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Sample records for cystic fibrosis lungs

  1. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease that ... quality of life has improved. Learn About Cystic Fibrosis Cystic fibrosis is a genetic (inherited) condition that ...

  2. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H.; Barr, Mark L.; Blackwell, Laura S.; Bosma, Otto H.; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D. R.; Jensen, Judy L.; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Robinson, Walter M.; Romero, Sandy L.; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C.; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Vrijlandt, Elianne J. L. E.; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing and transplantation on the patient's quality of life. Although recent population-based analyses of the US lung allocation system for the CF population have raised controversies about the survival benefits of transplantation, studies from the United Kingdom and Canada have suggested a definite survival advantage for those receiving transplants. In response to these and other controversies, leaders in transplantation and CF met together in Lansdowne, Virginia, to consider the state of the art in lung transplantation for CF in an international context, focusing on advances in surgical technique, measurement of outcomes, use of prognostic criteria, variations in local control over listing, and prioritization among the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and The Netherlands, patient adherence before and after transplantation and other issues in the broader context of lung transplantation. Finally, the conference members carefully considered how efforts to improve outcomes for lung transplantation for CF lung disease might best be studied. This Roundtable seeks to communicate the substance of our discussions. PMID:20008865

  3. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease. PMID:25929952

  4. The Spectrum of Nocardia Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mei-Zahav, Meir; Livnat, Galit; Bentur, Lea; Mussaffi, Huda; Prais, Dario; Stafler, Patrick; Bar-On, Ophir; Steuer, Guy; Blau, Hannah

    2015-08-01

    We reviewed all cases of Nocardia infection in cystic fibrosis patients at 2 centers. Eight of 200 patients had Nocardia in sputum. Four developed severe lung disease, including 3 with associated allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis; 4 remained clinically stable. Nocardia is often associated with significant lung disease in cystic fibrosis, possibly associated with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or steroids. PMID:25973994

  5. Lung Infections Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lyczak, Jeffrey B.; Cannon, Carolyn L.; Pier, Gerald B.

    2002-01-01

    While originally characterized as a collection of related syndromes, cystic fibrosis (CF) is now recognized as a single disease whose diverse symptoms stem from the wide tissue distribution of the gene product that is defective in CF, the ion channel and regulator, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Defective CFTR protein impacts the function of the pancreas and alters the consistency of mucosal secretions. The latter of these effects probably plays an important role in the defective resistance of CF patients to many pathogens. As the modalities of CF research have changed over the decades from empirical histological studies to include biophysical measurements of CFTR function, the clinical management of this disease has similarly evolved to effectively address the ever-changing spectrum of CF-related infectious diseases. These factors have led to the successful management of many CF-related infections with the notable exception of chronic lung infection with the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The virulence of P. aeruginosa stems from multiple bacterial attributes, including antibiotic resistance, the ability to utilize quorum-sensing signals to form biofilms, the destructive potential of a multitude of its microbial toxins, and the ability to acquire a mucoid phenotype, which renders this microbe resistant to both the innate and acquired immunologic defenses of the host. PMID:11932230

  6. Liver and lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis: an adult cystic fibrosis centre's experience.

    PubMed

    Sivam, S; Al-Hindawi, Y; Di Michiel, J; Moriarty, C; Spratt, P; Jansz, P; Malouf, M; Plit, M; Pleass, H; Havryk, A; Bowen, D; Haber, P; Glanville, A R; Bye, P T P

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease develops in one-third of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). It is rare for liver disease to have its onset after 20 years of age. Lung disease, however, is usually more severe in adulthood. A retrospective analysis was performed on nine patients. Three patients required lung transplantation approximately a decade after liver transplant, and another underwent combined liver and lung transplants. Four additional patients with liver transplants are awaiting assessment for lung transplants. One patient is awaiting combined liver and lung transplants. With increased survival in CF, several patients may require more than single organ transplantation. PMID:27405894

  7. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. The mucus clogs the lungs, causing breathing problems ...

  8. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Christopher S.; Abraham, William M.; Brogden, Kim A.; Engelhardt, John F.; Fisher, John T.; McCray, Paul B.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K.; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Prather, Randall S.; Sabater, Juan R.; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  9. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S; Abraham, William M; Brogden, Kim A; Engelhardt, John F; Fisher, John T; McCray, Paul B; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Prather, Randall S; Sabater, Juan R; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2008-08-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  10. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  11. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » Cystic Fibrosis Explore Cystic Fibrosis What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Bronchiectasis ...

  12. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000107.htm Cystic fibrosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystic fibrosis is a disease that causes thick, sticky mucus ...

  13. Future Directions in Early Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Banks-Schlegel, Susan; Accurso, Frank J.; Boucher, Richard C.; Cutting, Garry R.; Engelhardt, John F.; Guggino, William B.; Karp, Christopher L.; Knowles, Michael R.; Kolls, Jay K.; LiPuma, John J.; Lynch, Susan; McCray, Paul B.; Rubenstein, Ronald C.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Sorscher, Eric; Welsh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1989 discovery that mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF), there has been substantial progress toward understanding the molecular basis for CF lung disease, leading to the discovery and development of new therapeutic approaches. However, the earliest impact of the loss of CFTR function on airway physiology and structure and its relationship to initial infection and inflammation are poorly understood. Universal newborn screening for CF in the United States represents an unprecedented opportunity for investigating CF clinical manifestations very early in life. Recently developed animal models with pulmonary phenotypic manifestations also provide a window into the early consequences of this genetic disorder. For these reasons, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a working group of extramural experts, entitled “Future Research Directions in Early CF Lung Disease” on September 21–22, 2010, to identify future research directions of great promise in CF. The priority areas identified included (1) exploring pathogenic mechanisms of early CF lung disease; (2) leveraging newborn screening to elucidate the natural history of early lung disease; (3) developing a spectrum of biomarkers of early lung disease that reflects CF pathophysiology, clinical outcome, and response to treatment; (4) exploring the role of genetics/genomics (e.g., modifier genes, gene–environmental interactions, and epigenetics) in early CF pathogenesis; (5) defining early microbiological events in CF lung disease; and (6) elucidating the initial airway inflammatory, remodeling, and repair mechanisms in CF lung disease. PMID:22312017

  14. Inflammation in cystic fibrosis lung disease: Pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cantin, André M; Hartl, Dominik; Konstan, Michael W; Chmiel, James F

    2015-07-01

    Lung disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Although CF lung disease is primarily an infectious disorder, the associated inflammation is both intense and ineffective at clearing pathogens. Persistent high-intensity inflammation leads to permanent structural damage of the CF airways and impaired lung function that eventually results in respiratory failure and death. Several defective inflammatory responses have been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) deficiency including innate and acquired immunity dysregulation, cell membrane lipid abnormalities, various transcription factor signaling defects, as well as altered kinase and toll-like receptor responses. The inflammation of the CF lung is dominated by neutrophils that release oxidants and proteases, particularly elastase. Neutrophil elastase in the CF airway secretions precedes the appearance of bronchiectasis, and correlates with lung function deterioration and respiratory exacerbations. Anti-inflammatory therapies are therefore of particular interest for CF lung disease but must be carefully studied to avoid suppressing critical elements of the inflammatory response and thus worsening infection. This review examines the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease, summarizes the results of past clinical trials and explores promising new anti-inflammatory options. PMID:25814049

  15. Lung Transplantation and Survival in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; Cox, David R.; Cahill, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effects of lung transplantation on the survival and quality of life in children with cystic fibrosis are uncertain. METHODS We used data from the U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry and from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network to identify children with cystic fibrosis who were on the waiting list for lung transplantation during the period from 1992 through 2002. We performed proportional-hazards survival modeling, using multiple clinically relevant covariates that were available before the children were on the waiting list and the interactions of these covariates with lung transplantation as a time-dependent covariate. The data were insufficient in quality and quantity for a retrospective quality-of-life analysis. RESULTS A total of 248 of the 514 children on the waiting list underwent lung transplantation in the United States during the period from 1992 through 2002. Proportional-hazards modeling identified four variables besides transplantation that were associated with changes in survival. Burkholderia cepacia infection was associated with a trend toward decreased survival, regardless of whether the patient underwent transplantation. A diagnosis of diabetes before the patient was placed on the waiting list decreased survival while the patient was on the waiting list but did not decrease survival after transplantation, whereas older age did not affect waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Staphylococcus aureus infection increased waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Using age, diabetes status, and S. aureus infection status as covariates, we estimated the effect of transplantation on survival for each patient group, expressed as a hazard factor of less than 1 for a benefit and more than 1 for a risk of harm. Five patients had a significant estimated benefit, 283 patients had a significant risk of harm, 102 patients had an insignificant benefit, and 124 patients

  16. Lung Transplantation in Cystic Fibrosis: Trends and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This article is not an overview of all facets of lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis (CF), but rather it is intended as a review of current allocation controversies, as well as of trends in diagnostics and management in lung transplant recipients and in patients with end-stage lung disease. Despite changes in donor and recipient selection, long-term survival in pediatric lung transplant has continued to be limited by chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Due to, in part, this short survival benefit, transplant continues to be an appropriate option for only a subset of pediatric patients with CF. The feasibility of transplant as a therapeutic option is also affected by the limited pediatric organ supply, which has moreover contributed to controversy over lung allocation. Debates over the allocation of this scarce resource, however, may also help to drive innovation in the field of lung transplant. Longer pretransplant survival—as aided by new lung bypass technologies, for example—could help to alleviate organ shortages, as well as facilitate the transport of organs to suitable pediatric recipients. Improved diagnosis and treatment for CLAD and for antibody-mediated rejection have the potential to extend survival in pediatric lung transplant. Regardless, the relative rarity of transplant could pose future challenges for pediatric lung transplant programs, which require adequate numbers of patients to maintain proper expertise. PMID:26697265

  17. Practical Guidelines: Lung Transplantation in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirche, T. O.; Knoop, C.; Hebestreit, H.; Shimmin, D.; Solé, A.; Elborn, J. S.; Ellemunter, H.; Aurora, P.; Hogardt, M.; Wagner, T. O. F.; ECORN-CF Study Group

    2014-01-01

    There are no European recommendations on issues specifically related to lung transplantation (LTX) in cystic fibrosis (CF). The main goal of this paper is to provide CF care team members with clinically relevant CF-specific information on all aspects of LTX, highlighting areas of consensus and controversy throughout Europe. Bilateral lung transplantation has been shown to be an important therapeutic option for end-stage CF pulmonary disease. Transplant function and patient survival after transplantation are better than in most other indications for this procedure. Attention though has to be paid to pretransplant morbidity, time for referral, evaluation, indication, and contraindication in children and in adults. This review makes extensive use of specific evidence in the field of lung transplantation in CF patients and addresses all issues of practical importance. The requirements of pre-, peri-, and postoperative management are discussed in detail including bridging to transplant and postoperative complications, immune suppression, chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, and malignancies being the most important. Among the contributors to this guiding information are 19 members of the ECORN-CF project and other experts. The document is endorsed by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society and sponsored by the Christiane Herzog Foundation. PMID:24800072

  18. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or three times each week. Swimming, jogging, and cycling are good options. Clearing or bringing up mucus ... cannot be prevented. Screening those with a family history of the disease may detect the cystic fibrosis ...

  19. Microbial colonization and lung function in adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hector, Andreas; Kirn, Tobias; Ralhan, Anjali; Graepler-Mainka, Ute; Berenbrinker, Sina; Riethmueller, Joachim; Hogardt, Michael; Wagner, Marlies; Pfleger, Andreas; Autenrieth, Ingo; Kappler, Matthias; Griese, Matthias; Eber, Ernst; Martus, Peter; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-05-01

    With intensified antibiotic therapy and longer survival, patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are colonized with a more complex pattern of bacteria and fungi. However, the clinical relevance of these emerging pathogens for lung function remains poorly defined. The aim of this study was to assess the association of bacterial and fungal colonization patterns with lung function in adolescent patients with CF. Microbial colonization patterns and lung function parameters were assessed in 770 adolescent European (German/Austrian) CF patients in a retrospective study (median follow-up time: 10years). Colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA were most strongly associated with loss of lung function, while mainly colonization with Haemophilus influenzae was associated with preserved lung function. Aspergillus fumigatus was the only species that was associated with an increased risk for infection with P. aeruginosa. Microbial interaction analysis revealed three distinct microbial clusters within the longitudinal course of CF lung disease. Collectively, this study identified potentially protective and harmful microbial colonization patterns in adolescent CF patients. Further studies in different patient cohorts are required to evaluate these microbial patterns and to assess their clinical relevance. PMID:26856310

  20. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    PubMed

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24625547

  1. Lung microbiota across age and disease stage in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Bryan; Wang, Pauline W; Diaz Caballero, Julio; Clark, Shawn T; Brahma, Vijaya; Donaldson, Sylva; Zhang, Yu; Surendra, Anu; Gong, Yunchen; Elizabeth Tullis, D; Yau, Yvonne C W; Waters, Valerie J; Hwang, David M; Guttman, David S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the significance of bacterial species that colonize and persist in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways requires a detailed examination of bacterial community structure across a broad range of age and disease stage. We used 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing to characterize the lung microbiota in 269 CF patients spanning a 60 year age range, including 76 pediatric samples from patients of age 4-17, and a broad cross-section of disease status to identify features of bacterial community structure and their relationship to disease stage and age. The CF lung microbiota shows significant inter-individual variability in community structure, composition and diversity. The core microbiota consists of five genera - Streptococcus, Prevotella, Rothia, Veillonella and Actinomyces. CF-associated pathogens such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, Stenotrophomonas and Achromobacter are less prevalent than core genera, but have a strong tendency to dominate the bacterial community when present. Community diversity and lung function are greatest in patients less than 10 years of age and lower in older age groups, plateauing at approximately age 25. Lower community diversity correlates with worse lung function in a multivariate regression model. Infection by Pseudomonas correlates with age-associated trends in community diversity and lung function. PMID:25974282

  2. Lung microbiota across age and disease stage in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Bryan; Wang, Pauline W.; Diaz Caballero, Julio; Clark, Shawn T.; Brahma, Vijaya; Donaldson, Sylva; Zhang, Yu; Surendra, Anu; Gong, Yunchen; Elizabeth Tullis, D.; Yau, Yvonne C. W.; Waters, Valerie J.; Hwang, David M.; Guttman, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the significance of bacterial species that colonize and persist in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways requires a detailed examination of bacterial community structure across a broad range of age and disease stage. We used 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing to characterize the lung microbiota in 269 CF patients spanning a 60 year age range, including 76 pediatric samples from patients of age 4–17, and a broad cross-section of disease status to identify features of bacterial community structure and their relationship to disease stage and age. The CF lung microbiota shows significant inter-individual variability in community structure, composition and diversity. The core microbiota consists of five genera - Streptococcus, Prevotella, Rothia, Veillonella and Actinomyces. CF-associated pathogens such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, Stenotrophomonas and Achromobacter are less prevalent than core genera, but have a strong tendency to dominate the bacterial community when present. Community diversity and lung function are greatest in patients less than 10 years of age and lower in older age groups, plateauing at approximately age 25. Lower community diversity correlates with worse lung function in a multivariate regression model. Infection by Pseudomonas correlates with age-associated trends in community diversity and lung function. PMID:25974282

  3. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  4. Heritability of Lung Disease Severity in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanscoy, Lori L.; Blackman, Scott M.; Collaco, Joseph M.; Bowers, Amanda; Lai, Teresa; Naughton, Kathleen; Algire, Marilyn; McWilliams, Rita; Beck, Suzanne; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Hamosh, Ada; Cutler, Dave; Cutting, Garry R.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Obstructive lung disease, the major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF), is poorly correlated with mutations in the disease-causing gene, indicating that other factors determine severity of lung disease. Objectives: To quantify the contribution of modifier genes to variation in CF lung disease severity. Methods: Pulmonary function data from patients with CF living with their affected twin or sibling were converted into reference values based on both healthy and CF populations. The best measure of FEV1 within the last year was used for cross-sectional analysis. FEV1 measures collected over at least 4 years were used for longitudinal analysis. Genetic contribution to disease variation (i.e., heritability) was estimated in two ways: by comparing similarity of lung function in monozygous (MZ) twins (∼ 100% gene sharing) with that of dizygous (DZ) twins/siblings (∼ 50% gene sharing), and by comparing similarity of lung function measures for related siblings to similarity for all study subjects. Measurements and Main Results: Forty-seven MZ twin pairs, 10 DZ twin pairs, and 231 sibling pairs (of a total of 526 patients) with CF were studied. Correlations for all measures of lung function for MZ twins (0.82–0.91, p < 0.0001) were higher than for DZ twins and siblings (0.50–0.64, p < 0.001). Heritability estimates from both methods were consistent for each measure of lung function and ranged from 0.54 to 1.0. Heritability estimates generally increased after adjustment for differences in nutritional status (measured as body mass index z-score). Conclusions: Our heritability estimates indicate substantial genetic control of variation in CF lung disease severity, independent of CFTR genotype. PMID:17332481

  5. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis: Results, Indications, Complications, and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Joseph P.; Sayah, David M.; Belperio, John A.; Weigt, S. Sam

    2016-01-01

    Survival in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has improved dramatically over the past 30 to 40 years, with mean survival now approximately 40 years. Nonetheless, progressive respiratory insufficiency remains the major cause of mortality in CF patients, and lung transplantation (LT) is eventually required. Timing of listing for LT is critical, because up to 25 to 41% of CF patients have died while awaiting LT. Globally, approximately 16.4% of lung transplants are performed in adults with CF. Survival rates for LT recipients with CF are superior to other indications, yet LT is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality (~50% at 5-year survival rates). Myriad complications of LT include allograft failure (acute or chronic), opportunistic infections, and complications of chronic immunosuppressive medications (including malignancy). Determining which patients are candidates for LT is difficult, and survival benefit remains uncertain. In this review, we discuss when LT should be considered, criteria for identifying candidates, contraindications to LT, results post-LT, and specific complications that may be associated with LT. Infectious complications that may complicate CF (particularly Burkholderia cepacia spp., opportunistic fungi, and nontuberculous mycobacteria) are discussed. PMID:25826595

  6. Pseudomonas infection and mucociliary and absorptive clearance in the cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Weiner, Daniel J; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Muthukrishnan, Ashok; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Lacy, Ryan T; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2016-05-01

    Airway surface liquid hyperabsorption and mucus accumulation are key elements of cystic fibrosis lung disease that can be assessed in vivo using functional imaging methods. In this study we evaluated experimental factors affecting measurements of mucociliary clearance (MCC) and small-molecule absorption (ABS) and patient factors associated with abnormal absorption and mucus clearance.Our imaging technique utilises two radiopharmaceutical probes delivered by inhalation. Measurement repeatability was assessed in 10 adult cystic fibrosis subjects. Experimental factors were assessed in 29 adult and paediatric cystic fibrosis subjects (51 scans). Patient factors were assessed in a subgroup with optimal aerosol deposition (37 scans; 24 subjects). Paediatric subjects (n=9) underwent initial and 2-year follow-up scans. Control subjects from a previously reported study are included for comparison.High rates of central aerosol deposition influenced measurements of ABS and, to a lesser extent, MCC. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis was only detectable in subjects with previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Cystic fibrosis subjects without P. aeruginosa had similar MCC to control subjects. Cystic fibrosis subjects had consistently higher ABS rates.We conclude that the primary experimental factor affecting MCC/ABS measurements is central deposition percentage. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis is associated with P. aeruginosa infection. ABS is consistently increased in cystic fibrosis. PMID:27009167

  7. Interleukin-17 Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Intervention in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Daniel; Taylor, Patricia; Fletcher, Dave; van Heeckeren, Rolf; Eastman, Jean; van Heeckeren, Anna; Davis, Pamela; Chmiel, James F; Pearlman, Eric; Bonfield, Tracey L

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by an excessive neutrophilic inflammatory response within the airway as a result of defective cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor (CFTR) expression and function. Interleukin-17A induces airway neutrophilia and mucin production associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, which is associated with the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. The objectives of this study were to use the preclinical murine model of cystic fibrosis lung infection and inflammation to investigate the role of IL-17 in CF lung pathophysiology and explore therapeutic intervention with a focus on IL-17. Cftr-deficient mice (CF mice) and wild-type mice (WT mice) infected with P. aeruginosa had robust IL-17 production early in the infection associated with a persistent elevated inflammatory response. Intratracheal administration of IL-17 provoked a neutrophilic response in the airways of WT and CF animals which was similar to that observed with P. aeruginosa infection. The neutralization of IL-17 prior to infection significantly improved the outcomes in the CF mice, suggesting that IL-17 may be a therapeutic target. We demonstrate in this report that the pathophysiological contribution of IL-17 may be due to the induction of chemokines from the epithelium which is augmented by a deficiency of Cftr and ongoing inflammation. These studies demonstrate the in vivo contribution of IL-17 in cystic fibrosis lung disease and the therapeutic validity of attenuating IL-17 activity in cystic fibrosis. PMID:27271746

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  9. Lung transplantation in patients with cystic fibrosis: special focus to infection and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Daniel J; Hadjiliadis, Denis

    2014-06-01

    Despite advances in medical care, patients with cystic fibrosis still face limited life expectancy. The most common cause of death remains respiratory failure. End-stage cystic fibrosis can be treated with lung transplantation and is the third most common reason for which the procedure is performed. Outcomes for cystic fibrosis are better than most other lung diseases, but remain limited (5-year survival 60%). For patients with advanced disease lung transplantation appears to improve survival. Outcomes for patients with Burkholderia cepacia remain poor, although they are better for patients with certain genomovars. Controversy exists about Mycobacterium abscessus infection and appropriateness for transplant. More information is also becoming available for comorbidities, including diabetes and pulmonary hypertension among others. Extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation is used more frequently for end-stage disease as a bridge to lung transplantation and will likely be used more in the future. PMID:24655065

  10. Model of mucociliary clearance in cystic fibrosis lungs.

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, P; Bessonov, N; Volpert, V; Tiddens, H A W M; Cornu, C; Nony, P; Caudri, D

    2015-05-01

    Mucus clearance is a primary innate defense mechanism in the human airways. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CF is characterized by dehydration of airway surface liquid and impaired mucociliary clearance. As a result, microorganisms are not efficiently removed from the airways, and patients experience chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation. We propose a new physiologically based mathematical model of muco-ciliary transport consisting of the two major components of the mucociliary clearance system: (i) periciliary liquid layer (PCL) and (ii) mucus layer. We study mucus clearance under normal conditions and in CF patients. Restoring impaired clearance of airway secretions in one of the major goals of therapy in patients with CF. We consider the action of the aerosolized and inhaled medication dornase alfa, which reduces the viscosity of cystic fibrosis mucus, by selectively cleaving the long DNA strands it contains. The results of the model simulations stress the potential relevance of the location of the drug deposition in the central or peripheral airways. Mucus clearance was increased in case the drug was primarily deposited peripherally, i.e. in the small airways. PMID:25746843

  11. Quorum-sensing signals indicate that cystic fibrosis lungs are infected with bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Schaefer, A L; Parsek, M R; Moninger, T O; Welsh, M J; Greenberg, E P

    2000-10-12

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa permanently colonizes cystic fibrosis lungs despite aggressive antibiotic treatment. This suggests that P. aeruginosa might exist as biofilms--structured communities of bacteria encased in a self-produced polymeric matrix--in the cystic fibrosis lung. Consistent with this hypothesis, microscopy of cystic fibrosis sputum shows that P. aeruginosa are in biofilm-like structures. P. aeruginosa uses extracellular quorum-sensing signals (extracellular chemical signals that cue cell-density-dependent gene expression) to coordinate biofilm formation. Here we found that cystic fibrosis sputum produces the two principal P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing signals; however, the relative abundance of these signals was opposite to that of the standard P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 in laboratory broth culture. When P. aeruginosa sputum isolates were grown in broth, some showed quorum-sensing signal ratios like those of the laboratory strain. When we grew these isolates and PAO1 in a laboratory biofilm model, the signal ratios were like those in cystic fibrosis sputum. Our data support the hypothesis that P. aeruginosa are in a biofilm in cystic fibrosis sputum. Moreover, quorum-sensing signal profiling of specific P. aeruginosa strains may serve as a biomarker in screens to identify agents that interfere with biofilm development. PMID:11048725

  12. Role of Mutant CFTR in Hypersusceptibility of Cystic Fibrosis Patients to Lung Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.; Olsen, John C.; Johnson, Larry G.; Yankaskas, James R.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    1996-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are hypersusceptible to chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. Cultured human airway epithelial cells expressing the ΔF508 allele of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were defective in uptake of P. aeruginosa compared with cells expressing the wild-type allele. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-core oligosaccharide was identified as the bacterial ligand for epithelial cell ingestion; exogenous oligosaccharide inhibited bacterial ingestion in a neonatal mouse model, resulting in increased amounts of bacteria in the lungs. CFTR may contribute to a host-defense mechanism that is important for clearance of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract.

  13. Advances in Cell and Gene-based Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Mayumi; Sinn, Patrick L; McCray Jr, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease characterized by airway infection, inflammation, remodeling, and obstruction that gradually destroy the lungs. Direct delivery of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene to airway epithelia may offer advantages, as the tissue is accessible for topical delivery of vectors. Yet, physical and host immune barriers in the lung present challenges for successful gene transfer to the respiratory tract. Advances in gene transfer approaches, tissue engineering, and novel animal models are generating excitement within the CF research field. This review discusses current challenges and advancements in viral and nonviral vectors, cell-based therapies, and CF animal models. PMID:22371844

  14. Advances in cell and gene-based therapies for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Oakland, Mayumi; Sinn, Patrick L; McCray, Paul B

    2012-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease characterized by airway infection, inflammation, remodeling, and obstruction that gradually destroy the lungs. Direct delivery of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene to airway epithelia may offer advantages, as the tissue is accessible for topical delivery of vectors. Yet, physical and host immune barriers in the lung present challenges for successful gene transfer to the respiratory tract. Advances in gene transfer approaches, tissue engineering, and novel animal models are generating excitement within the CF research field. This review discusses current challenges and advancements in viral and nonviral vectors, cell-based therapies, and CF animal models. PMID:22371844

  15. Management of Scedosporium apiospermum in a pre- and post-lung transplant patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Nancy E; Haddad, Tarik J; Wills, Todd S

    2013-01-24

    Although the predominant type of infection seen in the cystic fibrosis lung remains bacterial, fungal organisms are being isolated more frequently and are associated with a high mortality rate in lung transplant recipients. We present a case of a patient with CF with sputum cultures positive for Scedosporium apiospermum prior to a successful lung transplant. She remains without evidence of infection 18 months later following treatment with a combination of triazoles and terbinafine. PMID:24432212

  16. [Nocardia farcinica lung infection in a patient with cystic fibrosis and a lung transplant].

    PubMed

    Chacón, C F; Vicente, R; Ramos, F; Porta, J; Lopez Maldonado, A; Ansotegui, E

    2015-03-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have a higher risk of developing chronic respiratory infectious diseases. The Nocardia farcinica lung infection is rare in this group of patients, and there are limited publications about this topic. Its diagnosis is complex, due to the clinical and the radiology signs being non-specific. Identification of the agent responsible in the sputum culture is occasionally negative. It is a slow growing organism and for this reason treatment is delayed, which can lead to an increase in complications, hospitable stays, and mortality. A case is reported on a 26 year-old woman with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung colonization by Nocardia farcinica and Aspergillus fumigatus, on long-term treatment with ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and posaconazole, who was admitted to ICU after bilateral lung transplantation. The initial post-operative progress was satisfactory. After discharge, the patient showed a gradual respiratory insufficiency with new chest X-ray showing diffuse infiltrates. Initially, the agent was not seen in the sputum culture. Prompt and aggressive measures were taken, due to the high clinical suspicion of a Nocardia farcinica lung infection. Treatment with a combination of amikacin and meropenem, and later combined with linezolid, led to the disappearance of the lung infiltrates and a clinical improvement. In our case, we confirm the rapid introduction of Nocardia farcinica in the new lungs. The complex identification and the delay in treatment increased the morbimortality. There is a special need for its eradication in patients with lung transplant, due to the strong immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:25443661

  17. Disseminated Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Scedosporium apiospermum Coinfection after Lung and Liver Transplantation in a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Letscher-Bru, Valérie; Pottecher, Julien; Lannes, Béatrice; Jeung, Mi Young; Degot, Tristan; Santelmo, Nicola; Sabou, Alina Marcela; Herbrecht, Raoul; Kessler, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans is a novel pathogen recently found in cystic fibrosis patients. We report the first case of a disseminated fatal infection with T. mycotoxinivorans associated with invasive Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum infection after lung and liver transplantation in a cystic fibrosis patient. PMID:23035187

  18. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. CASE REPORT We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. CONCLUSIONS As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  19. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 10 Final Diagnosis: Sepsis Symptoms: Fever • hypotension • not tollerating enteral feeds • respiratory deterioration Medication: — Clinical Procedure: IV antibiotics • lungtransplantion Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. Case Report: We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. Conclusions: As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  20. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic fibrosis (CF). This gene makes ... and very salty sweat. Research suggests that the CFTR protein also affects the body in other ways. ...

  1. Critical evaluation of lung scintigraphy in cystic fibrosis: study of 113 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Piepsz, A.; Wetzburger, C.; Spehl, M.; Machin, D.; Dab, I.; Ham, H.R.; Vandevivere, J.; Baran, D.

    1980-10-01

    A long-term study has been performed on 285 lung perfusion scintigrams obtained from 113 patients with cystic fibrosis. Transverse and longitudinal comparisons with clinical and radiological scores, as well as retrospective analysis of the deceased patients, were the methods used in order to evaluate the importance of the scintigraphic images. It appears that lung scintigraphy is the best index of the regional lung impairment, and contributes, as does a chest radiograph, to the early detection of lung lesions, the two methods being complementary.

  2. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you ... about CF Care Centers, go to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's Care Center Network Web page. It's standard ...

  3. Functional Gene Correction for Cystic Fibrosis in Lung Epithelial Cells Generated from Patient iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Firth, Amy L; Menon, Tushar; Parker, Gregory S; Qualls, Susan J; Lewis, Benjamin M; Ke, Eugene; Dargitz, Carl T; Wright, Rebecca; Khanna, Ajai; Gage, Fred H; Verma, Inder M

    2015-09-01

    Lung disease is a major cause of death in the United States, with current therapeutic approaches serving only to manage symptoms. The most common chronic and life-threatening genetic disease of the lung is cystic fibrosis (CF) caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR). We have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from CF patients carrying a homozygous deletion of F508 in the CFTR gene, which results in defective processing of CFTR to the cell membrane. This mutation was precisely corrected using CRISPR to target corrective sequences to the endogenous CFTR genomic locus, in combination with a completely excisable selection system, which significantly improved the efficiency of this correction. The corrected iPSCs were subsequently differentiated to mature airway epithelial cells where recovery of normal CFTR expression and function was demonstrated. This isogenic iPSC-based model system for CF could be adapted for the development of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26299960

  4. Antimicrobial resistance, respiratory tract infections and role of biofilms in lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Wang, Hengzhuang; Høiby, Niels

    2015-05-01

    Lung infection is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis and is mainly dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The biofilm mode of growth makes eradication of the infection impossible, and it causes a chronic inflammation in the airways. The general mechanisms of biofilm formation and antimicrobial tolerance and resistance are reviewed. Potential anti-biofilm therapeutic targets such as weakening of biofilms by quorum-sensing inhibitors or antibiotic killing guided by pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics are presented. The vicious circle of adaptive evolution of the persisting bacteria imposes important therapeutic challenges and requires development of new drug delivery systems able to reach the different niches occupied by the bacteria in the lung of cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:25477303

  5. Future directions in early cystic fibrosis lung disease research: an NHLBI workshop report.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Bonnie W; Banks-Schlegel, Susan; Accurso, Frank J; Boucher, Richard C; Cutting, Garry R; Engelhardt, John F; Guggino, William B; Karp, Christopher L; Knowles, Michael R; Kolls, Jay K; LiPuma, John J; Lynch, Susan; McCray, Paul B; Rubenstein, Ronald C; Singh, Pradeep K; Sorscher, Eric; Welsh, Michael

    2012-04-15

    Since the 1989 discovery that mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF), there has been substantial progress toward understanding the molecular basis for CF lung disease, leading to the discovery and development of new therapeutic approaches. However, the earliest impact of the loss of CFTR function on airway physiology and structure and its relationship to initial infection and inflammation are poorly understood. Universal newborn screening for CF in the United States represents an unprecedented opportunity for investigating CF clinical manifestations very early in life. Recently developed animal models with pulmonary phenotypic manifestations also provide a window into the early consequences of this genetic disorder. For these reasons, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a working group of extramural experts, entitled "Future Research Directions in Early CF Lung Disease" on September 21-22, 2010, to identify future research directions of great promise in CF. The priority areas identified included (1) exploring pathogenic mechanisms of early CF lung disease; (2) leveraging newborn screening to elucidate the natural history of early lung disease; (3) developing a spectrum of biomarkers of early lung disease that reflects CF pathophysiology, clinical outcome, and response to treatment; (4) exploring the role of genetics/genomics (e.g., modifier genes, gene-environmental interactions, and epigenetics) in early CF pathogenesis; (5) defining early microbiological events in CF lung disease; and (6) elucidating the initial airway inflammatory, remodeling, and repair mechanisms in CF lung disease. PMID:22312017

  6. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography for relating lung structure and function in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhetri, Raghav K.; Carpenter, Jerome; Superfine, Richard; Randell, Scott H.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and is the most common life-limiting genetic condition affecting the Caucasian population. It is an autosomal recessive, monogenic inherited disorder characterized by failure of airway host defense against bacterial infection, which results in bronchiectasis, the breakdown of airway wall extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we show that the in vitro models consisting of human tracheo-bronchial-epithelial (hBE) cells grown on porous supports with embedded magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at an air-liquid interface are suitable for long term, non-invasive assessment of ECM remodeling using magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MMOCE). The morphology of ex vivo CF and normal lung tissues using OCT and correlative study with histology is also examined. We also demonstrate a quantitative measure of normal and CF airway elasticity using MMOCE. The improved understanding of pathologic changes in CF lung structure and function and the novel method of longitudinal in vitro ECM assessment demonstrated in this study may lead to new in vivo imaging and elastography methods to monitor disease progression and treatment in cystic fibrosis.

  7. Pyrosequencing Unveils Cystic Fibrosis Lung Microbiome Differences Associated with a Severe Lung Function Decline

    PubMed Central

    Bacci, Giovanni; Paganin, Patrizia; Lopez, Loredana; Vanni, Chiara; Dalmastri, Claudia; Cantale, Cristina; Daddiego, Loretta; Perrotta, Gaetano; Dolce, Daniela; Morelli, Patrizia; Tuccio, Vanessa; De Alessandri, Alessandra; Fiscarelli, Ersilia Vita; Taccetti, Giovanni; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infection is a hallmark feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) disease. In the present study, sputum samples from CF patients were collected and characterized by 16S rRNA gene-targeted approach, to assess how lung microbiota composition changes following a severe decline in lung function. In particular, we compared the airway microbiota of two groups of patients with CF, i.e. patients with a substantial decline in their lung function (SD) and patients with a stable lung function (S). The two groups showed a different bacterial composition, with SD patients reporting a more heterogeneous community than the S ones. Pseudomonas was the dominant genus in both S and SD patients followed by Staphylococcus and Prevotella. Other than the classical CF pathogens and the most commonly identified non-classical genera in CF, we found the presence of the unusual anaerobic genus Sneathia. Moreover, the oligotyping analysis revealed the presence of other minor genera described in CF, highlighting the polymicrobial nature of CF infection. Finally, the analysis of correlation and anti-correlation networks showed the presence of antagonism and ecological independence between members of Pseudomonas genus and the rest of CF airways microbiota, with S patients showing a more interconnected community in S patients than in SD ones. This population structure suggests a higher resilience of S microbiota with respect to SD, which in turn may hinder the potential adverse impact of aggressive pathogens (e.g. Pseudomonas). In conclusion, our findings shed a new light on CF airway microbiota ecology, improving current knowledge about its composition and polymicrobial interactions in patients with CF. PMID:27355625

  8. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... order to digest food. Cystic Fibrosis: A Single Gene Disease Mutations in a single gene - the Cystic ... the defective gene, or correcting the defective protein. Gene Therapy Research Offers Promise of a Cure for ...

  9. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed? Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) based on ... to see whether the baby has CF. Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Testing People who have one normal CFTR ...

  10. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  11. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and chest for at least 20 minutes to help clear her lungs of the thick mucus that sometimes makes it difficult for her to breathe. At school, Lisa coughs a lot, so she keeps a box of tissues on her desk just in case she coughs up mucus and ...

