom will develop cystic fibrosis, but many not. This article offers an ethics-based approach to this clinical dilemma that should be helpful to clinicians managing the baby with an uncertain diagnosis of cystic fibrosis after NBS. PMID:24166986

  5. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  6. Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Collaborative Clinical and School Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawhacker, MaryAnn Tapper; Wellendorf, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments have improved both morbidity and mortality associated with cystic fibrosis, making regular school attendance a reality. School nurses have a unique opportunity to assist students with cystic fibrosis successfully manage their disease. Medical treatment for cystic fibrosis can be complex, leaving…

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco. PMID:23276843

  8. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  9. Using Cystic Fibrosis Therapies for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    ElMaraachli, Wael; Conrad, Douglas J; Wang, Angela C C

    2016-03-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is an increasingly prevalent disease that places a significant burden on patients and health systems globally. Although many of the therapies used to treat NCFB were originally developed as cystic fibrosis (CF) therapies, not all of them have been demonstrated to be efficacious in NCFB and some may even be harmful. This article explores the evidence for which therapeutic strategies used to treat CF have been translated into the care of NCFB. The conclusion is that therapies for adult NCFB cannot be simply extrapolated from CF clinical trials, and in some instances, doing so may actually result in harm. PMID:26857775

  10. [Rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Mainz, J G; Gerber, A; Arnold, C; Baumann, J; Baumann, I; Koitschev, A

    2015-11-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) mucociliary clearance of the entire respiratory system is impaired. This allows pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa to persist and proliferate, which by progressive pulmonary destruction causes 90 % of premature deaths due to this inherited disease. The dramatic improvement in life expectation of patients due to intensive therapy has resulted in the inevitable but variably expressed sinonasal involvement coming into the clinical and scientific focus. Thereby, almost all CF patients reveal sinonasal pathology and many suffer from chronic rhinosinusitis. Recently, the sinonasal niche has been recognized as a site of initial and persistent colonization by pathogens. This article presents the pathophysiological background of this multiorgan disease as well as general diagnostic and therapeutic standards. The focus of this article is on sinonasal involvement and conservative and surgical options for treatment. Prevention of pathogen acquisition is an essential issue in the otorhinolaryngological treatment of CF patients. PMID:26495450

  11. [News in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Delaisi, B

    2013-08-01

    The improvement over the last two decades in the treatment of cystic fibrosis led to an increase in life expectancy approaching 40 years at birth. Logically, the population of adult patients has been increasing and is currently 50% of patients followed in France. These therapeutic advances have justified the establishment in 2003 of a generalized neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis. The latest data of this screening show an incidence of CF of 1/5359 live births, far below the incidence of 1/2500 which was widely accepted twenty years ago. The performance of this screening is currently based on the dosage of trypsin immuno reactive, followed in case of exceeding the threshold of a search of the 30 most common mutations, can detect around 96% of 150 to 200 CF cases every year. Therefore, the possibility of a false negative of the screening cannot be excluded and evocative symptoms of cystic fibrosis, even for children born after 2003, will lead to prescribe a sweat test. While treatments available so far goal consequences of cystic fibrosis, a new therapeutic class to correct the functional defect of the mutated protein, called CFTR modulators, is emerging. Ivacaftor, leader of this new class, belonging to the category of "CFTR potentiator" got its access on the market in September 2012 for patients carrying the G551D mutation. New other molecules, named "CFTR correctors" which can have synergistic effect with ivacaftor and concern patients carrying the most common mutation--DF 508--are under development. PMID:23856023

  12. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Firmida, M.C.; Pereira, R.H.V.; Silva, E.A.S.R.; Marques, E.A.; Lopes, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10), intermittently colonized/infected (n=15), and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18) were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group). Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002). Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033). In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A. xylosoxidans

  13. Heart involvement in cystic fibrosis: A specific cystic fibrosis-related myocardial changes?

    PubMed

    Labombarda, Fabien; Saloux, Eric; Brouard, Jacques; Bergot, Emmanuel; Milliez, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a complex multi-systemic chronic disease characterized by progressive organ dysfunction with development of fibrosis, possibly affecting the heart. Over the last four decades pathological, experimental, and clinical evidence points towards the existence of a specific myocardial involvement in cystic fibrosis. Multi-modality cardiac imaging, especially recent echocardiographic techniques, evidenced diastolic and/or systolic ventricular dysfunction in cystic fibrosis leading to the concept of a cystic fibrosis-related cardiomyopathy. Hypoxemia and inflammation are among the most important factors for heart involvement in cystic fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator was found to be involved in the regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction and may also account for cystic fibrosis-related myocardial dysfunction. This review, mainly focused on echocardiographic studies, seeks to synthesize the existing literature for and against the existence of heart involvement in cystic fibrosis, its mechanisms and prognostic implications. Careful investigation of the heart function may be helpful for risk stratification and therapeutic decisions in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27578468

  14. IL8 gene as modifier of cystic fibrosis: unraveling the factors which influence clinical variability.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Larissa Lazzarini; Marson, Fernando Augusto Lima; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia; Salomão Junior, João Batista; Souza, Dorotéia Rossi Silva

    2016-08-01

    The severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with classes of mutations in the CFTR gene (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator), physical environment and modifier genes interaction. The IL8 gene (interleukin 8), according to its respective polymorphisms, influences inflammatory responses. This study analyzed IL8 gene polymorphisms (rs4073, rs2227306 and rs2227307), by means of PCR/RFLP, and their association with pulmonary function markers and clinical severity scores in 186 patients with CF, considering the CFTR genotype. There was an association between rs2227307 and precocity of the disease. The severity of lung disease was associated with the following markers: transcutaneous arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SaO2) (regardless of CFTR genotype, for the polymorphisms rs4073, rs2227306 and rs2227307); mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa (regardless of CFTR genotype, for the polymorphisms rs2227306 and rs2227307). Pulmonary function markers (SaO2 and spirometric variables) and clinical severity scores were also associated with IL8 gene polymorphisms. This study identified the IL8 gene, represented by rs4073 and rs2227306 polymorphisms, and particularly the rs2227307 polymorphism, as potentiating factors for the degree of variability in the severity of CF, especially in pulmonary clinical manifestation correlated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:27209008

  15. Acute Scedosporium apiospermum Endobronchial Infection in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Padoan, Rita; Poli, Piercarlo; Colombrita, Domenico; Borghi, Elisa; Timpano, Silviana; Berlucchi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Fungi are known pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients. A boy with cystic fibrosis boy presented with acute respiratory distress. Bronchoscopy showed airways obstruction by mucus plugs and bronchial casts. Scedosporium apiospermum was identified as the only pathogen. Bronchoalveolar lavage successfully resolved the acute obstruction. Plastic bronchitis is a new clinical picture of acute Scedosporium endobronchial colonization in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:26967814

  16. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease. PMID:25929952

  17. Key findings of the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's clinical practice benchmarking project.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Michael P; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Quinton, Hebe B; Marshall, Bruce C; Schechter, Michael S

    2014-04-01

    Benchmarking is the process of using outcome data to identify high-performing centres and determine practices associated with their outstanding performance. The US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) Patient Registry contains centre-specific outcomes data for all CFF-certified paediatric and adult cystic fibrosis (CF) care programmes in the USA. The CFF benchmarking project analysed these registry data, adjusting for differences in patient case mix known to influence outcomes, and identified the top-performing US paediatric and adult CF care programmes for pulmonary and nutritional outcomes. Separate multidisciplinary paediatric and adult benchmarking teams each visited 10 CF care programmes, five in the top quintile for pulmonary outcomes and five in the top quintile for nutritional outcomes. Key practice patterns and approaches present in both paediatric and adult programmes with outstanding clinical outcomes were identified and could be summarised as systems, attitudes, practices, patient/family empowerment and projects. These included: (1) the presence of strong leadership and a well-functioning care team working with a systematic approach to providing consistent care; (2) high expectations for outcomes among providers and families; (3) early and aggressive management of clinical declines, avoiding reliance on 'rescues'; and (4) patients/families that were engaged, empowered and well informed on disease management and its rationale. In summary, assessment of practice patterns at CF care centres with top-quintile pulmonary and nutritional outcomes provides insight into characteristic practices that may aid in optimising patient outcomes. PMID:24608546

  18. Clinical significance, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular identification of Nocardia species isolated from children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Betrán, Ana; Villuendas, M Cruz; Rezusta, Antonio; Pereira, Javier; Revillo, M José; Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia is an opportunistic pathogen that causes respiratory infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology, clinical significance and antimicrobial susceptibility of Nocardia species isolated from eight children with cystic fibrosis. The isolated species were identified as Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, Nocardia pneumoniae, Nocardia veterana and Nocardia wallacei. N. farcinica was isolated in three patients and all of them presented lung affectation with a chronic colonization and pneumonia. N. farcinica showed resistance against gentamicin, tobramycin, cefotaxime, but was susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and amikacin. N. transvalensis, which was isolated from two patients, showed an association with chronic colonization. N. transvalensis was resistant to tobramycin and amikacin, but susceptible to ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and cefotaxime. N. veterana, N. pneumoniae and N. wallacei were isolated from three different patients and appeared in transitory lung colonization. N. veterana and N. pneumoniae were susceptible to imipenem, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, tobramycin, and cefotaxime. N. wallacei was resistant to amikacin, tobramycin, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and susceptible to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime. All the isolates were identified up to species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The presence of Nocardia in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis is not always an indication of an active infection; therefore, the need for a treatment should be evaluated on an individual basis. The detection of multidrug-resistant species needs molecular identification and susceptibility testing, and should be performed for all Nocardia infections. PMID:27155949

  19. Outcome measures for clinical trials assessing treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Konstan, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex genetic disease characterized by death from loss of lung function. Therapies target pathophysiologic changes associated with pulmonary disease progression. Although therapeutic mechanisms differ, efficacy demonstration is limited to a few accepted outcome measures, each with shortcomings that are becoming more pronounced as CF population health improves. Pulmonary function improvement (as forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]) and reduction of pulmonary exacerbation risk are commonly used outcomes. Changes in FEV1 decline rate, quality of life, linear growth and/or weight gain are less utilized outcomes. Validated outcomes tend to work best in subjects with more aggressive or advanced lung disease and less so in healthier subjects. Assays of effects on primary therapeutic targets have yet to be validated as surrogate measures of clinical efficacy. As CF population health improves, it will become increasingly difficult to employ current clinical outcome measures to demonstrate efficacy. PMID:26146539

  20. Clinical and Genetic Correlates of Exercise Performance in Young Children with Cystic Fibrosis1,2

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Michael G.; Schall, Joan I.; Zemel, Babette S.; Stallings, Virginia A.; Ittenbach, Richard F.; Paridon, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Exercise performance in individuals with cystic fibrosis has been shown to be related to the degree of pulmonary dysfunction and undernutrition and genetic profile. The aim of this study was to examine these relationships in young children with cystic fibrosis. The participants were 64 children ages 8 to 11 years (M = 9.3, SD = 0.9) with cystic fibrosis and pancreatic insufficiency recruited from 13 different U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Centers. Assigned to one of three groups by ΔF508 status: ΔF508/ΔF508 homozygous, ΔF508/Other heterozygous, and Other/Other, growth, nutritional and pulmonary status, and exercise performance were measured. Differences in exercise performance, pulmonary function, and nutritional status were not observed among the three groups. However, undernutrition and decreased pulmonary function were associated with measures of exercise performance. These results imply no effect of ΔF508 status on overall functional capacity during preadolescence in children with cystic fibrosis. Rather, the degree of pulmonary disease and undernutrition were associated with functional performance. PMID:20865986

  1. Respiratory viruses in children with cystic fibrosis: viral detection and clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jane L.; Emerson, Julia; Kuypers, Jane; Campbell, Angela P.; Gibson, Ronald L.; McNamara, Sharon; Worrell, Kelly; Englund, Janet A.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Burns et al. (2011) Respiratory viruses in children with cystic fibrosis: viral detection and clinical findings. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), 218–223. Background  Viral detection from different respiratory sample types in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) is facilitated by available molecular methods, but optimum sampling strategies have not been identified. In addition, associations between viral detection and respiratory symptoms are not well described. Objectives  Study goals were to compare molecular detection of viruses from concurrent upper airway and sputum samples in children with CF and to describe relative frequency of respiratory viral infections and identify potential clinical associations. Methods  We conducted a 2‐year prospective surveillance study in 44 children with CF aged 6–18 years. Upper airway and sputum samples were collected quarterly and during pulmonary exacerbations and tested for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza viruses, parainfluenza viruses types 1–4, human metapneumovirus, coronaviruses, rhinoviruses, and adenoviruses. Physical exams and symptom surveys were used to identify respiratory signs and symptoms. Results  Upper airway samples were collected at 359 visits; concordance of PCR‐based viral detection was examined in a subset of paired upper airway and sputum samples from 21 participants at 92 visits. Rhinovirus was the most commonly detected virus (23·1% overall), and rhinovirus detection was the same for both sample types (21·7% each). Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of rhinovirus in sputum relative to upper airway sampling were 70% and 91·7%, respectively. Respiratory symptoms associated with rhinovirus detection included increased cough, increased nasal congestion, increased sputum production, and wheezing. Conclusions  A relatively high frequency of rhinovirus detection was observed by either upper airway or sputum samples, and

  2. Association between clinical antibiotic resistance and susceptibility of Pseudomonas in the cystic fibrosis lung

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Gunther; Mahrt, Niels; Tueffers, Leif; Barbosa, Camilo; Harjes, Malte; Adolph, Gernot; Friedrichs, Anette; Krenz-Weinreich, Annegret; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients suffer from chronic lung infections that require long-term antibiotic therapy. Pseudomonas readily evolve resistance, rendering antibiotics ineffective. In vitro experiments suggest that resistant bacteria may be treated by exploiting their collateral sensitivity to other antibiotics. Here, we investigate correlations of sensitivity and resistance profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that naturally adapted to antibiotics in the cystic fibrosis lung. Methodology: Resistance profiles for 13 antibiotics were obtained using broth dilution, E-test and VITEK mass spectroscopy. Genetic variants were determined from whole-genome sequences and interrelationships among isolates were analyzed using 13 MLST loci. Result: Our study focused on 45 isolates from 13 patients under documented treatment with antibiotics. Forty percent of these were clinically resistant and 15% multi-drug resistant. Colistin resistance was found once, despite continuous colistin treatment and even though colistin resistance can readily evolve experimentally in the laboratory. Patients typically harbored multiple genetically and phenotypically distinct clones. However, genetically similar clones often had dissimilar resistance profiles. Isolates showed mutations in genes encoding cell wall synthesis, alginate production, efflux pumps and antibiotic modifying enzymes. Cross-resistance was commonly observed within antibiotic classes and between aminoglycosides and β-lactam antibiotics. No evidence was found for consistent phenotypic resistance to one antibiotic and sensitivity to another within one genotype. Conclusions and implications: Evidence supporting potential collateral sensitivity in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates remains equivocal. However, cross-resistance within antibiotic classes is common. Colistin therapy is promising since resistance to it was rare despite its intensive use in the studied patients. PMID:27193199

  3. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  4. Chloride impermeability in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinton, Paul M.

    1983-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal genetic disease affecting Caucasians and is perhaps best characterized as an exocrinopathy involving a disturbance in fluid and electrolyte transport1. A high NaCl concentration in the sweat is characteristic of patients with this disease; the basic physiological reason for this abnormality is unknown. We have microperfused isolated sweat ducts from control subjects and cystic fibrosis patients, and report here results which suggest that abnormally low Cl- permeability in cystic fibrosis leads to poor reabsorption of NaCl in the sweat duct, and hence to a high concentration of NaCl in the sweat.

  5. Cystic fibrosis from the gastroenterologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chee Y; Durie, Peter R

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting, recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Increased survival outcomes and the multisystem nature of the disease, including the involvement of hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts, now require the need for more extensive knowledge and expertise in cystic fibrosis among gastroenterologists. Manifestations are either a direct consequence of the primary defect in cystic fibrosis or a secondary complication of the disease or therapy. Adult patients with cystic fibrosis also have an increased risk of malignancy in the gastrointestinal and pancreatico-biliary tracts compared with the general population. Novel treatments that target the basic defects in the CFTR protein have emerged, but to date not much is known about their effects on the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary systems. The introduction of such therapies has provided new opportunities for the application of intestinal endpoints in clinical trials and the understanding of underlying disease mechanisms that affect the gut in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26790364

  6. Pancreatic pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas is one of the earliest, and most commonly affected, organs in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Studying the pathogenesis of pancreatic disease is limited in CF patients, due to its early clinical onset, co-morbidities and lack of tissue samples from the early phases of disease. In recent years, several new CF animal models have been developed that have advanced our understanding of both CF exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease. Additionally, these models have helped us to better define the influence of pancreatic lesions on CF disease progression in other organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and lung. PMID:26365583

  7. Neutrophils in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Laval, Julie; Ralhan, Anjali; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. Among inflammatory cells, neutrophils represent the major cell population accumulating in the airways of CF patients. While neutrophils provide the first defensive cellular shield against bacterial and fungal pathogens, in chronic disease conditions such as CF these short-lived immune cells release their toxic granule contents that cause tissue remodeling and irreversible structural damage to the host. A variety of human and murine studies have analyzed neutrophils and their products in the context of CF, yet their precise functional role and therapeutic potential remain controversial and incompletely understood. Here, we summarize the current evidence in this field to shed light on the complex and multi-faceted role of neutrophils in CF lung disease. PMID:26854289

  8. Cystic fibrosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, N E; Farquharson, D F

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the outcomes of pregnancies in women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to address issues pertinent to the obstetric care of such women. DATA SOURCES: English-language case reports and case series published from 1960 to 1991 identified through a search of MEDLINE and Index Medicus. The terms of reference were "cystic fibrosis" and "pregnancy". Not all the reports reviewed addressed all the outcomes under consideration. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 20 reports citing cases of pregnancy in women with CF. DATA EXTRACTION: Outcomes included the number of spontaneous abortions, pregnancies continued beyond 20 weeks, preterm deliveries, maternal deaths at 6 months and 2 years after delivery and perinatal deaths. Breast-feeding was addressed. Measures to assess the severity of maternal disease included the mean age at diagnosis of CF, weight gain during pregnancy, pulmonary function studies if available and the need for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 217 pregnancies in 162 women spontaneous abortion occurred in 10 (4.6%). Pregnancy progressed beyond 20 weeks in 81.6% of cases; 24.3% of the deliveries were preterm. The maternal death rate did not exceed that among age-related women with CF who were not pregnant. The rate of perinatal death was 7.9%. Breast milk was not hypernatremic. Poor outcomes were associated with a weight gain of less than 4.5 kg and a forced vital capacity of less than 50% of the predicted value. CONCLUSIONS: Premature labour and delivery remain a significant risk for pregnant women with CF, contributing to a high rate of perinatal death. Maternal illness and death result from deteriorating pulmonary function. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated. Attention to energy intake and pulmonary function is important. PMID:8374843

  9. Current and future treatment options for cystic fibrosis lung disease: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Claire; Davies, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF) has conventionally targeted downstream consequences of the defect such as mucus plugging and infection. More recently, significant advances have been made in treating the root cause of the disease, namely a defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This review summarizes current pulmonary treatment options and highlights advances in research and development of new therapies. PMID:27347364

  10. Current and future treatment options for cystic fibrosis lung disease: latest evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Claire; Davies, Jane C

    2016-05-01

    Treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF) has conventionally targeted downstream consequences of the defect such as mucus plugging and infection. More recently, significant advances have been made in treating the root cause of the disease, namely a defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This review summarizes current pulmonary treatment options and highlights advances in research and development of new therapies. PMID:27347364

  11. Genetics Home Reference: cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... protects the linings of the airways, digestive system, reproductive system, and other organs and tissues. In people with ... experience health problems affecting the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems. Most men with cystic fibrosis have congenital bilateral ...

  12. Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... age 2, he grew up playing everything from football and lacrosse to ice hockey and golf. And ... Who's at Risk? Cystic fibrosis affects males and females from all racial and ethnic groups. It is ...

  13. Consensus on the use and interpretation of cystic fibrosis mutation analysis in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, C.; Cuppens, H.; Macek, M.; Cassiman, J.J.; Kerem, E.; Durie, P.; Tullis, E.; Assael, B.M.; Bombieri, C.; Brown, A.; Casals, T.; Claustres, M.; Cutting, G.R.; Dequeker, E.; Dodge, J.; Doull, I.; Farrell, P.; Ferec, C.; Girodon, E.; Johannesson, M.; Kerem, B.; Knowles, M.; Munck, A.; Pignatti, P.F.; Radojkovic, D.; Rizzotti, P.; Schwarz, M.; Stuhrmann, M.; Tzetis, M.; Zielenski, J.; Elborn, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    It is often challenging for the clinician interested in cystic fibrosis (CF) to interpret molecular genetic results, and to integrate them in the diagnostic process. The limitations of genotyping technology, the choice of mutations to be tested, and the clinical context in which the test is administered can all influence how genetic information is interpreted. This paper describes the conclusions of a consensus conference to address the use and interpretation of CF mutation analysis in clinical settings. Although the diagnosis of CF is usually straightforward, care needs to be exercised in the use and interpretation of genetic tests: genotype information is not the final arbiter of a clinical diagnosis of CF or CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein related disorders. The diagnosis of these conditions is primarily based on the clinical presentation, and is supported by evaluation of CFTR function (sweat testing, nasal potential difference) and genetic analysis. None of these features are sufficient on their own to make a diagnosis of CF or CFTR-related disorders. Broad genotype/phenotype associations are useful in epidemiological studies, but CFTR genotype does not accurately predict individual outcome. The use of CFTR genotype for prediction of prognosis in people with CF at the time of their diagnosis is not recommended. The importance of communication between clinicians and medical genetic laboratories is emphasized. The results of testing and their implications should be reported in a manner understandable to the clinicians caring for CF patients. PMID:18456578

  14. Improved growth and clinical, nutritional, and respiratory changes in response to nutritional therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, R; Cooksley, W G; Cooke, W D

    1980-09-01

    To investigate the role of nutritional factors in growth and in the clinical, nurtitional, and respiratory status in cystic fibrosis, we studied 12 problem CF patients from six months before to six months after a period of supplemental parenteral nutrition. During the initial six months' observation period on appropriate conventional therapy, the patients (aged 0.5 to 11 years) had inadequate growth and weight gain, a total of 21 active pulmonary infections, and, despite dietary supplements, inadequate ad libitum nutrient intakes. After nutritional therapy, providing a balanced consistent hypercaloric intake for 21 days, catch-up weight gain occurred by one month and continued at six months; catch-up in linear growth was observed by three months and continued at six months. In addition, significantly fewer pulmonary infections were observed in the six months' post-therapy (n = 3), sustained and significant improvements were noted in clinical score and plumonary function, and there was a marked improvement in well-being and ad libitum nutrient intake. We conclude that adequate nutritional support can favorably affect growth, clinical status, and the course of chronic pulmonary disease in problem cases of CF. PMID:6774070

  15. Clinical Sensitivity of Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Panels in a Diverse Population.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Erin E; Stevens, Colleen F; Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos A; Tavakoli, Norma P; Krein, Lea M; Parker, April; Zhang, Zhen; Maloney, Breanne; Vogel, Beth; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Kier, Catherine; Anbar, Ran D; Berdella, Maria N; Comber, Paul G; Dozor, Allen J; Goetz, Danielle M; Guida, Louis; Kattan, Meyer; Ting, Andrew; Voter, Karen Z; van Roey, Patrick; Caggana, Michele; Kay, Denise M

    2016-02-01

    Infants are screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) in New York State (NYS) using an IRT-DNA algorithm. The purpose of this study was to validate and assess clinical validity of the US FDA-cleared Illumina MiSeqDx CF 139-Variant Assay (139-VA) in the diverse NYS CF population. The study included 439 infants with CF identified via newborn screening (NBS) from 2002 to 2012. All had been screened using the Abbott Molecular CF Genotyping Assay or the Hologic InPlex CF Molecular Test. All with CF and zero or one mutation were tested using the 139-VA. DNA extracted from dried blood spots was reliably and accurately genotyped using the 139-VA. Sixty-three additional mutations were identified. Clinical sensitivity of three panels ranged from 76.2% (23 mutations recommended for screening by ACMG/ACOG) to 79.7% (current NYS 39-mutation InPlex panel), up to 86.0% for the 139-VA. For all, sensitivity was highest in Whites and lowest in the Black population. Although the sample size was small, there was a nearly 20% increase in sensitivity for the Black CF population using the 139-VA (68.2%) over the ACMG/ACOG and InPlex panels (both 50.0%). Overall, the 139-VA is more sensitive than other commercially available panels, and could be considered for NBS, clinical, or research laboratories conducting CF screening. PMID:26538069

  16. RISK OF HEMOPTYSIS IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS CLINICAL TRIALS: A RETROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, N.; Kloster, M.; Bilton, D.; Flume, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by airways infection and inflammation resulting in respiratory complications including hemoptysis. The objectives of this study were to characterize risk of hemoptysis attributable to the underlying disease and in the presence of standard of care therapy. Methods This retrospective cohort study estimated hemoptysis rates overall and by relevant risk factors utilizing adverse event data from longitudinal prospective CF clinical trials. Results Of the 1008 participants, 73% were ≤18 years old; of 929 with available spirometry, 27% had an FEV1 < 70% predicted. During the average 8.2 months of follow-up, 8% experienced ≥1 hemoptysis events (95% CI: 6%, 10%). Of the 125 events, 76% were mild in severity and only 9% were serious. Hemoptysis rates were greater among adults than children, those with FEV1 < 70% predicted, and participants infected with P. aeruginosa but not with S. aureus. Conclusions Hemoptysis is a common adverse event among CF clinical trial participants, and particularly in adults with more severe lung disease. These results can be used to predict event occurrence in future clinical trials. PMID:25725985

  17. Cystic Fibrosis: Brazilian ENT Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sih, Tania; Godinho, Ricardo; Franco, Leticia Paiva; Piltcher, Otávio

    2012-01-01

    Most published studies about Cystic Fibrosis (CF) are European or North American. There are still few publications about the characteristics of fibrocystic populations in developing countries. The incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF) in Brazil varies among different regions (1 : 10,000 in Minas Gerais, 1 : 9,500 in Paraná, 1 : 8,700 in Santa Catarina, and 1 : 1600 in Rio Grande do Sul). The prevalence of the DF508 mutation also varies according to population: 33% in Sao Paulo, 49% in Rio Grande do Sul, 27% in Santa Catarina, and 52% in Minas Gerais. Cough and nasal obstruction are the most common symptoms. The variation in nasal polyposis prevalence may be explained by population genotypic characteristics in a country that spans a continent. Findings on nasal endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) have better correlation than do this information compared with surgical and clinical history. Microbiologic studies suggest a high level of early contamination of the airways. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurs in these patients as a result of ototoxic antibiotics. The data compiled in this paper is useful, but also lead to the general agreement that more research would be welcome due to the unique characteristics of this country. PMID:22611403

  18. [Effect of montelukast on lung function and clinical symptoms in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Iwona; Korzeniewska, Aleksandra; Smejda, Katarzyna; Jarosz, Iwona; Stelmach, Włodzimierz

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory process contributes to progressive lung tissue damage in cystic fibrosis (CF). Cysteinyl leukotrienes have been found in the sputum of CF patients at concentrations sufficient to cause potent biological effect. This study was designed to assess the effect of anti-inflammatory treatment with montelukast sodium in CF patients. Twelve patients, aged 6-29 were recruited. It was 20 week, placebo-controlled, and randomized, double blind, crossover trial. At first and last week of each treatment course spirometry and whole body plethysmography parameters (FEV1, PEF, FEF25/75%, VC, TGV, Raw and RV) and clinical wheezing and cough scale were measured. In montelukast group significant improvement in FEV1 (mean +/- SD, 54.6 +/- 22.6 before and 62 +/- 19.0 after treatment, p=0.0112) and FEF25/75% (28.9 +/- 23.0 before and 37.5 +/- 25.5 after treatment, p=0.0053) were observed. Compared with placebo montelukast significantly improved FEV1 (p=0.0032), PEF (p=0.0298) and FEF25/75% (p=0.0091). There was no significant difference in VC, TGV, Raw and RV. Montelukast compared with placebo significantly decreased cough (p<0.0001) and wheezing (p=0.0002) score. In summary, therapy with montelukast may provide clinical benefit to patients with CF. PMID:15757268

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: scientific evidence regarding clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Silva Filho, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira da; Ferreira, Flavia de Aguiar; Reis, Francisco José Caldeira; Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim de; Levy, Carlos Emilio; Clark, Otavio; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based techniques have been increasingly used in the creation of clinical guidelines and the development of recommendations for medical practice. The use of levels of evidence allows the reader to identify the quality of scientific information that supports the recommendations made by experts. The objective of this review was to address current concepts related to the clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. For the preparation of this review, the authors defined a group of questions that would be answered in accordance with the principles of PICO-an acronym based on questions regarding the Patients of interest, Intervention being studied, Comparison of the intervention, and Outcome of interest. For each question, a structured review of the literature was performed using the Medline database in order to identify the studies with the methodological design most appropriate to answering the question. The questions were designed so that each of the authors could write a response. A first draft was prepared and discussed by the group. Recommendations were then made on the basis of the level of scientific evidence, in accordance with the classification system devised by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, as well as the level of agreement among the members of the group. PMID:24068273

  20. Advancing clinical development pathways for new CFTR modulators in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Boyle, Michael; VanDevanter, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease affecting approximately 70 000 individuals worldwide. Until recently, drug development efforts have emphasised therapies treating downstream signs and symptoms resulting from the underlying CF biological defect: reduced function of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The current CF drug development landscape has expanded to include therapies that enhance CFTR function by either restoring wild-type CFTR protein expression or increasing (modulating) the function of mutant CFTR proteins in cells. To date, two systemic small-molecule CFTR modulators have been evaluated in pivotal clinical trials in individuals with CF and specific mutant CFTR genotypes that have led to regulatory review and/or approval. Advances in the discovery of CFTR modulators as a promising new class of therapies have been impressive, yet work remains to develop highly effective, disease-modifying modulators for individuals of all CF genotypes. The objectives of this review are to outline the challenges and opportunities in drug development created by systemic genotype-specific CFTR modulators, highlight the advantages of sweat chloride as an established biomarker of CFTR activity to streamline early-phase development and summarise options for later phase clinical trial designs that respond to the adoption of approved genotype-specific modulators into standard of care. An optimal development framework will be needed to move the most promising therapies efficiently through the drug development pipeline and ultimately deliver efficacious and safe therapies to all individuals with CF. PMID:26903594

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: scientific evidence regarding clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira; Ferreira, Flavia de Aguiar; Reis, Francisco José Caldeira; de Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim; Levy, Carlos Emilio; Clark, Otavio; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based techniques have been increasingly used in the creation of clinical guidelines and the development of recommendations for medical practice. The use of levels of evidence allows the reader to identify the quality of scientific information that supports the recommendations made by experts. The objective of this review was to address current concepts related to the clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. For the preparation of this review, the authors defined a group of questions that would be answered in accordance with the principles of PICO–an acronym based on questions regarding the Patients of interest, Intervention being studied, Comparison of the intervention, and Outcome of interest. For each question, a structured review of the literature was performed using the Medline database in order to identify the studies with the methodological design most appropriate to answering the question. The questions were designed so that each of the authors could write a response. A first draft was prepared and discussed by the group. Recommendations were then made on the basis of the level of scientific evidence, in accordance with the classification system devised by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, as well as the level of agreement among the members of the group. PMID:24068273

  2. Advancing clinical development pathways for new CFTR modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Boyle, Michael; VanDevanter, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease affecting approximately 70,000 individuals worldwide. Until recently, drug development efforts have emphasised therapies treating downstream signs and symptoms resulting from the underlying CF biological defect: reduced function of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The current CF drug development landscape has expanded to include therapies that enhance CFTR function by either restoring wild-type CFTR protein expression or increasing (modulating) the function of mutant CFTR proteins in cells. To date, two systemic small-molecule CFTR modulators have been evaluated in pivotal clinical trials in individuals with CF and specific mutant CFTR genotypes that have led to regulatory review and/or approval. Advances in the discovery of CFTR modulators as a promising new class of therapies have been impressive, yet work remains to develop highly effective, disease-modifying modulators for individuals of all CF genotypes. The objectives of this review are to outline the challenges and opportunities in drug development created by systemic genotype-specific CFTR modulators, highlight the advantages of sweat chloride as an established biomarker of CFTR activity to streamline early-phase development and summarise options for later phase clinical trial designs that respond to the adoption of approved genotype-specific modulators into standard of care. An optimal development framework will be needed to move the most promising therapies efficiently through the drug development pipeline and ultimately deliver efficacious and safe therapies to all individuals with CF. PMID:26903594

  3. Mucolytics in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Henke, Markus O; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-03-01

    Mucus accumulation in the lower airways is a key feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The major component of mucus in CF is not mucin derived from mucus producing cells but rather pus that includes viscous material such as polymerized DNA derived from degraded neutrophils. This has important implications for mucolytic therapy aiming to improve mucus clearance from the airways, since degradation of mucin may not be a suitable treatment strategy. In addition, thinning of secretions may not always be beneficial, since it may negatively affect certain aspects of mucus transport such as cough clearance. While inhaled N-acetylcysteine has been used as a mucolytic drug in CF for decades, there is little evidence that it has any beneficial effect. Dornase alfa has been shown to reduce pulmonary exacerbations and improve lung function and is currently the only mucolytic agent with proven efficacy in CF. Newer agents targeting other components of CF mucus, such as filamentous actin, are currently in development. Ultimately, drugs that are mucokinetic, which preserve viscoelasticity, rather than mucolytic may prove to be beneficial for CF lung disease in the future. PMID:17419975

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Le, Christopher; McCrary, Hilary C; Chang, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene(CFTR) resulting in impaired ion transport. Nearly all people with CF will develop chronic rhino-sinusitis (CRS) and present with the characteristic viscous mucus, impaired mucociliary clearance and chronic inflammation/infection of the sinonasal cavity. While some individuals with CF can appear relatively asymptomatic in terms of their sinus disease, commonly reported symptoms include anosmia, headache, facial pain, nasal obstruction, chronic congestion and nasal discharge. Nasal endoscopy typically reveals mucosal edema, purulent discharge and nasal polyposis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging classically demonstrates the distinguishing findings of sinus hypoplasia or aplasia with generalized opacification, medial bulging of the lateral sinonasal sidewall and a demineralized uncinate process. Current treatment for CF sinusitis includes the use of hypertonic saline, topical and systemic steroids, antibiotics and endoscopic surgery. Research investigating novel therapies designed at targeting the primary defect of CF is showing promise for reversal of CF sinus disease, in addition to potential for disease prevention. PMID:27466844

  5. Development, clinical utility, and place of ivacaftor in the treatment of cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Ruth; Elphick, Heather E

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting, multisystem disease characterized by thick viscous secretions leading to recurrent lung infections, bronchiectasis, and progressive deterioration in lung function. CF is caused by loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein which is responsible for transepithelial chloride and water transport. Improved understanding of CFTR protein dysfunction has allowed the development of mutation-specific small-molecule compounds which directly target the underlying CFTR defect. Ivacaftor is the first licensed small-molecule compound for CF patients which targets the CFTR gating mutation Gly551Asp (previously termed G551D) and has the potential to be truly disease-modifying. Ivacaftor is an oral medication given twice daily and has shown benefit in terms of an increase in lung function, decreased sweat chloride, weight gain, improvement in patient-reported quality of life, and reduction in number of respiratory exacerbations in clinical trials. Although ivacaftor is currently only licensed for use in approximately 5% of the CF population (those who have at least one Gly551Asp mutation), the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CFTR modulators that may benefit many more patients. In particular, a CFTR modulator for those with the Phe508del deletion (previously ∆F508) would allow 90% of the CF population to benefit from disease-modifying treatment. PMID:24039402

  6. Physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis in Australia and New Zealand: A clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Button, Brenda M; Wilson, Christine; Dentice, Ruth; Cox, Narelle S; Middleton, Anna; Tannenbaum, Esta; Bishop, Jennifer; Cobb, Robyn; Burton, Kate; Wood, Michelle; Moran, Fiona; Black, Ryan; Bowen, Summar; Day, Rosemary; Depiazzi, Julie; Doiron, Katherine; Doumit, Michael; Dwyer, Tiffany; Elliot, Alison; Fuller, Louise; Hall, Kathleen; Hutchins, Matthew; Kerr, Melinda; Lee, Annemarie L; Mans, Christina; O'Connor, Lauren; Steward, Ranjana; Potter, Angela; Rasekaba, Tshepo; Scoones, Rebecca; Tarrant, Ben; Ward, Nathan; West, Samantha; White, Dianne; Wilson, Lisa; Wood, Jamie; Holland, Anne E

    2016-05-01

    Physiotherapy management is a key element of care for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) throughout the lifespan. Although considerable evidence exists to support physiotherapy management of CF, there is documented variation in practice. The aim of this guideline is to optimize the physiotherapy management of people with CF in Australia and New Zealand. A systematic review of the literature in key areas of physiotherapy practice for CF was undertaken. Recommendations were formulated based on National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) guidelines and considered the quality, quantity and level of the evidence; the consistency of the body of evidence; the likely clinical impact; and applicability to physiotherapy practice in Australia and New Zealand. A total of 30 recommendations were made for airway clearance therapy, inhalation therapy, exercise assessment and training, musculoskeletal management, management of urinary incontinence, managing the newly diagnosed patient with CF, delivery of non-invasive ventilation, and physiotherapy management before and after lung transplantation. These recommendations can be used to underpin the provision of evidence-based physiotherapy care to people with CF in Australia and New Zealand. PMID:27086904

  7. Molecular and clinical analyses of cystic fibrosis in the south of Spain.

    PubMed

    Borrego, S; Casals, T; Dapena, J; Fernández, E; Giménez, J; Cabeza, J C; Sánchez, J; Antiñolo, G

    1994-10-01

    We report molecular and clinical analyses in 71 unrelated patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from Andalusia (South of Spain). Direct mutation analysis of six mutations of the CFTR gene (delta F508, G542X, R1162X, N1303K, W1182X and 1949de184) was performed. The proportion of CF chromosomes with the above-mentioned mutations was 58.5%. Haplotype analysis was performed with the marker/enzyme pairs XV2C/TaqI and KM19/PstI. A particular haplotype has been found associated with each of the studied mutations, while the pooled data for the unknown mutations are not associated with any particular haplotype. This lack of association indicates that there will not be a single predominant mutation amongst the other CF chromosomes. To assess the relationship between genotype and phenotype in these patients, we correlated the pancreatic status and the occurrence of chronic Pseudomona aeruginosa infection with the observed genotype. Pancreatic insufficiency was present in all patients in whom the analyzed mutations were found to be homozygous or compound heterozygous. We also found a higher rate of Pseudomonas colonization in the group of patients in whom the genotype was homozygous or compound heterozygous for the analysed mutations when compared with the group of patients with a different genotype, but the difference was not statistically significant. PMID:7530610

  8. Physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis in Australia and New Zealand: A clinical practice guideline*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christine; Dentice, Ruth; Cox, Narelle S.; Middleton, Anna; Tannenbaum, Esta; Bishop, Jennifer; Cobb, Robyn; Burton, Kate; Wood, Michelle; Moran, Fiona; Black, Ryan; Bowen, Summar; Day, Rosemary; Depiazzi, Julie; Doiron, Katherine; Doumit, Michael; Dwyer, Tiffany; Elliot, Alison; Fuller, Louise; Hall, Kathleen; Hutchins, Matthew; Kerr, Melinda; Lee, Annemarie L.; Mans, Christina; O'Connor, Lauren; Steward, Ranjana; Potter, Angela; Rasekaba, Tshepo; Scoones, Rebecca; Tarrant, Ben; Ward, Nathan; West, Samantha; White, Dianne; Wilson, Lisa; Wood, Jamie; Holland, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Physiotherapy management is a key element of care for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) throughout the lifespan. Although considerable evidence exists to support physiotherapy management of CF, there is documented variation in practice. The aim of this guideline is to optimize the physiotherapy management of people with CF in Australia and New Zealand. A systematic review of the literature in key areas of physiotherapy practice for CF was undertaken. Recommendations were formulated based on National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) guidelines and considered the quality, quantity and level of the evidence; the consistency of the body of evidence; the likely clinical impact; and applicability to physiotherapy practice in Australia and New Zealand. A total of 30 recommendations were made for airway clearance therapy, inhalation therapy, exercise assessment and training, musculoskeletal management, management of urinary incontinence, managing the newly diagnosed patient with CF, delivery of non‐invasive ventilation, and physiotherapy management before and after lung transplantation. These recommendations can be used to underpin the provision of evidence‐based physiotherapy care to people with CF in Australia and New Zealand. PMID:27086904

  9. Complement Effectors of Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Fluid Correlate with Clinical Measures of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Laura A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Perkins, Amy M.; Shah, Tushar A.; Krishna, Neel K.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2015-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), lung damage is mediated by a cycle of obstruction, infection, and inflammation. Here we explored complement inflammatory effectors in CF lung fluid. In this study soluble fractions (sols) from sputum samples of 15 CF patients were assayed for complement effectors and analyzed with clinical measurements. The pro-inflammatory peptide C5a was increased 4.8-fold (P = 0.04) in CF sols compared with controls. Incubation of CF sols with P. aeruginosa or S. aureus increased C5a concentration 2.3-fold (P = 0.02). A peptide inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1) completely blocked the increase in C5a concentration from P. aeruginosa in CF sol in vitro (P = 0.001). C5a concentration in CF sol correlated inversely with body mass index (BMI) percentile in children (r = -0.77, P = 0.04). C3a, which has anti-inflammatory effects, correlated positively with FEV1% predicted (rs = 0.63, P = 0.02). These results suggest that complement effectors may significantly impact inflammation in CF lung fluid. PMID:26642048

  10. Pain and its clinical associations in individuals with cystic fibrosis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Rawlings, Sarah; Bennett, Katharine A; Armstrong, David

    2016-05-01

    Pain is recognized as a clinical complication in cystic fibrosis (CF), but the prevalence, characteristics and clinical associations of this co-morbidity have not been systematically reviewed. Electronic searches of six databases were performed. For inclusion in phase 1, studies reported a pain prevalence rate in CF and/or its clinical associations. For phase 2, included studies reported the measurement properties of validity, reliability and responsiveness of an instrument assessing pain in CF. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of evidence (phase 1) and the measurement properties using the 4-point COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist (phase 2). Of the 400 studies identified in the literature, 16 met the inclusion criteria for phase 1 and 5 for phase 2. The mean (SD) quality score (of 16) was 11.8 (2.3). The pooled prevalence of pain in adults with CF was 77% (95% confidence interval (CI): 57%-92%) and in children was 42% (95% CI: 0%-91%). Common regions of pain included back, abdomen, chest and limbs. In children and adults, pain was associated with a poorer quality of life (QOL) and significant interference with treatments. Measurement properties of three instruments (Brief Pain Inventory, Multidimensional Pain Inventory, Daily Pain Assessment-CF) were construct validity and criterion-predictive validity, with variable findings based on 'fair' to 'good' quality studies. Pain is a common problem in both children and adults with CF. It has negative clinical associations with QOL and the ability to successfully undertake treatment. Further research exploring the measurement properties of instruments assessing pain is required. PMID:26873725

  11. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis. PMID:26857767

  12. Variation in lung function is associated with worse clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; Pinto, Leonardo Araujo; Marostica, Paulo José Cauduro; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the variation in lung function over one year is associated with worse clinical outcomes, as well as with a decline in lung function in the following years, in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving CF patients (4-19 years of age), evaluated over a three-year period. We evaluated demographic characteristics, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, antibiotic use, hospitalization, six-minute walk distance (6MWD), and lung function. The inclusion criterion was having undergone pulmonary function testing at least three times in the first year and at least once in each of the next two years. RESULTS: We evaluated 35 CF patients. The variation in FEV1 in the first year (ΔFEV1) was greater among those who, in the third year, showed reduced FEV1, had a below-average 6MWD, or were hospitalized than among those with normal FEV1, normal 6MWD, or no hospital admissions, in that same year (p < 0.05), although no such difference was found for antibiotic use in the third year. Subjects showing a ΔFEV1 ≥ 10% also showed a greater decline in FEV1 over the two subsequent years (p = 0.04). The ΔFEV1 also showed an inverse correlation with absolute FEV1 in the third year (r = −0.340, p = 0.04) and with the rate of FEV1 decline (r = −0.52, p = 0.001). Linear regression identified ΔFEV1 as a predictor of FEV1 decline (coefficient of determination, 0.27). CONCLUSIONS: Significant variation in lung function over one year seems to be associated with a higher subsequent rate of FEV1 decline and worse clinical outcomes in CF patients. Short-term ΔFEV1 might prove useful as a predictor of CF progression in clinical practice. PMID:26785959

  13. Aspergillus bronchitis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shoseyov, David; Brownlee, Keith G; Conway, Steven P; Kerem, Eitan

    2006-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a widely distributed spore-bearing fungus, is commonly grown in sputum cultures of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A fumigatus may cause allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), a complex condition that leads to worsening of airway inflammation and progressive damage and is diagnosed by specific criteria. In this report, we present six CF patients with respiratory deterioration that did not respond to appropriate antibiotic treatment. All had had A fumigatus in sputum cultures but did not fulfill the criteria of ABPA. Treatment with antifungal agents was followed by improvement in clinical condition. We suggest that in patients with CF, A fumigatus should be considered as a pathogen that may directly cause respiratory exacerbations. Antifungal therapy should be considered when deteriorating respiratory function is not responding to antibacterial therapy and A fumigatus is growing in sputum cultures. PMID:16840406

  14. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future. PMID:26070393

  15. Diagnostic Testing in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brewington, John; Clancy, J P

    2016-03-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a rare, multisystem disease leading to significant morbidity and mortality. CF is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), a chloride and bicarbonate transporter. Early diagnosis and access to therapies provides benefits in nutrition, pulmonary health, and cognitive ability. Several screening and diagnostic tests are available to support a diagnosis. We discuss the characteristics of screening and diagnostic tests for CF and guideline-based algorithms using these tools to establish a diagnosis. We discuss classification and management of common "diagnostic dilemmas," including the CFTR-related metabolic syndrome and other CFTR-associated diseases. PMID:26857766

  16. Rectal forceps biopsy procedure in cystic fibrosis: technical aspects and patients perspective for clinical trials feasibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurements of CFTR function in rectal biopsies ex vivo have been used for diagnosis and prognosis of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) disease. Here, we aimed to evaluate this procedure regarding: i) viability of the rectal specimens obtained by biopsy forceps for ex vivo bioelectrical and biochemical laboratory analyses; and ii) overall assessment (comfort, invasiveness, pain, sedation requirement, etc.) of the rectal forceps biopsy procedure from the patients perspective to assess its feasibility as an outcome measure in clinical trials. Methods We compared three bowel preparation solutions (NaCl 0.9%, glycerol 12%, mannitol), and two biopsy forceps (standard and jumbo) in 580 rectal specimens from 132 individuals (CF and non-CF). Assessment of the overall rectal biopsy procedure (obtained by biopsy forceps) by patients was carried out by telephone surveys to 75 individuals who underwent the sigmoidoscopy procedure. Results Integrity and friability of the tissue specimens correlate with their transepithelial resistance (r = −0.438 and −0.305, respectively) and are influenced by the bowel preparation solution and biopsy forceps used, being NaCl and jumbo forceps the most compatible methods with the electrophysiological analysis. The great majority of the individuals (76%) did not report major discomfort due to the short procedure time (max 15 min) and considered it relatively painless (79%). Importantly, most (88%) accept repeating it at least for one more time and 53% for more than 4 times. Conclusions Obtaining rectal biopsies with a flexible endoscope and jumbo forceps after bowel preparation with NaCl solution is a safe procedure that can be adopted for both adults and children of any age, yielding viable specimens for CFTR bioelectrical/biochemical analyses. The procedure is well tolerated by patients, demonstrating its feasibility as an outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:23688510

  17. The Spectrum of Nocardia Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mei-Zahav, Meir; Livnat, Galit; Bentur, Lea; Mussaffi, Huda; Prais, Dario; Stafler, Patrick; Bar-On, Ophir; Steuer, Guy; Blau, Hannah

    2015-08-01

    We reviewed all cases of Nocardia infection in cystic fibrosis patients at 2 centers. Eight of 200 patients had Nocardia in sputum. Four developed severe lung disease, including 3 with associated allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis; 4 remained clinically stable. Nocardia is often associated with significant lung disease in cystic fibrosis, possibly associated with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or steroids. PMID:25973994

  18. Cutaneous manifestations of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Megan L; McCusker, Meagen M; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disease reported in 1 in 2500 live births in Northern American and Northern European Caucasian populations. Classic disease findings include chronic bacterial infection of airways and sinuses, malabsorption of fat, infertility in men, and elevated concentrations of chloride in sweat. Less well-recognized findings associated with cystic fibrosis include cutaneous findings, which can be primary or secondary manifestations of the disease process. Patients demonstrate more atopic and drug hypersensitivity reactions than the general population, but have similar rates of urticaria compared with the general population. In atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis, the nutrient deficiency dermatitis of the disease may aid with diagnosis, and notably can be the presenting sign. Other dermatologic manifestations of cystic fibrosis include early aquagenic skin wrinkling and cutaneous vasculitis, which can be associated with arthralgias. Familiarity with the nutrient deficiency dermatitis of this entity may play a role in the timely diagnosis of the disease, and the other cutaneous findings add to our understanding of the protean nature of its manifestations. PMID:18429769

  19. The Impact on Genetic Testing of Mutational Patterns of CFTR Gene in Different Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina M; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Testino, Giancarlo; Truglio, Gessica; Strom, Roberto; Quattrucci, Serena

    2016-07-01

    More than 2000 sequence variations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene are known. The marked genetic heterogeneity, poor functional characterization of the vast majority of sequence variations, and an uncertain genotype-phenotype relationship complicate the definition of mutational search strategies. We studied the effect of the marked genetic heterogeneity detected in a case series comprising 610 patients of cystic fibrosis (CF), grouped in different clinical macrocategories, on the operative characteristics of the genetic test designed to fully characterize CF patients. The detection rate in each clinical macrocategory and at each mutational step was found to be influenced by genetic heterogeneity. The definition of a single mutational panel that is suitable for all clinical macrocategories proved impossible. Only for classic CF with pancreas insufficiency did a reduced number of mutations yield a detection rate of diagnostic value. All other clinical macrocategories required an extensive genetic search. The search for specific mutational classes appears to be useful only in specific CF clinical forms. A flowchart defining a mutational search that may be adopted for different CF clinical forms, optimized in respect to those already available, is proposed. The findings also have consequences for carrier screening strategies. PMID:27157324

  20. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype. PMID:24309546

  1. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio de Aragão Dantas; Aguiar, Renata Arruti; Alves, Ana Cláudia S; Santana, Maria Angélica

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the principal extra-pulmonary complication of cystic fibrosis, occurring in 15-30% of adult cystic fibrosis patients. The number of cystic fibrosis patients who develop diabetes is increasing in parallel with increases in life expectancy. The aim of this study was to review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CFRD. A bibliographic search of the Medline and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature databases was made. Articles were selected from among those published in the last twenty years. Insulin deficiency, caused by reduced beta-cell mass, is the main etiologic mechanism, although insulin resistance also plays a role. Presenting features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD typically affects individuals of approximately 20 years of age. It can also be accompanied by fasting, non-fasting or intermittent hyperglycemia. Glucose intolerance is associated with worsening of nutritional status, increased morbidity, decreased survival and reduced pulmonary function. Microvascular complications are always present, although macrovascular complications are rarely seen. An oral glucose tolerance test is recommended annually for patients > or = 10 years of age and for any patients presenting unexplained weight loss or symptoms of diabetes. Patients hospitalized with severe diseases should also be screened. If fasting hyperglycemia persists for more than 48 h, insulin therapy is recommended. Insulin administration remains the treatment of choice for diabetes and fasting hyperglycemia. Calories should not be restricted, and patients with CFRD should be managed by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:17724542

  2. A first-year dornase alfa treatment impact on clinical parameters of patients with cystic fibrosis: the Brazilian cystic fibrosis multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Tatiana; Silva, Fernando Antônio A. e; Santana, Maria Angélica; Adde, Fabíola Villac; Mendes, Rita Heloisa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical impact of the first year treatment with dornase alfa, according to age groups, in a cohort of Brazilian Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. METHODS: The data on 152 eligible patients, from 16 CF reference centers, that answered the medical questionnaires and performed laboratory tests at baseline (T0), and at six (T2) and 12 (T4) months after dornase alfa initiation, were analyzed. Three age groups were assessed: six to 11, 12 to 13, and >14 years. Pulmonary tests, airway microbiology, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, emergency and routine treatments were evaluated. Student's t-test, chi-square test and analysis of variance were used when appropriated. RESULTS: Routine treatments were based on respiratory physical therapy, regular exercises, pancreatic enzymes, vitamins, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and antibiotics. In the six months prior the study (T0 phase), hospitalizations for pulmonary exacerbations occurred in 38.0, 10.0 and 61.4% in the three age groups, respectively. After one year of intervention, there was a significant reduction in the number of emergency room visits in the six to 11 years group. There were no significant changes in forced expiratory volume in one second (VEF1), in forced vital capacity (FVC), in oxygen saturation (SpO2), and in Tiffenau index for all age groups. A significant improvement in Shwachman-Kulczychi score was observed in the older group. In the last six months of therapy, chronic or intermittent colonization by P. aeruginosa was detected in 75.0, 71.4 and 62.5% of the studied groups, respectively, while S. aureus colonization was identified in 68.6, 66.6 and 41.9% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: The treatment with dornase alfa promoted the maintenance of pulmonary function parameters and was associated with a significant reduction of emergency room visits due to pulmonary exacerbations in the six to 11 years age group, with better clinical scores in the >14 age group, one year after the

  3. A Genotypic-Oriented View of CFTR Genetics Highlights Specific Mutational Patterns Underlying Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina Maria; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Stamato, Antonella; Narzi, Fabiana; Amato, Annalisa; Cimino, Giuseppe; Bertasi, Serenella; Quattrucci, Serena; Strom, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The genotype–phenotype relationship in this disease is still unclear, and diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic challenges persist. We enrolled 610 patients with different forms of CF and studied them from a clinical, biochemical, microbiological and genetic point of view. Overall, there were 125 different mutated alleles (11 with novel mutations and 10 with complex mutations) and 225 genotypes. A strong correlation between mutational patterns at the genotypic level and phenotypic macrocategories emerged. This specificity appears to largely depend on rare and individual mutations, as well as on the varying prevalence of common alleles in different clinical macrocategories. However, 19 genotypes appeared to underlie different clinical forms of the disease. The dissection of the pathway from the CFTR mutated genotype to the clinical phenotype allowed to identify at least two components of the variability usually found in the genotype–phenotype relationship. One component seems to depend on the genetic variation of CFTR, the other component on the cumulative effect of variations in other genes and cellular pathways independent from CFTR. The experimental dissection of the overall biological CFTR pathway appears to be a powerful approach for a better comprehension of the genotype–phenotype relationship. However, a change from an allele-oriented to a genotypic-oriented view of CFTR genetics is mandatory, as well as a better assessment of sources of variability within the CFTR pathway. PMID:25910067

  4. Pharmacogenetics of cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Suzanne C; McKone, Edward F

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is genetic autosomal recessive disease caused by reduced or absent function of CFTR protein. Treatments for patients with CF have primarily focused on the downstream end-organ consequences of defective CFTR. Since the discovery of the CFTR gene that causes CF in 1989 there have been tremendous advances in our understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of CF. This has recently led to the development of new CFTR mutation-specific targeted therapies for select patients with CF. This review will discuss the characteristics of the CFTR gene, the CFTR mutations that cause CF and the new mutation specific pharmacological treatments including gene therapy that are contributing to the dawning of a new era in cystic fibrosis care. PMID:27490265

  5. [Cystic fibrosis and associated complications].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, C; Staab, D

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease. The mutation is located on the long arm of chromosome 7. Due to a defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, chloride ion transport is reduced across the cell membrane. As a result, the disease can be described as an exocrinopathy. In all organs with exocrine glands, disorders occur in association with the defective chloride transport. The main impact of this defect is manifested in the lungs. Therefore, the most common cause of death is pulmonary disease with respiratory insufficiency due to recurrent infections. Unfortunately, a cure for the disease is still not available. However, new therapies that may affect the CFTR mutation more specifically give new hope for better therapeutic options in the future. The long-term goal of therapy is to develop a causal therapy for all six different mutation classes and thus for about 2000 mutations. PMID:25693903

  6. Respiratory Conditions Update: Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Lyle L

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease that occurs in approximately 1 in 2,500 white live births. It is less common in nonwhite individuals. A dysfunctional epithelial chloride channel leads to excessively thick mucus affecting multiple organ systems. Common issues include mucous plugging of the airway, lung inflammation, chronic pulmonary infections, intestinal malabsorption, and malnutrition. Universal screening of newborns for CF is recommended in many countries. CF can be diagnosed based on clinical evidence of disease along with genetic testing or other laboratory evidence of chloride channel dysfunction. Pulmonary system dysfunction causes the most morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary function testing is the primary modality used to monitor CF progression. Therapies include chest physiotherapy, mucolytics, antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, targeted therapies, and vaccines. Dysfunction of the exocrine pancreas and gastrointestinal tract leads to malabsorption, malnutrition, and intestinal obstruction. Nutrition should be optimized with adequate calories, pancreatic enzymes, and appropriate dietary supplements. Complications, including acute pulmonary exacerbations, gastrointestinal conditions, chronic rhinosinusitis, CF-related diabetes, osteoporosis, infertility, and psychosocial issues, must be managed. At the appropriate time, lung transplantation and end-of-life issues must be addressed. PMID:27576234

  7. Infection Control in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Saiman, Lisa; Siegel, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 20 years there has been a greater interest in infection control in cystic fibrosis (CF) as patient-to-patient transmission of pathogens has been increasingly demonstrated in this unique patient population. The CF Foundation sponsored a consensus conference to craft recommendations for infection control practices for CF care providers. This review provides a summary of the literature addressing infection control in CF. Burkholderia cepacia complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus have all been shown to spread between patients with CF. Standard precautions, transmission-based precautions including contact and droplet precautions, appropriate hand hygiene for health care workers, patients, and their families, and care of respiratory tract equipment to prevent the transmission of infectious agents serve as the foundations of infection control and prevent the acquisition of potential pathogens by patients with CF. The respiratory secretions of all CF patients potentially harbor clinically and epidemiologically important microorganisms, even if they have not yet been detected in cultures from the respiratory tract. CF patients should be educated to contain their secretions and maintain a distance of >3 ft from other CF patients to avoid the transmission of potential pathogens, even if culture results are unavailable or negative. To prevent the acquisition of pathogens from respiratory therapy equipment used in health care settings as well as in the home, such equipment should be cleaned and disinfected. It will be critical to measure the dissemination, implementation, and potential impact of these guidelines to monitor changes in practice and reduction in infections. PMID:14726455

  8. Clinical impact of laboratory error on therapeutic drug monitoring of once-daily tobramycin in cystic fibrosis: Case series

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Once-daily dosing intravenous tobramycin is commonly used to treat cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations. Clinicians often utilize historical therapeutic drug monitoring data to individualize the dose among patients who have been treated with tobramycin previously. This case series involves three patients with cystic fibrosis who had supra-therapeutic tobramycin levels despite use of a once-daily dosing that produced therapeutic drug levels during a previous hospital admission, raising questions about the validity of these levels. Investigation into several potential sources of error led to the discovery of an analyzer error in the laboratory. Once the laboratory’s tobramycin analyzer was recalibrated, the reported levels were comparable to historical levels. This case series emphasizes the clinical importance of critically analyzing reported levels, and specifically, the importance of utilizing past therapeutic drug monitoring data, if available, for all patients treated with intravenous tobramycin. If a patient was therapeutic on a similar dose of tobramycin during a previous admission, a dose adjustment may not be necessary, and clinicians should consider repeating levels while pursuing alternative explanations for the discrepant serum levels. PMID:27489639

  9. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa co-infection is associated with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes and poor clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Limoli, D H; Yang, J; Khansaheb, M K; Helfman, B; Peng, L; Stecenko, A A; Goldberg, J B

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) patients suffer from accelerated rates of pulmonary decline compared to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). However, the mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. While CFRD is associated with increased respiratory infections, a link between infection and enhanced pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear. The development of glucose intolerance is spectral, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) prior to the diagnosis of CFRD. Inclusion of IGT patients within the NGT group may diminish the ability to identify correlations with CFRD. With this in mind, this study aimed to determine if the association between CFRD and respiratory infections is correlated with pulmonary decline. Respiratory cultures from 234 CF patients with confirmed diagnosis of NGT or CFRD were analyzed to measure rates of infection, focusing on the two most prevalent bacteria in CF, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection status was correlated with pulmonary function and confounding clinical variables including age, gender, blood glucose levels, and CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) phenotype were considered in multivariate analyses. CFRD patients, particularly those with extremely high blood glucose levels, were more likely than NGT patients to be co-infected with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, compared to infection with only one pathogen. Co-infection was associated with decreased lung function and increased frequency of pulmonary exacerbations, even after adjustment for confounding variables. Alterations in the microbial community composition, as opposed to the presence of a single pathogen, may account for greater pulmonary decline in CFRD patients. PMID:26993289

  10. Systemic inflammatory mediators and cystic fibrosis genotype.

    PubMed

    Augarten, A; Paret, G; Avneri, I; Akons, H; Aviram, M; Bentur, L; Blau, H; Efrati, O; Szeinberg, A; Barak, A; Kerem, E; Yahav, J

    2004-10-01

    Morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis patients is mainly attributed to pulmonary infection and inflammation. Chemokines play a pivotal role in the inflammatory process. Although genotype-phenotype correlation in cystic fibrosis patients has been defined, a clear relationship between the defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene and pulmonary inflammation has not been established. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum chemokines levels in cystic fibrosis patients correlate with genotype and pulmonary function tests, as well as with other clinical characteristics. Serum levels of interleukin-8, RANTES, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were measured in 36 cystic fibrosis patients grouped according to their genotype. Group A included 25 patients who carried two mutations associated with a pathological sweat test and pancreatic insufficiency (deltaF508, W1282X, G542X, N1303K, S549R). Group B included 11 compound heterozygote patients who carried one mutation known to cause mild disease with borderline or normal sweat test and pancreatic sufficiency (3849+10kb C to T, 5T). Associations between chemokine levels, genotype, pulmonary function, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, age, sweat chloride level, and pancreatic and nutritional status were examined. Mean interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels were significantly higher in group A than group B (11.4 +/- 2.1 pg/ml vs. 5 +/- 0.9 pg/ml and 157 +/- 16 pg/ml vs. 88.8 +/- 16.4 pg/ml, respectively) (P < 0.01). No difference in RANTES levels were found between groups. interleukin-8 levels were inversely related to forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = -0.37, P < 0.02), while there was no association between the latter and RANTES and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. The Pseudomonas colonization rate was higher among group A patients than group B (88% vs. 40%, P < 0.01). No relationship was found between measured chemokines and age, sweat chloride

  11. [Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis with CFTR Modulators].

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B

    2016-05-01

    Personalized medicine promises that medical decisions, practices and products are tailored to the individual patient. Cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder of chloride and bicarbonate transport in exocrine glands, is the first successful example of customized drug development for mutation-specific therapy. There are two classes of CFTR modulators: potentiators that increase the activity of CFTR at the cell surface, and correctors that either promote the read-through of nonsense mutations or facilitate the translation, folding, maturation and trafficking of mutant CFTR to the cell surface. The potentiator ivacaftor and the corrector lumacaftor are approved in Germany for the treatment of people with cystic fibrosis who carry a gating mutation such as p.Gly551Asp or who are homozygous for the most common mutation p.Phe508del, respectively. This report provides an overview of the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, the population genetics of CFTR mutations in Germany and the bioassays to assess CFTR function in humans together with the major achievements of preclinical research and clinical trials to bring CFTR modulators to the clinic. Some practical information on the use of ivacaftor and lumacaftor in daily practice and an update on pitfalls, challenges and novel strategies of bench-to-bedside development of CFTR modulators are also provided. PMID:26894479

  12. Cystic fibrosis presenting with bilateral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anna P; Kumar, Prashant; Devlin, Anita M; O'Brien, Christopher J

    2007-07-01

    A 15-week old male infant presented with bilateral lower motor neuron facial palsy of unknown cause. Subsequently his growth deteriorated and he developed progressively worsening cough and wheeze. A diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was confirmed and hypovitaminosis A detected. Improvement of the facial palsy was noted following standard management of cystic fibrosis including vitamin A supplementation. PMID:17287135

  13. A combination therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2015-09-24

    The most prevalent form of cystic fibrosis arises from an amino acid deletion in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. A recently approved treatment for individuals homozygous for this mutation combines a chemical corrector, which helps CFTR fold, and a potentiator that increases CFTR channel activity. PMID:26406363

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Isolated from Clinical Specimens from Patients with Cystic Fibrosis and Associated Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Miles; Todd, Neil J.; Kerr, Kevin G.; Hawkey, Peter M.; Littlewood, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was isolated from the respiratory tracts of 41 (25%) of 163 children attending our pediatric cystic fibrosis unit between September 1993 and December 1995. The extents of S. maltophilia contamination of environmental sites frequented by these patients were investigated with a selective medium incorporating vancomycin, imipenem, and amphotericin B. Eighty-two isolates of S. maltophilia were cultured from 67 different environmental sites sampled between January and July 1996. The organism was widespread in the home environment, with 20 (36%) and 25 (42%) of sampled sites positive in the homes of colonized and noncolonized patients, respectively. In the nosocomial setting, it was isolated from 18 (32%) sites in the hospital ward and from 4 (17%) sites in the outpatient clinic area. The most common sites of contamination were sink drains, faucets, and other items frequently in contact with water. All environmental and clinical isolates were genotyped with enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences as primers. A total of 33 of the 41 patients were colonized with unique strains, and four pairs of patients shared strains. Further characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after digestion with XbaI found that there was no evidence of patient-to-patient transmission; however, there was some evidence that a small number of patients may have acquired the organism from the hospital environment. Resampling of environmental sites in the hospital ward in January 1997 revealed evidence of genetic drift, complicating the accurate determination of environmental sources for clinical strains. The source of the majority of S. maltophilia strains colonizing the respiratory tracts of these patients with cystic fibrosis remained uncertain but may have represented multiple, independent acquisitions from a variety of environmental sites both within and outside the hospital. PMID:9650943

  15. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. PMID:27469183

  16. Pulmonary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, M Y; Flight, W; Smith, E

    2014-03-01

    The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has steadily increased over recent decades with a corresponding increase in the frequency of complications of the disease. Radiologists are increasingly involved with managing and identifying the pulmonary complications of CF. This article reviews the common manifestations of CF lung disease as well as updating radiologists with a number of less well-known complications of the condition. Early and accurate detection of the pulmonary effects of CF are increasingly important to prevent irreversible lung damage and give patients the greatest possibility of benefiting from the new therapies becoming available, which correct the underlying defect causing CF. PMID:24361142

  17. [Isolation of Geosmithia argillacea in a cystic fibrosis patient].

    PubMed

    Labbé, F; Babchia, S; Evreux, F; Chenal, P

    2013-09-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old child with cystic fibrosis where Geosmithia argillacea has been isolated from sputum. This is a filamentous fungus (mold) recently described as emergent infectious agent in cystic fibrosis patients. In our case, the presence of G. argillacea was not associated with clinical disorder. However, recent evidence shows that it can be responsible for very serious invasive infection, especially in chronic granulomatous disease and may be, after lung transplantation. PMID:23856446

  18. Use of nasal potential difference and sweat chloride as outcome measures in multicenter clinical trials in subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Richard C; Standaert, Thomas A; Launspach, Janice; Han, Seung-Ho; Teresi, Mary E; Aitken, Moira L; Kelley, Thomas J; Hilliard, Kathleen A; Milgram, Laura J H; Konstan, Michael W; Weatherly, Mark R; McCarty, Nael A

    2002-02-01

    One of the goals of current research in cystic fibrosis (CF) is to develop treatments that correct or compensate for defects in function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. The use of outcome measures that assess CFTR function such as nasal potential difference (NPD) measurements and sweat chloride determinations will be required to evaluate the efficacy of such treatments in multicenter clinical trials. The purpose of this work was to identify the sources and magnitude of variability in NPD and sweat chloride measurements when performed at multiple centers. For the variance component analysis presented here, we used NPD and sweat chloride measurements from 37 subjects with CF participating in a phase I, four-center clinical trial of CPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine), a drug intended to enhance trafficking of Delta F508 CFTR to the cell membrane. The specific techniques used to measure these outcomes were not standardized, and varied between the four sites. Variability of both NPD measurements (baseline potential difference during infusion with Ringer's solution; change in response to addition of 0.1 mM amiloride; and subsequent change in response to perfusion with low chloride solution containing 0.1 mM amiloride and 0.01 mM isoproterenol) and sweat chloride measurements differed significantly between study sites. For change in NPD, one study site had significantly greater variability (lower reproducibility) of measurement than the other three sites. For sweat chloride measurements, reproducibility was lower at two of the sites relative to the other two sites. Sample size calculations showed that lower reproducibility at one or more sites can substantially reduce the power of studies using NPD or sweat chloride determinations as outcome measures. Standardization of measurement protocols, careful operator training and certification, and ongoing monitoring of individual operator performance may help to improve reliability in

  19. Cystic fibrosis in adults. From researcher to practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Marelich, G P; Cross, C E

    1996-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation currently tracks about 20,000 Americans with cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive genetic disease that leads to multisystem complications. With the institution of better therapeutic regimens over the past 2 decades, more patients with this disease are surviving to adulthood. Within the past decade, both clinical and basic science research in the field of cystic fibrosis has progressed at a rapid rate. The intent of this review is to introduce readers to the molecular, cellular, and systemic disorders of this disease. We discuss treatment strategies involving antibiotics, nutrition, immune-response mediators, chest physiotherapy, and sputum-active agents with respect to the airway dysfunction of cystic fibrosis. Other common complications, recent developments, transplantation, and gene therapy are also reviewed. PMID:8732732

  20. Hydrator Therapies for Chronic Bronchitis. Lessons from Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William D; Henderson, Ashley G; Donaldson, Scott H

    2016-04-01

    Patients with the chronic bronchitis form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis share similar clinical features, including mucus obstruction of airways and the development of chronic/recurrent airways infections that often manifest as disease exacerbations. There is growing evidence that these diseases may have parallels in disease pathogenesis as well, including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction, mucus dehydration, and defective mucociliary clearance. As progress is made in the development of therapies that target the basic defects that lead to cystic fibrosis lung disease, it is possible that similar approaches could also benefit patients with chronic bronchitis. A deeper understanding of how tobacco smoke and other triggers of chronic bronchitis actually lead to disease, and exploration of the concept that therapies that restore cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function, mucus hydration, and/or mucociliary clearance may benefit patients with chronic bronchitis, hold the prospect of significant progress in treating this prevalent disease. PMID:27115955

  1. Managing diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Laguna, T A; Nathan, B M; Moran, A

    2010-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is the most common co-morbidity in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). As the life expectancy of persons with CF continues to increase, the need to proactively diagnose and aggressively treat CFRD and its potential complications has become more apparent. CFRD negatively impacts lung function, growth and mortality, making its diagnosis and management crucial in a population already at high risk for early mortality. Compared to type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD is a unique entity, requiring a thorough understanding of its unique pathophysiology to facilitate the creation and utilization of an effective medical treatment plan. The physiology of CFRD is complex, likely consisting of a combination of insulin deficiency, insulin resistance and a genetic predisposition towards the development of diabetes. However, the hallmark of CFRD is insulin deficiency, necessitating the use of exogenous insulin as the mainstay of therapy. Insulin administration, in combination with a multidisciplinary team of health professionals with expertise in the care of patients with CF and CFRD, is the cornerstone of the care for these patients. The goals of treatment of the CFRD population are to reverse protein catabolism, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce acute and chronic diabetes complications. Creating a partnership between the treatment team and the patient is the ideal way to accomplish these goals and is essential for successful diabetes care. PMID:20920037

  2. Aspergillus infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    King, Jill; Brunel, Shan F; Warris, Adilia

    2016-07-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic lung infection and airway inflammation. Respiratory failure secondary to chronic or recurrent infection remains the commonest cause of death and accounts for over 90% of mortality. Bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex have been regarded the main CF pathogens and their role in progressive lung decline has been studied extensively. Little attention has been paid to the role of Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi in the pathogenesis of non-ABPA (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis) respiratory disease in CF, despite their frequent recovery in respiratory samples. It has become more apparent however, that Aspergillus spp. may play an important role in chronic lung disease in CF. Research delineating the underlying mechanisms of Aspergillus persistence and infection in the CF lung and its link to lung deterioration is lacking. This review summarizes the Aspergillus disease phenotypes observed in CF, discusses the role of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator)-protein in innate immune responses and new treatment modalities. PMID:27177733

  3. Biliary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S; Keogan, M; Casey, M; Duffy, G; McErlean, D; Fitzgerald, M X; Hegarty, J E

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and four adult patients with cystic fibrosis were evaluated for the presence of liver disease as defined by abnormal liver function tests of six months' duration, histological evidence of fibrosis or cirrhosis, or the presence of portal hypertension, or both. Twenty patients fulfilled these criteria and were evaluated further for the presence of biliary tract abnormalities with biliary scintigraphy using 99Tc diisopropylphenyl-carboxymethyl iminodiacetic acid (DISIDA) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Clearance of 99Tc DISIDA from the liver and biliary tree was diminished at 45 (E45) and 60 (E60) minutes in the patients with liver disease compared with those without liver disease; E45 = 37.8% and 65.8%, p less than 0.01; E60 = 48.2% and 77.5%, p less than 0.01 respectively. Serial analogue images of the extrahepatic biliary tree were consistent with common bile duct obstruction with retention of DISIDA and tapering of the common bile duct in seven of 18 patients with and two of 10 patients without liver disease. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed changes consistent with sclerosing cholangitis, with beading and stricturing of the intrahepatic ducts in 12 of the 14 patients. In all 14 patients, including those in whom biliary scintigraphy had suggested obstruction, no abnormality of the common bile duct was identified. These results indicate that abnormalities of the bile ducts in patients with cystic fibrosis related liver disease are confined to the intrahepatic biliary tree and that common bile duct strictures do not contribute to either the progression or development of liver disease in these patients. Images Figure 2 PMID:1568661

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator. Implications in Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Cantin, André M

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have traditionally been viewed as two distinct entities of unrelated origins. However, molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have revealed that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein dysfunction is common to both conditions, one (CF) being defined genetically and the other (COPD) as an acquired CFTR deficiency. Multiple molecular mechanisms of cigarette smoke-induced CFTR dysfunction have been reported. More importantly, considerable evidence of cigarette smoke-induced CFTR dysfunction in several respiratory and nonrespiratory tissues have been confirmed, making CFTR a target that cannot be overlooked in our quest to understand COPD and improve therapies for individuals affected by this disease. This review summarizes the molecular, cellular, and clinical evidence that CFTR dysfunction is induced by cigarette smoke exposure both in vitro and in vivo, and explores how this may contribute to the development of COPD. PMID:27115950

  5. Management of the Upper Airway in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Elisa A.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Upper airway disease engenders significant morbidity for patients with cystic fibrosis and is increasingly recognized as having a much greater role in pulmonary outcomes and quality of life than originally believed. Widespread disparate therapeutic strategies for cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis underscore the absence of a standardized treatment paradigm. This review outlines the most recent evidence-based trends in the management of upper airway disease in cystic fibrosis. Recent Findings The unified airway theory proposes that the sinuses are a focus of initial bacterial colonization which seeds the lower airway and may play a large role in maintaining lung infections. Mounting evidence suggests more aggressive treatment of the sinuses may confer significant improvement in pulmonary disease and quality of life outcomes in cystic fibrosis patients. However, there is a lack of high-level evidence regarding medical and surgical management of cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis that makes generalizations difficult. Summary Well designed clinical trials with long-term follow-up concerning medical and surgical interventions for cystic fibrosis sinus disease are required to establish standardized treatment protocols, but increased interest in the sinuses as a bacterial reservoir for pulmonary infections has generated considerable attention. PMID:25250804

  6. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martiniano, Stacey L; Nick, Jerry A; Daley, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are important emerging cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens, with estimates of prevalence ranging from 6% to 13%. Diagnosis of NTM disease in patients with CF is challenging, as the infection may remain indolent in some, without evidence of clinical consequence, whereas other patients suffer significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment requires prolonged periods of multiple drugs and varies depending on NTM species, resistance pattern, and extent of disease. The development of a disease-specific approach to the diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in CF patients is a research priority, as a lifelong strategy is needed for this high-risk population. PMID:26857770

  7. Vaccine strategies against cystic fibrosis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Le Moigne, Vincent; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    A great number of cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Burkholderia cepacia and the Mycobacterium abscessus complex raised difficult therapeutic problems due to their intrinsic multi-resistance to numerous antibiotics. Vaccine strategies represent one of the key weapons against these multi-resistant bacteria in a number of clinical settings like CF. Different strategies are considered in order to develop such vaccines, linked either to priming the host response, or by exploiting genomic data derived from the bacterium. Interestingly, virulence factors synthesized by various pathogens might serve as targets for vaccine development and have been, for example, evaluated in the context of CF. PMID:26618824

  8. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  9. Celiac Disease and Cystic Fibrosis: Challenges to Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alessandra Teixeira Pessoa; Figueirêdo, Manuella Machado; Aguiar, Ana Paula de B; Almeida, Carolina de Godoy; Mendes, Patrícia S A; Souza, Edna Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis and celiac disease were considered a single clinical entity for many years. Differentiation between the diseases occurred some time in the 1930s of the 20th Century. Both diseases may present the intestinal malabsorption syndrome and similar clinical manifestations that contribute to difficulties with clinical distinction. We describe a report of two patients with initial diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, who were subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease. These case reports emphasize the possibility of false positivity being shown in the sweat test in CD, which may result in delayed diagnosis and inadequate management of this disease. PMID:27552792

  10. The clinical benefits of long-term supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids in cystic fibrosis patients - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hanssens, L; Thiébaut, I; Lefèvre, N; Malfroot, A; Knoop, C; Duchateau, J; Casimir, G

    2016-05-01

    Effectiveness of omega-3 supplementation in cystic fibrosis (CF) remains controversial. This study sought to evaluate clinical status, exercise tolerance, inflammatory parameters, and erythrocyte fatty acid profile after 1 year of oral omega-3 supplementation in CF patients. Fifteen ΔF508-homozygous patients undergoing chronic azithromycin were randomized to receive omega-3 fish oil supplementation at a dose of 60mg/Kg/day or placebo. In comparison with the previous year, in the supplemented group, the number of pulmonary exacerbations decreased at 12 months (1.7 vs. 3.0, p<0.01), as did the duration of antibiotic therapy (26.5 days vs. 60.0 days, p<0.025). Supplementation significantly increased the levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as early as <3 months of administration, with concomitant decreases in arachidonic acid (AA) levels. This pilot study suggests that long-term omega-3 supplementation offers several clinical benefits as to the number of exacerbations and duration of antibiotic therapy in CF patients. PMID:27154364

  11. Cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Kejner, Alexandra; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Advances in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have improved pulmonary outcomes and survival. In addition, rapid developments regarding the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the disease have led to numerous novel targets for treatment. However, clinical and basic scientific research focusing on therapeutic strategies for CF-associated chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) lags behind the evidence-based approaches currently used for pulmonary disease. Methods: This review evaluates the available literature and provides an update concerning the pathophysiology, current treatment approaches, and future pharmaceutical tactics in the management of CRS in patients with CF. Results: Optimal medical and surgical strategies for CF CRS are lacking because of a dearth of well-performed clinical trials. Medical and surgical interventions are supported primarily by level 2 or 3 evidence and are aimed at improving clearance of mucus, infection, and inflammation. A number of novel therapeutics that target the basic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel are currently under investigation. Ivacaftor, a corrector of the G551D mutation, was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, sinonasal outcomes using this and other novel drugs are pending. Conclusion: CRS is a lifelong disease in CF patients that can lead to substantial morbidity and decreased quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach will be necessary to develop consistent and evidence-based treatment paradigms. PMID:24119602

  12. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Three Clonal Clinical Isolates of B. cenocepacia from a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ruth R.; Hird, Trevor J.; Tang, Patrick; Zlosnik, James E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria are amongst the most feared of pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF). The BCC comprises at least 20 distinct species that can cause chronic and unpredictable lung infections in CF. Historically the species B. cenocepacia has been the most prevalent in CF infections and has been associated in some centers with high rates of mortality. Modeling chronic infection by B. cenocepacia in the laboratory is challenging and no models exist which effectively recapitulate CF disease caused by BCC bacteria. Therefore our understanding of factors that contribute towards the morbidity and mortality caused by this organism is limited. In this study we used whole-genome sequencing to examine the evolution of 3 clonal clinical isolates of B. cenocepacia from a patient with cystic fibrosis. The first isolate was from the beginning of infection, and the second two almost 10 years later during the final year of the patients’ life. These isolates also demonstrated phenotypic heterogeneity, with the first isolate displaying the mucoid phenotype (conferred by the overproduction of exopolysaccharide), while one of the later two was nonmucoid. In addition we also sequenced a nonmucoid derivative of the initial mucoid isolate, acquired in the laboratory by antibiotic pressure. Examination of sequence data revealed that the two late stage isolates shared 20 variant nucleotides in common compared to the early isolate. However, despite their isolation within 10 months of one another, there was also considerable variation between the late stage isolates, including 42 single nucleotide variants and three deletions. Additionally, no sequence differences were identified between the initial mucoid isolate and its laboratory acquired nonmucoid derivative, however transcript analysis indicated at least partial down regulation of genes involved in exopolysaccharide production. Our study examines the progression of B. cenocepacia throughout chronic infection

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein repair as a therapeutic strategy in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, Peter A.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent progress in understanding the production, processing, and function of the cystic fibrosis gene product, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), has revealed new therapeutic targets to repair the mutant protein. Classification of CFTR mutations and new treatment strategies to address each will be described here. Recent findings High-throughput screening and other drug discovery efforts have identified small molecules that restore activity to mutant CFTR. Compounds such as VX-770 that potentiate CFTR have demonstrated exciting results in recent clinical trials and demonstrate robust effects across several CFTR mutation classes in the laboratory. A number of novel F508del CFTR processing correctors restore protein to the cell surface and improve ion channel function in vitro and are augmented by coadministration of CFTR potentiators. Ongoing discovery efforts that target protein folding, CFTR trafficking, and cell stress have also indicated promising results. Aminoglycosides and the novel small molecule ataluren induce translational readthrough of nonsense mutations in CFTR and other genetic diseases in vitro and in vivo and have shown activity in proof of concept trials, and ataluren is now being studied in confirmatory trials. Summary An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the basic genetic defect in cystic fibrosis have led to new treatment strategies to repair the mutant protein. PMID:20829696

  14. Abnormal Ion Permeation through Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Spock, A.; Fischer, N.; Gatzy, J. T.; Boucher, R. C.

    1983-09-01

    The epithelium of nasal tissue excised from subjects with cystic fibrosis exhibited higher voltage and lower conductance than tissue from control subjects. Basal sodium ion absorption by cystic fibrosis and normal nasal epithelia equaled the short-circuit current and was amiloride-sensitive. Amiloride induced chloride ion secretion in normal but not cystic fibrosis tissue and consequently was more effective in inhibiting the short-circuit current in cystic fibrosis epithelia. Chloride ion-free solution induced a smaller hyperpolarization of cystic fibrosis tissue. The increased voltage and amiloride efficacy in cystic fibrosis reflect absorption of sodium ions across an epithelium that is relatively impermeable to chloride ions.

  15. Non-coding small (micro) RNAs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from clinical isolates from adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rao, J R; Nelson, D; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Goldsmith, C E; Rendall, J; Elborn, J S

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs widely reported in eukaryotic multicellular organisms. In this study, a number of small non-coding micro (mi)RNA species in clinical isolates of prokaryote Pseudomonas aeruginosa were obtained from the sputum of adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) utilising a DynaExpress miRNA cloning kit, and five miRNAs of 16-47 nucleotides that were smaller than those encountered or described (80-100 nucleotides) previously in bacterial systems were described. This report presents data on these unknown cellular miRNAs cloned from P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients. Adapting a computational miRNA prediction model that takes advantage of the highly conserved known miRNA hair pin stems regions, the results revealed that the fold structure of the microRNAs had a high homology to the recently reported human bacterial infection response (BiR)-related microRNA, mi-146, associated with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, which is the primary evolutionarily conserved sensors of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and known to trigger host inflammatory and immune responses. PMID:20973407

  16. Identification of outer membrane Porin D as a vitronectin-binding factor in cystic fibrosis clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Magnus; Singh, Birendra; Al-Jubair, Tamim; Su, Yu-Ching; Høiby, Niels; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen that frequently colonizes patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several pathogens are known to bind vitronectin to increase their virulence. Vitronectin has been shown to enhance P. aeruginosa adhesion to host epithelial cells. Methods We screened clinical isolates from the airways of CF patients and from the bloodstream of patients with bacteremia for binding of vitronectin. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and a proteomic approach was used to identify vitronectin-receptors in P. aeruginosa. Results P. aeruginosa from the airways of CF patients (n=27) bound more vitronectin than bacteremic isolates (n=15, p=0.025). Porin D (OprD) was identified as a vitronectin-binding protein. A P. aeruginosa oprD transposon insertion mutant had a decreased binding to soluble and immobilized vitronectin (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from CF patients significantly bound vitronectin. Porin D was defined as a novel P. aeruginosa vitronectin-receptor, and we postulate that the Porin D-dependent interaction with vitronectin may be important for colonization. PMID:26047937

  17. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required. PMID:24095197

  18. Lung Infections Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lyczak, Jeffrey B.; Cannon, Carolyn L.; Pier, Gerald B.

    2002-01-01

    While originally characterized as a collection of related syndromes, cystic fibrosis (CF) is now recognized as a single disease whose diverse symptoms stem from the wide tissue distribution of the gene product that is defective in CF, the ion channel and regulator, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Defective CFTR protein impacts the function of the pancreas and alters the consistency of mucosal secretions. The latter of these effects probably plays an important role in the defective resistance of CF patients to many pathogens. As the modalities of CF research have changed over the decades from empirical histological studies to include biophysical measurements of CFTR function, the clinical management of this disease has similarly evolved to effectively address the ever-changing spectrum of CF-related infectious diseases. These factors have led to the successful management of many CF-related infections with the notable exception of chronic lung infection with the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The virulence of P. aeruginosa stems from multiple bacterial attributes, including antibiotic resistance, the ability to utilize quorum-sensing signals to form biofilms, the destructive potential of a multitude of its microbial toxins, and the ability to acquire a mucoid phenotype, which renders this microbe resistant to both the innate and acquired immunologic defenses of the host. PMID:11932230

  19. Antibiotic allergy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Parmar, J S; Nasser, S

    2005-06-01

    Allergic reactions to antibiotics are more common in cystic fibrosis (CF) than in the general population. This in part is due to the improving survival in adults with CF and the increased use of high dose intravenous antibiotics. While some are immediate anaphylaxis type (IgE mediated) reactions, the majority are late onset and may have non-specific features such as rash and fever. Piperacillin has consistently been found to have the highest rate of reported reactions (30-50%). There is a low risk of cross reactions between penicillins and other non-beta-lactam classes of antibiotics in penicillin skin prick positive patients. Carbapenems should only be used with extreme caution in patients with positive skin prick tests to penicillin. However, aztreonam can be used safely in patients who are penicillin allergic with positive skin prick reactions. The aminoglycosides are a relatively uncommon cause of allergic reactions, but patients who react to one member of the family may cross react with other aminoglycosides. Desensitisation relies on the incremental introduction of small quantities of the allergen and has been used for penicillins, ceftazidime, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin and must be repeated before each course. Personalized cards should be regularly updated for patients who develop allergic reactions. Written instructions on the emergency treatment of allergic reactions should be provided to patients self-administering intravenous antibiotics at home. Further research is required to identify risk factors and predictors for antibiotic allergy. PMID:15923254

  20. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H.; Barr, Mark L.; Blackwell, Laura S.; Bosma, Otto H.; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D. R.; Jensen, Judy L.; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Robinson, Walter M.; Romero, Sandy L.; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C.; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Vrijlandt, Elianne J. L. E.; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing and transplantation on the patient's quality of life. Although recent population-based analyses of the US lung allocation system for the CF population have raised controversies about the survival benefits of transplantation, studies from the United Kingdom and Canada have suggested a definite survival advantage for those receiving transplants. In response to these and other controversies, leaders in transplantation and CF met together in Lansdowne, Virginia, to consider the state of the art in lung transplantation for CF in an international context, focusing on advances in surgical technique, measurement of outcomes, use of prognostic criteria, variations in local control over listing, and prioritization among the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and The Netherlands, patient adherence before and after transplantation and other issues in the broader context of lung transplantation. Finally, the conference members carefully considered how efforts to improve outcomes for lung transplantation for CF lung disease might best be studied. This Roundtable seeks to communicate the substance of our discussions. PMID:20008865

  1. Cell therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Currently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis (CF). Treatments are focused on addressing the disease symptoms, with varying degrees of success. Regenerative medicine holds the promise of regenerating dysfunctional or damaged tissues and to enhance the body's own endogenous repair mechanisms. The discovery of endogenous and exogenous stem cells has provided valuable tools for development of novel treatments for CF. The ability of stem cells to differentiate into functional pulmonary cells, modulate inflammatory responses and contribute to pulmonary function has provided researchers with multiple approaches to develop effective treatment strategies. Several approaches show promise to produce viable therapeutic treatments to treat the underlying cause of CF, reduce the symptoms and mitigate long-term damage, and generate functional replacement organs for end-stage transplantation. This review provides an overview of the rapidly progressing field of cell therapy for CF, focusing on the various cell types utilized and current strategies that show promise to improve life expectancy and quality of life for CF patients. PMID:23894126

  2. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator correctors and potentiators.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven M; Verkman, Alan S

    2013-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  3. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Correctors and Potentiators

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  4. Sexual and reproductive health in cystic fibrosis: a life-course perspective.

    PubMed

    Frayman, Katherine B; Sawyer, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents and adults with cystic fibrosis now approach developmental milestones, including sexual and reproductive ones, at a similar time to their healthy peers. Yet, their sexual and reproductive health (SRH) is profoundly affected by their disease, and their SRH decisions can substantially affect their health. Navigation of SRH milestones in the context of cystic fibrosis needs education, guidance, and access to SRH services. In this Review, we discuss scientific knowledge of SRH in patients with cystic fibrosis across the life course and clinical practices for SRH within cystic fibrosis care. We identify crucial gaps in SRH education of patients and their access to resources and then present a model of care for provision of developmentally appropriate SRH education and care within cystic fibrosis services across the life course. This model emphasises the central importance of the cystic fibrosis team and service links to primary and specialist SRH care. PMID:25529340

  5. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  6. Breakthrough therapies: Cystic fibrosis (CF) potentiators and correctors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Marshall, Susan G; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Rowe, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators are also emphasized. PMID:26097168

  7. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions. PMID:27445556

  8. Determination of the Minimal Clinically Important Difference Scores for the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised Respiratory Symptom Scale in Two Populations of Patients With Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Airway Infection

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L.; Modi, Avani C.; Wainwright, Claire; Otto, Kelly; Kirihara, Jean; Montgomery, A. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised (CFQ-R) is a validated patient-reported outcome (PRO) containing both generic scales and scales specific to cystic fibrosis (CF). The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) score for a PRO corresponds to the smallest clinically relevant change a patient can detect. MCID scores for the CFQ-R respiratory symptom (CFQ-R-Respiratory) scale were determined using data from two 28 day, open-label, tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS) studies in patients with CF and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infection. At study enrollment, patients in the study 1-exacerbation had symptoms indicative of pulmonary exacerbation (n = 84; < 14 years of age, 31 patients; ≥ 14 years of age, 53 patients); patients in study 2-stable had stable respiratory symptoms (n = 140; < 14 years of age, 14 patients; ≥ 14 years, 126 patients). Methods: The anchor-based method utilized a global rating-of-change questionnaire (GRCQ) that assessed patients' perceptions of change in their respiratory symptoms after TIS treatment. The mean change from baseline CFQ-R-Respiratory scores were mapped onto the GRCQ to estimate the MCID. The two distribution-based methods were as follows: (1) 0.5 SD of mean change in CFQ-R-Respiratory scores (baseline to end of TIS treatment); and (2) 1 SEM for baseline CFQ-R-Respiratory scores. Triangulation of these three estimates defined the MCIDs. Results: MCID scores were larger for patients in study 1-exacerbation (8.5 points) than for those in study 2-stable (4.0 points), likely reflecting differences in patient disease status (exacerbation/stable) between these studies. Conclusions: Patient benefit from new and current CF therapies can be evaluated using changes in CFQ-R-Respiratory scores. Using the MCID provides a systematic way to interpret these changes, and facilitates the identification of CF treatments that improve both symptoms and physiologic variables, potentially leading to better treatment

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen S.; Steinle, Erich D.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Dawson, David C.

    1999-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channel exhibits lyotropic anion selectivity. Anions that are more readily dehydrated than Cl exhibit permeability ratios (PS/PCl) greater than unity and also bind more tightly in the channel. We compared the selectivity of CFTR to that of a synthetic anion-selective membrane [poly(vinyl chloride)–tridodecylmethylammonium chloride; PVC-TDMAC] for which the nature of the physical process that governs the anion-selective response is more readily apparent. The permeability and binding selectivity patterns of CFTR differed only by a multiplicative constant from that of the PVC-TDMAC membrane; and a continuum electrostatic model suggested that both patterns could be understood in terms of the differences in the relative stabilization of anions by water and the polarizable interior of the channel or synthetic membrane. The calculated energies of anion–channel interaction, derived from measurements of either permeability or binding, varied as a linear function of inverse ionic radius (1/r), as expected from a Born-type model of ion charging in a medium characterized by an effective dielectric constant of 19. The model predicts that large anions, like SCN, although they experience weaker interactions (relative to Cl) with water and also with the channel, are more permeant than Cl because anion–water energy is a steeper function of 1/r than is the anion–channel energy. These large anions also bind more tightly for the same reason: the reduced energy of hydration allows the net transfer energy (the well depth) to be more negative. This simple selectivity mechanism that governs permeability and binding acts to optimize the function of CFTR as a Cl filter. Anions that are smaller (more difficult to dehydrate) than Cl are energetically retarded from entering the channel, while the larger (more readily dehydrated) anions are retarded in their passage by “sticking” within the channel. PMID:10578016

  10. Drug disposition in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rey, E; Tréluyer, J M; Pons, G

    1998-10-01

    There are many pathological changes in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) which can lead to alterations in drug disposition. Although, in patients with CF, the extent of drug absorption varies widely and the rate of absorption is slower, bioavailability is not altered. Plasma protein binding for the majority of drugs studied did not differ in patients with CF compared with control groups. The difference in volume of distribution of most drugs between patients with CF and healthy individuals vanished when corrected for lean body mass. Despite hepatic dysfunction, patients with CF have enhanced clearance of many, but not all, drugs. Phase I mixed-function oxidases are selectively affected: cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP2C8 have enhanced activity, while other CYP isoforms such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are unaffected. Increased phase II activities are also demonstrated: glucuronyl transferase, acetyl transferase (NAT1) and sulfotransferase. The increased hepatic clearance of drugs in the presence of CF may be the consequence of disease-specific changes in both enzyme activity and/or drug transport within the liver. The renal clearance (CLR) of many drugs in patients with CF is enhanced although there has been no pathological abnormality identified which could explain this finding: glomerular filtration rate and tubular secretion appear normal in patients with CF. The precise mechanisms for enhanced drug clearance in patients with CF remain to be elucidated. The optimisation of antibiotic therapy in patients with CF includes increasing the dose of beta-lactams by 20 to 30% and monitoring plasma concentrations of aminoglycosides. The appropriate dosage of quinolones has not been definitively established. PMID:9812180

  11. Do brine shrimp diagnose cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Hodes, M E; Thomas, J; Morgan, S; Merritt, A D

    1975-11-01

    The nauplii of the brine shrimp Artemia salina are dependent upon the function of their salt gland to maintain osmotic pressure within narrow limits. A number of drugs interfere with this function and are lethal to the nauplii. Saliva and serum from normal persons, patients with cystic fibrosis, and obligate heterozygotes were tested for lethal effect against brine shrimp nauplii. At salt concentrations between 100 mM and 2.5 no difference was found among the phenotypes. At lower concentrations a difference was noted occasionally between some normal subjects and some individuals carrying one or two genes for cystic fibrosis. Data from an independent series of experiments indicate that the naupliar deaths result from distorted ratios of Na+/K+ and not from a specific gene product. No difference was noted in the O2 uptake of nauplii treated with saliva or serum obtained from normal subjects, patients with cystic fibrosis, or obligate heterozygotes. PMID:1187245

  12. Living with Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for the Young Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Atlanta, GA.

    Intended for the young adult with cystic fibrosis, the booklet provides information on dealing with problems and on advances in treatment and detection related to the disease. Addressed are the following topics: description of cystic fibrosis; inheritance of cystic fibrosis; early diagnosis; friends, careers, and other matters; treatment;…

  13. Developmental and psychosocial issues in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Michelle M; Johnson, Mark C; Stark, Lori J

    2011-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystemic life-limiting genetic disorder, primarily affecting respiratory functioning. Most patients with CF are diagnosed by 2 years of age, and the current median predicted survival rate is 37.4 years old, with 95% of patients dying from complications related to pulmonary infection. Given the chronic, progressive, and disabling nature of CF, multiple treatments are prescribed, most on a daily basis. Thus, this illness requires children, with the aid of their families, to adopt multiple health-related behaviors in addition to managing more typical developmental demands. The morbidity and mortality factors pose cognitive, emotional, and behavioral challenges for many children with CF and their families. This article applies a developmental perspective to describing the psychosocial factors affecting psychological adjustment and health-related behaviors relevant to infants, preschool and school-age children, and adolescents with CF. Topics particularly pertinent to developmental periods and medical milestones are noted, with clinical implications highlighted. PMID:21855711

  14. Treatment of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis - could do better?

    PubMed

    Smyth, Alan

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the nature and significance of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis (CF). The effectiveness and safety of current exacerbation treatment are explored. The article concludes with a summary of clinical trials (completed and ongoing) which aim to improve the efficacy and safety of exacerbation treatment. PMID:27349725

  15. 75 FR 45646 - Design of Clinical Trials of Aerosolized Antimicrobials for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... clinical trial endpoints to establish efficacy is a major challenge in the design of informative clinical.... The workshop will include discussion of clinical trial endpoints to establish efficacy, such as timing... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Design of Clinical Trials of Aerosolized Antimicrobials...

  16. Management issues for adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Withers, Adelaide Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The healthy adolescent will encounter major changes in biological and psychosocial domains. The adolescent period can be greatly affected by a chronic illness. Cystic fibrosis is a terminal illness that can significantly affect an adolescent's biological, mental and psychosocial health. This paper discusses general issues to consider when managing an adolescent with a chronic medical condition, and specifically how cystic fibrosis may impact upon puberty, body image, risk-taking behaviours, mental health, independence, nonadherence, reproductive health, transition, lung transplantation, and end of life care. PMID:22991662

  17. Cystic fibrosis, intravenous antibiotics, and home therapy.

    PubMed

    Hammond, L J; Caldwell, S; Campbell, P W

    1991-01-01

    The survival rate of patients with cystic fibrosis has improved considerably in the last 20 years. Although not all of the factors accounting for this change are understood, aggressive nutritional management and treatment of pulmonary exacerbations certainly play a role. Home intravenous (IV) antibiotic delivery for pulmonary exacerbation has proved to be as effective as hospital treatment and offers significant advantages to the patient and family. This article examines the microbiology of pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, as well as antimicrobial therapy, methods of IV administration, home IV therapy, and the nurse practitioner's role in this home program in the future. PMID:1990112

  18. Precision Genomic Medicine in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene H; Zabner, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    The successful application of precision genomic medicine requires an understanding of how a person's genome can influence his or her disease phenotype and how medical therapies can provide personalized therapy to one's genotype. In this review, we highlight advances in precision genomic medicine in cystic fibrosis (CF), a classic autosomal recessive genetic disorder. We discuss genotype-phenotype correlations in CF, genetic and environmental modifiers of disease, and pharmacogenetic therapies that target specific genetic mutations thereby addressing the primary defect of cystic fibrosis. PMID:26073768

  19. Novel molecular approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tim W. R.; Matthews, David A.; Blair, G. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of a range of inherited diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. However, efficient delivery and expression of the therapeutic transgene at levels sufficient to result in phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease has proved elusive. There are many reasons for this lack of progress, both macroscopically in terms of airway defence mechanisms and at the molecular level with regard to effective cDNA delivery. This review of approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy covers these areas in detail and highlights recent progress in the field. For gene therapy to be effective in patients with cystic fibrosis, the cDNA encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein must be delivered effectively to the nucleus of the epithelial cells lining the bronchial tree within the lungs. Expression of the transgene must be maintained at adequate levels for the lifetime of the patient, either by repeat dosage of the vector or by targeting airway stem cells. Clinical trials of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis have demonstrated proof of principle, but gene expression has been limited to 30 days at best. Results suggest that viral vectors such as adenovirus and adeno-associated virus are unsuited to repeat dosing, as the immune response reduces the effectiveness of each subsequent dose. Nonviral approaches, such as cationic liposomes, appear more suited to repeat dosing, but have been less effective. Current work regarding non-viral gene delivery is now focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in cell entry, endosomal escape and nuclear import of the transgene. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that additional ligands that facilitate endosomal escape or contain a nuclear localization signal may enhance liposome-mediated gene delivery. Much progress in this area has been informed by advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nuclei of host

  20. Guidelines for Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Newborns through Older Adults: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Report

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Philip M.; Rosenstein, Beryl J.; White, Terry B.; Accurso, Frank J.; Castellani, Carlo; Cutting, Garry R.; Durie, Peter R.; Legrys, Vicky A.; Massie, John; Parad, Richard B.; Rock, Michael J.; Campbell, Preston W.

    2009-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasingly being implemented and is soon likely to be in use throughout the United States, because early detection permits access to specialized medical care and improves outcomes. The diagnosis of CF is not always straightforward, however. The sweat chloride test remains the gold standard for CF diagnosis but does not always give a clear answer. Genotype analysis also does not always provide clarity; more than 1500 mutations have been identified in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, not all of which result in CF. Harmful mutations in the gene can present as a spectrum of pathology ranging from sinusitis in adulthood to severe lung, pancreatic, or liver disease in infancy. Thus, CF identified postnatally must remain a clinical diagnosis. To provide guidance for the diagnosis of both infants with positive NBS results and older patients presenting with an indistinct clinical picture, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened a meeting of experts in the field of CF diagnosis. Their recommendations, presented herein, involve a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory testing, and genetics to confirm a diagnosis of CF. PMID:18639722

  1. Predictive 5-Year Survivorship Model of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; FitzSimmons, Stacey C.; Cahill, Barbara C.; Hibbs, Jonathan R.; Marshall, Bruce C.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create a 5-year survivorship model to identify key clinical features of cystic fibrosis. Such a model could help researchers and clinicians to evaluate therapies, improve the design of prospective studies, monitor practice patterns, counsel individual patients, and determine the best candidates for lung transplantation. The authors used information from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR), which has collected longitudinal data on approximately 90% of cystic fibrosis patients diagnosed in the United States since 1986. They developed multivariate logistic regression models by using data on 5,820 patients randomly selected from 11,630 in the CFFPR in 1993. Models were tested for goodness of fit and were validated for the remaining 5,810 patients for 1993. The validated 5-year survivorship model included age, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as a percentage of predicted normal, gender, weight-for-age z score, pancreatic sufficiency, diabetes mellitus, Staphylococcus aureus infection, Burkerholderia cepacia infection, and annual number of acute pulmonary exacerbations. The model provides insights into the complex nature of cystic fibrosis and supplies a rigorous tool for clinical practice and research. PMID:11207152

  2. Zinc supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Symptomatic zinc deficiency has been reported in CF but little is known about zinc homeostasis in children with CF. Zinc supplementation (Zn suppl) is increasingly common in children with CF but it is not without theoretcial r...