  12. Novel variation at chr11p13 associated with cystic fibrosis lung disease severity.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hong; Gallins, Paul J; Pace, Rhonda G; Guo, Xue-Liang; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R; Corvol, Harriet; Cutting, Garry R; Drumm, Mitchell L; Strug, Lisa J; Knowles, Michael R; O'Neal, Wanda K

    2016-01-01

    Published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified an intergenic region with regulatory features on chr11p13 associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease severity. Targeted resequencing in n=377, followed by imputation to n=6,365 CF subjects, was used to identify unrecognized genetic variants (including indels and microsatellite repeats) associated with phenotype. Highly significant associations were in strong linkage disequilibrium and were seen only in Phe508del homozygous CF subjects, indicating a CFTR genotype-specific mechanism. PMID:27408752

  13. Novel variation at chr11p13 associated with cystic fibrosis lung disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hong; Gallins, Paul J; Pace, Rhonda G; Guo, Xue-liang; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R; Corvol, Harriet; Cutting, Garry R; Drumm, Mitchell L; Strug, Lisa J; Knowles, Michael R; O’Neal, Wanda K

    2016-01-01

    Published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified an intergenic region with regulatory features on chr11p13 associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease severity. Targeted resequencing in n=377, followed by imputation to n=6,365 CF subjects, was used to identify unrecognized genetic variants (including indels and microsatellite repeats) associated with phenotype. Highly significant associations were in strong linkage disequilibrium and were seen only in Phe508del homozygous CF subjects, indicating a CFTR genotype-specific mechanism. PMID:27408752

  14. Candida albicans pancreatitis in a child with cystic fibrosis post lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Mark M; Zhang, Lingxin; Stoll, Janis M; Sheybani, Elizabeth F

    2016-04-01

    We present a case of Candida albicans infection of a previously intact pancreas in a child with cystic fibrosis status post lung transplantation. Although Candida superinfection in necrotizing pancreatitis is not uncommon, this is a unique case of Candida infection of non-necrotic pancreatic parenchyma. This case presented a diagnostic dilemma for radiologists because it appeared virtually identical to acute interstitial edematous pancreatitis on imaging. Ultimately, endoscopic US-based biopsy was pursued for diagnosis. Although difficult to treat and compounded by the immunocompromised status of the child, the pancreatic infection improved with antifungal therapy. PMID:26546567

  15. Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco. PMID:23276843

  16. Neutrophil elastase and matrix metalloproteinase 12 in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Claudius J; Schultz, Carsten; Mall, Marcus A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic lung disease remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Recent studies in young children with CF diagnosed by newborn screening identified neutrophil elastase (NE), a major product released from neutrophils in inflamed airways, as a key risk factor for the onset and early progression of CF lung disease. However, the understanding of how NE and potentially other proteases contribute to the complex in vivo pathogenesis of CF lung disease remains limited. In this review, we summarize recent progress in this area based on studies in βENaC-overexpressing (βENaC-Tg) mice featuring CF-like lung disease and novel protease-specific Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors for localization and quantification of protease activity in the lung. These studies demonstrated that NE is implicated in several key features of CF lung disease such as neutrophilic airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and structural lung damage in vivo. Furthermore, these studies identified macrophage elastase (matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12)) as an additional protease contributing to early lung damage in βENaC-Tg mice. Collectively, these results suggest that NE and MMP12 released from activated neutrophils and macrophages in mucus-obstructed airways play important pathogenetic roles and may serve as potential therapeutic targets to prevent and/or delay irreversible structural lung damage in patients with CF. PMID:27456476

  17. Role of small colony variants in persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis lungs

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Jacob G

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that predominates during the later stages of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections. Over many years of chronic lung colonization, P. aeruginosa undergoes extensive adaptation to the lung environment, evolving both toward a persistent, low virulence state and simultaneously diversifying to produce a number of phenotypically distinct morphs. These lung-adapted P. aeruginosa strains include the small colony variants (SCVs), small, autoaggregative isolates that show enhanced biofilm formation, strong attachment to surfaces, and increased production of exopolysaccharides. Their appearance in the sputum of CF patients correlates with increased resistance to antibiotics, poor lung function, and prolonged persistence of infection, increasing their relevance as a subject for clinical investigation. The evolution of SCVs in the CF lung is associated with overproduction of the ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP, with increased cyclic-di-GMP levels shown to be responsible for the SCV phenotype in a number of different CF lung isolates. Here, we review the current state of research in clinical P. aeruginosa SCVs. We will discuss the phenotypic characteristics underpinning the SCV morphotype, the clinical implications of lung colonization with SCVs, and the molecular basis and clinical evolution of the SCV phenotype in the CF lung environment. PMID:26251621

  18. The Role of Serine Proteases and Antiproteases in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Matthew S.; Brockbank, Simon; Lowry, Philip; FitzGerald, S. Peter; Taggart, Clifford; Weldon, Sinéad

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is an inherited condition with an incidence rate of approximately 1 in 2500 new born babies. CF is characterized as chronic infection of the lung which leads to inflammation of the airway. Sputum from CF patients contains elevated levels of neutrophils and subsequently elevated levels of neutrophil serine proteases. In a healthy individual these proteases aid in the phagocytic process by degrading microbial peptides and are kept in homeostatic balance by cognate antiproteases. Due to the heavy neutrophil burden associated with CF the high concentration of neutrophil derived proteases overwhelms cognate antiproteases. The general effects of this protease/antiprotease imbalance are impaired mucus clearance, increased and self-perpetuating inflammation, and impaired immune responses and tissue. To restore this balance antiproteases have been suggested as potential therapeutics or therapeutic targets. As such a number of both endogenous and synthetic antiproteases have been trialed with mixed success as therapeutics for CF lung disease. PMID:26185359

  19. The Role of Serine Proteases and Antiproteases in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Matthew S; Brockbank, Simon; Lowry, Philip; FitzGerald, S Peter; Taggart, Clifford; Weldon, Sinéad

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is an inherited condition with an incidence rate of approximately 1 in 2500 new born babies. CF is characterized as chronic infection of the lung which leads to inflammation of the airway. Sputum from CF patients contains elevated levels of neutrophils and subsequently elevated levels of neutrophil serine proteases. In a healthy individual these proteases aid in the phagocytic process by degrading microbial peptides and are kept in homeostatic balance by cognate antiproteases. Due to the heavy neutrophil burden associated with CF the high concentration of neutrophil derived proteases overwhelms cognate antiproteases. The general effects of this protease/antiprotease imbalance are impaired mucus clearance, increased and self-perpetuating inflammation, and impaired immune responses and tissue. To restore this balance antiproteases have been suggested as potential therapeutics or therapeutic targets. As such a number of both endogenous and synthetic antiproteases have been trialed with mixed success as therapeutics for CF lung disease. PMID:26185359

  20. Update on host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Hector, Andreas; Frey, Nina; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections are hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. In the era of long-term inhaled antibiotics and increasing CF patient survival, new "emerging" pathogens are detected in CF airways, yet their pathophysiological disease relevance remains largely controversial and incompletely defined. As a response to chronic microbial triggers, innate immune cells, particularly neutrophils, are continuously recruited into CF airways where they combat pathogens but also cause tissue injury through release of oxidants and proteases. The coordinated interplay between host immune cell activation and pathogens is essential for the outcome of CF lung disease. Here, we provide a concise overview and update on host-pathogen interactions in CF lung disease. PMID:26905568

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolutionary Adaptation and Diversification in Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Lung Infections

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Craig; O’Brien, Siobhan; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations undergo a characteristic evolutionary adaptation during chronic infection of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, including reduced production of virulence factors, transition to a biofilm-associated lifestyle, and evolution of high-level antibiotic resistance. Populations of P. aeruginosa in chronic CF lung infections typically exhibit high phenotypic diversity, including for clinically important traits such as antibiotic resistance and toxin production, and this diversity is dynamic over time, making accurate diagnosis and treatment challenging. Population genomics studies reveal extensive genetic diversity within patients, including for transmissible strains the coexistence of highly divergent lineages acquired by patient-to-patient transmission. The inherent spatial structure and spatial heterogeneity of selection in the CF lung appears to play a key role in driving P. aeruginosa diversification. PMID:26946977

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolutionary Adaptation and Diversification in Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Lung Infections.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, Craig; O'Brien, Siobhan; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations undergo a characteristic evolutionary adaptation during chronic infection of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, including reduced production of virulence factors, transition to a biofilm-associated lifestyle, and evolution of high-level antibiotic resistance. Populations of P. aeruginosa in chronic CF lung infections typically exhibit high phenotypic diversity, including for clinically important traits such as antibiotic resistance and toxin production, and this diversity is dynamic over time, making accurate diagnosis and treatment challenging. Population genomics studies reveal extensive genetic diversity within patients, including for transmissible strains the coexistence of highly divergent lineages acquired by patient-to-patient transmission. The inherent spatial structure and spatial heterogeneity of selection in the CF lung appears to play a key role in driving P. aeruginosa diversification. PMID:26946977

  3. Analysis of Genome-scale Expression Network in Four Major Bacterial Residents of Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinkhan, Nazanin; Zarrineh, Peyman; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In polymicrobial communities where several species co-exist in a certain niche and consequently the possibility of interactions among species is very high, gene expression data sources can give better insights in to underlying adaptation mechanisms assumed by bacteria. Furthermore, several possible synergistic or antagonistic interactions among species can be investigated through gene expression comparisons. Lung is one of the habitats harboring several distinct pathogens during severe pulmonary disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis (CF). Expression data analysis of these lung residents can help to gain a better understanding on how these species interact with each other within the host cells. The first part of this paper deals with introducing available data sources for the major bacteria responsible for causing lung diseases and their genomic relations. In the second part, the main focus is on the studies concerning gene expression analyses of these species. PMID:25435803

  4. The activin A antagonist follistatin inhibits cystic fibrosis-like lung inflammation and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Charles L; King, Susannah J; Mifsud, Nicole A; Hedger, Mark P; Phillips, David J; Mackay, Fabienne; de Kretser, David M; Wilson, John W; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting genetically acquired respiratory disorder. Patients with CF have thick mucus obstructing the airways leading to recurrent infections, bronchiectasis and neutrophilic airway inflammation culminating in deteriorating lung function. Current management targets airway infection and mucus clearance, but despite recent advances in care, life expectancy is still only 40 years. We investigated whether activin A is elevated in CF lung disease and whether inhibiting activin A with its natural antagonist follistatin retards lung disease progression. We measured serum activin A levels, lung function and nutritional status in CF patients. We studied the effect of activin A on CF lung pathogenesis by treating newborn CF transgenic mice (β-ENaC) intranasally with the natural activin A antagonist follistatin. Activin A levels were elevated in the serum of adult CF patients, and correlated inversely with lung function and body mass index. Follistatin treatment of newborn β-ENaC mice, noted for respiratory pathology mimicking human CF, decreased the airway activin A levels and key features of CF lung disease including mucus hypersecretion, airway neutrophilia and levels of mediators that regulate inflammation and chemotaxis. Follistatin treatment also increased body weight and survival of β-ENaC mice, with no evidence of local or systemic toxicity. Our findings demonstrate that activin A levels are elevated in CF and provide proof-of-concept for the use of the activin A antagonist, follistatin, as a therapeutic in the long-term management of lung disease in CF patients. PMID:25753271

  5. Impact of lung disease on respiratory impedance in young children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Gangell, Catherine L; Turkovic, Lidija; Park, Judy; Skoric, Billy; Stick, Stephen M; Sly, Peter D; Hall, Graham L

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of the forced oscillation technique (FOT) to detect underlying lung disease in preschool children with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed following newborn screening.184 children (aged 3-6 years) with CF underwent lung function testing on 422 occasions using the FOT to assess respiratory resistance and reactance at the time of their annual bronchoalveolar lavage collection and chest computed tomography scan. We examined associations between FOT outcomes and the presence and progression of respiratory inflammation, infection and structural lung disease.Children with CF who had pronounced respiratory disease, including free neutrophil elastase activity, infection with pro-inflammatory pathogens and structural lung abnormalities had similar FOT outcomes to those children without detectable lung disease. In addition, the progression of lung disease over 1 year was not associated with worsening FOT outcomes.We conclude that the forced oscillation technique is relatively insensitive to detect underlying lung disease in preschool children with CF. However, FOT may still be of value in improving our understanding of the physiological changes associated with early CF lung disease. PMID:26405283

  6. CXCR1 and CXCR2 haplotypes synergistically modulate cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kormann, Michael S D; Hector, Andreas; Marcos, Veronica; Mays, Lauren E; Kappler, Matthias; Illig, Thomas; Klopp, Norman; Zeilinger, Sonja; Carevic, Melanie; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Zielen, Stefan; Gaggar, Amit; Moepps, Barbara; Griese, Matthias; Hartl, Dominik

    2012-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease severity is largely independent on the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genotype, indicating the contribution of genetic modifiers. The chemokine receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 have been found to play essential roles in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Here, we determine whether genetic variation of CXCR1 and CXCR2 influences CF lung disease severity. Genomic DNA of CF patients in Germany (n = 442) was analysed for common variations in CXCR1 and CXCR2 using a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) tagging approach. Associations of CXCR1 and CXCR2 SNPs and haplotypes with CF lung disease severity, CXCR1 and CXCR2 expression, and neutrophil effector functions were assessed. Four SNPs in CXCR1 and three in CXCR2 strongly correlated with age-adjusted lung function in CF patients. SNPs comprising haplotypes CXCR1_Ha and CXCR2_Ha were in high linkage disequilibrium and patients heterozygous for the CXCR1-2 haplotype cluster (CXCR1-2_Ha) had lower lung function compared with patients with homozygous wild-type alleles (forced expiratory volume in 1 s ≤ 70% predicted, OR 7.24; p = 2.30 × 10(-5)). CF patients carrying CXCR1-2_Ha showed decreased CXCR1 combined with increased CXCR2 mRNA and protein expression, and displayed disturbed antibacterial effector functions. CXCR1 and CXCR2 genotypes modulate lung function and antibacterial host defence in CF lung disease. PMID:22088968

  7. Neutrophils in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Laval, Julie; Ralhan, Anjali; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. Among inflammatory cells, neutrophils represent the major cell population accumulating in the airways of CF patients. While neutrophils provide the first defensive cellular shield against bacterial and fungal pathogens, in chronic disease conditions such as CF these short-lived immune cells release their toxic granule contents that cause tissue remodeling and irreversible structural damage to the host. A variety of human and murine studies have analyzed neutrophils and their products in the context of CF, yet their precise functional role and therapeutic potential remain controversial and incompletely understood. Here, we summarize the current evidence in this field to shed light on the complex and multi-faceted role of neutrophils in CF lung disease. PMID:26854289

  8. A Novel Lung Disease Phenotype Adjusted for Mortality Attrition for Cystic Fibrosis Genetic Modifier Studies

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Chelsea; Commander, Clayton W.; Collaco, Joseph M.; Strug, Lisa J.; Li, Weili; Wright, Fred A.; Webel, Aaron D.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Naughton, Kathleen; Dorfman, Ruslan; Sandford, Andrew; Blackman, Scott M.; Berthiaume, Yves; Paré, Peter; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Zielenski, Julian; Durie, Peter; Cutting, Garry R.; Knowles, Michael R.; Corey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Genetic studies of lung disease in Cystic Fibrosis are hampered by the lack of a severity measure that accounts for chronic disease progression and mortality attrition. Further, combining analyses across studies requires common phenotypes that are robust to study design and patient ascertainment. Using data from the North American Cystic Fibrosis Modifier Consortium (Canadian Consortium for CF Genetic Studies, Johns Hopkins University CF Twin and Sibling Study, and University of North Carolina/Case Western Reserve University Gene Modifier Study), the authors calculated age-specific CF percentile values of FEV1 which were adjusted for CF age-specific mortality data. The phenotype was computed for 2061 patients representing the Canadian CF population, 1137 extreme phenotype patients in the UNC/Case Western study, and 1323 patients from multiple CF sib families in the CF Twin and Sibling Study. Despite differences in ascertainment and median age, our phenotype score was distributed in all three samples in a manner consistent with ascertainment differences, reflecting the lung disease severity of each individual in the underlying population. The new phenotype score was highly correlated with the previously recommended complex phenotype, but the new phenotype is more robust for shorter follow-up and for extreme ages. A disease progression and mortality adjusted phenotype reduces the need for stratification or additional covariates, increasing statistical power and avoiding possible distortions. This approach will facilitate large scale genetic and environmental epidemiological studies which will provide targeted therapeutic pathways for the clinical benefit of patients with CF. PMID:21462361

  9. Host mucin glycosylation plays a role in bacterial adhesion in lungs of individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Packer, Nicolle H; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2013-10-01

    Malfunction of the cell surface glycoprotein, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, is the molecular hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF), causing salt imbalance across the lung epithelium and biochemical and biophysical alterations of the mucous secretion and airway surfaces. Abnormal glycosylation of both secreted and membrane-tethered airway mucins in CF hosts are reported by a substantial body of literature and correlates with bacterial infection and inflammation in CF airways, features that are linked to the CF pathology. It is established that Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other CF-typic bacteria use the altered host mucin glycosylation as receptors for adhesion by dedicated lectins and adhesins recognizing an array of the aberrantly expressed glycan determinants. This review aims to describe the aberrant mucin glycosylation phenotype observed in CF airways relative to the non-CF equivalent by summarizing the wealth of literature on this topic. The possible causes and effects of altered glycosylation in the respiratory system are discussed. Specific attention is given to the adhesion mechanisms of the opportunistic P. aeruginosa, which utilizes the molecular alterations of the lung to gain access to the normally sterile airways. Finally, the emerging glycosylation-based therapeutics that show promising potential for reducing bacterial infection in individuals with CF by molecular mimicry mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24138697

  10. Reduced airway surface pH impairs bacterial killing in the porcine cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Hoegger, Mark J; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H Abou; Ramachandran, Shyam; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Phillip H; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L; Haagsman, Henk P; van Eijk, Martin; Bánfi, Botond; Horswill, Alexander R; Stoltz, David A; McCray, Paul B; Welsh, Michael J; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Although bacterial lung infection and the resulting inflammation cause most of the morbidity and mortality, how the loss of CFTR function first disrupts airway host defence has remained uncertain. To investigate the abnormalities that impair elimination when a bacterium lands on the pristine surface of a newborn CF airway, we interrogated the viability of individual bacteria immobilized on solid grids and placed onto the airway surface. As a model, we studied CF pigs, which spontaneously develop hallmark features of CF lung disease. At birth, their lungs lack infection and inflammation, but have a reduced ability to eradicate bacteria. Here we show that in newborn wild-type pigs, the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) rapidly kills bacteria in vivo, when removed from the lung and in primary epithelial cultures. Lack of CFTR reduces bacterial killing. We found that the ASL pH was more acidic in CF pigs, and reducing pH inhibited the antimicrobial activity of ASL. Reducing ASL pH diminished bacterial killing in wild-type pigs, and, conversely, increasing ASL pH rescued killing in CF pigs. These results directly link the initial host defence defect to the loss of CFTR, an anion channel that facilitates HCO(3)(-) transport. Without CFTR, airway epithelial HCO(3)(-) secretion is defective, the ASL pH falls and inhibits antimicrobial function, and thereby impairs the killing of bacteria that enter the newborn lung. These findings suggest that increasing ASL pH might prevent the initial infection in patients with CF, and that assaying bacterial killing could report on the benefit of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22763554

  11. Reduced Airway Surface pH Impairs Bacterial Killing in the Porcine Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Hoegger, Mark J.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Ramachandran, Shyam; Moninger, Thomas O.; Karp, Phillip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Haagsman, Henk P.; van Eijk, Martin; Bánfi, Botond; Horswill, Alexander R.; Stoltz, David A.; McCray, Paul B.; Welsh, Michael J.; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene 1. Although bacterial lung infection and the resulting inflammation cause most of the morbidity and mortality, how loss of CFTR first disrupts airway host defense has remained uncertain 2–6. We asked what abnormalities impair eradication when a bacterium lands on the pristine surface of a newborn CF airway? To investigate these defects, we interrogated the viability of individual bacteria immobilized on solid grids and placed on the airway surface. As a model we studied CF pigs, which spontaneously develop hallmark features of CF lung disease 7,8. At birth, their lungs lack infection and inflammation, but have a reduced ability to eradicate bacteria 8. Here we show that in newborn wild-type pigs, the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) rapidly killed bacteria in vivo, when removed from the lung, and in primary epithelial cultures. Lack of CFTR reduced bacterial killing. We found that ASL pH was more acidic in CF, and reducing pH inhibited the antimicrobial activity of ASL. Reducing ASL pH diminished bacterial killing in wild-type pigs, and increasing ASL pH rescued killing in CF pigs. These results directly link the initial host defense defect to loss of CFTR, an anion channel that facilitates HCO3− transport 9–13. Without CFTR, airway epithelial HCO3− secretion is defective, ASL pH falls and inhibits antimicrobial function, and thereby impairs killing of bacteria that enter the newborn lung. These findings suggest that increasing ASL pH might prevent the initial infection in patients with CF and that assaying bacterial killing could report on the benefit of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22763554

  12. Cystic fibrosis pigs develop lung disease and exhibit defective bacterial eradication at birth.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, David A; Meyerholz, David K; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Ramachandran, Shyam; Rogan, Mark P; Davis, Greg J; Hanfland, Robert A; Wohlford-Lenane, Chris; Dohrn, Cassie L; Bartlett, Jennifer A; Nelson, George A; Chang, Eugene H; Taft, Peter J; Ludwig, Paula S; Estin, Mira; Hornick, Emma E; Launspach, Janice L; Samuel, Melissa; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip H; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Uc, Aliye; Starner, Timothy D; Horswill, Alexander R; Brogden, Kim A; Prather, Randall S; Richter, Sandra S; Shilyansky, Joel; McCray, Paul B; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2010-04-28

    Lung disease causes most of the morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). Understanding the pathogenesis of this disease has been hindered, however, by the lack of an animal model with characteristic features of CF. To overcome this problem, we recently generated pigs with mutated CFTR genes. We now report that, within months of birth, CF pigs spontaneously developed hallmark features of CF lung disease, including airway inflammation, remodeling, mucus accumulation, and infection. Their lungs contained multiple bacterial species, suggesting that the lungs of CF pigs have a host defense defect against a wide spectrum of bacteria. In humans, the temporal and causal relations between inflammation and infection have remained uncertain. To investigate these processes, we studied newborn pigs. Their lungs showed no inflammation but were less often sterile than controls. Moreover, after introduction of bacteria into their lungs, pigs with CF failed to eradicate bacteria as effectively as wild-type pigs. These results suggest that impaired bacterial elimination is the pathogenic event that initiates a cascade of inflammation and pathology in CF lungs. Our finding that pigs with CF have a host defense defect against bacteria within hours of birth provides an opportunity to further investigate CF pathogenesis and to test therapeutic and preventive strategies that could be deployed before secondary consequences develop. PMID:20427821

  13. Lung phenotype of juvenile and adult cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-knockout ferrets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xingshen; Olivier, Alicia K; Liang, Bo; Yi, Yaling; Sui, Hongshu; Evans, Turan I A; Zhang, Yulong; Zhou, Weihong; Tyler, Scott R; Fisher, John T; Keiser, Nicholas W; Liu, Xiaoming; Yan, Ziying; Song, Yi; Goeken, J Adam; Kinyon, Joann M; Fligg, Danielle; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Weiliang; Lynch, Thomas J; Kaminsky, Paul M; Stewart, Zoe A; Pope, R Marshall; Frana, Timothy; Meyerholz, David K; Parekh, Kalpaj; Engelhardt, John F

    2014-03-01

    Chronic bacterial lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) are caused by defects in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel. Previously, we described that newborn CF transmembrane conductance regulator-knockout ferrets rapidly develop lung infections within the first week of life. Here, we report a more slowly progressing lung bacterial colonization phenotype observed in juvenile to adult CF ferrets reared on a layered antibiotic regimen. Even on antibiotics, CF ferrets were still very susceptible to bacterial lung infection. The severity of lung histopathology ranged from mild to severe, and variably included mucus obstruction of the airways and submucosal glands, air trapping, atelectasis, bronchopneumonia, and interstitial pneumonia. In all CF lungs, significant numbers of bacteria were detected and impaired tracheal mucociliary clearance was observed. Although Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Enterococcus were observed most frequently in the lungs of CF animals, each animal displayed a predominant bacterial species that accounted for over 50% of the culturable bacteria, with no one bacterial taxon predominating in all animals. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry fingerprinting was used to quantify lung bacteria in 10 CF animals and demonstrated Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, or Escherichia as the most abundant genera. Interestingly, there was significant overlap in the types of bacteria observed in the lung and intestine of a given CF animal, including bacterial taxa unique to the lung and gut of each CF animal analyzed. These findings demonstrate that CF ferrets develop lung disease during the juvenile and adult stages that is similar to patients with CF, and suggest that enteric bacterial flora may seed the lung of CF ferrets. PMID:24074402

  14. Outcome measures for clinical trials assessing treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Konstan, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex genetic disease characterized by death from loss of lung function. Therapies target pathophysiologic changes associated with pulmonary disease progression. Although therapeutic mechanisms differ, efficacy demonstration is limited to a few accepted outcome measures, each with shortcomings that are becoming more pronounced as CF population health improves. Pulmonary function improvement (as forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]) and reduction of pulmonary exacerbation risk are commonly used outcomes. Changes in FEV1 decline rate, quality of life, linear growth and/or weight gain are less utilized outcomes. Validated outcomes tend to work best in subjects with more aggressive or advanced lung disease and less so in healthier subjects. Assays of effects on primary therapeutic targets have yet to be validated as surrogate measures of clinical efficacy. As CF population health improves, it will become increasingly difficult to employ current clinical outcome measures to demonstrate efficacy. PMID:26146539

  15. Predictors of deterioration of lung function in Polish children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olszowiec-Chlebna, Małgorzata; Koniarek-Maniecka, Agnieszka; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Smejda, Katarzyna; Jerzyńska, Joanna; Majak, Paweł; Białas, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severity of lung disease varies in patients with the same CFTR genotype. It suggests that other factors affect the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of the study was to identify risk factors that determine lung function decline in Polish cystic fibrosis children. Material and methods The follow-up time was no less than 5 years of respiratory status observation based on the forced expiratory volume in 1 s value (FEV1). The socio-economic data, perinatal interview, presence of meconium ileus (MI), time of CF diagnosis, initiation of tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS), pancreatic function, sensitization to Aspergillus fumigatus, presence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or diabetes mellitus, chronic bacterial colonization and number of exacerbations and hospitalizations were assessed. Results The mean age of 61 included children was 13.3 ±7.6 years. Delta F508 homozygosity was detected in 45.9%, 44.3% were delta F508 heterozygous, and 9.8% had other genotypes. FEV1 decline was observed among 20% of patients; the rest of the patients presented stable values of FEV1 during at least 5 years of observation. The most significant predictors related to the decline of FEV1 were presentation of MI (p = 0.0344), IGT (p = 0.0227), number of exacerbations (p = 0.0288), and early Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) chronic colonization (p = 0.0165) followed by late TIS initiation after the first detection of PA (p=0.0071). Neither time of diagnosis nor type of CFTR mutation was statistically significant as a predictor of lung deterioration. Conclusions The presence of MI, IGT, chronic PA colonization, and number of exacerbations are risk factors for lung function deterioration. PMID:27186187

  16. Lung disease severity, chronic inflammation, iron deficiency, and erythropoietin response in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, R; Simmerlein, R; Huber, R M; Schiffl, H; Lang, S M

    2007-12-01

    Chronic lung disorders are usually associated with a hypoxia driven increase in red cell mass. However, patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) often have normal or decreased haemoglobin levels. The present prospective observational study in cystic fibrosis patients was performed to determine which factors were involved in alterations in the hematopoetic response to corresponding arterial oxygen pressure. Sixty adult patients (age 21-51) with stable CF were included. They all had vitamin A, D, E, and K but no vitamin B12 supplementation. Twenty-five patients were on oral Fe(2+) (100 mg/day). Resting arterial blood gases, lung function, complete blood counts, parameters of iron status, CRP, sputum microbiology and serum erythropoietin were measured at recruitment and after 3 and 6 months. Patients had varying degrees of pulmonary functional impairment and 9% were hypoxemic (arterial oxygen pressure <60 mm Hg). Low-grade systemic inflammation (CRP > 0.5 mg/dl) was present in 40% of the patients, who all had bacterial colonization. None of the patient had erythrocytosis and 12 patients had anemia. There was no significant difference in iron status between patients with or without chronic iron supplementation and erythropoietin levels were normal. During the 6 months observation period no significant changes occurred. The patients exhibited an impaired erythropoietic response to hypoxemia with normal or low hematocrit in spite of chronic lung disease which might be caused by chronic inflammation associated with CF. Linear multivariate regression analysis revealed CRP levels but neither iron substitution, nor erythropoietin levels nor lung function parameters as independent determinant of haemoglobin levels. CF may be associated with anemia of variable severity as expression of the chronic inflammation present in these patients. The therapeutic consequences are to treat the underlying inflammation rather than to supplement iron. PMID:17948283

  17. Hyperglycemia impedes lung bacterial clearance in a murine model of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, William R.; Zughaier, Susu M.; Guentert, Dana E.; Shenep, Melissa A.; Koval, Michael; McCarty, Nael A.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the most common comorbidity associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), impacting more than half of patients over age 30. CFRD is clinically significant, portending accelerated decline in lung function, more frequent pulmonary exacerbations, and increased mortality. Despite the profound morbidity associated with CFRD, little is known about the underlying CFRD-related pulmonary pathology. Our aim was to develop a murine model of CFRD to explore the hypothesis that elevated glucose in CFRD is associated with reduced lung bacterial clearance. A diabetic phenotype was induced in gut-corrected CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) knockout mice (CFKO) and their CFTR-expressing wild-type littermates (WT) utilizing streptozotocin. Mice were subsequently challenged with an intratracheal inoculation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) (75 μl of 1–5 × 106 cfu/ml) for 18 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected for glucose concentration and cell counts. A portion of the lung was homogenized and cultured as a measure of the remaining viable PAO1 inoculum. Diabetic mice had increased airway glucose compared with nondiabetic mice. The ability to clear bacteria from the lung was significantly reduced in diabetic WT mice and control CFKO mice. Critically, bacterial clearance by diabetic CFKO mice was significantly more diminished compared with nondiabetic CFKO mice, despite an even more robust recruitment of neutrophils to the airways. This finding that CFRD mice boast an exaggerated, but less effective, inflammatory cell response to intratracheal PAO1 challenge presents a novel and useful murine model to help identify therapeutic strategies that promote bacterial clearance in CFRD. PMID:24097557

  18. Hyperglycemia impedes lung bacterial clearance in a murine model of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hunt, William R; Zughaier, Susu M; Guentert, Dana E; Shenep, Melissa A; Koval, Michael; McCarty, Nael A; Hansen, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the most common comorbidity associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), impacting more than half of patients over age 30. CFRD is clinically significant, portending accelerated decline in lung function, more frequent pulmonary exacerbations, and increased mortality. Despite the profound morbidity associated with CFRD, little is known about the underlying CFRD-related pulmonary pathology. Our aim was to develop a murine model of CFRD to explore the hypothesis that elevated glucose in CFRD is associated with reduced lung bacterial clearance. A diabetic phenotype was induced in gut-corrected CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) knockout mice (CFKO) and their CFTR-expressing wild-type littermates (WT) utilizing streptozotocin. Mice were subsequently challenged with an intratracheal inoculation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) (75 μl of 1-5 × 10(6) cfu/ml) for 18 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected for glucose concentration and cell counts. A portion of the lung was homogenized and cultured as a measure of the remaining viable PAO1 inoculum. Diabetic mice had increased airway glucose compared with nondiabetic mice. The ability to clear bacteria from the lung was significantly reduced in diabetic WT mice and control CFKO mice. Critically, bacterial clearance by diabetic CFKO mice was significantly more diminished compared with nondiabetic CFKO mice, despite an even more robust recruitment of neutrophils to the airways. This finding that CFRD mice boast an exaggerated, but less effective, inflammatory cell response to intratracheal PAO1 challenge presents a novel and useful murine model to help identify therapeutic strategies that promote bacterial clearance in CFRD. PMID:24097557

  19. Successful prevention of scedosporiosis after lung transplantation in a cystic fibrosis patient by combined local and systemic triazole therapy.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Carolin; Müller, Carsten; Weißbrodt, Hartmut; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Stolle, Stefan; Hansen, Gesine; Sedlacek, Ludwig

    2013-05-23

    A persistent colonization with Scedosporium apiospermum (S. apiospermum) often results in disseminated infection with a high mortality rate in immunosuppressed patients. We present the first case of successful prevention of scedosporiosis in an adolescent female cystic fibrosis patient post double lung transplant, with a combination of local and systemic voriconazole therapy and surgical intervention. PMID:24432232

  20. Nocardia Colonization: A Risk Factor for Lung Deterioration in Cystic Fibrosis Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Adi; Keller, Nathan; Vilozni, Daphna; Ramon-Saraf, Reut; Bar, Bat-El; Sarouk, Ifat; Ashkenazi, Moshe; Lavie, Moran; Efrati, Ori

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are predisposed to infection and colonization with different microbes. Some cause deterioration of lung functions, while others are colonizers without clear pathogenic effects. Our aim was to understand the effects of Nocardia species in sputum cultures on the course of lung disease in CF patients. Material/Methods A retrospective study analyzing the impact of positive Nocardia spp. in sputum of 19 CF patients over a period of 10 years, comparing them with similar status patients without Nocardia growth. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are used as indicators of lung disease severity and decline rate in functions per year is calculated. Results No significant difference in PFTs of CF patients with positive Nocardia in sputum was found in different sub-groups according to number of episodes of growth, background variables, or treatment plans. The yearly decline in PFTs was similar to that recognized in CF patients. The control group patients showed similar background data. However, a small difference was found in the rate of decline of their PFTs, which implies a possibly slower rate of progression of lung disease. Conclusions The prognosis of lung disease in CF patients colonized with Nocardia does not seem to differ based on the persistence of growth on cultures, different treatment plans or risk factors. Apparently, Nocardia does not cause a deterioration of lung functions with time. However, it may show a trend to faster decline in PFTs compared to similar status CF patients without isolation of this microorganism in their sputum. PMID:26125407

  1. Loss of social behaviours in populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin; Diggle, Stephen P; Scanlan, Pauline D; Ghoul, Melanie; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Santorelli, Lorenzo A; Popat, Roman; West, Stuart A; Griffin, Ashleigh S

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P. aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits - biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) - in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved in nutrient acquisition were produced in significantly smaller quantities with increased duration of infection, and patterns across four QS signal molecules were consistent with accumulation over time of mutations in lasR, which are known to disrupt the ability of cells to respond to QS signal. Pyocyanin production, and the proportion of cells in biofilm relative to motile, free-living cells in liquid culture, did not change. Overall, our results confirm that the loss of social behaviour is a consistent trend with time spent in the lung and suggest that social dynamics are potentially relevant to understanding the behaviour of P. aeruginosa in lung infections. PMID:24454693

  2. Cystic Fibrosis Pigs Develop Lung Disease and Exhibit Defective Bacterial Eradication at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, David A; Meyerholz, David K; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Ramachandran, Shyam; Rogan, Mark P; Davis, Greg J; Hanfland, Robert A; Wohlford-Lenane, Chris; Dohrn, Cassie L; Bartlett, Jennifer A; Nelson, George A; Chang, Eugene H; Taft, Peter J; Ludwig, Paula S; Estin, Mira; Hornick, Emma E; Launspach, Janice L; Samuel, Melissa; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip H; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Uc, Aliye; Starner, Timothy D; Horswill, Alexander R; Brogden, Kim A; Prather, Randall S; Richter, Sandra S; Shilyansky, Joel; McCray, Paul B; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Lung disease causes most of the morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding its pathogenesis has been hindered by lack of an animal model with characteristic features of CF. To overcome this problem, we recently generated pigs with targeted CFTR genes. We now report that, within months of birth, CF pigs spontaneously develop hallmark features of CF lung disease including airway inflammation, remodeling, mucus accumulation, and infection. Their lungs contained multiple bacterial species, suggesting an equal opportunity host defense defect. In humans, the temporal and causal relationships between inflammation and infection have remained uncertain. To investigate these processes, we studied newborn pigs. Their lungs showed no inflammation, but were less often sterile than controls. Moreover, after intrapulmonary bacterial challenge, CF pigs failed to eradicate bacteria as effectively as wild-type pigs. These results suggest that impaired bacterial elimination is the pathogenic event that initiates a cascade of inflammation and pathology in CF lungs. Finding that CF pigs have a bacterial host defense defect within hours of birth provides an opportunity to further investigate pathogenesis and to test therapeutic and preventive strategies before secondary consequences develop. PMID:20427821

  3. High peripheral blood th17 percent associated with poor lung function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Emily M; Hudson, Jo B; Beggs, Sean A; Reid, David W; Roddam, Louise F; Cooley, Margaret A

    2015-01-01

    People with cystic fibrosis (CF) have been reported to make lung T cell responses that are biased towards T helper (Th) 2 or Th17. We hypothesized that CF-related T cell regulatory defects could be detected by analyzing CD4+ lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 42 CF patients (6 months-53 years old) and 78 healthy controls (2-61 years old) were analyzed for Th1 (IFN-γ+), Th2 (IL-4+), Th17 (IL-17+), Treg (FOXP3+), IL-10+ and TGF-β+ CD4+ cells. We observed higher proportions of Treg, IL-10+ and TGF-β+ CD4+ cells in CF adults (≥ 18 years old), but not children/adolescents, compared with controls. Within the CF group, high TGF-β+% was associated with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection (p < 0.006). We observed no significant differences between control and CF groups in the proportions of Th1, Th2 or Th17 cells, and no association within the CF group of any subset with sex, CFTR genotype, or clinical exacerbation. However, high Th17% was strongly associated with poor lung function (FEV1 % predicted) (p = 0.0008), and this association was strongest when both lung function testing and blood sampling were performed within one week. Our results are consistent with reports of CF as a Th17 disease and suggest that peripheral blood Th17 levels may be a surrogate marker of lung function in CF. PMID:25803862

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Gene Mutation and Lung Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yafei; Sun, Zhifu; Wu, Yanhong; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Li, Yan; Cunningham, Julie M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) holds an important role in retaining lung function, but its association with lung cancer is unclear. A case-control study was conducted to determine the possible associations of the genetic variants in the CFTR gene with lung cancer risk. Genotypes of a most common deletion ΔF508, one functional SNP, and eight tag SNPs in the CFTR gene were determined in 574 lung cancer patients and 679 controls. A logistic regression model, adjusting for known risk factors, was used to evaluate the association of each variant with lung cancer risk, as confirmation haplotype and sub-haplotype analyses were performed. ΔF508 deletion and genotypes with minor alleles in one tag SNP, rs10487372, and one functional SNP, rs213950, were inversely associated with lung cancer risk. The results of haplotype and sub-haplotype analyses were consistent with single variant analysis, all pointing to deletion ΔF508 being the key variant for significant haplotypes and sub-haplotypes. Individuals with ‘deletion-T’ (ΔF508/rs10487372) haplotype had a 68% reduced risk for lung cancer compared to common haplotype ‘no-deletion-C’ (OR=0.32; 95% CI=0.15–0.68; p=0.01). Genetic variations in the CFTR gene might modulate the risk of lung cancer. This study, for the first time, provides evidence of a protective role of the CFTR deletion carrier in the etiology of lung cancer. PMID:20116881

  5. Iron accumulates in the lavage and explanted lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Oxidative stress participates in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF). An underlying disruption in iron homeostasis can frequently be demonstrated in injuries and diseases associated with an oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that iron accumulation and ...

  6. EFFECT OF DORNASE ALFA ON INFLAMMATION AND LUNG FUNCTION: POTENTIAL ROLE IN THE EARLY TREATMENT OF CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Konstan, Michael W.; Ratjen, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Dornase alfa has been shown to reduce markers of inflammation and neutrophil-associated metalloproteinases in cystic fibrosis (CF), suggesting a potential benefit from use of this therapy early in the disease. However, observational studies indicate that dornase alfa is often reserved for “sicker” patients. A 2-year, early intervention study of dornase alfa in CF patients with early lung disease demonstrated significant improvements in lung function and risk of exacerbation compared to placebo. A more recent analysis, using the database of the large observational Epidemiologic Study of Cystic Fibrosis (ESCF), found that initiation of dornase alfa has the potential to alter the course of CF by decreasing the rate of lung function decline in children and adults. These encouraging results, possibly linked to indirect effects on inflammation, suggest a greater role for dornase alfa therapy in the early treatment of CF, where it may help preserve lung function and potentially extend survival. PMID:22093951

  7. Transcriptional Activation of Mucin by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide in the Pathogenesis of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Dong; Dohrman, Austin F.; Gallup, Marianne; Miyata, Susumu; Gum, James R.; Kim, Young S.; Nadel, Jay A.; Prince, Alice; Basbaum, Carol B.

    1997-02-01

    An unresolved question in cystic fibrosis (CF) research is how mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a CI ion channel, cause airway mucus obstruction leading to fatal lung disease. Recent evidence has linked the CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutation to the onset and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the airways, and here we provide evidence directly linking P. aeruginosa infection to mucus overproduction. We show that P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide profoundly upregulates transcription of the mucin gene MUC 2 in epithelial cells via inducible enhancer elements and that this effect is blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG 126. These findings improve our understanding of CF pathogenesis and suggest that the attenuation of mucin production by lipopolysaccharide antagonists and tyrosine kinase inhibitors could reduce morbidity and mortality in this disease.