  3. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  4. [Macrolides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Guillot, M; Amiour, M; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Paris, C

    2006-10-01

    Long-term low dose azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is safe and reduces the decline in lung function, the number of acute exacerbations and improves nutritional status; underlying efficacy mechanisms are multiple and synergistic. PMID:17370396

  5. Nutrient Status of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    GORDON, CATHERINE M.; ANDERSON, ELLEN J.; HERLYN, KAREN; HUBBARD, JANE L.; PIZZO, ANGELA; GELBARD, RONDI; LAPEY, ALLEN; MERKEL, PETER A.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition is thought to influence disease status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This cross-sectional study sought to evaluate nutrient intake and anthropometric data from 64 adult outpatients with cystic fibrosis. Nutrient intake from food and supplements was compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes for 16 nutrients and outcomes influenced by nutritional status. Attention was given to vitamin D and calcium given potential skeletal implications due to cystic fibrosis. Measurements included weight, height, body composition, pulmonary function, and serum metabolic parameters. Participants were interviewed about dietary intake, supplement use, pulmonary function, sunlight exposure, and pain. The participants’ mean body mass index (±standard deviation) was 21.8±4.9 and pulmonary function tests were normal. Seventy-eight percent used pancreatic enzyme replacement for malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD)<37.5 nmol/L] was common: 25 (39%) were deficient despite adequate vitamin D intake. Lipid profiles were normal in the majority, even though total and saturated fat consumption represented 33.0% and 16.8% of energy intake, respectively. Reported protein intake represented 16.9% of total energy intake (range 10%–25%). For several nutrients, including vitamin D and calcium, intake from food and supplements in many participants exceeded recommended Tolerable Upper Intake Levels. Among adults with cystic fibrosis, vitamin D deficiency was common despite reported adequate intake, and lipid profiles were normal despite a relatively high fat intake. Mean protein consumption was adequate, but the range of intake was concerning, as both inadequate or excessive intake may have deleterious skeletal effects. These findings call into question the applicability of established nutrient thresholds for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18060897

  6. New and Emerging Treatments for Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barry, Peter J; Jones, Andrew M

    2015-07-01

    Recently, a significant number of additional key medications have become licensed in Europe for the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), including a number of inhaled antibiotics, such as nebulised aztreonam and dry powder versions of colistin and tobramycin for inhalation; dry powder inhaled mannitol, an agent to improve airway hydration and aid airway clearance; and ivacaftor, an oral therapy that directly acts on dysfunctional CFTR to correct the basic defect encountered in CF patients with the G551D CF gene mutation. The marked success of ivacaftor both in clinical trials and in post-licensing evaluation studies in treating patients with G551D and other gating mutations has greatly encouraged the ongoing development of similar therapies that can directly target the underlying cause of CF. Other therapies, including a number of anti-infectives, anti-inflammatories and replacement pancreatic enzymes, are currently undergoing clinical studies. This article reviews those treatments that have been recently licensed for CF and highlights some of the exciting emerging therapies presently under evaluation in clinical trials. In addition, it discusses some of the potential challenges being encountered by research and clinical teams in developing and delivering treatments for this condition. PMID:26091951

  7. Patient-reported Outcomes in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Christopher H.; Quittner, Alexandra L.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been tremendous progress in the area of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). A PRO instrument is defined as any measure of a patient's health status that is elicited directly from the patient and assesses how the patient “feels or functions with respect to his or her health condition.” The advances seen in clinical research regarding PROs has been mirrored in research in cystic fibrosis (CF). A large number of instruments have been used for both therapeutic and nontherapeutic clinical research for many chronic conditions. This review will summarize a history of the development of PROs and how PROs are viewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We will then review the current state of the art of patient-reported outcomes in CF, specifically addressing the evaluation of different PRO instruments in terms of their reliability and validity. Finally, we will delineate further areas for development of PROs in CF. We believe that the future of CF research will incorporate a more diverse selection of PRO outcome measures; these outcome measures ultimately may be incorporated into clinical care to standardize symptom assessment and provide information regarding the need for specific clinical interventions to improve the quality of care delivered to these patients. PMID:17652505

  8. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70 000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development. PMID:27030675

  9. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70,000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development. PMID:27030675

  10. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Derichs, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine. PMID:23457166

  11. Chemistry and biology of the potent endotoxin from a Burkholderia dolosa clinical isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Flaviana Di; Sturiale, Luisa; Palmigiano, Angelo; Lembo-Fazio, Luigi; Paciello, Ida; Coutinho, Carla P; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Bernardini, MariaLina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Garozzo, Domenico; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio

    2013-06-17

    This is the first report of the chemical and biological properties of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) endotoxin isolated from Burkholderia dolosa IST4208, an isolate recovered from a cystic fibrosis (CF) patient in a Portuguese CF center. B. dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of closely related species that are highly problematic and opportunistic pathogens in CF. B. dolosa infection leads to accelerated loss of lung function and decreased survival. The structural determination of its endotoxin was achieved using a combination of chemistry and spectroscopy, and has revealed a novel endotoxin structure. The purified LOS was tested for its immunostimulatory activity on human HEK 293 cells expressing TLR-4, MD-2, and CD-14. In these assays, the LOS showed strong proinflammatory activity. PMID:23733445

  12. The Role of Computed Tomography in Monitoring Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rybacka, Anna; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the Caucasian population. Although the survival rate in patients constantly improves, lung damage is still the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. In clinical practice, evaluation of patients' pulmonary state is made by combination of monitoring of lung function and more directly by assessing the lung structure in imaging studies. Studies showed that computed tomography findings are more sensitive as compared to the pulmonary function tests. Computed tomography can identify a wide range of morphological abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis, such as bronchiectasis (which is progressive, irreversible and probably the most relevant structural change in cystic fibrosis) peribronchial thickening, mucous plugging and many other disorders that occur in the course of the disease. Computed tomography has a crucial role in the assessment of pulmonary damage over time, detecting complications and monitoring treatment effects in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27103945

  13. The Role of Computed Tomography in Monitoring Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rybacka, Anna; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the Caucasian population. Although the survival rate in patients constantly improves, lung damage is still the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. In clinical practice, evaluation of patients’ pulmonary state is made by combination of monitoring of lung function and more directly by assessing the lung structure in imaging studies. Studies showed that computed tomography findings are more sensitive as compared to the pulmonary function tests. Computed tomography can identify a wide range of morphological abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis, such as bronchiectasis (which is progressive, irreversible and probably the most relevant structural change in cystic fibrosis) peribronchial thickening, mucous plugging and many other disorders that occur in the course of the disease. Computed tomography has a crucial role in the assessment of pulmonary damage over time, detecting complications and monitoring treatment effects in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27103945

  14. MicroRNA Dysregulation in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    McKiernan, Paul J.; Greene, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis lung is a complex milieu comprising multiple factors that coordinate its physiology. MicroRNAs are regulatory factors involved in most biological processes and it is becoming increasingly clear that they play a key role in the development and manifestations of CF lung disease. These small noncoding RNAs act posttranscriptionally to inhibit protein production. Their involvement in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease stems from the fact that their expression is altered in vivo in the CF lung due to intrinsic and extrinsic factors; to date defective chloride ion conductance, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, and infection have been implicated in altering endogenous miRNA expression in this setting. Here, the current state-of-the-art and biological consequences of altered microRNA expression in cystic fibrosis are reviewed. PMID:26185362

  15. Inflammation and its genesis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David P; Chmiel, James F

    2015-10-01

    The host inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has long been recognized as a central pathological feature and an important therapeutic target. Indeed, many believe that bronchiectasis results largely from the oxidative and proteolytic damage comprised within an exuberant airway inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils. In this review, we address the longstanding argument of whether or not the inflammatory response is directly attributable to impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or only secondary to airway obstruction and chronic bacterial infection and challenge the importance of this distinction in the context of therapy. We also review the centrality of neutrophils in CF lung pathophysiology and highlight more recent data that suggest the importance of other cell types and signaling beyond NF-κB activation. We discuss how protease and redox imbalance are critical factors in CF airway inflammation and end by reviewing some of the more promising therapeutic approaches now under development. PMID:26335954

  16. Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-01-01

    In the genetic airway disease cystic fibrosis (CF), deficiency or dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis membrane conductance regulator (CFTR) alters anion transport in respiratory epithelium and consequently disrupts mucociliary clearance. An enriched understanding of the role of CFTR in the maintenance of normal epithelial function has revealed that mild and variable CFTR mutations play a causative role in a number of diseases not classically associated with CF. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that acquired defects in wild-type CFTR protein processing, endocytic recycling and function can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this chapter, we discuss emerging findings implicating acquired CFTR dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis and propose a new and leading edge approach to future CRS therapy using CFTR potentiators. PMID:27466849

  17. Pregnancy and cystic fibrosis: Approach to contemporary management.

    PubMed

    Geake, James; Tay, George; Callaway, Leonie; Bell, Scott C

    2014-12-01

    Over the previous 50 years survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has progressively increased. As a result of improvements in health care, increasing numbers of patients with cystic fibrosis are now considering starting families of their own. For the health care professionals who look after these patients, the assessment of the potential risks, and the process of guiding prospective parents through pregnancy and beyond can be both challenging and rewarding. To facilitate appropriate discussions about pregnancy, health care workers must have a detailed understanding of the various important issues that will ultimately need to be considered for any patient with cystic fibrosis considering parenthood. This review will address these issues. In particular, it will outline pregnancy outcomes for mothers with cystic fibrosis, issues that need to be taken into account when planning a pregnancy and the management of pregnancy for mothers with cystic fibrosis or mothers who have undergone organ transplantation as a result of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27512443

  18. Pregnancy and cystic fibrosis: Approach to contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Tay, George; Callaway, Leonie; Bell, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Over the previous 50 years survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has progressively increased. As a result of improvements in health care, increasing numbers of patients with cystic fibrosis are now considering starting families of their own. For the health care professionals who look after these patients, the assessment of the potential risks, and the process of guiding prospective parents through pregnancy and beyond can be both challenging and rewarding. To facilitate appropriate discussions about pregnancy, health care workers must have a detailed understanding of the various important issues that will ultimately need to be considered for any patient with cystic fibrosis considering parenthood. This review will address these issues. In particular, it will outline pregnancy outcomes for mothers with cystic fibrosis, issues that need to be taken into account when planning a pregnancy and the management of pregnancy for mothers with cystic fibrosis or mothers who have undergone organ transplantation as a result of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27512443

  19. Progress in cystic fibrosis and the CF Therapeutics Development Network

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M; Borowitz, Drucy S; Burns, Jane L; Clancy, John P; Donaldson, Scott H; Retsch-Bogart, George; Sagel, Scott D; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-shortening genetic disorder in Caucasians, affects approximately 70 000 individuals worldwide. In 1998, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) launched the CF Therapeutics Development Network (CF-TDN) as a central element of its Therapeutics Development Programme. Designed to accelerate the clinical evaluation of new therapies needed to fulfil the CFF mission to control and cure CF, the CF-TDN has conducted 75 clinical trials since its inception, and has contributed to studies as varied as initial safety and proof of concept trials to pivotal programmes required for regulatory approval. This review highlights recent and significant research efforts of the CF-TDN, including a summary of contributions to studies involving CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators, airway surface liquid hydrators and mucus modifiers, anti-infectives, anti-inflammatories, and nutritional therapies. Efforts to advance CF biomarkers, necessary to accelerate the therapeutic goals of the network, are also summarised. PMID:22960984

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere

    PubMed Central

    Pytel, Kamila M.; Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Pytel, Kamila M; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-05-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  2. [Molecular epidemiology of cystic fibrosis in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Messaoud, T; Bel Haj Fredj, S; Bibi, A; Elion, J; Férec, C; Fattoum, S

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent autosomal recessive genetic disease in North European population. This pathology seems to not be rare in Tunisia. On another hand, development of molecular biology techniques has largely contributed to implement the study of the different mutations in the CFTR gene where over 1,300 mutations were reported. Herein, we describe the strategy used to detect molecular defects responsible of cystic fibrosis on 390 children (383 families) in Tunisian population. Several techniques were performed for genotype diagnosis: DNA extraction was from peripheral blood. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacylamide gel electrophoresis, and reverse dot blot procedures were used to detect known point mutations. Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used in a next step searching for the unknown point mutations that are later identified by automated sequencing on ABIprism 310. This strategy allowed us to detect 17 different mutations located on the different exons of the CFTR gene. The most frequent was the F508del (50.74%) followed by three other mutations (G542X, W1282X and N1303K) known to be common in the Mediterranean area. For mutations (T665S, 2766 del8, F1166C, L1043R) were exclusively found, up to now, in the Tunisian population. Our results permitted to establish cystic fibrosis mutations and their distribution in Tunisia and to implement an appropriate prevention program of these diseases through the genetic council and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:16330381

  3. Progress in therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Kris; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-08-01

    Standard follow-up and symptomatic treatment have allowed most patients with cystic fibrosis to live to young adulthood. However, many patients still die prematurely from respiratory insufficiency. Hence, further investigations to improve these therapies are important and might have relevance for other diseases-eg, exploring how to increase airway hydration, how to safely downscale the increased inflammatory response in the lung, and how to better combat lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis. In parallel, development of modulators that target the underlying dysfunction in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is fast moving forward. Existing treatments are specific to certain mutations, or mutation class, in CFTR. An effective, although not yet entirely corrective, treatment is available for patients with class III mutations, and a treatment with modest effectiveness is available for patients who are homozygous for Phe508del, albeit at a very high cost. Corrective treatments that are non-specific to mutation class and thus applicable to all patients-eg, gene therapy, cell-based therapies, and activation of alternative ion channels that bypass CFTR-are being explored, but they are still in early stages of development. In view of the large number of patients with very rare mutations, a plan to advance personalised biomarkers to predict treatment effect is also being investigated and validated. PMID:27053340

  4. New antimicrobial strategies in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    van Westreenen, Mireille; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2010-12-01

    With more antibiotic resistance and emerging pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, the need for new strategies in the lifelong treatment of pulmonary infection has increased. Most of the focus is on chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is still thought to be the main pathogen leading to advanced CF lung disease. Other bacterial species are also recognized in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease, even though their definitive role is not well established yet. Clearly, expansion of treatment options is urgently needed. This article focuses on recent developments in the field of new antimicrobial strategies for CF. It is clear that studies on new classes of antibiotics or antimicrobial-like drugs are scarce, and that most studies involve new (inhalation) formulations, new routes of delivery, or analogs of existing classes of antibiotics. Studies of new antibiotic-like drugs are, in most cases, in preclinical phases of development and only a few of these agents may reach the market. Importantly, new inhaled antibiotics, e.g. aztreonam, levofloxacin, and fosfomycin, and new, more efficient delivery systems such as dry powder inhalation and liposomes for current antibiotics are in the clinical phase of development. These developments will be of great importance in improving effective treatment and reducing the treatment burden for CF patients in the near future. PMID:21028914

  5. Cystic fibrosis: newborn screening in America.

    PubMed

    Kleven, Daniel T; McCudden, Christopher R; Willis, Monte S

    2008-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, manifesting as progressive lung dysfunction, pancreatic insufficiency, and intestinal disease. CF was traditionally diagnosed clinically, either because of a family history or occurrence of meconium ileus, or as a result of intestinal malabsorption and chronic pulmonary disease. In 1979, it was discovered that immunoreactive trypsinogen was increased in neonatal dried-blood specimens on Guthrie cards, making it possible to screen neonates. During the past decades, survival rates of patients with CF have improved significantly (see Figure 5). To continue this progress, universal newborn screening has been implemented in many states as an addition to the arsenal of therapies and strategies to improve survival. National newborn-screening programs to identify CF patients after birth have been adopted for a number of years in Europe, Australia, and Canada. As expected, many benefits have been seen due to the early identification of CF patients, including improved survival, better lung function and growth with less intensive therapy, and reduced cost of therapy. To date, 37 states in the United States have adopted similar programs, in the hopes of improving CF outcomes. This welcome trend should help improve the lives of CF patients living in America. PMID:18717498

  6. Lessons learned from the cystic fibrosis pig.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K

    2016-07-01

    Deficient function in the anion channel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator is the fundamental cause for CF. This is a monogenic condition that causes lesions in several organs including the respiratory tract, pancreas, liver, intestines, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is most notable, given it is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with CF. Shortly after the identification of CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CF mouse models were developed that did not show spontaneous lung disease as seen in humans, and this spurred development of additional CF animal models. Pig models were considered a leading choice for several reasons including their similarity to humans in respiratory anatomy, physiology, and in size for translational imaging. The first CF pig models were reported in 2008 and have been extremely valuable to help clarify persistent questions in the field and advance understanding of disease pathogenesis. Because CF pigs are susceptible to lung disease like humans, they have direct utility in translational research. In addition, CF pig models are useful to compare and contrast with current CF mouse models, human clinical studies, and even newer CF animal models being characterized. This "triangulation" strategy could help identify genetic differences that underlie phenotypic variations, so as to focus and accelerate translational research. PMID:27142487

  7. Cystic fibrosis on the African continent.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cheryl; Pepper, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF; OMIM 219700) is a life-shortening and costly autosomal recessive disease that has been most extensively studied in individuals of Caucasian descent. There is ample evidence, however, that it also affects other ethnicities. In Africa there have been several reports of CF, but there has been no concerted effort toward establishing the molecular epidemiology of this disease on the continent, which is the first step toward outlining a public health strategy to effectively address the needs of these patients. A literature search revealed reports from only 12 of the 54 African states on the molecular analysis of the mutations present in suspected CF patients, resulting in the identification of 79 mutations. Based on previous functional investigations, 39 of these cause CF, 10 are of varying clinical consequence, 4 have no associated evidence regarding whether they cause CF, 4 are synonymous, 5 are novel, and 21 are unique to Africa. We propose that CF be more thoroughly investigated on the continent to ensure that the public health needs of African CF patients-both those in Africa and those of African descent living elsewhere-are met.Genet Med 18 7, 653-662. PMID:26656651

  8. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  9. Improving care at cystic fibrosis centers through quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Kraynack, Nathan C; McBride, John T

    2009-10-01

    Quality improvement (QI) using a clinical microsystems approach provides cystic fibrosis (CF) centers the opportunity to make a significant positive impact on the health of their patients. The availability of center-specific outcomes data and the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation are important advantages for these quality improvement efforts. This article illustrates how the clinical microsystems methodology can improve care delivery and outcomes by describing the gradual application of quality improvement principles over the past 5 years by the CF team at the Lewis Walker Cystic Fibrosis Center at Akron Children's Hospital in Akron, Ohio. Using the example of a project to improve the pulmonary function of the pediatric patients at our center as a framework, we describe the QI process from the initial team-building phase, through the assessment of care processes, standardization of care, and developing a culture of continuous improvement. We outline how enthusiastic commitment from physician leadership, clinical managers and central administration, the availability of coaches, and an appreciation of the importance of measurement, patient involvement, communication, and standardization are critical components for successful process improvement. PMID:19760542

  10. Management of adolescent and adult inpatients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sterner-Allison, J L

    1999-01-15

    A program in which pharmacists help care for cystic fibrosis patients is described. The Egleston Cystic Fibrosis Center at Emory University houses outpatient clinic facilities and a 10-bed inpatient unit and is affiliated with Egleston Children's Hospital. The center provides full-service care for nearly 500 patients. Patients with mild to moderate exacerbations of pulmonary problems can receive their entire course of therapy at the center, and those with severe illness may complete their hospital stay there. A care team consisting of pharmacists, physicians, nurses, and others provides preventive and acute care. Patients can choose a "care partner" who will assist them with their care during any hospitalizations and at home. Both patient and care partner are taught drug administration, nutrition, and physical therapy and meet regularly with the care team. Patients must receive their medication education from a pharmacist before they can administer their own drugs. Pharmacists at the center also evaluate serum drug concentrations, stock the automated dispensing device, monitor for drug interactions, answer drug information questions, and attend multidisciplinary rounds. Pharmacy residents can work with the care team through rotations and clinic experience. Pharmacists at a cystic fibrosis center provide clinical services to patients and promote self-care. PMID:10030531

  11. Optimising inhaled mannitol for cystic fibrosis in an adult population

    PubMed Central

    Flume, Patrick A.; Aitken, Moira L.; Agent, Penny; Charlton, Brett; Forster, Emma; Fox, Howard G.; Hebestreit, Helge; Kolbe, John; Zuckerman, Jonathan B; Button, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has been remarkable progress in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients over the past 20 years. However, limitations of standard therapies have highlighted the need for a convenient alternative treatment to effectively target the pathophysiologic basis of CF-related disease by improving mucociliary clearance of airway secretions and consequently improve lung function and reduce respiratory exacerbations. Mannitol is an osmotic agent available as a dry powder, dispensed in a convenient disposable inhaler device for the treatment of adult patients with CF. Inhalation of mannitol as a dry powder is thought to change the viscoelastic properties of airway secretions, increase the hydration of the airway surface liquid and contribute to increased mucociliary and cough clearance of retained secretions. In two large phase 3 studies [1, 2], long-term use of inhaled mannitol resulted in a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in lung function relative to control in adult CF subjects and had an acceptable safety profile. Clinical experience with inhaled mannitol confirms that it is safe and effective. A minority of patients are unable to tolerate the medication. However, through training in proper inhaler technique and setting clear expectations regarding therapeutic effects, both the tolerance and adherence necessary for long term efficacy can be positively influenced. Educational aims To discuss the importance of airway clearance treatments in the management of cystic fibrosis. To describe the clinical data that supports the use of mannitol in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. To highlight the role of mannitol tolerance testing in screening for hyperresponsiveness. To provide practical considerations for patient education in use of mannitol inhaler. Key points Inhaled mannitol is a safe and effective option in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. Mannitol tolerance testing effectively screens for hyperresponsiveness prior to initiation

  12. Chronic rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis (mucoviscidosis).

    PubMed

    Brihaye, P; Jorissen, M; Clement, P A

    1997-01-01

    The authors present two clinical studies performed in the ENT departments of two Belgian Universities. A total of 248 patients with mucoviscidosis (cystic fibrosis, CF) were assessed by means of nasal endoscopy. One hundred eighteen underwent computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses (CT) and 55 were endoscopically operated. This allowed the observation of different clinical patterns of rhinosinusitis: mucopyosinusitis (pseudomucocele) of the maxillary antrum with bulging of the lateral nasal wall (LNW), nasal polyposis with erosion of the LNW, and chronic purulent rhinosinusitis with an isolated prominent uncinate process. The treatment of those patients could be tailored to the individual clinical pattern. Medical therapy consisted of systemic antibiotics and topical drugs delivered by sprays or by lavages with a nose can. Surgery was mainly aimed at removing the massive polyposis when it interfered with the daily life activities. The use of the endoscope enabled to perform safely more extensive procedures resulting in a lower recurrence rate. In patients with chronic rhinosinusitis without polyposis, yet presenting ostiomeatal obstruction, a limited and more functional endoscopic surgery was indicated in order to restore some drainage and to improve the penetration of topical drugs into the affected sinus. A short addendum presents two studies: one about genetics and the other about prevalence of middle ear disease in CF. The first concluded that no clear correlation was found between DF508 (the most common CF mutation) and nasal polyposis. The second revealed that in contrast with the extremely high prevalence of sinus problems, there was no clear evidence of an increased prevalence of middle ear disease in CF. PMID:9444379

  13. Emergent properties of proteostasis in managing cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Balch, William E; Roth, Daniela M; Hutt, Darren M

    2011-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a consequence of defective recognition of the multimembrane spanning protein cystic fibrosis conductance transmembrane regulator (CFTR) by the protein homeostasis or proteostasis network (PN) (Hutt and Balch (2010). Like many variant proteins triggering misfolding diseases, mutant CFTR has a complex folding and membrane trafficking itinerary that is managed by the PN to maintain proteome balance and this balance is disrupted in human disease. The biological pathways dictating the folding and function of CFTR in health and disease are being studied by numerous investigators, providing a unique opportunity to begin to understand and therapeutically address the role of the PN in disease onset, and its progression during aging. We discuss the general concept that therapeutic management of the emergent properties of the PN to control the energetics of CFTR folding biology may provide significant clinical benefit. PMID:21421917

  14. Actin - Lysozyme Interactions in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lori; Slimmer, Scott; Angelini, Thomas; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2003-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid consisting of mucin (a glycoprotein), lysozyme (a cationic polypeptide), water, salt, as well as a high concentration of a number of anionic biological polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin. The interactions governing these components are poorly understood, but may have important clinical consequences. For example, the formation of these biological polyelectrolytes into ordered gel phases may contribute significantly to the observed high viscosity of CF sputum. In this work, a number of model systems containing actin, lysozyme, and KCl were created to simulate CF sputum in vitro. These model systems were studied using small angle x-ray scattering and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  15. Polyelectrolyte Structure and Interactions in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slimmer, Scott; Angelini, Thomas; Liang, Hongjun; Butler, John; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2002-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid consisting of a number of components, including mucin (a glycoprotein), lysozyme (a cationic polypeptide), water, salt, as well as a high concentration of a number of anionic biological polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin. The interactions governing these components are poorly understood, but may have important clinical consequences. For example, the formation of these biological polyelectrolytes into ordered gel phases may contribute significantly to the observed high viscosity of CF sputum. In this work, a number of model systems were created to simulate CF sputum in vitro, in order to elucidate the contributions of the different components. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, DOE DEFG02-91ER45439, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  16. Natural Compounds as Therapeutic Agents in the Treatment Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Isha; Shah, Kalpit; Bradbury, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of two drugs to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis has given hope to patients and their families battling this devastating disease. Over many years, with heavy financial investment from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, pre-clinical evaluation of thousands of synthetic drugs resulted in the production of Kalydeco and Orkambi. Yet, despite the success of this endeavor, many other compounds have been proposed as therapeutic agents in the treatment of CF. Of note, several of these compounds are naturally occurring, and are present in spices from the grocery store and over the counter preparations in health food stores. In this short review, we look at three such compounds, genistein, curcumin, and resveratrol, and evaluate the scientific support for their use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of patients with CF. PMID:27081574

  17. Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes in Children: An Update.

    PubMed

    Kim, Roy J

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes mellitus (CFRD) is the most common endocrine complication of cystic fibrosis (CF), affecting more than 50% of patients by the 4th decade of life. CFRD is often preceded by worsening pulmonary status and nutritional decline. Treatment of CFRD is associated with improvements in body weight and pulmonary function and a reduction in pulmonary exacerbations. Because of the clinical significance of CFRD, diabetes screening with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is recommended annually for all patients with CF starting at age 10 years. The OGTT detects CFRD with greater sensitivity than random glucose or hemoglobin A1c testing. The first-line treatment for CFRD is insulin. The use of other treatments such as oral medications remains under study. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(9):e321-e326.]. PMID:27622916

  18. Clinical spectrum in homozygotes and compound heterozygotes inheriting cystic fibrosis mutation 3849+10kbC>T: Significance for geneticists

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, F.; Li, Zhen; Arzimanoglou, I.

    1995-09-25

    We describe patients inheriting cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation 3849+10kbC>T as homozygotes or compound heterozygotes. Three unrelated homozygotes for this mutation were all pancreatic-sufficient and sweat test-negative or inconclusive. Among the compound heterozygotes, both pancreatic sufficiency and insufficiency, as well as positive and negative/inconclusive sweat test results are reported, expanding the range of clinical expression associated with inheritance of this mutation. 3849+10kbC>T is one of several CF mutations that can result in atypical or variant forms of CF. For geneticists, the diagnosis of variant CF has implications for recurrence risk and prognosis counseling of the families of affected individuals, and possibly for CF carrier screening in the general population. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Cystic fibrosis database (CFDB): a new web-based tool for cystic fibrosis specialists.

    PubMed

    Buzzetti, Roberto; Cirilli, Natalia; Minicucci, Laura; Raia, Valeria; Salvatore, Donatello; Maffeis, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    In order to help specialists involved in CF care and clinical research to know the current best evidence about clinical effectiveness of interventions in CF, we designed and developed a web-based, free access tool called "CFDB"--Cystic Fibrosis DataBase (www.inetflow.it/CFDB). The database was built by searching in Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and worldwide trials registries all studies involving clinical interventions in CF. The tool lets the user define queries starting from one or more types of pathological conditions and one or more interventions. The output of the queries is structured in three levels: (1) how many and which studies deal with the conditions formulated in the query; (2) which are the main results of these studies; (3) a critical summary of the literature related to the query. This tool, providing a quick overview of the available evidence in clinical research in CF, may help clinical decision making, designing of new trials and building guidelines. PMID:24532370

  20. Maintenance of nutritional status in patients with cystic fibrosis: new and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalnins, Daina; Wilschanski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis are often associated with undernutrition. Normal growth and development should be achieved in cystic fibrosis, and nutritional counseling is paramount at all ages. Prevention and early detection of growth failure is the key to successful nutritional intervention. The advance in nutritional management is certainly one factor that has contributed to the improved survival in recent decades. This review outlines the major nutritional parameters in the management of the patient with cystic fibrosis, including recent advances in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and fat-soluble vitamin therapy. There are sections on complicated clinical situations which directly affect nutrition, for example, before and after lung transplantation, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, and bone health. PMID:22787388

  1. First isolations of Segniliparus rugosus from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Butler, W Ray; Sheils, Catherine A; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Charles, Nadege; Colin, Andrew A; Gant, Mary J; Goodill, John; Hindman, Diane; Toney, Sean R; Wallace, Richard J; Yakrus, Mitchell A

    2007-10-01

    We report three cases of the new genus Segniliparus isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis. All isolates were unambiguously identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Segniliparus rugosus (GenBank accession no. AY 60892). Drug susceptibility results that may enhance treatment for cystic fibrosis patients with this opportunistic pathogen are presented. PMID:17670929

  2. Pandoraea pulmonicola chronic colonization in a cystic fibrosis patient, France

    PubMed Central

    Kokcha, S; Bittar, F; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Mely, L; Gomez, C; Gaubert, J-Y; Thomas, P; Rolain, J-M

    2013-01-01

    Pandoraea are considered emerging multidrug resistant pathogens in the context of cystic fibrosis. We report herein for the first time the case of a 30-year-old woman with cystic fibrosis, living in France, who was chronically infected with Pandoraea pulmonicola and who died of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis 3 weeks after bilateral lung transplantation. PMID:25356323

  3. The Dynamics of Disease Progression in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis, statistical models have been more successful in predicting mortality than the time course of clinical status. We develop a system of partial differential equations that simultaneously track mortality and patient status, with all model parameters estimated from the extensive and carefully maintained database from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disease that leads to loss of lung function, most commonly assessed using the Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1%). This loss results from inflammation secondary to chronic bacterial infections, particularly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and members of the virulent Burkholderia complex. The model tracks FEV1% and carriage of these three bacteria over the course of a patient’s life. Analysis of patient state changes from year to year reveals four feedback loops: a damaging positive feedback loop between P. aeruginosa carriage and lower FEV1%, negative feedback loops between P. aeruginosa and MSSA and between P. aeruginosa and Burkholderia, and a protective positive feedback loop between MSSA carriage and higher FEV1%. The partial differential equations built from this data analysis accurately capture the life-long progression of the disease, quantify the key role of high annual FEV1% variability in reducing survivorship, the relative unimportance of short-term bacterial interactions for long-term survival, and the potential benefits of eradicating the most harmful bacteria. PMID:27248696

  4. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. PMID:26335952

  5. Evidence for a Cystic Fibrosis Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adriaanse, Marlou P. M.; van der Sande, Linda J. T. M.; van den Neucker, Anita M.; Menheere, Paul P. C. A.; Dompeling, Edward; Buurman, Wim A.; Vreugdenhil, Anita C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested the existence of enteropathy in cystic fibrosis (CF), which may contribute to intestinal function impairment, a poor nutritional status and decline in lung function. This study evaluated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF and studied its associations with nutritional status, CF-related morbidities such as impaired lung function and diabetes, and medication use. Methods Sixty-eight CF patients and 107 controls were studied. Levels of serum intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), a specific marker for enterocyte damage, were retrospectively determined. The faecal intestinal inflammation marker calprotectin was prospectively studied. Nutritional status, lung function (FEV1), exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), CF-related diabetes (CFRD) and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) were obtained from the medical charts. Results Serum I-FABP levels were elevated in CF patients as compared with controls (p<0.001), and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in children (r-.734, p<0.05). Faecal calprotectin level was elevated in 93% of CF patients, and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in adults (r-.484, p<0.05). No correlation was found between calprotectin levels in faeces and sputum. Faecal calprotectin level was significantly associated with the presence of CFRD, EPI, and PPI use. Conclusion This study demonstrated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF patients, and provides evidence for an inverse correlation between enteropathy and lung function. The presented associations of enteropathy with important CF-related morbidities further emphasize the clinical relevance. PMID:26484665

  6. Cystic Fibrosis: Microbiology and Host Response.

    PubMed

    Zemanick, Edith T; Hoffman, Lucas R

    2016-08-01

    The earliest descriptions of lung disease in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) showed the involvement of 3 interacting pathophysiologic elements in CF airways: mucus obstruction, inflammation, and infection. Over the past 7 decades, our understanding of CF respiratory microbiology and inflammation has evolved with the introduction of new treatments, increased longevity, and increasingly sophisticated laboratory techniques. This article reviews the current understanding of infection and inflammation and their roles in CF lung disease. It also discusses how this constantly evolving information is used to inform current therapeutic strategies, measures and predictors of disease severity, and research priorities. PMID:27469179

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis and Newborn Screening.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sontag, Marci K; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) has evolved over the past decade as newborn screening has become universal in the United States and elsewhere. The heterogeneity of phenotypes associated with CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and mutations in the CFTR gene has become clearer, ranging from classic pancreatic-insufficient CF to manifestations in only 1 organ system to indeterminate diagnoses identified by newborn screening. The tools available for diagnosis have also expanded. This article reviews the newest diagnostic criteria for CF, newborn screening, prenatal screening and diagnosis, and indeterminate diagnoses in newborn-screened infants and symptomatic adults. PMID:27469178

  8. The Changing Microbial Epidemiology in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    LiPuma, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Infection of the airways remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). This review describes salient features of the epidemiologies of microbial species that are involved in respiratory tract infection in CF. The apparently expanding spectrum of species causing infection in CF and recent changes in the incidences and prevalences of infection due to specific bacterial, fungal, and viral species are described. The challenges inherent in tracking and interpreting rates of infection in this patient population are discussed. PMID:20375354

  9. Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Thaker, Vidhu; Chang, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder which can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. Malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may occur and can cause subclinical deficiencies of some of these vitamins. Vitamin K is known to play an important role in both blood coagulation and bone formation. Supplementation with vitamin K appears to be one way of addressing the deficiency, but there is very limited agreement on the appropriate dose and frequency of use of these supplements. Objectives To assess the effects of vitamin K supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis and to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of vitamin K for both routine and therapeutic use. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group’s Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Most recent search: 08 October 2014. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of vitamin K used as a supplement compared to either no supplementation (or placebo) at any dose or route and for any duration, in children or adults diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Main results Two trials (total of 32 participants) each lasting one month were included in the review and were assessed as having a moderate risk of bias. One was a dose-ranging parallel group trial in children (aged 8 to 18 years); and the other (with an older cohort) had a crossover design comparing supplements to no treatment, but no separate data were reported for the first intervention period. Neither of the trials addressed any of the primary outcomes (coagulation, bone formation and quality of life). Both trials reported the restoration

  10. Targeting the Root Cause of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Trescott, Laura; Holcomb, Joshua; Spellmon, Nicholas; Mcleod, Cathy; Aljehane, Leala; Sun, Fei; Li, Chunying; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a serious genetic condition caused by CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation. CF patients have shortened lifespan due to airway obstruction, infection, and end-stage lung failure. However, recent development in CF therapy suggests a brighter future for CF patients. Targeting specific CFTR mutations aims to potentiate the channel gating activity of impaired CFTR and restore protein trafficking to the plasma membrane. Gene therapy introduces correct CFTR gene into the affected airway epithelium leading to the functional expression of CFTR in CF patients. This review will sum up the current status in CF-cause targeting therapy. PMID:25316272

  11. Nutrition and Growth in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lusman, Sarah; Sullivan, Jillian

    2016-08-01

    Close attention to nutrition and growth is essential in caring for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Growth and nutritional status should be monitored as part of routine CF care. Children with CF should achieve growth and nutritional status comparable with that of well-nourished children without CF. Children with CF are at risk for nutritional deficiencies. Optimal nutritional and growth status may be difficult to attain in this population given risk of insufficient caloric intake and likelihood of increased caloric expenditure. Various methods to attain optimal nutritional status may be used, including oral supplementation, behavioral treatment, pharmacotherapy, and enteral nutrition. PMID:27469181

  12. Moving cystic fibrosis care from rescue to prevention by embedding adherence measurement in routine care.

    PubMed

    Wildman, Martin J; Hoo, Zhe Hui

    2014-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis [CF] is a chronic disease in which preventative treatment with nebulised antibiotics can reduce pulmonary exacerbations that otherwise require rescue therapy. However, adherence is low. Making adherence to maintenance treatment visible is a crucial step towards improving adherence. In this article, we discuss how adherence data can be used to support Quality Improvement in CF through behaviour change in both people with cystic fibrosis and their clinical teams. PMID:24835307

  13. Cystic fibrosis: need for mass deployable screening methods.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Aditya Singh; Agarwal, Anirudh; Singh, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette superfamily of proteins and it functions as a chloride channel. CFTR largely controls the working of epithelial cells of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, exocrine glands, and genitourinary system. Cystic fibrosis is responsible for severe chronic pulmonary disorders in children. Other maladies in the spectrum of this life-limiting disorder include nasal polyposis, pansinusitis, rectal prolapse, pancreatitis, cholelithiasis, insulin-dependent hyperglycemia, and cirrhosis. This review summarizes the recent state of art in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnostic methods with the help of CF literature published so far and proposes new research domains in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnosis. PMID:24880895

  14. [Pancreatic cystic fibrosis in Mexicans over 15 years of age].

    PubMed

    Quezada, R; Hernandez, N; Sada, E

    1990-01-01

    A better knowledge of cystic fibrosis of the pancreas has contributed to raise the detection of cystic fibrosis in adults. We describe nine Mexican patients older than 15 years with cystic fibrosis. Respiratory symptoms were predominant and they were secondary to bronchiectasis. All patients were infected by mucoid Pseudomona aeruginosa and in some cases, the finding of this microorganism in sputum suggested the diagnosis. In Mexican population the cystyc fibrosis of the pancreas can be found in adult patients, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic respiratory diseases in adults. PMID:2125356

  15. Gene therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burney, Tabinda J; Davies, Jane C

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is being developed as a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), a condition that has hitherto been widely-researched yet for which no treatment exists that halts the progression of lung disease. Gene therapy involves the transfer of correct copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) DNA to the epithelial cells in the airways. The cloning of the CFTR gene in 1989 led to proof-of-principle studies of CFTR gene transfer in vitro and in animal models. The earliest clinical trials in CF patients were conducted in 1993 and used viral and non-viral gene transfer agents in both the nasal and bronchial airway epithelium. To date, studies have focused largely on molecular or bioelectric (chloride secretion) outcome measures, many demonstrating evidence of CFTR expression, but few have attempted to achieve clinical efficacy. As CF is a lifelong disease, turnover of the airway epithelium necessitates repeat administration. To date, this has been difficult to achieve with viral gene transfer agents due to host recognition leading to loss of expression. The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium (Imperial College London, University of Edinburgh and University of Oxford) is currently working on a large and ambitious program to establish the clinical benefits of CF gene therapy. Wave 1, which has reached the clinic, uses a non-viral vector. A single-dose safety trial is nearing completion and a multi-dose clinical trial is shortly due to start; this will be powered for clinically-relevant changes. Wave 2, more futuristically, will look at the potential of lentiviruses, which have long-lasting expression. This review will summarize the current status of translational research in CF gene therapy. PMID:23776378

  16. Recombinant Human DNase I Reduces the Viscosity of Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shak, Steven; Capon, Daniel J.; Hellmiss, Renate; Marsters, Scot A.; Baker, Carrie L.

    1990-12-01

    Respiratory distress and progressive lung destruction in cystic fibrosis can be attributed to bacterial persistence and the accumulation of viscous purulent secretions in the airways. More than 30 yr ago it was suggested that the large amounts of DNA in purulent secretions contribute to its viscosity and that bovine pancreatic DNase I could reduce the viscosity. To evaluate the potential clinical utility of recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) in the treatment of cystic fibrosis, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed rhDNase. Catalytic amounts of rhDNase greatly reduce the viscosity of purulent cystic fibrosis sputum, transforming it within minutes from a nonflowing viscous gel to a flowing liquid. The reduction in viscosity is associated with a decrease in size of DNA in the sputum. Inhalation of a rhDNase aerosol may be a simple direct approach that will help individuals with cystic fibrosis and other patients with pneumonia or bronchitis to clear their airways of purulent secretions.

  17. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; O'Ryan, Liam P.; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Riordan, John R.; Ford, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located). PMID:21931164

  18. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype. PMID:26115565

  19. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  20. Development of cystic fibrosis and noncystic fibrosis airway cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zabner, Joseph; Karp, Phil; Seiler, Michael; Phillips, Stacia L; Mitchell, Calista J; Saavedra, Mimi; Welsh, Michael; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we utilized the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, hTERT, and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 and E7 genes to transform normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human airway epithelial (HAE) cells. One cell line, designated NuLi-1 (normal lung, University of Iowa), was derived from HAE of normal genotype; three cell lines, designated CuFi (cystic fibrosis, University of Iowa)-1, CuFi-3, and CuFi-4, were derived from HAE of various CF genotypes. When grown at the air-liquid interface, the cell lines were capable of forming polarized differentiated epithelia that exhibited transepithelial resistance and maintained the ion channel physiology expected for the genotypes. The CF transmembrane conductance regulator defect in the CuFi cell lines could be corrected by infecting from the basolateral surface using adenoviral vectors. Using nuclear factor-kappaB promoter reporter constructs, we also demonstrated that the NuLi and CuFi cell lines retained nuclear factor-kappaB responses to lipopolysaccharide. These cell lines should therefore be useful as models for studying ion physiology, therapeutic intervention for CF, and innate immunity. PMID:12676769

  1. Air Trapping and Airflow Obstruction in Newborn Cystic Fibrosis Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Bauer, Christian; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Gross, Thomas J.; Awadalla, Maged S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Diwakar, Amit; Ochs, Matthias; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Beichel, Reinhard R.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Air trapping and airflow obstruction are being increasingly identified in infants with cystic fibrosis. These findings are commonly attributed to airway infection, inflammation, and mucus buildup. Objectives: To learn if air trapping and airflow obstruction are present before the onset of airway infection and inflammation in cystic fibrosis. Methods: On the day they are born, piglets with cystic fibrosis lack airway infection and inflammation. Therefore, we used newborn wild-type piglets and piglets with cystic fibrosis to assess air trapping, airway size, and lung volume with inspiratory and expiratory X-ray computed tomography scans. Micro–computed tomography scanning was used to assess more distal airway sizes. Airway resistance was determined with a mechanical ventilator. Mean linear intercept and alveolar surface area were determined using stereologic methods. Measurements and Main Results: On the day they were born, piglets with cystic fibrosis exhibited air trapping more frequently than wild-type piglets (75% vs. 12.5%, respectively). Moreover, newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis had increased airway resistance that was accompanied by luminal size reduction in the trachea, mainstem bronchi, and proximal airways. In contrast, mean linear intercept length, alveolar surface area, and lung volume were similar between both genotypes. Conclusions: The presence of air trapping, airflow obstruction, and airway size reduction in newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis before the onset of airway infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation indicates that cystic fibrosis impacts airway development. Our findings suggest that early airflow obstruction and air trapping in infants with cystic fibrosis might, in part, be caused by congenital airway abnormalities. PMID:24168209

  2. Lumacaftor/Ivacaftor: A Review in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Emma D

    2016-08-01

    Lumacaftor/ivacaftor (Orkambi™) is a fixed-dose tablet containing a corrector (lumacaftor) and potentiator (ivacaftor) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and is the first therapy approved to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis in patients (aged ≥12 years) homozygous for the most common CFTR mutation, F508del. Lumacaftor improves the processing of F508del CFTR and its transport to the cell surface, while ivacaftor increases the channel's open probability and transport of chloride. In two 24-week trials in the approved patient population (TRAFFIC and TRANSPORT), lumacaftor 400 mg plus ivacaftor 250 mg, administered every 12 h in combination with standard therapy, was associated with an ≈3 % statistically significant improvement in lung function relative to placebo (as measured by the percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s). Lumacaftor plus ivacaftor did not significantly improve respiratory symptoms, although reduced pulmonary exacerbations to a clinically meaningful extent and, in one trial (TRANSPORT), significantly improved body mass index (BMI). In an ongoing extension of these studies (PROGRESS), lumacaftor plus ivacaftor provided clinical benefit over a further 72 weeks of treatment. Lumacaftor plus ivacaftor had an acceptable tolerability profile, with the most common adverse events being respiratory or gastrointestinal in nature. Thus, lumacaftor/ivacaftor expands the treatment options available for patients with cystic fibrosis homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation, although its precise place in clinical practice remains to be determined. PMID:27394157

  3. The novel complex allele [A238V;F508del] of the CFTR gene: clinical phenotype and possible implications for cystic fibrosis etiological therapies.

    PubMed

    Diana, Anna; Polizzi, Angela Maria; Santostasi, Teresa; Ratclif, Luigi; Pantaleo, Maria Giuseppina; Leonetti, Giuseppina; Iusco, Danila Rosa; Gallo, Crescenzio; Conese, Massimo; Manca, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Few mutations in cis have been annotated for F508del homozygous patients. Southern Italy patients who at a first analysis appeared homozygous for the F508del mutation (n=63) or compound heterozygous for the F508del and another mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (n=155) were searched for the A238V mutation in exon 6. The allelic frequency of the complex allele [A238V;F508del] was 0.04. When the whole data set was used (comprised also of 56 F508del/F508del and 34 F508del/other mutation controls), no differences reached the statistical significance in the clinical parameters, except chloride concentrations which were lower in [A238V;F508del]/other mutation compared with F508del/other mutation (P=0.03). The two study groups presented less complications than the control groups. Within the minimal data set (34 F508del/F508del, 27 F508del/other mutation, 4 [A238V;F508del]/F508del cases and 5 [A238V;F508del]/other mutation cases); that is, presenting all the variables in each patient, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity presented a trend to lower levels in the study groups in comparison with the F508del/F508del group, and C-reactive protein approximated statistically significant higher levels in the [A238V;F508del]/other mutation as compared with F508del/F508del patients (P=0.09). The analysis of statistical dependence among the variables showed a significant anticorrelation between chloride and body mass index in the [A238V;F508del]/other mutation group. In conclusion, the complex allele [A238V;F508del] seems to be associated with less general complications than in the control groups, on the other hand possibly giving a worse pulmonary phenotype and higher systemic/local inflammatory response. These findings have implications for the correct recruitment and clinical response of F508del patients in the clinical trials testing the new etiological drugs for cystic fibrosis. PMID:26911355

  4. Subtotal Esophagectomy for Carcinoma in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel; Bourke, Stephen; Immanuel, Arul; Metcalfe, Sarah

    2016-06-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disorder characterized by progressive lung disease. Life expectancy is, however, continually improving. Patients with CF will therefore present with an increasing number of conditions, some of which will require operative management. We present our experience of the management of a patient with CF who underwent a subtotal esophagectomy for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. No significant difficulties were encountered in the perioperative management of the patient. Despite a decline in his lung function and weight postoperatively, he remains clinically stable. Major surgery can be successfully undertaken in selected patients with CF. PMID:27301055

  5. Familial non-cystic fibrosis mucus inspissation of respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, M; Williams, J; Hirsch, M; Bar-Ziv, J

    1975-01-01

    Perlman, M., Williams, J., Hirsch, M., and Bar-Ziv, J. (1975). Archives of Disease in Childhood, 50, 727. Familial non-cystic fibrosis mucus inspissation of respiratory tract. Two sibs, whose parents are first cousins, have had chronic obstructive airways disease from birth with recurrent otitis media, sinusitis, and mastoiditis. The disease, associated with clinically abnormal mucus, differs from other familial obstructive airways diseases and probably constitutes a new entity. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:1190822

  6. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    PubMed

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24625547

  7. Paediatric nasal polyps in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mohd Slim, Mohd Afiq; Dick, David; Trimble, Keith; McKee, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of nasal polyps. We present the case of a 17-month-old Caucasian patient with CF who presented with hypertelorism causing cycloplegic astigmatism, right-sided mucoid discharge, snoring and noisy breathing. Imaging suggested bilateral mucoceles in the ethmoid sinuses. Intraoperatively, bilateral soft tissue masses were noted, and both posterior choanae were patent. Polypectomy and bilateral mega-antrostomies were performed. Histological examination revealed inflammatory nasal polyposis typical of CF. The role of early functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) in children with CF nasal polyposis remains questionable as the recurrence rate is higher, and no improvement in pulmonary function has been shown. Our case, however, clearly demonstrates the beneficial upper airway symptom relief and normalisation of facial appearance following FESS in a child with this condition. PMID:27329094

  8. Imaging of Cystic Fibrosis and Pediatric Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kevin P; Maher, Michael M; O'Connor, Owen J

    2016-03-01

    1. CT is superior to pulmonary function tests and chest radiography for the assessment and monitoring of cystic fibrosis (CF)-related lung disease and, also, of pediatric bronchiectasis not caused by CF (hereafter referred to as non-CF bronchiectasis). 2. Low-dose CT protocols that impart radiation doses similar to those used in chest radiography are feasible for the surveillance of patients with bronchiectasis. 3. Chest radiography is still most commonly used as the first-line imaging examination of choice for the assessment of acute complications related to bronchiectasis. 4. Pulmonary MRI, with or without the use of inhaled hyperpolarized gas, can be performed to obtain functional information, and, in dedicated centers, it may yield imaging results comparable to those obtained by CT. 5. Gastrointestinal and pancreaticobiliary manifestations of CF are observed with greater frequency in adults, because of increased life expectancy. PMID:26901001

  9. Scoliosis in cystic fibrosis - an appraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Spasovsky-Chernick, M.

    1982-03-01

    An unusually high prevalence (10%) of scoliosis is described in a series of 151 patients aged four years and older with cystic fibrosis. The scolioses were of the late onset (juvenile and adolescent) type, being typically thoracic with the curve convex to the right, although there was no significant preference for either sex. No direct relationship was found between the spinal curvature and the severity or distribution of the lung disease, although the worse scolioses tended to occur in patients with relatively severe pulmonary involvement. There was no evidence of metabolic bone disease as a predisposing cause. Some indication of a familial tendency towards scoliosis was apparent, and a genetic or constitutional basis is postulated with an unknown precipitating factor.

  10. Chronic Rhinosinusitis in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hamilos, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is highly prevalent in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and accounts for significant morbidity and contribution to CF lung disease. Mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene occur with increased prevalence in patients with CRS without CF, suggesting some contribution to CRS pathophysiology. Nasal polyps (NPs) occur with increased prevalence in patients with CF of all ages and have a more neutrophilic appearance with fewer eosinophils and increased submucosal glandular elements in comparison to NPs from patients without CF. Mainstays of medical treatment include isotonic saline irrigations and topical intranasal glucocorticoids, with some evidence that topical intranasal glucocorticoids reduce NP size. Although inhaled hypertonic saline (7%) has been widely studied as a mucolytic agent for CF lung disease, there are no reports of its use in CF CRS. Mucolytics have also not been studied as a treatment for CRS in CF, and most evidence does not support their use for CF lung disease. Nasally nebulized dornase alfa (recombinant human deoxyribonuclease) following sinus surgery shows promise for treatment. Other unproven therapies include addition of baby shampoo to isotonic saline to potentially thin mucus and help prevent biofilm formation. There are no data to support the use of low-dose oral macrolide antibiotics or the use of prophylactic oral antibiotics for CRS in patients with CF. However, there is some support for the use of topical antibiotics, including colistimethate sodium or tobramycin, administered as a sinus irrigation or antral lavage in patients following sinus surgery when susceptible bacteria are cultured. Key components of CF sinus surgical management include extensive surgery to ensure that the maxillary, frontal, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinuses are all widely opened with smoothing of bony overhangs to prevent mucus retention and bacterial recolonization, postoperative meticulous daily nasal irrigations

  11. AEROSOL DEPOSITION AS A FUNCTION OF AIRWAY DISEASE: CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Progressive lung disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a continuous interaction of the processes of airway obstruction, infection and inflammation. ecent literature has suggested that the manifestation of CF could compromise the successful administration of pharmacologi...

  12. Cystic fibrosis--what are the prospects for a cure?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shankar; Tana, Anand; Shankar, Anu

    2014-11-01

    Significant improvements in the treatment of cystic fibrosis over the last few decades have altered this lethal disease in children to a multisystem disorder with survival into adult life now common. In most developed countries the numbers of adult cystic fibrosis patients outnumber children. This is mainly due to improvements in care during early life. The principal cause of morbidity and mortality is pulmonary disease, and so the focus of new treatments has targeted the lungs. Identification of the underlying gene defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator has ushered in a new era in cystic fibrosis research, with prospects of a cure. In this article, we review the most exciting recent advances that correct defects in cellular processing, chloride channel function and gene therapy. PMID:25447947

  13. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a distinct condition.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; González Albarrán, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, affecting approximately one out of every 2,000 births. Survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has significantly improved due to advances in respiratory and nutritional care, and their current average life expectancy is 30-40 years. Development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a comorbidity that increases with age and may reach a prevalence up to 50% in adults. Its development is associated to impaired lung function and nutritional status, and early diagnosis and treatment are therefore essential to improve quality of life and performance status. Insulin therapy for diabetes and other early carbohydrate metabolism disorders may improve lung function and nutritional status of patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:25151429

  14. Ciprofloxacin-induced phototoxicity in an adult cystic fibrosis population.

    PubMed

    Tolland, Julia P; Murphy, Bryan P; Boyle, Julie; Hall, Valerie; McKenna, Kevin E; Elborn, J Stuart

    2012-10-01

    The incidence of phototoxicity as a side effect of ciprofloxacin appears to be increased in patients with cystic fibrosis compared to the general population (approximately 2.4%). We used an interview-based questionnaire to determine the incidence of such phototoxic skin reactions in cystic fibrosis patients. Results from 105 respondents revealed the incidence of ciprofloxacin-induced phototoxicity in the adult cystic fibrosis population in Northern Ireland to be 48.4% with only 66% of the patients recalling being given sun care information beforehand. We concluded that the incidence of phototoxicity is increased in patients with cystic fibrosis and that it is important for all to receive good sun care information prior to taking ciprofloxacin given the high risk of developing phototoxic rash. PMID:22971191

  15. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Martini, S V; Rocco, P R M; Morales, M M

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR) to the affected organ (lung). Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy. PMID:21952739

  16. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and ... mucus that contains blood and bacteria. Respiratory System Signs and Symptoms People who have CF have thick, ...

  17. Increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Christensson, B A; Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ljungberg, B; Lindblad, A; Malmborg, A S; Hjelte, L; Strandvik, B

    1992-01-01

    The altered pharmacokinetic properties of, e.g., aminoglycosides in cystic fibrosis patients have to be considered when pulmonary exacerbations are treated. Since reported data on ciprofloxacin, a fluorinated quinolone, are conflicting, we compared intravenous and oral administration in cystic fibrosis patients when treating them for mild symptoms of pulmonary infection. All of the patients were colonized with Pseudomonas species. Ciprofloxacin was administered orally (15 mg/kg of body weight) or intravenously (6 mg/kg) twice a day for at least 10 days during separate treatment periods. Five healthy volunteers received single intravenous and oral doses. Pharmacokinetic evaluations were performed at first dose and at steady state. The results showed that cystic fibrosis patients have increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin (80% in cystic fibrosis patients versus 57% in volunteers) and increased total clearance (688 ml/min in CF patients versus 528 ml/min in volunteers). Our data indicate that the pharmacokinetic properties of ciprofloxacin are altered in cystic fibrosis patients with mild symptoms of pulmonary exacerbations and that the changes most probably are due to cystic fibrosis per se or to the impact of chronic infection. PMID:1489195

  18. Targeted therapies to improve CFTR function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brodlie, Malcolm; Haq, Iram J; Roberts, Katie; Elborn, J Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetically determined, life-limiting disorder in populations of European ancestry. The genetic basis of cystic fibrosis is well established to be mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that codes for an apical membrane chloride channel principally expressed by epithelial cells. Conventional approaches to cystic fibrosis care involve a heavy daily burden of supportive treatments to combat lung infection, help clear airway secretions and maintain nutritional status. In 2012, a new era of precision medicine in cystic fibrosis therapeutics began with the licensing of a small molecule, ivacaftor, which successfully targets the underlying defect and improves CFTR function in a subgroup of patients in a genotype-specific manner. Here, we review the three main targeted approaches that have been adopted to improve CFTR function: potentiators, which recover the function of CFTR at the apical surface of epithelial cells that is disrupted in class III and IV genetic mutations; correctors, which improve intracellular processing of CFTR, increasing surface expression, in class II mutations; and production correctors or read-through agents, which promote transcription of CFTR in class I mutations. The further development of such approaches offers great promise for future therapeutic strategies in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26403534

  19. Nontuberculous mycobacteria in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Park, In Kwon; Olivier, Kenneth N

    2015-04-01

    Increasing numbers of cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis patients are affected by pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection worldwide. Two species of NTM account for up to 95% of the pulmonary NTM infections: Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC). Diagnosis of pulmonary NTM infection is based on criteria specified in the 2007 American Thoracic Society/Infectious Disease Society of America (ATS/IDSA) guidelines. While many initial positive cultures do not progress to active NTM disease, even a single positive NTM sputum culture obtained from higher risk groups such as classic CF or older women with bronchiectasis and very low body mass index should be closely monitored for progressive disease. Macrolides remain the most effective agents available against MAC and MABSC. Infection with MABSC may be associated with worse clinical outcomes, as more than half of MABSC isolates have inducible macrolide resistance conferred by an active erm(41) gene. Of growing concern in CF is that MABSC is becoming more common than MAC, seems to target younger patients with classic CF, and is more difficult to manage, often requiring prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics. Recurrence rates of NTM after initial successful treatment remain high, likely due to nonmodifiable risk factors raising the question of whether secondary prophylaxis is feasible. More rapid and readily available methods for detecting inducible macrolide resistance and better in vitro susceptibility testing methods for other drugs that correlate with clinical responses are needed. This is crucial to identify more effective regimens of existing drugs and for development of novel drugs for NTM infection. PMID:25826589

  20. Improved clinical and radiographic outcomes after treatment with ivacaftor in a young adult with cystic fibrosis with the P67L CFTR mutation.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Shatha; Solomon, George M; Brody, Alan; Rowe, Steven M; Colin, Andrew A

    2015-03-01

    The underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) is the loss of epithelial chloride and bicarbonate transport due to mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding the CFTR protein. Ivacaftor is a gene-specific CFTR potentiator that augments in vivo chloride transport in CFTR mutations affecting channel gating. Originally approved for the G511D CFTR mutation, ivacaftor is now approved for eight additional alleles exhibiting gating defects and has also been tested in R117H, a CFTR mutation with residual function that exhibits abnormal gating. P67L is a class 4 conductance (nongating) mutation exhibiting residual CFTR function. We report marked clinical improvement, normalization of spirometry, and dramatic reduction in radiographic structural airway changes after > 1 year of treatment with ivacaftor in a young adult with the compound heterozygous genotype P67L/F508del CFTR. The case suggests that ivacaftor may have a potential benefit for patients with CF with nongating mutations. PMID:25732475

  1. Future Directions in Early Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Banks-Schlegel, Susan; Accurso, Frank J.; Boucher, Richard C.; Cutting, Garry R.; Engelhardt, John F.; Guggino, William B.; Karp, Christopher L.; Knowles, Michael R.; Kolls, Jay K.; LiPuma, John J.; Lynch, Susan; McCray, Paul B.; Rubenstein, Ronald C.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Sorscher, Eric; Welsh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1989 discovery that mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF), there has been substantial progress toward understanding the molecular basis for CF lung disease, leading to the discovery and development of new therapeutic approaches. However, the earliest impact of the loss of CFTR function on airway physiology and structure and its relationship to initial infection and inflammation are poorly understood. Universal newborn screening for CF in the United States represents an unprecedented opportunity for investigating CF clinical manifestations very early in life. Recently developed animal models with pulmonary phenotypic manifestations also provide a window into the early consequences of this genetic disorder. For these reasons, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a working group of extramural experts, entitled “Future Research Directions in Early CF Lung Disease” on September 21–22, 2010, to identify future research directions of great promise in CF. The priority areas identified included (1) exploring pathogenic mechanisms of early CF lung disease; (2) leveraging newborn screening to elucidate the natural history of early lung disease; (3) developing a spectrum of biomarkers of early lung disease that reflects CF pathophysiology, clinical outcome, and response to treatment; (4) exploring the role of genetics/genomics (e.g., modifier genes, gene–environmental interactions, and epigenetics) in early CF pathogenesis; (5) defining early microbiological events in CF lung disease; and (6) elucidating the initial airway inflammatory, remodeling, and repair mechanisms in CF lung disease. PMID:22312017

  2. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 10 Final Diagnosis: Sepsis Symptoms: Fever • hypotension • not tollerating enteral feeds • respiratory deterioration Medication: — Clinical Procedure: IV antibiotics • lungtransplantion Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. Case Report: We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. Conclusions: As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  3. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26678435

  4. Lung Transplantation and Survival in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; Cox, David R.; Cahill, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effects of lung transplantation on the survival and quality of life in children with cystic fibrosis are uncertain. METHODS We used data from the U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry and from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network to identify children with cystic fibrosis who were on the waiting list for lung transplantation during the period from 1992 through 2002. We performed proportional-hazards survival modeling, using multiple clinically relevant covariates that were available before the children were on the waiting list and the interactions of these covariates with lung transplantation as a time-dependent covariate. The data were insufficient in quality and quantity for a retrospective quality-of-life analysis. RESULTS A total of 248 of the 514 children on the waiting list underwent lung transplantation in the United States during the period from 1992 through 2002. Proportional-hazards modeling identified four variables besides transplantation that were associated with changes in survival. Burkholderia cepacia infection was associated with a trend toward decreased survival, regardless of whether the patient underwent transplantation. A diagnosis of diabetes before the patient was placed on the waiting list decreased survival while the patient was on the waiting list but did not decrease survival after transplantation, whereas older age did not affect waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Staphylococcus aureus infection increased waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Using age, diabetes status, and S. aureus infection status as covariates, we estimated the effect of transplantation on survival for each patient group, expressed as a hazard factor of less than 1 for a benefit and more than 1 for a risk of harm. Five patients had a significant estimated benefit, 283 patients had a significant risk of harm, 102 patients had an insignificant benefit, and 124 patients

  5. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator corrects defective chloride channel regulation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Devra P.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Gregory, Richard J.; Cheng, Seng H.; Paul, Sucharita; Jefferson, Douglas M.; McCann, John D.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Smith, Alan E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was expressed in cultured cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells and Cl- channel activation assessed in single cells using a fluorescence microscopic assay and the patch-clamp technique. Expression of CFTR, but not of a mutant form of CFTR (ΔF508), corrected the Cl- channel defect. Correction of the phenotypic defect demonstrates a causal relationship between mutations in the CFTR gene and defective Cl- transport which is the hallmark of the disease.

  6. Early Anti-Pseudomonal Acquisition in Young Patients with Cystic Fibrosis: Rationale and Design of the EPIC Clinical Trial and Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Treggiari, Miriam M; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Retsch-Bogart, George; Gibson, Ronald L.; Williams, Judy; Emerson, Julia; Kronmal, Richard A; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2009-01-01

    Background The primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is progressive obstructive pulmonary disease due to chronic endobronchial infection, particularly with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa). Risk factors for and clinical impact of early Pa infection in young CF patients are less well understood. Purpose The present studies are designed to evaluate risk factors and outcomes associated with early Pa acquisition, and the benefits and harms of four anti-pseudomonal treatment regimens in young CF patients initiated after the first Pa positive respiratory culture. Methods The Early Pseudomonas Infection Control (EPIC) program consists of two studies, a randomized multicenter trial in CF patients ages 1–12 years at first isolation of Pa from a respiratory culture, and a longitudinal cohort study enrolling Pa-negative patients. Using a factorial design, trial participants are assigned for 18 months to either anti-pseudomonal treatment on a scheduled quarterly basis (cycled therapy) or based on recovery of Pa from quarterly respiratory cultures (culture-based therapy). The study drugs include inhaled tobramycin (300 mg BID) for 28 days, combined with either oral ciprofloxacin (15–20 mg/kg BID) or oral placebo for 14 days. The primary endpoints of the trial are the time to pulmonary exacerbation requiring IV antibiotics or hospitalization for respiratory symptoms, and the proportion of patients with new Pa-positive respiratory cultures during the study. The broad goals of the observational study are to describe the risk factors and outcomes associated with early acquisition of Pa. 306 patients were randomized in the clinical trial and 1,787 were enrolled in the cohort study. Conclusions These companion studies will provide valuable epidemiological and microbiological information on early CF lung disease and Pa acquisition, and safety and clinical efficacy data on anti-pseudomonal treatment strategies for early Pa infections in the

  7. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad A.; Everest, Francesca L. C.; Cowley, Lauren A.; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S.; Bridge, Simon H.; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D.; Bourke, Stephen J.; Cummings, Stephen P.; Lanyon, Clare V.; Barr, Jeremy J.; Smith, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  8. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohammad A; Everest, Francesca L C; Cowley, Lauren A; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S; Bridge, Simon H; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D; Bourke, Stephen J; Cummings, Stephen P; Lanyon, Clare V; Barr, Jeremy J; Smith, Darren L

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  9. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations at a referral center for cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Cyntia Arivabeni de Araújo Correia; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of six mutations (F508del, G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed, at a referral center, on the basis of abnormal results in two determinations of sweat sodium and chloride concentrations. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 patients with CF. The mean age of the patients was 12.38 ± 9.00 years, 51.43% were female, and 94.29% were White. Mutation screening was performed with polymerase chain reaction (for F508del), followed by enzymatic digestion (for other mutations). Clinical analysis was performed on the basis of gender, age, ethnicity, pulmonary/gastrointestinal symptoms, and Shwachman-Kulczycki (SK) score. RESULTS: All of the patients showed pulmonary symptoms, and 8 had no gastrointestinal symptoms. On the basis of the SK scores, CF was determined to be mild, moderate, and severe in 22 (42.3%), 17 (32.7%), and 13 (25.0%) of the patients, respectively. There was no association between F508del mutation and disease severity by SK score. Of the 140 alleles analyzed, F508del mutation was identified in 70 (50%). Other mutations (G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) were identified in 12 (7.93%) of the alleles studied. In F508del homozygous patients with severe disease, the OR was 0.124 (95% CI: 0.005-0.826). CONCLUSIONS: In 50% of the alleles studied, the molecular diagnosis of CF was confirmed by identifying a single mutation (F508del). If we consider the analysis of the six most common mutations in the Brazilian population (including F508del), the molecular diagnosis was confirmed in 58.57% of the alleles studied. PMID:24310628

  10. Colonic wall thickness measured by ultrasound: striking differences in patients with cystic fibrosis versus healthy controls.

    PubMed Central

    Haber, H P; Benda, N; Fitzke, G; Lang, A; Langenberg, M; Riethmüller, J; Stern, M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colonic strictures represent an advanced stage of fibrosing colonopathy in patients with cystic fibrosis. AIMS: To clarify whether ultrasonography can identify patients with an early stage of fibrosing colonopathy and to determine clinical factors that influence bowel wall thickening. PATIENTS: Ninety patients with cystic fibrosis, median age 10 years, and 46 healthy controls, median age 13 years, were investigated. METHODS: Bowel wall thickness was measured by ultrasound in a prospective study. RESULTS: In cystic fibrosis, wall thickness of both small intestine and colon was significantly (p < 0.0001) higher than in controls; 81% of patients with cystic fibrosis had a maximum colon wall thickness at any site of 2 mm or more, a value that was never reached by controls. The maximum colon wall thickness was 6.5 mm. Bowel wall thickness was unchanged at re-examination after one year. There was no progression even with high dose pancreatic supplements. There was no association between bowel wall thickness and clinical features such as previous meconium ileus, intestinal resection, distal intestinal obstruction syndrome, abdominal pain, or pancreatic enzyme dose. CONCLUSIONS: There is genuine intestinal involvement in cystic fibrosis; in a few cases this could lead to fibrosing colonopathy. Images PMID:9135533

  11. Cystic Fibrosis Heterozygote Resistance to Cholera Toxin in the Cystic Fibrosis Mouse Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Sherif E.; Brigman, Kristen N.; Koller, Beverly H.; Boucher, Richard C.; Stutts, M. Jackson

    1994-10-01

    The effect of the number of cystic fibrosis (CF) alleles on cholera toxin (CT)-induced intestinal secretion was examined in the CF mouse model. CF mice that expressed no CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein did not secrete fluid in response to CT. Heterozygotes expressed 50 percent of the normal amount of CFTR protein in the intestinal epithelium and secreted 50 percent of the normal fluid and chloride ion in response to CT. This correlation between CFTR protein and CT-induced chloride ion and fluid secretion suggests that CF heterozygotes might possess a selective advantage of resistance to cholera.

  12. Liver and lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis: an adult cystic fibrosis centre's experience.

    PubMed

    Sivam, S; Al-Hindawi, Y; Di Michiel, J; Moriarty, C; Spratt, P; Jansz, P; Malouf, M; Plit, M; Pleass, H; Havryk, A; Bowen, D; Haber, P; Glanville, A R; Bye, P T P

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease develops in one-third of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). It is rare for liver disease to have its onset after 20 years of age. Lung disease, however, is usually more severe in adulthood. A retrospective analysis was performed on nine patients. Three patients required lung transplantation approximately a decade after liver transplant, and another underwent combined liver and lung transplants. Four additional patients with liver transplants are awaiting assessment for lung transplants. One patient is awaiting combined liver and lung transplants. With increased survival in CF, several patients may require more than single organ transplantation. PMID:27405894

  13. IgG antibodies to Aspergillus fumigatus in cystic fibrosis: a laboratory correlate of disease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, K D; Hohmann, A W; Martin, A J; Bradley, J

    1988-01-01

    Serum was collected from 50 patients with cystic fibrosis, and IgG antibodies to Aspergillus fumigatus were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, total IgE and Aspergillus specific IgE antibodies were measured in 41 of the 50. A close association was found between pulmonary function and clinical state, and IgG antibodies to Aspergillus. There was no association between pulmonary function or clinical state and IgE antibodies. It is postulated that in patients with cystic fibrosis, Aspergillus fumigatus may contribute to deterioration in pulmonary function by local pathogenicity, or by hypersensitivity mechanisms mediated by IgG. PMID:3046514

  14. Inflammation in cystic fibrosis lung disease: Pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cantin, André M; Hartl, Dominik; Konstan, Michael W; Chmiel, James F

    2015-07-01

    Lung disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Although CF lung disease is primarily an infectious disorder, the associated inflammation is both intense and ineffective at clearing pathogens. Persistent high-intensity inflammation leads to permanent structural damage of the CF airways and impaired lung function that eventually results in respiratory failure and death. Several defective inflammatory responses have been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) deficiency including innate and acquired immunity dysregulation, cell membrane lipid abnormalities, various transcription factor signaling defects, as well as altered kinase and toll-like receptor responses. The inflammation of the CF lung is dominated by neutrophils that release oxidants and proteases, particularly elastase. Neutrophil elastase in the CF airway secretions precedes the appearance of bronchiectasis, and correlates with lung function deterioration and respiratory exacerbations. Anti-inflammatory therapies are therefore of particular interest for CF lung disease but must be carefully studied to avoid suppressing critical elements of the inflammatory response and thus worsening infection. This review examines the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease, summarizes the results of past clinical trials and explores promising new anti-inflammatory options. PMID:25814049

  15. Evidence of Inhaled Tobramycin in Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, Montserrat; Muñoz, Gerard; de Gracia, Javier

    2015-01-01

    There is currently less experience with inhaled tobramycin in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis than in cystic fibrosis (CF). Intravenous formulation and solution for inhalation (TSI) have been studied in non-CF bronchiectasis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa bronchial infection. An improvement in clinical parameters and a reduction in bacterial density have been shown with both inhaled solutions in these patients. However, further trials are needed to determine the most effective dose and administration protocol in these patients. Based on the current evidence, recommendations cannot be made regarding the use of TSI to treat exacerbations. Although no systemic toxicity has been reported in studies specifically investigating this treatment, patients with known kidney disease or ear disorders should be treated with caution. Adverse respiratory effects are reported to be more common in non-CF patients than in CF patients, who tend to be non-smokers and younger. Research is being conducted into the possibility of combining tobramycin with other antibiotics to increase its antibacterial activity. In this review we will present and discuss the published evidence regarding the use of inhaled tobramycin in non–CF bronchiectasis. PMID:25893022

  16. The role of hepatobiliary scintigraphy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, P J; Southern, K W; Bowler, I M; Irving, H C; Robinson, P J; Littlewood, J M

    1996-02-01

    This was a prospective open study that examined the quantitative and qualitative analysis of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (DISIDA) in detecting liver involvement in cystic fibrosis (CF). Forty-four adult and pediatric patients (median age, 12.1 years; range, 1.1-36.3 years) were divided into three groups: group 1, no evidence of liver involvement (n = 8); group 2, biochemical evidence of liver involvement on two or more occasions (n = 26); and group 3, clinical evidence of liver disease (n = 10). In groups 1 and 2, the most common qualitative scintigraphic finding was focal intrahepatic retention of tracer (26/34 patients, 12 of whom had normal findings on ultrasonography). This finding corresponds to focal cholestasis and may warrant treatment with the choleretic agent ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). In the group 3 patients, the abnormal qualitative scintigraphic appearances (heterogeneous uptake of tracer and nodular liver outline) added little to the findings on ultrasonography; however, these patients had a prolonged mean hepatic clearance time compared with those in groups 1 and 2 (one-way ANOVA; P < .015). It is proposed that scintigraphy with DISIDA has a role in the detection of early liver involvement in cystic fibrosis. PMID:8591853

  17. Fully automated scoring of chest radiographs in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Zhao; Cai, Weidong; Song, Yang; Selvadurai, Hiran; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-01-01

    We present a prototype of a fully automated scoring system for chest radiographs (CXRs) in cystic fibrosis. The system was used to analyze real, clinical CXR data, to estimate the Shwachman-Kulczycki score for the image. Images were resampled and normalized to a standard size and intensity level, then segmented with a patch-based nearest-neighbor mapping algorithm. Texture features were calculated regionally and globally, using Tamura features, local binary patterns (LBP), gray-level co-occurrence matrix and Gabor filtering. Feature selection was guided by current understanding of the disease process, in particular the reorganization and thickening of airways. Combinations of these features were used as inputs for support vector machine (SVM) learning to classify each CXR, and evaluated using two-fold cross-validation for agreement with clinician scoring. The final computed score for each image was compared with the score assigned by a physician. Using this prototype system, we analyzed 139 CXRs from an Australian pediatric cystic fibrosis registry, for which texture directionality showed greatest discriminating power. Computed scores agreed with clinician scores in 75% of cases, and up to 90% of cases in discriminating severe disease from mild disease, similar to the level of human interobserver agreement for this dataset. PMID:24110600

  18. Practical Guidelines: Lung Transplantation in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirche, T. O.; Knoop, C.; Hebestreit, H.; Shimmin, D.; Solé, A.; Elborn, J. S.; Ellemunter, H.; Aurora, P.; Hogardt, M.; Wagner, T. O. F.; ECORN-CF Study Group

    2014-01-01

    There are no European recommendations on issues specifically related to lung transplantation (LTX) in cystic fibrosis (CF). The main goal of this paper is to provide CF care team members with clinically relevant CF-specific information on all aspects of LTX, highlighting areas of consensus and controversy throughout Europe. Bilateral lung transplantation has been shown to be an important therapeutic option for end-stage CF pulmonary disease. Transplant function and patient survival after transplantation are better than in most other indications for this procedure. Attention though has to be paid to pretransplant morbidity, time for referral, evaluation, indication, and contraindication in children and in adults. This review makes extensive use of specific evidence in the field of lung transplantation in CF patients and addresses all issues of practical importance. The requirements of pre-, peri-, and postoperative management are discussed in detail including bridging to transplant and postoperative complications, immune suppression, chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, and malignancies being the most important. Among the contributors to this guiding information are 19 members of the ECORN-CF project and other experts. The document is endorsed by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society and sponsored by the Christiane Herzog Foundation. PMID:24800072

  19. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  20. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  1. Cystic fibrosis and estrogens: a perfect storm

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    Irreversible destruction and widening of the airways due to acquired infections or genetic mutations as well as those of unknown cause are more severe in females. Differences between male and female anatomy, behavior, and hormonal state have been proposed to explain the increased incidence and severity in females with airway disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF); however, a mechanism to explain a sex-related difference has remained elusive. In this issue of the JCI, Coakley et al. report that elevations in the major estrogen hormone in humans — 17β-estradiol — reduce Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion by airway epithelial cells in culture, thereby disrupting ion and water balance (see the related article beginning on page 4025). They measure a similar diminution of nasal epithelial Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion in women with CF during the menstrual cycle phase at which 17β-estradiol level is at its highest. These data suggest that for about one week of a four-week menstrual cycle, women with CF will have a reduced ability to efficiently clear airway secretions, the buildup of which is a hallmark of CF. The authors suggest that these data warrant the testing of antiestrogen therapy in females with CF and propose an alternative avenue for CF therapeutic development. PMID:19033654

  2. Cephalexin pharmacokinetics in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nahata, M C; Lubin, A H; Visconti, J A

    1984-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of cephalexin were studied in 7 pediatric and 4 adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 4 normal adult volunteers. Cephalexin, 250-500 mg, was given as a single dose in suspension. The area under the cephalexin serum concentration-time curve normalized for dose per kilogram averaged 0.185, 0.242, and 0.272 ml/min/kg-1 in pediatric CF patients, adult CF patients, and normal adults, respectively (p greater than 0.05). A threefold interindividual variation was observed in cephalexin renal clearance in CF patients. Renal clearance of cephalexin averaged 5.85 ml/min/kg in pediatric and 4.61 ml/min/kg in adult CF patients (p greater than 0.05). Elimination half-life of cephalexin averaged 0.74, 0.76, and 1.04 h in pediatric patients, adult patients, and normal adults (p greater than 0.05). Cephalexin was well absorbed based on a mean 24-hour urinary recovery of 89 and 93% in pediatric and adult patients. A trend for higher renal clearance of cephalexin was observed among pediatric compared to adult patients. These results indicate that clearance of cephalexin may not increase in patients with CF of minimal severity characterized by an excellent Shwachman score. PMID:6468223

  3. Infection, inflammation and exercise in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Regular exercise is positively associated with health. It has also been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects. In healthy subjects, a single exercise session results in immune cell activation, which is characterized by production of immune modulatory peptides (e.g. IL-6, IL-8), a leukocytosis and enhanced immune cell functions. Upon cessation of exercise, immune activation is followed by a tolerizing phase, characterized by a reduced responsiveness of immune cells. Regular exercise of moderate intensity and duration has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects and is associated with a reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Specific exercise programs may therefore be used to modify the course of chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF suffer from severe and chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation, leading to obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease, exercise intolerance and muscle cachexia. Inflammation is characterized by a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Patients are encouraged to engage in exercise programs to maintain physical fitness, quality of life, pulmonary function and health. In this review, we present an overview of available literature describing the association between regular exercise, inflammation and infection susceptibility and discuss the implications of these observations for prevention and treatment of inflammation and infection susceptibility in patients with CF. PMID:23497303

  4. The Evolution of Cystic Fibrosis Care.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Jessica E; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting inherited illness of whites. Most of the morbidity and mortality in CF stems from impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic, progressive airways obstruction and damage. Significant progress has been made in the care of patients with CF, with advances focused on improving mucociliary clearance, minimizing inflammatory damage, and managing infections; these advances include new antimicrobial therapies, mucolytic and osmotic agents, and antiinflammatory treatments. More recently, researchers have targeted disease-causing mutations using therapies to promote gene transcription and improve channel function, which has led to impressive physiologic changes in some patients. As we develop more advanced, allele-directed therapies for the management of CF, it will become increasingly important to understand the specific genetic and environmental interactions that cause the significant heterogeneity of lung disease seen in the CF population. This understanding of CF endotypes will allow for more targeted, personalized therapies for future patients. This article reviews the genetic and molecular basis of CF lung disease, the treatments currently available, and novel therapies that are in development. PMID:25764168

  5. Cystic fibrosis, atopy, and airways lability.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, M; Hobbs, F D; Gordon, I R; Carswell, F

    1978-01-01

    In a survey of cystic fibrosis (CF) in the Avon area, 48 children with CF from 40 families together with 71 of their parents were studied by spirometry, exercise tests, and pinch tests. A control group of 42 young adults was similarly tested; control data for children were taken from previously published work. The prevalence of atopy (any positive prick test) in children with CF was 48%. Sensitivity to grass pollens and house dust mite was no more common in these children (29%) than in a normal population (34%). Hypersensitivity to Aspergillus fumigatus was found in 35% of children with CF and was associated with severe lung disease. The parents had a normal pattern and prevalence of atopy. Exercise-induced airways obstruction was present in only 22% of children with CF; its association with severe lung disease rendered interpretation difficult. The parents had a normal response to exercise. Both hypersensitivity to A. fumigatus and exercise-induced airways lability had the features of acquired characteristics. There was nothing in the present study to support the hypothesis that the possession of a CF gene predisposed to atopy. PMID:365112

  6. Antimicrobial resistance in the respiratory microbiota of people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, Laura J; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart

    2014-08-23

    Cystic fibrosis is characterised by chronic polymicrobial infection and inflammation in the airways of patients. Antibiotic treatment regimens, targeting recognised pathogens, have substantially contributed to increased life expectancy of patients with this disease. Although the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and selection of highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains is of major concern, the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis is yet to be defined. Resistance has been identified in recognised cystic fibrosis pathogens and in other bacteria (eg, Prevotella and Streptococcus spp) detected in the airway microbiota, but their role in the pathophysiology of infection and inflammation in chronic lung disease is unclear. Increased antibiotic resistance in cystic fibrosis might be attributed to a range of complex factors including horizontal gene transfer, hypoxia, and biofilm formation. Strategies to manage antimicrobial resistance consist of new antibiotics or localised delivery of antimicrobial agents, iron sequestration, inhibition of quorum-sensing, and resistome analysis. Determination of the contributions of every bacterial species to lung health or disease in cystic fibrosis might also have an important role in the management of antibiotic resistance. PMID:25152272

  7. Screening policy for cystic fibrosis: the role of evidence.

    PubMed

    Wilfond, Benjamin S

    1995-01-01

    Setting priorities about medical services, including genetic testing services, often occurs in an extemporaneous fashion. Normative assumptions may not be examined critically, although doing so is a necessary component of making health policy decisions about clinical practice. The normative dimension to health policy questions suggests a need for greater public participation in the development of clinical practice guidelines. The experiences of newborn screening and carrier screening for cystic fibrosis in the United States can be examined within the framework of two models of health policy development that help explain the role in health policy development of normative assumptions and public participation. Specifically, this paper focuses on assumptions about what counts as sufficient empirical data to make health policy decisions. PMID:11654188

  8. Report of the European Respiratory Society/European Cystic Fibrosis Society task force on the care of adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elborn, J Stuart; Bell, Scott C; Madge, Susan L; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Castellani, Carlo; Conway, Steven; De Rijcke, Karleen; Dembski, Birgit; Drevinek, Pavel; Heijerman, Harry G M; Innes, J Alistair; Lindblad, Anders; Marshall, Bruce; Olesen, Hanne V; Reimann, Andreas L; Solé, Ampara; Viviani, Laura; Wagner, Thomas O F; Welte, Tobias; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The improved survival in people with cystic fibrosis has led to an increasing number of patients reaching adulthood. This trend is likely to be maintained over the next decades, suggesting a need to increase the number of centres with expertise in the management of adult patients with cystic fibrosis. These centres should be capable of delivering multidisciplinary care addressing the complexity of the disease, in addition to addressing the psychological burden on patients and their families. Further issues that require attention are organ transplantation and end of life management.Lung disease in adults with cystic fibrosis drives most of the clinical care requirements, and major life-threatening complications, such as respiratory infection, respiratory failure, pneumothorax and haemoptysis, and the management of lung transplantation require expertise from trained respiratory physicians. The taskforce therefore strongly reccommends that medical leadership in multidisciplinary adult teams should be attributed to a respiratory physician adequately trained in cystic fibrosis management.The task force suggests the implementation of a core curriculum for trainees in adult respiratory medicine and the selection and accreditation of training centres that deliver postgraduate training to the standards of the HERMES programme. PMID:26453627

  9. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. CASE REPORT We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. CONCLUSIONS As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  10. Orthodontic and prosthetic treatment of a patient with cystic fibrosis and agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Harold; Greenberg, Joseph R

    2011-06-01

    The young dental patient with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis, maxillary canine impaction, and cystic fibrosis presents considerable challenges to the dentist. An interdisciplinary approach is described here for the orthodontist and restorative dentist to plan and work together with the patient's and parents' cooperation and consent. Despite some compromises, a successful outcome was achieved, as demonstrated in this case report. The use of conservative yet esthetic and durable fixed replacement prostheses is highlighted. Congenitally absent maxillary lateral incisors, impacted maxillary canines, and cystic fibrosis are clinical conditions that can significantly complicate and compromise dental treatment for any young patient. All three can be present simultaneously, as described in this case report. PMID:23738937

  11. New Therapeutic Approaches to Modulate and Correct Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    PubMed

    Ong, Thida; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators are clinically available personalized medicines approved for some individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) to target the underlying defect of disease. This review summarizes strategies used to develop CFTR modulators as therapies that improve function and availability of CFTR protein. Lessons learned from dissemination of ivacaftor across the CF population responsive to this therapy and future approaches to predict and monitor treatment response of CFTR modulators are discussed. The goal remains to expand patient-centered and personalized therapy to all patients with CF, ultimately improving life expectancy and quality of life for this disease. PMID:27469186

  12. Defining the disease liability of variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene

    PubMed Central

    Sosnay, Patrick R; Siklosi, Karen R; Van Goor, Fredrick; Kaniecki, Kyle; Yu, Haihui; Sharma, Neeraj; Ramalho, Anabela S; Amaral, Margarida D; Dorfman, Ruslan; Zielenski, Julian; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel; Millen, Linda; Thomas, Philip J; Patrinos, George P; Corey, Mary; Lewis, Michelle H; Rommens, Johanna M; Castellani, Carlo; Penland, Christopher M; Cutting, Garry R

    2013-01-01

    Allelic heterogeneity in disease-causing genes presents a substantial challenge to the translation of genomic variation to clinical practice. Few of the almost 2,000 variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have empirical evidence that they cause cystic fibrosis. To address this gap, we collected both genotype and phenotype data for 39,696 cystic fibrosis patients in registries and clinics in North America and Europe. Among these patients, 159 CFTR variants had an allele frequency of ≥0.01%. These variants were evaluated for both clinical severity and functional consequence with 127 (80%) meeting both clinical and functional criteria consistent with disease. Assessment of disease penetrance in 2,188 fathers of cystic fibrosis patients enabled assignment of 12 of the remaining 32 variants as neutral while the other 20 variants remained indeterminate. This study illustrates that sourcing data directly from well-phenotyped subjects can address the gap in our ability to interpret clinically-relevant genomic variation. PMID:23974870

  13. Identification and functional analysis of a bacteriocin, pyocin S6, with ribonuclease activity from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Dingemans, Jozef; Ghequire, Maarten G K; Craggs, Michael; De Mot, René; Cornelis, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    S-type pyocins are bacteriocins produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates to antagonize or kill other strains of the same species. They have a modular organization comprising a receptor-binding domain recognizing a surface constituent of the target bacterium, a domain for translocation through the periplasm, and a killing or toxic domain with DNase, tRNase, or pore-forming activity. Pyocins S2, S3, S4, and S5 recognize TonB-dependent ferri-siderophore receptors in the outer membrane. We here describe a new nuclease bacteriocin, pyocin S6, encoded in the genome of a P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis (CF) clinical isolate, CF_PA39. Similarly to pyocins S1 and S2, the S6 toxin-immunity gene tandem was recruited to the genomic region encoding exotoxin A. The pyocin S6 receptor-binding and translocation domains are identical to those of pyocin S1, whereas the killing domain is similar to the 16S ribonuclease domain of Escherichia coli colicin E3. The cytotoxic activity was abolished in pyocin S6 forms with a mutation in the colicin E3-equivalent catalytic motif. The CF_PA39 S6 immunity gene displays a higher expression level than the gene encoding the killing protein, the latter being only detected when bacteria are grown under iron-limiting conditions. In the S1-pyocinogenic strain P. aeruginosa ATCC 25324 and pyocin S2 producer P. aeruginosa PAO1, a remnant of the pyocin S6 killing domain and an intact S6-type immunity gene are located downstream of their respective pyocin operons. Strain PAO1 is insensitive for pyocin S6, and its S6-type immunity gene provides protection against pyocin S6 activity. Purified pyocin S6 inhibits one-fifth of 110 P. aeruginosa CF clinical isolates tested, showing clearer inhibition zones when the target cells are grown under iron limitation. In this panel, about half of the CF clinical isolates were found to host the S6 genes. The pyocin S6 locus is also present in the genome of some non-CF clinical isolates. PMID:26860427

  14. Cystic fibrosis: nutritional consequences and management.

    PubMed

    Dodge, John A; Turck, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Life expectancy for patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) has steadily improved during the last three decades, and death in childhood is now uncommon. Nutrition is a critical component of the management of CF, and nutritional status is directly associated with both pulmonary status and survival. Expert dietetic care is necessary, and attention must be given to ensuring an adequate energy intake in the face of demands which may be increased by inadequately controlled malabsorption, chronic broncho-pulmonary colonisation by bacteria and fungi, exacerbations of acute lung infection, impaired lung function, and the need for rehabilitation, repair and growth. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is needed by up to 90% of CF patients in Northern Europe, where the 'severe' mutation deltaF508 predominates, but a smaller proportion in Mediterranean countries and elsewhere, because pancreatic insufficiency is one of few features of CF which correlate with genotype. Complications of CF including liver disease and CF-related diabetes pose further challenges. In addition, deficiency of specific nutrients including fat soluble vitamins (particularly A, E and K) essential fatty acids and occasionally minerals occur for a variety of reasons. Osteopenia is common and poorly understood. Liver disease increases the likelihood of vitamin D deficiency. Glucose intolerance and diabetes affect at least 25% of CF adults, and the diabetes differs from both types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, but it inversely correlates with prognosis. Management consists of anticipating problems and addressing them vigorously as soon as they appear. Supplements of vitamins are routinely given. Energy supplements can be oral, enteral or, rarely, parenteral. All supplements, including PERT, are adjusted to individual needs. PMID:16782527

  15. The diffusing capacity in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, J D; Ruppel, G; Shrestha, Y; Kleinhenz, M E

    2003-06-01

    The value of adjusting the diffusing capacity for the lung volume has been demonstrated in a large number of patients with other lung diseases but has not been validated in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary function test results on a cohort of 52 adult CF patients were analyzed to determine whether the diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide by single breath method (DLCO(SB)) when adjusted for alveolar volume (V(A)%), correlated with the severity of pulmonary dysfunction. The DLCO(SB) remained within the reference range except in those with severe lung impairment (61.88 +/- 15.48%). DLCO(SB) has a significant (P < 0.05) positive correlation (0.70, 0.67, 048, 0.69 and 0.31, respectively) with measures of airflow limitation (FVC%, FEV1%, FEV1/FVC%, MVV%, and sGaw) and negative correlation (-0.36 and -0.21, respectively) with measures of air trapping (RV% and RV/TLC%). DLCO(SB)/V(A) remained above 100% of predicted despite worsening lung disease and did not correlate with other measures of lung function. On the other hand, the DLCO(SB) and DLCO(SB)/V(A), when adjusted for V(A)%, decreased and were significantly correlated with worsening airflow limitation and, to a lesser extent, air trapping. The relatively preserved adjusted DLCO(SB) and DLCO(SB)/V(A) values in CF patients up until late in its course may be explained the predominant airway involvement, minimal loss of alveolar-capillary units, and enhanced V/Q relationship due to claustration in CF. PMID:12814143

  16. Cystic Fibrosis Therapy: A Community Ecology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Matthew; Salamon, Peter; Rainey, Paul B.; Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    Current therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) focuses on minimizing the microbial community and the host’s immune response through the aggressive use of airway clearance techniques, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and treatments that break down the pervasive endobronchial biofilm. Antibiotic selection is typically based on the susceptibility of individual microbial strains to specific antibiotics in vitro. Often this approach cannot accurately predict medical outcomes because of factors both technical and biological. Recent culture-independent assessments of the airway microbial and viral communities demonstrated that the CF airway infection is considerably more complex and dynamic than previously appreciated. Understanding the ecological and evolutionary pressures that shape these communities is critically important for the optimal use of current therapies (in both the choice of therapy and timing of administration) and the development of newer strategies. The climax–attack model (CAM) presented here, grounded in basic ecological principles, postulates the existence of two major functional communities. The attack community consists of transient viral and microbial populations that induce strong innate immune responses. The resultant intense immune response creates microenvironments that facilitate the establishment of a climax community that is slower-growing and inherently resistant to antibiotic therapy. Newer methodologies, including sequence-based metagenomic analysis, can track not only the taxonomic composition but also the metabolic capabilities of these changing viral and microbial communities over time. Collecting this information for CF airways will enable the mathematical modeling of microbial community dynamics during disease progression. The resultant understanding of airway communities and their effects on lung physiology will facilitate the optimization of CF therapies. PMID:23103995

  17. Paranasal mucoceles in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Di Cicco, Maurizio; Costantini, Diana; Padoan, Rita; Colombo, Carla

    2005-10-01

    Sinus mucocele is rare in the paediatric age, and so far no prevalence data have been reported in children with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Moreover, safety and efficacy of endoscopic management of sinus mucoceles has been widely proven but only in the adult population. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of this complication and the efficacy of endoscopic sinus surgery in CF patients during the initial years of life. Among the 242 CF patients born in the period between 1990 and 2001 and in regular follow up at our CF Centre, 90 patients with possible symptoms of chronic upper airways disease (CUAD) underwent a comprehensive ENT examination including rhinofibroscopy. In selected cases a CT scan of the paranasal sinuses was also performed. CUAD was diagnosed in 55/90 because of the consistent presence of nasal obstruction, combined with at least two other nasal symptoms such as chronic nasal discharge, snoring, epiphora. Diagnosis of mucoceles (five maxillary bilateral mucoceles, one maxillary unilateral, three maxillary and etmoidal mucoceles) was done by means of CT scan in 9/15 who performed the examination. Median age at the diagnosis was 4+/-0.5 years, ranging from 0.5+/-7 years, showing a prevalence of 16.4% (9/55) among patients with symptoms. Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in all the cases. The follow-up period ranged from 3 months to 6 years with no recurrence observed. Sinus mucocele in CF population is less unusual than expected and a high degree of suspicion is needed. Endoscopic sinus surgery seems to be a safe and efficient treatment of this complication also in a paediatric population at a high risk as for the CF patients. PMID:15939485

  18. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  19. Mechanisms of the noxious inflammatory cycle in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rottner, Mathilde; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie; Martínez, M Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Multiple evidences indicate that inflammation is an event occurring prior to infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. The self-perpetuating inflammatory cycle may play a pathogenic part in this disease. The role of the NF-κB pathway in enhanced production of inflammatory mediators is well documented. The pathophysiologic mechanisms through which the intrinsic inflammatory response develops remain unclear. The unfolded mutated protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTRΔF508), accounting for this pathology, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), induces a stress, and modifies calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, CFTR is implicated in the transport of glutathione, the major antioxidant element in cells. CFTR mutations can alter redox homeostasis and induce an oxidative stress. The disturbance of the redox balance may evoke NF-κB activation and, in addition, promote apoptosis. In this review, we examine the hypotheses of the integrated pathogenic processes leading to the intrinsic inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis. PMID:19284656

  20. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto Junior, Walter; Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel de; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  1. Outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in cystic fibrosis patients, France.

    PubMed

    Bittar, Fadi; Cassagne, Carole; Bosdure, Emmanuelle; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean Christophe; Sarles, Jacques; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2010-08-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that nondiphtheria corynebacteria may be responsible for respiratory tract infections. We report an outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). To identify 18 C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains isolated from 13 French children with CF, we used molecular methods (partial rpoB gene sequencing) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Clinical symptoms were exhibited by 10 children (76.9%), including cough, rhinitis, and lung exacerbations. The results of MALDI-TOF identification matched perfectly with those obtained from molecular identification. Retrospective analysis of sputum specimens by using specific real-time PCR showed that approximately 20% of children with CF were colonized with these bacteria, whereas children who did not have CF had negative test results. Our study reemphasizes the conclusion that correctly identifying bacteria at the species level facilitates detection of an outbreak of new or emerging infections in humans. PMID:20678316

  2. Outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum Infection in Cystic Fibrosis Patients, France

    PubMed Central

    Bittar, Fadi; Cassagne, Carole; Bosdure, Emmanuelle; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Sarles, Jacques; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that nondiphtheria corynebacteria may be responsible for respiratory tract infections. We report an outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). To identify 18 C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains isolated from 13 French children with CF, we used molecular methods (partial rpoB gene sequencing) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Clinical symptoms were exhibited by 10 children (76.9%), including cough, rhinitis, and lung exacerbations. The results of MALDI-TOF identification matched perfectly with those obtained from molecular identification. Retrospective analysis of sputum specimens by using specific real-time PCR showed that ≈20% of children with CF were colonized with these bacteria, whereas children who did not have CF had negative test results. Our study reemphasizes the conclusion that correctly identifying bacteria at the species level facilitates detection of an outbreak of new or emerging infections in humans. PMID:20678316

  3. Cystic fibrosis in Sudanese children: First report of 35 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Salah A; Fadl Elmola, Munadhil A; Karrar, Zain A; Arabi, Ali M E; Abdullah, Mohamed A; Ali, Sulafa K; Elawad, Fathelrahman; Ali, Tag Elsir A; Abdulrahman, Mashair B; Ahmed, Salma O; Gundi, Abelrazzag S

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common severe genetic disorder among children of European descent. It is much less common in Africans and Asians. It affects most critically the lungs causing chronic lung disease, failure to thrive and social deprivation. This is a retrospective review of 35 Sudanese patients with confirmed cystic fibrosis. About 60% of cases presented before the age of 5 years and male to female ratio was 1.7:1.0. Consanguinity was reported in 25 of the families. The main presenting features were productive cough, wheeze and clubbing. The chest X-ray showed variable degrees of hyperinflation, collapse, cystic, fibrotic changes and bronchiectasis involving both upper and lower lobes with blurring of cardiac border and hilar vasculature in the majority of cases. The sweat chloride was between 70 and 140 mmol/l in 83% of the patients (positive > 60 mmol/l). Three patients underwent DNA study and confirmed to have cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations. Gene study was not available for the rest of the patients. To our knowledge this is the first report of confirmed cases of cystic fibrosis in Sudanese patients. PMID:27493388

  4. Interactions Between DNA and Actin in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Hee; Sanders, Lori; Angelini, Thomas; Butler, John; Wong, Gerard

    2003-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid which has a high concentration of DNA and F-actin, two anionic biological polyelectrolytes. In this work, we study the interactions between DNA and actin in an aqueous environment over a wide range of polyelectrolyte lengths and salt levels, using synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering(SAXS) and confocal microscopy. Perliminary results indicate the existence of a compressed phase of nematic F-actin in the presence of DNA. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  5. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Christopher S.; Abraham, William M.; Brogden, Kim A.; Engelhardt, John F.; Fisher, John T.; McCray, Paul B.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K.; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Prather, Randall S.; Sabater, Juan R.; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  6. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S; Abraham, William M; Brogden, Kim A; Engelhardt, John F; Fisher, John T; McCray, Paul B; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Prather, Randall S; Sabater, Juan R; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2008-08-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  7. Pharmacists' perspectives on monitoring adherence to treatment in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Karen; Ryan, Cristín; Downey, Damian G

    2016-04-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) management requires complex treatment regimens but adherence to treatment is poor and has negative health implications. There are various methods of measuring adherence, but little is known regarding the extent of adherence measurement in CF centres throughout the UK and Ireland. Objective To determine the adherence monitoring practices in CF centres throughout the UK and Ireland, and to establish CF pharmacists' views on these practices. Setting UK and Ireland Cystic Fibrosis Pharmacists' Group's annual meeting (2014). Methods A questionnaire was designed, piloted and distributed to pharmacists attending the UK and Ireland Cystic Fibrosis Pharmacists' Group's annual meeting (2014). The main outcome measures were the methods of inhaled/nebulised antibiotic supply and the methods used to measure treatment adherence in CF centres. The questionnaire also ascertained the demographic information of participating pharmacists. Closed question responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Open questions were analysed using content analysis. Results Twenty-one respondents (84 % response) were included in the analysis and were mostly from English centres (66.7 %). Detailed records of patients receiving their inhaled/nebulised antibiotics were lacking. Adherence was most commonly described to be measured at 'every clinic visit' (28.6 %) and 'occasionally' (28.6 %). Patient self-reported adherence was the most commonly used method of measuring adherence in practice (90.5 %). The availability of electronic adherence monitoring in CF centres did not guarantee its use. Pharmacists attributed an equal professional responsibility for adherence monitoring in CF to Consultants, Nurses and Pharmacists. Seventy-six percent of pharmacists felt that the current adherence monitoring practices within their own unit were inadequate and associated with the absence of sufficient specialist CF pharmacist involvement. Many suggested that greater

  8. Dual core quantum dots for highly quantitative ratiometric detection of trypsin activity in cystic fibrosis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelló Serrano, Iván; Stoica, Georgiana; Matas Adams, Alba; Palomares, Emilio

    2014-10-01

    We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for recessive genetic diseases like human cystic fibrosis. In a screening program in which the goal is to detect disease and also the carrier status, early diagnosis could be of great help.We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for

  9. Cystic Fibrosis: A Novel Pharmacologic Approach to Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Modulation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Virant-Young, Deborah; Thomas, Justin; Woiderski, Sarah; Powers, Michelle; Carlier, Joseph; McCarty, James; Kupchick, Tyler; Larder, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) has progressed during the past several decades. Much of this progress is because of advances in genetic testing to precisely identify the underlying cause of CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) dysfunction. However, with more than 1900 mutations that can produce a faulty CFTR, the management of CF can remain a challenge. Several innovative drugs recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration, termed genetic modulators, target the underlying disease by modulating the CFTR defect. This review provides physicians with an established simple classification scheme to guide their use of these drugs. The treatment challenge of 1900 CFTR mutations has been simplified into 6 physiologic classes, each paired with an available therapy to offer patients the most functional improvement. Drug therapy monitoring, adverse effects, and indications for discontinuation must also be considered. PMID:26322933

  10. Changing susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients with the clinical use of newer antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Bosso, J A; Allen, J E; Matsen, J M

    1989-01-01

    To detect a change in antibiotic susceptibility patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates upon the introduction and clinical use of ciprofloxacin, aztreonam, and ceftazidime, MICs for clinical isolates collected before introduction of the antibiotics, during early clinical use, and later were determined for these and seven other antipseudomonal antibiotics. Concomitant resistance to two or more antibiotics was also studied. Over the three study periods, rates of susceptibility to 9 of the 10 antibiotics decreased. The largest decrease occurred with ceftazidime. Analysis of subsets of isolates from patients treated with ciprofloxacin or aztreonam also showed declining susceptibility to the latter but a stabilization of susceptibility to the former after an initial decline. Concomitant resistance within and among antibiotic classes was common. PMID:2499252

  11. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.

  12. Heterogeneity of the cystic fibrosis phenotype in a large kindred family in Qatar with cystic fibrosis mutation (I1234V).

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Al Thani, G; Dawod, S T; Kambouris, M; Al Hamed, M

    2001-04-01

    Twenty-nine subjects (17 families) with cystic fibrosis belonging to the same Bedouin tribe were screened for cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR). Homozygous I1234V mutation in exon 19 was identified in all families with a relatively high rate of consanguinity (96.6 per cent). The homozygous I1234V mutation tended to present with a variable degree of pulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency and electrolyte imbalance. Homozygous I1234V was found to be a common mutation in the studied Bedouin tribe in Qatar. PMID:11336127

  13. Unplugging Mucus in Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A

    2016-04-01

    Airway mucus obstruction is a key feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The thin layer of mucus that covers healthy airway surfaces has important protective functions in lung defense. However, excess mucus produces airflow obstruction and provides a nidus for bacterial infection and inflammation. Despite its importance in pathogenesis, understanding of the mechanisms underlying airway mucus obstruction, as well as therapeutic options, remain limited. Studies in the rare genetic disease CF identified airway surface dehydration due to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene dysfunction as an important disease mechanism that may explain mucus stasis and plugging in a spectrum of muco-obstructive lung diseases, including COPD. This concept is supported by the phenotype of the β-epithelial Na(+) channel-transgenic mouse that exhibits airway surface dehydration and develops a spontaneous lung disease that shares key features with CF and COPD, such as airway mucus plugging, chronic neutrophilic inflammation, and structural lung damage. Furthermore, preclinical testing demonstrated that hydration strategies, including osmotically active hypertonic saline and preventive inhibition of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel are effective in unplugging airways in this mouse model of chronic obstructive lung disease. On the other hand, genetic deletion of neutrophil elastase, a potent stimulus for mucus hypersecretion, reduced goblet cell metaplasia and mucin expression but had no effect on mucus obstruction in vivo. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that airway surface dehydration is sufficient to produce mucus obstruction even in the absence of mucus hypersecretion and support further clinical testing of hydrating agents as a promising therapeutic strategy to unplug mucus in CF and COPD. PMID:27115954

  14. L206W mutation of the cystic fibrosis gene, relatively frequent in French Canadians, is associated with atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rozen, R.; Ferreira-Rajabi, L.; Robb, L.

    1995-07-03

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Over 400 mutations have been reported at this locus. Although severe forms of cystic fibrosis are usually associated with pancreatic insufficiency, pulmonary dysfunction, and elevated sweat chloride, there is a wide range of phenotypes, including congenital absence of the vas deferens, observed with some of the milder mutations. The L206W mutation, which was first identified in patients from South France, is relatively frequent in French Canadians from Quebec. In this report, we document the atypical form of cystic fibrosis associated with this mutation in a cohort of 7 French Canadian probands. 20 refs.

  15. Pancreatic Cystosis in Two Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kampouras, Asterios; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Markou, Andreas; Anastasiou, Athanasia; Tsanakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present pancreatic cystosis in two adolescents with cystic fibrosis, a 13-year-old girl and an 18-year-old boy. In pancreatic cystosis, which is a rare manifestation of CF, the pancreatic parenchyma is replaced with multiple cysts of different sizes. Pancreatic cystosis is mainly an imaging based diagnosis and frequent follow-up should be recommended. PMID:27110419

  16. THE METABOLIC EFFECTS OF PREGNANCY IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to determine glucose tolerance in pregnant women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to relate glucose tolerance to insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, and protein turnover. We studied 8 CF women during pregnancy (CFPreg). Results were compared with those from 9 pregnant contr...

  17. Delayed diagnosis of cystic fibrosis due to normal sweat electrolytes.

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, I M; Ward, I; Schwarz, M; David, T J

    1995-01-01

    The sweat test, if properly performed, is a reliable tool to assist in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. In practice, most errors arise from false positive results. This case serves as a reminder that false negatives may also occur. PMID:7562815

  18. CFTR Modulators for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Rebecca S; Fellner, Chris

    2014-07-01

    Defects in a single gene lead to the defective proteins that cause cystic fibrosis, making the disease an ideal candidate for mutation-targeted therapy. Although ivacaftor is currently the only FDA-approved CFTR modifier, others are in development. PMID:25083129

  19. Strength and Conditioning for the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how a strength and conditioning program can be safety incorporated into the daily life of people with cystic fibrosis as a complementary therapy to medications, regular checkups, bronchial drainage, and respiratory therapy, examining physical restrictions and guidelines, exercise prescriptions, and exercise applications, and explaining…

  20. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25053610

  1. Students as Technicians: Screening Newborns for Cystic Fibrosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, freshman college students learn biotechnology techniques while playing the role of a laboratory technician. They perform simulations of three diagnostic tests used to screen newborns for cystic fibrosis. By performing an ELISA, a PCR analysis, and a conductivity test, students learn how biotechnology techniques can be used to…

  2. Pancreatic Cystosis in Two Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kampouras, Asterios; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Markou, Andreas; Anastasiou, Athanasia; Tsanakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present pancreatic cystosis in two adolescents with cystic fibrosis, a 13-year-old girl and an 18-year-old boy. In pancreatic cystosis, which is a rare manifestation of CF, the pancreatic parenchyma is replaced with multiple cysts of different sizes. Pancreatic cystosis is mainly an imaging based diagnosis and frequent follow-up should be recommended. PMID:27110419

  3. 78 FR 26681 - Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... we published in the Federal Register on February 4, 2013 (78 FR 7968). We use Listings 3.04 and 103... ADMINISTRATION RIN 0960-AF58 Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis AGENCY: Social Security... additional information regarding this teleconference, please contact Cheryl Williams, Office of...

  4. Microbiology of airway disease in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, P H

    1991-01-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis have abbreviated life spans primarily due to chronic airway infection. A limited number of types of organisms are responsible for these infections, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being of primary importance. In the pre-antibiotic era, greater than 90% of deaths due to infection were caused by S. aureus and death usually occurred in the first 2 years of life. With the advent of effective antistaphylococcal therapy, life spans increased and P. aeruginosa became the pathogen of primary importance. P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with cystic fibrosis have a unique phenotypic characteristic referred to as "mucoid." The mucoid phenotype is due to the production of a mucoid exopolysaccharide. A mucoid exopolysaccharide is believed to play a central role in the establishment of chronic pseudomonal lung infection in these patients. A third organism, Pseudomonas cepacia, has recently been detected in the airways of older patients with cystic fibrosis and is associated with increased mortality. The virulence of P. cepacia is not understood, but the organism is extremely refractory to antimicrobial therapy. Other bacteria, including Haemophilus influenzae and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, appear to play a secondary role in airway infection. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important fungal agent causing allergic bronchopulmonary disease. The role of viruses has only recently been examined. At least in some patients with cystic fibrosis, respiratory syncytial virus may be important in predisposing to subsequent bacterial infections. PMID:1900735

  5. Vocational Rehabilitation of the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isralsky, Marc; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explored vocational development, self-concept, and vocational adjustment of persons with cystic fibrosis. The following measures of vocational development correlated with work adjustment: vocational plans, educational plans, initiative, occupational information, and average vocational development score. Vocational development did not correlate…

  6. The Cystic Fibrosis Database: Content and Research Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, William M., Jr.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the files contained in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) database and discusses educational and research opportunities using this database. Topics discussed include queries, evaluating the relevance of items retrieved, and use of the database in an online searching course in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North…

  7. Psychological Concomitants of Cystic Fibrosis in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashani, Javad H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Administered several psychiatric inventories to 30 cystic fibrosis and 30 matched control children and their parents. Data analysis revealed few differences in either psychopathological symptoms or psychiatric diagnoses between groups. Differences were either physical in nature or did not depart enough from normal scores to merit label of high…

  8. Cystic fibrosis newborn screening: a model for neuromuscular disease screening?

    PubMed

    Scully, Michele A; Farrell, Philip M; Ciafaloni, Emma; Griggs, Robert C; Kwon, Jennifer M

    2015-02-01

    Congenital neuromuscular disorders, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), and Pompe disease (acid maltase deficiency [AMD]), are candidates for universal newborn screening (NBS). In this article, we discuss the future path of NBS for these disorders with particular emphasis on DMD NBS, because of the likely approval of new gene-modifying treatments, the possible benefits of earlier treatment with corticosteroids, and the recently demonstrated feasibility of a 2-tiered approach to NBS with screening by creatine kinase (CK) levels in dried blood spots followed by mutation detection in those with elevated CK. The cystic fibrosis (CF) NBS program is a successful model for NBS. CF outcomes have consistently improved into adulthood following introduction of CF NBS because considerable resources have been devoted to practices that include: attention to improving laboratory screening, consistent confirmatory testing and immediate referral of all newly diagnosed infants to designated CF care centers that follow established practice guidelines, and ongoing evaluation of CF care centers via a centralized clinical database. Like CF, DMD, SMA, and infantile AMD are inexorably debilitating and require lifetime multidisciplinary clinical management. NBS would address the delays in diagnosis that prevent patients from receiving timely treatments. Standardized care following early diagnosis would reduce disparities in clinical care and outcomes. NBS in these neuromuscular disorders should be implemented, utilizing lessons learned from the past 20 years of CF NBS: standardized protocols for all patients identified by DMD NBS, longitudinal follow-up in multidisciplinary clinics, and coordinated oversight of these clinics. PMID:25425541

  9. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered ‘good’ agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  10. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered 'good' agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  11. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use. PMID:26452630

  12. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use. PMID:26452630

  13. miR-17 overexpression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells decreases interleukin-8 production.