  8. Approaches to analyse dynamic microbial communities such as those seen in cystic fibrosis lung

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Microbial communities play vital roles in many aspects of our lives, although our understanding of microbial biogeography and community profiles remains unclear. The number of microbes or the diversity of the microbes, even in small environmental niches, is staggering. Current microbiological methods used to analyse these communities are limited, in that many microorganisms cannot be cultured. Even for the isolates that can be cultured, the expense of identifying them definitively is much too high to be practical. Many recent molecular technologies, combined with bioinformatic tools, are raising the bar by improving the sensitivity and reliability of microbial community analysis. These tools and techniques range from those that attempt to understand a microbial community from their length heterogeneity profiles to those that help to identify the strains and species of a random sampling of the microbes in a given sample. These technologies are reviewed here, using the microbial communities present in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients as a paradigm. PMID:19403459

  9. Adaptation of Iron Homeostasis Pathways by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pyoverdine Mutant in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; O'Neill, Maura J.; Watts, Annabelle M.; Robson, Cynthia L.; Lamont, Iain L.; Wilks, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from chronic bacterial lung infections, most notably by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which persists for decades in the lungs and undergoes extensive evolution. P. aeruginosa requires iron for virulence and uses the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdine to scavenge and solubilize ferric iron during acute infections. Pyoverdine mutants accumulate in the lungs of some CF patients, however, suggesting that the heme and ferrous iron acquisition pathways of P. aeruginosa are more important in this environment. Here, we sought to determine how evolution of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung affects iron acquisition and regulatory pathways through the use of longitudinal CF isolates. These analyses demonstrated a significant reduction of siderophore production during the course of CF lung infection in nearly all strains tested. Mass spectrometry analysis of one of these strains showed that the later CF isolate has streamlined the metabolic flux of extracellular heme through the HemO heme oxygenase, resulting in more-efficient heme utilization. Moreover, gene expression analysis shows that iron regulation via the PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs) is enhanced in the later CF isolate. Finally, analysis of P. aeruginosa gene expression in the lungs of various CF patients demonstrates that both PrrF and HemO are consistently expressed in the CF lung environment. Combined, these results suggest that heme is a critical source of iron during prolonged infection of the CF lung and that changes in iron and heme regulatory pathways play a crucial role in adaptation of P. aeruginosa to this ever-changing host environment. PMID:24727222

  10. Adaptation of iron homeostasis pathways by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyoverdine mutant in the cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Angela T; O'Neill, Maura J; Watts, Annabelle M; Robson, Cynthia L; Lamont, Iain L; Wilks, Angela; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2014-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from chronic bacterial lung infections, most notably by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which persists for decades in the lungs and undergoes extensive evolution. P. aeruginosa requires iron for virulence and uses the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdine to scavenge and solubilize ferric iron during acute infections. Pyoverdine mutants accumulate in the lungs of some CF patients, however, suggesting that the heme and ferrous iron acquisition pathways of P. aeruginosa are more important in this environment. Here, we sought to determine how evolution of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung affects iron acquisition and regulatory pathways through the use of longitudinal CF isolates. These analyses demonstrated a significant reduction of siderophore production during the course of CF lung infection in nearly all strains tested. Mass spectrometry analysis of one of these strains showed that the later CF isolate has streamlined the metabolic flux of extracellular heme through the HemO heme oxygenase, resulting in more-efficient heme utilization. Moreover, gene expression analysis shows that iron regulation via the PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs) is enhanced in the later CF isolate. Finally, analysis of P. aeruginosa gene expression in the lungs of various CF patients demonstrates that both PrrF and HemO are consistently expressed in the CF lung environment. Combined, these results suggest that heme is a critical source of iron during prolonged infection of the CF lung and that changes in iron and heme regulatory pathways play a crucial role in adaptation of P. aeruginosa to this ever-changing host environment. PMID:24727222

  11. Changes in cystic fibrosis airway microbial community associated with a severe decline in lung function.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Patrizia; Fiscarelli, Ersilia Vita; Tuccio, Vanessa; Chiancianesi, Manuela; Bacci, Giovanni; Morelli, Patrizia; Dolce, Daniela; Dalmastri, Claudia; De Alessandri, Alessandra; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Taccetti, Giovanni; Mengoni, Alessio; Bevivino, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease resulting in chronic polymicrobial infections of the airways and progressive decline in lung function. To gain insight into the underlying causes of severe lung diseases, we aimed at comparing the airway microbiota detected in sputum of CF patients with stable lung function (S) versus those with a substantial decline in lung function (SD). Microbiota composition was investigated by using culture-based and culture-independent methods, and by performing multivariate and statistical analyses. Culture-based methods identified some microbial species associated with a worse lung function, i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rothia mucilaginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida albicans, but only the presence of S. pneumoniae and R. mucilaginosa was found to be associated with increased severe decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed a higher bacterial diversity than that detected by culture-based methods. Molecular signatures with a statistically significant odds ratio for SD status were detected, and classified as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Shewanella, while for other Terminal Restriction Fragments (T-RFs) no species assignation was achieved. The analysis of T-RFLP data using ecological biodiversity indices showed reduced Evenness in SD patients compared to S ones, suggesting an impaired ecology of the bacterial community in SD patients. Statistically significant differences of the ecological biodiversity indices among the three sub-groups of FEV1 (normal/mild vs moderate vs severe) were also found, suggesting that the patients with moderate lung disease experienced changes in the airway assembly of taxa. Overall, changes in CF airway microbial community associated with a severe lung function decline were detected, allowing us to define some discriminatory species as well as some discriminatory T-RFs that represent good candidates for the

  12. Characterizing Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Airway Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Darquenne, Chantal; Elliott, Ann R.; Bailey, Barbara A.; Conrad, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Translational investigations in cystic fibrosis (CF) have a need for improved quantitative and longitudinal measures of disease status. To establish a non-invasive quantitative MRI technique to monitor lung health in patients with CF and correlate MR metrics with airway physiology as measured by multiple breath washout (MBW). Data were collected in 12 CF patients and 12 healthy controls. Regional (central and peripheral lung) measures of fractional lung water density (FLD: air to 100% fluid) were acquired both at FRC and TLC on a 1.5T MRI. The median FLD (mFLD) and the FRC-to-TLC mFLD ratio were calculated for each region at both lung volumes. Spirometry and MBW data were also acquired for each subject. Ventilation inhomogeneities were quantified by the lung clearance index (LCI) and by indices Scond* and Sacin* that assess inhomogeneities in the conducting (central) and acinar (peripheral) lung regions, respectively. MBW indices and mFLD at TLC (both regions) were significantly elevated in CF (p<0.01) compared to controls. The mFLD at TLC (central: R = 0.82) and the FRC-to-TLC mFLD ratio (peripheral: R = -0.77) were strongly correlated with Scond* and LCI. CF patients had high lung water content at TLC when compared to controls. This is likely due to the presence of retained airway secretions and airway wall edema (more water) and to limited expansions of air trapping areas (less air) in CF subjects. FRC-to-TLC ratios of mFLD strongly correlated with central ventilation inhomogeneities. These combined measures may provide a useful marker of both retained mucus and air trapping in CF lungs. PMID:27337056

  13. Association between clinical antibiotic resistance and susceptibility of Pseudomonas in the cystic fibrosis lung

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Gunther; Mahrt, Niels; Tueffers, Leif; Barbosa, Camilo; Harjes, Malte; Adolph, Gernot; Friedrichs, Anette; Krenz-Weinreich, Annegret; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients suffer from chronic lung infections that require long-term antibiotic therapy. Pseudomonas readily evolve resistance, rendering antibiotics ineffective. In vitro experiments suggest that resistant bacteria may be treated by exploiting their collateral sensitivity to other antibiotics. Here, we investigate correlations of sensitivity and resistance profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that naturally adapted to antibiotics in the cystic fibrosis lung. Methodology: Resistance profiles for 13 antibiotics were obtained using broth dilution, E-test and VITEK mass spectroscopy. Genetic variants were determined from whole-genome sequences and interrelationships among isolates were analyzed using 13 MLST loci. Result: Our study focused on 45 isolates from 13 patients under documented treatment with antibiotics. Forty percent of these were clinically resistant and 15% multi-drug resistant. Colistin resistance was found once, despite continuous colistin treatment and even though colistin resistance can readily evolve experimentally in the laboratory. Patients typically harbored multiple genetically and phenotypically distinct clones. However, genetically similar clones often had dissimilar resistance profiles. Isolates showed mutations in genes encoding cell wall synthesis, alginate production, efflux pumps and antibiotic modifying enzymes. Cross-resistance was commonly observed within antibiotic classes and between aminoglycosides and β-lactam antibiotics. No evidence was found for consistent phenotypic resistance to one antibiotic and sensitivity to another within one genotype. Conclusions and implications: Evidence supporting potential collateral sensitivity in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates remains equivocal. However, cross-resistance within antibiotic classes is common. Colistin therapy is promising since resistance to it was rare despite its intensive use in the studied patients. PMID:27193199

  14. Microevolution of the major common Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones C and PA14 in cystic fibrosis lungs.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Nina; Klockgether, Jens; Wrasman, Kristie; Schmidt, Mario; Davenport, Colin F; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2011-07-01

    Clones C and PA14 are the worldwide most abundant clonal complexes in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa population. The microevolution of clones C and PA14 was investigated in serial cystic fibrosis (CF) airway isolates collected over 20 years since the onset of colonization. Intraclonal evolution in CF lungs was resolved by genome sequencing of first, intermediate and late isolates and subsequent multimarker SNP genotyping of the whole strain panel. Mapping of sequence reads onto the P. aeruginosa PA14 reference genome unravelled an intraclonal and interclonal sequence diversity of 0.0035% and 0.68% respectively. Clone PA14 diversified into three branches in the patient's lungs, and the PA14 population acquired 15 nucleotide substitutions and a large deletion during the observation period. The clone C genome remained invariant during the first 3 years in CF lungs; however, 15 years later 947 transitions and 12 transversions were detected in a clone C mutL mutant strain. Key mutations occurred in retS, RNA polymerase, multidrug transporter, virulence and denitrification genes. Late clone C and PA14 persistors in the CF lungs were compromised in growth and cytotoxicity, but their mutation frequency was normal even in mutL mutant clades. PMID:21492363

  15. MEASURING AND IMPROVING RESPIRATORY OUTCOMES IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS LUNG DISEASE: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES TO THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, Edith T.; Harris, J. Kirk; Conway, Steven; Konstan, Michael W.; Marshall, Bruce; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Retsch-Bogart, George; Saiman, Lisa; Accurso, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease with significant morbidity. Despite overall improvements in survival, patients with CF experience frequent pulmonary exacerbations and declining lung function, which often accelerates during adolescence. New treatments target steps in the pathogenesis of lung disease, such as the basic defect in CF (CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator [CFTR]), pulmonary infections, inflammation, and mucociliary clearance. These treatments offer hope but also present challenges to patients, clinicians, and researchers. Comprehensive assessment of efficacy is critical to identify potentially beneficial treatments. Lung function and pulmonary exacerbation are the most commonly used outcome measures in CF clinical research. Other outcome measures under investigation include measures of CFTR function; biomarkers of infection, inflammation, lung injury and repair; and patient-reported outcomes. Molecular diagnostics may help elucidate the complex CF airway microbiome. As new treatments are developed for patients with CF, efforts should be made to balance treatment burden with quality of life. This review highlights emerging treatments, obstacles to optimizing outcomes, and key future directions for research. PMID:19833563

  16. Mucolytics in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Henke, Markus O; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-03-01

    Mucus accumulation in the lower airways is a key feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The major component of mucus in CF is not mucin derived from mucus producing cells but rather pus that includes viscous material such as polymerized DNA derived from degraded neutrophils. This has important implications for mucolytic therapy aiming to improve mucus clearance from the airways, since degradation of mucin may not be a suitable treatment strategy. In addition, thinning of secretions may not always be beneficial, since it may negatively affect certain aspects of mucus transport such as cough clearance. While inhaled N-acetylcysteine has been used as a mucolytic drug in CF for decades, there is little evidence that it has any beneficial effect. Dornase alfa has been shown to reduce pulmonary exacerbations and improve lung function and is currently the only mucolytic agent with proven efficacy in CF. Newer agents targeting other components of CF mucus, such as filamentous actin, are currently in development. Ultimately, drugs that are mucokinetic, which preserve viscoelasticity, rather than mucolytic may prove to be beneficial for CF lung disease in the future. PMID:17419975

  17. Antiinflammatory effects of bromodomain and extraterminal domain inhibition in cystic fibrosis lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kong; Campfield, Brian T.; Wenzel, Sally E.; McAleer, Jeremy P.; Kreindler, James L.; Kurland, Geoffrey; Gopal, Radha; Wang, Ting; Chen, Wei; Eddens, Taylor; Quinn, Kathleen M.; Myerburg, Mike M.; Horne, William T.; Lora, Jose M.; Albrecht, Brian K.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2016-01-01

    Significant morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF) results from chronic lung inflammation, most commonly due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Recent data suggest that IL-17 contributes to pathological inflammation in the setting of abnormal mucosal immunity, and type 17 immunity–driven inflammatory responses may represent a target to block aberrant inflammation in CF. Indeed, transcriptomic analysis of the airway epithelium from CF patients undergoing clinical bronchoscopy revealed upregulation of IL-17 downstream signature genes, implicating a substantial contribution of IL-17–mediated immunity in CF lungs. Bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) chromatin modulators can regulate T cell responses, specifically Th17-mediated inflammation, by mechanisms that include bromodomain-dependent inhibition of acetylated histones at the IL17 locus. Here, we show that, in vitro, BET inhibition potently suppressed Th17 cell responses in explanted CF tissue and inhibited IL-17–driven chemokine production in human bronchial epithelial cells. In an acute P. aeruginosa lung infection murine model, BET inhibition decreased inflammation, without exacerbating infection, suggesting that BET inhibition may be a potential therapeutic target in patients with CF. PMID:27517095

  18. Transcription of Interleukin-8: How Altered Regulation Can Affect Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Jundi, Karim; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a neutrophil chemokine that is encoded on the CXCL8 gene. Normally CXCL8 expression is repressed due to histone deacetylation, octamer-1 binding to the promoter and the inhibitory effect of nuclear factor-κB repressing factor (NRF). However, in response to a suitable stimulus, the human CXCL8 gene undergoes transcription due to its inducible promoter that is regulated by the transcription factors nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), activating protein (AP-1), CAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ, also known as NF-IL-6), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). CXCL8 mRNA is then stabilised by the activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterised by a neutrophil-dominated airway inflammatory response. A major factor contributing to the large number of neutrophils is the higher than normal levels of IL-8 that are present within the CF lung. Infection and inflammation, together with intrinsic alterations in CF airway cells are responsible for the abnormally high intrapulmonary levels of IL-8. Strategies to inhibit aberrantly high CXCL8 expression hold therapeutic potential for CF lung disease. PMID:26140537

  19. Complement Effectors of Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Fluid Correlate with Clinical Measures of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Laura A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Perkins, Amy M.; Shah, Tushar A.; Krishna, Neel K.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2015-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), lung damage is mediated by a cycle of obstruction, infection, and inflammation. Here we explored complement inflammatory effectors in CF lung fluid. In this study soluble fractions (sols) from sputum samples of 15 CF patients were assayed for complement effectors and analyzed with clinical measurements. The pro-inflammatory peptide C5a was increased 4.8-fold (P = 0.04) in CF sols compared with controls. Incubation of CF sols with P. aeruginosa or S. aureus increased C5a concentration 2.3-fold (P = 0.02). A peptide inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1) completely blocked the increase in C5a concentration from P. aeruginosa in CF sol in vitro (P = 0.001). C5a concentration in CF sol correlated inversely with body mass index (BMI) percentile in children (r = -0.77, P = 0.04). C3a, which has anti-inflammatory effects, correlated positively with FEV1% predicted (rs = 0.63, P = 0.02). These results suggest that complement effectors may significantly impact inflammation in CF lung fluid. PMID:26642048

  20. Risk of Post-Lung Transplant Renal Dysfunction in Adults With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Aitken, Moira L.; Goss, Christopher H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the leading indications for lung transplantation. The incidence and pre-lung transplant risk factors for posttransplant renal dysfunction in the CF population remain undefined. Methods: We conducted a cohort study using adults (≥ 18 years old) in the CF Foundation Patient Registry from 2000 to 2008 to determine the incidence of post-lung transplant renal dysfunction, defined by an estimated glomerular filtration rate of < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify independent pretransplant risk factors for post-lung transplant renal dysfunction. Results: The study cohort included 993 adult lung transplant recipients with CF, with a median follow-up of 2 years. During the study period, 311 individuals developed renal dysfunction, with a 2-year risk of 35% (95% CI, 32%-39%). Risk of posttransplant renal dysfunction increased substantially with increasing age (25 to < 35 years vs 18 to < 25 years: hazard ratio [HR], 1.60; 95% CI, 1.15-2.23; vs ≥ 35 years: HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.73-3.47) and female sex (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.22-1.99). CF-related diabetes requiring insulin therapy (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.02-1.67) and pretransplant renal function impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 60-90 mL/min/m2 vs > 90 mL/min/m2: HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.19-2.12) also increased the risk of posttransplant renal dysfunction. Conclusions: Renal dysfunction is common following lung transplant in the adult CF population. Increased age, female sex, CF-related diabetes requiring insulin, and pretransplant renal impairment are significant risk factors. PMID:22222189

  1. Polymorphisms associated with expression of BPIFA1/BPIFB1 and lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saferali, Aabida; Obeidat, Ma'en; Bérubé, Jean-Christophe; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bossé, Yohan; Laviolette, Michel; Hao, Ke; Nickle, David C; Timens, Wim; Sin, Don D; Postma, Dirkje S; Strug, Lisa J; Gallins, Paul J; Paré, Peter D; Bingle, Colin D; Sandford, Andrew J

    2015-11-01

    BPI fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1) and BPIFB1 are putative innate immune molecules expressed in the upper airways. Because of their hypothesized roles in airway defense, these molecules may contribute to lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis (CF). We interrogated BPIFA1/BPIFB1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in data from an association study of CF modifier genes and found an association of the G allele of rs1078761 with increased lung disease severity (P = 2.71 × 10(-4)). We hypothesized that the G allele of rs1078761 is associated with decreased expression of BPIFA1 and/or BPIFB1. Genome-wide lung gene expression and genotyping data from 1,111 individuals with lung disease, including 51 patients with CF, were tested for associations between genotype and BPIFA1 and BPIFB1 gene expression levels. Findings were validated by quantitative PCR in a subset of 77 individuals. Western blotting was used to measure BPIFA1 and BPIFB1 protein levels in 93 lung and 101 saliva samples. The G allele of rs1078761 was significantly associated with decreased mRNA levels of BPIFA1 (P = 4.08 × 10(-15)) and BPIFB1 (P = 0.0314). These findings were confirmed with quantitative PCR and Western blotting. We conclude that the G allele of rs1078761 may be detrimental to lung function in CF owing to decreased levels of BPIFA1 and BPIFB1. PMID:25574903

  2. Pulmonary bacterial communities in surgically resected noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis lungs are similar to those in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Heather; Cunningham, Kristopher S; Wang, Pauline W; Zhang, Yu; Cypel, Marcelo; Chaparro, Cecilia; Tullis, D Elizabeth; Waddell, Thomas K; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao; Guttman, David S; Hwang, David M

    2012-01-01

    Background. Recurrent bacterial infections play a key role in the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis, but conventional microbiologic methods may fail to identify pathogens in many cases. We characterized and compared the pulmonary bacterial communities of cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis patients using a culture-independent molecular approach. Methods. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed from lung tissue of 10 non-CF bronchiectasis and 21 CF patients, followed by DNA sequencing of isolates from each library. Community characteristics were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Results. A wide range of bacterial diversity was detected in both groups, with between 1 and 21 bacterial taxa found in each patient. Pseudomonas was the most common genus in both groups, comprising 49% of sequences detected and dominating numerically in 13 patients. Although Pseudomonas appeared to be dominant more often in CF patients than in non-CF patients, analysis of entire bacterial communities did not identify significant differences between these two groups. Conclusions. Our data indicate significant diversity in the pulmonary bacterial community of both CF and non-CF bronchiectasis patients and suggest that this community is similar in surgically resected lungs of CF and non-CF bronchiectasis patients. PMID:22448327

  3. Expression of MUC5AC and MUC5B mucins in normal and cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Groneberg, D A; Eynott, P R; Oates, T; Lim, S; Wu, R; Carlstedt, I; Nicholson, A G; Chung, K F

    2002-02-01

    Hypersecretion of airway mucus is a characteristic feature of chronic airway diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF) and leads via impairment of the muco-ciliary clearance and bacterial superinfection to respiratory failure. The major components of the mucus matrix forming family of mucins in the airways are MUC5AC and MUC5B. To investigate the expression of these glycoproteins in CF, immunohistochemistry was carried out on trachea, bronchi and peripheral lung obtained from CF patients and compared to normal lung tissues. MUC5AC immunohistochemistry demonstrated signals in goblet cells of the epithelial lining. Also, goblet cells inside glandular secretory ducts revealed MUC5AC-positive staining. In comparison to those from normal subjects, CF sections were characterized by inflammatory changes and goblet cell hyperplasia, resulting in increased numbers of MUC5AC-positive cells. Immunohistochemical staining for MUC5B showed abundant staining of submucosal glands and epithelial goblet cells. Inside the glands, the immunoreactivity was restricted to glandular mucous cells. MUC5AC and MUC5B are expressed in the same histological pattern in CF compared to normal tissues with an increase of MUC5AC-positive cells due to goblet cell hyper- and metaplasia. PMID:11860173

  4. Higher Risk of Acute Cellular Rejection in Lung Transplant Recipients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Fiorella; Lunardi, Francesca; Nannini, Nazarena; Balestro, Elisabetta; Loy, Monica; Marulli, Giuseppe; Calabrese, Francesca; Vuljan, Stefania Edith; Schiavon, Marco; Perissinotto, Egle; Rea, Federico

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute cellular rejection (ACR) affects up to 40% of recipients within the first year after lung transplant (LTx). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of ACR and associated major risk factors in cystic fibrosis (CF) recipients. Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and 1-year/long-term survival were also evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS ACR was reviewed in 643 scheduled biopsies from 44 CF (Group 1) versus 89 other recipients (Group 2). We performed univariate/multivariate analyses of risk factors for ACR and BOS, and survival analysis. RESULTS Group 1 showed higher ACR frequency, especially for ACR ≥ A2. Multivariable generalized linear models considering both native lung disease and age showed that higher values of ACR index were significantly related to the pretransplant diagnosis of CF. BOS and long-term survival were not influenced by the increased incidence of ACR. Poorer long-term survival was observed in Group 2. CONCLUSIONS CF recipients have a higher ACR risk, which may be due to enhanced immune activation related to a genetic disorder, and younger age. PMID:26718747

  5. Progress in gene and cell therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2012-01-01

    Although the development of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) was high priority for many groups in academia and industry in the first 10 to 15 years after cloning the gene, more recently active research into CF gene therapy is only being performed by a small number of committed, mainly academic, groups. However, despite the waning enthusiasm, which is largely due to the realisation that gene transfer into lungs is more difficult than originally thought and the fact that meaningful clinical trials are expensive and difficult to perform, gene therapy continues to hold promise for the treatment of CF lung disease. Problems related to repeat administration of adenovirus and adeno-associated virus-based vectors led to a focus on non-viral vectors in clinical trials. The UK CF Gene Therapy Consortium is currently running the only active gene therapy programme, aimed at assessing if repeated administration of a non-viral gene transfer agent can improve CF lung disease. However, the recent suggestion that lentiviral vectors may be able to evade the immune system and, thereby, allow for repeat administration and long lasting expression opens new doors for the use of viral vectors in the context of CF gene therapy. In addition, early pre-clinical studies have recently been initiated to address cell therapy-based approaches for CF. This involves systemic and topical administration of a variety of stem/progenitor cells, as well as first attempts as producing a tissue-engineered lung. Recent studies in viral and non-viral vector developments, as well as cell therapy will be discussed and an update on clinical gene therapy studies will be provided here. PMID:22229571

  6. Effect of Shear Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dingemans, Jozef; Monsieurs, Pieter; Yu, Sung-Huan; Crabbé, Aurélie; Förstner, Konrad U.; Malfroot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic colonization of the lungs by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To gain insights into the characteristic biofilm phenotype of P. aeruginosa in the CF lungs, mimicking the CF lung environment is critical. We previously showed that growth of the non-CF-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in a rotating wall vessel, a device that simulates the low fluid shear (LS) conditions present in the CF lung, leads to the formation of in-suspension, self-aggregating biofilms. In the present study, we determined the phenotypic and transcriptomic changes associated with the growth of a highly adapted, transmissible P. aeruginosa CF strain in artificial sputum medium under LS conditions. Robust self-aggregating biofilms were observed only under LS conditions. Growth under LS conditions resulted in the upregulation of genes involved in stress response, alginate biosynthesis, denitrification, glycine betaine biosynthesis, glycerol metabolism, and cell shape maintenance, while genes involved in phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion, and multidrug efflux were downregulated. In addition, a number of small RNAs appeared to be involved in the response to shear stress. Finally, quorum sensing was found to be slightly but significantly affected by shear stress, resulting in higher production of autoinducer molecules during growth under high fluid shear (HS) conditions. In summary, our study revealed a way to modulate the behavior of a highly adapted P. aeruginosa CF strain by means of introducing shear stress, driving it from a biofilm lifestyle to a more planktonic lifestyle. PMID:27486191

  7. Variation in lung function is associated with worse clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; Pinto, Leonardo Araujo; Marostica, Paulo José Cauduro; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the variation in lung function over one year is associated with worse clinical outcomes, as well as with a decline in lung function in the following years, in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving CF patients (4-19 years of age), evaluated over a three-year period. We evaluated demographic characteristics, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, antibiotic use, hospitalization, six-minute walk distance (6MWD), and lung function. The inclusion criterion was having undergone pulmonary function testing at least three times in the first year and at least once in each of the next two years. RESULTS: We evaluated 35 CF patients. The variation in FEV1 in the first year (ΔFEV1) was greater among those who, in the third year, showed reduced FEV1, had a below-average 6MWD, or were hospitalized than among those with normal FEV1, normal 6MWD, or no hospital admissions, in that same year (p < 0.05), although no such difference was found for antibiotic use in the third year. Subjects showing a ΔFEV1 ≥ 10% also showed a greater decline in FEV1 over the two subsequent years (p = 0.04). The ΔFEV1 also showed an inverse correlation with absolute FEV1 in the third year (r = −0.340, p = 0.04) and with the rate of FEV1 decline (r = −0.52, p = 0.001). Linear regression identified ΔFEV1 as a predictor of FEV1 decline (coefficient of determination, 0.27). CONCLUSIONS: Significant variation in lung function over one year seems to be associated with a higher subsequent rate of FEV1 decline and worse clinical outcomes in CF patients. Short-term ΔFEV1 might prove useful as a predictor of CF progression in clinical practice. PMID:26785959

  8. Antibiotic management of lung infections in cystic fibrosis. II. Nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi.

    PubMed

    Chmiel, James F; Aksamit, Timothy R; Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Dasenbrook, Elliott C; Elborn, J Stuart; LiPuma, John J; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Waters, Valerie J; Ratjen, Felix A

    2014-10-01

    Airway infections are a key component of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Whereas the approach to common pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa is guided by a significant body of evidence, other infections often pose a considerable challenge to treating physicians. In Part I of this series on the antibiotic management of difficult lung infections, we discussed bacterial organisms including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacterial infections, and treatment of multiple bacterial pathogens. Here, we summarize the approach to infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi. Nontuberculous mycobacteria can significantly impact the course of lung disease in patients with CF, but differentiation between colonization and infection is difficult clinically as coinfection with other micro-organisms is common. Treatment consists of different classes of antibiotics, varies in intensity, and is best guided by a team of specialized clinicians and microbiologists. The ability of anaerobic bacteria to contribute to CF lung disease is less clear, even though clinical relevance has been reported in individual patients. Anaerobes detected in CF sputum are often resistant to multiple drugs, and treatment has not yet been shown to positively affect patient outcome. Fungi have gained significant interest as potential CF pathogens. Although the role of Candida is largely unclear, there is mounting evidence that Scedosporium species and Aspergillus fumigatus, beyond the classical presentation of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, can be relevant in patients with CF and treatment should be considered. At present, however there remains limited information on how best to select patients who could benefit from antifungal therapy. PMID:25167882

  9. Aerosol delivery of DNA/liposomes to the lung for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davies, Lee A; Nunez-Alonso, Graciela A; McLachlan, Gerry; Hyde, Stephen C; Gill, Deborah R

    2014-06-01

    Abstract Lung gene therapy is being evaluated for a range of acute and chronic diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF). As these therapies approach clinical realization, it is becoming increasingly clear that the ability to efficiently deliver gene transfer agents (GTAs) to target cell populations within the lung may prove just as critical as the gene therapy formulation itself in terms of generating positive clinical outcomes. Key to the success of any aerosol gene therapy is the interaction between the GTA and nebulization device. We evaluated the effects of aerosolization on our preferred formulation, plasmid DNA (pDNA) complexed with the cationic liposome GL67A (pDNA/GL67A) using commercially available nebulizer devices. The relatively high viscosity (6.3±0.1 cP) and particulate nature of pDNA/GL67A formulations hindered stable aerosol generation in ultrasonic and vibrating mesh nebulizers but was not problematic in the jet nebulizers tested. Aerosol size characteristics varied significantly between devices, but the AeroEclipse II nebulizer operating at 50 psi generated stable pDNA/GL67A aerosols suitable for delivery to the CF lung (mass median aerodynamic diameter 3.4±0.1 μm). Importantly, biological function of pDNA/GL67A formulations was retained after nebulization, and although aerosol delivery rate was lower than that of other devices (0.17±0.01 ml/min), the breath-actuated AeroEclipse II nebulizer generated aerosol only during the inspiratory phase and as such was more efficient than other devices with 83±3% of generated aerosol available for patient inhalation. On the basis of these results, we have selected the AeroEclipse II nebulizer for the delivery of pDNA/GL67A formulations to the lungs of CF patients as part of phase IIa/b clinical studies. PMID:24865497

  10. Aerosol delivery of DNA/liposomes to the lung for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davies, Lee Adrian; Nunez-Alonso, Graciela A; McLachlan, Gerry; Hyde, Stephen C; Gill, Deborah Rebecca

    2014-04-29

    Lung gene therapy is being evaluated for a range of acute and chronic diseases including cystic fibrosis (CF). As these therapies approach clinical realisation it is becoming increasingly clear that the ability to efficiently deliver gene transfer agents (GTAs) to target cell populations within the lung may prove just as critical as the gene therapy formulation itself in terms of generating positive clinical outcomes. Key to the success of any aerosol gene therapy is the interaction between the GTA and nebulisation device. We evaluated the effects of aerosolisation on our preferred formulation, plasmid DNA (pDNA) complexed with the cationic liposome GL67A (pDNA/GL67A) using commercially available nebuliser devices. The relatively high viscosity (6.3 ± 0.1 cP) and particulate nature of pDNA/GL67A formulations hindered stable aerosol generation in ultrasonic and vibrating mesh nebulisers, but was not problematic in the jet nebulisers tested. Aerosol size characteristics varied significantly between devices but the AeroEclipse II nebuliser operating at 50 psi generated stable pDNA/GL67A aerosols suitable for delivery to the CF lung (MMAD 3.4 ± 0.1 µm). Importantly, biological function of pDNA/GL67A formulations was retained following nebulisation and although aerosol delivery rate was lower than other devices (0.17 ± 0.01 ml/min) the breath-actuated AeroEclipse II nebuliser generated aerosol only during the inspiratory phase and as such was more efficient than other devices with 83 ± 3% of generated aerosol available for patient inhalation. Based on these results we have selected the AeroEclipse II nebuliser for the delivery of pDNA/GL67A formulations to the lungs of CF patients as part of Phase IIa/b clinical studies. PMID:24773062

  11. [News in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Delaisi, B

    2013-08-01

    The improvement over the last two decades in the treatment of cystic fibrosis led to an increase in life expectancy approaching 40 years at birth. Logically, the population of adult patients has been increasing and is currently 50% of patients followed in France. These therapeutic advances have justified the establishment in 2003 of a generalized neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis. The latest data of this screening show an incidence of CF of 1/5359 live births, far below the incidence of 1/2500 which was widely accepted twenty years ago. The performance of this screening is currently based on the dosage of trypsin immuno reactive, followed in case of exceeding the threshold of a search of the 30 most common mutations, can detect around 96% of 150 to 200 CF cases every year. Therefore, the possibility of a false negative of the screening cannot be excluded and evocative symptoms of cystic fibrosis, even for children born after 2003, will lead to prescribe a sweat test. While treatments available so far goal consequences of cystic fibrosis, a new therapeutic class to correct the functional defect of the mutated protein, called CFTR modulators, is emerging. Ivacaftor, leader of this new class, belonging to the category of "CFTR potentiator" got its access on the market in September 2012 for patients carrying the G551D mutation. New other molecules, named "CFTR correctors" which can have synergistic effect with ivacaftor and concern patients carrying the most common mutation--DF 508--are under development. PMID:23856023

  12. Current and future treatment options for cystic fibrosis lung disease: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Claire; Davies, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF) has conventionally targeted downstream consequences of the defect such as mucus plugging and infection. More recently, significant advances have been made in treating the root cause of the disease, namely a defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This review summarizes current pulmonary treatment options and highlights advances in research and development of new therapies. PMID:27347364

  13. Current and future treatment options for cystic fibrosis lung disease: latest evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Claire; Davies, Jane C

    2016-05-01

    Treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF) has conventionally targeted downstream consequences of the defect such as mucus plugging and infection. More recently, significant advances have been made in treating the root cause of the disease, namely a defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This review summarizes current pulmonary treatment options and highlights advances in research and development of new therapies. PMID:27347364

  14. [Cystic fibrosis and associated complications].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, C; Staab, D

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease. The mutation is located on the long arm of chromosome 7. Due to a defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, chloride ion transport is reduced across the cell membrane. As a result, the disease can be described as an exocrinopathy. In all organs with exocrine glands, disorders occur in association with the defective chloride transport. The main impact of this defect is manifested in the lungs. Therefore, the most common cause of death is pulmonary disease with respiratory insufficiency due to recurrent infections. Unfortunately, a cure for the disease is still not available. However, new therapies that may affect the CFTR mutation more specifically give new hope for better therapeutic options in the future. The long-term goal of therapy is to develop a causal therapy for all six different mutation classes and thus for about 2000 mutations. PMID:25693903

  15. Gas exchange in disease: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Young, Iven H; Bye, Peter T P

    2011-04-01

    Ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) inequality is the underlying abnormality determining hypoxemia and hypercapnia in lung diseases. Hypoxemia in asthma is characterized by the presence of low VA/Q units, which persist despite improvement in airway function after an attack. This hypoxemia is generally attenuated by compensatory redistribution of blood flow mediated by hypoxic vasoconstriction and changes in cardiac output, however, mediator release and bronchodilator therapy may cause deterioration. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have more complex patterns of VA/Q inequality, which appear more fixed, and changes in blood flow and ventilation have less benefit in improving gas exchange efficiency. The inability of ventilation to match increasing cardiac output limits exercise capacity as the disease progresses. Deteriorating hypoxemia during exacerbations reflects the falling mixed venous oxygen tension from increased respiratory muscle activity, which is not compensated by any redistribution of VA/Q ratios. Shunt is not a feature of any of these diseases. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have no substantial shunt when managed according to modern treatment regimens. Interstitial lung diseases demonstrate impaired oxygen diffusion across the alveolar-capillary barrier, particularly during exercise, although VA/Q inequality still accounts for most of the gas exchange abnormality. Hypoxemia may limit exercise capacity in these diseases and in CF. Persistent hypercapnic respiratory failure is a feature of advancing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF, closely associated with sleep disordered breathing, which is not a prominent feature of the other diseases. Better understanding of the mechanisms of hypercapnic respiratory failure, and of the detailed mechanisms controlling the distribution of ventilation and blood flow in the lung, are high priorities for future research. PMID:23737199

  16. Pulmonary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, M Y; Flight, W; Smith, E

    2014-03-01

    The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has steadily increased over recent decades with a corresponding increase in the frequency of complications of the disease. Radiologists are increasingly involved with managing and identifying the pulmonary complications of CF. This article reviews the common manifestations of CF lung disease as well as updating radiologists with a number of less well-known complications of the condition. Early and accurate detection of the pulmonary effects of CF are increasingly important to prevent irreversible lung damage and give patients the greatest possibility of benefiting from the new therapies becoming available, which correct the underlying defect causing CF. PMID:24361142

  17. Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability of Oral Sildenafil in Adults with Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Cousar, JL; Wiley, C; Felton, LA; St Clair, C; Jones, M; Curran-Everett, D; Poch, K; Nichols, DP; Solomon, GM; Saavedra, MT; Accurso, FJ; Nick, JA

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Airway inflammation is central to cystic fibrosis (CF) pathophysiology. Pre-clinical models have shown that phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDEi) like sildenafil have anti-inflammatory activity. PDEi have not been studied in CF subjects. Objectives We evaluated the pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety of sildenafil in subjects with CF. Sputum biomarkers were used to explore efficacy. Methods An open-label pilot study of oral sildenafil administration was conducted in adults with mild to moderate CF lung disease. Subjects received oral sildenafil 20 or 40 mg p.o. t.i.d. for 6 weeks. Measurements and Main Results Twenty subjects completed the study. Estimated elimination rate constants were statistically different in subjects with CF compared to previously published non-CF subjects. Side effects were generally mild. There were no drug-related serious adverse events. Sputum neutrophil elastase activity decreased. Conclusions Subjects with CF may eliminate sildenafil at a faster rate than non-CF subjects. Sildenafil administration was safe in subjects with CF, and decreased sputum elastase activity. Sildenafil warrants further study as an anti-inflammatory in CF. PMID:25466700

  18. [Effect of montelukast on lung function and clinical symptoms in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Iwona; Korzeniewska, Aleksandra; Smejda, Katarzyna; Jarosz, Iwona; Stelmach, Włodzimierz

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory process contributes to progressive lung tissue damage in cystic fibrosis (CF). Cysteinyl leukotrienes have been found in the sputum of CF patients at concentrations sufficient to cause potent biological effect. This study was designed to assess the effect of anti-inflammatory treatment with montelukast sodium in CF patients. Twelve patients, aged 6-29 were recruited. It was 20 week, placebo-controlled, and randomized, double blind, crossover trial. At first and last week of each treatment course spirometry and whole body plethysmography parameters (FEV1, PEF, FEF25/75%, VC, TGV, Raw and RV) and clinical wheezing and cough scale were measured. In montelukast group significant improvement in FEV1 (mean +/- SD, 54.6 +/- 22.6 before and 62 +/- 19.0 after treatment, p=0.0112) and FEF25/75% (28.9 +/- 23.0 before and 37.5 +/- 25.5 after treatment, p=0.0053) were observed. Compared with placebo montelukast significantly improved FEV1 (p=0.0032), PEF (p=0.0298) and FEF25/75% (p=0.0091). There was no significant difference in VC, TGV, Raw and RV. Montelukast compared with placebo significantly decreased cough (p<0.0001) and wheezing (p=0.0002) score. In summary, therapy with montelukast may provide clinical benefit to patients with CF. PMID:15757268

  19. Pyrosequencing reveals transient cystic fibrosis lung microbiome changes with intravenous antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel J; Badrick, Alison C; Zakrzewski, Martha; Krause, Lutz; Bell, Scott C; Anderson, Gregory J; Reid, David W

    2014-10-01

    Chronic airway infection in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) is polymicrobial and the impact of intravenous antibiotics on the bacterial community composition is poorly understood. We employed culture-independent molecular techniques to explore the early effects of i.v. antibiotics on the CF airway microbiome. DNA was extracted from sputum samples collected from adult subjects with CF at three time-points (before starting treatment, and at day 3 and day 8-10 of i.v. antibiotics) during treatment of an infective pulmonary exacerbation. Microbial community profiles were derived through analysis of bacterial-derived 16S ribosomal RNA by pyrosequencing and changes over time were compared. 59 sputum samples were collected during 24 pulmonary exacerbations from 23 subjects. Between treatment onset and day 3 there was a significant reduction in the relative abundance of Pseudomonas and increased microbial diversity. By day 8-10, bacterial community composition was similar to pre-treatment. Changes in community composition did not predict improvements in lung function. The relative abundance of Pseudomonas falls rapidly in subjects with CF receiving i.v. antibiotic treatment for a pulmonary exacerbation and is accompanied by an increase in overall microbial diversity. However, this effect is not maintained beyond the first week of treatment. PMID:25034564

  20. Lung clearance index in cystic fibrosis subjects treated for pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Sonneveld, Nicole; Stanojevic, Sanja; Amin, Reshma; Aurora, Paul; Davies, Jane; Elborn, J Stuart; Horsley, Alex; Latzin, Philipp; O'Neill, Katherine; Robinson, Paul; Scrase, Emma; Selvadurai, Hiran; Subbarao, Padmaja; Welsh, Liam; Yammine, Sophie; Ratjen, Felix

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary exacerbations are important clinical events for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Studies assessing the ability of the lung clearance index (LCI) to detect treatment response for pulmonary exacerbations have yielded heterogeneous results. Here, we conduct a retrospective analysis of pooled LCI data to assess treatment with intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations and to understand factors explaining the heterogeneous response.A systematic literature search was performed to identify prospective observational studies. Factors predicting the relative change in LCI and spirometry were evaluated while adjusting for within-study clustering.Six previously reported studies and one unpublished study, which included 176 pulmonary exacerbations in both paediatric and adult patients, were included. Overall, LCI significantly decreased by 0.40 units (95% CI -0.60- -0.19, p=0.004) or 2.5% following treatment. The relative change in LCI was significantly correlated with the relative change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), but results were discordant in 42.5% of subjects (80 out of 188). Higher (worse) baseline LCI was associated with a greater improvement in LCI (slope: -0.9%, 95% CI -1.0- -0.4%).LCI response to therapy for pulmonary exacerbations is heterogeneous in CF patients; the overall effect size is small and results are often discordant with FEV1. PMID:26160868

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses multiple pathways to acquire iron during chronic infection in cystic fibrosis lungs.