    PubMed

    Oglesby, Irene K; Vencken, Sebastian F; Agrawal, Raman; Gaughan, Kevin; Molloy, Kevin; Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; McElvaney, Noel G; Mall, Marcus A; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 levels are higher than normal in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, causing neutrophil infiltration and non-resolving inflammation. Overexpression of microRNAs that target IL-8 expression in airway epithelial cells may represent a therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis. IL-8 protein and mRNA were measured in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial brushings (n=20 per group). miRNAs decreased in the cystic fibrosis lung and predicted to target IL-8 mRNA were quantified in βENaC-transgenic, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-/- and wild-type mice, primary cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and a range of cystic fibrosis versus non-cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell lines or cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas-conditioned medium or cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The effect of miRNA overexpression on IL-8 protein production was measured. miR-17 regulates IL-8 and its expression was decreased in adult cystic fibrosis bronchial brushings, βENaC-transgenic mice and bronchial epithelial cells chronically stimulated with Pseudomonas-conditioned medium. Overexpression of miR-17 inhibited basal and agonist-induced IL-8 protein production in F508del-CFTR homozygous CFTE29o(-) tracheal, CFBE41o(-) and/or IB3 bronchial epithelial cells. These results implicate defective CFTR, inflammation, neutrophilia and mucus overproduction in regulation of miR-17. Modulating miR-17 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells may be a novel anti-inflammatory strategy for cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26160865

  14. Molecular Characterization of Achromobacter Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis and Non-Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Barrado, Laura; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Martínez, M. Teresa; García, Gloria; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and nrdA sequence analysis identified 6 different species or genogroups and 13 sequence types (STs) among 15 Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 7 species or genogroups and 11 STs among 11 isolates from non-CF patients. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the most frequently isolated species among CF patients. PMID:23536401

  15. Recombinant human DNase I reduces the viscosity of cystic fibrosis sputum.

    PubMed

    Shak, S; Capon, D J; Hellmiss, R; Marsters, S A; Baker, C L

    1990-12-01

    Respiratory distress and progressive lung destruction in cystic fibrosis can be attributed to bacterial persistence and the accumulation of viscous purulent secretions in the airways. More than 30 yr ago it was suggested that the large amounts of DNA in purulent secretions contribute to its viscosity and that bovine pancreatic DNase I could reduce the viscosity. To evaluate the potential clinical utility of recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) in the treatment of cystic fibrosis, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed rhDNase. Catalytic amounts of rhDNase greatly reduce the viscosity of purulent cystic fibrosis sputum, transforming it within minutes from a nonflowing viscous gel to a flowing liquid. The reduction in viscosity is associated with a decrease in size of DNA in the sputum. Inhalation of a rhDNase aerosol may be a simple direct approach that will help individuals with cystic fibrosis and other patients with pneumonia or bronchitis to clear their airways of purulent secretions. PMID:2251263

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase activation by free neutrophil elastase contributes to bronchiectasis progression in early cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Luke W; Sutanto, Erika N; Ling, Kak-Ming; Looi, Kevin; Iosifidis, Thomas; Martinovich, Kelly M; Shaw, Nicole C; Kicic-Starcevich, Elizabeth; Knight, Darryl A; Ranganathan, Sarath; Stick, Stephen M; Kicic, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Neutrophil elastase is the most significant predictor of bronchiectasis in early-life cystic fibrosis; however, the causal link between neutrophil elastase and airway damage is not well understood. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in extracellular matrix modelling and are activated by neutrophil elastase. The aim of this study was to assess if MMP activation positively correlates with neutrophil elastase activity, disease severity and bronchiectasis in young children with cystic fibrosis.Total MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 and TIMP-1 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collected from young children with cystic fibrosis during annual clinical assessment. Active/pro-enzyme ratio of MMP-9 was determined by gelatin zymography. Annual chest computed tomography imaging was scored for bronchiectasis.A higher MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was associated with free neutrophil elastase activity. In contrast, MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio decreased and MMP-1 and MMP-7 were not detected in the majority of samples. Ratio of active/pro-enzyme MMP-9 was also higher in the presence of free neutrophil elastase activity, but not infection. Across the study cohort, both MMP-9/TIMP-1 and active MMP-9 were associated with progression of bronchiectasis.Both MMP-9/TIMP-1 and active MMP-9 increased with free neutrophil elastase and were associated with bronchiectasis, further demonstrating that free neutrophil elastase activity should be considered an important precursor to cystic fibrosis structural disease. PMID:25929954

  17. Airway inflammatory markers in individuals with cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Bergin, David A; Hurley, Killian; Mehta, Adwait; Cox, Stephen; Ryan, Dorothy; O’Neill, Shane J; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2013-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is an airway disease characterized by thickening of the bronchial wall, chronic inflammation , and destruction of affected bronchi. Underlying etiologies include severe pulmonary infection and cystic fibrosis (CF); however, in a substantial number of patients with non-CF-related bronchiectasis (NCFB), no cause is found. The increasing armamentarium of therapies now available to combat disease in CF is in stark contrast to the limited tools employed in NCFB. Our study aimed to evaluate similarities and differences in airway inflammatory markers in patients with NCFB and CF, and to suggest potential common treatment options. The results of this study show that NCFB bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples possessed significantly increased NE activity and elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01); however, the levels detected were lower than in CF (P < 0.01). Interleukin-8 (IL-8) concentrations were significantly elevated in NCFB and CF compared to controls (P < 0.05), but in contrast, negligible levels of IL-18 were detected in both NCFB and CF. Analogous concentrations of IL-10 and IL-4 measured in NCFB and CF were statistically elevated above the healthy control values (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). These results indicate high levels of important proinflammatory markers in both NCFB and CF and support the use of appropriate anti-inflammatory therapies already employed in the treatment of CF bronchiectasis in NCFB. PMID:23426081

  18. Targets for cystic fibrosis therapy: proteomic analysis and correction of mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Collawn, James F; Fu, Lianwu; Bebok, Zsuzsa

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic analysis has proved to be an important tool for understanding the complex nature of genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis (CF), by defining the cellular protein environment (proteome) associated with wild-type and mutant proteins. Proteomic screens identified the proteome of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and provided fundamental information to studies designed for understanding the crucial components of physiological CFTR function. Simultaneously, high-throughput screens for small-molecular correctors of CFTR mutants provided promising candidates for therapy. The majority of CF cases are caused by nucleotide deletions (ΔF508 CFTR; >75%), resulting in CFTR misfolding, or insertion of premature termination codons (~10%), leading to unstable mRNA and reduced levels of truncated dysfunctional CFTR. In this article, we review recent results of proteomic screens, developments in identifying correctors for the most frequent CFTR mutants, and comment on how integration of the knowledge gained from these studies may aid in finding a cure for CF and a number of other genetic disorders. PMID:20653506

  19. Sleep-disordered breathing in patients with cystic fibrosis *

    PubMed Central

    Veronezi, Jefferson; Carvalho, Ana Paula; Ricachinewsky, Claudio; Hoffmann, Anneliese; Kobayashi, Danielle Yuka; Piltcher, Otavio Bejzman; Silva, Fernando Antonio Abreu e; Martinez, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To test the hypothesis that disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is correlated with an increased risk of sleep apnea. Methods: A total of 34 CF patients underwent clinical and functional evaluation, as well as portable polysomnography, spirometry, and determination of IL-1β levels. Results: Mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), SpO2 on room air, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale score were 4.8 ± 2.6, 95.9 ± 1.9%, and 7.6 ± 3.8 points, respectively. Of the 34 patients, 19 were well-nourished, 6 were at nutritional risk, and 9 were malnourished. In the multivariate model to predict the AHI, the following variables remained significant: nutritional status (β = −0.386; p = 0.014); SpO2 (β = −0.453; p = 0.005), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (β = 0.429; p = 0.006). The model explained 51% of the variation in the AHI. Conclusions: The major determinants of sleep apnea were nutritional status, SpO2, and daytime sleepiness. This knowledge not only provides an opportunity to define the clinical risk of having sleep apnea but also creates an avenue for the treatment and prevention of the disease. PMID:26398755

  20. Targeting of dornase alpha therapy in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ledson, M J; Wahbi, Z; Convery, R P; Cowperthwaite, C; Heaf, D P; Walshaw, M J

    1998-01-01

    Although dornase alpha (recombinant human DNase) can thin the viscid pulmonary secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF), clinical trials in groups of unselected patients have shown only modest average improvements in pulmonary function. The product is very expensive, so in conjunction with purchasers we designed selection criteria and a protocol for a 2-week trial to target CF individuals who might gain most benefit. Treatment was to be continued in those showing > or = 10% improvement in pulmonary function. Those who had a trial of dornase alpha were followed up for 2 years. Of 25 patients who had a 2-week trial of dornase alpha, 17 met the criteria for continuation (average gain in forced expiratory volume 37%). The 11 of these who were still alive at 2 years had a greater initial average FEV1 improvement than those who had died (45% versus 22%), and still had an average improvement of 31% at 2 years. The 8 patients who did not meet the criteria for continuation were older and had required fewer intravenous antibiotic courses. All these were alive at 2 years with unchanged clinical indices. This method of selection for dornase alpha treatment allows targeting to those who gain most benefit without disadvantaging the remaining patients. Furthermore, production of such guidelines in conjunction with purchasers obviates funding difficulties and allows rational prescribing. PMID:9771494

  1. Analysis of Cystic Fibrosis in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Selimovic, Amina; Mujicic, Ermina; Milisic, Selma; Mesihovic-Dinarevic, Senka; Dzinovic, Amra; Cengic, Selma; Bakalovic, Ganimeta; Moro, Mahir; Djozic, Meliha; Lukic-Bilela, Lada

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to present the first total number of tested children in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the number of children with positive sweat test. During the study we determined the number of ill children, the median age of children with cystic fibrosis, date of initial diagnosis, an average amount of chloride in the sweat. Material and methods: The study was a retrospective, conducted at the Department of Pulmonology Pediatric Clinic of University Clinical Center of Sarajevo. Results: In the period from March 2003 to December 2014, we have tested 625 children. 351 child were from Sarajevo Canton and 272 children from other cantons. Female children were more affected then male children, in the ratio of 1: 1,105. An average age of female children was 4.19±4.26 years, and the male 2.15±3.11 years. The median concentration of chloride in the sweat measured by sweat test was for male children 103.05±21.29 mmol/L, and for the female children 96.05±28.85 mmol/L. Conclusion: Most of children in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina have ∆F508 gene mutation. In the post-war period we started to use a sweat test. Male children tend to live longer than female children with CF. PMID:26543305

  2. Pandoraea pnomenusa Isolated from an Australian Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Mark; Malley, Roslyn C.; Warren, Sanchia J. C.; Beggs, Sean A.; Swallow, Oliver F. E.; McEwan, Belinda; Stock, David; Roddam, Louise F.

    2016-01-01

    Pandoraea species are considered as emerging pathogens in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). The contribution of these organisms to disease progression in CF patients is not fully understood owing in large measure to the scant reports in clinical and research literature describing their colonization of CF patients and their associated virulence determinants. In an effort to increase awareness and evidence for Pandoraea spp. infection in people with CF, and to stimulate research aimed at unraveling the pathogenic properties of Pandoraea, we report a case of a 26-year-old Australian (Tasmanian) man with CF who was chronically infected with Pandoraea pnomenusa for at least one year prior to his death from respiratory failure. In addition, we describe for the first time evidence suggesting that this bacterium is a facultative anaerobe and report on the availability of a whole genome sequence for this organism. To the best of our knowledge, this report represents only the second clinical case study of P. pnomenusa infection in the world, and the first in an Australian CF patient. PMID:27242717

  3. Bringing new treatments to the bedside in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Amanda L; Geddes, Duncan M

    2004-02-01

    The discovery of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene in 1989 led to a dramatic increase in the understanding of the molecular basis of CF. Increased knowledge has provided the opportunity to target drug development at correcting the basic defect either by gene therapy or pharmacological modulation of the abnormal physiological processes. Development of new medications for the CF population poses many challenges. The discovery and development of new medications is always time consuming and expensive. Since CF affects a small population worldwide, the potential for a drug company to profit from a new treatment is limited. In addition, each new therapy must have an additional and proven benefit to be attractive to clinicians and consumers, otherwise it will not be commercially viable. Demonstrating clinical benefit is problematic as a limited number of patients are available to participate in clinical trails and outcome measures, such as length of life, are hard to measure. In this review we will illustrate these challenges by discussing the development of treatments which have successfully reached the bedside and those that were unsuccessful. PMID:14730652

  4. [Insights into cystic fibrosis-related bone disease].

    PubMed

    Braun, C; Bacchetta, J; Reix, P

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), prevalence of late complications such as CF-related bone disease (CFBD) has increased. It was initially described in 24% of the adult population with CF and has also been reported in the pediatric population. CFBD is multifactorial and progresses in different steps. Both decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption (in different amounts) are observed. CFBD is likely primitive (directly related to the CFTR defect itself), but is also worsened by acquired secondary factors such as lung infections, chronic inflammation, denutrition, vitamin deficiency, and decreased physical activity. CFBD may be clinically apparent (i.e., mainly vertebral and costal fractures), or clinically asymptomatic (therefore corresponding to abnormalities in bone density and architecture). CFBD management mainly aims to prevent the occurrence of fractures. Prevention and regular monitoring of bone disease as early as 8 years of age is of the utmost importance, as is the control of possible secondary deleterious CFBD factors. New radiological tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, allow an accurate evaluation of cortical and trabecular bone micro-architecture in addition to compartmental density; as such, they will likely improve the assessment of the bone fracture threat in CF patients in the near future. PMID:27345551

  5. Pathogenesis and management of nasal polyposis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Jochen G; Koitschev, Assen

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in preschool age, during their lives, up to 50% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients experience obstructing nasal polyposis (NP), which is rare in non-CF children. Pathogenetic factors of NP in general and especially in CF are still obscure. However, defective epithelial ion transport from mucosal glands plays a central role in CF, and viscous secretions impair mucociliary clearance, promoting chronic pathogen colonization and neutrophil-dominated chronic inflammation. Presently, CF-NP is not curable but can be clinically stabilized, though the large variety of proposed treatment modalities indicates a lack of standardization and of evidence of treatment efficacy. When conservative measures are exhausted, surgical intervention combining individually adapted endoscopic sinus surgery and supportive conservative treatment is performed. Topical steroids, approved as the gold standard for non-CF NP, may be beneficial, but they are discussed to be less effective in neutrophilic inflammation, and CF-specific antimicrobial and mucolytic therapy, as is true of all treatment modalities, urgently requires evaluation by controlled clinical trials within interdisciplinary networks. PMID:22350539

  6. Pathogenesis and management of nasal polyposis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Jochen G; Koitschev, Assen

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in preschool age, during their lives, upto 50% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients experience obstructing nasal polyposis (NP), which is rare in non-CF children. Pathogenetic factors of NP in general and especially in CF are still obscure. However, defective epithelial ion transport from mucosal glands plays a central role in CF, and viscous secretions impair mucociliary clearance, promoting chronic pathogen colonization and neutrophil-dominated chronic inflammation.Presently, CF-NP is not curable but can be clinically stabilized,though the large variety of proposed treatment modalities indicates a lack of standardization and of evidence of treatment efficacy. When conservative measures are exhausted, surgical intervention combining individually adapted endoscopic sinus surgery and supportive conservative treatment is performed. Topical steroids, approved as the gold standard for non-CF NP, may be beneficial, but they are discussed to be less effective in neutrophilic inflammation,and CF-specific antimicrobial and mucolytic therapy, as is true of all treatment modalities, urgently requires evaluation by controlled clinical trials within interdisciplinary networks. PMID:23520643

  7. Chronic ataluren (PTC124) treatment of nonsense mutation cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wilschanski, M; Miller, L L; Shoseyov, D; Blau, H; Rivlin, J; Aviram, M; Cohen, M; Armoni, S; Yaakov, Y; Pugatsch, T; Pugatch, T; Cohen-Cymberknoh, M; Miller, N L; Reha, A; Northcutt, V J; Hirawat, S; Donnelly, K; Elfring, G L; Ajayi, T; Kerem, E

    2011-07-01

    In a subset of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), nonsense mutations (premature stop codons) disrupt production of full-length, functional CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Ataluren (PTC124) allows ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons in mRNA. We evaluated drug activity and safety in patients with nonsense mutation CF who took ataluren three times daily (morning, midday and evening) for 12 weeks at either a lower dose (4, 4 and 8 mg·kg(-1)) or higher dose (10, 10 and 20 mg·kg(-1)). The study enrolled 19 patients (10 males and nine females aged 19-57 yrs; dose: lower 12, higher seven) with a classic CF phenotype, at least one CFTR nonsense mutation allele, and an abnormal nasal total chloride transport. Both ataluren doses were similarly active, improving total chloride transport with a combined mean change of -5.4 mV (p<0.001), and on-treatment responses (at least -5 mV improvement) and hyperpolarisations (values more electrically negative than -5 mV) in 61% (p<0.001) and 56% (p = 0.002) of patients. CFTR function was greater with time and was accompanied by trends toward improvements in pulmonary function and CF-related coughing. Adverse clinical and laboratory findings were uncommon and usually mild. Chronic ataluren administration produced time-dependent improvements in CFTR activity and clinical parameters with generally good tolerability. PMID:21233271

  8. Microbial colonization and lung function in adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hector, Andreas; Kirn, Tobias; Ralhan, Anjali; Graepler-Mainka, Ute; Berenbrinker, Sina; Riethmueller, Joachim; Hogardt, Michael; Wagner, Marlies; Pfleger, Andreas; Autenrieth, Ingo; Kappler, Matthias; Griese, Matthias; Eber, Ernst; Martus, Peter; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-05-01

    With intensified antibiotic therapy and longer survival, patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are colonized with a more complex pattern of bacteria and fungi. However, the clinical relevance of these emerging pathogens for lung function remains poorly defined. The aim of this study was to assess the association of bacterial and fungal colonization patterns with lung function in adolescent patients with CF. Microbial colonization patterns and lung function parameters were assessed in 770 adolescent European (German/Austrian) CF patients in a retrospective study (median follow-up time: 10years). Colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA were most strongly associated with loss of lung function, while mainly colonization with Haemophilus influenzae was associated with preserved lung function. Aspergillus fumigatus was the only species that was associated with an increased risk for infection with P. aeruginosa. Microbial interaction analysis revealed three distinct microbial clusters within the longitudinal course of CF lung disease. Collectively, this study identified potentially protective and harmful microbial colonization patterns in adolescent CF patients. Further studies in different patient cohorts are required to evaluate these microbial patterns and to assess their clinical relevance. PMID:26856310

  9. New insights about miRNAs in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sonneville, Florence; Ruffin, Manon; Guillot, Loïc; Rousselet, Nathalie; Le Rouzic, Philippe; Corvol, Harriet; Tabary, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    The molecular basis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is a mutation-related defect in the epithelial-cell chloride channel called CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This defect alters chloride ion transport and impairs water transport across the cell membrane. Marked clinical heterogeneity occurs even among patients carrying the same mutation in the CFTR gene. Recent studies suggest that such heterogeneity could be related to epigenetic factors and/or miRNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs that modulate the expression of various proteins via post-transcriptional inhibition of gene expression. In the respiratory system, it has been shown that the dysregulation of miRNAs could participate in and lead to pathogenicity in several diseases. In CF airways, recent studies have proposed that miRNAs may modulate disease progression by affecting the production of either CFTR or various proteins that are dysregulated in the CF lung. Herein, we provide an overview of studies showing how miRNAs may modulate CF pathology and the efforts to develop miRNA-based treatments and/or to consider miRNAs as biomarkers. The identification of miRNAs involved in CF disease progression opens up new avenues toward treatments targeting selected clinical components of CF, independently from the CFTR mutation. PMID:25687559

  10. Cystic fibrosis in a large kindred family in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Dawod, S T; al Thani, G

    2000-09-01

    We describe 45 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), diagnosed between June 1987 and May 1999, seen at the Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar in the Arabian Gulf. Twenty-six of 32 families in the study were related and belonged to the same Bedouin tribe. The parents of 98% of these cases were consanguineous. Metabolic alkalosis and/or hypo-electrolytaemia were found in a large proportion of infants with CF. Cystic fibrosis in Qatari children is phenotypically variable with mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, and none of them died during this study. Among the non-Arabic-Asian patients, pulmonary symptoms were more severe, Pseudomonas colonization was earlier, pancreatic insufficiency occurred in infancy and four died in early life. PMID:11064773

  11. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Gillian M; White, Michelle M; Browne, Niall; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  12. Is there a role for stool metabolomics in cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Pickford, Russell; Jaffe, Adam; Ooi, Chee Y

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies utilizing metabolomics have focused on the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Here, we performed fecal metabolomics on pancreatic insufficient (PI) and sufficient (PS) children with CF and compared them with healthy controls (HC). Fecal metabolomics can differentiate between PS-CF and PI-CF. We identified a potential biomarker of disease severity or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function (m/z, 463.247; retention time, 0.570717 min) that discriminates between HC versus PS-CF versus PI-CF. We also identified lipoyl-GMP as a potential novel inflammatory biomarker, and elevation in fecal glycerol 1,2-didodecanoate 3-tetradecanoate may provide clues to the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. For the first time, we demonstrate the potential applications of fecal metabolomics in CF. PMID:27553892

  13. Analysis of 16 cystic fibrosis mutations in Mexican patients

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Torres, C.; Rojas-Martinez, A.; Barrera-Saldana, H.A.

    1997-04-14

    We carried out molecular analysis of 80 chromosomes from 40 unrelated Mexican patients with a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. The study was performed in two PCR steps: a preliminary one to identify mutation AF508, the most frequent cause of cystic fibrosis worldwide, and the second a reverse dot-blot with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes to detect 15 additional common mutations in the Caucasian population. A frequency of 45% for AF508 was found, making it the most common in our sample of Mexican patients. Another five mutations (G542X, 3849 + 10 kb C{r_arrow}T, N1303K, S549N, and 621 + 1 G{r_arrow}T) were detected, and these accounted for 11.25%. The remaining mutations (43.75%) were undetectable with the methodology used. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced drug transport in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Plumley, John B.; Withers, Nathan J.; Kopciuch, Michael; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Huber, Dale L.; Smyth, Hugh D.; Osinski, Marek

    2012-10-01

    Iron oxide colloidal nanoparticles (ferrofluids) are investigated for application in the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung infections, the leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. We investigate the use of iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the effectiveness of administering antibiotics through aerosol inhalation using two mechanisms: directed particle movement in the presence of an inhomogeneous static external magnetic field and magnetic hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia is an effective method for decreasing the viscosity of the mucus and biofilm, thereby enhancing drug, immune cell, and antibody penetration to the affected area. Iron oxide nanoparticles of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power). Nanoparticles in the superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited excellent heating power. Additionally, iron oxide / zinc selenide core/shell nanoparticles were prepared, in order to enable imaging of the iron oxide nanoparticles. We also report on synthesis and characterization of MnSe/ZnSeS alloyed quantum dots.

  15. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences

    PubMed Central

    McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  16. Allele frequency for Cystic fibrosis in Indians vis-a/-vis global populations.

    PubMed

    Bepari, Karnajit Kumar; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Paul, Prosenjit; Halder, Binata; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This gene encodes a protein involved in epithelial anion channel. Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-limiting genetic disorder in Caucasians; it also affects other ethnic groups like the Blacks and the Native Americans. Cystic fibrosis is considered to be rare among individuals from the Indian subcontinent. We analyzed a total of 29 world׳s populations for cystic fibrosis on the basis of gene frequency and heterozygosity. Among 29 countries Switzerland revealed the highest gene frequency and heterozygosity for CF (0.022, 0.043) whereas Japan recorded the lowest values (0.002, 0.004) followed by India (0.004, 0.008). Our analysis suggests that the prevalence of cystic fibrosis is very low in India. PMID:26339151

  17. Is deafness mutation screening required in cystic fibrosis patients?

    PubMed

    Abusamra, Rania; McShane, Donna

    2016-08-01

    Aminoglycosides are widely used in cystic fibrosis management. The m.1555A>G mutation predisposes to aminoglycoside ototoxicity. It may cause later onset hearing loss in the absence of aminoglycosides use and gradual hearing loss may be an inevitable consequence of the mutation. Given that aminoglycoside therapy forms the backbone of IV protocols in CF, this article recommends screening for this mutation to allow informed decision-making prior to aminoglycoside administration, to avoid preventable deafness. PMID:27427311

  18. Bilateral paranasal sinus mucopyoceles in a child with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Aubry, K; Orsel, S; Menetrey, C; Bessède, J P; Sauvage, J P

    2009-01-01

    Mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses are well-described complication of chronic sinusitis in adults. They are extremely rare in children and the main predisposing factor is cystic fibrosis (CF). We report a case of bilateral ethmoid and maxillary sinus mucopyoceles, associated with CF occurring in a six months old boy. The main symptom was a complete nasal obstruction. The marsupialization of mucocele was performed by endoscopic surgery. One year follow-up showed no recurrence. PMID:20597414

  19. Amyloid goitre and hypothyroidism secondary to cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sala, R.; Prados, C.; Sastre Marcos, J.; García Río, F.; Vicandi, B.; de Ramón, A.; Villamor, J.

    1995-01-01

    Although cystic fibrosis (CF) is still the most frequently fatal childhood disease, many adults now survive into their third and fourth decades. Uncommon complications of chronic diseases, such as amyloidosis, while infrequent, may now appear during the course of CF in adulthood. We present a case of a patient with CF who was diagnosed with hypothyroidism due to amyloid deposits in the thyroid. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7596942

  20. Partial splenectomy in cystic fibrosis patients with hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, G H; Eber, E; Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Zach, M S

    2003-02-01

    We report three cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with hypersplenism who underwent partial splenectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful in two patients; one patient developed a complication necessitating resection of the rest of the spleen. Haematological parameters improved and oesophageal varices regressed in all patients. On follow up, one patient showed a normal spleen, the other a normally functioning accessory spleen; the third patient again developed splenomegaly with hypersplenism. Partial splenectomy is a promising therapeutic option for CF patients with hypersplenism. PMID:12538318

  1. A haplotype framework for cystic fibrosis mutations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R; Sanati, Mohammad H; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R

    2006-02-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, DeltaF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  2. A Haplotype Framework for Cystic Fibrosis Mutations in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G.; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R.; Sanati, Mohammad H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, ΔF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  3. Pseudomonas siderophores in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lois W; Reid, David W; Sharples, Katrina J; Lamont, Iain L

    2011-12-01

    The lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis become chronically infected with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which heralds progressive lung damage and a decline in health. Iron is a crucial micronutrient for bacteria and its acquisition is a key factor in infection. P. aeruginosa can acquire this element by secreting pyoverdine and pyochelin, iron-chelating compounds (siderophores) that scavenge iron and deliver it to the bacteria. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is generally considered a key factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to cause infection. We have investigated the amounts of pyoverdine in 148 sputum samples from 36 cystic fibrosis patients (30 infected with P. aeruginosa and 6 as negative controls). Pyoverdine was present in 93 samples in concentrations between 0.30 and 51 μM (median 4.6 μM) and there was a strong association between the amount of pyoverdine and the number of P. aeruginosa present. However, pyoverdine was not present, or below the limits of detection (~0.3 μM), in 21 sputum samples that contained P. aeruginosa. Pyochelin was also absent, or below the limits of detection (~1 μM), in samples from P. aeruginosa-infected patients with little or no detectable pyoverdine. Our data show that pyoverdine is an important iron-scavenging molecule for P. aeruginosa in many cystic fibrosis patients, but other P. aeruginosa iron-uptake systems must be active in some patients to satisfy the bacterial need for iron. PMID:21643731

  4. Model of mucociliary clearance in cystic fibrosis lungs.

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, P; Bessonov, N; Volpert, V; Tiddens, H A W M; Cornu, C; Nony, P; Caudri, D

    2015-05-01

    Mucus clearance is a primary innate defense mechanism in the human airways. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CF is characterized by dehydration of airway surface liquid and impaired mucociliary clearance. As a result, microorganisms are not efficiently removed from the airways, and patients experience chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation. We propose a new physiologically based mathematical model of muco-ciliary transport consisting of the two major components of the mucociliary clearance system: (i) periciliary liquid layer (PCL) and (ii) mucus layer. We study mucus clearance under normal conditions and in CF patients. Restoring impaired clearance of airway secretions in one of the major goals of therapy in patients with CF. We consider the action of the aerosolized and inhaled medication dornase alfa, which reduces the viscosity of cystic fibrosis mucus, by selectively cleaving the long DNA strands it contains. The results of the model simulations stress the potential relevance of the location of the drug deposition in the central or peripheral airways. Mucus clearance was increased in case the drug was primarily deposited peripherally, i.e. in the small airways. PMID:25746843

  5. Recent advances in understanding and managing cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in Caucasians and has been extensively studied for many decades. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene was identified in 1989. It encodes a complex protein which has numerous cellular functions. Our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathophysiology and genetics is constantly expanding and being refined, leading to improved management of the disease and increased life expectancy in affected individuals. PMID:26097737

  6. Recent advances in understanding and managing cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in Caucasians and has been extensively studied for many decades. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene was identified in 1989. It encodes a complex protein which has numerous cellular functions. Our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathophysiology and genetics is constantly expanding and being refined, leading to improved management of the disease and increased life expectancy in affected individuals. PMID:26097737

  7. Nocturnal hypoxemia in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Regina Terse Trindade; Santana, Maria Angélica Pinheiro; Almeida, Priscila de Carvalho; Machado, Almério de Souza; Araújo-Filho, José Bouzas; Salles, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of nocturnal hypoxemia and its association with pulmonary function, nutritional status, sleep macrostructure, and obstructive respiratory events during sleep in a population of clinically stable children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 67 children and adolescents with CF between 2 and 14 years of age. All of the participants underwent polysomnography, and SpO2 was measured by pulse oximetry. We also evaluated the Shwachman-Kulczycki (S-K) scores, spirometry findings, and nutritional status of the patients. RESULTS: The study involved 67 patients. The mean age of the patients was 8 years. The S-K scores differed significantly between the patients with and without nocturnal hypoxemia, which was defined as an SpO2 < 90% for more than 5% of the total sleep time (73.75 ± 6.29 vs. 86.38 ± 8.70; p < 0.01). Nocturnal hypoxemia correlated with the severity of lung disease, FEV1 (rs = −0.42; p = 0.01), FVC (rs = −0.46; p = 0.01), microarousal index (rs = 0.32; p = 0.01), and apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.56; p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of patients with CF and mild-to-moderate lung disease, nocturnal oxygenation correlated with the S-K score, spirometry variables, sleep macrostructure variables, and the apnea-hypopnea index. PMID:24473760

  8. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in an adult with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Manika, K; Giouleka, P; Zarogoulidis, K; Kioumis, I

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is rare. We report a 22-year-old CF patient with high fever, dyspnea and weight loss that progressively worsened over 2 weeks before admission. The patient suffered from liver cirrhosis, was colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and had been repeatedly hospitalized for pulmonary infections. The patient was treated initially as for an exacerbation of P. aeruginosa infection, but tuberculosis (TBC) was suspected due to lack of improvement. A CT of the chest revealed enlarged bilateral cavities in the upper and middle lobes. A tuberculin skin test was positive, and M. tuberculosis nucleic acid was isolated from sputum samples. After receiving first-line anti-TBC drugs for 1 month, the patient's condition continued to worsen so molecular drug susceptibility testing was performed. Multidrug-resistant TBC was discovered, leading to a change in regimen. The patient was treated with ethionamide, moxifloxacin, linezolid, amikacin, imipenem/cilastatin and rifabutin and showed a remarkable clinical improvement. Although nontuberculous mycobacteria are more common in CF, the possibility of TBC should not be ignored. In that setting, early suspicion of infection due to resistant M. tuberculosis can be life saving. PMID:22869452

  9. Drug management of noninfective complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, I; Guiraldes, E

    1995-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the commonest lethal hereditary disease in Caucasians. The disease involves a gene mutation located at the long arm of chromosome 7, and more than 300 mutations have been identified. CF is a systemic illness affecting the upper respiratory tract and airways, sweat and salivary glands, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and male reproductive system. The course is highly variable depending on the specific molecular abnormalities in the mutant gene. The current approach to therapy now involves the use of: (i) chest physiotherapy; (ii) bronchodilators when there is evidence of airways hyperreactivity; (iii) oral and intravenous antibiotics for acute pulmonary exacerbations and aerosolised antibiotics for prevention; (iv) recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I (dornase alfa) to promote airways clearance; (v) amiloride to improve sputum viscosity; (vi) pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy along with nutritional support and supplements; (vi) vitamins; and (vii) ursodeoxycholic acid in selected patients. The use of antiprotease and anti-inflammatory agents has been shown to be useful in preventing the damage secondary to chronic lung infection. In patients with severely impaired lung function, lung transplantations have been performed with good results. Finally, it seems probable that lung disease in CF patients will be ameliorated or prevented in the future with early gene therapy, using vectors such as recombinant adenoviruses, adeno-associated virus, lipofection or retrovirus. However, this require extensive basic and clinical research. PMID:8536551

  10. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mroueh, S; Spock, A

    1994-01-01

    In order to determine the incidence of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), we reviewed the records of 236 patients followed up at the Duke CF Center. Sixty patients (25 percent) had colonies of Aspergillus fumigatus. These patients were older and had more severe disease as assessed by lower Shwachman-Kulczycki (S-K) scores than the patients who did not have evidence of A fumigatus. In 15 of the patients with A fumigatus (6.5 percent of the total population), the diagnosis was ABPA. Age and S-K scores were not significantly different from those of the patients with A fumigatus without ABPA. Diagnostic features of the affected patients included wheezing refractory to bronchodilator therapy, persistent pulmonary infiltrates, peripheral eosinophilia, positive skin reactivity to an A fumigatus antigen and elevated total serum IgE levels. Steroid therapy was started for all patients, and clinical improvement was noted within 1 month as evidenced by decreased symptoms and weight gain. Chest x-ray films usually showed improvement. Vital capacity improved in all but two patients. Total IgE did not consistently decrease in response to therapy. Although the diagnosis of ABPA may be difficult to establish, ABPA commonly is associated with CF. Most patients respond to steroid therapy; however, the effect of therapy on the course of the disease is difficult to assess. PMID:8275769

  11. Evidence of microvascular dysfunction in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Thomas, Jeffrey; Seigler, Nichole; Crandall, Reva; McKie, Kathleen T; Forseen, Caralee; Harris, Ryan A

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic, multisystemic disorder with broad clinical manifestations apart from the well-characterized pulmonary dysfunction. Recent findings have described impairment in conduit vessel function in patients with CF; however, whether microvascular function is affected in this population has yet to be elucidated. Using laser-Doppler imaging, we evaluated microvascular function through postocclusive reactive hyperemia (PORH), local thermal hyperemia (LTH), and iontophoresis with acetylcholine (ACh). PORH [518 ± 174% (CF) and 801 ± 125% (control), P = 0.039], LTH [1,338 ± 436% (CF) and 1,574 ± 620% (control), P = 0.045], and iontophoresis with ACh [416 ± 140% (CF) and 617 ± 143% (control), P = 0.032] were significantly lower in patients with CF than control subjects. In addition, the ratio of PORH to LTH was significantly (P = 0.043) lower in patients with CF (55.3 ± 5.1%) than control subjects (68.8 ± 3.1%). Significant positive correlations between LTH and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%predicted) (r = 0.441, P = 0.013) and between the PORH-to-LTH ratio and exercise capacity (r = 0.350, P = 0.049) were observed. These data provide evidence of microvascular dysfunction in patients with CF compared with control subjects. In addition, our data demonstrate a complex relationship between microvascular function and classical markers of disease severity (i.e., pulmonary function and exercise capacity) in CF. PMID:27084387

  12. Translating the genetics of cystic fibrosis to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Thompson, Kristin E; Tabary, Olivier; le Rouzic, Philippe; Guillot, Loïc

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening recessive genetic disease in the Caucasian population. This multiorgan disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a chloride channel recognized as regulating several apical ion channels. The gene mutations result either in the lack of the protein at the apical surface or in an improperly functioning protein. Morbidity and mortality because of the mutation of CFTR are mainly attributable to lung disease resulting from chronic infection and inflammation. Since its discovery as the causative gene in 1989, much progress has been achieved not only in clinical genetics but also in basic science studies. Recently, combinations of these efforts have been successfully translated into development and availability for patients of new therapies targeting specific CFTR mutations to correct the CFTR at the protein level. Current technologies such as next gene sequencing and novel genomic editing tools may offer new strategies to identify new CFTR variants and modifier genes, and to correct CFTR to pursue personalized medicine, which is already developed in some patient subsets. Personalized medicine or P4 medicine ("personalized," "predictive," "preventive," and "participatory") is currently booming for CF. The various current and future challenges of personalized medicine as they apply to the issues faced in CF are discussed in this review. PMID:25940043

  13. BPI-ANCA Provides Additional Clinical Information to Anti-Pseudomonas Serology: Results from a Cohort of 117 Swedish Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ulrika; Carlsson, Malin; Hellmark, Thomas; Segelmark, Mårten

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) have worse prognosis compared with patients who are not. BPI-ANCA is an anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody against BPI (bactericidal/permeability increasing protein) correlating with P. aeruginosa colonization and adverse long time prognosis. Whether it provides additional information as compared to standard anti-P. aeruginosa serology tests is not known. 117 nontransplanted CF patients at the CF centre in Lund, Sweden, were followed prospectively for ten years. Bacterial colonisation was classified according to the Leeds criteria. IgA BPI-ANCA was compared with assays for antibodies against alkaline protease (AP), Elastase (ELA), and Exotoxin A (ExoA). Lung function and patient outcome, alive, lung transplanted, or dead, were registered. BPI-ANCA showed the highest correlation with lung function impairment with an r-value of 0.44. Forty-eight of the 117 patients were chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa. Twenty of these patients experienced an adverse outcome. Receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis revealed that this could be predicted by BPI-ANCA (AUC = 0.77), (p = 0.002) to a better degree compared with serology tests. BPI-ANCA correlates better with lung function impairment and long time prognosis than anti-P. aeruginosa serology and has similar ability to identify patients with chronic P. aeruginosa. PMID:26273683

  14. Restoration of Chloride Efflux by Azithromycin in Airway Epithelial Cells of Cystic Fibrosis Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Rebeyrol, Carine; Ruffin, Manon; Roque, Telma; Guillot, Loïc; Jacquot, Jacky; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) has shown promising anti-inflammatory properties in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and clinical studies have presented an improvement in the respiratory condition of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate, in human airway cells, the mechanism by which AZM has beneficial effects in CF. We demonstrated that AZM did not have any anti-inflammatory effect on CF airway cells but restored Cl− efflux. PMID:21220528

  15. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression in the male excretory duct system during development.

    PubMed

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Gillet, Danièle; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Ledé, Françoise; Samaison, Laura; Huguen, Geneviève; Ferec, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Sterility due to bilateral destruction in utero or in early infancy resulting in congenital absence of the vas deferens is the rule in male patients with cystic fibrosis. To understand the developmental pattern of this anomaly, the microscopic morphology of the male excretory system was analyzed during development and the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was explored by immunohistochemistry. We observed that cystic fibrosis fetuses had no excretory ducts agenesis or obstruction until 22 weeks of gestation. However, a focal inflammatory pattern and mucinous plugs in the oldest cystic fibrosis case suggested a disruptive mechanism. Immunolabeling of cytoplasmic epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was demonstrated in all cystic fibrosis and control cases with a similar pattern of expression of the protein between age-matched controls and cystic fibrosis cases. At midgestation, an apical intensification appeared in both cystic fibrosis and control cases and was stable during the remainder of fetal life. No gradient of intensity could be detected between the different segments of the excretory tract. These findings are different from those reported in adults. The absence of any morphologic anomaly until 22 weeks of gestation, the focal destruction of the epithelial structures during the second trimester, and the chronological pattern of expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are of interest for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:21840567

  16. The Cystic Fibrosis-causing Mutation ΔF508 Affects Multiple Steps in Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Richardson, John M.; Wang, Wei; Millen, Linda; Watson, Jarod; Mendoza, Juan L.; Du, Kai; Fischman, Sharon; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Kirk, Kevin; Thomas, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    The deletion of phenylalanine 508 in the first nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is directly associated with >90% of cystic fibrosis cases. This mutant protein fails to traffic out of the endoplasmic reticulum and is subsequently degraded by the proteasome. The effects of this mutation may be partially reversed by the application of exogenous osmolytes, expression at low temperature, and the introduction of second site suppressor mutations. However, the specific steps of folding and assembly of full-length cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) directly altered by the disease-causing mutation are unclear. To elucidate the effects of the ΔF508 mutation, on various steps in CFTR folding, a series of misfolding and suppressor mutations in the nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains were evaluated for effects on the folding and maturation of the protein. The results indicate that the isolated NBD1 responds to both the ΔF508 mutation and intradomain suppressors of this mutation. In addition, identification of a novel second site suppressor of the defect within the second transmembrane domain suggests that ΔF508 also effects interdomain interactions critical for later steps in the biosynthesis of CFTR. PMID:20667826

  17. Analysis of the CFTR gene in Venezuelan cystic fibrosis patients, identification of six novel cystic fibrosis-causing genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Karen; de Mendonca, Elizabeth; Matute, Xiorama; Chaustre, Ismenia; Villalón, Marlene; Takiff, Howard

    2016-01-01

    The mutations in the CFTR gene found in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have geographic differences, but there are scant data on their prevalence in Venezuelan patients. This study determined the frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in a group of Venezuelan patients with CF. The 27 exons of the CFTR gene from 110 Venezuelan patients in the National CF Program were amplified and sequenced. A total of 36 different mutations were identified, seven with frequencies greater than 1%: p.Phe508del (27.27%), p.Gly542* (3.18%), c.2988+1G>A (3.18%), p.Arg334Trp (1.36%), p.Arg1162* (1.36%), c.1-8G>C (1.36%), and p.[Gly628Arg;Ser1235Arg](1.36). In 40% of patients, all with a clinical diagnosis of CF, no mutations were found. This report represents the largest cohort of Venezuelan patients with CF ever examined, and includes a wider mutation panel than has been previously studied in this population. Mutations common in Southern European populations predominate, and several new mutations were discovered, but no mutations were found in 40% of the cohort. PMID:27022295

  18. Hallmarks of therapeutic management of the cystic fibrosis functional landscape.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Margarida D; Balch, William E

    2015-11-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein does not operate in isolation, rather in a dynamic network of interacting components that impact its synthesis, folding, stability, intracellular location and function, referred to herein as the 'CFTR Functional Landscape (CFFL)'. For the prominent F508del mutation, many of these interactors are deeply connected to a protein fold management system, the proteostasis network (PN). However, CF encompasses an additional 2000 CFTR variants distributed along its entire coding sequence (referred to as CFTR2), and each variant contributes a differential liability to PN management of CFTR and to a protein 'social network' (SN) that directs the probability of the (patho)physiologic events that impact ion transport in each cell, tissue and patient in health and disease. Recognition of the importance of the PN and SN in driving the unique patient CFFL leading to disease highlights the importance of precision medicine in therapeutic management of disease progression. We take the view herein that it is not CFTR, rather the PN/SN, and their impact on the CFFL, that are the key physiologic forces driving onset and clinical progression of CF. We posit that a deep understanding of each patients PN/SN gained by merging genomic, proteomic (mass spectrometry (MS)), and high-content microscopy (HCM) technologies in the context of novel network learning algorithms will lead to a paradigm shift in CF clinical management. This should allow for generation of new classes of patient specific PN/SN directed therapeutics for personalized management of the CFFL in the clinic. PMID:26526359

  19. Parents’ Religious Coping Styles in the First Year After Their Child’s Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    GROSSOEHME, DANIEL H.; RAGSDALE, JUDY; COTTON, SIAN; WOOLDRIDGE, JAMIE L.; GRIMES, LISA; SEID, MICHAEL

    2015-01-01

    Parents of children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis described it as “devastating.” Given religion’s importance to many Americans, parents may utilize religious coping. Relatively little is known about parents’ use of religious coping to handle their child’s illness. Interviews with 15 parents about their use of religion in the year following their child’s cystic fibrosis diagnosis were coded for religious coping styles. Sixteen styles were identified. Positive religious coping styles were more frequent than negative styles (previously associated with poorer health outcomes), and occurred more frequently than in other studies. Religious coping styles used to make meaning, gain control, or seek comfort/intimacy with God were equally prevalent. The most common styles were: Pleading, Collaboration, Benevolent Religious Reappraisals, and Seeking Spiritual Support. Parents described active rather than passive coping styles. Religious coping involving religious others was rare. Clinical attention to negative religious coping may prevent it becoming chronic and negatively affecting health. PMID:20658425

  20. Reliability and validity of a single item measure of quality of life scale for adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is important to monitor health related quality of life in order to determine the efficacy of interventions and physical functioning of patients with cystic fibrosis in their daily activities. There is no a single-item global quality of life scale for routine clinical practice for adult patients with cystic fibrosis. We assessed the reliability and validity of a single-item global quality of life scale and compared with the Cystic Fibrosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (CF-QOL) for adult patients with cystic fibrosis. Method 121 (men = 66, women = 55) adult cystic fibrosis patients self-completed the CF-QOL, the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, and the single item global quality of life scale at the out patient clinic. 33 (17 women) completed the repeat questionnaires at home within two weeks. Socio-demographic characteristic and lung function data were extracted from the recent medical notes. Results Mean (SD) age was 29.6 (8.9) years and mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 2.20 (0.94) litres. The test-retest reproducibility using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for the CF-QOL was 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.68 to 0.91. The single item global quality of life ICC score was 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.88. Concurrent validity of the single-item global quality of life was examined in relation to all items of the CF-QOL, frequent episodes of readmission, anxiety and depression (all, p < 0.01) were moderately correlated. Conclusion The study provides preliminary evidence that the single-item quality of life scale is acceptable, valid and repeatable for adult patients with cystic fibrosis. It is a promising tool that can be easily incorporated into a routine clinical practice to assess patients' quality of life. PMID:22117573

  1. Multidrug-Resistant Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cândido, Pedro Henrique Campanini; Nunes, Luciana de Souza; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Folescu, Tânia Wrobel; Coelho, Fábrice Santana; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Gomes, Karen Machado; Lourenço, Maria Cristina da Silva; Aguiar, Fábio Silva; Chitolina, Fernanda; Armstrong, Derek T.; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Neves, Felipe Piedade Gonçalves; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have become emergent pathogens of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with an estimated prevalence ranging from 5 to 20%. This work investigated the presence of NTM in sputum samples of 129 CF patients (2 to 18 years old) submitted to longitudinal clinical supervision at a regional reference center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From June 2009 to March 2012, 36 NTM isolates recovered from 10 (7.75%) out of 129 children were obtained. Molecular identification of NTM was performed by using PCR restriction analysis targeting the hsp65 gene (PRA-hsp65) and sequencing of the rpoB gene, and susceptibility tests were performed that followed Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. For evaluating the genotypic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and/or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR) was performed. The species identified were Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii (n = 24), M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (n = 6), Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium marseillense (n = 2), and Mycobacterium timonense (n = 1). Most of the isolates presented resistance to five or more of the antimicrobials tested. Typing profiles were mainly patient specific. The PFGE profiles indicated the presence of two clonal groups for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and five clonal groups for M. abscesssus subsp. bolletii, with just one clone detected in two patients. Given the observed multidrug resistance patterns and the possibility of transmission between patients, we suggest the implementation of continuous and routine investigation of NTM infection or colonization in CF patients, including countries with a high burden of tuberculosis disease. PMID:24920766

  2. Quantitative deposition of aerosolized gentamicin in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ilowite, J.S.; Gorvoy, J.D.; Smaldone, G.C.

    1987-12-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), the clinical effectiveness of aerosolized antibiotics is controversial. Previous investigators have not considered the type of nebulizer, droplet size, and dose to the lung in assessing the results of aerosol therapy. The present study tests the importance of these factors by standardizing an aerosol system for delivery of antibiotics and other agents to patients with CF. Particle size, distribution, and output from a commercially available nebulizer were measured. Thirteen patients with CF inhaled aerosol (MMAD = 1.1 micron) containing gentamicin (160 mg in nebulizer) and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled human serum albumin. Patients' sputum and serum were analyzed for gentamicin levels by immunoenzymatic assay. Using a gamma camera and suitable filters, central versus peripheral deposition (C/P ratio) and whole lung deposition were measured and related to sputum gentamicin levels. Gentamicin deposit averaged 12.3 mg +/- 5.9 (SD) or 7.69% of the original amount placed in the nebulizer. Peak sputum levels averaged 376.6 micrograms/ml +/- 275, whereas serum levels were undetectable in all patients. When peak sputum levels were normalized for the amount deposited, a close correlation with C/P ratio was obtained (r = 0.88, p less than 0.05). Furthermore, an inverse relationship was found between the C/P ratio and the %FEV1 (r = 0.76, p less than 0.05). Finally, a bell-shaped relationship between deposited dose and minute ventilation was seen in the patients (r = 0.88, p less than 0.05), i.e., an optimal minute ventilation was shown. These relationships may be important when designing future clinical studies.

  3. New horizons in the treatment of cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, AW

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal, recessive, genetic disease affecting approximately 1 in 2500 live births among Caucasians. The CF gene codes for a cAMP/PKA-dependent, ATP-requiring, membrane chloride ion channel, generally found in the apical membranes of many secreting epithelia and known as CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). There are currently over 1700 known mutations affecting CFTR, many of which give rise to a disease phenotype. Around 75% of CF alleles contain the ΔF508 mutation in which a triplet codon has been lost, leading to a missing phenylalanine at position 508 in the protein. This altered protein fails to be trafficked to the correct location in the cell and is generally destroyed by the proteasome. The small amount that does reach the correct location functions poorly. Clearly the cohort of patients with at least one ΔF508 allele are a major target for therapeutic intervention. It is now over two decades since the CF gene was discovered and during this time the properties of CFTR have been intensely investigated. At long last there appears to be progress with the pharmaco-therapeutic approach. Ongoing clinical trials have produced fascinating results in which clinical benefit appears to have been achieved. To arrive at this point ingenious ways have been devised to screen very large chemical libraries for one of two properties: (i) agents promoting trafficking of mutant CFTR to, and insertion into the membrane, and known as correctors or (ii) agents which activate appropriately located mutant CFTR, known as potentiators. The best compounds emerging from these programmes are then used as chemical scaffolds to synthesize other compounds with appropriate pharmaceutical properties, hopefully with their pharmacological activity maintained or even enhanced. In summary, this approach attempts to make the mutant CFTR function in place of the real CFTR. A major function of CFTR in healthy airways is to maintain an adequate airway

  4. Chronic cough with normal sweat chloride: Phenotypic descriptions of two rare cystic fibrosis genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Hemang; Lim, Kaiser G.

    2015-01-01

    While our understanding of cystic fibrosis genetics has expanded in recent decades, the genetics and clinical manifestations of the disease remains highly heterogeneous. Diagnosis of CF in non-classical mutations remains a clinical challenge. We describe the clinical presentation of two patients with chronic cough found to have normal sweat chlorides. We discuss the subsequent evaluation that lead to the diagnosis of two rare CF mutations. We briefly discuss the use of the expanded 106-panel of CF mutations (homozygous 3849 + 10  kb C > T), and the role of whole CFTR gene sequencing (heterozygous c.2752-26 A > G/5T).

  5. Cystic Fibrosis in a Female Infant with Cardiac, Ocular, and Musculoskeletal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Azhar; Eldin, Susan Gamal; Ali, Muna Dawood; AlTalhi, Ali; AlDigheari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) remains the most common hereditary disease in the western population. Its concomitant presence with other congenital abnormalities is a rare phenomenon with very little documentation. In this case report we describe a case of cystic fibrosis in a female infant with cardiac, ocular, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. A brief literature review is also provided. PMID:26693372

  6. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  7. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  8. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  9. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  10. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  11. Self-Efficacy, Pulmonary Function, Perceived Health and Global Quality of Life of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Astrid K.; Rustoen ,Tone; Hanestad, Berit R.; Gjengedal, Eva; Moum, Torbjorn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the extent that pulmonary function is related to perceived health status and global quality of life in adults suffering from cystic fibrosis, and the extent that self-efficacy modifies these relationships. Our sample comprised 86 adults (48% female; mean age, 29 years; age range, 18-54 years) with cystic fibrosis, recruited…

  12. Pseudomonas infection and mucociliary and absorptive clearance in the cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Weiner, Daniel J; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Muthukrishnan, Ashok; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Lacy, Ryan T; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2016-05-01

    Airway surface liquid hyperabsorption and mucus accumulation are key elements of cystic fibrosis lung disease that can be assessed in vivo using functional imaging methods. In this study we evaluated experimental factors affecting measurements of mucociliary clearance (MCC) and small-molecule absorption (ABS) and patient factors associated with abnormal absorption and mucus clearance.Our imaging technique utilises two radiopharmaceutical probes delivered by inhalation. Measurement repeatability was assessed in 10 adult cystic fibrosis subjects. Experimental factors were assessed in 29 adult and paediatric cystic fibrosis subjects (51 scans). Patient factors were assessed in a subgroup with optimal aerosol deposition (37 scans; 24 subjects). Paediatric subjects (n=9) underwent initial and 2-year follow-up scans. Control subjects from a previously reported study are included for comparison.High rates of central aerosol deposition influenced measurements of ABS and, to a lesser extent, MCC. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis was only detectable in subjects with previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Cystic fibrosis subjects without P. aeruginosa had similar MCC to control subjects. Cystic fibrosis subjects had consistently higher ABS rates.We conclude that the primary experimental factor affecting MCC/ABS measurements is central deposition percentage. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis is associated with P. aeruginosa infection. ABS is consistently increased in cystic fibrosis. PMID:27009167

  13. Epidemiological evaluation regarding the role of cystic fibrosis as a risk factor for child malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Florescu, Laura; Paduraru, Dana Teodora Anton; Mîndru, Dana Elena; Temneanu, Oana Raluea; Petrariu, F D; Matei, Mioara Calipsoana

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common monogenic autosomal recessive disorder with progressive chronic evolution which is potentially lethal. Poor growth is a characteristic of children suffering from cystic fibrosis. A poor nutritional status is an independent risk factor for inadequate survival in cystic fibrosis and is associated with disease complications. The appropriate nutritional management is an important part of the treatment so that the patient with cystic fibrosis can achieve normal growth and development and maintain the best possible health status. A balanced diet supplemented with snacks high in fat and calories is necessary to increase the caloric intake in children with cystic fibrosis. Children with cystic fibrosis have higher caloric needs than healthy children of the same age and sex. Malnutrition in CF is multifactorial. Cystic fibrosis is a complex multisystem disorder affecting mainly the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. In the past, malnutrition was an inevitable consequence of disease progression, leading to poor growth, impaired respiratory muscle function, decreased exercise tolerance and immunological impairment. A positive association between body weight and height and survival has been widely reported. The energy requirements of patients with CF vary widely and generally increase with age and disease severity. Cystic fibrosis remains a paediatric disorder which is often underdiagnosed but which, if therapeutically managed properly (by means of drug therapy as well as by appropriate physiotherapy techniques), can lead to improved quality of life and, thus, to a bigger life expectancy. PMID:25076714

  14. Diabetes as a Determinant of Mortality in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chamnan, Parinya; Shine, Brian S.F.; Haworth, Charles S.; Bilton, Diana; Adler, Amanda I.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes is increasingly common in cystic fibrosis, but little information describing its influence on mortality exists. Using national U.K. data, in this study we document diabetes-specific mortality rates, estimate the impact of diabetes on survival, and estimate population-attributable fractions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This retrospective cohort study identified 8,029 individuals aged 0–65 years from the U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Registry (1996–2005). A total of 5,892 patients were included in analyses of mortality rates, and 4,234 were included in analyses of risk factors. We calculated age-adjusted mortality rates using Poisson regression, standardized mortality ratios using the population of England and Wales, and relative risks using proportional hazards modeling. RESULTS During 17,672 person-years of follow-up, 393 subjects died. The age-adjusted mortality rate was 1.8 per 100 person-years (95% CI 1.6–2.0). The age-adjusted mortality rates per 100 person-years were 2.0 (1.8–2.4) in female subjects and 1.6 (1.4–1.9) in male subjects, and 4.2 (3.4–5.1) in individuals with diabetes vs. 1.5 (1.3–1.7) in those without diabetes. Independent risk factors for death included diabetes (hazard ratio 1.31 [95% CI 1.03–1.67], female sex (1.71 [1.36–2.14]) plus poorer pulmonary function, lower BMI, Burkholderia cepacia infection, absence of Staphylococcus aureus infection, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, liver disease, prior organ transplantation, and corticosteroid use. CONCLUSIONS Individuals with cystic fibrosis die earlier if they have diabetes, which, if delayed or better treated, might reasonably extend survival; this hypothesis merits testing. PMID:19918014

  15. Shwachman-Kulczycki score still useful to monitor cystic fibrosis severity

    PubMed Central

    Stollar, Fabíola; Villac Adde, Fabíola; Cunha, Maristela T; Leone, Claudio; Rodrigues, Joaquim C

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Shwachman-Kulczycki score was the first scoring system used in cystic fibrosis to assess disease severity. Despite its subjectivity, it is still widely used. OBJECTIVE: To study correlations among forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), chest radiography, chest computed tomography, 6-minute walk test, and Shwachman-Kulczycki score in patients with cystic fibrosis and to test whether the Shwachman-Kulczycki score is still useful in monitoring the severity of the disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional prospective study was performed to analyze the correlations (Spearman). Patients with clinically stable cystic fibrosis, aged 3-21 years, were included. RESULTS: 43 patients, 19F/24M, mean age 10.5 ± 4.7 years, with a median Shwachman-Kulczycki score of 70 were studied. The median Brasfield and Bhalla scores were 17 and 10, respectively. The mean Z score for the 6-minute walk test was −1.1 ± 1.106 and the mean FEV1 was 59 ± 26 (as percentage of predicted values). The following significant correlations versus the Shwachman-Kulczycki score were found: FEV1 (r  =  0.76), 6-minute walk test (r  =  0.71), chest radiography (r  =  0.71) and chest computed tomography (r  =  −0.78). When patients were divided according to FEV1, a statistically significantly correlation with the Shwachman-Kulczycki score was found only in patients with FEV1 <70% (r  =  0.67). CONCLUSIONS: The Shwachman-Kulczycki score remains an useful tool for monitoring the severity of cystic fibrosis, adequately reflecting the functional impairment and chest radiography and tomography changes, especially in patients with greater impairment of lung function. When assessing patients with mild lung disease its limitations should be considered and its usefulness in such patients should be evaluated in larger populations. PMID:21808862

  16. Cystic Fibrosis below the Diaphragm: Abdominal Findings in Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Lisa P; McEvoy, Sinead H; Ni Mhurchu, Elaine; Gibney, Robert G; McMahon, Colm J; Heffernan, Eric J; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disease in the white population. Mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene on chromosome 7 results in production of abnormally viscous mucus and secretions in the lungs of patients with CF. A similar pathologic process occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary system. Inspissated mucus causes luminal obstruction and resultant clinical and radiologic complications associated with the disease process. Pancreatic involvement can result in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, pancreatic atrophy, fatty replacement, or lipomatous pseudohypertrophy. Acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic calcification, cysts, and cystosis also occur. Hepatic manifestations include hepatic steatosis, focal biliary and multilobular cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Biliary complications include cholelithiasis, microgallbladder, and sclerosing cholangitis. The entire digestive tract can be involved. Distal ileal obstruction syndrome, intussusception, appendicitis, chronic constipation, colonic wall thickening, fibrosing colonopathy, pneumatosis intestinalis, gastroesophageal reflux, and peptic ulcer disease have been described. Renal manifestations include nephrolithiasis and secondary amyloidosis. The educational objectives of this review are to reveal the abdominal manifestations of CF to facilitate focused analysis of cross-sectional imaging in adult patients. Life expectancy in patients with CF continues to improve because of a combination of aggressive antibiotic treatment, improved emphasis on nutrition and physiotherapy, and development of promising new CF transmembrane conductance regulator modulators. As lung function and survival improve, extrapulmonary conditions, including hepatic and gastrointestinal malignancy, will be an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the expected abdominal manifestations of CF may assist radiologists in identifying

  17. Cat and Dog Exposure and Respiratory Morbidities in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Christopher B.; Raraigh, Karen S.; Green, Deanna M.; Blackman, Scott M.; Cutting, Garry R.; Collaco, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the triggers that may impact respiratory health in cystic fibrosis (CF), including the effects of pets, because environmental factors contribute to one-half of the variation in lung function in patients with CF. Study design A total of 703 subjects with CF were recruited through the U.S. CF Twin-Sibling Study. Questionnaires were used to determine the presence/absence of cats and dogs in households with a child with CF. Questionnaires, chart review, and U.S. CF Foundation Patient Registry data were used to track respiratory and infection outcomes. Results Within the sample 47% of subjects reported owning a dog, and 28% reported owning a cat. After adjustment for demographic factors, dog ownership was not associated with any adverse clinical outcomes, and cat ownership was associated an increased risk in developing nasal polyps (adjusted OR 1.66; p=0.024) compared with non-cat owners. Subjects who owned both cats and dogs were twice as likely to report wheezing compared with other subjects (adjusted OR: 2.01; p=0.009). There were no differences in prevalence and age of acquisition for the common CF respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus between cat/dog owners and non-cat/dog owners. Conclusions Cat ownership was associated with a higher frequency of developing nasal polyps and combined cat-dog ownership was associated with a higher rate of wheezing. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations and the potential psychosocial benefits of cat and/or dog ownership. PMID:25027361

  18. Inhaled therapy in cystic fibrosis: agents, devices and regimens

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Key points There have been significant advances in both inhalation medicines and delivery devices with “intelligent nebulisers” and “dry-powder inhalers” becoming commonplace in CF care. Inhaled medicines generate high levels of a drug within the airways with limited systemic effects, offering safe and convenient antibiotic and mucolytic therapy for individuals with CF. Variations in adherence are not unique to CF; however, treatment burden is high and therefore fast inhaled drug delivery devices may assist individuals in completing the prescribed treatment regimes. Prescribers of inhaled medicines have a responsibility to consider, in addition to efficacy, the appropriated drug/device combination for each individual in order to promote adherence and achieve the desired clinical benefit. Summary The recognised mainstay daily treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) focus on inhaled and oral medications, airway clearance and optimised nutrition. This review discusses recent advances in inhaled therapies for the management of CF, including devices such as intelligent nebulisers, drug formulations and supporting evidence for inhaled antibiotics (for the management of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and muco-active drugs. We include practical advice for clinicians regarding the optimisation of inhalation technique and education. The influence of adherence on the use of inhaled therapies in CF is also reviewed. Educational aims To inform readers about the history and progression of inhaled therapies for people with CF with reference to the literature supporting current practice. To highlight the factors that may impact the success of inhaled therapies, including those which are device specific such as drug deposition and those which influence adherence. PMID:26306111

  19. Cough in adult cystic fibrosis: diagnosis and response to fundoplication

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Hosnieh; Moon, Tanya; Donaldson, Jo; Jackson, Warren; Sedman, Peter; Morice, Alyn H

    2009-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux is one of the most common causes of chronic cough in the general population. Reflux occurs frequently in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We undertook laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in adult CF patients with a clinical diagnosis of reflux cough who had failed conventional medical therapies. Objective We determined the response to the surgical route in the treatment of intractable reflux cough in CF. Method Patients with refractory cough were assessed by 24 h pH monitoring and oesophageal manometry. Pre-and post-operation cough, lung function and exacerbation frequency were compared. Cough was assessed by the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ), lung function by spirometry and exacerbation frequency was defined by comparing the postoperative epoch with a similar preoperatively. Results Significant abnormalities of oesophageal function were seen in all patients studied. 6 patients (2 females), with the mean age of 34.5 years consented to surgery. Their mean number of reflux episodes was 144.4, mean DeMeester score was 39.2, and mean lower oesophageal sphincter pressure 12.4 mmHg. There was a small change in the FEV1 from 1.03 L to 1.17 (P = 0.04), and FVC improved from 2.62 to 2.87 (P = 0.05). Fundoplication lead to a marked fall in cough with the total LCQ score increasing from 11.9 to 18.3 (P = 0.01). Exacerbation events were reduced by 50% post operatively. Conclusion Whilst there is an obvious attention to respiratory causes of cough in CF, reflux is also a common cause. Fundoplication is highly effective in the control of reflux cough in CF. Significant reduction in exacerbation frequency may indicate that reflux with possible aspiration is a major unrecognised contributor to airway disease. PMID:19149907

  20. Cystic fibrosis and beckwith-wiedemann syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Claudia; Correia-Costa, Liane; Eden, Paulo; Guedes-Vaz, Luisa

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease of exocrine gland function that involves multiple systems but chiefly results in chronic respiratory infections, the major cause of death, pancreatic enzyme deficiency and severe malnutrition, mostly in untreated patients. The association between CF and other inherited diseases or congenital anomalies is rare. We describe for the first time the association of CF and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). BWS is a genetic disorder commonly characterized by overgrowth. The most common features of BWS include macrosomia, macroglossia, abdominal wall defects, an increased risk for childhood tumors, kidney abnormalities, hypoglycemia in the newborn period and unusual ear creases or pits. PMID:25584105

  1. Cystic Fibrosis and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Claudia; Correia-Costa, Liane; Eden, Paulo; Guedes-Vaz, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease of exocrine gland function that involves multiple systems but chiefly results in chronic respiratory infections, the major cause of death, pancreatic enzyme deficiency and severe malnutrition, mostly in untreated patients. The association between CF and other inherited diseases or congenital anomalies is rare. We describe for the first time the association of CF and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). BWS is a genetic disorder commonly characterized by overgrowth. The most common features of BWS include macrosomia, macroglossia, abdominal wall defects, an increased risk for childhood tumors, kidney abnormalities, hypoglycemia in the newborn period and unusual ear creases or pits. PMID:25584105

  2. Fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bronchopulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Matthew; Smyth, Alan

    2012-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These patients are susceptible to lung infection with common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, but are also prone to infection by opportunistic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The good oral bioavailability and broad antimicrobial spectrum of activity, including antipseudomonal properties, make this class of antimicrobial attractive. We review the evidence assessing the use of fluoroquinolones in the context of preventing and eradicating early lung infection and in managing chronic lung infection and pulmonary exacerbations. The safety of fluoroquinolones and the use of newer agents in the class are also discussed. PMID:22968160

  3. Developing a handheld record for patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Omendra; Davies, Siobhan; Tibbins, Carly; Rees, JH Martyn; Lenney, Warren; Gilchrist, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Patient handheld records (PHHRs) promote self-management and empower the holder to take a more active role in the management of their disease. They have been used successfully in improving preventative care for children and have contributed to improved adherence in a number of chronic illnesses. Despite the potential advantages, there are no standard PHHRs for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We report the consultation process that led to the development of a CF PHHR, describe the final document, and analyze the feedback from their use at our center. We have made the CF PHHR freely available online. PMID:26316833

  4. Gastrointestinal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Meghana Nitin; Freeman, Alvin Jay

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis (CF), but significant involvement within gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems occurs as well. As in the airways, defects in CFTR alter epithelial surface fluid, mucus viscosity, and pH, increasing risk of stasis through the various hollow epithelial-lined structures of the gastrointestinal tract. This exerts secondary influences that are responsible for most gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary manifestations of CF. Understanding these gastrointestinal morbidities of CF is essential in understanding and treating CF as a multisystem disease process and improving overall patient care. PMID:27469182

  5. Highlights from the 2015 North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference.

    PubMed

    Zemanick, Edith T; Ong, Thida; Daines, Cori L; Dellon, Elisabeth P; Muhlebach, Marianne S; Esther, Charles R

    2016-06-01

    The 29th Annual North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference was held in Phoenix, Arizona on October 8-10, 2015. Abstracts were published in a supplement to Pediatric Pulmonology.(1) In this review, we summarize presentations in several of the topic areas addressed at the conference. Our goal is to provide an overview of presentations with relevance to emerging or changing concepts in several areas rather than a comprehensive review. Citations from the conference are by first author and abstract number or symposium number, as designated in the supplement. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:650-657. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27074261

  6. Increased Congregational Support for Parents of Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Szczesniak, Rhonda D.; Zou, Yuanshu; Wetzel, J. Denise; Krause, Neal; Grossoehme, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Positive health outcomes are related to adults’ religious congregational participation. For parents of children with chronic disease, structured daily care routines and or strict infection-control precautions may limit participation. For this exploratory study, we examined the relationship between congregational support and religious coping by parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) compared to parents for whom child health issues were not significant stressors. CF parents reported higher levels of emotional support from congregation members and use of religious coping. Within-group differences were found for CF parents by denominational affiliation. Congregational support for parents dealing with child chronic disease is important. PMID:25119628

  7. Pulmonary nocardiosis in an immunocompetent patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Lucy; Santoro, Jonathan D; Milla, Carlos; Bhargava, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia spp. are bacteria of low virulence that cause infection classically in immunocompromised hosts with the lungs as the primary site of infection in the majority of cases. Patients with cystic fibrosis have pulmonary disease characterized by frequent and progressive bacterial infections. Reports of Nocardia spp. isolation in CF are rare in the literature and may represent colonization or active infection, the significance and optimal treatment of which are unknown. We report the second case to date of Nocardia transvalensis pulmonary infection in an immunocompetent patient with CF and the first in a child under the age of eighteen. PMID:25960909

  8. Genetics and epithelial cell dysfunction in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, J.R.; Buchwald, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the advances being made in the study of the physiology, cell biology, and molecular genetics of cystic fibrosis. Emphasis is placed on various areas of research that involve epithelial cells (e.g., the CF-specific phenotypes exhibited by epithelial cells, abnormalities in epithelium ion transport, chloride channel regulation in CF epithelial.) Coverage is presented on the current status of CF, including data on the incidence of the disease, its mode of inheritance, chromosomal localization, genetic heterogeneity, and screening and management.

  9. Moving forward: cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2013-10-15

    Since cloning of the CFTR gene more than 20 years ago a large number of pre-clinical and clinical CF gene therapy studies have been performed and a vast amount of information and know-how has been generated. Here, we will review key studies with a particular emphasis on clinical findings. We have learnt that the lung is a more difficult target than originally anticipated, and we describe the strength and weaknesses of the most commonly used airway gene transfer agents (GTAs). In our view, one of the most significant developments in recent years is the generation of lentiviral vectors, which efficiently transduce lung tissue. However, focused and co-ordinated efforts assessing lentiviral vector safety and scaling up of production will be required to move this vector into clinical lung gene therapy studies. PMID:23918661

  10. Pregnancy outcomes in cystic fibrosis: a 10-year experience from a UK centre

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, L; Bennett, L; Mackillop, L; Chapman, SJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis manifests as a multisystem disease, despite this female fertility is relatively preserved with levels approaching that of the non-cystic fibrosis population. We reviewed pregnancies in cystic fibrosis patients over a 10-year period from a UK adult cystic fibrosis centre by considering maternal and fetal outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective case-note review of pregnancies during 2003–2013 using respiratory and obstetric records. Results We observed moderate falls in lung function immediately after delivery, which persisted at 12 months postpartum. We found that a decline in lung function at delivery was a marker for further decline in function during the subsequent postpartum period. We found baseline lung function was predictive of gestational age at delivery. We observed a high incidence of haemoptysis. Conclusion Consistent with current guidance we found pregnancy is feasible and well tolerated in the majority of patients with cystic fibrosis. There was a high incidence of haemoptysis, which warrants further study.

  11. Evaluation of the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Liposomal Amikacin for Inhalation in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Chronic Pseudomonal Infections Using Data from Two Phase 2 Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Okusanya, Olanrewaju O.; Hammel, Jeffrey P.; Forrest, Alan; Bulik, Catharine C.; Ambrose, Paul G.; Gupta, Renu

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) relationships between serum exposure measures of liposomal amikacin for inhalation (LAI) and the change in pulmonary function test (PFT) measures and number of CFU from baseline were evaluated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A dose of 70, 140, 280, or 560 mg of LAI or placebo was administered to CF patients once daily for 28 days. PFTs and sputum samples for microbiology were assessed on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 (for log10 CFU), and 56 (for PFTs). Serum, urine, and sputum samples were collected for PK evaluation. The relationships between efficacy endpoints (relative change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1 {expressed in liters}] and FEV1% predicted and the absolute change in log10 CFU of P. aeruginosa from baseline) and exposure measures (dose, day 1 area under the curve [AUC], dose/MIC ratio, and day 1 AUC/MIC ratio) and baseline MIC value were assessed. The serum and urine PK data were best fit by a 3-compartment model (lung, serum, and urine) with linear clearance and interoccasional variation on total and renal clearance. Significant univariable relationships between dose or day 1 AUC and the relative change in PFT measures (P ≤ 0.017) or the absolute change in log10 CFU from baseline (P ≤ 0.037) on the study days were identified. Repeated-measures mixed-effects models, which showed dose- and AUC-related improvements for each efficacy endpoint (P ≤ 0.041), predicted the observed data well. The increases in the relative change in FEV1 and FEV1% predicted of 11% and 9.9%, respectively, and a 1.23-log10 CFU reduction per 560 mg of LAI estimated on day 7 were comparable to the observed increases of 10.7% and 10.3%, respectively, and a 1.24-log10 CFU reduction on the same day. The model-estimated PFT effects were predicted to be sustained to day 28. An additional 0.451-log10 CFU reduction (P = 0.022) was estimated on day 14 relative to day 7, with a persistence

  12. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of liposomal amikacin for inhalation in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic pseudomonal infections using data from two phase 2 clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Okusanya, Olanrewaju O; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Forrest, Alan; Bulik, Catharine C; Ambrose, Paul G; Gupta, Renu

    2014-09-01

    The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) relationships between serum exposure measures of liposomal amikacin for inhalation (LAI) and the change in pulmonary function test (PFT) measures and number of CFU from baseline were evaluated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A dose of 70, 140, 280, or 560 mg of LAI or placebo was administered to CF patients once daily for 28 days. PFTs and sputum samples for microbiology were assessed on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 (for log10 CFU), and 56 (for PFTs). Serum, urine, and sputum samples were collected for PK evaluation. The relationships between efficacy endpoints (relative change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1 {expressed in liters}] and FEV1% predicted and the absolute change in log10 CFU of P. aeruginosa from baseline) and exposure measures (dose, day 1 area under the curve [AUC], dose/MIC ratio, and day 1 AUC/MIC ratio) and baseline MIC value were assessed. The serum and urine PK data were best fit by a 3-compartment model (lung, serum, and urine) with linear clearance and interoccasional variation on total and renal clearance. Significant univariable relationships between dose or day 1 AUC and the relative change in PFT measures (P≤0.017) or the absolute change in log10 CFU from baseline (P≤0.037) on the study days were identified. Repeated-measures mixed-effects models, which showed dose- and AUC-related improvements for each efficacy endpoint (P≤0.041), predicted the observed data well. The increases in the relative change in FEV1 and FEV1% predicted of 11% and 9.9%, respectively, and a 1.23-log10 CFU reduction per 560 mg of LAI estimated on day 7 were comparable to the observed increases of 10.7% and 10.3%, respectively, and a 1.24-log10 CFU reduction on the same day. The model-estimated PFT effects were predicted to be sustained to day 28. An additional 0.451-log10 CFU reduction (P=0.022) was estimated on day 14 relative to day 7, with a persistence of

  13. Azithromycin reduces spontaneous and induced inflammation in ΔF508 cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Legssyer, Rachida; Huaux, François; Lebacq, Jean; Delos, Monique; Marbaix, Etienne; Lebecque, Patrick; Lison, Dominique; Scholte, Bob J; Wallemacq, Pierre; Leal, Teresinha

    2006-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays a critical role in lung disease development and progression in cystic fibrosis. Azithromycin is used for the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease, although its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that azithromycin modulates lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis mice. Methods We monitored cellular and molecular inflammatory markers in lungs of cystic fibrosis mutant mice homozygous for the ΔF508 mutation and their littermate controls, either in baseline conditions or after induction of acute inflammation by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which would be independent of interactions of bacteria with epithelial cells. The effect of azithromycin pretreatment (10 mg/kg/day) given by oral administration for 4 weeks was evaluated. Results In naive cystic fibrosis mice, a spontaneous lung inflammation was observed, characterized by macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, and increased intra-luminal content of the pro-inflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2. After induced inflammation, cystic fibrosis mice combined exaggerated cellular infiltration and lower anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 production. In cystic fibrosis mice, azithromycin attenuated cellular infiltration in both baseline and induced inflammatory condition, and inhibited cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) release in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. Conclusion Our findings further support the concept that inflammatory responses are upregulated in cystic fibrosis. Azithromycin reduces some lung inflammation outcome measures in cystic fibrosis mice. We postulate that some of the benefits of azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients are due to modulation of lung inflammation. PMID:17064416

  14. How the airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis reacts in proinflammatory conditions: implications for airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McCuaig, Sarah; Martin, James G

    2013-04-01

    Among patients with cystic fibrosis there is a high prevalence (40-70%) of asthma signs and symptoms such as cough and wheezing and airway hyper-responsiveness to inhaled histamine or methacholine. Whether these abnormal airway responses are due to a primary deficiency in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or are secondary to the inflammatory environment in the cystic fibrosis lungs is not clear. A role for the CFTR in smooth muscle function is emerging, and alterations in contractile signalling have been reported in CFTR-deficient airway smooth muscle. Persistent bacterial infection, especially with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, stimulates interleukin-8 release from the airway epithelium, resulting in neutrophilic inflammation. Increased neutrophilia and skewing of CFTR-deficient T-helper cells to type 2 helper T cells creates an inflammatory environment characterised by high concentrations of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin-8, and interleukin-13, which might all contribute to increased contractility of airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis. An emerging role of interleukin-17, which is raised in patients with cystic fibrosis, in airway smooth muscle proliferation and hyper-responsiveness is apparent. Increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the altered smooth muscle physiology in patients with cystic fibrosis might provide insight into airway dysfunction in this disease. PMID:24429094

  15. Improving performance in the detection and management of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes in the Mountain West Cystic Fibrosis Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G; Jensen, Judith L; Allen, Sarah E; Brayshaw, Sara J; Brown, Mark A; Chatfield, Barbara; Koenig, Joni; McDonald, Catherine; Packer, Kristyn A; Peet, Kimberly; Radford, Peggy; Reineke, Linda M; Otsuka, Kim; Wagener, Jeffrey S; Young, David; Marshall, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cystic fibrosis (CF)-related diabetes (CFRD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Improved detection and management may improve outcomes; however, actual practice falls short of published guidelines. We studied efforts to improve CFRD screening and management in the Mountain West CF Consortium (MWCFC). Research design and methods This is a prospective observational cohort study evaluating quality improvement by accredited CF centers in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah performed between 2002 and 2008. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, centers evaluated adherence with CF Foundation guidelines for CFRD. Each center developed and implemented quality improvement plans to improve both screening and management. Centers were reassessed 1 year later. Results Initially, each CF center had low adherence with screening recommendations (26.5% of eligible patients) that did not improve during the study. However, patients with confirmed CFRD markedly increased (141 (12% of MWCFC patients) to 224 (17%), p<0.001), and with improved adherence to management guidelines, patients with CFRD had increased weight (56.8–58.9 kg, p<0.001), body mass index (21.1–21.4, p=0.003), and weight-for-age z-score (−1.42 to –0.84, p<0.001). Quality improvement methods were specific to the practice settings of each center but shared the common goal of adhering to CFRD care guidelines. 1 year after implementation, no center significantly differed from any other in level of adherence to guidelines. Conclusions Improving adherence with CFRD care guidelines requires substantial effort and may be incompletely successful, particularly for CFRD screening, but the effort may significantly improve patient monitoring and clinically relevant outcomes such as weight. PMID:27158517

  16. Small intestinal brush border enzymes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Van Biervliet, S; Eggermont, E; Carchon, H; Veereman, G; Deboeck, K

    1999-01-01

    The study concerns the maltase, saccharase, lactase and alkaline phosphatase activity in small intestinal biopsy specimens from 61 consecutively admitted, untreated, Caucasian cystic fibrosis patients. A group of 319 age matched controls admitted during the same time period for undefined gastrointestinal or nutritional disorders acted as the controls. In order to eliminate morphological damage as a confounding factor, the enzyme activities were studied in small intestinal biopsy specimens having both normal stereomicroscopic and histological features. It was shown that neither maltase nor saccharase activity was different in the two groups, in contrast to lactase and alkaline phophatase activity, that was significantly lower in cystic fibrosis patients. The differences could not be explained by the nutritional status as judged by the body mass index. Lactase activity is known to be easily affected by numerous enteropathies. As the information on alkaline phosphatase activity is limited, the low activity is discussed in more detail. Taking into account the literature data, the low alkaline phosphatase activity is tentatively attributed either to enhanced release from the brush border or to the faulty handling of alkaline phophatase protein in the post-golgi compartments secondary to the accumulation of incorrectly glycosylated CFTR in the same cell structures. PMID:10547891

  17. CYSTIC FIBROSIS: AN INHERITED DISEASE AFFECTING MUCIN-PRODUCING ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Ehre, Camille; Ridley, Caroline; Thornton, David J

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of cystic fibrosis (CF) has revealed that the biophysical properties of mucus play a considerable role in the pathogenesis of the disease in view of the fact that most mucus-producing organs are affected in CF patients. In this review, we discuss the potential causal relationship between altered cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function and the production of mucus with abnormal biophysical properties in the intestine and lungs, highlighting what has been learned from cell cultures and animal models that mimic CF pathogenesis. A similar cascade of events, including mucus obstruction, infection and inflammation, is common to all epithelia affected by impaired surface hydration. Hence, the main structural components of mucus, namely the polymeric, gel-forming mucins, are critical to the onset of the disease. Defective CFTR leads to epithelial surface dehydration, altered pH/electrolyte composition and mucin concentration. Further, it can influence mucin transition from the intracellular to extracellular environment, potentially resulting in aberrant mucus gel formation. While defective HCO3− production has long been identified as a feature of CF, it has only recently been considered as a key player in the transition phase of mucins. We conclude by examining the influence of mucins on the biophysical properties of CF sputum and discuss existing and novel therapies aimed at removing mucus from the lungs. PMID:24685676

  18. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  19. Curcumin stimulates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activity.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Randak, Christoph O; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Karp, Philip H; Vermeer, Daniel W; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-18

    Compounds that enhance either the function or biosynthetic processing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel may be of value in developing new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF). Previous studies suggested that the herbal extract curcumin might affect the processing of a common CF mutant, CFTR-DeltaF508. Here, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin influences channel function. Curcumin increased CFTR channel activity in excised, inside-out membrane patches by reducing channel closed time and prolonging the time channels remained open. Stimulation was dose-dependent, reversible, and greater than that observed with genistein, another compound that stimulates CFTR. Curcumin-dependent stimulation required phosphorylated channels and the presence of ATP. We found that curcumin increased the activity of both wild-type and DeltaF508 channels. Adding curcumin also increased Cl(-) transport in differentiated non-CF airway epithelia but not in CF epithelia. These results suggest that curcumin may directly stimulate CFTR Cl(-) channels. PMID:15582996

  20. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice.

    PubMed

    Shah, Viral S; Meyerholz, David K; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud; Ernst, Sarah E; Karp, Philip H; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L; Heilmann, Kristopher P; Leidinger, Mariah R; Allen, Patrick D; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Stoltz, David A; Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-01-29

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H(+) secretion by the nongastric H(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H(+); consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  1. Expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene in the respiratory tract of normal individuals and individuals with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Trapnell, B.C.; Chinshyan Chu; Paakko, P.K.; Banks, T.C.; Yoshimura, Kunihiko; Ferrans, V.J.; Chernick, M.S.; Crystal, R.G. )

    1991-08-01

    The most common mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene, CFTR, associated with the clinical disorder cystic fibrosis (CF) is called {Delta}Phe{sup 508}, a triple-base deletion resulting in loss of phenylalanine at residue 508 of the predicted 1480-amino acid CFTR protein. In the context that the lung is the major site of morbidity and mortality in CF, the authors evaluated airway epithelial cells for CFTR mRNA transcripts in normal individuals, normal-{Delta}Phe{sup 508} heterozygotes, and {Delta}Phe{sup 508} homozygotes to determine if the normal and {Delta}Phe{sup 508} CFTR alleles are expressed in the respiratory epithelium, to what extent they are expressed, and whether there are relative differences in the expression of the normal and abnormal alleles at the mRNA level. Respiratory tract epithelial cells recovered by fiberoptic bronchoscopy with a cytology brush demonstrated CFTR mRNA transcripts with sequences appropriately reflecting the normal and {Delta}Phe{sup 508} CFTR alleles of the various study groups. CFTR gene expression quantified by limited polymerase chain reaction amplification showed that in normal individuals, CFTR mRNA transcripts are expressed in nasal, tracheal, and bronchial epithelial cells.

  2. Use of exercise in the management of cystic fibrosis: short communication about a survey of cystic fibrosis referral centers.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, T A; ZeBranek, J D; McKey, R M

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 47 cystic fibrosis referral centers was conducted to study the use of exercise in the management of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A questionnaire with 5 brief questions concerning the prescription and application of exercise therapy was sent to the first 47 centers (38.5%) listed in the 1988 CF Foundation Directory, and 46 (97.9%) were returned. While all but one of the respondents recommend exercise at least to selected patients, and while 80.4% of the centers refer patients to summer camp programs, only 43.5% offer exercise stress testing and only 21.7% offer an exercise program for their patients. Most of the respondents who recommend exercise prescribe aerobic exercise, swimming being the most frequently chosen type. Although there is a large discrepancy between those centers that acknowledge the benefits of exercise and those that have arranged for regularly available exercise services, inroads have been made in utilizing this therapeutic tool for patients with CF. PMID:1852520

  3. Oxidation contributes to low glutathione in the airways of children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kettle, Anthony J; Turner, Rufus; Gangell, Catherine L; Harwood, D Timothy; Khalilova, Irada S; Chapman, Anna L; Winterbourn, Christine C; Sly, Peter D

    2014-07-01

    Glutathione is an important antioxidant in the lungs but its concentration is low in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis. Whether this deficit occurs from an early age or how oxidative stress contributes to lowering glutathione is unknown. We measured glutathione, its oxidation products, myeloperoxidase, and biomarkers of hypochlorous acid in bronchoalveolar lavage from children with cystic fibrosis and disease controls using mass spectrometry and immunological techniques. The concentration of glutathione was lower in bronchoalveolar lavage from children with cystic fibrosis, whereas glutathione sulfonamide, a specific oxidation product of hypochlorous acid, was higher. Oxidised glutathione and glutathione sulfonamide correlated with myeloperoxidase and a biomarker of hypochlorous acid. The percentage of glutathione attached to proteins was higher in children with cystic fibrosis than controls. Pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis resulted in lower levels of glutathione but higher levels of oxidised glutathione and glutathione sulfonamide in bronchoalveolar lavage. The concentration of glutathione is low in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis from an early age. Increased oxidation of glutathione by hypochlorous acid and its attachment to proteins contribute to this deficiency. Therapies targeted against myeloperoxidase may boost antioxidant defence and slow the onset and progression of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. PMID:24659542

  4. Psychosocial functioning of young adults with cystic fibrosis and their families.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, C.; Cull, A.; Freeman, C. P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The psychosocial functioning of adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis still living in the parental home was investigated. With its proven genetic aetiology cystic fibrosis is an ideal model with which to assess the impact of a chronic and life threatening disorder on family and individual psychological and social functioning. METHODS--Twenty nine patients with cystic fibrosis and their families were compared with those of 27 patients with anorexia nervosa and 31 well controls. Assessments were made using self reporting, interview, and observational methods. RESULTS--Most patients with cystic fibrosis were in robust psychological health and only differed from their healthy peers in that they were much less likely to be in employment. Mothers of patients with cystic fibrosis or anorexia nervosa were more likely than the mothers of the well group to be emotionally distressed, although this was not so for fathers. Young people in both illness groups were more likely to have parents with high levels of expressed emotion. Most families of patients with cystic fibrosis had good problem solving abilities. CONCLUSIONS--In spite of the burden of illness in cystic fibrosis psychological functioning in many respects matches that of well young people. PMID:8091327

  5. Measurement of intracellular mediators in enterocytes isolated from jejunal biopsy specimens of control and cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hitchin, B W; Dobson, P R; Brown, B L; Hardcastle, J; Hardcastle, P T; Taylor, C J

    1991-01-01

    A method that maximises the yield of viable enterocytes has been developed for the isolation of enterocytes from human jejunal biopsy specimens. These enterocytes have been used to study the values of intracellular free calcium and the rises in adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) induced by secretagogues in normal and cystic fibrosis cells. Basal intracellular free calcium of cystic fibrosis enterocytes, measured fluorimetrically with fura-2, was within the range of the basal intracellular free calcium of non-cystic fibrosis enterocytes (cystic fibrosis 263 nmol/l; non-cystic fibrosis 287 nmol/l). Changes in intracellular free calcium were observed after exposure to ionomycin: a 100 nmol/l solution induced a 2.5 fold increase in intracellular free calcium in the cystic fibrosis enterocytes and a 2.2 fold increase in the intracellular free calcium concentration of the non-cystic fibrosis enterocytes. Basal cAMP values were not significantly different between cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis enterocytes (cystic fibrosis 575 fmol/100,000 cells; non-cystic fibrosis 716 fmol/100,000 cells, p greater than 0.05) and the enterocyte cAMP value increased in response to stimulation with prostaglandin E2 (7 mumol/l) (cystic fibrosis 2.2 fold increase over basal, p less than 0.05; non-cystic fibrosis 1.9 fold stimulation over basal, p less than 0.05) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (100 nmol/l) (cystic fibrosis 7.1 fold increase over basal, p less than 0.05; non-cystic fibrosis 5.8 fold increase over basal, p less than 0.05). There was no significant difference in the magnitude of the response between cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis enterocytes (p greater than 0.05). These results indicate that the cystic fibrosis defect in the small intestine, as in other affected epithelia, seems to be distal to the production of second messengers. The small intestine is therefore an appropriate model in which to study the biochemical defect in cystic fibrosis

  6. Abnormal fucosylation of ileal mucus in cystic fibrosis: I. A histochemical study using peroxidase labelled lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Thiru, S; Devereux, G; King, A

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidase conjugated lectins were used to analyse the glycoproteins of small intestinal mucins in normal infants and those with cystic fibrosis to ascertain whether there are any detectable histochemical differences in saccharide composition. A significant decrease in Lotus tetragonolobus (LTG) binding fucose was shown in normal small intestinal mucin starting around 36 weeks' gestation with total absence of staining at term and beyond. In contrast, the age matched patients with cystic fibrosis showed persistent and intense LTG binding of fucose. These results provide the first clear histochemical evidence that cystic fibrosis mucin is abnormal and confirm the findings of previous biochemical studies. Images PMID:2266173

  7. Relationship of Adherence Determinants and Parental Spirituality in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; VanDyke, Rhonda; Thurmond, Sophia; Seid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary The course of cystic fibrosis (CF) progression in children is affected by parent adherence to treatment plans. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) posits that intentions are the best behavioral predictors and that intentions reasonably follow from beliefs (“determinants”). Determinants are affected by multiple “background factors,” including spirituality. This study’s purpose was to understand whether two parental adherence determinants (attitude towards treatment and self-efficacy) were associated with spirituality (religious coping and sanctification of the body). We hypothesized that parents’ attitudes toward treatment adherence are associated with these spiritual constructs. A convenience sample of parents of children with CF aged 3–12 years (n = 28) participated by completing surveys of adherence and spirituality during a regular outpatient clinic visit. Type and degree of religious coping was examined using principal component analysis. Adherence measures were compared based on religious coping styles and sanctification of the body using unpaired t-tests. Collaborative religious coping was associated with higher self-efficacy for completing airway clearance (M = 1070.8; SD = 35.8; P = 0.012), for completing aerosolized medication administration (M = 1077.1; SD = 37.4; P = 0.018), and for attitude towards treatment utility (M = 38.8; SD = 2.36; P = 0.038). Parents who attributed sacred qualities to their child’s body (e.g., “blessed” or “miraculous”) had higher mean scores for self-efficacy (airway clearance, M = 1058.6; SD = 37.7; P = 0.023; aerosols M = 1070.8; SD = 41.6; P = 0.020). Parents for whom God was manifested in their child’s body (e.g., “My child’s body is created in God’s image”) had higher mean scores for self-efficacy for airway clearance (M = 1056.4; SD = 59.0; P = 0.039), aerosolized medications (M = 1068.8; SD = 42.6; P = 0.033) and treatment utility (M = 38.8; SD = 2.4; P = 0.025). Spiritual

  8. Genetic screening for cystic fibrosis: an overview of the science and the economics.

    PubMed

    Brice, Philippa; Jarrett, James; Mugford, Miranda

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the current scientific and economic thinking on the use of genetic technologies for cystic fibrosis (CF) screening. The paper takes a public health genetics viewpoint and gives an overview of the genetics behind CF, then describes current practices in screening for the disease. We then discuss the current literature on the economic evaluations of screening for CF. As the "wet" science improves, there are direct implications for health service. Therefore, it is important to keep examining both clinical practice and economics behind the technologies. PMID:17369107

  9. A new era of personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis – at last!

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Bradley S; Wilcox, Pearce G

    2015-01-01

    The gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF) was discovered 25 years ago. This breakthrough has enabled a sophisticated understanding of how various mutations lead to specific alterations in the structure and function of the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) protein. Until recently, all therapies in CF were focused on ameliorating the downstream consequences of CFTR dysfunction. High-throughput drug screening approaches have yielded compounds that can modify CFTR structure and function, thus targeting the basic defect in CF. The present article describes the CFTR mutational classes, reviews mutation-specific therapies currently in late-phase clinical development, and highlights research opportunities and challenges with personalized medicine in CF. PMID:26083544

  10. A new era of personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis - at last!

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Wilcox, Pearce G

    2015-01-01

    The gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF) was discovered 25 years ago. This breakthrough has enabled a sophisticated understanding of how various mutations lead to specific alterations in the structure and function of the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) protein. Until recently, all therapies in CF were focused on ameliorating the downstream consequences of CFTR dysfunction. High-throughput drug screening approaches have yielded compounds that can modify CFTR structure and function, thus targeting the basic defect in CF. The present article describes the CFTR mutational classes, reviews mutation-specific therapies currently in late-phase clinical development, and highlights research opportunities and challenges with personalized medicine in CF. PMID:26083544

  11. Critical evaluation of lung scintigraphy in cystic fibrosis: study of 113 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Piepsz, A.; Wetzburger, C.; Spehl, M.; Machin, D.; Dab, I.; Ham, H.R.; Vandevivere, J.; Baran, D.

    1980-10-01

    A long-term study has been performed on 285 lung perfusion scintigrams obtained from 113 patients with cystic fibrosis. Transverse and longitudinal comparisons with clinical and radiological scores, as well as retrospective analysis of the deceased patients, were the methods used in order to evaluate the importance of the scintigraphic images. It appears that lung scintigraphy is the best index of the regional lung impairment, and contributes, as does a chest radiograph, to the early detection of lung lesions, the two methods being complementary.

  12. Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Dysfunction in Chronic Bronchitis and Other Diseases of Mucus Clearance.

    PubMed

    Raju, S Vamsee; Solomon, George M; Dransfield, Mark T; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem. No therapies alter the natural history of the disease. Chronic bronchitis is perhaps the most clinically troublesome phenotype. Emerging data strongly suggest that cigarette smoke and its components can lead to acquired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction. Findings in vitro, in animal models, and in smokers with and without COPD also show acquired CFTR dysfunction, which is associated with chronic bronchitis. This abnormality is also present in extrapulmonary organs, suggesting that CFTR dysfunction may contribute to smoking-related systemic diseases. PMID:26857776

  13. Clinical and microbiological features of a cystic fibrosis patient chronically colonized with Pandoraea sputorum identified by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, A; Morosini, M I; Lamas, A; García-Castillo, M; García-García, L; Cantón, R; Máiz, L

    2012-03-01

    Clonal isolates identified as various nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli over a 5-year period from sputum cultures of a 30-year-old cystic fibrosis patient were successfully reidentified as Pandoraea sputorum by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Decreased lung function improved after 1 year of azithromycin and inhaled 7%-hypertonic saline treatment. PMID:22170922

  14. Lifestyle treatments in cystic fibrosis: The NHS should pay.

    PubMed

    Ketchell, Robert Ian

    2016-08-01

    With the NHS under increasing financial pressure and healthcare costs soaring year on year, it is perhaps not surprising that assessment agencies focus on cost-effectiveness analysis when assessing new therapies. Such an approach does not however, always take sufficient account of treatment burden, lifestyle and patient choice and therefore new equally effective but perhaps "easier to take" formulations and faster delivery systems for current therapies do not always take precedence in current treatment guidelines. In arguing that the NHS should pay for so-called lifestyle treatments in cystic fibrosis the counterintuitive nature of some of the current decision making is discussed and a more holistic approach to improve NHS efficiency is presented. PMID:27373763

  15. Anti-coagulant therapy with dabigatran for cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Manvi; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism, especially in association with central venous catheter use. Coumarin drugs and low molecular weight heparin are frequently used for anti-coagulant therapy, but are more challenging to administer in CF patients. Dabigatran, an oral thrombin antagonist, is an alternative anti-coagulant medication, but its use in CF has not been reported. We describe our experience in successfully using dabigatran for long-term anti-coagulation therapy in two CF patients. Our experience suggests that dabigatran can serve as an option for anticoagulation therapy in CF. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E29-E30. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27128852

  16. A 12 megabase restriction map at the cystic fibrosis locus.

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, T R; Bowcock, A M; Smith, D R; Daneshvar, L; Green, P; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Donis-Keller, H

    1989-01-01

    We have constructed a physical map of the chromosomal region containing the cystic fibrosis locus using seven DNA markers and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis methods. The map includes cleavage sites for 8 rare-cutting restriction enzymes and spans over 12 megabases (Mb) of DNA, with one unlinked probe covering an additional 5 Mb. To our knowledge, this is the largest segment of human DNA which has been restriction-mapped to date. We can identify thirteen putative HTF islands spaced at intervals of 0.3-3.2 Mb. The region between loci D7S8 and MET, where the CF gene lies, includes 1.4-1.9 Mb of DNA. Images PMID:2911467

  17. Tuberculosis reinfection in a pregnant cystic fibrosis patient

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Asween; Montales, Maria Theresa; Mittadodla, Penchala; Mukasa, Leonard; Bhaskar, Nutan; Bates, Joseph; Patil, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disease predominantly affecting the airways and predisposing patients to recurrent infections with various multidrug resistant organisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection is rarely seen, but considered a potential pathogen in CF patients. We report a 26 year old pregnant CF patient on Ivacaftor who was admitted with symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis. Three years prior to the current admission, she had completed four drug anti- MTB therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis and was considered cured as her sputum cultures after six months of treatment were negative. Genotype analysis revealed the current MTB strain to be different from the strain causing the previous infection. After receiving first line anti-tuberculous regimen for nine months, the patient's condition markedly improved culminating in an uneventful pregnancy and delivery. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case of reinfection tuberculosis in a CF patient. PMID:26744656

  18. Infection in cystic fibrosis: impact of the environment and climate.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, K A; Stockwell, R E; Bell, S C; Kidd, T J

    2016-01-01

    In many countries numbers of adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) exceed that of children, with median survival predicted to surpass 50 years. Increasing longevity is, in part, due to intensive therapies including eradication of early infection and suppressive therapies and pulmonary exacerbations. Initial infections with common CF pathogens are thought to arise from the natural environment. We review the impact of climate and environment on infection in CF. Specifically, several studies indicate that higher ambient temperatures, proximity to the equator and the summer season may be linked to the increased prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with CF. The environment may also play an important role in the acquisition of Gram negative organisms other than P. aeruginosa. There is emerging data suggesting that climatic and environmental factors are likely to impact on the risk of infection with NTM and fungi in people which are found extensively throughout the natural environment. PMID:26949990

  19. Parent routines for managing cystic fibrosis in children.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Filigno, Stephanie Spear; Bishop, Meredith

    2014-06-01

    Management of cystic fibrosis (CF) is burdensome and adherence is often suboptimal. Family routines are associated with adherence and health outcomes in other disease populations. Few studies have examined routines in CF. The study's aim was to describe parent experiences developing and utilizing CF care routines. Semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of 25 parents of children under 13 years of age with CF were analyzed using phenomenological analysis. Three domains emerged: parent experiences developing a routine, support systems facilitating maintenance of routines, and challenges with maintaining care routines. Parents found routines difficult to establish, used trial and error, encountered barriers, and found support helpful to manage care demands. Some parents chose to deviate from their routine. Providing anticipatory guidance to promote the use of care routines and strategies to manage potential challenges may facilitate use of routines and improve CF management. PMID:24838648

  20. Supporting parents in managing drugs for children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Slatter, Amanda; Francis, Sally-Anne; Smith, Felicity; Bush, Andrew

    A semi-structured interview guide was used to interview 17 parents of children with cystic fibrosis identified through a shared care patient database at a London hospital to examine parents' medication-related roles and problems. Parents described their responsibilities in the home and the problems experienced, including adherence to regiments, involvement in decision-making, and relationships with the hospital teams and other healthcare professionals. The findings confirmed medication management as an integral part of the informal caring role. Many practical problems of ensuring the availability and administration of medication on a regular basis were described. Information gaps and problems with medication adherence increased the stress of providing effective care. The involvement of healthcare professionals across primary, secondary and tertiary care sectors in supporting parents in all aspects of medication management, including the development of strategies for transferring the responsibility for medication to their children, must be improved. PMID:15573006

  1. Prenatal screening of Cystic Fibrosis: a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Bizzoco, Domenico; Mesoraca, Alvaro; Cima, Antonella; Sarti, Monica; Di Giacomo, Gianluca; Scerra, Giovanna; Barone, Maria Antonietta; Di Natale, Manuela; Gabrielli, Ivan; Tamburino, Caterina; Scargiali, Claudia; Ernandez, Cristina; D’Aleo, Maria Pia; Todini, Michele; Pompili, Rita; Mobili, Luisa; Mangiafico, Lucia; Carcioppolo, Ornella; Coco, Claudio; Cignini, Pietro; D’Emidio, Laura; Girgenti, Alessandra; Brizzi, Cristiana; Cavaliere, Alessandro; Giorlandino, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The gene responsible for the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis has been known for over 15 years and represent the most common autosomal recessive disease in the european population. We aimed to investigate the incidence of this condition during fetal life. Methods: In the past 10 years we examined in our centre 25393 fetuses of women underwent to amniocentesis. We carried out the examination of the most frequent mutations which enable, according to the literature data, the identification of almost 80% of the affected alleles. Result: We identified 922 heterozygous and 9 homozygous for the mutation. The frequency of heterozygousin the examined sample was 1/27,5 while that of the affected was 1/2821. Conclusion: We encourage new thoughts regarding the diagnostic validity of the most frequent panel of mutations among the italian population in order to exclude never encountered mutations and the insertion of other more significant mutations. PMID:22439019

  2. Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, James F.; Konstan, Michael W.; Elborn, J. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from <6 mo in 1940 to >38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  3. Antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chmiel, James F; Konstan, Michael W; Elborn, J Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from <6 mo in 1940 to >38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  4. Phenotypic abnormalities in long-term surviving cystic fibrosis mice.