    PubMed

    Konings, Anna F; Martin, Lois W; Sharples, Katrina J; Roddam, Louise F; Latham, Roger; Reid, David W; Lamont, Iain L

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronically infects the lungs of more than 80% of adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is a major contributor to the progression of disease pathology. P. aeruginosa requires iron for growth and has multiple iron uptake systems that have been studied in bacteria grown in laboratory culture. The purpose of this research was to determine which of these are active during infection in CF. RNA was extracted from 149 sputum samples obtained from 23 CF patients. Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to measure the expression of P. aeruginosa genes encoding transport systems for the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin, for heme, and for ferrous ions. Expression of P. aeruginosa genes could be quantified in 89% of the sputum samples. Expression of genes associated with siderophore-mediated iron uptake was detected in most samples but was at low levels in some samples, indicating that other iron uptake mechanisms are active. Expression of genes encoding heme transport systems was also detected in most samples, indicating that heme uptake occurs during infection in CF. feoB expression was detected in all sputum samples, implying an important role for ferrous ion uptake by P. aeruginosa in CF. Our data show that multiple P. aeruginosa iron uptake mechanisms are active in chronic CF infection and that RT-qPCR of RNA extracted from sputum provides a powerful tool for investigating bacterial physiology during infection in CF. PMID:23690396

  2. Aspergillus infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    King, Jill; Brunel, Shan F; Warris, Adilia

    2016-07-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic lung infection and airway inflammation. Respiratory failure secondary to chronic or recurrent infection remains the commonest cause of death and accounts for over 90% of mortality. Bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex have been regarded the main CF pathogens and their role in progressive lung decline has been studied extensively. Little attention has been paid to the role of Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi in the pathogenesis of non-ABPA (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis) respiratory disease in CF, despite their frequent recovery in respiratory samples. It has become more apparent however, that Aspergillus spp. may play an important role in chronic lung disease in CF. Research delineating the underlying mechanisms of Aspergillus persistence and infection in the CF lung and its link to lung deterioration is lacking. This review summarizes the Aspergillus disease phenotypes observed in CF, discusses the role of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator)-protein in innate immune responses and new treatment modalities. PMID:27177733

  3. Biogeochemical Forces Shape the Composition and Physiology of Polymicrobial Communities in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Robert A.; Lim, Yan Wei; Maughan, Heather; Conrad, Douglas; Rohwer, Forest; Whiteson, Katrine L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cystic fibrosis (CF) lung contains thick mucus colonized by opportunistic pathogens which adapt to the CF lung environment over decades. The difficulty associated with sampling airways has impeded a thorough examination of the biochemical microhabitats these pathogens are exposed to. An indirect approach is to study the responses of microbial communities to these microhabitats, facilitated by high-throughput sequencing of microbial DNA and RNA from sputum samples. Microbial metagenomes and metatranscriptomes were sequenced from multiple CF patients, and the reads were assigned taxonomy and function through sequence homology to NCBI and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database hierarchies. For a comparison, saliva microbial metagenomes from the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) were also analyzed. These analyses identified that functions encoded and expressed by CF microbes were significantly enriched for amino acid catabolism, folate biosynthesis, and lipoic acid biosynthesis. The data indicate that the community uses oxidative phosphorylation as a major energy source but that terminal electron acceptors were diverse. Nitrate reduction was the most abundant anaerobic respiratory pathway, and genes for nitrate reductase were largely assigned to Pseudomonas and Rothia. Although many reductive pathways of the nitrogen cycle were present, the cycle was incomplete, because the oxidative pathways were absent. Due to the abundant amino acid catabolism and incomplete nitrogen cycle, the CF microbial community appears to accumulate ammonia. This finding was verified experimentally using a CF bronchiole culture model system. The data also revealed abundant sensing and transport of iron, ammonium, zinc, and other metals along with a low-oxygen environment. This study reveals the core biochemistry and physiology of the CF microbiome. PMID:24643867

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Posaconazole Suspension in Lung Transplant Patients with and without Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongfei; Nguyen, M Hong; Clancy, Cornelius J; Joshi, Rujuta; Zhao, Wenchen; Ensor, Chris; Venkataramanan, Raman; Shields, Ryan K

    2016-06-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are common among lung transplant recipients (LTRs). Posaconazole is an important antifungal agent for both prophylaxis and treatment of IFIs; however, detailed pharmacokinetic data are limited among LTRs, particularly those with cystic fibrosis (CF). Our objective was to conduct a pharmacokinetic study of posaconazole oral suspension among LTRs, with particular attention to patients with CF. We enrolled 20 LTRs, 7 with CF and 13 with other underlying lung diseases. Average daily doses in CF and non-CF patients were 829 and 862 mg, respectively. After ≥5 days of treatment, only 4 patients had average plasma concentrations of >0.7 μg/ml. Average steady-state plasma concentrations were 61% lower in CF patients (0.233 μg/ml) than in non-CF LTRs (0.594 μg/ml; P = 0.03). The average dose-normalized plasma area-under-the-curve (AUC) values were also lower in CF (0.007 h·μg/ml) than in non-CF LTRs (0.02 h·μg/ml; P = 0.02). The weight-normalized apparent oral clearance values were 2.51 and 0.74 liters/h/kg among CF and non-CF LTRs, respectively (P = 0.005). Despite significant interpatient variability, plasma trough concentrations were strongly correlated with posaconazole AUC across all LTRs (r(2) = 0.95, P < 0.0001). Taken together, our study highlights a critical need to incorporate new formulations of posaconazole into prophylaxis and treatment strategies for LTRs, particularly those with CF. Future pharmacokinetic studies of both tablet and intravenous formulations must consider LTR-specific factors and incorporate a therapeutic drug monitoring plan in this patient population. PMID:27021324

  5. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  6. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis and the Lung Disease Associated with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency are two of the commonest lethal hereditary lung diseases affecting white individuals. Although having quite different phenotypic extrapulmonary presentations, the lung disease associated with these conditions is exemplified by a neutrophil-dominated inflammation in which neutrophil elastase plays a major role. In AAT deficiency the diminution of the anti-neutrophil elastase protection, due to diminished AAT levels in the lung, predisposes the lung to an unopposed neutrophil elastase attack, whereas, in cystic fibrosis, the levels of AAT and other antiproteases are normal, but the neutrophil elastase burden is so large that it overwhelms the normal anti-neutrophil elastase protection. With this as background, it seems logical to augment the anti-neutrophil elastase defenses of the lung in both conditions using exogenous AAT. The type of AAT, the route of administration, and the physiologic, radiologic, and clinical readouts for this type of therapy are discussed, along with the similarities and differences between the two conditions and their responses to AAT therapy. PMID:27115956

  7. Epidemiology of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Spoonhower, Kimberly A; Davis, Pamela B

    2016-03-01

    Improved quality of care and rapidly emerging therapeutic strategies to restore chloride transport profoundly impact the epidemiology and pathobiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) in the twenty-first century. CF now serves as a model for chronic illness management, continuous quality improvement via registry data, and a seamless link between basic science research, translational studies, clinical trials, and outcomes research to enable rapid expansion of treatment options. PMID:26857763

  8. Pancreatic pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas is one of the earliest, and most commonly affected, organs in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Studying the pathogenesis of pancreatic disease is limited in CF patients, due to its early clinical onset, co-morbidities and lack of tissue samples from the early phases of disease. In recent years, several new CF animal models have been developed that have advanced our understanding of both CF exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease. Additionally, these models have helped us to better define the influence of pancreatic lesions on CF disease progression in other organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and lung. PMID:26365583

  9. Improved quality of life after lung transplantation in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Karin M; van der Bij, Wim; Erasmus, Michiel E; Duiverman, Eric J; Koëter, Gerard H; TenVergert, Elisabeth M

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of lung transplantation (LgTX) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in a group of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), compared to patients with other diagnoses (non-CF). HRQL was assessed before transplantation in a group of 32 CF patients and 183 non-CF patients. After LgTX, we conducted a prospective longitudinal study among 10 CF patients and 35 non-CF patients who survived at least 31 months after LgTX. Measures were the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZUNG), the Index of Well-Being (IWB), and the Karnofsky Performance Index. Patients in the CF group were younger, spent more days on the waiting list, and were more likely to be working or going to school than patients with other indications. Before transplantation, CF patients and non-CF patients experienced restrictions on almost all HRQL measures, compared to the general population. On the NHP dimensions of mobility and energy, CF patients had significantly better scores than non-CF patients. Between 1-4 months after transplantation, scores on the NHP, ZUNG, and Karnofsky performance indices improved, and STAI and IWB scores even occurred within the reference value in both groups. Significantly better scores in the CF group compared to the non-CF group were found on the NHP dimension of mobility 4 months after transplantation, and on the dimension of sleep 7 and 13 months after transplantation. Scores remained more or less stable over time in both groups. It may be concluded that patients in both groups experience major restrictions in HRQL before transplantation. However, pretransplant non-CF patients experience more restrictions than CF patients. After LgTX, both groups of patients showed substantial improvement in HRQL, and this improvement was maintained until 31 months after LgTX. PMID:15095325

  10. Inhaled hypertonic saline in adults hospitalised for exacerbation of cystic fibrosis lung disease: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, David A; Hornick, Douglas B; Durairaj, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhaled hypertonic saline (HTS) improves quality of life and reduces pulmonary exacerbations when given long term in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While increasingly being offered for acute pulmonary exacerbations, little is known about the efficacy in this setting. Objectives The authors examined the tolerability and efficacy of HTS use among adult subjects hospitalised with a CF pulmonary exacerbation and hypothesised that use of HTS would improve pulmonary function during the admission. Design Pilot retrospective non-randomised study. Setting Single tertiary care centre. Participants 45 subjects admitted to the inpatient service for acute CF pulmonary exacerbation in 2006–2007. A subset of 18 subjects who were also admitted in 2005 when HTS was not available was included in the comparative study. Primary outcome Change in forced expiratory volume in one second from admission to discharge. Secondary outcomes Change in weight from admission to discharge and time to next exacerbation. Results Mean age was 32.5 years, and mean length of stay was 11.5 days. HTS was offered to 33 subjects and was well tolerated for a total use of 336 days out of 364 days of hospital stay. Baseline demographics, lung function and sputum culture results were comparable in first and second visits. Use of HTS was not associated with an improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second (p=0.1), weight gain (p=0.24) or in the time to next admission (p=0.08). Conclusions These pilot data suggest that HTS is well tolerated during CF pulmonary exacerbation but offers no clear outcome benefits. It is possible that HTS may not have much advantage above and beyond intensive rehabilitation and intravenous antibiotics and may add to hospital costs and treatment burden. PMID:22517980

  11. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  12. Oxidant stress stimulates anion secretion from the human airway epithelial cell line calu-3: implications for cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with tissue damage in the lung and may be a common element in the pathogenesis of all inflammatory lung diseases. Exposure to the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) evoked a rapid increase in transepithelial anion secretion across monolayers of the human submucosal gland serous cell line Calu-3. This increase was almost entirely abolished by the addition of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC), implicating the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel in the response. The response was also reduced by inhibitors of basolateral K+ channels. Studies of electrically isolated apical and basolateral membranes revealed that H2O2 stimulated both apical Cl− and basolateral K+ conductances (GCl and GK). Apical GCl was sensitive to DPC, but unaffected by 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS), suggesting that CFTR is the major anion conduction pathway mediating the response to H2O2. Additionally, H2O2 had no effect on GCl in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or following maximal stimulation of GCl with forskolin, implicating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway in the apical response to H2O2. Basolateral GK was reduced by the K+ channel inhibitors clotrimazole and clofilium, indicating roles for KCNN4 and KCNQ1 in the H2O2-stimulated response. We propose that ROS-stimulated anion secretion from serous cells plays an important role in keeping the airways clear from damaging radicals that could potentially initiate tissue destruction. Our finding that this response is CFTR dependent suggests that an important host defence mechanism would be dysfunctional in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. Loss of this compensatory protective mechanism could expose the CF lung to ROS for extended periods, which could be important in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. PMID:12181292

  13. Oxidant stress stimulates anion secretion from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3: implications for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-08-15

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with tissue damage in the lung and may be a common element in the pathogenesis of all inflammatory lung diseases. Exposure to the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) evoked a rapid increase in transepithelial anion secretion across monolayers of the human submucosal gland serous cell line Calu-3. This increase was almost entirely abolished by the addition of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC), implicating the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel in the response. The response was also reduced by inhibitors of basolateral K+ channels. Studies of electrically isolated apical and basolateral membranes revealed that H2O2 stimulated both apical Cl- and basolateral K+ conductances (G(Cl) and G(K)). Apical G(Cl) was sensitive to DPC, but unaffected by 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), suggesting that CFTR is the major anion conduction pathway mediating the response to H2O2. Additionally, H2O2 had no effect on G(Cl) in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or following maximal stimulation of G(Cl) with forskolin, implicating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway in the apical response to H2O2. Basolateral G(K) was reduced by the K+ channel inhibitors clotrimazole and clofilium, indicating roles for KCNN4 and KCNQ1 in the H2O2-stimulated response. We propose that ROS-stimulated anion secretion from serous cells plays an important role in keeping the airways clear from damaging radicals that could potentially initiate tissue destruction. Our finding that this response is CFTR dependent suggests that an important host defence mechanism would be dysfunctional in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. Loss of this compensatory protective mechanism could expose the CF lung to ROS for extended periods, which could be important in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. PMID:12181292

  14. [Macrolides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Guillot, M; Amiour, M; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Paris, C

    2006-10-01

    Long-term low dose azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is safe and reduces the decline in lung function, the number of acute exacerbations and improves nutritional status; underlying efficacy mechanisms are multiple and synergistic. PMID:17370396

  15. Long-term leukopenia in a lung transplanted patient with cystic fibrosis treated with zoledronic acid: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karahasanovic, A; Thorsteinsson, A-L; Bjarnason, N H; Eiken, P

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a serious autosomal recessive genetic disorder associated with chronic lung disease, malabsorption, malnutrition, pancreatic insufficiency and premature respiratory failure. Recent advances in medical science and technology have increased the lifespan of patients with CF, albeit with long-term consequences of the disease, such as osteoporosis, becoming of increasing significance. The medical treatment of osteoporosis in patients with CF or after organ transplantation is still being explored, and no clear guidelines regarding the best choice of bisphosphonate exist. We report a case of a young woman with CF, lung transplantation and low bone mass developing long-term leukopenia after treatment with zoledronic acid. The leukopenia, with a strong affection of the neutrocytes, lasted for 4 months and the condition only went into remission after granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. It is important to be aware of symptomatic leukopenia in immunosuppressive patients after treatment with zoledronic acid. PMID:27080707

  16. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  17. Chloride impermeability in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinton, Paul M.

    1983-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal genetic disease affecting Caucasians and is perhaps best characterized as an exocrinopathy involving a disturbance in fluid and electrolyte transport1. A high NaCl concentration in the sweat is characteristic of patients with this disease; the basic physiological reason for this abnormality is unknown. We have microperfused isolated sweat ducts from control subjects and cystic fibrosis patients, and report here results which suggest that abnormally low Cl- permeability in cystic fibrosis leads to poor reabsorption of NaCl in the sweat duct, and hence to a high concentration of NaCl in the sweat.

  18. Managing diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Laguna, T A; Nathan, B M; Moran, A

    2010-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is the most common co-morbidity in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). As the life expectancy of persons with CF continues to increase, the need to proactively diagnose and aggressively treat CFRD and its potential complications has become more apparent. CFRD negatively impacts lung function, growth and mortality, making its diagnosis and management crucial in a population already at high risk for early mortality. Compared to type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD is a unique entity, requiring a thorough understanding of its unique pathophysiology to facilitate the creation and utilization of an effective medical treatment plan. The physiology of CFRD is complex, likely consisting of a combination of insulin deficiency, insulin resistance and a genetic predisposition towards the development of diabetes. However, the hallmark of CFRD is insulin deficiency, necessitating the use of exogenous insulin as the mainstay of therapy. Insulin administration, in combination with a multidisciplinary team of health professionals with expertise in the care of patients with CF and CFRD, is the cornerstone of the care for these patients. The goals of treatment of the CFRD population are to reverse protein catabolism, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce acute and chronic diabetes complications. Creating a partnership between the treatment team and the patient is the ideal way to accomplish these goals and is essential for successful diabetes care. PMID:20920037

  19. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretory product pyocyanin inactivates alpha1 protease inhibitor: implications for the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Britigan, B E; Railsback, M A; Cox, C D

    1999-03-01

    Alpha1 Protease inhibitor (alpha1PI) modulates serine protease activity in the lung. Reactive oxygen species inactivate alpha1PI, and this process has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of forms of lung injury. An imbalance of protease-antiprotease activity is also detected in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis-associated lung disease who are infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa secretes pyocyanin, which, through its ability to redox cycle, induces cells to generate reactive oxygen species. We tested the hypothesis that redox cycling of pyocyanin could lead to inactivation of alpha1PI. When alpha1PI was exposed to NADH and pyocyanin, a combination that results in superoxide production, alpha1PI lost its ability to form an inhibitory complex with both porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) and trypsin. Similarly, addition of pyocyanin to cultures of human airway epithelial cells to which alpha1PI was also added resulted in a loss of the ability of alpha1PI to form a complex with PPE or trypsin. Neither superoxide dismutase, catalase, nor dimethylthiourea nor depletion of the media of O2 to prevent formation of reactive oxygen species blocked pyocyanin-mediated inactivation of alpha1PI. These data raise the possibility that a direct interaction between reduced pyocyanin and alpha1PI is involved in the process. Consistent with this possibility, pretreatment of alpha1PI with the reducing agent beta-mercaptoethanol also inhibited binding of trypsin to alpha1PI. These data suggest that pyocyanin could contribute to lung injury in the P. aeruginosa-infected airway of cystic fibrosis patients by decreasing the ability of alpha1PI to control the local activity of serine proteases. PMID:10024562

  20. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Secretory Product Pyocyanin Inactivates α1 Protease Inhibitor: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Britigan, Bradley E.; Railsback, Michelle A.; Cox, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    α1 Protease inhibitor (α1PI) modulates serine protease activity in the lung. Reactive oxygen species inactivate α1PI, and this process has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of forms of lung injury. An imbalance of protease-antiprotease activity is also detected in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis-associated lung disease who are infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa secretes pyocyanin, which, through its ability to redox cycle, induces cells to generate reactive oxygen species. We tested the hypothesis that redox cycling of pyocyanin could lead to inactivation of α1PI. When α1PI was exposed to NADH and pyocyanin, a combination that results in superoxide production, α1PI lost its ability to form an inhibitory complex with both porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) and trypsin. Similarly, addition of pyocyanin to cultures of human airway epithelial cells to which α1PI was also added resulted in a loss of the ability of α1PI to form a complex with PPE or trypsin. Neither superoxide dismutase, catalase, nor dimethylthiourea nor depletion of the media of O2 to prevent formation of reactive oxygen species blocked pyocyanin-mediated inactivation of α1PI. These data raise the possibility that a direct interaction between reduced pyocyanin and α1PI is involved in the process. Consistent with this possibility, pretreatment of α1PI with the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol also inhibited binding of trypsin to α1PI. These data suggest that pyocyanin could contribute to lung injury in the P. aeruginosa-infected airway of cystic fibrosis patients by decreasing the ability of α1PI to control the local activity of serine proteases. PMID:10024562

  1. [Rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Mainz, J G; Gerber, A; Arnold, C; Baumann, J; Baumann, I; Koitschev, A

    2015-11-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) mucociliary clearance of the entire respiratory system is impaired. This allows pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa to persist and proliferate, which by progressive pulmonary destruction causes 90 % of premature deaths due to this inherited disease. The dramatic improvement in life expectation of patients due to intensive therapy has resulted in the inevitable but variably expressed sinonasal involvement coming into the clinical and scientific focus. Thereby, almost all CF patients reveal sinonasal pathology and many suffer from chronic rhinosinusitis. Recently, the sinonasal niche has been recognized as a site of initial and persistent colonization by pathogens. This article presents the pathophysiological background of this multiorgan disease as well as general diagnostic and therapeutic standards. The focus of this article is on sinonasal involvement and conservative and surgical options for treatment. Prevention of pathogen acquisition is an essential issue in the otorhinolaryngological treatment of CF patients. PMID:26495450

  2. Management issues for adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Withers, Adelaide Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The healthy adolescent will encounter major changes in biological and psychosocial domains. The adolescent period can be greatly affected by a chronic illness. Cystic fibrosis is a terminal illness that can significantly affect an adolescent's biological, mental and psychosocial health. This paper discusses general issues to consider when managing an adolescent with a chronic medical condition, and specifically how cystic fibrosis may impact upon puberty, body image, risk-taking behaviours, mental health, independence, nonadherence, reproductive health, transition, lung transplantation, and end of life care. PMID:22991662

  3. Cystic fibrosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, N E; Farquharson, D F

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the outcomes of pregnancies in women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to address issues pertinent to the obstetric care of such women. DATA SOURCES: English-language case reports and case series published from 1960 to 1991 identified through a search of MEDLINE and Index Medicus. The terms of reference were "cystic fibrosis" and "pregnancy". Not all the reports reviewed addressed all the outcomes under consideration. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 20 reports citing cases of pregnancy in women with CF. DATA EXTRACTION: Outcomes included the number of spontaneous abortions, pregnancies continued beyond 20 weeks, preterm deliveries, maternal deaths at 6 months and 2 years after delivery and perinatal deaths. Breast-feeding was addressed. Measures to assess the severity of maternal disease included the mean age at diagnosis of CF, weight gain during pregnancy, pulmonary function studies if available and the need for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 217 pregnancies in 162 women spontaneous abortion occurred in 10 (4.6%). Pregnancy progressed beyond 20 weeks in 81.6% of cases; 24.3% of the deliveries were preterm. The maternal death rate did not exceed that among age-related women with CF who were not pregnant. The rate of perinatal death was 7.9%. Breast milk was not hypernatremic. Poor outcomes were associated with a weight gain of less than 4.5 kg and a forced vital capacity of less than 50% of the predicted value. CONCLUSIONS: Premature labour and delivery remain a significant risk for pregnant women with CF, contributing to a high rate of perinatal death. Maternal illness and death result from deteriorating pulmonary function. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated. Attention to energy intake and pulmonary function is important. PMID:8374843

  4. Pandoraea pulmonicola chronic colonization in a cystic fibrosis patient, France

    PubMed Central

    Kokcha, S; Bittar, F; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Mely, L; Gomez, C; Gaubert, J-Y; Thomas, P; Rolain, J-M

    2013-01-01

    Pandoraea are considered emerging multidrug resistant pathogens in the context of cystic fibrosis. We report herein for the first time the case of a 30-year-old woman with cystic fibrosis, living in France, who was chronically infected with Pandoraea pulmonicola and who died of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis 3 weeks after bilateral lung transplantation. PMID:25356323

  5. Genetics Home Reference: cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... protects the linings of the airways, digestive system, reproductive system, and other organs and tissues. In people with ... experience health problems affecting the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems. Most men with cystic fibrosis have congenital bilateral ...

  6. Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... age 2, he grew up playing everything from football and lacrosse to ice hockey and golf. And ... Who's at Risk? Cystic fibrosis affects males and females from all racial and ethnic groups. It is ...

  7. Analysis of the cystic fibrosis lung microbiota via serial Illumina sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA hypervariable regions.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Heather; Wang, Pauline W; Diaz Caballero, Julio; Fung, Pauline; Gong, Yunchen; Donaldson, Sylva L; Yuan, Lijie; Keshavjee, Shaf; Zhang, Yu; Yau, Yvonne C W; Waters, Valerie J; Tullis, D Elizabeth; Hwang, David M; Guttman, David S

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of bacterial communities using DNA sequencing has revolutionized our ability to study microbes in nature and discover the ways in which microbial communities affect ecosystem functioning and human health. Here we describe Serial Illumina Sequencing (SI-Seq): a method for deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using next-generation sequencing technology. SI-Seq serially sequences portions of the V5, V6 and V7 hypervariable regions from barcoded 16S rRNA amplicons using an Illumina short-read genome analyzer. SI-Seq obtains taxonomic resolution similar to 454 pyrosequencing for a fraction of the cost, and can produce hundreds of thousands of reads per sample even with very high multiplexing. We validated SI-Seq using single species and mock community controls, and via a comparison to cystic fibrosis lung microbiota sequenced using 454 FLX Titanium. Our control runs show that SI-Seq has a dynamic range of at least five orders of magnitude, can classify >96% of sequences to the genus level, and performs just as well as 454 and paired-end Illumina methods in estimation of standard microbial ecology diversity measurements. We illustrate the utility of SI-Seq in a pilot sample of central airway secretion samples from cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:23056217

  8. MicroRNA Dysregulation in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    McKiernan, Paul J.; Greene, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis lung is a complex milieu comprising multiple factors that coordinate its physiology. MicroRNAs are regulatory factors involved in most biological processes and it is becoming increasingly clear that they play a key role in the development and manifestations of CF lung disease. These small noncoding RNAs act posttranscriptionally to inhibit protein production. Their involvement in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease stems from the fact that their expression is altered in vivo in the CF lung due to intrinsic and extrinsic factors; to date defective chloride ion conductance, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, and infection have been implicated in altering endogenous miRNA expression in this setting. Here, the current state-of-the-art and biological consequences of altered microRNA expression in cystic fibrosis are reviewed. PMID:26185362

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exploits Lipid A and Muropeptides Modification as a Strategy to Lower Innate Immunity during Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ieranò, Teresa; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Bianconi, Irene; Silipo, Alba; Cozzolino, Flora; Lanzetta, Rosa; Molinaro, Antonio; Bernardini, Maria Lina; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long airways chronic infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with pathogenic variants distinguished from initially acquired strain. Here, we analysed chemical and biological activity of P. aeruginosa Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) in clonal strains, including mucoid and non-mucoid phenotypes, isolated during a period of up to 7.5 years from a CF patient. Chemical structure by MS spectrometry defined lipopolysaccharide (LPS) lipid A and peptidoglycan (PGN) muropeptides with specific structural modifications temporally associated with CF lung infection. Gene sequence analysis revealed novel mutation in pagL, which supported lipid A changes. Both LPS and PGN had different potencies when activating host innate immunity via binding TLR4 and Nod1. Significantly higher NF-kB activation, IL-8 expression and production were detected in HEK293hTLR4/MD2-CD14 and HEK293hNod1 after stimulation with LPS and PGN respectively, purified from early P. aeruginosa strain as compared to late strains. Similar results were obtained in macrophages-like cells THP-1, epithelial cells of CF origin IB3-1 and their isogenic cells C38, corrected by insertion of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). In murine model, altered LPS structure of P. aeruginosa late strains induces lower leukocyte recruitment in bronchoalveolar lavage and MIP-2, KC and IL-1β cytokine levels in lung homogenates when compared with early strain. Histopathological analysis of lung tissue sections confirmed differences between LPS from early and late P. aeruginosa. Finally, in this study for the first time we unveil how P. aeruginosa has evolved the capacity to evade immune system detection, thus promoting survival and establishing favourable conditions for chronic persistence. Our findings provide relevant information with respect to chronic infections in CF. PMID:20037649

  10. A comparison of change point models with application to longitudinal lung function measurements in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Angela; Juarez-Colunga, E; Nathoo, Farouk; Wagner, Brandie; Sagel, Scott

    2016-05-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary lung disease characterized by loss of lung function over time. Lung function in CF is believed to decline at a higher rate during the adolescence period. It has been also hypothesized that there is a subgroup of individuals for whom lung disease remains relatively stable with only a slight decline over their lifetime. Using data from the University of Colorado CF Children's Registry, we investigate four change point models to model the decline of lung function in children and adolescents: (i) a two-component mixture random change point model, (ii) a two-component mixture-fixed change point model, (iii) a random change point model, and (iv) a fixed change point model. The models are investigated through posterior predictive simulation at the individual and population levels, and a simulation study examining the effects of model misspecification. The data support the mixed random change point model as the preferred model, with roughly 30% of adolescents experiencing a steady decline of 0.5 %FEV1 per year and 70% experiencing an increase in decline of 4.4 %FEV1 per year beginning on average at 14.6 years of age. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27118629

  11. Genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies five modifier loci of lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Blackman, Scott M; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Gallins, Paul J; Pace, Rhonda G; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R; Accurso, Frank J; Clement, Annick; Collaco, Joseph M; Dang, Hong; Dang, Anthony T; Franca, Arianna; Gong, Jiafen; Guillot, Loic; Keenan, Katherine; Li, Weili; Lin, Fan; Patrone, Michael V; Raraigh, Karen S; Sun, Lei; Zhou, Yi-Hui; O'Neal, Wanda K; Sontag, Marci K; Levy, Hara; Durie, Peter R; Rommens, Johanna M; Drumm, Mitchell L; Wright, Fred A; Strug, Lisa J; Cutting, Garry R; Knowles, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    The identification of small molecules that target specific CFTR variants has ushered in a new era of treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), yet optimal, individualized treatment of CF will require identification and targeting of disease modifiers. Here we use genome-wide association analysis to identify genetic modifiers of CF lung disease, the primary cause of mortality. Meta-analysis of 6,365 CF patients identifies five loci that display significant association with variation in lung disease. Regions on chr3q29 (MUC4/MUC20; P=3.3 × 10(-11)), chr5p15.3 (SLC9A3; P=6.8 × 10(-12)), chr6p21.3 (HLA Class II; P=1.2 × 10(-8)) and chrXq22-q23 (AGTR2/SLC6A14; P=1.8 × 10(-9)) contain genes of high biological relevance to CF pathophysiology. The fifth locus, on chr11p12-p13 (EHF/APIP; P=1.9 × 10(-10)), was previously shown to be associated with lung disease. These results provide new insights into potential targets for modulating lung disease severity in CF. PMID:26417704

  12. Impact of Long-Term Tiotropium Bromide Therapy on Annual Lung Function Decline in Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Claudia; Thronicke, Anja; Roehmel, Jobst F.; Krannich, Alexander; Staab, Doris; Schwarz, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic lung disease is the leading cause of death in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and is often treated with bronchodilators. It is not known whether long-term tiotropium bromide treatment may have a positive impact on lung function. Methods This retrospective cohort study estimated annual lung function decline utilizing longitudinal data for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). Results A total of 160 adult patients with CF were analyzed. The subjects treated for 24 months with tiotropium bromide had a significantly slower decline of mean annual change of FEV1 (treated: -0.3±4.0%; control: -2.3±5.0%; p = 0.0130). In patients with FEV1 ≥70% predicted, long-term tiotropium bromide treatment was associated with greater improvements in annual lung function decline (FEV1 ≥70% predicted: treated: +0.5±4.7%; control: -4.0±6.3%; p = 0.0132; FEV1 50–69% predicted: treated: -0.5±4.4%; control: -0.8±3.8%; p = 0.7142; FEV1 ≤49% predicted: treated: -0.6±3.4%; control: -2.4±4.8%; p = 0.0898). Conclusion This study suggests that long-term tiotropium bromide treatment may be associated with reduced annual decline of FEV1 in patients with CF, particularly in adults with a mild degree of severity. PMID:27351829

  13. Cystic Fibrosis Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Le, Christopher; McCrary, Hilary C; Chang, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene(CFTR) resulting in impaired ion transport. Nearly all people with CF will develop chronic rhino-sinusitis (CRS) and present with the characteristic viscous mucus, impaired mucociliary clearance and chronic inflammation/infection of the sinonasal cavity. While some individuals with CF can appear relatively asymptomatic in terms of their sinus disease, commonly reported symptoms include anosmia, headache, facial pain, nasal obstruction, chronic congestion and nasal discharge. Nasal endoscopy typically reveals mucosal edema, purulent discharge and nasal polyposis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging classically demonstrates the distinguishing findings of sinus hypoplasia or aplasia with generalized opacification, medial bulging of the lateral sinonasal sidewall and a demineralized uncinate process. Current treatment for CF sinusitis includes the use of hypertonic saline, topical and systemic steroids, antibiotics and endoscopic surgery. Research investigating novel therapies designed at targeting the primary defect of CF is showing promise for reversal of CF sinus disease, in addition to potential for disease prevention. PMID:27466844

  14. AEROSOL DEPOSITION AS A FUNCTION OF AIRWAY DISEASE: CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Progressive lung disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a continuous interaction of the processes of airway obstruction, infection and inflammation. ecent literature has suggested that the manifestation of CF could compromise the successful administration of pharmacologi...

  15. RPTOR, a novel target of miR-155, elicits a fibrotic phenotype of cystic fibrosis lung epithelium by upregulating CTGF.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Motohiro; Kalurupalle, Swathi; Kumar, Parameet; Ghoshal, Sarani; Zhang, Yongqing; Lehrmann, Elin; Becker, Kevin G; Gorospe, Myriam; Biswas, Roopa

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, the most frequent of which is F508del-CFTR. CF is characterized by excessive secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators into the airway lumen, inducing a highly inflammatory cellular phenotype. This process triggers fibrosis, causing airway destruction and leading to high morbidity and mortality. We previously reported that miR-155 is upregulated in CF lung epithelial cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which miR-155 affects the disease phenotype is not understood. Here we report that RPTOR (regulatory associated protein of mTOR, complex 1) is a novel target of miR-155 in CF lung epithelial cells. The suppression of RPTOR expression and subsequent activation of TGF-β signaling resulted in the induction of fibrosis by elevating connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) abundance in CF lung epithelial cells. Thus, we propose that miR-155 might regulate fibrosis of CF lungs through the increased CTGF expression, highlighting its potential value in CF therapy. PMID:27284727

  16. Genetic Adaptation of Achromobacter sp. during Persistence in the Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ridderberg, Winnie; Nielsen, Signe Maria; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Achromobacter species are increasingly isolated from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients and often a chronic infection is established. How Achromobacter sp. adapts to the human host remains uncharacterised. By comparing longitudinally collected isolates of Achromobacter sp. isolated from five CF patients, we have investigated the within-host evolution of clonal lineages. The majority of identified mutations were isolate-specific suggesting co-evolution of several subpopulations from the original infecting isolate. The largest proportion of mutated genes were involved in the general metabolism of the bacterium, but genes involved in virulence and antimicrobial resistance were also affected. A number of virulence genes required for initiation of acute infection were selected against, e.g. genes of the type I and type III secretion systems and genes related to pilus and flagellum formation or function. Six antimicrobial resistance genes or their regulatory genes were mutated, including large deletions affecting the repressor genes of an RND-family efflux pump and a beta-lactamase. Convergent evolution was observed for five genes that were all implicated in bacterial virulence. Characterisation of genes involved in adaptation of Achromobacter to the human host is required for understanding the pathogen-host interaction and facilitate design of future therapeutic interventions. PMID:26313451

  17. Using Cystic Fibrosis Therapies for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    ElMaraachli, Wael; Conrad, Douglas J; Wang, Angela C C

    2016-03-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is an increasingly prevalent disease that places a significant burden on patients and health systems globally. Although many of the therapies used to treat NCFB were originally developed as cystic fibrosis (CF) therapies, not all of them have been demonstrated to be efficacious in NCFB and some may even be harmful. This article explores the evidence for which therapeutic strategies used to treat CF have been translated into the care of NCFB. The conclusion is that therapies for adult NCFB cannot be simply extrapolated from CF clinical trials, and in some instances, doing so may actually result in harm. PMID:26857775

  18. Aspergillus fumigatus chronic colonization and lung function decline in cystic fibrosis may have a two-way relationship.

    PubMed

    Noni, M; Katelari, A; Dimopoulos, G; Doudounakis, S-E; Tzoumaka-Bakoula, C; Spoulou, V

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is commonly found in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Our aim was to assess the relationship between A. fumigatus chronic colonization and lung function in CF patients. A case-control study of CF patients born from 1989 to 2002 was performed. Medical records were reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis until December 2013. Chronic colonization was defined as two or more positive sputum cultures in a given year. Each patient chronically colonized with A. fumigatus was matched with three control patients (never colonized by A. fumigatus) for age, sex, and year of birth (±3 years). A number of parameters were recorded and analyzed prospectively. The primary outcome measure was the difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) in percent predicted between groups. Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analyses to evaluate the relationship between A. fumigatus chronic colonization and lung function during a 7-year period and study the lung function 4 years before the time of enrollment (t0). Twenty patients had chronic colonization and were matched with 60 controls. A significant difference in lung function was detected throughout the 7-year period after adjustment for confounders (est = 8.66, p = 0.020). Four years before t0, FEV1 baseline was the only factor associated with the course of lung function (est = 0.64, p < 0.001) and was significantly different between groups (p = 0.001). In conclusion, a decreased FEV1 baseline appears to be a risk factor for chronic colonization by A. fumigatus, which, in turn, may cause a faster deterioration of lung function. PMID:26319147

  19. Localization of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs and Interactions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Hypoxic Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Lubna H.; Perlmutt, Olivia S.; Albert, Daniel; Davis, C. William; Arnold, Roland R.; Yankaskas, James R.; Gilligan, Peter; Neubauer, Heiner; Randell, Scott H.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The localization of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs, alone or during coinfection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is poorly understood. We performed immunohistochemistry for Bcc and P. aeruginosa bacteria on 21 coinfected or singly infected CF lungs obtained at transplantation or autopsy. Parallel in vitro experiments examined the growth of two Bcc species, Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans, in environments similar to those occupied by P. aeruginosa in the CF lung. Bcc bacteria were predominantly identified in the CF lung as single cells or small clusters within phagocytes and mucus but not as “biofilm-like structures.” In contrast, P. aeruginosa was identified in biofilm-like masses, but densities appeared to be reduced during coinfection with Bcc bacteria. Based on chemical analyses of CF and non-CF respiratory secretions, a test medium was defined to study Bcc growth and interactions with P. aeruginosa in an environment mimicking the CF lung. When test medium was supplemented with alternative electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions, B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans used fermentation rather than anaerobic respiration to gain energy, consistent with the identification of fermentation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both Bcc species also expressed mucinases that produced carbon sources from mucins for growth. In the presence of P. aeruginosa in vitro, both Bcc species grew anaerobically but not aerobically. We propose that Bcc bacteria (i) invade a P. aeruginosa-infected CF lung when the airway lumen is anaerobic, (ii) inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm-like growth, and (iii) expand the host bacterial niche from mucus to also include macrophages. PMID:25156735

  20. Inflammation and its genesis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David P; Chmiel, James F

    2015-10-01

    The host inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has long been recognized as a central pathological feature and an important therapeutic target. Indeed, many believe that bronchiectasis results largely from the oxidative and proteolytic damage comprised within an exuberant airway inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils. In this review, we address the longstanding argument of whether or not the inflammatory response is directly attributable to impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or only secondary to airway obstruction and chronic bacterial infection and challenge the importance of this distinction in the context of therapy. We also review the centrality of neutrophils in CF lung pathophysiology and highlight more recent data that suggest the importance of other cell types and signaling beyond NF-κB activation. We discuss how protease and redox imbalance are critical factors in CF airway inflammation and end by reviewing some of the more promising therapeutic approaches now under development. PMID:26335954

  1. Respiratory Conditions Update: Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Lyle L

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease that occurs in approximately 1 in 2,500 white live births. It is less common in nonwhite individuals. A dysfunctional epithelial chloride channel leads to excessively thick mucus affecting multiple organ systems. Common issues include mucous plugging of the airway, lung inflammation, chronic pulmonary infections, intestinal malabsorption, and malnutrition. Universal screening of newborns for CF is recommended in many countries. CF can be diagnosed based on clinical evidence of disease along with genetic testing or other laboratory evidence of chloride channel dysfunction. Pulmonary system dysfunction causes the most morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary function testing is the primary modality used to monitor CF progression. Therapies include chest physiotherapy, mucolytics, antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, targeted therapies, and vaccines. Dysfunction of the exocrine pancreas and gastrointestinal tract leads to malabsorption, malnutrition, and intestinal obstruction. Nutrition should be optimized with adequate calories, pancreatic enzymes, and appropriate dietary supplements. Complications, including acute pulmonary exacerbations, gastrointestinal conditions, chronic rhinosinusitis, CF-related diabetes, osteoporosis, infertility, and psychosocial issues, must be managed. At the appropriate time, lung transplantation and end-of-life issues must be addressed. PMID:27576234

  2. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future. PMID:26070393

  3. Diagnostic Testing in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brewington, John; Clancy, J P

    2016-03-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a rare, multisystem disease leading to significant morbidity and mortality. CF is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), a chloride and bicarbonate transporter. Early diagnosis and access to therapies provides benefits in nutrition, pulmonary health, and cognitive ability. Several screening and diagnostic tests are available to support a diagnosis. We discuss the characteristics of screening and diagnostic tests for CF and guideline-based algorithms using these tools to establish a diagnosis. We discuss classification and management of common "diagnostic dilemmas," including the CFTR-related metabolic syndrome and other CFTR-associated diseases. PMID:26857766

  4. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Martini, S V; Rocco, P R M; Morales, M M

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR) to the affected organ (lung). Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy. PMID:21952739

  5. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Controls Lung Proteasomal Degradation and Nuclear Factor-κB Activity in Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Boncoeur, Emilie; Roque, Telma; Bonvin, Elise; Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Bonora, Monique; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Jacquot, Jacky

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a lethal inherited disorder caused by mutations in a single gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, resulting in progressive oxidative lung damage. In this study, we evaluated the role of CFTR in the control of ubiquitin-proteasome activity and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκB-α signaling after lung oxidative stress. After a 64-hour exposure to hyperoxia-mediated oxidative stress, CFTR-deficient (cftr−/−) mice exhibited significantly elevated lung proteasomal activity compared with wild-type (cftr+/+) animals. This was accompanied by reduced lung caspase-3 activity and defective degradation of NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α. In vitro, human CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited increased proteasomal activity and decreased NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity compared with CFTR-sufficient lung cells. Inhibition of the CFTR Cl− channel by CFTRinh-172 in the normal bronchial immortalized cell line 16HBE14o− increased proteasomal degradation after exposure to oxidative stress. Caspase-3 inhibition by Z-DQMD in CFTR-sufficient lung cells mimicked the response profile of increased proteasomal degradation and reduced NF-κB activity observed in CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress. Taken together, these results suggest that functional CFTR Cl− channel activity is crucial for regulation of lung proteasomal degradation and NF-κB activity in conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:18372427

  6. Selective Sweeps and Parallel Pathoadaptation Drive Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolution in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Caballero, Julio; Clark, Shawn T.; Coburn, Bryan; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Pauline W.; Donaldson, Sylva L.; Tullis, D. Elizabeth; Yau, Yvonne C. W.; Waters, Valerie J.; Hwang, David M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pulmonary infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a recalcitrant problem in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. While the clinical implications and long-term evolutionary patterns of these infections are well studied, we know little about the short-term population dynamics that enable this pathogen to persist despite aggressive antimicrobial therapy. Here, we describe a short-term population genomic analysis of 233 P. aeruginosa isolates collected from 12 sputum specimens obtained over a 1-year period from a single patient. Whole-genome sequencing and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling identified the expansion of two clonal lineages. The first lineage originated from the coalescence of the entire sample less than 3 years before the end of the study and gave rise to a high-diversity ancestral population. The second expansion occurred 2 years later and gave rise to a derived population with a strong signal of positive selection. These events show characteristics consistent with recurrent selective sweeps. While we cannot identify the specific mutations responsible for the origins of the clonal lineages, we find that the majority of mutations occur in loci previously associated with virulence and resistance. Additionally, approximately one-third of all mutations occur in loci that are mutated multiple times, highlighting the importance of parallel pathoadaptation. One such locus is the gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 3, which received three independent mutations. Our functional analysis of these alleles shows that they provide differential fitness benefits dependent on the antibiotic under selection. These data reveal that bacterial populations can undergo extensive and dramatic changes that are not revealed by lower-resolution analyses. PMID:26330513

  7. Role of Adherence in the Pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Donald E.; Bass, Joe A.; Johanson, W. G.; Straus, David C.