    PubMed

    Kent, G; Oliver, M; Foskett, J K; Frndova, H; Durie, P; Forstner, J; Forstner, G G; Riordan, J R; Percy, D; Buchwald, M

    1996-08-01

    Mouse models for cystic fibrosis (CF) with no CFTR function (Cftr-/-) have the disadvantage that most animals die of intestinal obstruction shortly after weaning. The objective of this research was to extend the lifespan of CF mice and characterize their phenotype. Weanlings were placed on a nutrient liquid diet, and histologic and functional aspects of organs implicated in the disease were subsequently examined. Approximately 90% of Cftr-/- mice survived to 60 d, the majority beyond 100 d. Cftr-/- mice were underweight and had markedly abnormal intestinal histology. The intestinal epithelia did not respond to challenges with agents that raised intracellular cAMP, consistent with the absence of functional CFTR. No lesions or functional abnormalities were evident in the lungs. Liquid-fed Cftr-/- mice were infertile, although some males weaned to a solid diet were fertile before they died. Thus, we have succeeded in using dietary means to prolong the lives of Cftr-/- mice. PMID:8827771

  5. Computed tomography dose optimisation in cystic fibrosis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Helena; Twomey, Maria; Moloney, Fiachra; O’Neill, Siobhan B; Murphy, Kevin; O’Connor, Owen J; Maher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive disease of the Caucasian population worldwide, with respiratory disease remaining the most relevant source of morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) is frequently used for monitoring disease complications and progression. Over the last fifteen years there has been a six-fold increase in the use of CT, which has lead to a growing concern in relation to cumulative radiation exposure. The challenge to the medical profession is to identify dose reduction strategies that meet acceptable image quality, but fulfil the requirements of a diagnostic quality CT. Dose-optimisation, particularly in CT, is essential as it reduces the chances of patients receiving cumulative radiation doses in excess of 100 mSv, a dose deemed significant by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. This review article explores the current trends in imaging in CF with particular emphasis on new developments in dose optimisation. PMID:27158420

  6. Hepatopulmonary Syndrome in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Oded; Shteyer, Eyal; Wilschanski, Michael; Perles, Zeev; Cohen-Cymberknoh, Malena; Kerem, Eitan; Shoseyov, David

    2016-02-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a liver-induced lung disorder defined as a triad of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatation, and a defect in oxygenation. It can complicate chronic liver disease of any etiology, but is most commonly associated with portal hypertension. Severe liver disease with portal hypertension is present in 2% to 8% of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), but to date, to our knowledge, only one patient with CF has been reported to suffer from HPS. Here, we describe two patients with CF diagnosed with HPS, one subsequent to unresolved hypoxemia and the other following screening for HPS performed in our center. We speculate that HPS is underdiagnosed in patients with CF because of their coexisting respiratory morbidity, and we advocate routine screening for every patient with CF who has liver disease and portal hypertension. PMID:26867851

  7. Isolation of Staphylococcus aureus from sputum in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sparham, P D; Lobban, D I; Speller, D C

    1978-10-01

    The success in the isolation of Staphylococcus aureus of different methods of sputum processing was investigated in 60 specimens collected from 14 patients with cystic fibrosis during a seven-month period. Fifty specimens (83%) from 11 patients yielded Staph. aureus by one or more methods. Direct plating of purulent portions of sputum on to media designed for general use in respiratory infections gave unsatisfactory results (35% yield of Staph. aureus). Some increase in isolations was obtained with preliminary liquefaction of sputum; but the best results were given by the addition of a medium selective for staphylococci (mannitol salt agar, BBL) or by initial sonication of sputum (each 83% yield). Seven of the 11 strains of Staph. aureus were thymidine-dependent and otherwise atypical in laboratory characteristics; these were isolated from patients who had received co-trimoxazole. PMID:101553

  8. Epigenetics in Cystic Fibrosis: Epigenetic Targeting of a Genetic Disease.

    PubMed

    Sirinupong, Nualpun; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a deadly genetic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system. A mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene is the cause of the disease. How epigenetics contributes to CFTR expression is still poorly understood. Epigenetics is a mechanism that alters gene expression without changing the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and histone modification. Both mechanisms have been implicated in CFTR gene regulation. Here we review epigenetic regulation of CFTR transcription while discussing potential epigenetic targeting strategies including DNA methyltransferase, histone deacetylase, and histone methyltransferase and demethylase inhibition. Because of the reversibility of epigenetics, targeting epigenetic mechanisms has been an attractive therapeutic approach. However, epigenetic targeting of CF disease is still at its infant stage. PMID:25882215

  9. ENaC inhibitors for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Butler, Rebecca; Hunt, Thomas; Smith, Nichola J

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel, ENaC, is a key regulator of the volume of airway surface liquid in the human airway epithelium. In cystic fibrosis (CF), Na(+) hyperabsorption through ENaC in the absence of CFTR-mediated anion secretion results in the dehydration of respiratory secretions and the impairment of mucociliary clearance. The hypothesis of utilizing an ENaC-blocking molecule to facilitate restoration of the airway surface liquid volume sufficiently to allow normal mucociliary clearance is of interest in the management of lung disease in CF patients. This article summarizes the published patent applications from 2010 that claim approaches to inhibit the function of ENaC for utility in the treatment of CF. Patents were located though SciFinder(®), using "ENaC" as the keyword from 2010 onwards; documents not relevant to CF were then manually removed. PMID:25565157

  10. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; James, Tamara; Conover, Chris; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most commonly tested autosomal recessive disorders in the US. Clinical CF is associated with mutations in the CFTR gene, of which the most common mutation among Caucasians, ΔF508, was identified in 1989. The University of Michigan, Johns Hopkins University, and the Hospital for Sick Children, where much of the initial research occurred, hold key patents for CF genetic sequences, mutations and methods for detecting them. Several patents including the one that covers detection of the ΔF508 mutation are jointly held by the University of Michigan and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, with Michigan administering patent licensing in the US. The University of Michigan broadly licenses the ΔF508 patent for genetic testing with over 60 providers of genetic testing to date. Genetic testing is now used in newborn screening, diagnosis, and reproductive decisions. Interviews with key researchers and intellectual property managers, a survey of laboratories’ prices for CF genetic testing, a review of literature on CF tests’ cost effectiveness, and a review of the developing market for CF testing provide no evidence that patents have significantly hindered access to genetic tests for CF or prevented financially cost-effective screening. Current licensing practices for cystic fibrosis (CF) genetic testing appear to facilitate both academic research and commercial testing. More than one thousand different CFTR mutations have been identified, and research continues to determine their clinical significance. Patents have been nonexclusively licensed for diagnostic use, and have been variably licensed for gene transfer and other therapeutic applications. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has been engaged in licensing decisions, making CF a model of collaborative and cooperative patenting and licensing practice. PMID:20393308

  11. Effects of Probiotics on Quality of Life in Children with Cystic Fibrosis; A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Seyed-Ali; Mehdizadeh-Hakkak, Atieh; Kianifar, Hamid-Reza; Hebrani, Paria; Ahanchian, Hamid; Abbasnejad, Elaheh

    2013-01-01

    Objective Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) usually have abnormal intestinal microbiota and dysregulated immune mediators due to massive exposure to antibiotics. Probiotics as immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory substances are considered to improve both clinical and biochemical intestinal and pulmonary function in CF patients. We decided to investigate the effects of probiotics on quality of life and pulmonary exacerbations in children with cystic fibrosis. Methods In a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial, 37 CF patients (2-12 years old) were randomly divided into two groups. 20 patients of probiotic group took probiotics (2×109CFU/d) for one month while 17 patients of control group took placebo capsules. Quality of life was determined using PedsQL™4.0 questionnaire at the beginning, then three and six months after completing the treatment period. Rate of pulmonary exacerbation in probiotic group patients was also evaluated during three months after intervention and compared to the same three months of the previous year. Results were analyzed using SPSS (11.5). P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Findings Significant improvement was observed in the mean total score of parent reported quality of life among probiotic group patients in comparison with placebo group at 3rd month (P=0.01), but this was not significant at 6th month of probiotic treatment. Rate of pulmonary exacerbation was significantly reduced among probiotic group (P<0.01). Conclusion Probiotics are considered as useful nutritional supplements on reducing number of pulmonary exacerbations and improving quality of life in patients with cystic fibrosis. Effects of probiotics seem to be temporary and probably continuous ingestion might have more stable improving effects on quality of life. PMID:24910746

  12. Phenotypic expression of the p.Leu1077Pro CFTR mutation in Sicilian cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The p.Leu1077Pro CFTR mutation was firstly described in 1992 as a mild allele that confers a pancreatic sufficiency phenotype but the information collected in database CFTR2 lead to consider p.Leu1077Pro as a severe CF mutation. Although it is typical of Southern Italy, p.Leu1077Pro is not included in the mutation panel firstly tested in individuals originated from this area. The aim of our study was to describe prevalence and clinical features in patients bearing this mutation followed in our Cystic Fibrosis Centre to demonstrate that this mutation should be included in the mutation panel firstly tested in patients originated from Southern Italy. Findings We reviewed data from a cohort of 111 cystic fibrosis patients. 4 patients who were heterozygous for the p.Leu1077Pro mutation were included in the study. In our Cystic Fibrosis Centre, the prevalence of p.Leu1077Pro is 3.6% among all mutations. All patients had positive sweat test values, pancreatic insufficiency and pulmonary exacerbations. One out of four patients even showed both FEV1 and FVC values significantly below the normal range, the presence of bronchiectasis and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization. Conclusions We found that the p.Leu1077Pro CFTR mutation is associated with a classic CF phenotype confirming what is reported in CFTR2 database. The relatively high prevalence of p.Leu1077Pro associated with the severe clinical course of the disease in patients bearing this mutation is of interest for genetic counselling purposes, as it should be part of mutation panel to be tested in individuals originated from Southern Italy. PMID:24225052

  13. Cystic Fibrosis-Related Oxidative Stress and Intestinal Lipid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kleme, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal genetic disorder in the Caucasian people. It is due to the mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene located on the long arm of the chromosome 7, which encodes for CFTR protein. The latter, an adenosine triphosphate binding cassette, is a transmembrane chloride channel that is also involved in glutathione transport. As glutathione/glutathione disulfide constitutes the most important pool of cellular redox systems, CFTR defects could thus disrupt the intracellular redox balance. Resulting multisystemic diseases are essentially characterized by a chronic respiratory failure, a pancreatic insufficiency, an essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD), and inadequate levels of antioxidant vitamins. Recent Advances: The pathophysiology of CF is complex; however, several mechanisms are proposed, including oxidative stress (OxS) whose implication is recognized and has been clearly demonstrated in CF airways. Critical Issues: Little is known about OxS intrinsic triggers and its own involvement in intestinal lipid disorders. Despite the regular administration of pancreatic supplements, high-fat high-calorie diets, and antioxidant fat-soluble vitamins, there is a persistence of steatorrhea, EFAD, and harmful OxS. Intriguingly, several trials with elevated doses of antioxidant vitamins have not yielded significant improvements. Future Directions: The main sources and self-maintenance of OxS in CF should be clarified to improve treatment of patients. Therefore, this review will discuss the potential sources and study the mechanisms of OxS in the intestine, known to develop various complications, and its involvement in intestinal lipid disorders in CF patients. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 614–631. PMID:25611180

  14. Gender Differences in Outcomes of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Harness-Brumley, Cayce L.; Elliott, Alan C.; Rosenbluth, Daniel B.; Raghavan, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening genetic disease in which women have been described to have worse outcomes than males, particularly in response to respiratory infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, as advancements in therapies have improved life expectancy, this gender disparity has been challenged. The objective of this study is to examine whether a gender-based survival difference still exists in this population and determine the impact of common CF respiratory infections on outcomes in males versus females with CF. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of 32,766 patients from the United States Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry over a 13-year period. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare overall mortality and pathogen based survival rates in males and females. Results: Females demonstrated a decreased median life expectancy (36.0 years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 35.0–37.3) compared with men (38.7 years; 95% CI 37.8–39.6; p<0.001). Female gender proved to be a significant risk factor for death (hazard ratio 2.22, 95% CI 1.79–2.77), despite accounting for variables known to influence CF mortality. Women were also found to become colonized earlier with several bacteria and to have worse outcomes with common CF pathogens. Conclusions: CF women continue to have a shortened life expectancy relative to men despite accounting for key CF-related comorbidities. Women also become colonized with certain common CF pathogens earlier than men and show a decreased life expectancy in the setting of respiratory infections. Explanations for this gender disparity are only beginning to be unraveled and further investigation into mechanisms is needed to help develop therapies that may narrow this gender gap. PMID:25495366

  15. CFTR, Mucins, and Mucus Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kreda, Silvia M.; Davis, C. William; Rose, Mary Callaghan

    2012-01-01

    Mucus pathology in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been known for as long as the disease has been recognized and is sometimes called mucoviscidosis. The disease is marked by mucus hyperproduction and plugging in many organs, which are usually most fatal in the airways of CF patients, once the problem of meconium ileus at birth is resolved. After the CF gene, CFTR, was cloned and its protein product identified as a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel, causal mechanisms underlying the strong mucus phenotype of the disease became obscure. Here we focus on mucin genes and polymeric mucin glycoproteins, examining their regulation and potential relationships to a dysfunctional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Detailed examination of CFTR expression in organs and different cell types indicates that changes in CFTR expression do not always correlate with the severity of CF disease or mucus accumulation. Thus, the mucus hyperproduction that typifies CF does not appear to be a direct cause of a defective CFTR but, rather, to be a downstream consequence. In organs like the lung, up-regulation of mucin gene expression by inflammation results from chronic infection; however, in other instances and organs, the inflammation may have a non-infectious origin. The mucus plugging phenotype of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse is proving to be an archetypal example of this kind of inflammation, with a dehydrated airway surface/concentrated mucus gel apparently providing the inflammatory stimulus. Data indicate that the luminal HCO3 − deficiency recently described for CF epithelia may also provide such a stimulus, perhaps by causing a mal-maturation of mucins as they are released onto luminal surfaces. In any event, the path between CFTR dysfunction and mucus hyperproduction has proven tortuous, and its unraveling continues to offer its own twists and turns, along with fascinating glimpses into biology. PMID:22951447

  16. Iron accumulates in the lavage and explanted lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Oxidative stress participates in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF). An underlying disruption in iron homeostasis can frequently be demonstrated in injuries and diseases associated with an oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that iron accumulation and ...

  17. Na and K Dependence of the Na/K Pump in Cystic Fibrosis Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Vivian M.; Schneider, Jerry A.; Mendoza, Stanley A.

    1981-11-01

    The Na and K dependence of the Na/K pump was measured in skin fibroblasts from patients with cystic fibrosis and age/sex-matched controls. Under basal conditions, there was no difference between control and cystic fibrosis cells in protein per cell, intracellular Na and K content, or Na/K pump activity (measured as ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake). There was no difference in the Na dependence of the Na/K pump between cystic fibrosis cells and control cells. In cells from patients with cystic fibrosis, the Na/K pump had a significantly lower affinity for K (Km = 1.6 mM) when compared to normals (Km = 0.9 mM). This difference was demonstrated by using two independent experimental designs.

  18. Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... being active in sports. Photo: Boomer Esiason Foundation Fast Facts Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease ... 2; his parents launched a foundation to raise money for CF research and to support the CF ...

  19. Therapeutic approaches to cystic fibrosis: memorandum from a joint WHO/ICF(M)A meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is one of the commonest genetic diseases among Caucasians and represents an important cause of suffering and death among children and adults. In the past two decades marked prolongation of the life of patients with cystic fibrosis has been achieved as the result of improved case-finding and an extensive regimen of therapies. More recently, a variety of new approaches to therapy have been developed or proposed as the result of advances in cell physiology and molecular biology. This article summarizes the presentations and discussions made at a joint WHO/ICF(M)A (International Cystic Fibrosis (Mucoviscidosis) Association) meeting, held in Washington, DC, on 14 October 1992, and reviews the current status of possible therapies for cystic fibrosis and their implications for treatment in various countries of the world. PMID:7520369

  20. Recombinant growth hormone therapy for cystic fibrosis in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Vidhu; Haagensen, Alexandra L; Carter, Ben; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Houston, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition causing disease most noticeably in the lungs, digestive tract and pancreas. People with cystic fibrosis often have malnutrition and growth delay. Adequate nutritional supplementation does not improve growth optimally and hence an anabolic agent, recombinant growth hormone, has been proposed as a potential intervention. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of recombinant human growth hormone therapy in improving lung function, quality of life and clinical status of children and young adults with cystic fibrosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group’s Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of latest search: 11 February 2015. We conducted a search of relevant endocrine journals and proceedings of the Endocrinology Society meetings using Scopus and Proceedings First. Date of latest search: 04 March 2015. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of recombinant growth hormone compared to either no treatment, or placebo, or each other at any dose (high-dose and low-dose) or route and for any duration, in children or young adults aged up to 25 years diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Main results Four controlled trials were included in this review (with 161 participants in total), each with an unclear risk of bias. Analysis of data obtained from these trials shows improvement in height for all comparisons, but improvements in weight and lean tissue mass were only reported in the comparison of standard dose recombinant growth hormone versus no treatment. One study showed moderate improvement at one time point

  1. Community-based care in cystic fibrosis: role of the cystic fibrosis nurse specialist and implications for patients and families.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, J; Burrows, E

    1998-01-01

    Improved survival for cystic fibrosis has rapidly increased over the past four decades, with patients now living well into adult life. With changes in the structure of the National Health Service and the formation of provider units and general practitioner (GP) fund-holding practices, it is important to strengthen links between the hospital and community teams to ensure that the CF patient receives adequate care. Increasingly, treatment is being carried out at home, and this emphasis on home-based therapy demands that parents/carers and patients must acquire the skills and knowledge of complex therapies in order to optimize health. It is the role of the CF nurse specialist (NS) to educate those who will deliver the care, co-ordinate the provision of services at home, liaise with the CF team and community health-care professionals and to support the patient and their carers. PMID:9637934

  2. Effects of C-terminal deletions on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Randak, Christoph; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip; Vermeer, Daniel; Ashbourne Excoffon, Katherine J; Welsh, Michael J

    2003-02-18

    To better understand the function of the conserved C terminus of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator, we studied constructs containing deletions in the C-terminal tail. When expressed in well differentiated CF airway epithelia, each construct localized predominantly to the apical membrane and generated transepithelial Cl(-) current. The results suggested that neither the C-terminal PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 (PDZ)-interacting motif nor other C-terminal sequences were absolutely required for apical expression in airway epithelia. Surprisingly, deleting an acidic cluster near the C terminus reduced both channel opening rate and transepithelial Cl(-) transport, indicating that it influences channel gating. These results may help explain the relative paucity of CF-associated mutations in the C terminus. PMID:12578973

  3. Effects of C-terminal deletions on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Randak, Christoph; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip; Vermeer, Daniel; Ashbourne Excoffon, Katherine J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the function of the conserved C terminus of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator, we studied constructs containing deletions in the C-terminal tail. When expressed in well differentiated CF airway epithelia, each construct localized predominantly to the apical membrane and generated transepithelial Cl− current. The results suggested that neither the C-terminal PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 (PDZ)-interacting motif nor other C-terminal sequences were absolutely required for apical expression in airway epithelia. Surprisingly, deleting an acidic cluster near the C terminus reduced both channel opening rate and transepithelial Cl− transport, indicating that it influences channel gating. These results may help explain the relative paucity of CF-associated mutations in the C terminus. PMID:12578973

  4. Calcium and sodium transport processes in patients with cystic fibrosis 2. Mg2+- dependent, Ca2+ ATPase activity in fibroblast membrane preparations from cystic fibrosis patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Katz, S

    1978-03-01

    Mg2+-dependent Ca2+-ATPase activity was determined in membrane preparations of fibroblasts grown from skin biopsies of cystic fibrosis patients and age-matched controls. This enzyme was stimulated by increasing free calcium concentrations with an apparent Kdiss for calcium of approximately 45 micron. Although there was a great deal of variation in Ca2+-ATPase activity observed between individual strains, there was a significant decrease in the maximal activation of the Ca2+-ATPase in membrane preparations of fibroblasts obtained from cystic fibrosis patients compared to the controls (P less than 0.05). This observation indicates that decreased Ca2+-ATPase activity is a generalized phenomenon in cystic fibrosis found in more than one cell-type. This decrease in Ca2+-ATPase activity may have a number of implications that may explain some of the manifestations of the disease. PMID:148720

  5. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Allelic Variants Relate to Shifts in Faecal Microbiota of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Floriana; Gagliardi, Antonella; De Biase, Riccardo Valerio; Stamato, Antonella; Bertasi, Serenella; Lucarelli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study we investigated the effects of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene variants on the composition of faecal microbiota, in patients affected by Cystic Fibrosis (CF). CFTR mutations (F508del is the most common) lead to a decreased secretion of chloride/water, and to mucus sticky secretions, in pancreas, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Intestinal manifestations are underestimated in CF, leading to ileum meconium at birth, or small bowel bacterial overgrowth in adult age. Methods Thirty-six CF patients, fasting and under no-antibiotic treatment, were CFTR genotyped on both alleles. Faecal samples were subjected to molecular microbial profiling through Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis and species-specific PCR. Ecological parameters and multivariate algorithms were employed to find out if CFTR variants could be related to the microbiota structure. Results Patients were classified by two different criteria: 1) presence/absence of F508del mutation; 2) disease severity in heterozygous and homozygous F508del patients. We found that homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients exhibited an enhanced dysbiotic faecal microbiota composition, even within the CF cohort itself, with higher biodiversity and evenness. We also found, by species-specific PCR, that potentially harmful species (Escherichia coli and Eubacterium biforme) were abundant in homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients, while beneficial species (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium limosum) were reduced. Conclusions This is the first report that establishes a link among CFTR variants and shifts in faecal microbiota, opening the way to studies that perceive CF as a ‘systemic disease’, linking the lung and the gut in a joined axis. PMID:23613805

  6. Mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator inhibits acidification and apoptosis in C127 cells: possible relevance to cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, R A; Dosanjh, A

    1996-01-01

    We have shown elsewhere that acidification is an early event in apoptosis, preceding DNA cleavage. Cells expressing the most common mutation (delF508) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) exhibit a higher resting intracellular pH and are unable to secrete chloride and bicarbonate in response to cAMP. We hypothesized that defective acidification in cells expressing delF508 CFTR would interfere with the acidification that accompanies apoptosis, which in turn, would prevent endonuclease activation and cleavage of DNA. We therefore determined whether the function of the CFTR would affect the process of apoptosis in mouse mammary epithelial C127 cells stably transfected with the wild-type CFTR (C127/wt) or the delF508 mutation of the CFTR (C127/508). C127 cells possessed an acid endonuclease capable of DNA degradation at low pH. Sixteen hours after treatment with cycloheximide, C127/wt cells underwent cytoplasmic acidification. In contrast, C127/508 cells failed to demonstrate acidification. Furthermore, the C127/508 cells did not show nuclear condensation or DNA fragmentation detected by in situ nick-end labeling after treatment with cycloheximide or etoposide, in contrast to the characteristic features of apoptosis demonstrated by the C127/wt cells. Measurement of cell viability indicated a preservation of cell viability in C127/508 cells but not in C127/wt cells. That this resistance to the induction of apoptosis depended upon the loss of CFTR activity is shown by the finding that inhibition of the CFTR with diphenylamine carboxylate in C127/wt cells conferred similar protection. These findings suggest a role for the CFTR in acidification during the initiation of apoptosis in epithelial cells and imply that a failure to undergo programmed cell death could contribute to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8622979

  7. Ceftaroline Fosamil for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Pulmonary Exacerbation in a Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Ashley Hall; Srivastava, Ruma; Rybak, Michael J.; McGrath, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Ceftaroline, an advanced generation cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), may present a new therapeutic alternative for treating lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis. We report a case of ceftaroline therapy in a pediatric patient with cystic fibrosis, whose dose was increased from 9.7 mg/kg/dose every 12 hours to 10.8 mg/kg/dose every 8 hours by using pharmacokinetic analyses. PMID:25024675

  8. Genotypic characterization of sequential Aspergillus fumigatus isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, P E; Meis, J F; Sarfati, J; Hoogkamp-Korstanje, J A; Latgé, J P; Melchers, W J

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-three sequential Aspergillus fumigatus sputum isolates, which had been collected over a period of 2 years, from two patients with cystic fibrosis were genotyped by random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. In patient B, one genotype was predominantly present in the sputum samples, while in the other patient up to nine different genotypes were identified. This study suggests that different patterns of colonization with A.fumigatus exist in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:8880528

  9. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Is a Novel Regulator of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Activity

    PubMed Central

    Semenkov, Illya; Molinski, Steven; Pasyk, Stan; Ahmadi, Saumel; Bui, Hai H.; Bear, Christine E.; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) attenuates sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling in resistance arteries and has emerged as a prominent regulator of myogenic vasoconstriction. This investigation demonstrates that S1P inhibits CFTR activity via adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK), establishing a potential feedback link. In Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK) cells expressing wild-type human CFTR, S1P (1μmol/L) attenuates forskolin-stimulated, CFTR-dependent iodide efflux. S1P’s inhibitory effect is rapid (within 30 seconds), transient and correlates with CFTR serine residue 737 (S737) phosphorylation. Both S1P receptor antagonism (4μmol/L VPC 23019) and AMPK inhibition (80μmol/L Compound C or AMPK siRNA) attenuate S1P-stimluated (i) AMPK phosphorylation, (ii) CFTR S737 phosphorylation and (iii) CFTR activity inhibition. In BHK cells expressing the ΔF508 CFTR mutant (CFTRΔF508), the most common mutation causing cystic fibrosis, both S1P receptor antagonism and AMPK inhibition enhance CFTR activity, without instigating discernable correction. In summary, we demonstrate that S1P/AMPK signaling transiently attenuates CFTR activity. Since our previous work positions CFTR as a negative S1P signaling regulator, this signaling link may positively reinforce S1P signals. This discovery has clinical ramifications for the treatment of disease states associated with enhanced S1P signaling and/or deficient CFTR activity (e.g. cystic fibrosis, heart failure). S1P receptor/AMPK inhibition could synergistically enhance the efficacy of therapeutic strategies aiming to correct aberrant CFTR trafficking. PMID:26079370

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Is a Novel Regulator of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Activity.

    PubMed

    Malik, Firhan A; Meissner, Anja; Semenkov, Illya; Molinski, Steven; Pasyk, Stan; Ahmadi, Saumel; Bui, Hai H; Bear, Christine E; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) attenuates sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling in resistance arteries and has emerged as a prominent regulator of myogenic vasoconstriction. This investigation demonstrates that S1P inhibits CFTR activity via adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK), establishing a potential feedback link. In Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK) cells expressing wild-type human CFTR, S1P (1μmol/L) attenuates forskolin-stimulated, CFTR-dependent iodide efflux. S1P's inhibitory effect is rapid (within 30 seconds), transient and correlates with CFTR serine residue 737 (S737) phosphorylation. Both S1P receptor antagonism (4μmol/L VPC 23019) and AMPK inhibition (80μmol/L Compound C or AMPK siRNA) attenuate S1P-stimluated (i) AMPK phosphorylation, (ii) CFTR S737 phosphorylation and (iii) CFTR activity inhibition. In BHK cells expressing the ΔF508 CFTR mutant (CFTRΔF508), the most common mutation causing cystic fibrosis, both S1P receptor antagonism and AMPK inhibition enhance CFTR activity, without instigating discernable correction. In summary, we demonstrate that S1P/AMPK signaling transiently attenuates CFTR activity. Since our previous work positions CFTR as a negative S1P signaling regulator, this signaling link may positively reinforce S1P signals. This discovery has clinical ramifications for the treatment of disease states associated with enhanced S1P signaling and/or deficient CFTR activity (e.g. cystic fibrosis, heart failure). S1P receptor/AMPK inhibition could synergistically enhance the efficacy of therapeutic strategies aiming to correct aberrant CFTR trafficking. PMID:26079370

  11. Interleukin-17 Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Intervention in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Daniel; Taylor, Patricia; Fletcher, Dave; van Heeckeren, Rolf; Eastman, Jean; van Heeckeren, Anna; Davis, Pamela; Chmiel, James F; Pearlman, Eric; Bonfield, Tracey L

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by an excessive neutrophilic inflammatory response within the airway as a result of defective cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor (CFTR) expression and function. Interleukin-17A induces airway neutrophilia and mucin production associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, which is associated with the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. The objectives of this study were to use the preclinical murine model of cystic fibrosis lung infection and inflammation to investigate the role of IL-17 in CF lung pathophysiology and explore therapeutic intervention with a focus on IL-17. Cftr-deficient mice (CF mice) and wild-type mice (WT mice) infected with P. aeruginosa had robust IL-17 production early in the infection associated with a persistent elevated inflammatory response. Intratracheal administration of IL-17 provoked a neutrophilic response in the airways of WT and CF animals which was similar to that observed with P. aeruginosa infection. The neutralization of IL-17 prior to infection significantly improved the outcomes in the CF mice, suggesting that IL-17 may be a therapeutic target. We demonstrate in this report that the pathophysiological contribution of IL-17 may be due to the induction of chemokines from the epithelium which is augmented by a deficiency of Cftr and ongoing inflammation. These studies demonstrate the in vivo contribution of IL-17 in cystic fibrosis lung disease and the therapeutic validity of attenuating IL-17 activity in cystic fibrosis. PMID:27271746

  12. Quorum-sensing signals indicate that cystic fibrosis lungs are infected with bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Schaefer, A L; Parsek, M R; Moninger, T O; Welsh, M J; Greenberg, E P

    2000-10-12

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa permanently colonizes cystic fibrosis lungs despite aggressive antibiotic treatment. This suggests that P. aeruginosa might exist as biofilms--structured communities of bacteria encased in a self-produced polymeric matrix--in the cystic fibrosis lung. Consistent with this hypothesis, microscopy of cystic fibrosis sputum shows that P. aeruginosa are in biofilm-like structures. P. aeruginosa uses extracellular quorum-sensing signals (extracellular chemical signals that cue cell-density-dependent gene expression) to coordinate biofilm formation. Here we found that cystic fibrosis sputum produces the two principal P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing signals; however, the relative abundance of these signals was opposite to that of the standard P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 in laboratory broth culture. When P. aeruginosa sputum isolates were grown in broth, some showed quorum-sensing signal ratios like those of the laboratory strain. When we grew these isolates and PAO1 in a laboratory biofilm model, the signal ratios were like those in cystic fibrosis sputum. Our data support the hypothesis that P. aeruginosa are in a biofilm in cystic fibrosis sputum. Moreover, quorum-sensing signal profiling of specific P. aeruginosa strains may serve as a biomarker in screens to identify agents that interfere with biofilm development. PMID:11048725

  13. Energy content of stools in normal healthy controls and patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J L; Wootton, S A; Bond, S A; Jackson, A A

    1991-01-01

    Stool energy losses and the sources of energy within the stool were determined in 20 healthy controls and 20 patients with cystic fibrosis while on their habitual pancreatic enzyme replacement treatment. Stool energy losses were equivalent to 3.5% of gross energy intake in healthy children (range 1.3-5.8%). Despite a comparable gross energy intake, stool energy losses were three times greater in patients with cystic fibrosis than controls averaging 10.6% of gross energy intake (range 4.9-19.7%). Stool lipid could account for only 29% and 41% of the energy within the stool in controls and patients with cystic fibrosis respectively and was poorly related to stool energy. Approximately 30% of the energy within the stool could be attributable to colonic bacteria in both the healthy children and patients with cystic fibrosis. These results suggest that stool energy losses in healthy children are relatively modest but that even when patients with cystic fibrosis are symptomatically well controlled on pancreatic enzyme replacement, raised stool energy losses may continue to contribute towards an energy deficit sufficient to limit growth in cystic fibrosis. As the energy content per gram wet weight remains relatively constant (8 kJ/g), stool energy losses may be estimated from simple measurements of stool wet weight. PMID:2031608

  14. Pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis and drugs used in associated digestive tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Adriana; Aragão, Giselle Gonçalves; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) causes chronic infections in the respiratory tract and alters the digestive tract. This paper reviews the most important aspects of drug treatment and changes in the digestive tract of patients with CF. This is a review of the literature, emphasizing the discoveries made within the last 15 years by analyzing scientific papers published in journals indexed in the Scientific Electronic Library Online, Sciences Information, United States National Library of Medicine and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online databases, both in English and Portuguese, using the key words: cystic fibrosis, medication, therapeutic, absorption, digestion. Randomized, observational, experimental, and epidemiological clinical studies were selected, among others, with statistical significance of 5%. This review evaluates the changes found in the digestive tract of CF patients including pancreatic insufficiency, constipation and liver diseases. Changes in nutritional status are also described. Clinical treatment, nutritional supplementation and drug management were classified in this review as essential to the quality of life of CF patients, and became available through public policies for monitoring and treating CF. The information gathered on CF and a multi professional approach to the disease is essential in the treatment of these patients. PMID:24379572

  15. Therapeutic Approaches to Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Dysfunction in Chronic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Raju, S Vamsee; Dransfield, Mark T; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common cause of morbidity and a rising cause of mortality worldwide. Its rising impact indicates the ongoing unmet need for novel and effective therapies. Previous work has established a pathophysiological link between the chronic bronchitis phenotype of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis as well as phenotypic similarities between these two airways diseases. An extensive body of evidence has established that cigarette smoke and its constituents contribute to acquired dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein in the airways, pointing to a mechanistic link with smoking-related and chronic bronchitis. Recent interest surrounding new drugs that target both mutant and wild-type CFTR channels has paved the way for a new treatment opportunity addressing the mucus defect in chronic bronchitis. We review the clinical and pathologic evidence for modulating CFTR to address acquired CFTR dysfunction and pragmatic issues surrounding clinical trials as well as a discussion of other ion channels that may represent alternative therapeutic targets. PMID:27115953

  16. Characterizing responses to CFTR-modulating drugs using rectal organoids derived from subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Berkers, Gitte; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; de Jonge, Hugo R; Janssens, Hettie M; Bronsveld, Inez; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Houwen, Roderick H J; Vleggaar, Frank P; Escher, Johanna C; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-22

    Identifying subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who may benefit from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-modulating drugs is time-consuming, costly, and especially challenging for individuals with rare uncharacterized CFTR mutations. We studied CFTR function and responses to two drugs-the prototypical CFTR potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor/KALYDECO) and the CFTR corrector VX-809 (lumacaftor)-in organoid cultures derived from the rectal epithelia of subjects with CF, who expressed a broad range of CFTR mutations. We observed that CFTR residual function and responses to drug therapy depended on both the CFTR mutation and the genetic background of the subjects. In vitro drug responses in rectal organoids positively correlated with published outcome data from clinical trials with VX-809 and VX-770, allowing us to predict from preclinical data the potential for CF patients carrying rare CFTR mutations to respond to drug therapy. We demonstrated proof of principle by selecting two subjects expressing an uncharacterized rare CFTR genotype (G1249R/F508del) who showed clinical responses to treatment with ivacaftor and one subject (F508del/R347P) who showed a limited response to drug therapy both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that in vitro measurements of CFTR function in patient-derived rectal organoids may be useful for identifying subjects who would benefit from CFTR-correcting treatment, independent of their CFTR mutation. PMID:27334259

  17. Future directions in early cystic fibrosis lung disease research: an NHLBI workshop report.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Bonnie W; Banks-Schlegel, Susan; Accurso, Frank J; Boucher, Richard C; Cutting, Garry R; Engelhardt, John F; Guggino, William B; Karp, Christopher L; Knowles, Michael R; Kolls, Jay K; LiPuma, John J; Lynch, Susan; McCray, Paul B; Rubenstein, Ronald C; Singh, Pradeep K; Sorscher, Eric; Welsh, Michael

    2012-04-15

    Since the 1989 discovery that mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF), there has been substantial progress toward understanding the molecular basis for CF lung disease, leading to the discovery and development of new therapeutic approaches. However, the earliest impact of the loss of CFTR function on airway physiology and structure and its relationship to initial infection and inflammation are poorly understood. Universal newborn screening for CF in the United States represents an unprecedented opportunity for investigating CF clinical manifestations very early in life. Recently developed animal models with pulmonary phenotypic manifestations also provide a window into the early consequences of this genetic disorder. For these reasons, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a working group of extramural experts, entitled "Future Research Directions in Early CF Lung Disease" on September 21-22, 2010, to identify future research directions of great promise in CF. The priority areas identified included (1) exploring pathogenic mechanisms of early CF lung disease; (2) leveraging newborn screening to elucidate the natural history of early lung disease; (3) developing a spectrum of biomarkers of early lung disease that reflects CF pathophysiology, clinical outcome, and response to treatment; (4) exploring the role of genetics/genomics (e.g., modifier genes, gene-environmental interactions, and epigenetics) in early CF pathogenesis; (5) defining early microbiological events in CF lung disease; and (6) elucidating the initial airway inflammatory, remodeling, and repair mechanisms in CF lung disease. PMID:22312017

  18. Chest CT abnormalities and quality of life: relationship in adult cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Aoife; Lavelle, Lisa P.; McCarthy, Colin J.; McEvoy, Sinead H.; Fleming, Hannah; Gallagher, Annika; Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm; McKone, Edward; Gallagher, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the relationship between lung parenchymal abnormalities on chest CT and health-related quality of life in adult cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods The chest CT scans of 101 consecutive CF adults (mean age 27.8±7.9, 64 males) were prospectively scored by two blinded radiologists in consensus using a modified Bhalla score. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the revised Quittner Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire (CFQ-R). Multiple regressions were performed with each of the CFQ-R domains and all clinical and imaging findings to assess independent correlations. Results There were 18 inpatients and 83 outpatients. For the cohort of inpatients, CT abnormalities were significantly (P<0.005 for all) associated with Respiratory Symptoms (Air Trapping), and also with Social Functioning (Consolidation) and Role Functioning (Consolidation). For outpatients, CT abnormalities were significantly (P<0.005 for all) associated with Respiratory Symptoms (Consolidation) and also with Physical Functioning (Consolidation), Vitality (Consolidation, Severity of Bronchiectasis), Eating Problems (airway wall thickening), Treatment Burden (Total CT Score), Body Image (Severity of Bronchiectasis) and Role Functioning (Tree-in-bud nodules). Consolidation was the commonest independent CT predictor for both inpatients (predictor for 2 domains) and outpatients (predictor in 3 domains). Several chest CT abnormalities excluded traditional measures such as FEV1 and BMI from the majority of CFQ-R domains. Conclusions Chest CT abnormalities are significantly associated with quality of life measures in adult CF, independent of clinical or spirometric measurements. PMID:27047946

  19. The Relevance of Sweat Testing for the Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in the Genomic Era

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited disorder of childhood. The diagnosis of CF has traditionally been based on clinical features with confirmatory evidence by sweat electrolyte analysis. Since 1989 it has been possible to also use gene mutation analysis to aid the diagnosis. Cloning of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene has advanced our understanding of CF, in particular the molecular basis of an expanded CF phenotype. However, because there are over 1000 mutations and 200 polymorphisms, many without recognised effects on CFTR, the molecular diagnosis can be troublesome. This has necessitated measurement of CFTR function with renewed interest in the sweat test. This review provides an overview of the clinical features of CF, the diagnosis and complex genetics. We provide a detailed discussion of the structure and function of CFTR and the classification of CFTR mutations. Sweat electrolyte analysis is discussed, from the physiology of sweating to the rigours of a properly performed sweat test and its interpretation. With this information it is possible to understand the relevance of the sweat test in the genomic era. PMID:16648884

  20. The Potential of Wharton's Jelly Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Boruczkowski, D; Gładysz, D; Demkow, U; Pawelec, K

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening autosomal recessive multi-organ disorder with the mean incidence of 0.737 per 10,000 people worldwide. Despite many advances in therapy, patients fail to have a satisfactory quality of life. The end-stage lung disease still accounts for significant mortality and puts patients in the need of lung transplantation. Even though the disease is monogenic, the trials of topical gene transfer into airway epithelial cells have so far been disappointing. It is proven that stem cells can be differentiated into type II alveolar epithelial cells. Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from non-CF carrier third-party donors could be an effective alternative to bone marrow or embryonic stem cells. The harvesting process is an easy and ethically uncontroversial procedure. The MSC cell should be applied through repetitive infusions due to rapid lung epithelial cell turnover. However, the low stem cell incorporation remains a problem. Pre-clinical studies imply that even 6-10% of the wild-type cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression could be enough to restore chloride secretion. The route of administration, the optimal dose, as well as the intervals between infusions have yet to be determined. This review discusses the clinical potential of mesenchymal stem cell in CF patients. PMID:25248343

  1. From CFTR biology toward combinatorial pharmacotherapy: expanded classification of cystic fibrosis mutations

    PubMed Central

    Veit, Gudio; Avramescu, Radu G.; Chiang, Annette N.; Houck, Scott A.; Cai, Zhiwei; Peters, Kathryn W.; Hong, Jeong S.; Pollard, Harvey B.; Guggino, William B.; Balch, William E.; Skach, William R.; Cutting, Garry R.; Frizzell, Raymond A.; Sheppard, David N.; Cyr, Douglas M.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Lukacs, Gergely L.

    2016-01-01

    More than 2000 mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been described that confer a range of molecular cell biological and functional phenotypes. Most of these mutations lead to compromised anion conductance at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia and cause cystic fibrosis (CF) with variable disease severity. Based on the molecular phenotypic complexity of CFTR mutants and their susceptibility to pharmacotherapy, it has been recognized that mutations may impose combinatorial defects in CFTR channel biology. This notion led to the conclusion that the combination of pharmacotherapies addressing single defects (e.g., transcription, translation, folding, and/or gating) may show improved clinical benefit over available low-efficacy monotherapies. Indeed, recent phase 3 clinical trials combining ivacaftor (a gating potentiator) and lumacaftor (a folding corrector) have proven efficacious in CF patients harboring the most common mutation (deletion of residue F508, ΔF508, or Phe508del). This drug combination was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients homozygous for ΔF508. Emerging studies of the structural, cell biological, and functional defects caused by rare mutations provide a new framework that reveals a mixture of deficiencies in different CFTR alleles. Establishment of a set of combinatorial categories of the previously defined basic defects in CF alleles will aid the design of even more efficacious therapeutic interventions for CF patients. PMID:26823392

  2. From CFTR biology toward combinatorial pharmacotherapy: expanded classification of cystic fibrosis mutations.

    PubMed

    Veit, Gudio; Avramescu, Radu G; Chiang, Annette N; Houck, Scott A; Cai, Zhiwei; Peters, Kathryn W; Hong, Jeong S; Pollard, Harvey B; Guggino, William B; Balch, William E; Skach, William R; Cutting, Garry R; Frizzell, Raymond A; Sheppard, David N; Cyr, Douglas M; Sorscher, Eric J; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2016-02-01

    More than 2000 mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been described that confer a range of molecular cell biological and functional phenotypes. Most of these mutations lead to compromised anion conductance at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia and cause cystic fibrosis (CF) with variable disease severity. Based on the molecular phenotypic complexity of CFTR mutants and their susceptibility to pharmacotherapy, it has been recognized that mutations may impose combinatorial defects in CFTR channel biology. This notion led to the conclusion that the combination of pharmacotherapies addressing single defects (e.g., transcription, translation, folding, and/or gating) may show improved clinical benefit over available low-efficacy monotherapies. Indeed, recent phase 3 clinical trials combining ivacaftor (a gating potentiator) and lumacaftor (a folding corrector) have proven efficacious in CF patients harboring the most common mutation (deletion of residue F508, ΔF508, or Phe508del). This drug combination was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients homozygous for ΔF508. Emerging studies of the structural, cell biological, and functional defects caused by rare mutations provide a new framework that reveals a mixture of deficiencies in different CFTR alleles. Establishment of a set of combinatorial categories of the previously defined basic defects in CF alleles will aid the design of even more efficacious therapeutic interventions for CF patients. PMID:26823392

  3. Determination of right ventricular ejection fraction in children with cystic fibrosis, using krypton-81m

    SciTech Connect

    Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R.; Millet, E.; Dab, I.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of cor pulmonale and incipient heart failure remains difficult to assess in cystic fibrosis (CF) on the basis of the clinical as well as the biological parameters. The measurement of the right ventricular ejection fraction has been facilitated these last years by the introduction of the radionuclide methods. Methodological difficulties are however encountered when Tc-99m RBC are used, and are mainly related to heart chambers superposition (equilibrium method) or the low count density (first pass method). Few papers have been published on RVEF in cystic fibrosis and the results are somewhat contradictory. The authors have recently introduced a new method for the determination of RVEF, using equilibrium study during continuous injection of Kr-81m in glucose solution. This method offers several advantages related to an increased accuracy and a favorable dosimetry. In 25 patients aged 2 to 23 years with CF, one or more RVEF studies were performed. The severity of the disease was evaluated on the basis of the clinical Schwachman score, the lung function tests, the ventilation scan and the pa02. RVEF tended to decrease with the progression of the lung disease, although, owing to the spread of the results, no RVEF could be predicted on the basis of the other parameters. The decrease of RVEF in patients with advanced lung disease was moderate and terminal lung disease was sometimes associated with normal right heart contractility.

  4. A French multicentric study and review of pulmonary Nocardia spp. in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nava, Verónica; Durupt, Stéphane; Chyderiotis, Sandra; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Karsenty, Judith; de Montclos, Michèle; Reix, Philippe; Durieu, Isabelle; Nove-Josserand, Raphaele; Chiron, Raphael; Bremont, François; Têtu, Laurent; Murris, Marlène; Terru, Dominique; Godreuil, Sylvain; Bergeron, Emmanuelle; Freney, Jean; Boiron, Patrick; Vandenesch, François; Marchandin, Hélène; Segonds, Christine; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Some bacterial species recovered from the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are indisputably associated with lung infections, whereas the clinical relevance of others, such as Nocardia spp., remains unclear. Sixteen French CF cases of colonization/infection with Nocardia spp. were reviewed in order to evaluate the epidemiology, the clinical impact and the potential treatment of these bacteria, and results were compared to those of the literature. Five Nocardia species were identified, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica being the major species (50 % of cases). At first isolation, Nocardia was the sole pathogen recovered in six patients. Seven patients presented pulmonary exacerbation. For 12 patients, antimicrobial treatment against Nocardia was started immediately, mainly based on cotrimoxazole (6 of the 12 cases). In this study, we highlight the heterogeneity of the clinical management of Nocardia spp. in CF. Guidelines for the clinical management of Nocardia infections in CF patients are proposed. PMID:25344657

  5. Lumacaftor–Ivacaftor in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Homozygous for Phe508del CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, C.E.; Elborn, J.S.; Ramsey, B.W.; Marigowda, G.; Huang, X.; Cipolli, M.; Colombo, C.; Davies, J.C.; De Boeck, K.; Flume, P.A.; Konstan, M.W.; McColley, S.A.; McCoy, K.; McKone, E.F.; Munck, A.; Ratjen, F.; Rowe, S.M.; Waltz, D.; Boyle, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS These data show that lumacaftor in combination with ivacaftor provided a benefit for patients with cystic fibrosis homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. (Funded by Vertex Pharmaceuticals and others; TRAFFIC and TRANSPORT ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01807923 and NCT01807949.) PMID:25981758

  6. Compacted DNA nanoparticles administered to the nasal mucosa of cystic fibrosis subjects are safe and demonstrate partial to complete cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Konstan, Michael W; Davis, Pamela B; Wagener, Jeffrey S; Hilliard, Kathleen A; Stern, Robert C; Milgram, Laura J H; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Hyatt, Susannah L; Fink, Tamara L; Gedeon, Christopher R; Oette, Sharon M; Payne, Jennifer M; Muhammad, Osman; Ziady, Assem G; Moen, Robert C; Cooper, Mark J

    2004-12-01

    A double-blind, dose escalation gene transfer trial was conducted in subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF), among whom placebo (saline) or compacted DNA was superfused onto the inferior turbinate of the right or left nostril. The vector consisted of single molecules of plasmid DNA carrying the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator- encoding gene compacted into DNA nanoparticles, using polyethylene glycol-substituted 30-mer lysine peptides. Entry criteria included age greater than 18 years, FEV1 exceeding 50% predicted, and basal nasal potential difference (NPD) isoproterenol responses (> or = -5 mV) that are typical for subjects with classic CF. Twelve subjects were enrolled: 2 in dose level I (DLI) (0.8 mg DNA), 4 in DLII (2.67 mg), and 6 in DLIII (8.0 mg). The primary trial end points were safety and tolerability, and secondary gene transfer end points were assessed. In addition to routine clinical assessments and laboratory tests, subjects were serially evaluated for serum IL-6, complement, and C-reactive protein; nasal washings were taken for cell counts, protein, IL-6, and IL-8; and pulmonary function and hearing tests were performed. No serious adverse events occurred, and no events were attributed to compacted DNA. There was no association of serum or nasal washing inflammatory mediators with administration of compacted DNA. Day 14 vector polymerase chain reaction analysis showed a mean value in DLIII nasal scraping samples of 0.58 copy per cell. Partial to complete NPD isoproterenol responses were observed in eight subjects: one of two in DLI, three of four in DLII, and four of six in DLIII. Corrections persisted for as long as 6 days (1 subject to day 28) after gene transfer. In conclusion, compacted DNA nanoparticles can be safely administered to the nares of CF subjects, with evidence of vector gene transfer and partial NPD correction. PMID:15684701

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Burkholderia multivorans Sequential Isolates from a Chronic Lung Infection of a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Inês N.; Santos, Pedro M.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia multivorans belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex, which comprises opportunistic pathogens infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we report the genome sequences and annotations of two sequential B. multivorans clinical isolates (D2095 and D2214) displaying different traits. The differences in the genomic contents of these isolates may provide clues regarding the evolution of B. multivorans within the airways of a CF patient. PMID:25676757

  8. Chronic cough with normal sweat chloride: Phenotypic descriptions of two rare cystic fibrosis genotypes.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Hemang; Lim, Kaiser G

    2016-01-01

    While our understanding of cystic fibrosis genetics has expanded in recent decades, the genetics and clinical manifestations of the disease remains highly heterogeneous. Diagnosis of CF in non-classical mutations remains a clinical challenge. We describe the clinical presentation of two patients with chronic cough found to have normal sweat chlorides. We discuss the subsequent evaluation that lead to the diagnosis of two rare CF mutations. We briefly discuss the use of the expanded 106-panel of CF mutations (homozygous 3849 + 10  kb C > T), and the role of whole CFTR gene sequencing (heterozygous c.2752-26 A > G/5T). PMID:27222777

  9. An Approach for Treating the Hepatobiliary Disease of Cystic Fibrosis by Somatic Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yiping; Raper, Steven E.; Cohn, Jonathan A.; Engelhardt, John F.; Wilson, James M.

    1993-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of epithelial cell ion transport that is associated with pathology in multiple organ systems, including lung, pancreas, and liver. As treatment of the pulmonary manifestations of CF has improved, management of CF liver disease has become increasingly important in adult patients. This report describes an approach for treating CF liver disease by somatic gene transfer. In situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry analysis of rat liver sections indicated that the endogenous CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene is primarily expressed in the intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells. To specifically target recombinant genes to the biliary epithelium in vivo, recombinant adenoviruses expressing lacZ or human CFTR were infused retrograde into the biliary tract through the common bile duct. Conditions were established for achieving recombinant gene expression in virtually all cells of the intrahepatic bile ducts in vivo. Expression persisted in the smaller bile ducts for the duration of the experiment, which was 21 days. These studies suggest that it may be feasible to prevent CF liver disease by genetically reconstituting CFTR expression in the biliary tract, using an approach that is clinically feasible.

  10. A Novel Lung Disease Phenotype Adjusted for Mortality Attrition for Cystic Fibrosis Genetic Modifier Studies

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Chelsea; Commander, Clayton W.; Collaco, Joseph M.; Strug, Lisa J.; Li, Weili; Wright, Fred A.; Webel, Aaron D.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Naughton, Kathleen; Dorfman, Ruslan; Sandford, Andrew; Blackman, Scott M.; Berthiaume, Yves; Paré, Peter; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Zielenski, Julian; Durie, Peter; Cutting, Garry R.; Knowles, Michael R.; Corey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Genetic studies of lung disease in Cystic Fibrosis are hampered by the lack of a severity measure that accounts for chronic disease progression and mortality attrition. Further, combining analyses across studies requires common phenotypes that are robust to study design and patient ascertainment. Using data from the North American Cystic Fibrosis Modifier Consortium (Canadian Consortium for CF Genetic Studies, Johns Hopkins University CF Twin and Sibling Study, and University of North Carolina/Case Western Reserve University Gene Modifier Study), the authors calculated age-specific CF percentile values of FEV1 which were adjusted for CF age-specific mortality data. The phenotype was computed for 2061 patients representing the Canadian CF population, 1137 extreme phenotype patients in the UNC/Case Western study, and 1323 patients from multiple CF sib families in the CF Twin and Sibling Study. Despite differences in ascertainment and median age, our phenotype score was distributed in all three samples in a manner consistent with ascertainment differences, reflecting the lung disease severity of each individual in the underlying population. The new phenotype score was highly correlated with the previously recommended complex phenotype, but the new phenotype is more robust for shorter follow-up and for extreme ages. A disease progression and mortality adjusted phenotype reduces the need for stratification or additional covariates, increasing statistical power and avoiding possible distortions. This approach will facilitate large scale genetic and environmental epidemiological studies which will provide targeted therapeutic pathways for the clinical benefit of patients with CF. PMID:21462361

  11. Bone disease in cystic fibrosis: new pathogenic insights opening novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, J; Delion, M; Gangloff, S; Braux, J; Velard, F

    2016-04-01

    Mutations within the gene encoding for the chloride ion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) results in cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease that causes a number of long-term health problems, as the bone disease. Osteoporosis and increased vertebral fracture risk associated with CF disease are becoming more important as the life expectancy of patients continues to improve. The etiology of low bone density is multifactorial, most probably a combination of inadequate peak bone mass during puberty and increased bone losses in adults. Body mass index, male sex, advanced pulmonary disease, malnutrition and chronic therapies are established additional risk factors for CF-related bone disease (CFBD). Consistently, recent evidence has confirmed that CFTR plays a major role in the osteoprotegerin (OPG) and COX-2 metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, two key regulators in the bone formation and regeneration. Several others mechanisms were also recognized from animal and cell models contributing to malfunctions of osteoblast (cell that form bone) and indirectly of bone-resorpting osteoclasts. Understanding such mechanisms is crucial for the development of therapies in CFBD. Innovative therapeutic approaches using CFTR modulators such as C18 have recently shown in vitro capacity to enhance PGE2 production and normalized the RANKL-to-OPG ratio in human osteoblasts bearing the mutation F508del-CFTR and therefore potential clinical utility in CFBD. This review focuses on the recently identified pathogenic mechanisms leading to CFBD and potential future therapies for treating CFBD. PMID:26431978

  12. Electrolyte transport properties in distal small airways from cystic fibrosis pigs with implications for host defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Vargas Buonfiglio, Luis G; Comellas, Alejandro P; Thornell, Ian M; Ramachandran, Shyam; Karp, Philip H; Taft, Peter J; Sheets, Kelsey; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Welsh, Michael J; Meyerholz, David K; Stoltz, David A; Zabner, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    While pathological and clinical data suggest that small airways are involved in early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease development, little is known about how the lack of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function contributes to disease pathogenesis in these small airways. Large and small airway epithelia are exposed to different airflow velocities, temperatures, humidity, and CO2 concentrations. The cellular composition of these two regions is different, and small airways lack submucosal glands. To better understand the ion transport properties and impacts of lack of CFTR function on host defense function in small airways, we adapted a novel protocol to isolate small airway epithelial cells from CF and non-CF pigs and established an organotypic culture model. Compared with non-CF large airways, non-CF small airway epithelia cultures had higher Cl(-) and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) short-circuit currents and higher airway surface liquid (ASL) pH under 5% CO2 conditions. CF small airway epithelia were characterized by minimal Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) transport and decreased ASL pH, and had impaired bacterial killing compared with non-CF small airways. In addition, CF small airway epithelia had a higher ASL viscosity than non-CF small airways. Thus, the activity of CFTR is higher in the small airways, where it plays a role in alkalinization of ASL, enhancement of antimicrobial activity, and lowering of mucus viscosity. These data provide insight to explain why the small airways are a susceptible site for the bacterial colonization. PMID:26801568

  13. Novel short chain fatty acids restore chloride secretion in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Toan D. . E-mail: T1Nguyen@u.washington.edu; Kim, Ug-Sung; Perrine, Susan P.

    2006-03-31

    Phenylalanine deletion at position 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ({delta}F508-CFTR), the most common mutation in cystic fibrosis (CF), causes a misfolded protein exhibiting partial chloride conductance and impaired trafficking to the plasma membrane. 4-Phenylbutyrate corrects defective {delta}F508-CFTR trafficking in vitro, but is not clinically efficacious. From a panel of short chain fatty acid derivatives, we showed that 2,2-dimethyl-butyrate (ST20) and {alpha}-methylhydrocinnamic acid (ST7), exhibiting high oral bioavailability and sustained plasma levels, correct the {delta}F508-CFTR defect. Pre-incubation ({>=}6 h) of CF IB3-1 airway cells with {>=}1 mM ST7 or ST20 restored the ability of 100 {mu}M forskolin to stimulate an {sup 125}I{sup -} efflux. This efflux was fully inhibited by NPPB, DPC, or glibenclamide, suggesting mediation through CFTR. Partial inhibition by DIDS suggests possible contribution from an additional Cl{sup -} channel regulated by CFTR. Thus, ST7 and ST20 offer treatment potential for CF caused by the {delta}F508 mutation.

  14. Analysis and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Small Colony Variants Isolated From Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Austria.