    1980-01-01

    A correlation has been demonstrated between the in vitro adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to upper respiratory tract epithelium and colonization of the respiratory tract by this organism. Twenty patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 20 age-matched controls were examined in this study. All of the CF patients but none of the controls were colonized with P. aeruginosa at the time of study. P. aeruginosa adherence to isolated epithelial cells, as determined by an in vitro assay, was 19.1 ± 1.1 bacteria per buccal epithelial cell in the CF patients and 2.3 ± 0.3 bacteria per cell in the controls (P < 0.01). P. aeruginosa strains of the mucoid colony type adhered in significantly lower numbers to buccal epithelial cells than did strains of the rough colony type (1.8 + 0.1 versus 24.8 ± 0.9, P < 0.001). This difference might explain the common observation that the initial pseudomonas colonization of the respiratory tract of CF patients is due to organisms of the rough colony type. We have further demonstrated that increased P. aeruginosa adherence in vitro varies directly with the loss of a protease-sensitive glycoprotein, fibronectin, from the cell surface, as well as increased levels of salivary proteases in CF patients. When examined by a direct radioimmune binding assay, buccal cells from CF patients possessed only 17% of the total cell surface fibronectin present on similar cells obtained from controls. Salivary protease levels, as measured by 125I release from an 125I-labeled insoluble fibrin matrix, were increased about threefold in CF patients versus controls. Thus, colonization of the respiratory tract by P. aeruginosa in CF patients correlates well with buccal cell adherence of this organism; increased adherence is associated with decreased amounts of fibronectin on respiratory epithelial cell surfaces and increased levels of salivary proteases. PMID:7014444

  8. Case report of vertebral osteomyelitis and mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by Scedosporium apiospermum in a lung transplant patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, S; Alibhai, K; Winkelaar, G; Lien, D; Halloran, K; Kapasi, A; Weinkauf, J

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients are frequently plagued by infections, often with unusual or hardy organisms. Their infections are only complicated by transplantation. In this report, we review the case of a young woman who had a double lung transplant secondary to cystic fibrosis who developed a lumbar osteomyelitis/discitis several years after transplantation. After treatment, she went on to develop a mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. The patient underwent thoracic and abdominal aortic replacement, and histopathology revealed Scedosporium apiospermum infection. The patient recovered well from surgery and was discharged home on long-term antifungal therapy. This represents the first reported case of S apiospermum mycotic aneurysm in a lung transplant patient, and possibly the largest number and longest duration of S apiospermum infections reported in a single patient. PMID:25645805

  9. Measures of body habitus are associated with lung function in adults with cystic fibrosis: A population-based study☆

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Doug L.; Knox, Alan J.; Smyth, Alan R.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Body habitus differences may explain some of the variation in lung function between individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that measures of lean muscle mass and obesity are independently associated with lung function in CF. Methods Cross-sectional study design using UK CF registry data from 2096 clinically stable adults. Results Serum creatinine and BMI were positively and independently associated with FEV1 and FVC. One standard deviation increment in serum creatinine was associated with an FEV1 increase of 171 ml (95% confidence intervals CI: + 116 to + 227 ml) in males and 90 ml (95% CI: + 46 to + 133 ml) in females. Compared to the reference group of 20–24.9 kg/m2, those with a BMI < 20 kg/m2 had lower FEV1 with values of − 642 ml (95%CI: − 784 to − 500 ml) for males and − 468 ml (95%CI: − 564 to − 372 ml) for females. Conclusions Prospective studies and controlled trials are required to ascertain if these associations have therapeutic potential in modifying disease progression. PMID:22958983

  10. Carrier-free combination for dry powder inhalation of antibiotics in the treatment of lung infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pilcer, Gabrielle; De Bueger, Véronique; Traina, Karl; Traore, Hamidou; Sebti, Thami; Vanderbist, Francis; Amighi, Karim

    2013-07-15

    The aim of the study was to develop an efficient combination antibiotic formulation containing tobramycin and clarithromycin as a dry powder for inhalation. A carrier-free formulation of the two drugs was produced by spray-drying and characterised for its aerodynamic behaviour by impaction tests with an NGI and release profiles. The particle size distribution, morphological evaluation and crystallinity state were determined by laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction, respectively. Drug deposition profiles were similar for the two antibiotics, which has a synergistic effect, allowing them to reach the target simultaneously at the expected dose. The release profiles show that tobramycin and clarithromycin should probably dissolve without any difficulties in vivo in the lung as 95% of tobramycin and 57% of clarithromycin mass dissolved in 10min for the spray-dried formulation. The FPF increased from 35% and 31% for the physical blend for tobramycin and clarithromycin, respectively, to 65% and 63% for the spray-dried formulation. The spray-dried formulation shows particularly high deposition results, even at sub-optimal inspiratory flow rates, and therefore, represents an attractive alternative in the local treatment of lung infection such as in cystic fibrosis. PMID:23643509

  11. Cutaneous manifestations of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Megan L; McCusker, Meagen M; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disease reported in 1 in 2500 live births in Northern American and Northern European Caucasian populations. Classic disease findings include chronic bacterial infection of airways and sinuses, malabsorption of fat, infertility in men, and elevated concentrations of chloride in sweat. Less well-recognized findings associated with cystic fibrosis include cutaneous findings, which can be primary or secondary manifestations of the disease process. Patients demonstrate more atopic and drug hypersensitivity reactions than the general population, but have similar rates of urticaria compared with the general population. In atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis, the nutrient deficiency dermatitis of the disease may aid with diagnosis, and notably can be the presenting sign. Other dermatologic manifestations of cystic fibrosis include early aquagenic skin wrinkling and cutaneous vasculitis, which can be associated with arthralgias. Familiarity with the nutrient deficiency dermatitis of this entity may play a role in the timely diagnosis of the disease, and the other cutaneous findings add to our understanding of the protean nature of its manifestations. PMID:18429769

  12. Analysis of Lung Microbiota in Bronchoalveolar Lavage, Protected Brush and Sputum Samples from Subjects with Mild-To-Moderate Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Deborah A.; Willger, Sven D.; Dolben, Emily L.; Hampton, Thomas H.; Stanton, Bruce A.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Czum, Julianna; Ashare, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) often acquire chronic lung infections that lead to irreversible damage. We sought to examine regional variation in the microbial communities in the lungs of individuals with mild-to-moderate CF lung disease, to examine the relationship between the local microbiota and local damage, and to determine the relationships between microbiota in samples taken directly from the lung and the microbiota in spontaneously expectorated sputum. In this initial study, nine stable, adult CF patients with an FEV1>50% underwent regional sampling of different lobes of the right lung by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and protected brush (PB) sampling of mucus plugs. Sputum samples were obtained from six of the nine subjects immediately prior to the procedure. Microbial community analysis was performed on DNA extracted from these samples and the extent of damage in each lobe was quantified from a recent CT scan. The extent of damage observed in regions of the right lung did not correlate with specific microbial genera, levels of community diversity or composition, or bacterial genome copies per ml of BAL fluid. In all subjects, BAL fluid from different regions of the lung contained similar microbial communities. In eight out of nine subjects, PB samples from different regions of the lung were also similar in microbial community composition, and were similar to microbial communities in BAL fluid from the same lobe. Microbial communities in PB samples were more diverse than those in BAL samples, suggesting enrichment of some taxa in mucus plugs. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine the microbiota in different regions of the CF lung in clinically stable individuals with mild-to-moderate CF-related lung disease. PMID:26943329

  13. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype. PMID:24309546

  14. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a distinct condition.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; González Albarrán, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, affecting approximately one out of every 2,000 births. Survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has significantly improved due to advances in respiratory and nutritional care, and their current average life expectancy is 30-40 years. Development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a comorbidity that increases with age and may reach a prevalence up to 50% in adults. Its development is associated to impaired lung function and nutritional status, and early diagnosis and treatment are therefore essential to improve quality of life and performance status. Insulin therapy for diabetes and other early carbohydrate metabolism disorders may improve lung function and nutritional status of patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:25151429

  15. Progress in therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Kris; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-08-01

    Standard follow-up and symptomatic treatment have allowed most patients with cystic fibrosis to live to young adulthood. However, many patients still die prematurely from respiratory insufficiency. Hence, further investigations to improve these therapies are important and might have relevance for other diseases-eg, exploring how to increase airway hydration, how to safely downscale the increased inflammatory response in the lung, and how to better combat lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis. In parallel, development of modulators that target the underlying dysfunction in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is fast moving forward. Existing treatments are specific to certain mutations, or mutation class, in CFTR. An effective, although not yet entirely corrective, treatment is available for patients with class III mutations, and a treatment with modest effectiveness is available for patients who are homozygous for Phe508del, albeit at a very high cost. Corrective treatments that are non-specific to mutation class and thus applicable to all patients-eg, gene therapy, cell-based therapies, and activation of alternative ion channels that bypass CFTR-are being explored, but they are still in early stages of development. In view of the large number of patients with very rare mutations, a plan to advance personalised biomarkers to predict treatment effect is also being investigated and validated. PMID:27053340

  16. Flagellin induces myeloid-derived suppressor cells: implications for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Rieber, Nikolaus; Brand, Alina; Hector, Andreas; Graepler-Mainka, Ute; Ost, Michael; Schäfer, Iris; Wecker, Irene; Neri, Davide; Wirth, Andreas; Mays, Lauren; Zundel, Sabine; Fuchs, Jörg; Handgretinger, Rupert; Stern, Martin; Hogardt, Michael; Döring, Gerd; Riethmüller, Joachim; Kormann, Michael; Hartl, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa persists in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and drives CF lung disease progression. P. aeruginosa potently activates the innate immune system, mainly mediated through pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as flagellin. However, the host is unable to eradicate this flagellated bacterium efficiently. The underlying immunological mechanisms are incompletely understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells generated in cancer and proinflammatory microenvironments and are capable of suppressing T cell responses. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa induces MDSCs to escape T cell immunity. In this article, we demonstrate that granulocytic MDSCs accumulate in CF patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa and correlate with CF lung disease activity. Flagellated P. aeruginosa culture supernatants induced the generation of MDSCs, an effect that was 1) dose-dependently mimicked by purified flagellin protein, 2) significantly reduced using flagellin-deficient P. aeruginosa bacteria, and 3) corresponded to TLR5 expression on MDSCs in vitro and in vivo. Both purified flagellin and flagellated P. aeruginosa induced an MDSC phenotype distinct from that of the previously described MDSC-inducing cytokine GM-CSF, characterized by an upregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 on the surface of MDSCs. Functionally, P. aeruginosa-infected CF patient ex vivo-isolated as well as flagellin or P. aeruginosa in vitro-generated MDSCs efficiently suppressed polyclonal T cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and modulated Th17 responses. These studies demonstrate that flagellin induces the generation of MDSCs and suggest that P. aeruginosa uses this mechanism to undermine T cell-mediated host defense in CF and other P. aeruginosa-associated chronic lung diseases. PMID:23277486

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Periodontal Pathogens in the Oral Cavity and Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Patients: a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Rivas Caldas, Rocio; Le Gall, Florence; Revert, Krista; Rault, Gilles; Virmaux, Michèle; Gouriou, Stephanie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Barbier, Georges; Boisramé, Sylvie

    2015-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent lethal genetic disease in the Caucasian population. Lung destruction is the principal cause of death by chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization. There is a high prevalence of oropharyngeal anaerobic bacteria in sputum of CF patients. This study was carried out due to the lack of results comparing subgingival periodontal pathogenic bacteria between the oral cavity and lungs in patients with CF in relation with P. aeruginosa presence. Our first goal was to detect P. aeruginosa in oral and sputum samples by culture and molecular methods and to determine clonality of isolates. In addition, subgingival periodontal anaerobic bacteria were searched for in sputum. A cross-sectional pilot case-control study was conducted in the CF Reference Center in Roscoff, France. Ten CF patients with a ΔF508 homozygous mutation (5 chronically colonized [CC] and 5 not colonized [NC]) were enrolled. P. aeruginosa was detected in saliva, sputum, and subgingival plaque samples by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Subsequently, periodontal bacteria were also detected and quantified in subgingival plaque and sputum samples by qPCR. In CC patients, P. aeruginosa was recovered in saliva and subgingival plaque samples. Sixteen P. aeruginosa strains were isolated in saliva and sputum from this group and compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Subgingival periodontal anaerobic bacteria were found in sputum samples. A lower diversity of these species was recovered in the CC patients than in the NC patients. The presence of the same P. aeruginosa clonal types in saliva and sputum samples underlines that the oral cavity is a possible reservoir for lung infection. PMID:25854483

  18. Rapid Detection of Emerging Pathogens and Loss of Microbial Diversity Associated with Severe Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Flight, William G.; Smith, Ann; Paisey, Christopher; Marchesi, Julian R.; Bull, Matthew J.; Norville, Phillip J.; Mutton, Ken J.; Webb, A. Kevin; Bright-Thomas, Rowland J.; Jones, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) is polymicrobial, but standard sputum microbiology does not account for the lung microbiome or detect changes in microbial diversity associated with disease. As a clinically applicable CF microbiome surveillance scheme, total sputum nucleic acids isolated by a standard high-throughput robotic method for accredited viral diagnosis were profiled for bacterial diversity using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) PCR. Conventional culture and RISA were performed on 200 paired sputum samples from 93 CF adults; pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was applied to 59 patients to systematically determine bacterial diversity. Compared to the microbiology data, RISA profiles clustered into two groups: the emerging nonfermenting Gram-negative organisms (eNFGN) and Pseudomonas groups. Patients who were culture positive for Burkholderia, Achromobacter, Stenotrophomonas, and Ralstonia clustered within the eNFGN group. Pseudomonas group RISA profiles were associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture-positive patients. Sequence analysis confirmed the abundance of eNFGN genera and Pseudomonas within these respective groups. Low bacterial diversity was associated with severe lung disease (P < 0.001) and the presence of Burkholderia (P < 0.001). An absence of Streptococcus (P < 0.05) occurred in individuals with lung function in the lowest quartile. In summary, nucleic acids isolated from CF sputum can serve as a single template for both molecular virology and bacteriology, with a RISA PCR rapidly detecting the presence of dominant eNFGN pathogens or P. aeruginosa missed by culture (11% of cases). We provide guidance for how this straightforward CF microbiota profiling scheme may be adopted by clinical laboratories. PMID:25878338

  19. Comparative genomics of isolates of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa epidemic strain associated with chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Jeukens, Julie; Boyle, Brian; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Ouellet, Myriam M; Aaron, Shawn D; Charette, Steve J; Fothergill, Joanne L; Tucker, Nicholas P; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main cause of fatal chronic lung infections among individuals suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). During the past 15 years, particularly aggressive strains transmitted among CF patients have been identified, initially in Europe and more recently in Canada. The aim of this study was to generate high-quality genome sequences for 7 isolates of the Liverpool epidemic strain (LES) from the United Kingdom and Canada representing different virulence characteristics in order to: (1) associate comparative genomics results with virulence factor variability and (2) identify genomic and/or phenotypic divergence between the two geographical locations. We performed phenotypic characterization of pyoverdine, pyocyanin, motility, biofilm formation, and proteolytic activity. We also assessed the degree of virulence using the Dictyostelium discoideum amoeba model. Comparative genomics analysis revealed at least one large deletion (40-50 kb) in 6 out of the 7 isolates compared to the reference genome of LESB58. These deletions correspond to prophages, which are known to increase the competitiveness of LESB58 in chronic lung infection. We also identified 308 non-synonymous polymorphisms, of which 28 were associated with virulence determinants and 52 with regulatory proteins. At the phenotypic level, isolates showed extensive variability in production of pyocyanin, pyoverdine, proteases and biofilm as well as in swimming motility, while being predominantly avirulent in the amoeba model. Isolates from the two continents were phylogenetically and phenotypically undistinguishable. Most regulatory mutations were isolate-specific and 29% of them were predicted to have high functional impact. Therefore, polymorphism in regulatory genes is likely to be an important basis for phenotypic diversity among LES isolates, which in turn might contribute to this strain's adaptability to varying conditions in the CF lung. PMID:24505294

  20. Cystic Fibrosis: Microbiology and Host Response.

    PubMed

    Zemanick, Edith T; Hoffman, Lucas R

    2016-08-01

    The earliest descriptions of lung disease in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) showed the involvement of 3 interacting pathophysiologic elements in CF airways: mucus obstruction, inflammation, and infection. Over the past 7 decades, our understanding of CF respiratory microbiology and inflammation has evolved with the introduction of new treatments, increased longevity, and increasingly sophisticated laboratory techniques. This article reviews the current understanding of infection and inflammation and their roles in CF lung disease. It also discusses how this constantly evolving information is used to inform current therapeutic strategies, measures and predictors of disease severity, and research priorities. PMID:27469179

  1. [Isolation of Geosmithia argillacea in a cystic fibrosis patient].

    PubMed

    Labbé, F; Babchia, S; Evreux, F; Chenal, P

    2013-09-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old child with cystic fibrosis where Geosmithia argillacea has been isolated from sputum. This is a filamentous fungus (mold) recently described as emergent infectious agent in cystic fibrosis patients. In our case, the presence of G. argillacea was not associated with clinical disorder. However, recent evidence shows that it can be responsible for very serious invasive infection, especially in chronic granulomatous disease and may be, after lung transplantation. PMID:23856446

  2. Air Trapping and Airflow Obstruction in Newborn Cystic Fibrosis Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Bauer, Christian; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Gross, Thomas J.; Awadalla, Maged S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Diwakar, Amit; Ochs, Matthias; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Beichel, Reinhard R.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Air trapping and airflow obstruction are being increasingly identified in infants with cystic fibrosis. These findings are commonly attributed to airway infection, inflammation, and mucus buildup. Objectives: To learn if air trapping and airflow obstruction are present before the onset of airway infection and inflammation in cystic fibrosis. Methods: On the day they are born, piglets with cystic fibrosis lack airway infection and inflammation. Therefore, we used newborn wild-type piglets and piglets with cystic fibrosis to assess air trapping, airway size, and lung volume with inspiratory and expiratory X-ray computed tomography scans. Micro–computed tomography scanning was used to assess more distal airway sizes. Airway resistance was determined with a mechanical ventilator. Mean linear intercept and alveolar surface area were determined using stereologic methods. Measurements and Main Results: On the day they were born, piglets with cystic fibrosis exhibited air trapping more frequently than wild-type piglets (75% vs. 12.5%, respectively). Moreover, newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis had increased airway resistance that was accompanied by luminal size reduction in the trachea, mainstem bronchi, and proximal airways. In contrast, mean linear intercept length, alveolar surface area, and lung volume were similar between both genotypes. Conclusions: The presence of air trapping, airflow obstruction, and airway size reduction in newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis before the onset of airway infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation indicates that cystic fibrosis impacts airway development. Our findings suggest that early airflow obstruction and air trapping in infants with cystic fibrosis might, in part, be caused by congenital airway abnormalities. PMID:24168209

  3. Probability of Treatment Following Acute Drop in Lung Function in Children with Cystic Fibrosis is related to baseline pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Wayne J.; Wagener, Jeffrey S.; Yegin, Ashley; Pasta, David J.; Millar, Stefanie J.; Konstan, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To hypothesize whether the association between high forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and increased rate of decline in FEV1 in children with cystic fibrosis could be due to less frequent intervention after acute drops (sudden decline events) in FEV1. Study design Patients with CF aged 6-17 years enrolled in ESCF were assessed for a sudden decline event, defined as a 10% relative drop in FEV1 % predicted from an average of 3 consecutive stable baseline spirometries. The likelihood of therapeutic intervention within 14 days before and 56 days after this event was then related to their baseline FEV1 % predicted age-specific decile using a logistic regression adjusting for age group (6-12y, 13-17y) and presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on respiratory culture. Results 10,888 patients had at least one sudden decline event in FEV1. Patients in the highest FEV1 decile were significantly less likely than those in the lowest decile to receive intravenous antibiotics (odds ratio [OR], 0.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.11-0.18; P<.001) or be hospitalized (OR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.14-0.23; P<.001) following decline. Conclusions Children and adolescents with high baseline lung function are less likely to receive a therapeutic intervention following an acute drop in FEV1, which may explain their greater rate of FEV1 decline. PMID:23810128

  4. Improvements in Lung Function and Height among Cohorts of 6-Year-Olds with Cystic Fibrosis from 1994 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, Donald R.; Pasta, David J.; Konstan, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize spirometry and height changes in cohorts of 6-year-olds with cystic fibrosis (CF). Study design Global Lung Initiative (GLI) forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC and CDC height-for-age (HFA) Z-scores were generated for 6-year-olds in the from the CF Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR) each year from 1994 and 2012. Z-score mean differences were analyzed by t-test and time trends of means by least squares regression for all children and for subgroups (sex, F580del mutation genotype, Medicaid insurance, and prenatal/newborn screening identification). Z-score distributions were compared by two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. Results 11,670 children with CF were studied, of whom 50.5% were males, 50.2% had the F508del/F508del genotype, and 46.6% were insured by Medicaid. Mean HFA, FEV1 and FVC Z-scores increased significantly over the period in the entire population and all subgroups (P<0.001), but FEV1/FVC Z-scores were below normal and did not change significantly. In 2012, children identified by screening had significantly higher mean HFA (P=0.002), FEV1 (P<0.001) and FVC (P<0.001) Z-scores than those not screened, with 90% of FVC and 71.4% of FEV1 Z-scores greater than predicted by the Normal distribution; FEV1/FVC Z-scores were not different between screening groups. Conclusions Consistent, significant increases in HFA, FEV1, and FVC occurred from 1994–2012, but FEV1/FVC, a measure of airway obstruction, did not appreciably change. FVC and FEV1 Z-score distributions suggest that normative equation reference populations under-predict lung volumes of children with CF, but the reason(s) for this remain unclear. PMID:25134852

  5. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Virulence and Specific Variations in Trace Elements during Acute Lung Infection: Implications in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Crocetta, Valentina; Consalvo, Ada; Zappacosta, Roberta; Di Ilio, Carmine; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Metal ions are necessary for the proper functioning of the immune system, and, therefore, they might have a significant influence on the interaction between bacteria and host. Ionic dyshomeostasis has been recently observed also in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, whose respiratory tract is frequently colonized by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. For the first time, here we used an inductively mass spectrometry method to perform a spatial and temporal analysis of the pattern of changes in a broad range of major trace elements in response to pulmonary infection by S. maltophilia. To this, DBA/2 mouse lungs were comparatively infected by a CF strain and by an environmental one. Our results showed that pulmonary ionomic profile was significantly affected during infection. Infected mice showed increased lung levels of Mg, P, S, K, Zn, Se, and Rb. To the contrary, Mn, Fe, Co, and Cu levels resulted significantly decreased. Changes of element concentrations were correlated with pulmonary bacterial load and markers of inflammation, and occurred mostly on day 3 post-exposure, when severity of infection culminated. Interestingly, CF strain – significantly more virulent than the environmental one in our murine model - provoked a more significant impact in perturbing pulmonary metal homeostasis. Particularly, exposure to CF strain exclusively increased P and K levels, while decreased Fe and Mn ones. Overall, our data clearly indicate that S. maltophilia modulates pulmonary metal balance in a concerted and virulence-dependent manner highlighting the potential role of the element dyshomeostasis during the progression of S. maltophilia infection, probably exacerbating the harmful effects of the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator function. Further investigations are required to understand the biological significance of these alterations and to confirm they are specifically caused by S. maltophilia. PMID:24586389

  6. Localized lipidomics in cystic fibrosis: TOF-SIMS imaging of lungs from Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Desbenoit, Nicolas; Saussereau, Emilie; Bich, Claudia; Bourderioux, Matthieu; Fritsch, Janine; Edelman, Aleksander; Brunelle, Alain; Ollero, Mario

    2014-07-01

    A consistent body of research has linked cystic fibrosis (CF) with variations in the tissue and fluid content in a number of lipid molecules. However, little is known about the spatial localization of those variations. We have recently applied TOF-SIMS mass spectrometry imaging to detect differential lipid signatures at the colon epithelium between normal and cftr-/- mice. In the present work we have used this technology to investigate potential differences in the spatial distribution of lipids due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) infection in mouse lung expressing or not cftr. Wild-type and exon 10 cftr knockout mice were subjected to intranasal infection with a clinical strain of P.a. Lung cryosections from infected and non-infected mice were subjected to cluster TOF-SIMS analysis in the negative ion mode. We observed a highly specific localization of a phosphoinositol fragment ion at m/z 299.1 in bronchial epithelium. Using this ion to delineate a region of interest, we studied the relative abundance of ions below m/z 1500. We found a significant increase in m/z 465.4 (identified as cholesteryl sulfate) in cftr-/- epithelium and in response to bacterial infection, as well as a decrease in most carboxylic ions. In conclusion, the m/z 299.1 ion can be used as a marker of bronchial epithelium, where P.a. infection leads to increased presence of cholesteryl sulfate in this tissue. TOF-SIMS imaging reveals as a valuable tool for the study of respiratory epithelium. PMID:24513532

  7. Pharmacogenetics of cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Suzanne C; McKone, Edward F

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is genetic autosomal recessive disease caused by reduced or absent function of CFTR protein. Treatments for patients with CF have primarily focused on the downstream end-organ consequences of defective CFTR. Since the discovery of the CFTR gene that causes CF in 1989 there have been tremendous advances in our understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of CF. This has recently led to the development of new CFTR mutation-specific targeted therapies for select patients with CF. This review will discuss the characteristics of the CFTR gene, the CFTR mutations that cause CF and the new mutation specific pharmacological treatments including gene therapy that are contributing to the dawning of a new era in cystic fibrosis care. PMID:27490265

  8. Use of bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) in end-stage patients with cystic fibrosis awaiting lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caronia, C G; Silver, P; Nimkoff, L; Gorvoy, J; Quinn, C; Sagy, M

    1998-09-01

    Nine consecutive end-stage patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) awaiting lung transplantation were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in respiratory decompensation. They all received noninvasive bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) support and were evaluated to determine whether or not it improved their oxygenation and provided them with long-term respiratory stability. BIPAP was applied to all patients after a brief period of assessment of their respiratory status. Inspiratory and expiratory positive airway pressures (IPAP, EPAP) were initially set at 8 and 4 cm H2O respectively. IPAP was increased by increments of 2 cm H2O and EPAP was increased by 1 cm H2O increments until respiratory comfort was achieved and substantiated by noninvasive monitoring. Patients were observed in the PICU for 48 to 72 hours and then discharged to home with instructions to apply BIPAP during night sleep and whenever subjectively required. Regular follow-up visits were scheduled through the hospital-based CF clinic. The patients' final IPAP and EPAP settings ranged from 14 to 18 cm H2O and 4 to 8 cm H2O, respectively. All nine patients showed a marked improvement in their respiratory status with nocturnal use of BIPAP at the time of discharge from the PICU. Their oxygen requirement dropped from a mean of 4.6 +/- 1.1 L/min to 2.3 +/- 1.5 L/min (P < 0.05). Their mean respiratory rate decreased from 34 +/- 4 to 28 +/- 5 breaths per minute (P < 0.05). The oxygen saturation of hemoglobin measured by pulse oximetry, significantly increased from a mean of 80% +/- 15% to 91% +/- 5% (P < 0.05). The patients have been followed up for a period of 2 to 43 months and have all tolerated the use of home nocturnal BIPAP without any reported discomfort. Six patients underwent successful lung transplantation after having utilized nocturnal BIPAP for 2, 6, 14, 15, 26, and 43 months, respectively. Three patients have utilized home BIPAP support for 2, 3, and 19 months, respectively

  9. Multiple cystic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Francisco, Flavia Angélica; Soares Souza, Arthur; Zanetti, Gláucia; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-12-01

    Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt-Hogg-Dubé); other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:26621970

  10. Cystic fibrosis--what are the prospects for a cure?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shankar; Tana, Anand; Shankar, Anu

    2014-11-01

    Significant improvements in the treatment of cystic fibrosis over the last few decades have altered this lethal disease in children to a multisystem disorder with survival into adult life now common. In most developed countries the numbers of adult cystic fibrosis patients outnumber children. This is mainly due to improvements in care during early life. The principal cause of morbidity and mortality is pulmonary disease, and so the focus of new treatments has targeted the lungs. Identification of the underlying gene defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator has ushered in a new era in cystic fibrosis research, with prospects of a cure. In this article, we review the most exciting recent advances that correct defects in cellular processing, chloride channel function and gene therapy. PMID:25447947

  11. Hydrator Therapies for Chronic Bronchitis. Lessons from Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William D; Henderson, Ashley G; Donaldson, Scott H

    2016-04-01

    Patients with the chronic bronchitis form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis share similar clinical features, including mucus obstruction of airways and the development of chronic/recurrent airways infections that often manifest as disease exacerbations. There is growing evidence that these diseases may have parallels in disease pathogenesis as well, including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction, mucus dehydration, and defective mucociliary clearance. As progress is made in the development of therapies that target the basic defects that lead to cystic fibrosis lung disease, it is possible that similar approaches could also benefit patients with chronic bronchitis. A deeper understanding of how tobacco smoke and other triggers of chronic bronchitis actually lead to disease, and exploration of the concept that therapies that restore cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function, mucus hydration, and/or mucociliary clearance may benefit patients with chronic bronchitis, hold the prospect of significant progress in treating this prevalent disease. PMID:27115955

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Burkholderia multivorans Sequential Isolates from a Chronic Lung Infection of a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Inês N.; Santos, Pedro M.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia multivorans belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex, which comprises opportunistic pathogens infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we report the genome sequences and annotations of two sequential B. multivorans clinical isolates (D2095 and D2214) displaying different traits. The differences in the genomic contents of these isolates may provide clues regarding the evolution of B. multivorans within the airways of a CF patient. PMID:25676757

  13. Cystic and nodular lung disease.

    PubMed

    Richards, J Caleb; Lynch, David A; Chung, Jonathan H

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse cystic and nodular lung diseases have characteristic imaging findings. The most common causes of cystic lung disease are lymphangioleiomyomatosis and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Other less common cystic lung diseases include Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis, and light chain deposition disease. Computed tomography is used to differentiate cystic lung disease from emphysema, honeycombing, cavities, and bronchiectasis, which mimic cystic lung disease. Diffuse nodular lung disease are categorized as centrilobular, perilymphatic, and random types. In diffuse nodular lung disease, a specific diagnosis is achieved through a combination of history, physical examination, and imaging findings. PMID:26024606

  14. A new double-tracer gas single-breath washout to assess early cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Singer, Florian; Stern, Georgette; Thamrin, Cindy; Abbas, Chiara; Casaulta, Carmen; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2013-02-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), tests for ventilation inhomogeneity are sensitive but not established for clinical routine. We assessed feasibility of a new double-tracer gas single-breath washout (SBW) in school-aged children with CF and control subjects, and compared SBW between groups and with multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW). Three SBW and MBNW were performed in 118 children (66 with CF) using a side-stream ultrasonic flowmeter setup. The double-tracer gas containing 5% sulfur hexafluoride and 26.3% helium was applied during one tidal breath. Outcomes were SBW phase III slope (SIII(DTG)), MBNW-derived lung clearance index (LCI), and indices of acinar (S(acin)) and conductive (S(cond)) ventilation inhomogeneity. SBW took significantly less time to perform than MBNW. SBW and MBNW were feasible in 109 (92.4%) and 98 (83.0%) children, respectively. SIII(DTG) differed between children with CF and controls, mean±sd was -456.7±492.8 and -88.4±129.1 mg·mol·L(-1), respectively. Abnormal SIII(DTG) was present in 36 (59%) children with CF. SIII(DTG) was associated with LCI (r= -0.58) and S(acin) (r= -0.58), but not with S(cond). In CF, steeply sloping SIII(DTG) potentially reflects ventilation inhomogeneity near the acinus entrance. This tidal SBW is a promising test to assess ventilation inhomogeneity in an easy and fast way. PMID:22599360

  15. Targeting the Root Cause of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Trescott, Laura; Holcomb, Joshua; Spellmon, Nicholas; Mcleod, Cathy; Aljehane, Leala; Sun, Fei; Li, Chunying; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a serious genetic condition caused by CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation. CF patients have shortened lifespan due to airway obstruction, infection, and end-stage lung failure. However, recent development in CF therapy suggests a brighter future for CF patients. Targeting specific CFTR mutations aims to potentiate the channel gating activity of impaired CFTR and restore protein trafficking to the plasma membrane. Gene therapy introduces correct CFTR gene into the affected airway epithelium leading to the functional expression of CFTR in CF patients. This review will sum up the current status in CF-cause targeting therapy. PMID:25316272

  16. BPIFB1 (LPLUNC1) is upregulated in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Bingle, Lynne; Wilson, Kirsty; Musa, Maslinda; Araujo, Bianca; Rassl, Doris; Wallace, William A; LeClair, Elizabeth E; Mauad, Thais; Zhou, Zhe; Mall, Marcus A; Bingle, Colin D

    2012-11-01

    Although the biology the PLUNC (recently renamed BPI fold, BPIF) family of secreted proteins is poorly understood, multiple array based studies have suggested that some are differentially expressed in lung diseases. We have examined the expression of BPIFB1 (LPLUNC1), the prototypic two-domain containing family member, in lungs from CF patients and in mouse models of CF lung disease. BPIFB1 was localized in CF lung samples along with BPIFA1, MUC5AC, CD68 and NE and directly compared to histologically normal lung tissues and that of bacterial pneumonia. We generated novel antibodies to mouse BPIF proteins to conduct similar studies on ENaC transgenic (ENaC-Tg) mice, a model for CF-like lung disease. Small airways in CF demonstrated marked epithelial staining of BPIFB1 in goblet cells but staining was absent from alveolar regions. BPIFA1 and BPIFB1 were not co-localised in the diseased lungs. In ENaC-Tg mice there was strong staining of both proteins in the airways and luminal contents. This was most marked for BPIFB1 and was noted within 2 weeks of birth. The two proteins were present in distinct cells within epithelium. BPIFB1 was readily detected in BAL from ENaC-Tg mice but was absent from wild-type mice. Alterations in the expression of BPIF proteins is associated with CF lung disease in humans and mice. It is unclear if this elevation of protein production, which results from phenotypic alteration of the cells within the diseased epithelium, plays a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:22767025

  17. In vitro and in vivo evidence for an inflammatory role of the calcium channel TRPV4 in lung epithelium: Potential involvement in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Henry, Clémence O; Dalloneau, Emilie; Pérez-Berezo, Maria-Teresa; Plata, Cristina; Wu, Yongzheng; Guillon, Antoine; Morello, Eric; Aimar, Rose-France; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Esnard, Frédéric; Coraux, Christelle; Börnchen, Christian; Kiefmann, Rainer; Vandier, Christophe; Touqui, Lhousseine; Valverde, Miguel A; Cenac, Nicolas; Si-Tahar, Mustapha

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease associated with chronic severe lung inflammation, leading to premature death. To develop innovative anti-inflammatory treatments, we need to characterize new cellular and molecular components contributing to the mechanisms of lung inflammation. Here, we focused on the potential role of "transient receptor potential vanilloid-4" (TRPV4), a nonselective calcium channel. We used both in vitro and in vivo approaches to demonstrate that TRPV4 expressed in airway epithelial cells triggers the secretion of major proinflammatory mediators such as chemokines and biologically active lipids, as well as a neutrophil recruitment in lung tissues. We characterized the contribution of cytosolic phospholipase A2, MAPKs, and NF-κB in TRPV4-dependent signaling. We also showed that 5,6-, 8,9-, 11,12-, and 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, i.e., four natural lipid-based TRPV4 agonists, are present in expectorations of CF patients. Also, TRPV4-induced calcium mobilization and inflammatory responses were enhanced in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-deficient cellular and animal models, suggesting that TRPV4 is a promising target for the development of new anti-inflammatory treatments for diseases such as CF. PMID:27496898

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic fungal pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Pethani, Bhavin P.; Kumar, Sheemal; Kim, Minkyoung; Sunna, Anwar; Kautto, Liisa; Penesyan, Anahit; Paulsen, Ian T.; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Scedosporium aurantiacum and the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens isolated from lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa has been known to suppress the growth of a number of CF related fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the interactions between P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum have not been investigated in depth. Hence we assessed the effect of P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 and two clinical isolates PASS1 and PASS2 on the growth of two clinical S. aurantiacum isolates WM 06.482 and WM 08.202 using solid plate assays and liquid cultures, in a synthetic medium mimicking the nutrient condition in the CF sputum. Solid plate assays showed a clear inhibition of growth of both S. aurantiacum strains when cultured with P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In addition to using chemical fluorescent stains, strains tagged with yfp (P. aeruginosa PASS1) and mCherry (S. aurantiacum WM 06.482) were created to facilitate detailed microscopic observations on strain interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing successful genetic transformation of S. aurantiacum. Inhibition of growth was observed only in co-cultures of P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum; the cell fractions obtained from independent bacterial monocultures failed to initiate a response against the fungus. In the liquid co-cultures, biofilm forming P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1 displayed higher inhibition of fungal growth when compared to PASS2. No change was observed in the inhibition pattern when direct cell contact between the bacterial and fungal strains was prevented using a separation membrane suggesting the involvement of extracellular metabolites in the fungal inhibition. However, one of the most commonly described bacterial virulence factors, pyocyanin, had no effect against either of the S

  19. Cystic fibrosis presenting with bilateral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anna P; Kumar, Prashant; Devlin, Anita M; O'Brien, Christopher J

    2007-07-01

    A 15-week old male infant presented with bilateral lower motor neuron facial palsy of unknown cause. Subsequently his growth deteriorated and he developed progressively worsening cough and wheeze. A diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was confirmed and hypovitaminosis A detected. Improvement of the facial palsy was noted following standard management of cystic fibrosis including vitamin A supplementation. PMID:17287135

  20. A combination therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2015-09-24

    The most prevalent form of cystic fibrosis arises from an amino acid deletion in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. A recently approved treatment for individuals homozygous for this mutation combines a chemical corrector, which helps CFTR fold, and a potentiator that increases CFTR channel activity. PMID:26406363

  1. Management of the Upper Airway in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Elisa A.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Upper airway disease engenders significant morbidity for patients with cystic fibrosis and is increasingly recognized as having a much greater role in pulmonary outcomes and quality of life than originally believed. Widespread disparate therapeutic strategies for cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis underscore the absence of a standardized treatment paradigm. This review outlines the most recent evidence-based trends in the management of upper airway disease in cystic fibrosis. Recent Findings The unified airway theory proposes that the sinuses are a focus of initial bacterial colonization which seeds the lower airway and may play a large role in maintaining lung infections. Mounting evidence suggests more aggressive treatment of the sinuses may confer significant improvement in pulmonary disease and quality of life outcomes in cystic fibrosis patients. However, there is a lack of high-level evidence regarding medical and surgical management of cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis that makes generalizations difficult. Summary Well designed clinical trials with long-term follow-up concerning medical and surgical interventions for cystic fibrosis sinus disease are required to establish standardized treatment protocols, but increased interest in the sinuses as a bacterial reservoir for pulmonary infections has generated considerable attention. PMID:25250804

  2. Targeted therapies to improve CFTR function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brodlie, Malcolm; Haq, Iram J; Roberts, Katie; Elborn, J Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetically determined, life-limiting disorder in populations of European ancestry. The genetic basis of cystic fibrosis is well established to be mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that codes for an apical membrane chloride channel principally expressed by epithelial cells. Conventional approaches to cystic fibrosis care involve a heavy daily burden of supportive treatments to combat lung infection, help clear airway secretions and maintain nutritional status. In 2012, a new era of precision medicine in cystic fibrosis therapeutics began with the licensing of a small molecule, ivacaftor, which successfully targets the underlying defect and improves CFTR function in a subgroup of patients in a genotype-specific manner. Here, we review the three main targeted approaches that have been adopted to improve CFTR function: potentiators, which recover the function of CFTR at the apical surface of epithelial cells that is disrupted in class III and IV genetic mutations; correctors, which improve intracellular processing of CFTR, increasing surface expression, in class II mutations; and production correctors or read-through agents, which promote transcription of CFTR in class I mutations. The further development of such approaches offers great promise for future therapeutic strategies in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26403534

  3. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. PMID:27469183

  4. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26678435

  5. Cystic Fibrosis: Brazilian ENT Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sih, Tania; Godinho, Ricardo; Franco, Leticia Paiva; Piltcher, Otávio

    2012-01-01

    Most published studies about Cystic Fibrosis (CF) are European or North American. There are still few publications about the characteristics of fibrocystic populations in developing countries. The incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF) in Brazil varies among different regions (1 : 10,000 in Minas Gerais, 1 : 9,500 in Paraná, 1 : 8,700 in Santa Catarina, and 1 : 1600 in Rio Grande do Sul). The prevalence of the DF508 mutation also varies according to population: 33% in Sao Paulo, 49% in Rio Grande do Sul, 27% in Santa Catarina, and 52% in Minas Gerais. Cough and nasal obstruction are the most common symptoms. The variation in nasal polyposis prevalence may be explained by population genotypic characteristics in a country that spans a continent. Findings on nasal endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) have better correlation than do this information compared with surgical and clinical history. Microbiologic studies suggest a high level of early contamination of the airways. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurs in these patients as a result of ototoxic antibiotics. The data compiled in this paper is useful, but also lead to the general agreement that more research would be welcome due to the unique characteristics of this country. PMID:22611403

  6. miR-17 overexpression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells decreases interleukin-8 production.

    PubMed

    Oglesby, Irene K; Vencken, Sebastian F; Agrawal, Raman; Gaughan, Kevin; Molloy, Kevin; Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; McElvaney, Noel G; Mall, Marcus A; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 levels are higher than normal in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, causing neutrophil infiltration and non-resolving inflammation. Overexpression of microRNAs that target IL-8 expression in airway epithelial cells may represent a therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis. IL-8 protein and mRNA were measured in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial brushings (n=20 per group). miRNAs decreased in the cystic fibrosis lung and predicted to target IL-8 mRNA were quantified in βENaC-transgenic, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-/- and wild-type mice, primary cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and a range of cystic fibrosis versus non-cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell lines or cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas-conditioned medium or cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The effect of miRNA overexpression on IL-8 protein production was measured. miR-17 regulates IL-8 and its expression was decreased in adult cystic fibrosis bronchial brushings, βENaC-transgenic mice and bronchial epithelial cells chronically stimulated with Pseudomonas-conditioned medium. Overexpression of miR-17 inhibited basal and agonist-induced IL-8 protein production in F508del-CFTR homozygous CFTE29o(-) tracheal, CFBE41o(-) and/or IB3 bronchial epithelial cells. These results implicate defective CFTR, inflammation, neutrophilia and mucus overproduction in regulation of miR-17. Modulating miR-17 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells may be a novel anti-inflammatory strategy for cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26160865

  7. Biliary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S; Keogan, M; Casey, M; Duffy, G; McErlean, D; Fitzgerald, M X; Hegarty, J E

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and four adult patients with cystic fibrosis were evaluated for the presence of liver disease as defined by abnormal liver function tests of six months' duration, histological evidence of fibrosis or cirrhosis, or the presence of portal hypertension, or both. Twenty patients fulfilled these criteria and were evaluated further for the presence of biliary tract abnormalities with biliary scintigraphy using 99Tc diisopropylphenyl-carboxymethyl iminodiacetic acid (DISIDA) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Clearance of 99Tc DISIDA from the liver and biliary tree was diminished at 45 (E45) and 60 (E60) minutes in the patients with liver disease compared with those without liver disease; E45 = 37.8% and 65.8%, p less than 0.01; E60 = 48.2% and 77.5%, p less than 0.01 respectively. Serial analogue images of the extrahepatic biliary tree were consistent with common bile duct obstruction with retention of DISIDA and tapering of the common bile duct in seven of 18 patients with and two of 10 patients without liver disease. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed changes consistent with sclerosing cholangitis, with beading and stricturing of the intrahepatic ducts in 12 of the 14 patients. In all 14 patients, including those in whom biliary scintigraphy had suggested obstruction, no abnormality of the common bile duct was identified. These results indicate that abnormalities of the bile ducts in patients with cystic fibrosis related liver disease are confined to the intrahepatic biliary tree and that common bile duct strictures do not contribute to either the progression or development of liver disease in these patients. Images Figure 2 PMID:1568661

  8. Rationale and Design of a Randomized Trial of Home Electronic Symptom and Lung Function Monitoring to Detect Cystic Fibrosis Pulmonary Exacerbations: the early intervention in cystic fibrosis exacerbation (eICE) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lechtzin, N; West, N; Allgood, S; Wilhelm, E; Khan, U; Mayer-Hamblett, N; Aitken, M L; Ramsey, BW; Boyle, MP; Mogayzel, PJ; Goss, CH

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute pulmonary exacerbations are central events in the lives of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary Exacerbations lead to impaired lung function, worse quality of life, and shorter survival. We hypothesized that aggressive early treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbation may improve clinical outcomes. Purpose Describe the rationale of an ongoing trial designed to determine the efficacy of home monitoring of both lung function measurements and symptoms for early detection and subsequent early treatment of acute CF pulmonary exacerbations. Study Design A randomized, non-blinded, multi-center trial in 320 individuals with CF age 14 years and older. The study compares usual care to a twice a week assessment of home spirometry and CF respiratory symptoms using an electronic device with data transmission to the research personnel to identify and trigger early treatment of CF pulmonary exacerbation. Participants will be enrolled in the study for 12 months. The primary endpoint is change in FEV1 (L) from baseline to 12 months determined by a linear mixed effects model incorporating all quarterly FEV1 measurements. Secondary endpoints include time to first acute protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbation, number of acute pulmonary exacerbations, number of hospitalization days for acute pulmonary exacerbation, time from the end of acute pulmonary exacerbation to onset of subsequent pulmonary exacerbation, change in Health related quality of life, change in treatment burden, change in CF respiratory symptoms, and adherence to the study protocol. Conclusions This study is a first step in establishing alternative approaches to the care of CF pulmonary exacerbations. We hypothesize that early treatment of pulmonary exacerbations has the potential to slow lung function decline, reduce respiratory symptoms and improve the quality of life for individuals with CF. PMID:24055998

  9. Combinations of colistin solutions and nebulisers for lung infection management in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Buttini, Francesca; Rossi, Irene; Di Cuia, Marica; Rossi, Alessandra; Colombo, Gaia; Elviri, Lisa; Sonvico, Fabio; Balducci, Anna Giulia

    2016-04-11

    In this work different nebulisers were investigated in order to assess their efficiency in combination with colistimethate sodium (CMS) inhalation products. Four nebulisers, namely I-neb(®), Aeroneb(®) Go, eFlow(®)rapid and PARI LC(®) Sprint were studied in terms of delivered dose (DD), drug delivery rate (DDR) and respirable dose (RD) of CMS. The goal was to provide scientific data to physicians for prescribing the most appropriate nebuliser for the CMS specific user. All the apparatuses nebulised ColiFin 1MIU/3ml solution (80mg of CMS) with delivered doses between 31% and 41% of the loaded amount. Aeroneb Go showed the longest nebulisation time (more than 20min). When ColiFin 2MIU/4ml was nebulised with eFlow rapid or PARI LC Sprint, the CMS respirable dose was 45.3mg and 39.2mg, in times of 5.6 and 10.8min, respectively. I-neb, having a medication cup capacity limited to 0.4ml, loaded with Promixin 0.4MIU/0.4ml (32mg of CMS), provided in a time of 9min a RD of 21.5mg, a value slightly higher than those obtained by nebulising ColiFin 1MIU/3ml with the other nebulisers (range 15.9-17.6mg). The results illustrate that the clinical outcome depends on the comparative analysis of nebulisation efficiency (respirable dose) and convenience (time), not disregarding the ratios between the amount loaded, delivered and deposited at lung level. PMID:26854429

  10. Heart involvement in cystic fibrosis: A specific cystic fibrosis-related myocardial changes?

    PubMed

    Labombarda, Fabien; Saloux, Eric; Brouard, Jacques; Bergot, Emmanuel; Milliez, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a complex multi-systemic chronic disease characterized by progressive organ dysfunction with development of fibrosis, possibly affecting the heart. Over the last four decades pathological, experimental, and clinical evidence points towards the existence of a specific myocardial involvement in cystic fibrosis. Multi-modality cardiac imaging, especially recent echocardiographic techniques, evidenced diastolic and/or systolic ventricular dysfunction in cystic fibrosis leading to the concept of a cystic fibrosis-related cardiomyopathy. Hypoxemia and inflammation are among the most important factors for heart involvement in cystic fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator was found to be involved in the regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction and may also account for cystic fibrosis-related myocardial dysfunction. This review, mainly focused on echocardiographic studies, seeks to synthesize the existing literature for and against the existence of heart involvement in cystic fibrosis, its mechanisms and prognostic implications. Careful investigation of the heart function may be helpful for risk stratification and therapeutic decisions in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27578468

  11. Azithromycin reduces spontaneous and induced inflammation in ΔF508 cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Legssyer, Rachida; Huaux, François; Lebacq, Jean; Delos, Monique; Marbaix, Etienne; Lebecque, Patrick; Lison, Dominique; Scholte, Bob J; Wallemacq, Pierre; Leal, Teresinha

    2006-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays a critical role in lung disease development and progression in cystic fibrosis. Azithromycin is used for the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease, although its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that azithromycin modulates lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis mice. Methods We monitored cellular and molecular inflammatory markers in lungs of cystic fibrosis mutant mice homozygous for the ΔF508 mutation and their littermate controls, either in baseline conditions or after induction of acute inflammation by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which would be independent of interactions of bacteria with epithelial cells. The effect of azithromycin pretreatment (10 mg/kg/day) given by oral administration for 4 weeks was evaluated. Results In naive cystic fibrosis mice, a spontaneous lung inflammation was observed, characterized by macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, and increased intra-luminal content of the pro-inflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2. After induced inflammation, cystic fibrosis mice combined exaggerated cellular infiltration and lower anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 production. In cystic fibrosis mice, azithromycin attenuated cellular infiltration in both baseline and induced inflammatory condition, and inhibited cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) release in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. Conclusion Our findings further support the concept that inflammatory responses are upregulated in cystic fibrosis. Azithromycin reduces some lung inflammation outcome measures in cystic fibrosis mice. We postulate that some of the benefits of azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients are due to modulation of lung inflammation. PMID:17064416

  12. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype. PMID:26115565

  13. Pregnancy outcomes in cystic fibrosis: a 10-year experience from a UK centre

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, L; Bennett, L; Mackillop, L; Chapman, SJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis manifests as a multisystem disease, despite this female fertility is relatively preserved with levels approaching that of the non-cystic fibrosis population. We reviewed pregnancies in cystic fibrosis patients over a 10-year period from a UK adult cystic fibrosis centre by considering maternal and fetal outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective case-note review of pregnancies during 2003–2013 using respiratory and obstetric records. Results We observed moderate falls in lung function immediately after delivery, which persisted at 12 months postpartum. We found that a decline in lung function at delivery was a marker for further decline in function during the subsequent postpartum period. We found baseline lung function was predictive of gestational age at delivery. We observed a high incidence of haemoptysis. Conclusion Consistent with current guidance we found pregnancy is feasible and well tolerated in the majority of patients with cystic fibrosis. There was a high incidence of haemoptysis, which warrants further study.

  14. The Role of Computed Tomography in Monitoring Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rybacka, Anna; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the Caucasian population. Although the survival rate in patients constantly improves, lung damage is still the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. In clinical practice, evaluation of patients' pulmonary state is made by combination of monitoring of lung function and more directly by assessing the lung structure in imaging studies. Studies showed that computed tomography findings are more sensitive as compared to the pulmonary function tests. Computed tomography can identify a wide range of morphological abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis, such as bronchiectasis (which is progressive, irreversible and probably the most relevant structural change in cystic fibrosis) peribronchial thickening, mucous plugging and many other disorders that occur in the course of the disease. Computed tomography has a crucial role in the assessment of pulmonary damage over time, detecting complications and monitoring treatment effects in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27103945

  15. The Role of Computed Tomography in Monitoring Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rybacka, Anna; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the Caucasian population. Although the survival rate in patients constantly improves, lung damage is still the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. In clinical practice, evaluation of patients’ pulmonary state is made by combination of monitoring of lung function and more directly by assessing the lung structure in imaging studies. Studies showed that computed tomography findings are more sensitive as compared to the pulmonary function tests. Computed tomography can identify a wide range of morphological abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis, such as bronchiectasis (which is progressive, irreversible and probably the most relevant structural change in cystic fibrosis) peribronchial thickening, mucous plugging and many other disorders that occur in the course of the disease. Computed tomography has a crucial role in the assessment of pulmonary damage over time, detecting complications and monitoring treatment effects in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27103945

  16. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  17. Aspergillus bronchitis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shoseyov, David; Brownlee, Keith G; Conway, Steven P; Kerem, Eitan

    2006-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a widely distributed spore-bearing fungus, is commonly grown in sputum cultures of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A fumigatus may cause allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), a complex condition that leads to worsening of airway inflammation and progressive damage and is diagnosed by specific criteria. In this report, we present six CF patients with respiratory deterioration that did not respond to appropriate antibiotic treatment. All had had A fumigatus in sputum cultures but did not fulfill the criteria of ABPA. Treatment with antifungal agents was followed by improvement in clinical condition. We suggest that in patients with CF, A fumigatus should be considered as a pathogen that may directly cause respiratory exacerbations. Antifungal therapy should be considered when deteriorating respiratory function is not responding to antibacterial therapy and A fumigatus is growing in sputum cultures. PMID:16840406

  18. Clinical Significance of Microbial Infection and Adaptation in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Alan R.; Jain, Manu; Bar-Meir, Maskit; McColley, Susanna A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: A select group of microorganisms inhabit the airways of individuals with cystic fibrosis. Once established within the pulmonary environment in these patients, many of these microbes adapt by altering aspects of their structure and physiology. Some of these microbes and adaptations are associated with more rapid deterioration in lung function and overall clinical status, whereas others appear to have little effect. Here we review current evidence supporting or refuting a role for the different microbes and their adaptations in contributing to poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis. PMID:21233507

  19. Chronic Rhinosinusitis in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hamilos, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is highly prevalent in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and accounts for significant morbidity and contribution to CF lung disease. Mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene occur with increased prevalence in patients with CRS without CF, suggesting some contribution to CRS pathophysiology. Nasal polyps (NPs) occur with increased prevalence in patients with CF of all ages and have a more neutrophilic appearance with fewer eosinophils and increased submucosal glandular elements in comparison to NPs from patients without CF. Mainstays of medical treatment include isotonic saline irrigations and topical intranasal glucocorticoids, with some evidence that topical intranasal glucocorticoids reduce NP size. Although inhaled hypertonic saline (7%) has been widely studied as a mucolytic agent for CF lung disease, there are no reports of its use in CF CRS. Mucolytics have also not been studied as a treatment for CRS in CF, and most evidence does not support their use for CF lung disease. Nasally nebulized dornase alfa (recombinant human deoxyribonuclease) following sinus surgery shows promise for treatment. Other unproven therapies include addition of baby shampoo to isotonic saline to potentially thin mucus and help prevent biofilm formation. There are no data to support the use of low-dose oral macrolide antibiotics or the use of prophylactic oral antibiotics for CRS in patients with CF. However, there is some support for the use of topical antibiotics, including colistimethate sodium or tobramycin, administered as a sinus irrigation or antral lavage in patients following sinus surgery when susceptible bacteria are cultured. Key components of CF sinus surgical management include extensive surgery to ensure that the maxillary, frontal, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinuses are all widely opened with smoothing of bony overhangs to prevent mucus retention and bacterial recolonization, postoperative meticulous daily nasal irrigations

  20. Development of cystic fibrosis and noncystic fibrosis airway cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zabner, Joseph; Karp, Phil; Seiler, Michael; Phillips, Stacia L; Mitchell, Calista J; Saavedra, Mimi; Welsh, Michael; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we utilized the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, hTERT, and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 and E7 genes to transform normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human airway epithelial (HAE) cells. One cell line, designated NuLi-1 (normal lung, University of Iowa), was derived from HAE of normal genotype; three cell lines, designated CuFi (cystic fibrosis, University of Iowa)-1, CuFi-3, and CuFi-4, were derived from HAE of various CF genotypes. When grown at the air-liquid interface, the cell lines were capable of forming polarized differentiated epithelia that exhibited transepithelial resistance and maintained the ion channel physiology expected for the genotypes. The CF transmembrane conductance regulator defect in the CuFi cell lines could be corrected by infecting from the basolateral surface using adenoviral vectors. Using nuclear factor-kappaB promoter reporter constructs, we also demonstrated that the NuLi and CuFi cell lines retained nuclear factor-kappaB responses to lipopolysaccharide. These cell lines should therefore be useful as models for studying ion physiology, therapeutic intervention for CF, and innate immunity. PMID:12676769

  1. Cystic fibrosis in Sudanese children: First report of 35 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Salah A; Fadl Elmola, Munadhil A; Karrar, Zain A; Arabi, Ali M E; Abdullah, Mohamed A; Ali, Sulafa K; Elawad, Fathelrahman; Ali, Tag Elsir A; Abdulrahman, Mashair B; Ahmed, Salma O; Gundi, Abelrazzag S

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common severe genetic disorder among children of European descent. It is much less common in Africans and Asians. It affects most critically the lungs causing chronic lung disease, failure to thrive and social deprivation. This is a retrospective review of 35 Sudanese patients with confirmed cystic fibrosis. About 60% of cases presented before the age of 5 years and male to female ratio was 1.7:1.0. Consanguinity was reported in 25 of the families. The main presenting features were productive cough, wheeze and clubbing. The chest X-ray showed variable degrees of hyperinflation, collapse, cystic, fibrotic changes and bronchiectasis involving both upper and lower lobes with blurring of cardiac border and hilar vasculature in the majority of cases. The sweat chloride was between 70 and 140 mmol/l in 83% of the patients (positive > 60 mmol/l). Three patients underwent DNA study and confirmed to have cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations. Gene study was not available for the rest of the patients. To our knowledge this is the first report of confirmed cases of cystic fibrosis in Sudanese patients. PMID:27493388

  2. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  3. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto Junior, Walter; Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel de; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  4. Cystic fibrosis from the gastroenterologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chee Y; Durie, Peter R

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting, recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Increased survival outcomes and the multisystem nature of the disease, including the involvement of hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts, now require the need for more extensive knowledge and expertise in cystic fibrosis among gastroenterologists. Manifestations are either a direct consequence of the primary defect in cystic fibrosis or a secondary complication of the disease or therapy. Adult patients with cystic fibrosis also have an increased risk of malignancy in the gastrointestinal and pancreatico-biliary tracts compared with the general population. Novel treatments that target the basic defects in the CFTR protein have emerged, but to date not much is known about their effects on the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary systems. The introduction of such therapies has provided new opportunities for the application of intestinal endpoints in clinical trials and the understanding of underlying disease mechanisms that affect the gut in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26790364

  5. Pharmacological modulation of the AKT/microRNA-199a-5p/CAV1 pathway ameliorates cystic fibrosis lung hyper-inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping-xia; Cheng, Jijun; Zou, Siying; D’Souza, Anthony D.; Koff, Jonathan L.; Lu, Jun; Lee, Patty J.; Krause, Diane S.; Egan, Marie E.; Bruscia, Emanuela M.

    2015-01-01

    In Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients, hyper-inflammation is a key factor in lung destruction and disease morbidity. We have previously demonstrated that macrophages drive the lung hyper-inflammatory response to LPS in CF mice, due to reduced levels of the scaffold protein CAV1 with subsequent uncontrolled TLR4 signaling. Here we show that reduced CAV1 and, consequently, increased TLR4 signaling, in human and murine CF macrophages and murine CF lungs, is caused by high microRNA-199a-5p levels, which are PI3K/AKT-dependent. Down-regulation of microRNA-199a-5p or increased AKT signaling restores CAV1 expression and reduces hyper-inflammation in CF macrophages. Importantly, the FDA approved drug celecoxib reestablishes the AKT/miR-199a-5p/CAV1 axis in CF macrophages, and ameliorates lung hyper-inflammation in Cftr-deficient mice. Thus, we identify the AKT/miR-199a-5p/CAV1 pathway as a regulator of innate immunity, which is dysfunctional in CF macrophages contributing to lung hyper-inflammation. Importantly, this pathway is targeted by celecoxib. PMID:25665524

  6. Association of CFTR gene variants with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease in a Korean population with a low prevalence of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Su-Young; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok; Koh, Won-Jung

    2013-05-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that in Caucasian populations, mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene are associated with susceptibility to lung disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). However, there is little data available in Asian populations, in which the prevalence of CF is very low. Therefore, we investigated this potential relationship in a Korean population. Sixty patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for NTM lung disease were screened for genetic alterations in the CFTR gene by whole-exon resequencing. For all identified CFTR gene variants, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) genotyping was performed. Genotype and haplotype data were compared between 360 patients with NTM lung disease and 446 healthy controls. Among 13 CFTR genetic variants that were found by whole-exon resequencing, Q1352H showed a significantly higher frequency in NTM patients than in controls, giving an odds ratio (OR) of 4.27 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.43-12.78). A haplotype with Q1352H showed the strongest association with the disease, with an OR of 3.73 (95% CI, 1.50-9.25). Furthermore, all Q1352H alleles were associated with the V allele of the V470M variant. Our results suggest that CFTR gene variants may increase susceptibility to NTM lung disease in the Korean population. Q1352H appears to be strongly related to NTM lung disease susceptibility in the Korean population. PMID:23514810

  7. Imaging of Cystic Fibrosis and Pediatric Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kevin P; Maher, Michael M; O'Connor, Owen J

    2016-03-01

    1. CT is superior to pulmonary function tests and chest radiography for the assessment and monitoring of cystic fibrosis (CF)-related lung disease and, also, of pediatric bronchiectasis not caused by CF (hereafter referred to as non-CF bronchiectasis). 2. Low-dose CT protocols that impart radiation doses similar to those used in chest radiography are feasible for the surveillance of patients with bronchiectasis. 3. Chest radiography is still most commonly used as the first-line imaging examination of choice for the assessment of acute complications related to bronchiectasis. 4. Pulmonary MRI, with or without the use of inhaled hyperpolarized gas, can be performed to obtain functional information, and, in dedicated centers, it may yield imaging results comparable to those obtained by CT. 5. Gastrointestinal and pancreaticobiliary manifestations of CF are observed with greater frequency in adults, because of increased life expectancy. PMID:26901001

  8. Scoliosis in cystic fibrosis - an appraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Spasovsky-Chernick, M.

    1982-03-01

    An unusually high prevalence (10%) of scoliosis is described in a series of 151 patients aged four years and older with cystic fibrosis. The scolioses were of the late onset (juvenile and adolescent) type, being typically thoracic with the curve convex to the right, although there was no significant preference for either sex. No direct relationship was found between the spinal curvature and the severity or distribution of the lung disease, although the worse scolioses tended to occur in patients with relatively severe pulmonary involvement. There was no evidence of metabolic bone disease as a predisposing cause. Some indication of a familial tendency towards scoliosis was apparent, and a genetic or constitutional basis is postulated with an unknown precipitating factor.

  9. Abnormal Ion Permeation through Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Spock, A.; Fischer, N.; Gatzy, J. T.; Boucher, R. C.

    1983-09-01

    The epithelium of nasal tissue excised from subjects with cystic fibrosis exhibited higher voltage and lower conductance than tissue from control subjects. Basal sodium ion absorption by cystic fibrosis and normal nasal epithelia equaled the short-circuit current and was amiloride-sensitive. Amiloride induced chloride ion secretion in normal but not cystic fibrosis tissue and consequently was more effective in inhibiting the short-circuit current in cystic fibrosis epithelia. Chloride ion-free solution induced a smaller hyperpolarization of cystic fibrosis tissue. The increased voltage and amiloride efficacy in cystic fibrosis reflect absorption of sodium ions across an epithelium that is relatively impermeable to chloride ions.

  10. Antibiotic allergy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Parmar, J S; Nasser, S

    2005-06-01

    Allergic reactions to antibiotics are more common in cystic fibrosis (CF) than in the general population. This in part is due to the improving survival in adults with CF and the increased use of high dose intravenous antibiotics. While some are immediate anaphylaxis type (IgE mediated) reactions, the majority are late onset and may have non-specific features such as rash and fever. Piperacillin has consistently been found to have the highest rate of reported reactions (30-50%). There is a low risk of cross reactions between penicillins and other non-beta-lactam classes of antibiotics in penicillin skin prick positive patients. Carbapenems should only be used with extreme caution in patients with positive skin prick tests to penicillin. However, aztreonam can be used safely in patients who are penicillin allergic with positive skin prick reactions. The aminoglycosides are a relatively uncommon cause of allergic reactions, but patients who react to one member of the family may cross react with other aminoglycosides. Desensitisation relies on the incremental introduction of small quantities of the allergen and has been used for penicillins, ceftazidime, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin and must be repeated before each course. Personalized cards should be regularly updated for patients who develop allergic reactions. Written instructions on the emergency treatment of allergic reactions should be provided to patients self-administering intravenous antibiotics at home. Further research is required to identify risk factors and predictors for antibiotic allergy. PMID:15923254

  11. Infection Control in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Saiman, Lisa; Siegel, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 20 years there has been a greater interest in infection control in cystic fibrosis (CF) as patient-to-patient transmission of pathogens has been increasingly demonstrated in this unique patient population. The CF Foundation sponsored a consensus conference to craft recommendations for infection control practices for CF care providers. This review provides a summary of the literature addressing infection control in CF. Burkholderia cepacia complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus have all been shown to spread between patients with CF. Standard precautions, transmission-based precautions including contact and droplet precautions, appropriate hand hygiene for health care workers, patients, and their families, and care of respiratory tract equipment to prevent the transmission of infectious agents serve as the foundations of infection control and prevent the acquisition of potential pathogens by patients with CF. The respiratory secretions of all CF patients potentially harbor clinically and epidemiologically important microorganisms, even if they have not yet been detected in cultures from the respiratory tract. CF patients should be educated to contain their secretions and maintain a distance of >3 ft from other CF patients to avoid the transmission of potential pathogens, even if culture results are unavailable or negative. To prevent the acquisition of pathogens from respiratory therapy equipment used in health care settings as well as in the home, such equipment should be cleaned and disinfected. It will be critical to measure the dissemination, implementation, and potential impact of these guidelines to monitor changes in practice and reduction in infections. PMID:14726455

  12. Cell therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Currently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis (CF). Treatments are focused on addressing the disease symptoms, with varying degrees of success. Regenerative medicine holds the promise of regenerating dysfunctional or damaged tissues and to enhance the body's own endogenous repair mechanisms. The discovery of endogenous and exogenous stem cells has provided valuable tools for development of novel treatments for CF. The ability of stem cells to differentiate into functional pulmonary cells, modulate inflammatory responses and contribute to pulmonary function has provided researchers with multiple approaches to develop effective treatment strategies. Several approaches show promise to produce viable therapeutic treatments to treat the underlying cause of CF, reduce the symptoms and mitigate long-term damage, and generate functional replacement organs for end-stage transplantation. This review provides an overview of the rapidly progressing field of cell therapy for CF, focusing on the various cell types utilized and current strategies that show promise to improve life expectancy and quality of life for CF patients. PMID:23894126

  13. Novel molecular approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tim W. R.; Matthews, David A.; Blair, G. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of a range of inherited diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. However, efficient delivery and expression of the therapeutic transgene at levels sufficient to result in phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease has proved elusive. There are many reasons for this lack of progress, both macroscopically in terms of airway defence mechanisms and at the molecular level with regard to effective cDNA delivery. This review of approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy covers these areas in detail and highlights recent progress in the field. For gene therapy to be effective in patients with cystic fibrosis, the cDNA encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein must be delivered effectively to the nucleus of the epithelial cells lining the bronchial tree within the lungs. Expression of the transgene must be maintained at adequate levels for the lifetime of the patient, either by repeat dosage of the vector or by targeting airway stem cells. Clinical trials of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis have demonstrated proof of principle, but gene expression has been limited to 30 days at best. Results suggest that viral vectors such as adenovirus and adeno-associated virus are unsuited to repeat dosing, as the immune response reduces the effectiveness of each subsequent dose. Nonviral approaches, such as cationic liposomes, appear more suited to repeat dosing, but have been less effective. Current work regarding non-viral gene delivery is now focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in cell entry, endosomal escape and nuclear import of the transgene. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that additional ligands that facilitate endosomal escape or contain a nuclear localization signal may enhance liposome-mediated gene delivery. Much progress in this area has been informed by advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nuclei of host

  14. Fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bronchopulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Matthew; Smyth, Alan

    2012-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These patients are susceptible to lung infection with common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, but are also prone to infection by opportunistic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The good oral bioavailability and broad antimicrobial spectrum of activity, including antipseudomonal properties, make this class of antimicrobial attractive. We review the evidence assessing the use of fluoroquinolones in the context of preventing and eradicating early lung infection and in managing chronic lung infection and pulmonary exacerbations. The safety of fluoroquinolones and the use of newer agents in the class are also discussed. PMID:22968160

  15. Lessons learned from the cystic fibrosis pig.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K

    2016-07-01

    Deficient function in the anion channel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator is the fundamental cause for CF. This is a monogenic condition that causes lesions in several organs including the respiratory tract, pancreas, liver, intestines, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is most notable, given it is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with CF. Shortly after the identification of CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CF mouse models were developed that did not show spontaneous lung disease as seen in humans, and this spurred development of additional CF animal models. Pig models were considered a leading choice for several reasons including their similarity to humans in respiratory anatomy, physiology, and in size for translational imaging. The first CF pig models were reported in 2008 and have been extremely valuable to help clarify persistent questions in the field and advance understanding of disease pathogenesis. Because CF pigs are susceptible to lung disease like humans, they have direct utility in translational research. In addition, CF pig models are useful to compare and contrast with current CF mouse models, human clinical studies, and even newer CF animal models being characterized. This "triangulation" strategy could help identify genetic differences that underlie phenotypic variations, so as to focus and accelerate translational research. PMID:27142487

  16. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  17. Reduced Bacterial Colony Count of Anaerobic Bacteria Is Associated with a Worsening in Lung Clearance Index and Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Judy M.; Johnston, Elinor; McGrath, Stephanie; McIlreavey, Leanne; Rowan, Stephen; Reid, Alastair; Bradbury, Ian; Einarsson, Gisli

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria have been identified in abundance in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. The impact their presence and abundance has on lung function and inflammation is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the colony count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, lung clearance index (LCI), spirometry and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in patients with CF. Sputum and blood were collected from CF patients at a single cross-sectional visit when clinically stable. Community composition and bacterial colony counts were analysed using extended aerobic and anaerobic culture. Patients completed spirometry and a multiple breath washout (MBW) test to obtain LCI. An inverse correlation between colony count of aerobic bacteria (n = 41, r = -0.35; p = 0.02), anaerobic bacteria (n = 41, r = -0.44, p = 0.004) and LCI was observed. There was an inverse correlation between colony count of anaerobic bacteria and CRP (n = 25, r = -0.44, p = 0.03) only. The results of this study demonstrate that a lower colony count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria correlated with a worse LCI. A lower colony count of anaerobic bacteria also correlated with higher CRP levels. These results indicate that lower abundance of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria may reflect microbiota disruption and disease progression in the CF lung. PMID:25992575

  18. State of the art: why do the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis become infected and why can't they clear the infection?

    PubMed

    Chmiel, James F; Davis, Pamela B

    2003-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease, which is characterized by airway obstruction, chronic bacterial infection, and an excessive inflammatory response, is responsible for most of the morbidity and mortality. Early in life, CF patients become infected with a limited spectrum of bacteria, especially P. aeruginosa. New data now indicate that decreased depth of periciliary fluid and abnormal hydration of mucus, which impede mucociliary clearance, contribute to initial infection. Diminished production of the antibacterial molecule nitric oxide, increased bacterial binding sites (e.g., asialo GM-1) on CF airway epithelial cells, and adaptations made by the bacteria to the airway microenvironment, including the production of virulence factors and the ability to organize into a biofilm, contribute to susceptibility to initial bacterial infection. Once the patient is infected, an overzealous inflammatory response in the CF lung likely contributes to the host's inability to eradicate infection. In response to increased IL-8 and leukotriene B4 production, neutrophils infiltrate the lung where they release mediators, such as elastase, that further inhibit host defenses, cripple opsonophagocytosis, impair mucociliary clearance, and damage airway wall architecture. The combination of these events favors the persistence of bacteria in the airway. Until a cure is discovered, further investigations into therapies that relieve obstruction, control infection, and attenuate inflammation offer the best hope of limiting damage to host tissues and prolonging survival. PMID:14511398

  19. The diffusing capacity in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, J D; Ruppel, G; Shrestha, Y; Kleinhenz, M E

    2003-06-01

    The value of adjusting the diffusing capacity for the lung volume has been demonstrated in a large number of patients with other lung diseases but has not been validated in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary function test results on a cohort of 52 adult CF patients were analyzed to determine whether the diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide by single breath method (DLCO(SB)) when adjusted for alveolar volume (V(A)%), correlated with the severity of pulmonary dysfunction. The DLCO(SB) remained within the reference range except in those with severe lung impairment (61.88 +/- 15.48%). DLCO(SB) has a significant (P < 0.05) positive correlation (0.70, 0.67, 048, 0.69 and 0.31, respectively) with measures of airflow limitation (FVC%, FEV1%, FEV1/FVC%, MVV%, and sGaw) and negative correlation (-0.36 and -0.21, respectively) with measures of air trapping (RV% and RV/TLC%). DLCO(SB)/V(A) remained above 100% of predicted despite worsening lung disease and did not correlate with other measures of lung function. On the other hand, the DLCO(SB) and DLCO(SB)/V(A), when adjusted for V(A)%, decreased and were significantly correlated with worsening airflow limitation and, to a lesser extent, air trapping. The relatively preserved adjusted DLCO(SB) and DLCO(SB)/V(A) values in CF patients up until late in its course may be explained the predominant airway involvement, minimal loss of alveolar-capillary units, and enhanced V/Q relationship due to claustration in CF. PMID:12814143

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen S.; Steinle, Erich D.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Dawson, David C.

    1999-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channel exhibits lyotropic anion selectivity. Anions that are more readily dehydrated than Cl exhibit permeability ratios (PS/PCl) greater than unity and also bind more tightly in the channel. We compared the selectivity of CFTR to that of a synthetic anion-selective membrane [poly(vinyl chloride)–tridodecylmethylammonium chloride; PVC-TDMAC] for which the nature of the physical process that governs the anion-selective response is more readily apparent. The permeability and binding selectivity patterns of CFTR differed only by a multiplicative constant from that of the PVC-TDMAC membrane; and a continuum electrostatic model suggested that both patterns could be understood in terms of the differences in the relative stabilization of anions by water and the polarizable interior of the channel or synthetic membrane. The calculated energies of anion–channel interaction, derived from measurements of either permeability or binding, varied as a linear function of inverse ionic radius (1/r), as expected from a Born-type model of ion charging in a medium characterized by an effective dielectric constant of 19. The model predicts that large anions, like SCN, although they experience weaker interactions (relative to Cl) with water and also with the channel, are more permeant than Cl because anion–water energy is a steeper function of 1/r than is the anion–channel energy. These large anions also bind more tightly for the same reason: the reduced energy of hydration allows the net transfer energy (the well depth) to be more negative. This simple selectivity mechanism that governs permeability and binding acts to optimize the function of CFTR as a Cl filter. Anions that are smaller (more difficult to dehydrate) than Cl are energetically retarded from entering the channel, while the larger (more readily dehydrated) anions are retarded in their passage by “sticking” within the channel. PMID:10578016

  1. Drug disposition in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rey, E; Tréluyer, J M; Pons, G

    1998-10-01

    There are many pathological changes in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) which can lead to alterations in drug disposition. Although, in patients with CF, the extent of drug absorption varies widely and the rate of absorption is slower, bioavailability is not altered. Plasma protein binding for the majority of drugs studied did not differ in patients with CF compared with control groups. The difference in volume of distribution of most drugs between patients with CF and healthy individuals vanished when corrected for lean body mass. Despite hepatic dysfunction, patients with CF have enhanced clearance of many, but not all, drugs. Phase I mixed-function oxidases are selectively affected: cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP2C8 have enhanced activity, while other CYP isoforms such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are unaffected. Increased phase II activities are also demonstrated: glucuronyl transferase, acetyl transferase (NAT1) and sulfotransferase. The increased hepatic clearance of drugs in the presence of CF may be the consequence of disease-specific changes in both enzyme activity and/or drug transport within the liver. The renal clearance (CLR) of many drugs in patients with CF is enhanced although there has been no pathological abnormality identified which could explain this finding: glomerular filtration rate and tubular secretion appear normal in patients with CF. The precise mechanisms for enhanced drug clearance in patients with CF remain to be elucidated. The optimisation of antibiotic therapy in patients with CF includes increasing the dose of beta-lactams by 20 to 30% and monitoring plasma concentrations of aminoglycosides. The appropriate dosage of quinolones has not been definitively established. PMID:9812180

  2. Do brine shrimp diagnose cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Hodes, M E; Thomas, J; Morgan, S; Merritt, A D

    1975-11-01

    The nauplii of the brine shrimp Artemia salina are dependent upon the function of their salt gland to maintain osmotic pressure within narrow limits. A number of drugs interfere with this function and are lethal to the nauplii. Saliva and serum from normal persons, patients with cystic fibrosis, and obligate heterozygotes were tested for lethal effect against brine shrimp nauplii. At salt concentrations between 100 mM and 2.5 no difference was found among the phenotypes. At lower concentrations a difference was noted occasionally between some normal subjects and some individuals carrying one or two genes for cystic fibrosis. Data from an independent series of experiments indicate that the naupliar deaths result from distorted ratios of Na+/K+ and not from a specific gene product. No difference was noted in the O2 uptake of nauplii treated with saliva or serum obtained from normal subjects, patients with cystic fibrosis, or obligate heterozygotes. PMID:1187245

  3. Living with Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for the Young Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Atlanta, GA.