    PubMed

    Masoud-Landgraf, Lilian; Zarfel, Gernot; Kaschnigg, Tanja; Friedl, Simone; Feierl, Gebhard; Wagner-Eibel, Ute; Eber, Ernst; Grisold, Andrea J; Kittinger, Clemens

    2016-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common hereditary lung disease in the Caucasian population, characterized by viscous bronchial secretion, consecutive defective mucociliary clearance, and unavoidable colonization with microorganisms. Besides Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial species colonizing the CF respiratory tract. Under antibiotic pressure S. aureus is able to switch to small colony variants (SCV). These small colony variants can invade epithelial cells, overcome antibiotic therapy inside the cells and can be the starting point for extracellular recolonization. The aim of the present study was the isolation and characterization of S. aureus small colony variants from Austrian cystic fibrosis patients. Samples collected from 147 patients were screened for the presence of S. aureus wild-type and small colony variants. Antibiotic susceptibility testing and determination of the small colony variants causing auxotrophism were performed. Wild-type isolates were assigned to corresponding small colony variants with spa typing. In total, 17 different small colony variant isolates and 12 corresponding wild-type isolates were obtained. 13 isolates were determined thymidine auxotroph, 2 isolates were auxotroph for hemin, and none of the tested isolates was auxotroph for both, respectively. The presence of SCVs is directly related to a poor clinical outcome, therefore a monitoring of SCV prevalence is recommended. This study revealed rather low SCV ratios in CF patients compared to other countries. PMID:26821237

  15. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.W.; Hamosh, A.; Macek, M. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    The etiology of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is not well understood. A clinical phenotype resembling the pulmonary disease seen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can occur in some individuals with ABPA. Reports of familial occurrence of ABPA and increased incidence in CF patients suggest a possible genetic basis for the disease. To test this possibility, the entire coding region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene was analyzed in 11 individuals who met strict criteria for the diagnosis of ABPA and had normal sweat electrolytes ({le}40 mmol/liter). One patient carried two CF mutations ({Delta}F508/R347H), and five were found to carry one CF mutation (four {Delta}F508; one R117H). The frequency of the {Delta}F508 mutation in patients with ABPA was significantly higher than in 53 Caucasian patients with chronic bronchitis (P < .0003) and the general population (P < .003). These results suggest that CFTR plays an etiologic role in a subset of ABPA patients. 54 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Intrinsic pro-angiogenic status of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaeghe, Catherine; Tabruyn, Sebastien P.; Oury, Cecile; Bours, Vincent . E-mail: vbours@ulg.ac.be; Griffioen, Arjan W.

    2007-05-11

    Cystic fibrosis is a common genetic disorder characterized by a severe lung inflammation and fibrosis leading to the patient's death. Enhanced angiogenesis in cystic fibrosis (CF) tissue has been suggested, probably caused by the process of inflammation, as similarly described in asthma and chronic bronchitis. The present study demonstrates an intrinsic pro-angiogenic status of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells. Microarray experiments showed that CF airway epithelial cells expressed several angiogenic factors such as VEGF-A, VEGF-C, bFGF, and PLGF at higher levels than control cells. These data were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and, at the protein level, by ELISA. Conditioned media of these cystic fibrosis cells were able to induce proliferation, migration and sprouting of cultured primary endothelial cells. This report describes for the first time that cystic fibrosis epithelial cells have an intrinsic angiogenic activity. Since excess of angiogenesis is correlated with more severe pulmonary disease, our results could lead to the development of new therapeutic applications.

  17. Screening for F508del as a first step in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis*,**

    PubMed Central

    Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia; Ribeiro, Maria Ângela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relevance of screening for the F508del mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene as a first step in the genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) by associating the genotype with various clinical variables. METHODS: We evaluated 180 CF patients regarding the F508del mutation. The clinical data were obtained from the medical records of the patients and from interviews with their parents or legal guardians. RESULTS: Of the 180 patients studied, 65 (36.1%) did not carry the F508del mutation (group 0 [G0]), 67 (37.2%) were F508del heterozygous (G1), and 48 (26.7%) were F508del homozygous (G2). All three groups showed associations with the clinical variables. Homozygosis was associated with younger patients, younger age at CF diagnosis, and younger age at the first isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), as well as with higher prevalence of pancreatic insufficiency (PI) and non-mucoid PA (NMPA) colonization. In comparison with G1+G2 patients, G0 patients were older; first experienced clinical symptoms, digestive disease, and pulmonary disease at an older age; were older at CF diagnosis and at first PA isolation; and had a lower prevalence of PI and meconium ileus, as well as of colonization by NMPA, mucoid PA, and Burkholderia cepacia. In G1 patients, values were intermediate for age at CF diagnosis; age at first PA isolation, first pulmonary symptoms, and first clinical manifestations; MPA colonization; and OR for PI. CONCLUSIONS: The identification of F508del in 63.9% of the patients studied showed that this can be a useful tool as a first step in the genetic diagnosis of CF. The F508del genotype was associated with clinical severity of the disease, especially with the variables related to CF onset. PMID:23857699

  18. Analysis of cystic fibrosis gene mutations in children with cystic fibrosis and in 964 infertile couples within the region of Basilicata, Italy: a research study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in the Caucasian population. Extending knowledge about the molecular pathology on the one hand allows better delineation of the mutations in the CFTR gene and the other to dramatically increase the predictive power of molecular testing. Methods This study reports the results of a molecular screening of cystic fibrosis using DNA samples of patients enrolled from January 2009 to December 2013. Patients were referred to our laboratory for cystic fibrosis screening for infertile couples. In addition, we identified the gene mutations present in 76 patients affected by cystic fibrosis in the pediatric population of Basilicata. Results In the 964 infertile couples examined, 132 subjects (69 women and 63 men) resulted heterozygous for one of the CFTR mutations, with a recurrence of carriers of 6.85%. The recurrence of carriers in infertile couples is significantly higher from the hypothetical value of the general population (4%). Conclusions This study shows that in the Basilicata region of Italy the CFTR phenotype is caused by a small number of mutations. Our aim is to develop a kit able to detect not less than 96% of CTFR gene mutations so that the relative risk for screened couples is superimposable with respect to the general population. PMID:25304080

  19. Facilitating Positive Psychosocial Adaptation in Children with Cystic Fibrosis by Increasing Family Communication and Problem-Solving Skills. A Research Report to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stabler, Brian; And Others

    This study tested the effects of two group-oriented supportive and educational approaches on the parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Thirteen families were randomly assigned either to a group which received information on medical and technical aspects of CF or to a group which received instruction in communication skills in addition to…

  20. Phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of bacteria associated with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Guss, Adam M; Roeselers, Guus; Newton, Irene L G; Young, C Robert; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Lory, Stephen; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2011-01-01

    In patients afflicted with cystic fibrosis (CF), morbidity and mortality are primarily associated with the adverse consequences of chronic microbial bronchial infections, which are thought to be caused by a few opportunistic pathogens. However, recent evidence suggests the presence of other microorganisms, which may significantly affect the course and outcome of the infection. Using a combination of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, bacterial culturing and pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA amplicons, the microbial communities present in CF patient sputum samples were examined. In addition to previously recognized CF pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, >60 phylogenetically diverse bacterial genera that are not typically associated with CF pathogenesis were also detected. A surprisingly large number of fermenting facultative and obligate anaerobes from multiple bacterial phyla was present in each sample. Many of the bacteria and sequences found were normal residents of the oropharyngeal microflora and with many containing opportunistic pathogens. Our data suggest that these undersampled organisms within the CF lung are part of a much more complex microbial ecosystem than is normally presumed. Characterization of these communities is the first step in elucidating potential roles of diverse bacteria in disease progression and to ultimately facilitate advances in CF therapy. PMID:20631810

  1. Ibuprofen regulation of microtubule dynamics in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rymut, Sharon M; Kampman, Claire M; Corey, Deborah A; Endres, Tori; Cotton, Calvin U; Kelley, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    High-dose ibuprofen, an effective anti-inflammatory therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), has been shown to preserve lung function in a pediatric population. Despite its efficacy, few patients receive ibuprofen treatment due to potential renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. The mechanism of ibuprofen efficacy is also unclear. We have previously demonstrated that CF microtubules are slower to reform after depolymerization compared with respective wild-type controls. Slower microtubule dynamics in CF cells are responsible for impaired intracellular transport and are related to inflammatory signaling. Here, it is identified that high-dose ibuprofen treatment in both CF cell models and primary CF nasal epithelial cells restores microtubule reformation rates to wild-type levels, as well as induce extension of microtubules to the cell periphery. Ibuprofen treatment also restores microtubule-dependent intracellular transport monitored by measuring intracellular cholesterol transport. These effects are specific to ibuprofen as other cyclooxygenase inhibitors have no effect on these measures. Effects of ibuprofen are mimicked by stimulation of AMPK and blocked by the AMPK inhibitor compound C. We conclude that high-dose ibuprofen treatment enhances microtubule formation in CF cells likely through an AMPK-related pathway. These findings define a potential mechanism to explain the efficacy of ibuprofen therapy in CF. PMID:27317686

  2. Superantigens and Cystic Fibrosis: Resistance of Presenting Cells to Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Josef; Gozal, David; Dorio, Raymond J.; Bowman, C. Michael; Reiff, Andreas; Walker, Sharyn M.

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a common pulmonary pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF), produces exotoxins that are extremely potent superantigens. A number of animal studies have shown that superantigens cause pulmonary inflammation, but the possible role of superantigens in CF has not been investigated. The present study assessed possible differences between control and CF B cells in presenting superantigens to T cells. Immortalized B-cell lines were used as superantigen-presenting cells to avoid environmental influences (e.g., infection or antibiotics) common to freshly isolated cells. The results show that CF B-cell lines presented a staphylococcal superantigen to the immortalized T-cell line (Jurkat) as effectively as did control B-cell lines as measured by interleukin-2 production. However, in contrast to the case for control B-cell lines, dexamethasone did not inhibit CF B-cell lines from presenting superantigen. The resistance of superantigen-presenting CF B cells to corticosteroids suggests that the pulmonary response to superantigens may be poorly regulated in CF, leading to an exaggerated inflammatory response to S. aureus. PMID:10882650

  3. Cystic fibrosis heterozygote screening in 5,161 pregnant women

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, D.R.; Hallam, P.; Blumberg, B.; Fishbach, A.

    1996-04-01

    A screening program for cystic fibrosis (CF) heterozygotes was conducted in a large HMO prenatal population, to evaluate the level of interest among eligible patients, the effectiveness of prescreening education, attitudes toward the screening process, psychological effects, and utilization of prenatal diagnosis and its outcomes. The heterozygote identification rate and frequency of specific CFTR mutations were also assessed. Identified carriers were offered genetic counseling and testing of male partners. Prenatal diagnosis was offered if both partners were identified as carriers. A total of 5,161 women underwent carrier testing; 947 others completed survey instruments only. The acceptance rate of screening was high (78%), and pretest education by videotape was generally effective. Adverse psychological effects were not reported. Participants generally found screening to be desirable and useful. Screening identified 142 female heterozygotes, 109 couples in which the male partner was not a carrier, and 7 high-risk couples. The incidence of R117H mutations was much higher than expected. The number of identified carriers was much lower in Hispanics than in Caucasians. We conclude that large-scale prenatal screening for CF heterozygotes in the absence of a family history of CF is an acceptable method for identifying couples at risk for affected fetuses. Sufficient pretest education can be accomplished efficiently, test insensitivity is well accepted, adverse psychological events are not observed, and general patient satisfaction is high. 66 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  4. Opportunities for Quality Improvement in Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Groose, Molly K.; Reynolds, Richard; Li, Zhanhai; M.Farrell, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Background With the rapid implementation of cystic fibrosis (CF) newborn screening (NBS), quality improvement (QI) has become essential to identify and prevent errors. Using Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (PFMEA), we adapted this method to determine if it could be applied to discover and rank high priority QI opportunities. Methods Site visits to three programmes were conducted, and PFMEA exercises were accomplished in Colorado, Massachusetts and Wisconsin with 23 experienced professionals. During each of these comprehensive sessions, participants identified and ranked potential failures based on severity, occurrence and detection to calculate risk priority number (RPN) values. Results A total of 96 failure modes were generated and ranked in a list of the 20 riskiest problems that show no significant discordances by site, although there were differences by profession of the rater, particularly nurses. Conclusions Our results illustrate that the PFMEA method applies well to CF NBS and that steps requiring communication and information transfer are perceived to be the highest risks. The number of identified failure makes and their potential impact demonstrate considerable overall risk and a need for ongoing QI. PMID:20471332

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Nasal Epithelial Cells from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Papon, Jean-François; Chhuon, Cerina; Zadigue, Patricia; Prulière-Escabasse, Virginie; Amselem, Serge; Escudier, Estelle; Coste, André; Edelman, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease remains incompletely understood. New explanations for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease may be discovered by studying the patterns of protein expression in cultured human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC). To that aim, we compared the level of protein expressions in primary cultures of HNEC from nasal polyps secondary to CF (CFNP, n = 4), primary nasal polyps (NP, n = 8) and control mucosa (CTRL, n = 4) using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with liquid chromatography (LC)-MS-MS. The analysis of the data revealed 42 deregulated protein expressions in CFNP compared to NP and CTRL, suggesting that these alterations are related to CF. Overall, AmiGo analysis highlighted six major pathways important for cell functions that seem to be impaired: metabolism, G protein process, inflammation and oxidative stress response, protein folding, proteolysis and structural proteins. Among them, glucose and fatty acid metabolic pathways could be impaired in CF with nine deregulated proteins. Our proteomic study provides a reproducible set of differentially expressed proteins in airway epithelial cells from CF patients and reveals many novel deregulated proteins that could lead to further studies aiming to clarify the involvement of such proteins in CF pathophysiology. PMID:25268127

  6. Nasal Potential Difference in Cystic Fibrosis considering Severe CFTR Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ronny Tah Yen; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Ribeiro, Jose Dirceu; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Severino, Silvana Dalge; Sakano, Eulalia

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard for diagnosing cystic fibrosis (CF) is a sweat chloride value above 60 mEq/L. However, this historical and important tool has limitations; other techniques should be studied, including the nasal potential difference (NPD) test. CFTR gene sequencing can identify CFTR mutations, but this method is time-consuming and too expensive to be used in all CF centers. The present study compared CF patients with two classes I-III CFTR mutations (10 patients) (G1), CF patients with classes IV-VI CFTR mutations (five patients) (G2), and 21 healthy subjects (G3). The CF patients and healthy subjects also underwent the NPD test. A statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, χ2, and Fisher's exact tests, α = 0.05. No differences were observed between the CF patients and healthy controls for the PDMax, Δamiloride, and Δchloride + free + amiloride markers from the NPD test. For the finger value, a difference between G2 and G3 was described. The Wilschanski index values were different between G1 and G3. In conclusion, our data showed that NPD is useful for CF diagnosis when classes I-III CFTR mutations are screened. However, if classes IV-VI are considered, the NPD test showed an overlap in values with healthy subjects. PMID:25667564

  7. Lung Transplantation in Cystic Fibrosis: Trends and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This article is not an overview of all facets of lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis (CF), but rather it is intended as a review of current allocation controversies, as well as of trends in diagnostics and management in lung transplant recipients and in patients with end-stage lung disease. Despite changes in donor and recipient selection, long-term survival in pediatric lung transplant has continued to be limited by chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Due to, in part, this short survival benefit, transplant continues to be an appropriate option for only a subset of pediatric patients with CF. The feasibility of transplant as a therapeutic option is also affected by the limited pediatric organ supply, which has moreover contributed to controversy over lung allocation. Debates over the allocation of this scarce resource, however, may also help to drive innovation in the field of lung transplant. Longer pretransplant survival—as aided by new lung bypass technologies, for example—could help to alleviate organ shortages, as well as facilitate the transport of organs to suitable pediatric recipients. Improved diagnosis and treatment for CLAD and for antibody-mediated rejection have the potential to extend survival in pediatric lung transplant. Regardless, the relative rarity of transplant could pose future challenges for pediatric lung transplant programs, which require adequate numbers of patients to maintain proper expertise. PMID:26697265

  8. Inhaled therapies, azithromycin and Mycobacterium abscessus in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Catherinot, Emilie; Roux, Anne-Laure; Vibet, Marie-Anne; Bellis, Gil; Lemonnier, Lydie; Le Roux, Evelyne; Bernède-Bauduin, Claire; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Guillemot, Didier; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are at particularly high risk of developing lung disease caused by Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC). Over the last 10 years, changes in CF treatment, with increasing use of inhaled therapies and low-dose azithromycin, have been accompanied by an increase in the prevalence of MABSC infections in CF patients. There is therefore some concern about the role of new CF treatments in the emergence of MABSC infections. We addressed this issue by means of a case-control study including 30 MABSC-positive cases and 60 nontuberculous mycobacteria-negative CF controls matched for age, sex and centre. We also compared practices at the CF centres with the highest prevalence of MABSC with those at the other centres. No positive association was found between MABSC lung disease and the use of inhaled therapies or low-dose azithromycin in the 4 years preceding MABSC isolation. These treatments were not significantly more frequently used at the CF centres with the highest MABSC prevalence rates. In conclusion, there is no evidence for a link between M. abscessus complex lung disease and inhaled therapies or low-dose azithromycin in patients with CF. PMID:22936714

  9. Managing treatment complexity in cystic fibrosis: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Tiddens, Harm

    2012-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex, chronic, multisystem disease for which there is currently no cure. Nonetheless, advances in management have led to dramatic improvements in patient survival. With this development, new issues have arisen for CF patients and their care providers, including an increased symptom burden and increased frequency of co-morbidities as patients reach older ages, leading to the need for a highly complicated and time-consuming regimen of treatments. Such high symptom and treatment burden often leads to non-adherence and low levels of competence with administration of therapy, both of which may have detrimental impacts on CF outcomes. Optimal management is also hindered by other patient-related factors, including inadequacies in disease education which may lead to issues with self-management. This is particularly important during the transition from parent-directed therapy to independent self-management that occurs during adolescence and early adulthood. Clinicians are also faced with a considerable challenge when selecting interventions for individual patients; although the paradigm of aggressive care necessitates a wide range of therapies, there is a limited evidence base with which to compare available therapeutic regimens. Novel pharmacological agents are being developed to target the underlying cause of CF, while non-pharmacological interventions aim to improve competence and maximize adherence and health outcomes. Comparative effectiveness research is needed to simplify management and facilitate the implementation of appropriate treatment strategies. PMID:22467341

  10. Amniotic fluid disaccharidases in the prenatal detection of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kleijer, W J; Janse, H C; van Diggelen, O P; Niermeijer, M F

    1985-01-01

    Intestinal disaccharidases in amniotic fluid were studied in 41 pregnancies with a recurrence risk for cystic fibrosis (CF). In 11 out of 13 pregnancies with CF fetuses the maltase and sucrase activities were either below the control range (8 cases) or below the 10th percentile of control values (3 cases). Trehalase and lactase were slightly less informative indicators of CF. Of the other 28 pregnancies 3 had low amniotic fluid activities of several intestinal enzymes and were terminated, 12 resulted in the birth of a healthy child and 13 are continuing. The findings in fetal CF suggest an impairment of the defaecation of intestinal contents into the amniotic fluid. Reduced or low amniotic fluid disaccharidase activities were also found in other fetal disorders with demonstrated or presumed intestinal anomalies: e.g. anal atresia (2 cases), anencephaly (3 our of the 7 cases), trisomy 13 (5 cases), trisomy 18 (3 of the 5 cases) and trisomy 21 (19 of the 22 cases). Reduced amniotic fluid disaccharidase activities, although not specific for CF, are highly informative in pregnancies at high risk for CF. Using the 10th percentile of the normal range for amniotic fluid disaccharidase activities as an action line, the sensitivity of CF detection is estimated at 80 to 90 per cent, which could in high risk pregnancies reduce the risk of having another affected child from 1 in 4 to 1 in 20. PMID:3991466

  11. CFTR and Ca2+ Signaling in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Antigny, Fabrice; Norez, Caroline; Becq, Frédéric; Vandebrouck, Clarisse

    2011-01-01

    Among the diverse physiological functions exerted by calcium signaling in living cells, its role in the regulation of protein biogenesis and trafficking remains incompletely understood. In cystic fibrosis (CF) disease the most common CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation, F508del-CFTR generates a misprocessed protein that is abnormally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) compartment, rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and hence absent at the plasma membrane of CF epithelial cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that intracellular calcium signals consequent to activation of apical G-protein-coupled receptors by different agonists are increased in CF airway epithelia. Moreover, the regulation of various intracellular calcium storage compartments, such as ER is also abnormal in CF cells. Although the molecular mechanism at the origin of this increase remains puzzling in epithelial cells, the F508del-CFTR mutation is proposed to be the onset of abnormal Ca2+ influx linking the calcium signaling to CFTR pathobiology. This article reviews the relationships between CFTR and calcium signaling in the context of the genetic disease CF. PMID:22046162

  12. Impact of gene editing on the study of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Patrick T; Sanz, David J; Hollywood, Jennifer A

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic and progressive autosomal recessive disorder of secretory epithelial cells, which causes obstructions in the lung airways and pancreatic ducts of 70,000 people worldwide (for recent review see Cutting Nat Rev Genet 16(1):45-56, 2015). The finding that mutations in the CFTR gene cause CF (Kerem et al. Science 245(4922):1073-1080, 1989; Riordan et al. Science 245(4922):1066-1073, 1989; Rommens et al. Science 245(4922):1059-1065, 1989), was hailed as the very happy middle of a story whose end is a cure for a fatal disease (Koshland Science 245(4922):1029, 1989). However, despite two licensed drugs (Ramsey et al. N Engl J Med 365(18):1663-1672, 2011; Wainwright et al. N Engl J Med 373(3):220-231, 2015), and a formal demonstration that repeated administration of CFTR cDNA to patients is safe and effects a modest but significant stabilisation of disease (Alton et al. Lancet Respir Med 3(9):684-691, 2015), we are still a long way from a cure, with many patients taking over 100 tablets per day, and a mean age at death of 28 years. The aim of this review is to discuss the impact on the study of CF of gene-editing techniques as they have developed over the last 30 years, up to and including the possibility of editing as a therapeutic approach. PMID:27325484

  13. Mucociliary transport in trachea of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yeates, D B; Sturgess, J M; Kahn, S R; Levison, H; Aspin, N

    1976-01-01

    Mucociliary tracheal transport rates were measured in 20 patients with cystic fibrosis, in whom these rates ranged from 0 to 12.8 mm/min. The patients were divided into 3 roughly equal groups on the basis of their transport rates. (1) Those in whom no abnormality in mucociliary transport was detected in the trachea; (2) those in whom normal transport rates were measured but in whom abnormalities such as cessation, or reversal of bolus movement were observed; (3) those in whom no normal transport rates were observed. In the first group the rates were similar to those observed in a population of healthy adults. These normal rates were observed in some patients who had a productive cough. The mean mucociliary tracheal transport rate increased with increasing maximum midexpiratory flow. Those patients with a low Shwachman score and poor arterial oxygen tension tended to fall into groups 2 and 3. In the ciliary dyskinesia assay in rabbit trachea the serum from the patients with the higher transport rates tended to initiate more rapid discharge of material from the epithelium and ciliary dyskinesia. PMID:942226

  14. Inhaled corticosteroids and Aspergillus fumigatus isolation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Noni, Maria; Katelari, Anna; Dimopoulos, George; Kourlaba, Georgia; Spoulou, Vana; Alexandrou-Athanassoulis, Helen; Doudounakis, Stavros-Eleftherios; Tzoumaka-Bakoula, Chryssa

    2014-10-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus isolation in cultures from respiratory specimens of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is quite common; however, the role of A. fumigatus as a pathogen and whether its presence is associated with progression of pulmonary disease remain unclear. We investigated the association between inhaled corticosteroids and the recovery of A. fumigatus by performing a retrospective cohort study of CF patients born between 1988 and 1996. The patients' medical records from their first visit to the CF Center until December 2010 were reviewed. Outcomes were the occurrence of A. fumigatus first isolation, chronic colonization, or the last visit at the CF Center. A number of possible confounders were included in the multivariate logistic regression analysis in order to identify an independent association between inhaled corticosteroids and colonization status. A total of 121 patients were included in the study. Thirty-nine patients (32.2%) had at least one positive culture and 14 (11.6%) developed chronic colonization. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent effect of inhaled corticosteroids on the odds of first isolation (odds ratio [OR], 1.165; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.015-1.337; P = 0.029) and chronic colonization (OR, 1.180; 95% CI, 1.029-1.353; P = 0.018). In conclusion, A. fumigatus first isolation and chronic colonization are associated with the duration of inhaled corticosteroid treatment. PMID:25056962

  15. Lung microbiota across age and disease stage in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Bryan; Wang, Pauline W; Diaz Caballero, Julio; Clark, Shawn T; Brahma, Vijaya; Donaldson, Sylva; Zhang, Yu; Surendra, Anu; Gong, Yunchen; Elizabeth Tullis, D; Yau, Yvonne C W; Waters, Valerie J; Hwang, David M; Guttman, David S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the significance of bacterial species that colonize and persist in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways requires a detailed examination of bacterial community structure across a broad range of age and disease stage. We used 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing to characterize the lung microbiota in 269 CF patients spanning a 60 year age range, including 76 pediatric samples from patients of age 4-17, and a broad cross-section of disease status to identify features of bacterial community structure and their relationship to disease stage and age. The CF lung microbiota shows significant inter-individual variability in community structure, composition and diversity. The core microbiota consists of five genera - Streptococcus, Prevotella, Rothia, Veillonella and Actinomyces. CF-associated pathogens such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, Stenotrophomonas and Achromobacter are less prevalent than core genera, but have a strong tendency to dominate the bacterial community when present. Community diversity and lung function are greatest in patients less than 10 years of age and lower in older age groups, plateauing at approximately age 25. Lower community diversity correlates with worse lung function in a multivariate regression model. Infection by Pseudomonas correlates with age-associated trends in community diversity and lung function. PMID:25974282

  16. Lung microbiota across age and disease stage in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Bryan; Wang, Pauline W.; Diaz Caballero, Julio; Clark, Shawn T.; Brahma, Vijaya; Donaldson, Sylva; Zhang, Yu; Surendra, Anu; Gong, Yunchen; Elizabeth Tullis, D.; Yau, Yvonne C. W.; Waters, Valerie J.; Hwang, David M.; Guttman, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the significance of bacterial species that colonize and persist in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways requires a detailed examination of bacterial community structure across a broad range of age and disease stage. We used 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing to characterize the lung microbiota in 269 CF patients spanning a 60 year age range, including 76 pediatric samples from patients of age 4–17, and a broad cross-section of disease status to identify features of bacterial community structure and their relationship to disease stage and age. The CF lung microbiota shows significant inter-individual variability in community structure, composition and diversity. The core microbiota consists of five genera - Streptococcus, Prevotella, Rothia, Veillonella and Actinomyces. CF-associated pathogens such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, Stenotrophomonas and Achromobacter are less prevalent than core genera, but have a strong tendency to dominate the bacterial community when present. Community diversity and lung function are greatest in patients less than 10 years of age and lower in older age groups, plateauing at approximately age 25. Lower community diversity correlates with worse lung function in a multivariate regression model. Infection by Pseudomonas correlates with age-associated trends in community diversity and lung function. PMID:25974282

  17. Intestinal CFTR expression alleviates meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, David A.; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Ernst, Sarah E.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Karp, Philip H.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Rector, Michael V.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H. Abou; Hoegger, Mark J.; Ludwig, Paula S.; Taft, Peter J.; Wallen, Tanner J.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; McMenimen, James D.; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Bogan, Katrina L.; Adam, Ryan J.; Hornick, Emma E.; Nelson, George A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Chang, Eugene H.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Prather, Randall S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs develop disease with features remarkably similar to those in people with CF, including exocrine pancreatic destruction, focal biliary cirrhosis, micro-gallbladder, vas deferens loss, airway disease, and meconium ileus. Whereas meconium ileus occurs in 15% of babies with CF, the penetrance is 100% in newborn CF pigs. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of porcine CF transmembrane conductance regulator (pCFTR) cDNA under control of the intestinal fatty acid–binding protein (iFABP) promoter would alleviate the meconium ileus. We produced 5 CFTR–/–;TgFABP>pCFTR lines. In 3 lines, intestinal expression of CFTR at least partially restored CFTR-mediated anion transport and improved the intestinal phenotype. In contrast, these pigs still had pancreatic destruction, liver disease, and reduced weight gain, and within weeks of birth, they developed sinus and lung disease, the severity of which varied over time. These data indicate that expressing CFTR in intestine without pancreatic or hepatic correction is sufficient to rescue meconium ileus. Comparing CFTR expression in different lines revealed that approximately 20% of wild-type CFTR mRNA largely prevented meconium ileus. This model may be of value for understanding CF pathophysiology and testing new preventions and therapies. PMID:23676501

  18. Development of a Porcine Model of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michael J.; Rogers, Christopher S.; Stoltz, David A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Prather, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a common autosomal recessive disease that affects multiple organs. The lack of an animal model with manifestations like those typically found in humans has slowed understanding of its pathogenesis. Therefore, because of the similarities between human and swine anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics, we chose to develop a porcine model of CF. We used homologous recombination in primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts to disrupt the CFTR gene and then used those cells as nuclear donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer. After crossing heterozygous pigs, we produced CFTR−/− pigs. The newborn CFTR null piglets manifested meconium ileus, pancreatic destruction, early focal biliary cirrhosis, and gall bladder abnormalities that were very similar to those observed in humans with CF. At birth, there were no abnormalities in the airway epithelium or submucosal glands and no evidence of inflammation, consistent with findings in the newborn human. We hope that this porcine model will help elucidate the pathogenesis of CF and thereby lead to the development of new mechanism-based therapies. PMID:19768173

  19. Intestinal CFTR expression alleviates meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis pigs.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, David A; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Ernst, Sarah E; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Karp, Philip H; Samuel, Melissa S; Reznikov, Leah R; Rector, Michael V; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Bouzek, Drake C; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H Abou; Hoegger, Mark J; Ludwig, Paula S; Taft, Peter J; Wallen, Tanner J; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; McMenimen, James D; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Bogan, Katrina L; Adam, Ryan J; Hornick, Emma E; Nelson, George A; Hoffman, Eric A; Chang, Eugene H; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B; Prather, Randall S; Meyerholz, David K; Welsh, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs develop disease with features remarkably similar to those in people with CF, including exocrine pancreatic destruction, focal biliary cirrhosis, micro-gallbladder, vas deferens loss, airway disease, and meconium ileus. Whereas meconium ileus occurs in 15% of babies with CF, the penetrance is 100% in newborn CF pigs. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of porcine CF transmembrane conductance regulator (pCFTR) cDNA under control of the intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (iFABP) promoter would alleviate the meconium ileus. We produced 5 CFTR-/-;TgFABP>pCFTR lines. In 3 lines, intestinal expression of CFTR at least partially restored CFTR-mediated anion transport and improved the intestinal phenotype. In contrast, these pigs still had pancreatic destruction, liver disease, and reduced weight gain, and within weeks of birth, they developed sinus and lung disease, the severity of which varied over time. These data indicate that expressing CFTR in intestine without pancreatic or hepatic correction is sufficient to rescue meconium ileus. Comparing CFTR expression in different lines revealed that approximately 20% of wild-type CFTR mRNA largely prevented meconium ileus. This model may be of value for understanding CF pathophysiology and testing new preventions and therapies. PMID:23676501

  20. Development of a porcine model of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael J; Rogers, Christopher S; Stoltz, David A; Meyerholz, David K; Prather, Randall S

    2009-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a common autosomal recessive disease that affects multiple organs. The lack of an animal model with manifestations like those typically found in humans has slowed understanding of its pathogenesis. Therefore, because of the similarities between human and swine anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics, we chose to develop a porcine model of CF. We used homologous recombination in primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts to disrupt the CFTR gene and then used those cells as nuclear donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer. After crossing heterozygous pigs, we produced CFTR-/- pigs. The newborn CFTR null piglets manifested meconium ileus, pancreatic destruction, early focal biliary cirrhosis, and gall bladder abnormalities that were very similar to those observed in humans with CF. At birth, there were no abnormalities in the airway epithelium or submucosal glands and no evidence of inflammation, consistent with findings in the newborn human. We hope that this porcine model will help elucidate the pathogenesis of CF and thereby lead to the development of new mechanism-based therapies. PMID:19768173

  1. Population Pharmacokinetics of Inhaled Tobramycin Powder in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ting, L; Aksenov, S; Bhansali, S G; Ramakrishna, R; Tang, P; Geller, D E

    2014-01-01

    Tobramycin powder for inhalation (TOBI Podhaler or TIP) is approved for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A population pharmacokinetic model for tobramycin inhalation powder (TIP) in CF patients was developed to characterize the effect of covariates including body mass index (BMI) and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s as percent of the predicted value (FEV1% predicted) at baseline) on the serum exposure parameters. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination and first-order absorption was developed. Across a range of baseline demographic values in the study population, the predicted mean values for the maximum (Cmax) and trough (Ctrough) plasma concentrations at steady state were at least 7.5 and 5-fold lower, respectively, than the recommended thresholds for tobramycin toxicity (12 µg/ml for Cmax and 2 µg/ml for Ctrough). This model adequately described the tobramycin serum concentration–time course in CF patients following inhalation of TIP. The results indicate that no BMI- or FEV1-based dose adjustment is needed for use of TIP in CF patients. PMID:24522146

  2. Attitudes toward abortion among parents of children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, D C; Rosenfield, J M; Janes, S R; Erbe, R W

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA prenatal diagnosis for cystic fibrosis (CF) has been available for parents of affected children since late 1985. METHODS: Using anonymous questionnaires, we surveyed 395 parents of children with CF at 12 New England CF centers with regard to 12 maternal or family situations and 11 fetal characteristics; 271 (68%) responded. RESULTS: The majority supported legal abortion in the first trimester for all 23 situations; 58% would abort for severe mental retardation (MR), 40% would abort for a genetic disorder leading to death before age five years, 41% for a child bedridden for life, 35% for moderate MR, 20% for CF and 17% for a severe incurable disorder starting at age 40 years. Few would abort for a disorder starting at age 60 years, for genetic susceptibility to alcoholism or for sex selection. Variables most strongly related to abortion for CF were attitudes of spouse, respondent's siblings, and CF doctor toward abortion for CF as well as infrequent attendance at religious services. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal diagnosis may not reduce substantially the number of CF births to parents of CF children because most do not accept abortion for CF. PMID:1854017

  3. Changing the Paradigm - Treating the Basic Defect in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Guglani, Lokesh

    2015-08-01

    Since the first description of Cystic fibrosis (CF) more than 75 y ago, significant advances have been made in understanding its pathogenesis and in developing specific therapies. The pace of these developments was further accelerated after the discovery of CF gene in 1989 and since then, CF has been transformed from being a pediatric illness into a chronic life-limiting genetic disorder with survival up to the fourth decade. The development of mutation-specific therapies in the first decade of the 21st century has the potential to change the natural history of CF and has now ushered in the era of 'Precision Medicine'. The ability to revert the basic defect in CF by using Personalized Medicine approach based on each individual's genetic profile will serve as a model for other chronic disorders as well. This review highlights the recent advances in the field of CF research that have led to a paradigm shift in its management and outcomes. PMID:26077199

  4. Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Capacity in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Melissa L.; Seigler, Nichole; McKie, Kathleen T.; McCully, Kevin K.; Harris, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exercise intolerance predicts mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF); however, the mechanisms have yet to be fully elucidated. Using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), this study compared skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in patients with CF to healthy controls. Methods Thirteen patients and 16 demographically-matched controls participated in this study. NIRS was utilized to measure the recovery rate of oxygen consumption (musVO2max) of the vastus lateralis muscle after 15 s of electrical stimulation (4 Hz) and subsequent repeated transient arterial occlusions. Results musVO2max was reduced in patients with CF (1.82 ± 0.4 min−1) compared to controls (2.13 ± 0.5 min−1, p = 0.04). A significant inverse relationship between age and musVO2max was observed in patients (r = −0.676, p = 0.011), but not controls (r = −0.291, p = 0.274). Discussion Patients with CF exhibit a reduction in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity compared to controls. It appears as the reduced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity is accelerated by age and could likely contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with CF. PMID:25758606

  5. Quantitative imaging of airway liquid absorption in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Harding, Thomas J; Brown, Stefanie L; Nero, Joseph A; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    New measures are needed to rapidly assess emerging treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Using an imaging approach, we evaluated the absorptive clearance of the radiolabeled small molecule probe diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) as an in vivo indicator of changes in airway liquid absorption. DTPA absorption and mucociliary clearance rates were measured in 21 patients with CF (12 adults and nine children) and nine adult controls using nuclear imaging. The effect of hypertonic saline on DTPA absorption was also studied. In addition, in vitro studies were conducted to identify the determinants of transepithelial DTPA absorption. CF patients had significantly increased rates of DTPA absorption compared with control subjects but had similar mucociliary clearance rates. Treatment with hypertonic saline resulted in a decrease in DTPA absorption and an increase in mucociliary clearance in 11 out of 11 adult CF patients compared with treatment with isotonic saline. In vitro studies revealed that ∼ 50% of DTPA absorption can be attributed to transepithelial fluid transport. Apically applied mucus impedes liquid and DTPA absorption. However, mucus effects become negligible in the presence of an osmotic stimulus. Functional imaging of DTPA absorption provides a quantifiable marker of immediate response to treatments that promote airway surface liquid hydration. PMID:24743971

  6. Effects of calcium on intestinal mucin: implications for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Forstner, J F; Forstner, G G

    1976-06-01

    A major feature of the disease cystic fibrosis is the excessive concentration of mucus within ducts and glands of mucous-producing organs. Some mucous secretions also show an elevation in calcium concentration. Using purified rat intestinal goblet cell mucin as a model mucin, we have investigated the effect of millimolar additions (1-25 mM) of CaCl2 on the physical properties of the mucin. Isotonicity of incubation media was preserved in order to mimic in vivo conditions. CaCl2 (8-15mM) caused a 15-33% decrease in viscosity, no change in electrophoretic mobility in acrylamide gels, and a 20-30% decrease in solubility of the mucin. Solubility changes were reversed by the addition of EDTA (20 mM) to incubations. Insolubility was also produced in incubations of mucin with a mixture of soluble intestinal contents (NaCl washings). These findings strongly suggest that the mucin became smaller and more dense as calcium was added, a process most probably achieved by loss of intramolecular water. PMID:1272637

  7. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis: Results, Indications, Complications, and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Joseph P.; Sayah, David M.; Belperio, John A.; Weigt, S. Sam

    2016-01-01

    Survival in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has improved dramatically over the past 30 to 40 years, with mean survival now approximately 40 years. Nonetheless, progressive respiratory insufficiency remains the major cause of mortality in CF patients, and lung transplantation (LT) is eventually required. Timing of listing for LT is critical, because up to 25 to 41% of CF patients have died while awaiting LT. Globally, approximately 16.4% of lung transplants are performed in adults with CF. Survival rates for LT recipients with CF are superior to other indications, yet LT is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality (~50% at 5-year survival rates). Myriad complications of LT include allograft failure (acute or chronic), opportunistic infections, and complications of chronic immunosuppressive medications (including malignancy). Determining which patients are candidates for LT is difficult, and survival benefit remains uncertain. In this review, we discuss when LT should be considered, criteria for identifying candidates, contraindications to LT, results post-LT, and specific complications that may be associated with LT. Infectious complications that may complicate CF (particularly Burkholderia cepacia spp., opportunistic fungi, and nontuberculous mycobacteria) are discussed. PMID:25826595

  8. Fatty acyltranferases in serum in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zielenski, J.; Newman, L.J.; Slomiany, B.L.; Slomiany, A.

    1987-05-01

    Studies on serum and gastrointestinal secretion from CF patient is suggest that defective accumulation of mucus in gastrointestinal tract and excessive amount of a protease resistant peptides in serum are related to the abnormal activity of enzymes responsible for fatty acylation of proteins. Here, the authors investigated the fatty acyltransferase activities in serum of normal and CF patients. A 15 l of serum was mixed with 0.85 nmol ( UC)palmitoyl CoA, 200 g of serine and threonine and incubated at 37C for 30 min. The incubates were immediately frozen, dried extracted with C/M and chromatographed in chloroform/methanol/water. The incorporation of ( UC)palmitate was determined using linear radioscanner and authoradiography. The results of HPTLC revealed that CF serum in addition of ACAT and LCAT contained enzymes responsible for the transfer of ( UC)palmitate to monoacylphosphoglycerides, and serine and threonine. In normal serum the formation of a small amount of palmitoyl serine and palmitoyl threonine was also observed but the acylation of monoacylphosphoglycerides was not detectable. The authors conclude that in cystic fibrosis the abnormal fatty acyltransferases are responsible for the occurrence of protease resistant glycoprotein, unusual peptides in serum and possibly for the modification of membrane proteins and lipids.

  9. Altered chloride metabolism in cultured cystic fibrosis skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mattes, P.M.; Maloney, P.C.; Littlefield, J.W.

    1987-05-01

    An abnormal regulation of chloride permeability has been described for epithelial cells from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). To learn more about the biochemical basis of this inherited disease, the authors have studied chloride metabolism in cultured CF fibroblasts by comparing the efflux of /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ from matched pairs of CF and normal fibroblasts. The rate constants describing /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ efflux did not differ between the two cell types, but in each of the four pairs tested the amount of /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ contained within CF cells was consistently reduced, by 25-30%, relative to normal cells. Comparisons of cell water content and /sup 22/Na/sup +/ efflux showed no differences between the two cell types, suggesting that overall intracellular chloride concentration is lower than normal in CF fibroblasts. Such data suggest that the CF gene defect is expressed in skin fibroblasts and that this defect may alter the regulation of intracellular Cl/sup -/ concentration, perhaps through changes in Cl/sup -/ permeability.

  10. Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Surface Liquid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tarran, Robert; Button, Brian; Picher, Maryse; Paradiso, Anthony M.; Ribeiro, Carla M.; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Zhang, Liqun; Collins, Peter L.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian airways normally regulate the volume of a thin liquid layer, the periciliary liquid (PCL), to facilitate the mucus clearance component of lung defense. Studies under standard (static) culture conditions revealed that normal airway epithelia possess an adenosine-regulated pathway that blends Na+ absorption and Cl− secretion to optimize PCL volume. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the absence of CF transmembrane conductance regulator results in a failure of adenosine regulation of PCL volume, which is predicted to initiate mucus stasis and infection. However, under conditions that mimic the phasic motion of the lung in vivo, ATP release into PCL was increased, CF ion transport was rebalanced, and PCL volume was restored to levels adequate for lung defense. This ATP signaling system was vulnerable, however, to insults that trigger CF bacterial infections, such as viral (respiratory syncitial virus) infections, which up-regulated extracellular ATPase activity and abolished motion-dependent ATP regulation of CF PCL height. These studies demonstrate (i) how the normal coordination of opposing ion transport pathways to maintain PCL volume is disrupted in CF, (ii) the hitherto unknown role of phasic motion in regulating key aspects of normal and CF innate airways defense, and (iii) that maneuvers directed at increasing motion-induced nucleotide release may be therapeutic in CF patients. PMID:16087672

  11. Malnutrition and age-specific nutritional management in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dodge, J A

    1992-10-01

    Malnutrition is recognised as a major prognostic factor adversely affecting survival in cystic fibrosis (CF) and is the result of an unfavourable energy balance in these patients. A high resting energy expenditure, dependent on the patient's genotype, in addition to pulmonary infection play an important role in producing anorexia and weight loss. Nutritional management with the aim to gain weight and catch up with growth is age-specific. It is important to repair nutritional status as early as possible after diagnosis. In infancy breast feeding is advised with, if necessary, supplemental feeding with predigested formulae such as Pregestimil. In childhood nutritional management must be aimed towards a normal weight gain and growth velocity. The latter is the best guide of nutritional adequacy. If weight gain falters the first principle is to treat any associated respiratory infection, the second is to ensure adequate enzyme therapy and control of steatorrhoea, and only then should dietary energy supplements be introduced. When oral hypernutrition fails, nocturnal naso-gastric tube feeding of a non-elemental formula may be considered. Parenteral nutrition is rarely indicated and should be reserved as a last solution for CF-patients. PMID:1470282

  12. Recent advances and new perspectives in targeting CFTR for therapy of cystic fibrosis and enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiqiang; Fujii, Naoaki; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized primarily at the apical surfaces of epithelial cells lining airway, gut and exocrine glands, where it is responsible for transepithelial salt and water transport. Several human diseases are associated with an altered channel function of CFTR. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by the loss or dysfunction of CFTR-channel activity resulting from the mutations on the gene; whereas enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas are caused by the hyperactivation of CFTR channel function. CFTR is a validated target for drug development to treat these diseases. Significant progress has been made in developing CFTR modulator therapy by means of high-throughput screening followed by hit-to-lead optimization. Several oral administrated investigational drugs are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for CF. Also importantly, new ideas and methodologies are emerging. Targeting CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes is one such novel approach. PMID:22393940

  13. Distribution of the different species of the Pseudallescheria boydii/Scedosporium apiospermum complex in French patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zouhair, Rachid; Rougeron, Amandine; Razafimandimby, Bienvenue; Kobi, Abdessamad; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Giraud, Sandrine

    2013-08-01

    As various new sibling species within the Pseudallescheria boydii/Scedosporium apiospermum complex have been described recently with differences in their susceptibility to antifungals, this study was conducted in order to determine their respective frequency in cystic fibrosis. Results indicated that P. boydii largely predominated (62%), followed by S. apiospermum (24%), Scedosporium aurantiacum (10%) and Pseudallescheria minutispora (4%). Scedosporium dehoogii was not recovered in this study. The multiple correspondence factor analysis highlighted geographical discrepancies within species distribution: P. boydii was rarely encountered in Northern France, while S. apiospermum was less represented in the west of the country. Additionally, we demonstrated that all species encountered in the cystic fibrosis context were capable to chronically colonize the respiratory tract of patients. Molecular typing of a large set of environmental and clinical isolates should be conducted to delineate the epidemiology of each sibling species in the complex. PMID:23461512

  14. Novel inhaled combined antibiotic formulations in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa airways infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Antoniu, Sabina

    2015-07-01

    In cystic fibrosis, chronic airways infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be treated with inhaled antibiotics such as inhaled tobramycin, aztreonam or colistin. However, biofilm formation induced by this bacterium can reduce the effectiveness of such therapies and can contribute to antibiotic resistance. Inhaled antibiotic combination might represent an optimal antibiofilm strategy in this setting. This review discusses the rationale for combining the antibiotics as well as some emerging or existing combinations. Most of the combinations except for fosfomycin/tobramycin are at an early stage of development. The latter combination was found to be effective in Phase II clinical studies and is planned to be tested in Phase III trials. The clinical data on long-term efficacy are currently missing, but the existing evidence as well as the unmet therapeutic need can prompt the further evaluation of such compounds. PMID:25921312

  15. The future of antimicrobial therapy in the era of antibiotic resistance in cystic fibrosis pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, G; Gilpin, Df; Elborn, Js; Tunney, Michael M

    2013-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterised by chronic polymicrobial airway infection and inflammation, which is the major cause of morbidity and mortality. Aggressive use of antimicrobials has been fundamental in increasing the life expectancy of CF patients in recent years. However, enhanced culture and non-culture based detection methods have identified bacteria in the CF lung not previously isolated from CF patients by routine diagnostic microbiology Coupled with increasing antimicrobial resistance, the future of antimicrobial therapy in CF respiratory infection remains challenging. New strategies are needed to address these problems and ensure improvements in life expectancy are maintained. Potential future strategies include the use of new antimicrobial agents and formulations currently in clinical trials, alternative methods of selecting appropriate therapeutic regimens, determination of the pathogenicity of species newly associated with CF and the development of new antimicrobials and adjuvants for use in clinical practice. PMID:23964628

  16. [Measurement of nasal transepithelial potential difference: a diagnostic test for cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Charfi, M R; Matran, R; Regnard, J; Lockhart, A

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of nasal transepithelial potential difference allows the exploration of transepithelial ionic transports in vivo. Cystic fibrosis is an interesting indication of this test. Indeed, this disease is characterized by a chloride and water secretion deficit across respiratory epithelium. We have measured nasal potential in 8 healthy volunteers. Measurements were repeated 3 times a day, during 3 days for each subject. The reproducibility of the data was analysed with factorial variance model. The mean nasal potential in the healthy volunteers group and in 10 patients with cystic fibrosis was compared. In the cystic fibrosis group, the nasal potential was measured 3 times with a 2 mn-interval between the measurements. No significant variation of the nasal potential values was found from day to day or in the same day from one measurement to another. Mean value was -19 +/- 3.5 mv in normal subjects and -42.6 +/- 5.1 mv in cystic fibrosis patients. We conclude that nasal potential measurement is an easy and reproducible test that might be a complementary tool routinely used along with the classical tests in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. PMID:8731749

  17. ∆F508 CFTR interactome remodelling promotes rescue of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pankow, Sandra; Bamberger, Casimir; Calzolari, Diego; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Balch, William E; Yates, John R

    2015-12-24

    Deletion of phenylalanine 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (∆F508 CFTR) is the major cause of cystic fibrosis, one of the most common inherited childhood diseases. The mutated CFTR anion channel is not fully glycosylated and shows minimal activity in bronchial epithelial cells of patients with cystic fibrosis. Low temperature or inhibition of histone deacetylases can partly rescue ∆F508 CFTR cellular processing defects and function. A favourable change of ∆F508 CFTR protein-protein interactions was proposed as a mechanism of rescue; however, CFTR interactome dynamics during temperature shift and inhibition of histone deacetylases are unknown. Here we report the first comprehensive analysis of the CFTR and ∆F508 CFTR interactome and its dynamics during temperature shift and inhibition of histone deacetylases. By using a novel deep proteomic analysis method, we identify 638 individual high-confidence CFTR interactors and discover a ∆F508 deletion-specific interactome, which is extensively remodelled upon rescue. Detailed analysis of the interactome remodelling identifies key novel interactors, whose loss promote ∆F508 CFTR channel function in primary cystic fibrosis epithelia or which are critical for CFTR biogenesis. Our results demonstrate that global remodelling of ∆F508 CFTR interactions is crucial for rescue, and provide comprehensive insight into the molecular disease mechanisms of cystic fibrosis caused by deletion of F508. PMID:26618866

  18. eSensor®: A Microarray Technology Based on Electrochemical Detection of Nucleic Acids and Its Application to Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Michael R.; Coty, William A.

    We have developed a test for identification of carriers for cystic fibrosis using the eSensor® DNA detection technology. Oligonucleotide probes are deposited within self-assembled monolayers on gold electrodes arrayed upon printed circuit boards. These probes allow sequence-specific capture of amplicons containing a panel of mutation sites associated with cystic fibrosis. DNA targets are detected and mutations genotyped using a “sandwich” assay methodology employing electrochemical detection of ferrocene-labeled oligonucleotides for discrimination of carrier and non-carrier alleles. Performance of the cystic fibrosis application demonstrates sufficient accuracy and reliability for clinical diagnostic use, and the procedure can be performed by trained medical technologists available in the hospital laboratory.

  19. Polymorphisms in the glutathione pathway modulate cystic fibrosis severity: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) clinically manifests with various levels of severity, which are thought to be modulated by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), modifier genes, and the environment. This study verified whether polymorphisms in modifier genes associated with glutathione (GSH) metabolism influence CF severity. Methods A cross-sectional study of 180 CF patients was carried out from 2011 to 2012. We analyzed CFTR mutations, polymorphisms (GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions, GSTP1 + 313A > G, GCLC-129C > T, and GCLC-3506A > G) in modifier genes and CF clinical severity as assessed by 28 clinical and laboratory variables. Results Significant associations were found between modifier gene polymorphisms and particular phenotypes or genotype changes. These included GCLC-129C > T with a higher frequency of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid to CC genotype (p = 0.044), and GCLC-3506A > G with a higher frequency of the no-mucoid P. aeruginosa (NMPA) to AA genotype (p = 0.012). The GSTT1 deletion was associated with a higher frequency of the NMPA to homozygous deletion (p = 0.008), GSTP1 + 313A > G with a minor risk of osteoporosis (p = 0.036), and patient age ≤ 154 months (p = 0.044) with the AA genotype. The Bhalla score was associated with GCLC-3506A > G (p = 0.044) and GSTM1/GSTT1 deletion polymorphisms (p = 0.02), while transcutaneous hemoglobin oxygen saturation levels were associated with GSTT1 deletions (p = 0.048). Conclusion CF severity is associated with polymorphisms in GSH pathways and CFTR mutations. PMID:24593045

  20. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from chronically infected children with cystic fibrosis in India

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Gunjan; Kapil, Arti; Kabra, Susheel Kumar; Das, Bimal Kumar; Dwivedi, Sada Nand

    2005-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). With chronicity of infection, the organism resides as a biofilm, shows multi-drug resistance, diversifies its colony morphology and becomes auxotrophic. The patients have been found to be colonized with multiple genotypes. The present work was carried out to characterize P. aeruginosa isolated from children with cystic fibrosis using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Results We studied 56 patients with CF attending the Pediatric Chest clinic at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India during August 1998-August 2001. These patients were regularly followed up at the clinic. Out of 56 patients, 27 were culture positive for P. aeruginosa where 8 were chronically infected (Group1) and 19 were intermittently colonized with the organism (Group2). Patients under Group1 had significantly higher rates of hospitalization, death and colonization with different colony morphotypes (p < 0.05). The isolates from Group1 patients were the positive producers of extended spectrum beta lactamase. A total of 5 auxotrophs were recovered from 2 patients where one was chronically infected with P. aeruginosa and the other was a recently enrolled patient. The auxotrophs had the specific requirement for methionine and arginine. Molecular typing revealed 33 ERIC-PCR (E1-E33) and 5 PCR-ribotyping (P1-P5) patterns. By ERIC-PCR, 4 patients were colonized with 2–4 genotypes and the remaining 23 patients were colonized with the single genotype. Conclusion With chronicity of infection, P. aeruginosa becomes multidrug resistant, diversifies its colony morphology, acquires mucoidity and shows auxotrophy for amino acids. The chronically infected patients can be colonized with multiple genotypes. Thus in a particular clinical set up, high index of suspicion should be there for diagnosis of CF patients so as to prevent the delay in diagnosis and management of CF