    Intended for the young adult with cystic fibrosis, the booklet provides information on dealing with problems and on advances in treatment and detection related to the disease. Addressed are the following topics: description of cystic fibrosis; inheritance of cystic fibrosis; early diagnosis; friends, careers, and other matters; treatment;…

  4. Acute Scedosporium apiospermum Endobronchial Infection in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Padoan, Rita; Poli, Piercarlo; Colombrita, Domenico; Borghi, Elisa; Timpano, Silviana; Berlucchi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Fungi are known pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients. A boy with cystic fibrosis boy presented with acute respiratory distress. Bronchoscopy showed airways obstruction by mucus plugs and bronchial casts. Scedosporium apiospermum was identified as the only pathogen. Bronchoalveolar lavage successfully resolved the acute obstruction. Plastic bronchitis is a new clinical picture of acute Scedosporium endobronchial colonization in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:26967814

  5. Predictive 5-Year Survivorship Model of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; FitzSimmons, Stacey C.; Cahill, Barbara C.; Hibbs, Jonathan R.; Marshall, Bruce C.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create a 5-year survivorship model to identify key clinical features of cystic fibrosis. Such a model could help researchers and clinicians to evaluate therapies, improve the design of prospective studies, monitor practice patterns, counsel individual patients, and determine the best candidates for lung transplantation. The authors used information from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR), which has collected longitudinal data on approximately 90% of cystic fibrosis patients diagnosed in the United States since 1986. They developed multivariate logistic regression models by using data on 5,820 patients randomly selected from 11,630 in the CFFPR in 1993. Models were tested for goodness of fit and were validated for the remaining 5,810 patients for 1993. The validated 5-year survivorship model included age, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as a percentage of predicted normal, gender, weight-for-age z score, pancreatic sufficiency, diabetes mellitus, Staphylococcus aureus infection, Burkerholderia cepacia infection, and annual number of acute pulmonary exacerbations. The model provides insights into the complex nature of cystic fibrosis and supplies a rigorous tool for clinical practice and research. PMID:11207152

  6. Microbiology of airway disease in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, P H

    1991-01-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis have abbreviated life spans primarily due to chronic airway infection. A limited number of types of organisms are responsible for these infections, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being of primary importance. In the pre-antibiotic era, greater than 90% of deaths due to infection were caused by S. aureus and death usually occurred in the first 2 years of life. With the advent of effective antistaphylococcal therapy, life spans increased and P. aeruginosa became the pathogen of primary importance. P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with cystic fibrosis have a unique phenotypic characteristic referred to as "mucoid." The mucoid phenotype is due to the production of a mucoid exopolysaccharide. A mucoid exopolysaccharide is believed to play a central role in the establishment of chronic pseudomonal lung infection in these patients. A third organism, Pseudomonas cepacia, has recently been detected in the airways of older patients with cystic fibrosis and is associated with increased mortality. The virulence of P. cepacia is not understood, but the organism is extremely refractory to antimicrobial therapy. Other bacteria, including Haemophilus influenzae and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, appear to play a secondary role in airway infection. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important fungal agent causing allergic bronchopulmonary disease. The role of viruses has only recently been examined. At least in some patients with cystic fibrosis, respiratory syncytial virus may be important in predisposing to subsequent bacterial infections. PMID:1900735

  7. New antimicrobial strategies in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    van Westreenen, Mireille; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2010-12-01

    With more antibiotic resistance and emerging pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, the need for new strategies in the lifelong treatment of pulmonary infection has increased. Most of the focus is on chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is still thought to be the main pathogen leading to advanced CF lung disease. Other bacterial species are also recognized in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease, even though their definitive role is not well established yet. Clearly, expansion of treatment options is urgently needed. This article focuses on recent developments in the field of new antimicrobial strategies for CF. It is clear that studies on new classes of antibiotics or antimicrobial-like drugs are scarce, and that most studies involve new (inhalation) formulations, new routes of delivery, or analogs of existing classes of antibiotics. Studies of new antibiotic-like drugs are, in most cases, in preclinical phases of development and only a few of these agents may reach the market. Importantly, new inhaled antibiotics, e.g. aztreonam, levofloxacin, and fosfomycin, and new, more efficient delivery systems such as dry powder inhalation and liposomes for current antibiotics are in the clinical phase of development. These developments will be of great importance in improving effective treatment and reducing the treatment burden for CF patients in the near future. PMID:21028914

  8. Cystic fibrosis: newborn screening in America.

    PubMed

    Kleven, Daniel T; McCudden, Christopher R; Willis, Monte S

    2008-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, manifesting as progressive lung dysfunction, pancreatic insufficiency, and intestinal disease. CF was traditionally diagnosed clinically, either because of a family history or occurrence of meconium ileus, or as a result of intestinal malabsorption and chronic pulmonary disease. In 1979, it was discovered that immunoreactive trypsinogen was increased in neonatal dried-blood specimens on Guthrie cards, making it possible to screen neonates. During the past decades, survival rates of patients with CF have improved significantly (see Figure 5). To continue this progress, universal newborn screening has been implemented in many states as an addition to the arsenal of therapies and strategies to improve survival. National newborn-screening programs to identify CF patients after birth have been adopted for a number of years in Europe, Australia, and Canada. As expected, many benefits have been seen due to the early identification of CF patients, including improved survival, better lung function and growth with less intensive therapy, and reduced cost of therapy. To date, 37 states in the United States have adopted similar programs, in the hopes of improving CF outcomes. This welcome trend should help improve the lives of CF patients living in America. PMID:18717498

  9. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  10. The Evolution of Cystic Fibrosis Care.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Jessica E; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting inherited illness of whites. Most of the morbidity and mortality in CF stems from impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic, progressive airways obstruction and damage. Significant progress has been made in the care of patients with CF, with advances focused on improving mucociliary clearance, minimizing inflammatory damage, and managing infections; these advances include new antimicrobial therapies, mucolytic and osmotic agents, and antiinflammatory treatments. More recently, researchers have targeted disease-causing mutations using therapies to promote gene transcription and improve channel function, which has led to impressive physiologic changes in some patients. As we develop more advanced, allele-directed therapies for the management of CF, it will become increasingly important to understand the specific genetic and environmental interactions that cause the significant heterogeneity of lung disease seen in the CF population. This understanding of CF endotypes will allow for more targeted, personalized therapies for future patients. This article reviews the genetic and molecular basis of CF lung disease, the treatments currently available, and novel therapies that are in development. PMID:25764168

  11. Cystic fibrosis, atopy, and airways lability.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, M; Hobbs, F D; Gordon, I R; Carswell, F

    1978-01-01

    In a survey of cystic fibrosis (CF) in the Avon area, 48 children with CF from 40 families together with 71 of their parents were studied by spirometry, exercise tests, and pinch tests. A control group of 42 young adults was similarly tested; control data for children were taken from previously published work. The prevalence of atopy (any positive prick test) in children with CF was 48%. Sensitivity to grass pollens and house dust mite was no more common in these children (29%) than in a normal population (34%). Hypersensitivity to Aspergillus fumigatus was found in 35% of children with CF and was associated with severe lung disease. The parents had a normal pattern and prevalence of atopy. Exercise-induced airways obstruction was present in only 22% of children with CF; its association with severe lung disease rendered interpretation difficult. The parents had a normal response to exercise. Both hypersensitivity to A. fumigatus and exercise-induced airways lability had the features of acquired characteristics. There was nothing in the present study to support the hypothesis that the possession of a CF gene predisposed to atopy. PMID:365112

  12. Guidelines for Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Newborns through Older Adults: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Report

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Philip M.; Rosenstein, Beryl J.; White, Terry B.; Accurso, Frank J.; Castellani, Carlo; Cutting, Garry R.; Durie, Peter R.; Legrys, Vicky A.; Massie, John; Parad, Richard B.; Rock, Michael J.; Campbell, Preston W.

    2009-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasingly being implemented and is soon likely to be in use throughout the United States, because early detection permits access to specialized medical care and improves outcomes. The diagnosis of CF is not always straightforward, however. The sweat chloride test remains the gold standard for CF diagnosis but does not always give a clear answer. Genotype analysis also does not always provide clarity; more than 1500 mutations have been identified in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, not all of which result in CF. Harmful mutations in the gene can present as a spectrum of pathology ranging from sinusitis in adulthood to severe lung, pancreatic, or liver disease in infancy. Thus, CF identified postnatally must remain a clinical diagnosis. To provide guidance for the diagnosis of both infants with positive NBS results and older patients presenting with an indistinct clinical picture, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened a meeting of experts in the field of CF diagnosis. Their recommendations, presented herein, involve a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory testing, and genetics to confirm a diagnosis of CF. PMID:18639722

  13. Cystic fibrosis, intravenous antibiotics, and home therapy.

    PubMed

    Hammond, L J; Caldwell, S; Campbell, P W

    1991-01-01

    The survival rate of patients with cystic fibrosis has improved considerably in the last 20 years. Although not all of the factors accounting for this change are understood, aggressive nutritional management and treatment of pulmonary exacerbations certainly play a role. Home intravenous (IV) antibiotic delivery for pulmonary exacerbation has proved to be as effective as hospital treatment and offers significant advantages to the patient and family. This article examines the microbiology of pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, as well as antimicrobial therapy, methods of IV administration, home IV therapy, and the nurse practitioner's role in this home program in the future. PMID:1990112

  14. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis. PMID:26857767

  15. Precision Genomic Medicine in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene H; Zabner, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    The successful application of precision genomic medicine requires an understanding of how a person's genome can influence his or her disease phenotype and how medical therapies can provide personalized therapy to one's genotype. In this review, we highlight advances in precision genomic medicine in cystic fibrosis (CF), a classic autosomal recessive genetic disorder. We discuss genotype-phenotype correlations in CF, genetic and environmental modifiers of disease, and pharmacogenetic therapies that target specific genetic mutations thereby addressing the primary defect of cystic fibrosis. PMID:26073768

  16. Genetics of Cystic Fibrosis: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Egan, Marie E

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Almost 2000 variants in the CFTR gene have been identified. The mutational classes are based on the functional consequences on CFTR. New therapies are being developed to target mutant CFTR and restore CFTR function. Understanding specific CF genotypes is essential for providing state-of-the art care to patients. In addition to the variation in CFTR genotype, there are several modifier genes that contribute to the respiratory phenotype. PMID:26857764

  17. Evidence for a Cystic Fibrosis Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adriaanse, Marlou P. M.; van der Sande, Linda J. T. M.; van den Neucker, Anita M.; Menheere, Paul P. C. A.; Dompeling, Edward; Buurman, Wim A.; Vreugdenhil, Anita C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested the existence of enteropathy in cystic fibrosis (CF), which may contribute to intestinal function impairment, a poor nutritional status and decline in lung function. This study evaluated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF and studied its associations with nutritional status, CF-related morbidities such as impaired lung function and diabetes, and medication use. Methods Sixty-eight CF patients and 107 controls were studied. Levels of serum intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), a specific marker for enterocyte damage, were retrospectively determined. The faecal intestinal inflammation marker calprotectin was prospectively studied. Nutritional status, lung function (FEV1), exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), CF-related diabetes (CFRD) and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) were obtained from the medical charts. Results Serum I-FABP levels were elevated in CF patients as compared with controls (p<0.001), and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in children (r-.734, p<0.05). Faecal calprotectin level was elevated in 93% of CF patients, and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in adults (r-.484, p<0.05). No correlation was found between calprotectin levels in faeces and sputum. Faecal calprotectin level was significantly associated with the presence of CFRD, EPI, and PPI use. Conclusion This study demonstrated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF patients, and provides evidence for an inverse correlation between enteropathy and lung function. The presented associations of enteropathy with important CF-related morbidities further emphasize the clinical relevance. PMID:26484665

  18. Clonal Dissemination, Emergence of Mutator Lineages and Antibiotic Resistance Evolution in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mulet, Xavier; Cabot, Gabriel; Moyà, Bartolomé; Figuerola, Joan; Togores, Bernat; Pérez, José L.; Oliver, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). We investigated the interplay between three key microbiological aspects of these infections: the occurrence of transmissible and persistent strains, the emergence of variants with enhanced mutation rates (mutators) and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, 10 sequential isolates, covering up to an 8-year period, from each of 10 CF patients were studied. As anticipated, resistance significantly accumulated overtime, and occurred more frequently among mutator variants detected in 6 of the patients. Nevertheless, highest resistance was documented for the nonmutator CF epidemic strain LES-1 (ST-146) detected for the first time in Spain. A correlation between resistance profiles and resistance mechanisms evaluated [efflux pump (mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY) and ampC overexpression and OprD production] was not always obvious and hypersusceptibility to certain antibiotics (such as aztreonam or meropenem) was frequently observed. The analysis of whole genome macrorestriction fragments through Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that a single genotype (clone FQSE-A) produced persistent infections in 4 of the patients. Multilocus Sequence typing (MLST) identified clone FQSE-A as the CF epidemic clone ST-274, but striking discrepancies between PFGE and MLST profiles were evidenced. While PFGE macrorestriction patterns remained stable, a new sequence type (ST-1089) was detected in two of the patients, differing from ST-274 by only two point mutations in two of the genes, each leading to a nonpreviously described allele. Moreover, detailed genetic analyses revealed that the new ST-1089 is a mutS deficient mutator lineage that evolved from the epidemic strain ST-274, acquired specific resistance mechanisms, and underwent further interpatient spread. Thus, presented results provide the first evidence of interpatient dissemination of mutator

  19. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered ‘good’ agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  20. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered 'good' agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  1. Zinc supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Symptomatic zinc deficiency has been reported in CF but little is known about zinc homeostasis in children with CF. Zinc supplementation (Zn suppl) is increasingly common in children with CF but it is not without theoretcial r...

  2. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  3. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio de Aragão Dantas; Aguiar, Renata Arruti; Alves, Ana Cláudia S; Santana, Maria Angélica

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the principal extra-pulmonary complication of cystic fibrosis, occurring in 15-30% of adult cystic fibrosis patients. The number of cystic fibrosis patients who develop diabetes is increasing in parallel with increases in life expectancy. The aim of this study was to review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CFRD. A bibliographic search of the Medline and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature databases was made. Articles were selected from among those published in the last twenty years. Insulin deficiency, caused by reduced beta-cell mass, is the main etiologic mechanism, although insulin resistance also plays a role. Presenting features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD typically affects individuals of approximately 20 years of age. It can also be accompanied by fasting, non-fasting or intermittent hyperglycemia. Glucose intolerance is associated with worsening of nutritional status, increased morbidity, decreased survival and reduced pulmonary function. Microvascular complications are always present, although macrovascular complications are rarely seen. An oral glucose tolerance test is recommended annually for patients > or = 10 years of age and for any patients presenting unexplained weight loss or symptoms of diabetes. Patients hospitalized with severe diseases should also be screened. If fasting hyperglycemia persists for more than 48 h, insulin therapy is recommended. Insulin administration remains the treatment of choice for diabetes and fasting hyperglycemia. Calories should not be restricted, and patients with CFRD should be managed by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:17724542

  4. Oxidation contributes to low glutathione in the airways of children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kettle, Anthony J; Turner, Rufus; Gangell, Catherine L; Harwood, D Timothy; Khalilova, Irada S; Chapman, Anna L; Winterbourn, Christine C; Sly, Peter D

    2014-07-01

    Glutathione is an important antioxidant in the lungs but its concentration is low in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis. Whether this deficit occurs from an early age or how oxidative stress contributes to lowering glutathione is unknown. We measured glutathione, its oxidation products, myeloperoxidase, and biomarkers of hypochlorous acid in bronchoalveolar lavage from children with cystic fibrosis and disease controls using mass spectrometry and immunological techniques. The concentration of glutathione was lower in bronchoalveolar lavage from children with cystic fibrosis, whereas glutathione sulfonamide, a specific oxidation product of hypochlorous acid, was higher. Oxidised glutathione and glutathione sulfonamide correlated with myeloperoxidase and a biomarker of hypochlorous acid. The percentage of glutathione attached to proteins was higher in children with cystic fibrosis than controls. Pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis resulted in lower levels of glutathione but higher levels of oxidised glutathione and glutathione sulfonamide in bronchoalveolar lavage. The concentration of glutathione is low in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis from an early age. Increased oxidation of glutathione by hypochlorous acid and its attachment to proteins contribute to this deficiency. Therapies targeted against myeloperoxidase may boost antioxidant defence and slow the onset and progression of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. PMID:24659542

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines From the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation for Preschoolers With Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Thomas; Hempstead, Sarah E; Brady, Cynthia; Cannon, Carolyn L; Clark, Kelli; Condren, Michelle E; Guill, Margaret F; Guillerman, R Paul; Leone, Christina G; Maguiness, Karen; Monchil, Lisa; Powers, Scott W; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Tompkins, Connie L; Zemanick, Edith T; Davis, Stephanie D

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) clinical care guidelines exist for the care of infants up to age 2 years and for individuals ≥6 years of age. An important gap exists for preschool children between the ages of 2 and 5 years. This period marks a time of growth and development that is critical to achieve optimal nutritional status and maintain lung health. Given that disease often progresses in a clinically silent manner, objective and sensitive tools that detect and track early disease are important in this age group. Several challenges exist that may impede the delivery of care for these children, including adherence to therapies. A multidisciplinary committee was convened by the CF Foundation to develop comprehensive evidence-based and consensus recommendations for the care of preschool children, ages 2 to 5 years, with CF. This document includes recommendations in the following areas: routine surveillance for pulmonary disease, therapeutics, and nutritional and gastrointestinal care. PMID:27009033

  6. Measurements of Functional Responses in Human Primary Lung Cells as a Basis for Personalized Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Awatade, Nikhil T.; Uliyakina, Inna; Farinha, Carlos M.; Clarke, Luka A.; Mendes, Karina; Solé, Amparo; Pastor, Juan; Ramos, Maria Margarida; Amaral, Margarida D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The best investigational drug to treat cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with the most common CF-causing mutation (F508del) is VX-809 (lumacaftor) which recently succeeded in Phase III clinical trial in combination with ivacaftor. This corrector rescues F508del-CFTR from its abnormal intracellular localization to the cell surface, a traffic defect shared by all Class II CFTR mutants. Our goal here is to test the efficacy of lumacaftor in other Class II mutants in primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells derived from CF patients. Methods The effect of lumacaftor was investigated in primary HBE cells from non-CF and CF patients with F508del/F508del, A561E/A561E, N1303K/G542X, F508del/G542X and F508del/Y1092X genotypes by measurements of Forskolin plus Genistein-inducible equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq-SC-Fsk + Gen) in perfused open-circuit Ussing chambers. Efficacy of corrector C18 was also assessed on A561E/A561E and F508del/F508del cells. Results Our data indicate that A561E (when present in both alleles) responds positively to lumacaftor treatment at equivalent efficacy of F508del in primary HBE cells. Similarly, lumacaftor has a positive impact on Y1092X, but not on N1303K. Our data also show that cells with only one copy of F508del-CFTR respond less to VX-809. Moreover, there is great variability in lumacaftor responses among F508del-homozygous cells from different donors. Compound C18 failed to rescue A561E-CFTR but not in F508del-CFTR, thus plausibly it has a different mechanism of action distinct from lumacaftor. Conclusions CF patients with A561E (and likely also those with Y1029X) can potentially benefit from lumacaftor. Moreover, the methodology used here exemplifies how ex vivo approaches may apply personalized therapies to CF and possibly other respiratory diseases. PMID:26137539

  7. Nutrient Status of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    GORDON, CATHERINE M.; ANDERSON, ELLEN J.; HERLYN, KAREN; HUBBARD, JANE L.; PIZZO, ANGELA; GELBARD, RONDI; LAPEY, ALLEN; MERKEL, PETER A.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition is thought to influence disease status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This cross-sectional study sought to evaluate nutrient intake and anthropometric data from 64 adult outpatients with cystic fibrosis. Nutrient intake from food and supplements was compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes for 16 nutrients and outcomes influenced by nutritional status. Attention was given to vitamin D and calcium given potential skeletal implications due to cystic fibrosis. Measurements included weight, height, body composition, pulmonary function, and serum metabolic parameters. Participants were interviewed about dietary intake, supplement use, pulmonary function, sunlight exposure, and pain. The participants’ mean body mass index (±standard deviation) was 21.8±4.9 and pulmonary function tests were normal. Seventy-eight percent used pancreatic enzyme replacement for malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD)<37.5 nmol/L] was common: 25 (39%) were deficient despite adequate vitamin D intake. Lipid profiles were normal in the majority, even though total and saturated fat consumption represented 33.0% and 16.8% of energy intake, respectively. Reported protein intake represented 16.9% of total energy intake (range 10%–25%). For several nutrients, including vitamin D and calcium, intake from food and supplements in many participants exceeded recommended Tolerable Upper Intake Levels. Among adults with cystic fibrosis, vitamin D deficiency was common despite reported adequate intake, and lipid profiles were normal despite a relatively high fat intake. Mean protein consumption was adequate, but the range of intake was concerning, as both inadequate or excessive intake may have deleterious skeletal effects. These findings call into question the applicability of established nutrient thresholds for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18060897

  8. Antibiotic management of lung infections in cystic fibrosis. I. The microbiome, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacteria, and multiple infections.

    PubMed

    Chmiel, James F; Aksamit, Timothy R; Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Dasenbrook, Elliott C; Elborn, J Stuart; LiPuma, John J; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Waters, Valerie J; Ratjen, Felix A

    2014-09-01

    Despite significant advances in treatment strategies targeting the underlying defect in cystic fibrosis (CF), airway infection remains an important cause of lung disease. In this two-part series, we review recent evidence related to the complexity of CF airway infection, explore data suggesting the relevance of individual microbial species, and discuss current and future treatment options. In Part I, the evidence with respect to the spectrum of bacteria present in the CF airway, known as the lung microbiome is discussed. Subsequently, the current approach to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacteria, as well as multiple coinfections is reviewed. Newer molecular techniques have demonstrated that the airway microbiome consists of a large number of microbes, and the balance between microbes, rather than the mere presence of a single species, may be relevant for disease pathophysiology. A better understanding of this complex environment could help define optimal treatment regimens that target pathogens without affecting others. Although relevance of these organisms is unclear, the pathologic consequences of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in patients with CF have been recently determined. New strategies for eradication and treatment of both acute and chronic infections are discussed. Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a prominent role in CF lung disease, but many other nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria are also found in the CF airway. Many new inhaled antibiotics specifically targeting P. aeruginosa have become available with the hope that they will improve the quality of life for patients. Part I concludes with a discussion of how best to treat patients with multiple coinfections. PMID:25102221

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere

    PubMed Central

    Pytel, Kamila M.; Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  10. Pseudomonas siderophores in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lois W; Reid, David W; Sharples, Katrina J; Lamont, Iain L

    2011-12-01

    The lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis become chronically infected with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which heralds progressive lung damage and a decline in health. Iron is a crucial micronutrient for bacteria and its acquisition is a key factor in infection. P. aeruginosa can acquire this element by secreting pyoverdine and pyochelin, iron-chelating compounds (siderophores) that scavenge iron and deliver it to the bacteria. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is generally considered a key factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to cause infection. We have investigated the amounts of pyoverdine in 148 sputum samples from 36 cystic fibrosis patients (30 infected with P. aeruginosa and 6 as negative controls). Pyoverdine was present in 93 samples in concentrations between 0.30 and 51 μM (median 4.6 μM) and there was a strong association between the amount of pyoverdine and the number of P. aeruginosa present. However, pyoverdine was not present, or below the limits of detection (~0.3 μM), in 21 sputum samples that contained P. aeruginosa. Pyochelin was also absent, or below the limits of detection (~1 μM), in samples from P. aeruginosa-infected patients with little or no detectable pyoverdine. Our data show that pyoverdine is an important iron-scavenging molecule for P. aeruginosa in many cystic fibrosis patients, but other P. aeruginosa iron-uptake systems must be active in some patients to satisfy the bacterial need for iron. PMID:21643731

  11. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Pytel, Kamila M; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-05-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  12. Is there a role for stool metabolomics in cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Pickford, Russell; Jaffe, Adam; Ooi, Chee Y

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies utilizing metabolomics have focused on the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Here, we performed fecal metabolomics on pancreatic insufficient (PI) and sufficient (PS) children with CF and compared them with healthy controls (HC). Fecal metabolomics can differentiate between PS-CF and PI-CF. We identified a potential biomarker of disease severity or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function (m/z, 463.247; retention time, 0.570717 min) that discriminates between HC versus PS-CF versus PI-CF. We also identified lipoyl-GMP as a potential novel inflammatory biomarker, and elevation in fecal glycerol 1,2-didodecanoate 3-tetradecanoate may provide clues to the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. For the first time, we demonstrate the potential applications of fecal metabolomics in CF. PMID:27553892

  13. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced drug transport in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Plumley, John B.; Withers, Nathan J.; Kopciuch, Michael; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Huber, Dale L.; Smyth, Hugh D.; Osinski, Marek

    2012-10-01

    Iron oxide colloidal nanoparticles (ferrofluids) are investigated for application in the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung infections, the leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. We investigate the use of iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the effectiveness of administering antibiotics through aerosol inhalation using two mechanisms: directed particle movement in the presence of an inhomogeneous static external magnetic field and magnetic hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia is an effective method for decreasing the viscosity of the mucus and biofilm, thereby enhancing drug, immune cell, and antibody penetration to the affected area. Iron oxide nanoparticles of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power). Nanoparticles in the superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited excellent heating power. Additionally, iron oxide / zinc selenide core/shell nanoparticles were prepared, in order to enable imaging of the iron oxide nanoparticles. We also report on synthesis and characterization of MnSe/ZnSeS alloyed quantum dots.

  14. Subtotal Esophagectomy for Carcinoma in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel; Bourke, Stephen; Immanuel, Arul; Metcalfe, Sarah

    2016-06-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disorder characterized by progressive lung disease. Life expectancy is, however, continually improving. Patients with CF will therefore present with an increasing number of conditions, some of which will require operative management. We present our experience of the management of a patient with CF who underwent a subtotal esophagectomy for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. No significant difficulties were encountered in the perioperative management of the patient. Despite a decline in his lung function and weight postoperatively, he remains clinically stable. Major surgery can be successfully undertaken in selected patients with CF. PMID:27301055

  15. Ceftaroline Fosamil for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Pulmonary Exacerbation in a Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Ashley Hall; Srivastava, Ruma; Rybak, Michael J.; McGrath, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Ceftaroline, an advanced generation cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), may present a new therapeutic alternative for treating lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis. We report a case of ceftaroline therapy in a pediatric patient with cystic fibrosis, whose dose was increased from 9.7 mg/kg/dose every 12 hours to 10.8 mg/kg/dose every 8 hours by using pharmacokinetic analyses. PMID:25024675

  16. Optimising inhaled mannitol for cystic fibrosis in an adult population

    PubMed Central

    Flume, Patrick A.; Aitken, Moira L.; Agent, Penny; Charlton, Brett; Forster, Emma; Fox, Howard G.; Hebestreit, Helge; Kolbe, John; Zuckerman, Jonathan B; Button, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has been remarkable progress in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients over the past 20 years. However, limitations of standard therapies have highlighted the need for a convenient alternative treatment to effectively target the pathophysiologic basis of CF-related disease by improving mucociliary clearance of airway secretions and consequently improve lung function and reduce respiratory exacerbations. Mannitol is an osmotic agent available as a dry powder, dispensed in a convenient disposable inhaler device for the treatment of adult patients with CF. Inhalation of mannitol as a dry powder is thought to change the viscoelastic properties of airway secretions, increase the hydration of the airway surface liquid and contribute to increased mucociliary and cough clearance of retained secretions. In two large phase 3 studies [1, 2], long-term use of inhaled mannitol resulted in a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in lung function relative to control in adult CF subjects and had an acceptable safety profile. Clinical experience with inhaled mannitol confirms that it is safe and effective. A minority of patients are unable to tolerate the medication. However, through training in proper inhaler technique and setting clear expectations regarding therapeutic effects, both the tolerance and adherence necessary for long term efficacy can be positively influenced. Educational aims To discuss the importance of airway clearance treatments in the management of cystic fibrosis. To describe the clinical data that supports the use of mannitol in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. To highlight the role of mannitol tolerance testing in screening for hyperresponsiveness. To provide practical considerations for patient education in use of mannitol inhaler. Key points Inhaled mannitol is a safe and effective option in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. Mannitol tolerance testing effectively screens for hyperresponsiveness prior to initiation

  17. Cystic fibrosis: nutritional consequences and management.

    PubMed

    Dodge, John A; Turck, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Life expectancy for patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) has steadily improved during the last three decades, and death in childhood is now uncommon. Nutrition is a critical component of the management of CF, and nutritional status is directly associated with both pulmonary status and survival. Expert dietetic care is necessary, and attention must be given to ensuring an adequate energy intake in the face of demands which may be increased by inadequately controlled malabsorption, chronic broncho-pulmonary colonisation by bacteria and fungi, exacerbations of acute lung infection, impaired lung function, and the need for rehabilitation, repair and growth. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is needed by up to 90% of CF patients in Northern Europe, where the 'severe' mutation deltaF508 predominates, but a smaller proportion in Mediterranean countries and elsewhere, because pancreatic insufficiency is one of few features of CF which correlate with genotype. Complications of CF including liver disease and CF-related diabetes pose further challenges. In addition, deficiency of specific nutrients including fat soluble vitamins (particularly A, E and K) essential fatty acids and occasionally minerals occur for a variety of reasons. Osteopenia is common and poorly understood. Liver disease increases the likelihood of vitamin D deficiency. Glucose intolerance and diabetes affect at least 25% of CF adults, and the diabetes differs from both types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, but it inversely correlates with prognosis. Management consists of anticipating problems and addressing them vigorously as soon as they appear. Supplements of vitamins are routinely given. Energy supplements can be oral, enteral or, rarely, parenteral. All supplements, including PERT, are adjusted to individual needs. PMID:16782527

  18. Considerations for the Conduct of Clinical Trials with Antiinflammatory Agents in Cystic Fibrosis. A Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Torphy, Theodore J; Allen, Janet; Cantin, André M; Konstan, Michael W; Accurso, Frank J; Joseloff, Elizabeth; Ratjen, Felix A; Chmiel, James F

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation leads to lung destruction and loss of pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Drugs that modulate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have recently been approved. Although the impact of CFTR modulators on sweat chloride and lung function are exciting, they have not yet demonstrated an effect on inflammation. Therefore, CF antiinflammatory drug development must continue. Unfortunately, the lack of clarity with this process has left investigators and industry sponsors frustrated. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation established a working group in early 2014 to address this issue. There are many inflammatory processes disrupted in CF, and, therefore, there are many potential targets amenable to antiinflammatory therapy. Regardless of a drug's specific mechanism of action, it must ultimately affect the neutrophil or its products to impact CF. The working group concluded that before bringing new antiinflammatory drugs to clinical trial, preclinical safety studies must be conducted in disease-relevant models to assuage safety concerns. Furthermore, although studies of antiinflammatory therapies must first establish safety in adults, subsequent studies must involve children, as they are most likely to reap the most benefit. The working group also recommended that pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies and early-phase safety studies be performed before proceeding to larger studies of longer duration. In addition, innovative study designs may improve the likelihood of adequately assessing treatment response and mitigating risk before conducting multiyear studies. Learning from past experiences and incorporating this knowledge into new drug development programs will be instrumental in bringing new antiinflammatory therapies to patients. PMID:26146892

  19. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients. PMID:26895996

  20. Systemic inflammatory mediators and cystic fibrosis genotype.

    PubMed

    Augarten, A; Paret, G; Avneri, I; Akons, H; Aviram, M; Bentur, L; Blau, H; Efrati, O; Szeinberg, A; Barak, A; Kerem, E; Yahav, J

    2004-10-01

    Morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis patients is mainly attributed to pulmonary infection and inflammation. Chemokines play a pivotal role in the inflammatory process. Although genotype-phenotype correlation in cystic fibrosis patients has been defined, a clear relationship between the defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene and pulmonary inflammation has not been established. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum chemokines levels in cystic fibrosis patients correlate with genotype and pulmonary function tests, as well as with other clinical characteristics. Serum levels of interleukin-8, RANTES, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were measured in 36 cystic fibrosis patients grouped according to their genotype. Group A included 25 patients who carried two mutations associated with a pathological sweat test and pancreatic insufficiency (deltaF508, W1282X, G542X, N1303K, S549R). Group B included 11 compound heterozygote patients who carried one mutation known to cause mild disease with borderline or normal sweat test and pancreatic sufficiency (3849+10kb C to T, 5T). Associations between chemokine levels, genotype, pulmonary function, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, age, sweat chloride level, and pancreatic and nutritional status were examined. Mean interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels were significantly higher in group A than group B (11.4 +/- 2.1 pg/ml vs. 5 +/- 0.9 pg/ml and 157 +/- 16 pg/ml vs. 88.8 +/- 16.4 pg/ml, respectively) (P < 0.01). No difference in RANTES levels were found between groups. interleukin-8 levels were inversely related to forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = -0.37, P < 0.02), while there was no association between the latter and RANTES and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. The Pseudomonas colonization rate was higher among group A patients than group B (88% vs. 40%, P < 0.01). No relationship was found between measured chemokines and age, sweat chloride

  1. How the airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis reacts in proinflammatory conditions: implications for airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McCuaig, Sarah; Martin, James G

    2013-04-01

    Among patients with cystic fibrosis there is a high prevalence (40-70%) of asthma signs and symptoms such as cough and wheezing and airway hyper-responsiveness to inhaled histamine or methacholine. Whether these abnormal airway responses are due to a primary deficiency in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or are secondary to the inflammatory environment in the cystic fibrosis lungs is not clear. A role for the CFTR in smooth muscle function is emerging, and alterations in contractile signalling have been reported in CFTR-deficient airway smooth muscle. Persistent bacterial infection, especially with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, stimulates interleukin-8 release from the airway epithelium, resulting in neutrophilic inflammation. Increased neutrophilia and skewing of CFTR-deficient T-helper cells to type 2 helper T cells creates an inflammatory environment characterised by high concentrations of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin-8, and interleukin-13, which might all contribute to increased contractility of airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis. An emerging role of interleukin-17, which is raised in patients with cystic fibrosis, in airway smooth muscle proliferation and hyper-responsiveness is apparent. Increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the altered smooth muscle physiology in patients with cystic fibrosis might provide insight into airway dysfunction in this disease. PMID:24429094

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic properties of Microbacterium yannicii, a recently described multidrug resistant bacterium isolated from a lung transplanted patient with cystic fibrosis in France

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung microbiota consists of diverse species which are pathogens or opportunists or have unknown pathogenicity. Here we report the full characterization of a recently described multidrug resistant bacterium, Microbacterium yannicii, isolated from a CF patient who previously underwent lung transplantation. Results Our strain PS01 (CSUR-P191) is an aerobic, rod shaped, non-motile, yellow pigmented, gram positive, oxidase negative and catalase positive bacterial isolate. Full length 16S rRNA gene sequence showed 98.8% similarity with Microbacterium yannicii G72T type strain, which was previously isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The genome size is 3.95Mb, with an average G+C content of 69.5%. In silico DNA-DNA hybridization analysis between our Microbacterium yannicii PS01isolate in comparison with Microbacterium testaceum StLB037 and Microbacterium laevaniformans OR221 genomes revealed very weak relationship with only 28% and 25% genome coverage, respectively. Our strain, as compared to the type strain, was resistant to erythromycin because of the presence of a new erm 43 gene encoding a 23S rRNA N-6-methyltransferase in its genome which was not detected in the reference strain. Interestingly, our patient received azithromycin 250 mg daily for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome for more than one year before the isolation of this bacterium. Conclusions Although significance of isolating this bacterium remains uncertain in terms of clinical evolution, this bacterium could be considered as an opportunistic human pathogen as previously reported for other species in this genus, especially in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23642186

  3. Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-01-01

    In the genetic airway disease cystic fibrosis (CF), deficiency or dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis membrane conductance regulator (CFTR) alters anion transport in respiratory epithelium and consequently disrupts mucociliary clearance. An enriched understanding of the role of CFTR in the maintenance of normal epithelial function has revealed that mild and variable CFTR mutations play a causative role in a number of diseases not classically associated with CF. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that acquired defects in wild-type CFTR protein processing, endocytic recycling and function can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this chapter, we discuss emerging findings implicating acquired CFTR dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis and propose a new and leading edge approach to future CRS therapy using CFTR potentiators. PMID:27466849

  4. Pregnancy and cystic fibrosis: Approach to contemporary management.

    PubMed

    Geake, James; Tay, George; Callaway, Leonie; Bell, Scott C

    2014-12-01

    Over the previous 50 years survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has progressively increased. As a result of improvements in health care, increasing numbers of patients with cystic fibrosis are now considering starting families of their own. For the health care professionals who look after these patients, the assessment of the potential risks, and the process of guiding prospective parents through pregnancy and beyond can be both challenging and rewarding. To facilitate appropriate discussions about pregnancy, health care workers must have a detailed understanding of the various important issues that will ultimately need to be considered for any patient with cystic fibrosis considering parenthood. This review will address these issues. In particular, it will outline pregnancy outcomes for mothers with cystic fibrosis, issues that need to be taken into account when planning a pregnancy and the management of pregnancy for mothers with cystic fibrosis or mothers who have undergone organ transplantation as a result of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27512443

  5. Pregnancy and cystic fibrosis: Approach to contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Tay, George; Callaway, Leonie; Bell, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Over the previous 50 years survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has progressively increased. As a result of improvements in health care, increasing numbers of patients with cystic fibrosis are now considering starting families of their own. For the health care professionals who look after these patients, the assessment of the potential risks, and the process of guiding prospective parents through pregnancy and beyond can be both challenging and rewarding. To facilitate appropriate discussions about pregnancy, health care workers must have a detailed understanding of the various important issues that will ultimately need to be considered for any patient with cystic fibrosis considering parenthood. This review will address these issues. In particular, it will outline pregnancy outcomes for mothers with cystic fibrosis, issues that need to be taken into account when planning a pregnancy and the management of pregnancy for mothers with cystic fibrosis or mothers who have undergone organ transplantation as a result of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27512443

  6. The Dynamics of Disease Progression in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis, statistical models have been more successful in predicting mortality than the time course of clinical status. We develop a system of partial differential equations that simultaneously track mortality and patient status, with all model parameters estimated from the extensive and carefully maintained database from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disease that leads to loss of lung function, most commonly assessed using the Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1%). This loss results from inflammation secondary to chronic bacterial infections, particularly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and members of the virulent Burkholderia complex. The model tracks FEV1% and carriage of these three bacteria over the course of a patient’s life. Analysis of patient state changes from year to year reveals four feedback loops: a damaging positive feedback loop between P. aeruginosa carriage and lower FEV1%, negative feedback loops between P. aeruginosa and MSSA and between P. aeruginosa and Burkholderia, and a protective positive feedback loop between MSSA carriage and higher FEV1%. The partial differential equations built from this data analysis accurately capture the life-long progression of the disease, quantify the key role of high annual FEV1% variability in reducing survivorship, the relative unimportance of short-term bacterial interactions for long-term survival, and the potential benefits of eradicating the most harmful bacteria. PMID:27248696

  7. [Molecular epidemiology of cystic fibrosis in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Messaoud, T; Bel Haj Fredj, S; Bibi, A; Elion, J; Férec, C; Fattoum, S

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent autosomal recessive genetic disease in North European population. This pathology seems to not be rare in Tunisia. On another hand, development of molecular biology techniques has largely contributed to implement the study of the different mutations in the CFTR gene where over 1,300 mutations were reported. Herein, we describe the strategy used to detect molecular defects responsible of cystic fibrosis on 390 children (383 families) in Tunisian population. Several techniques were performed for genotype diagnosis: DNA extraction was from peripheral blood. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacylamide gel electrophoresis, and reverse dot blot procedures were used to detect known point mutations. Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used in a next step searching for the unknown point mutations that are later identified by automated sequencing on ABIprism 310. This strategy allowed us to detect 17 different mutations located on the different exons of the CFTR gene. The most frequent was the F508del (50.74%) followed by three other mutations (G542X, W1282X and N1303K) known to be common in the Mediterranean area. For mutations (T665S, 2766 del8, F1166C, L1043R) were exclusively found, up to now, in the Tunisian population. Our results permitted to establish cystic fibrosis mutations and their distribution in Tunisia and to implement an appropriate prevention program of these diseases through the genetic council and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:16330381

  8. [Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis with CFTR Modulators].

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B

    2016-05-01

    Personalized medicine promises that medical decisions, practices and products are tailored to the individual patient. Cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder of chloride and bicarbonate transport in exocrine glands, is the first successful example of customized drug development for mutation-specific therapy. There are two classes of CFTR modulators: potentiators that increase the activity of CFTR at the cell surface, and correctors that either promote the read-through of nonsense mutations or facilitate the translation, folding, maturation and trafficking of mutant CFTR to the cell surface. The potentiator ivacaftor and the corrector lumacaftor are approved in Germany for the treatment of people with cystic fibrosis who carry a gating mutation such as p.Gly551Asp or who are homozygous for the most common mutation p.Phe508del, respectively. This report provides an overview of the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, the population genetics of CFTR mutations in Germany and the bioassays to assess CFTR function in humans together with the major achievements of preclinical research and clinical trials to bring CFTR modulators to the clinic. Some practical information on the use of ivacaftor and lumacaftor in daily practice and an update on pitfalls, challenges and novel strategies of bench-to-bedside development of CFTR modulators are also provided. PMID:26894479

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Therapy: A Community Ecology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Matthew; Salamon, Peter; Rainey, Paul B.; Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    Current therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) focuses on minimizing the microbial community and the host’s immune response through the aggressive use of airway clearance techniques, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and treatments that break down the pervasive endobronchial biofilm. Antibiotic selection is typically based on the susceptibility of individual microbial strains to specific antibiotics in vitro. Often this approach cannot accurately predict medical outcomes because of factors both technical and biological. Recent culture-independent assessments of the airway microbial and viral communities demonstrated that the CF airway infection is considerably more complex and dynamic than previously appreciated. Understanding the ecological and evolutionary pressures that shape these communities is critically important for the optimal use of current therapies (in both the choice of therapy and timing of administration) and the development of newer strategies. The climax–attack model (CAM) presented here, grounded in basic ecological principles, postulates the existence of two major functional communities. The attack community consists of transient viral and microbial populations that induce strong innate immune responses. The resultant intense immune response creates microenvironments that facilitate the establishment of a climax community that is slower-growing and inherently resistant to antibiotic therapy. Newer methodologies, including sequence-based metagenomic analysis, can track not only the taxonomic composition but also the metabolic capabilities of these changing viral and microbial communities over time. Collecting this information for CF airways will enable the mathematical modeling of microbial community dynamics during disease progression. The resultant understanding of airway communities and their effects on lung physiology will facilitate the optimization of CF therapies. PMID:23103995

  10. Maintenance of nutritional status in patients with cystic fibrosis: new and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalnins, Daina; Wilschanski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis are often associated with undernutrition. Normal growth and development should be achieved in cystic fibrosis, and nutritional counseling is paramount at all ages. Prevention and early detection of growth failure is the key to successful nutritional intervention. The advance in nutritional management is certainly one factor that has contributed to the improved survival in recent decades. This review outlines the major nutritional parameters in the management of the patient with cystic fibrosis, including recent advances in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and fat-soluble vitamin therapy. There are sections on complicated clinical situations which directly affect nutrition, for example, before and after lung transplantation, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, and bone health. PMID:22787388

  11. Recombinant Human DNase I Reduces the Viscosity of Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shak, Steven; Capon, Daniel J.; Hellmiss, Renate; Marsters, Scot A.; Baker, Carrie L.

    1990-12-01

    Respiratory distress and progressive lung destruction in cystic fibrosis can be attributed to bacterial persistence and the accumulation of viscous purulent secretions in the airways. More than 30 yr ago it was suggested that the large amounts of DNA in purulent secretions contribute to its viscosity and that bovine pancreatic DNase I could reduce the viscosity. To evaluate the potential clinical utility of recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) in the treatment of cystic fibrosis, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed rhDNase. Catalytic amounts of rhDNase greatly reduce the viscosity of purulent cystic fibrosis sputum, transforming it within minutes from a nonflowing viscous gel to a flowing liquid. The reduction in viscosity is associated with a decrease in size of DNA in the sputum. Inhalation of a rhDNase aerosol may be a simple direct approach that will help individuals with cystic fibrosis and other patients with pneumonia or bronchitis to clear their airways of purulent secretions.

  12. Comparison of efficacy and tolerance of intravenously and orally administered ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients with acute exacerbations of lung infection.

    PubMed

    Strandvik, B; Hjelte, L; Lindblad, A; Ljungberg, B; Malmborg, A S; Nilsson-Ehle, I

    1989-01-01

    Twenty patients (17-27 yr) with cystic fibrosis were given ciprofloxacin at 30 pulmonary infectious exacerbations. All patients were chronically colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Twenty-five courses were completed, 13 orally (15 mg/kg b.i.d.) and 12 intravenously (4-6 mg/kg b.i.d.). Clinical efficacy was excellent or good in 85-90% of the courses and growth of P. aeruginosa was markedly reduced in 33-46%. Body weight and clinical score improved significantly. White blood cell count decreased and pulmonary function was improved. Reversible adverse effects, mainly rash and urticaria, appeared at seven occasions, five severe enough to cause interruption of treatment. Clinical efficacy and tolerance were better with oral than intravenous administration at the dosages used in this study. Excellent bioavailability provides additional basis for oral treatment with ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:2756354

  13. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  14. Proteomics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian epidemic strain 1 (AES-1) cultured under conditions mimicking the cystic fibrosis lung reveals increased iron acquisition via the siderophore pyochelin.

    PubMed

    Hare, Nathan J; Soe, Cho Zin; Rose, Barbara; Harbour, Colin; Codd, Rachel; Manos, Jim; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2012-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While most CF patients are thought to acquire P. aeruginosa from the environment, person-to-person transmissible strains have been identified in CF clinics worldwide, and the molecular basis for transmissibility remains poorly understood. We undertook a complementary proteomics approach to characterize protein profiles from a transmissible, acute isolate of the Australian epidemic strain 1 (AES-1R), the virulent burns/wound isolate PA14, and the poorly virulent, laboratory-associated strain PAO1 when grown in an artificial medium that mimics the CF lung environment compared to growth in standard laboratory medium. Proteins elevated in abundance in AES-1R included those involved in methionine and S-adenosylmethionine biosynthesis and in the synthesis of phenazines. Proteomic data were validated by measuring culture supernatant levels of the virulence factor pyocyanin, which is the final product of the phenazine pathway. AES-1R and PAO1 released higher extracellular levels of pyocyanin compared to PA14 when grown in conditions that mimic the CF lung. Proteins associated with biosynthesis of the iron-scavenging siderophore pyochelin (PchDEFGH and FptA) were also present at elevated abundance in AES-1R and at much higher levels than in PAO1, whereas they were reduced in PA14. These protein changes resulted phenotypically in increased extracellular iron acquisition potential and, specifically, elevated pyochelin levels in AES-1R culture supernatants as detected by chrome azurol-S assay and fluorometry, respectively. Transcript analysis of pyochelin genes (pchDFG and fptA) showed they were highly expressed during the early stage of growth in artificial sputum medium (18 h) but returned to basal levels following the establishment of microcolony growth (72 h) consistent with that observed in the CF lung. This provides further

  15. Physiological levels of nitrate support anoxic growth by denitrification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at growth rates reported in cystic fibrosis lungs and sputum

    PubMed Central

    Line, Laura; Alhede, Morten; Kolpen, Mette; Kühl, Michael; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus; Toyofuku, Masanori; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Høiby, Niels; Jensen, Peter Ø.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the most severe complication in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The infection is characterized by the formation of biofilm surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and strong O2 depletion in the endobronchial mucus. We have reported that O2 is mainly consumed by the activated PMNs, while O2 consumption by aerobic respiration is diminutive and nitrous oxide (N2O) is produced in infected CF sputum. This suggests that the reported growth rates of P. aeruginosa in lungs and sputum may result from anaerobic respiration using denitrification. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa achieved by denitrification at physiological levels (~400 μM) of nitrate (NO−3) is however, not known. Therefore, we have measured growth rates of anoxic cultures of PAO1 and clinical isolates (n = 12) in LB media supplemented with NO−3 and found a significant increase of growth when supplementing PAO1 and clinical isolates with ≥150 μM NO−3 and 100 μM NO−3, respectively. An essential contribution to growth by denitrification was demonstrated by the inability to establish a significantly increased growth rate by a denitrification deficient ΔnirS-N mutant at <1 mM of NO−3. Activation of denitrification could be achieved by supplementation with as little as 62.5 μM of NO−3 according to the significant production of N2O by the nitrous oxide reductase deficient ΔnosZ mutant. Studies of the promoter activity, gene transcripts, and enzyme activity of the four N-oxide reductases in PAO1 (Nar, Nir, Nor, Nos) further verified the engagement of denitrification, showing a transient increase in activation and expression and rapid consumption of NO−3 followed by a transient increase of NO−2. Growth rates obtained by denitrification in this study were comparable to our reported growth rates in the majority of P. aeruginosa cells in CF lungs and sputum. Thus, we have demonstrated that denitrification is required for P

  16. An impulse oscillometry system is less efficient than spirometry in tracking lung function improvements after intravenous antibiotic therapy in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Buchs, Clélia; Coutier, Laurianne; Vrielynck, Stéphanie; Jubin, Virginie; Mainguy, Catherine; Reix, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    A literature search identified one retrospective study on the responsiveness of impulse oscillometry (IOS) in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of this prospective observational study was to assess this property in an adequately powered study after intravenous antibiotic therapy (IVAT) administered for an acute episode of pulmonary exacerbation. Spirometry and IOS were done on the same day as the start and the end of IVAT. Data from 34 patients' of mean age 11.9 years (range, 5-17 years) were studied. The mean FEV1 at the start and at the end of the IVAT was 73.1 ± 23.8% (range, 23.4-122%) and 88.3 ± 21.3% (range, 29.4-131%), respectively. The mean relative change (mean ± SD) was 20.2 ± 14.2% for FEV1 (ΔFEV1 ), -21.9 ± 23.8% for reactance at 5 Hz (ΔX5) and -13.4 ± 18.9% for resistance at 5 Hz (Δ R5) (all P-values <0.05). There was a weak but significant correlation between ΔFEV1 and ΔX5 (r =-0.473; p = 0.01). The magnitude of improvement of ΔX5 was not statistically different between patients with normal versus abnormal lung function at the start of IVAT. Furthermore, using ΔX5 alone as an outcome measure of IVAT efficiency resulted in a significant improvement in 44% of the patients, while it was 79% with ΔFEV1 . These results indicate that IOS may track changes after IVAT, but that this improvement may be insufficiently evaluated using IOS alone. PMID:26340567

  17. Galectin-9 Signaling through TIM-3 Is Involved in Neutrophil-Mediated Gram-Negative Bacterial Killing: An Effect Abrogated within the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Carrascal, Isabel; Bergin, David A.; McElvaney, Oliver J.; McCarthy, Cormac; Banville, Nessa; Pohl, Kerstin; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Reeves, Emer P.; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    The T cell Ig and mucin domain–containing molecule (TIM) family of receptors have emerged as potential therapeutic targets to correct abnormal immune function in chronic inflammatory conditions. TIM-3 serves as a functional receptor in structural cells of the airways and via the ligand galectin-9 (Gal-9) can modulate the inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate TIM-3 expression and function in neutrophils, focusing on its potential role in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Results revealed that TIM-3 mRNA and protein expression values of circulating neutrophils were equal between healthy controls (n = 20) and people with CF (n = 26). TIM-3 was detected on resting neutrophil membranes by FACS analysis, and expression levels significantly increased post IL-8 or TNF-α exposure (p < 0.05). Our data suggest a novel role for TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling involving modulation of cytosolic calcium levels. Via TIM-3 interaction, Gal-9 induced neutrophil degranulation and primed the cell for enhanced NADPH oxidase activity. Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was significantly increased upon bacterial opsonization with Gal-9 (p < 0.05), an effect abrogated by blockade of TIM-3 receptors. This mechanism appeared to be Gram-negative bacteria specific and mediated via Gal-9/ LPS binding. Additionally, we have demonstrated that neutrophil TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling is perturbed in the CF airways due to proteolytic degradation of the receptor. In conclusion, results suggest a novel neutrophil defect potentially contributing to the defective bacterial clearance observed in the CF airways and suggest that manipulation of the TIM-3 signaling pathway may be of therapeutic value in CF, preferably in conjunction with antiprotease treatment. PMID:24477913

  18. Pulmonary nocardiosis in an immunocompetent patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Lucy; Santoro, Jonathan D; Milla, Carlos; Bhargava, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia spp. are bacteria of low virulence that cause infection classically in immunocompromised hosts with the lungs as the primary site of infection in the majority of cases. Patients with cystic fibrosis have pulmonary disease characterized by frequent and progressive bacterial infections. Reports of Nocardia spp. isolation in CF are rare in the literature and may represent colonization or active infection, the significance and optimal treatment of which are unknown. We report the second case to date of Nocardia transvalensis pulmonary infection in an immunocompetent patient with CF and the first in a child under the age of eighteen. PMID:25960909

  19. First isolations of Segniliparus rugosus from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Butler, W Ray; Sheils, Catherine A; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Charles, Nadege; Colin, Andrew A; Gant, Mary J; Goodill, John; Hindman, Diane; Toney, Sean R; Wallace, Richard J; Yakrus, Mitchell A

    2007-10-01

    We report three cases of the new genus Segniliparus isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis. All isolates were unambiguously identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Segniliparus rugosus (GenBank accession no. AY 60892). Drug susceptibility results that may enhance treatment for cystic fibrosis patients with this opportunistic pathogen are presented. PMID:17670929

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis and Newborn Screening.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sontag, Marci K; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) has evolved over the past decade as newborn screening has become universal in the United States and elsewhere. The heterogeneity of phenotypes associated with CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and mutations in the CFTR gene has become clearer, ranging from classic pancreatic-insufficient CF to manifestations in only 1 organ system to indeterminate diagnoses identified by newborn screening. The tools available for diagnosis have also expanded. This article reviews the newest diagnostic criteria for CF, newborn screening, prenatal screening and diagnosis, and indeterminate diagnoses in newborn-screened infants and symptomatic adults. PMID:27469178

  1. The Changing Microbial Epidemiology in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    LiPuma, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Infection of the airways remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). This review describes salient features of the epidemiologies of microbial species that are involved in respiratory tract infection in CF. The apparently expanding spectrum of species causing infection in CF and recent changes in the incidences and prevalences of infection due to specific bacterial, fungal, and viral species are described. The challenges inherent in tracking and interpreting rates of infection in this patient population are discussed. PMID:20375354

  2. Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Thaker, Vidhu; Chang, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder which can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. Malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may occur and can cause subclinical deficiencies of some of these vitamins. Vitamin K is known to play an important role in both blood coagulation and bone formation. Supplementation with vitamin K appears to be one way of addressing the deficiency, but there is very limited agreement on the appropriate dose and frequency of use of these supplements. Objectives To assess the effects of vitamin K supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis and to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of vitamin K for both routine and therapeutic use. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group’s Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Most recent search: 08 October 2014. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of vitamin K used as a supplement compared to either no supplementation (or placebo) at any dose or route and for any duration, in children or adults diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Main results Two trials (total of 32 participants) each lasting one month were included in the review and were assessed as having a moderate risk of bias. One was a dose-ranging parallel group trial in children (aged 8 to 18 years); and the other (with an older cohort) had a crossover design comparing supplements to no treatment, but no separate data were reported for the first intervention period. Neither of the trials addressed any of the primary outcomes (coagulation, bone formation and quality of life). Both trials reported the restoration

  3. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martiniano, Stacey L; Nick, Jerry A; Daley, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are important emerging cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens, with estimates of prevalence ranging from 6% to 13%. Diagnosis of NTM disease in patients with CF is challenging, as the infection may remain indolent in some, without evidence of clinical consequence, whereas other patients suffer significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment requires prolonged periods of multiple drugs and varies depending on NTM species, resistance pattern, and extent of disease. The development of a disease-specific approach to the diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in CF patients is a research priority, as a lifelong strategy is needed for this high-risk population. PMID:26857770

  4. Vaccine strategies against cystic fibrosis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Le Moigne, Vincent; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    A great number of cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Burkholderia cepacia and the Mycobacterium abscessus complex raised difficult therapeutic problems due to their intrinsic multi-resistance to numerous antibiotics. Vaccine strategies represent one of the key weapons against these multi-resistant bacteria in a number of clinical settings like CF. Different strategies are considered in order to develop such vaccines, linked either to priming the host response, or by exploiting genomic data derived from the bacterium. Interestingly, virulence factors synthesized by various pathogens might serve as targets for vaccine development and have been, for example, evaluated in the context of CF. PMID:26618824

  5. Nutrition and Growth in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lusman, Sarah; Sullivan, Jillian

    2016-08-01

    Close attention to nutrition and growth is essential in caring for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Growth and nutritional status should be monitored as part of routine CF care. Children with CF should achieve growth and nutritional status comparable with that of well-nourished children without CF. Children with CF are at risk for nutritional deficiencies. Optimal nutritional and growth status may be difficult to attain in this population given risk of insufficient caloric intake and likelihood of increased caloric expenditure. Various methods to attain optimal nutritional status may be used, including oral supplementation, behavioral treatment, pharmacotherapy, and enteral nutrition. PMID:27469181

  6. Cystic fibrosis: need for mass deployable screening methods.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Aditya Singh; Agarwal, Anirudh; Singh, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette superfamily of proteins and it functions as a chloride channel. CFTR largely controls the working of epithelial cells of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, exocrine glands, and genitourinary system. Cystic fibrosis is responsible for severe chronic pulmonary disorders in children. Other maladies in the spectrum of this life-limiting disorder include nasal polyposis, pansinusitis, rectal prolapse, pancreatitis, cholelithiasis, insulin-dependent hyperglycemia, and cirrhosis. This review summarizes the recent state of art in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnostic methods with the help of CF literature published so far and proposes new research domains in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnosis. PMID:24880895

  7. [Pancreatic cystic fibrosis in Mexicans over 15 years of age].

    PubMed

    Quezada, R; Hernandez, N; Sada, E

    1990-01-01

    A better knowledge of cystic fibrosis of the pancreas has contributed to raise the detection of cystic fibrosis in adults. We describe nine Mexican patients older than 15 years with cystic fibrosis. Respiratory symptoms were predominant and they were secondary to bronchiectasis. All patients were infected by mucoid Pseudomona aeruginosa and in some cases, the finding of this microorganism in sputum suggested the diagnosis. In Mexican population the cystyc fibrosis of the pancreas can be found in adult patients, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic respiratory diseases in adults. PMID:2125356

  8. CYSTIC FIBROSIS: AN INHERITED DISEASE AFFECTING MUCIN-PRODUCING ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Ehre, Camille; Ridley, Caroline; Thornton, David J

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of cystic fibrosis (CF) has revealed that the biophysical properties of mucus play a considerable role in the pathogenesis of the disease in view of the fact that most mucus-producing organs are affected in CF patients. In this review, we discuss the potential causal relationship between altered cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function and the production of mucus with abnormal biophysical properties in the intestine and lungs, highlighting what has been learned from cell cultures and animal models that mimic CF pathogenesis. A similar cascade of events, including mucus obstruction, infection and inflammation, is common to all epithelia affected by impaired surface hydration. Hence, the main structural components of mucus, namely the polymeric, gel-forming mucins, are critical to the onset of the disease. Defective CFTR leads to epithelial surface dehydration, altered pH/electrolyte composition and mucin concentration. Further, it can influence mucin transition from the intracellular to extracellular environment, potentially resulting in aberrant mucus gel formation. While defective HCO3− production has long been identified as a feature of CF, it has only recently been considered as a key player in the transition phase of mucins. We conclude by examining the influence of mucins on the biophysical properties of CF sputum and discuss existing and novel therapies aimed at removing mucus from the lungs. PMID:24685676

  9. Unplugging Mucus in Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A

    2016-04-01

    Airway mucus obstruction is a key feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The thin layer of mucus that covers healthy airway surfaces has important protective functions in lung defense. However, excess mucus produces airflow obstruction and provides a nidus for bacterial infection and inflammation. Despite its importance in pathogenesis, understanding of the mechanisms underlying airway mucus obstruction, as well as therapeutic options, remain limited. Studies in the rare genetic disease CF identified airway surface dehydration due to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene dysfunction as an important disease mechanism that may explain mucus stasis and plugging in a spectrum of muco-obstructive lung diseases, including COPD. This concept is supported by the phenotype of the β-epithelial Na(+) channel-transgenic mouse that exhibits airway surface dehydration and develops a spontaneous lung disease that shares key features with CF and COPD, such as airway mucus plugging, chronic neutrophilic inflammation, and structural lung damage. Furthermore, preclinical testing demonstrated that hydration strategies, including osmotically active hypertonic saline and preventive inhibition of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel are effective in unplugging airways in this mouse model of chronic obstructive lung disease. On the other hand, genetic deletion of neutrophil elastase, a potent stimulus for mucus hypersecretion, reduced goblet cell metaplasia and mucin expression but had no effect on mucus obstruction in vivo. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that airway surface dehydration is sufficient to produce mucus obstruction even in the absence of mucus hypersecretion and support further clinical testing of hydrating agents as a promising therapeutic strategy to unplug mucus in CF and COPD. PMID:27115954

  10. Respiratory Exacerbations in Indigenous Children From Two Countries With Non-Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease/Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Valery, Patricia C.; Williams, Hayley; Grimwood, Keith; Morris, Peter S.; Torzillo, Paul J.; McCallum, Gabrielle B.; Chikoyak, Lori; Holman, Robert C.; Chang, Anne B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory exacerbations (AREs) cause morbidity and lung function decline in children with chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis. In a prospective longitudinal cohort study, we determined the patterns of AREs and factors related to increased risks for AREs in children with CSLD/bronchiectasis. METHODS: Ninety-three indigenous children aged 0.5 to 8 years with CSLD/bronchiectasis in Australia (n = 57) and Alaska (n = 36) during 2004 to 2009 were followed for > 3 years. Standardized parent interviews, physical examinations, and medical record reviews were undertaken at enrollment and every 3 to 6 months thereafter. RESULTS: Ninety-three children experienced 280 AREs (median = 2, range = 0-11 per child) during the 3-year period; 91 (32%) were associated with pneumonia, and 43 (15%) resulted in hospitalization. Of the 93 children, 69 (74%) experienced more than two AREs over the 3-year period, and 28 (30%) had more than one ARE in each study year. The frequency of AREs declined significantly over each year of follow-up. Factors associated with recurrent (two or more) AREs included age < 3 years, ARE-related hospitalization in the first year of life, and pneumonia or hospitalization for ARE in the year preceding enrollment. Factors associated with hospitalizations for AREs in the first year of study included age < 3 years, female caregiver education, and regular use of bronchodilators. CONCLUSIONS: AREs are common in children with CSLD/bronchiectasis, but with clinical care and time AREs occur less frequently. All children with CSLD/bronchiectasis require comprehensive care; however, treatment strategies may differ for these patients based on their changing risks for AREs during each year of care. PMID:24811693

  11. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required. PMID:24095197

  12. Cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Kejner, Alexandra; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Advances in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have improved pulmonary outcomes and survival. In addition, rapid developments regarding the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the disease have led to numerous novel targets for treatment. However, clinical and basic scientific research focusing on therapeutic strategies for CF-associated chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) lags behind the evidence-based approaches currently used for pulmonary disease. Methods: This review evaluates the available literature and provides an update concerning the pathophysiology, current treatment approaches, and future pharmaceutical tactics in the management of CRS in patients with CF. Results: Optimal medical and surgical strategies for CF CRS are lacking because of a dearth of well-performed clinical trials. Medical and surgical interventions are supported primarily by level 2 or 3 evidence and are aimed at improving clearance of mucus, infection, and inflammation. A number of novel therapeutics that target the basic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel are currently under investigation. Ivacaftor, a corrector of the G551D mutation, was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, sinonasal outcomes using this and other novel drugs are pending. Conclusion: CRS is a lifelong disease in CF patients that can lead to substantial morbidity and decreased quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach will be necessary to develop consistent and evidence-based treatment paradigms. PMID:24119602

  13. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; O'Ryan, Liam P.; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Riordan, John R.; Ford, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located). PMID:21931164

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  15. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad A.; Everest, Francesca L. C.; Cowley, Lauren A.; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S.; Bridge, Simon H.; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D.; Bourke, Stephen J.; Cummings, Stephen P.; Lanyon, Clare V.; Barr, Jeremy J.; Smith, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  16. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohammad A; Everest, Francesca L C; Cowley, Lauren A; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S; Bridge, Simon H; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D; Bourke, Stephen J; Cummings, Stephen P; Lanyon, Clare V; Barr, Jeremy J; Smith, Darren L

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  17. Antimicrobial resistance in the respiratory microbiota of people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, Laura J; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart

    2014-08-23

    Cystic fibrosis is characterised by chronic polymicrobial infection and inflammation in the airways of patients. Antibiotic treatment regimens, targeting recognised pathogens, have substantially contributed to increased life expectancy of patients with this disease. Although the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and selection of highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains is of major concern, the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis is yet to be defined. Resistance has been identified in recognised cystic fibrosis pathogens and in other bacteria (eg, Prevotella and Streptococcus spp) detected in the airway microbiota, but their role in the pathophysiology of infection and inflammation in chronic lung disease is unclear. Increased antibiotic resistance in cystic fibrosis might be attributed to a range of complex factors including horizontal gene transfer, hypoxia, and biofilm formation. Strategies to manage antimicrobial resistance consist of new antibiotics or localised delivery of antimicrobial agents, iron sequestration, inhibition of quorum-sensing, and resistome analysis. Determination of the contributions of every bacterial species to lung health or disease in cystic fibrosis might also have an important role in the management of antibiotic resistance. PMID:25152272

  18. Lumacaftor/Ivacaftor: A Review in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Emma D

    2016-08-01

    Lumacaftor/ivacaftor (Orkambi™) is a fixed-dose tablet containing a corrector (lumacaftor) and potentiator (ivacaftor) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and is the first therapy approved to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis in patients (aged ≥12 years) homozygous for the most common CFTR mutation, F508del. Lumacaftor improves the processing of F508del CFTR and its transport to the cell surface, while ivacaftor increases the channel's open probability and transport of chloride. In two 24-week trials in the approved patient population (TRAFFIC and TRANSPORT), lumacaftor 400 mg plus ivacaftor 250 mg, administered every 12 h in combination with standard therapy, was associated with an ≈3 % statistically significant improvement in lung function relative to placebo (as measured by the percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s). Lumacaftor plus ivacaftor did not significantly improve respiratory symptoms, although reduced pulmonary exacerbations to a clinically meaningful extent and, in one trial (TRANSPORT), significantly improved body mass index (BMI). In an ongoing extension of these studies (PROGRESS), lumacaftor plus ivacaftor provided clinical benefit over a further 72 weeks of treatment. Lumacaftor plus ivacaftor had an acceptable tolerability profile, with the most common adverse events being respiratory or gastrointestinal in nature. Thus, lumacaftor/ivacaftor expands the treatment options available for patients with cystic fibrosis homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation, although its precise place in clinical practice remains to be determined. PMID:27394157

  19. Gene therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burney, Tabinda J; Davies, Jane C

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is being developed as a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), a condition that has hitherto been widely-researched yet for which no treatment exists that halts the progression of lung disease. Gene therapy involves the transfer of correct copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) DNA to the epithelial cells in the airways. The cloning of the CFTR gene in 1989 led to proof-of-principle studies of CFTR gene transfer in vitro and in animal models. The earliest clinical trials in CF patients were conducted in 1993 and used viral and non-viral gene transfer agents in both the nasal and bronchial airway epithelium. To date, studies have focused largely on molecular or bioelectric (chloride secretion) outcome measures, many demonstrating evidence of CFTR expression, but few have attempted to achieve clinical efficacy. As CF is a lifelong disease, turnover of the airway epithelium necessitates repeat administration. To date, this has been difficult to achieve with viral gene transfer agents due to host recognition leading to loss of expression. The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium (Imperial College London, University of Edinburgh and University of Oxford) is currently working on a large and ambitious program to establish the clinical benefits of CF gene therapy. Wave 1, which has reached the clinic, uses a non-viral vector. A single-dose safety trial is nearing completion and a multi-dose clinical trial is shortly due to start; this will be powered for clinically-relevant changes. Wave 2, more futuristically, will look at the potential of lentiviruses, which have long-lasting expression. This review will summarize the current status of translational research in CF gene therapy. PMID:23776378

  20. Report of the European Respiratory Society/European Cystic Fibrosis Society task force on the care of adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elborn, J Stuart; Bell, Scott C; Madge, Susan L; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Castellani, Carlo; Conway, Steven; De Rijcke, Karleen; Dembski, Birgit; Drevinek, Pavel; Heijerman, Harry G M; Innes, J Alistair; Lindblad, Anders; Marshall, Bruce; Olesen, Hanne V; Reimann, Andreas L; Solé, Ampara; Viviani, Laura; Wagner, Thomas O F; Welte, Tobias; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The improved survival in people with cystic fibrosis has led to an increasing number of patients reaching adulthood. This trend is likely to be maintained over the next decades, suggesting a need to increase the number of centres with expertise in the management of adult patients with cystic fibrosis. These centres should be capable of delivering multidisciplinary care addressing the complexity of the disease, in addition to addressing the psychological burden on patients and their families. Further issues that require attention are organ transplantation and end of life management.Lung disease in adults with cystic fibrosis drives most of the clinical care requirements, and major life-threatening complications, such as respiratory infection, respiratory failure, pneumothorax and haemoptysis, and the management of lung transplantation require expertise from trained respiratory physicians. The taskforce therefore strongly reccommends that medical leadership in multidisciplinary adult teams should be attributed to a respiratory physician adequately trained in cystic fibrosis management.The task force suggests the implementation of a core curriculum for trainees in adult respiratory medicine and the selection and accreditation of training centres that deliver postgraduate training to the standards of the HERMES programme. PMID:26453627

  1. Intrinsic pro-angiogenic status of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaeghe, Catherine; Tabruyn, Sebastien P.; Oury, Cecile; Bours, Vincent . E-mail: vbours@ulg.ac.be; Griffioen, Arjan W.

    2007-05-11

    Cystic fibrosis is a common genetic disorder characterized by a severe lung inflammation and fibrosis leading to the patient's death. Enhanced angiogenesis in cystic fibrosis (CF) tissue has been suggested, probably caused by the process of inflammation, as similarly described in asthma and chronic bronchitis. The present study demonstrates an intrinsic pro-angiogenic status of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells. Microarray experiments showed that CF airway epithelial cells expressed several angiogenic factors such as VEGF-A, VEGF-C, bFGF, and PLGF at higher levels than control cells. These data were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and, at the protein level, by ELISA. Conditioned media of these cystic fibrosis cells were able to induce proliferation, migration and sprouting of cultured primary endothelial cells. This report describes for the first time that cystic fibrosis epithelial cells have an intrinsic angiogenic activity. Since excess of angiogenesis is correlated with more severe pulmonary disease, our results could lead to the development of new therapeutic applications.

  2. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator. Implications in Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Cantin, André M

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have traditionally been viewed as two distinct entities of unrelated origins. However, molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have revealed that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein dysfunction is common to both conditions, one (CF) being defined genetically and the other (COPD) as an acquired CFTR deficiency. Multiple molecular mechanisms of cigarette smoke-induced CFTR dysfunction have been reported. More importantly, considerable evidence of cigarette smoke-induced CFTR dysfunction in several respiratory and nonrespiratory tissues have been confirmed, making CFTR a target that cannot be overlooked in our quest to understand COPD and improve therapies for individuals affected by this disease. This review summarizes the molecular, cellular, and clinical evidence that CFTR dysfunction is induced by cigarette smoke exposure both in vitro and in vivo, and explores how this may contribute to the development of COPD. PMID:27115950

  3. Comparison of 133Xenon Ventilation Equilibrium Scan (XV) and 99mTechnetium Transmission (TT) Scan for Use in Regional Lung Analysis by 2D Gamma Scintigraphy in Healthy and Cystic Fibrosis Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jihong; Donaldson, Scott H.; Bennett, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Quantification of particle deposition in the lung by gamma scintigraphy requires a reference image for location of regions of interest (ROIs) and normalization to lung thickness. In various laboratories, the reference image is made by a transmission scan (57Co or 99mTc) or gas ventilation scan (133Xe or 81Kr). There has not been a direct comparison of measures from the two methods. Methods We compared 99mTc transmission scans to 133Xe equilibrium ventilation scans as reference images for 38 healthy subjects and 14 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients for their effects on measures of regional particle deposition: the central-to-peripheral ratio of lung counts (C/P); and ROI area versus forced vital capacity. Whole right lung ROI was based on either an isocontour threshold of three times the soft tissue transmission (TT) or a threshold of 20% of peak xenon ventilation counts (XV). We used a central ROI drawn to 50% of height and of width of the whole right lung ROI and placed along the left lung margin and centered vertically. Results In general, the correlation of normalized C/P (nC/P) between the two methods was strong. However, the value of nC/P was significantly smaller for the XV method than the TT method. Regression equations for the relationship of nC/P between the two methods were, for healthy subjects, y=0.75x+0.61, R2=0.64 using rectangular ROIs and y=0.76x+0.45, R2=0.66 using isocontour ROIs; and for CF patients, y=0.94x+0.46, R2=0.43 and y=0.85x+0.42, R2=0.41, respectively. Conclusions (1) A transmission scan with an isocontour outline in combination with a rectangular central region to define the lung borders may be more useful than a ventilation scan. (2) Close correlation of nC/Ps measured by transmission or gas ventilation should allow confident comparison of values determined by the two methods. PMID:23421899

  4. Whole-Genome Sequences of Five Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates from Australian Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Timothy J.; Bell, Scott C.; Currie, Bart J.

    2015-01-01

    We report here five improved high-quality draft genomes of Burkholderia pseudomallei isolated from Australian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This pathogen is rarely seen in CF patients. These genomes will be used to better understand chronic carriage of B. pseudomallei in the CF lung and the within-host evolution of longitudinal isolates from these patients. PMID:25883282

  5. "No Time to Play": Perceptions toward Physical Activity in Youth with Cystic Fibrosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moola, Fiona; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Schneiderman, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    Although physical activity may reduce lung function decline in youth with cystic fibrosis (CF), most patients are inactive. Little is known about why youth with CF are inactive or how to facilitate physical activity. This study explored perceptions toward physical activity in 14 youth with CF at a Canadian Hospital. Qualitative interviews were…

  6. Associations between Academic Achievement and Psychosocial Variables in Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieve, Adam J.; Tluczek, Audrey; Racine-Gilles, Caroline N.; Laxova, Anita; Albers, Craig A.; Farrell, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic genetic disease that leads to the accumulation of thick mucus in multiple organ systems, leading to chronic lung infection and affecting the body's ability to absorb nutrients necessary for growth and development. This cross-sectional, correlational study examined the potential effects of CF on…

  7. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein repair as a therapeutic strategy in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, Peter A.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent progress in understanding the production, processing, and function of the cystic fibrosis gene product, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), has revealed new therapeutic targets to repair the mutant protein. Classification of CFTR mutations and new treatment strategies to address each will be described here. Recent findings High-throughput screening and other drug discovery efforts have identified small molecules that restore activity to mutant CFTR. Compounds such as VX-770 that potentiate CFTR have demonstrated exciting results in recent clinical trials and demonstrate robust effects across several CFTR mutation classes in the laboratory. A number of novel F508del CFTR processing correctors restore protein to the cell surface and improve ion channel function in vitro and are augmented by coadministration of CFTR potentiators. Ongoing discovery efforts that target protein folding, CFTR trafficking, and cell stress have also indicated promising results. Aminoglycosides and the novel small molecule ataluren induce translational readthrough of nonsense mutations in CFTR and other genetic diseases in vitro and in vivo and have shown activity in proof of concept trials, and ataluren is now being studied in confirmatory trials. Summary An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the basic genetic defect in cystic fibrosis have led to new treatment strategies to repair the mutant protein. PMID:20829696

  8. Paediatric nasal polyps in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mohd Slim, Mohd Afiq; Dick, David; Trimble, Keith; McKee, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of nasal polyps. We present the case of a 17-month-old Caucasian patient with CF who presented with hypertelorism causing cycloplegic astigmatism, right-sided mucoid discharge, snoring and noisy breathing. Imaging suggested bilateral mucoceles in the ethmoid sinuses. Intraoperatively, bilateral soft tissue masses were noted, and both posterior choanae were patent. Polypectomy and bilateral mega-antrostomies were performed. Histological examination revealed inflammatory nasal polyposis typical of CF. The role of early functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) in children with CF nasal polyposis remains questionable as the recurrence rate is higher, and no improvement in pulmonary function has been shown. Our case, however, clearly demonstrates the beneficial upper airway symptom relief and normalisation of facial appearance following FESS in a child with this condition. PMID:27329094

  9. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator correctors and potentiators.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven M; Verkman, Alan S

    2013-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Correctors and Potentiators

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  11. Developmental and psychosocial issues in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Michelle M; Johnson, Mark C; Stark, Lori J

    2011-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystemic life-limiting genetic disorder, primarily affecting respiratory functioning. Most patients with CF are diagnosed by 2 years of age, and the current median predicted survival rate is 37.4 years old, with 95% of patients dying from complications related to pulmonary infection. Given the chronic, progressive, and disabling nature of CF, multiple treatments are prescribed, most on a daily basis. Thus, this illness requires children, with the aid of their families, to adopt multiple health-related behaviors in addition to managing more typical developmental demands. The morbidity and mortality factors pose cognitive, emotional, and behavioral challenges for many children with CF and their families. This article applies a developmental perspective to describing the psychosocial factors affecting psychological adjustment and health-related behaviors relevant to infants, preschool and school-age children, and adolescents with CF. Topics particularly pertinent to developmental periods and medical milestones are noted, with clinical implications highlighted. PMID:21855711

  12. Clinical monitoring of steatorrhoea in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M P; Kelleher, J; Gilbert, J; Littlewood, J M

    1990-01-01

    In 100 patients with cystic fibrosis the severity of steatorrhoea was assessed by three separate methods. Using chemical faecal fat assay as the gold standard, two other rapid and inexpensive methods were compared with it. The steatocrit method proved unreliable in our hands and gave little indication of the presence or severity of steatorrhoea. The more simple microscopy method was highly sensitive (97%) and only three of 80 patients with steatorrhoea were missed. All patients with severe steatorrhoea (greater than 60 mmol fat/day) were clearly demonstrated. The method is applicable to spot faecal samples and can readily be carried out on an outpatient basis. In centres where faecal fat assays are not available, the simple and cheap microscopic examination will give some indication of the response to enzyme treatment and may also help to identify non-compliant individuals. PMID:2301990

  13. Enhanced IL-1{beta}-induced IL-8 production in cystic fibrosis lung epithelial cells is dependent of both mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-{kappa}B signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Muselet-Charlier, Celine; Roque, Telma; Boncoeur, Emilie; Chadelat, Katarina; Clement, Annick; Jacquot, Jacky; Tabary, Olivier . E-mail: olivier.tabary@st-antoine.inserm.fr

    2007-06-01

    Transcription nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is hyperactivated in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung epithelial cells, and participates in exaggerated IL-8 production in the CF lung. We recently found that rapid activation of NF-{kappa}B occurred in a CF lung epithelial IB3-1 cell line (CF cells) upon IL-1{beta} stimulation, which was not observed in its CFTR-corrected lung epithelial S9 cell line (corrected cells). To test whether other signaling pathways such as that of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) could be involved in IL-1{beta}-induced IL-8 production of CF cells, we investigated ERK1/2, JNK, and p38MAP signaling compared to NF-{kappa}B. Within 30 min, exposure to IL-1{beta} caused high activation of NF-{kappa}B, ERK1/2, p38MAP but not JNK in CF cells compared to corrected cells. Treatment of IL-1{beta}-stimulated CF cells with a series of chemical inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B, ERK1/2, and p38MAP, when used separately, reduced slightly IL-8 production. However, when used together, these inhibitors caused a blockade in IL-1{beta}-induced IL-8 production in CF cells. Understanding of the cross-talk between NF-{kappa}B and MAPKs signaling in CF lung epithelial cells may help in developing new therapeutics to reduce lung inflammation in patients with CF.

  14. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  15. The tyrosine kinase BceF and the phosphotyrosine phosphatase BceD of Burkholderia contaminans are required for efficient invasion and epithelial disruption of a cystic fibrosis lung epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana S; Silva, Inês N; Fernandes, Fábio; Pilkington, Ruth; Callaghan, Máire; McClean, Siobhán; Moreira, Leonilde M

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial tyrosine kinases and their cognate protein tyrosine phosphatases are best known for regulating the biosynthesis of polysaccharides. Moreover, their roles in the stress response, DNA metabolism, cell division, and virulence have also been documented. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathogenicity and potential mechanisms of virulence dependent on the tyrosine kinase BceF and phosphotyrosine phosphatase BceD of the cystic fibrosis opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia contaminans IST408. The insertion mutants bceD::Tp and bceF::Tp showed similar attenuation of adhesion and invasion of the cystic fibrosis lung epithelial cell line CFBE41o- compared to the parental strain B. contaminans IST408. In the absence of bceD or bceF genes, B. contaminans also showed a reduction in the ability to translocate across polarized epithelial cell monolayers, demonstrated by a higher transepithelial electrical resistance, reduced flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, and higher levels of tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 present in monolayers exposed to these bacterial mutants. Furthermore, bceD::Tp and bceF::Tp mutants induced lower levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 release than the parental strain. In conclusion, although the mechanisms of pathogenicity dependent on BceD and BceF are not understood, these proteins contribute to the virulence of Burkholderia by enhancement of cell attachment and invasion, disruption of epithelial integrity, and modulation of the proinflammatory response. PMID:25486990

  16. The Tyrosine Kinase BceF and the Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase BceD of Burkholderia contaminans Are Required for Efficient Invasion and Epithelial Disruption of a Cystic Fibrosis Lung Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana S.; Silva, Inês N.; Fernandes, Fábio; Pilkington, Ruth; Callaghan, Máire; McClean, Siobhán

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial tyrosine kinases and their cognate protein tyrosine phosphatases are best known for regulating the biosynthesis of polysaccharides. Moreover, their roles in the stress response, DNA metabolism, cell division, and virulence have also been documented. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathogenicity and potential mechanisms of virulence dependent on the tyrosine kinase BceF and phosphotyrosine phosphatase BceD of the cystic fibrosis opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia contaminans IST408. The insertion mutants bceD::Tp and bceF::Tp showed similar attenuation of adhesion and invasion of the cystic fibrosis lung epithelial cell line CFBE41o- compared to the parental strain B. contaminans IST408. In the absence of bceD or bceF genes, B. contaminans also showed a reduction in the ability to translocate across polarized epithelial cell monolayers, demonstrated by a higher transepithelial electrical resistance, reduced flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, and higher levels of tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 present in monolayers exposed to these bacterial mutants. Furthermore, bceD::Tp and bceF::Tp mutants induced lower levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 release than the parental strain. In conclusion, although the mechanisms of pathogenicity dependent on BceD and BceF are not understood, these proteins contribute to the virulence of Burkholderia by enhancement of cell attachment and invasion, disruption of epithelial integrity, and modulation of the proinflammatory response. PMID:25486990

  17. Decreased polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotactic response to leukotriene B4 in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, R H; Sorrelli, T C

    1992-01-01

    Evidence that leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a significant inflammatory mediator in chronic pseudomonal respiratory disease was sought in adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis. Specific chemotaxis of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) was used as an indirect measure of remote in vivo exposure to LTB4. PMN from 17 patients showed a significant decrease in chemotaxis to 10(-7)-10(-9) M LTB4, but normal responses to 10(-8) M n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and 4 mg/ml casein, when compared with 17 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. This result is consistent with chronic production of LTB4, and specific deactivation of circulating PMN receptors for LTB4 in patients with cystic fibrosis. Pharmacologic inhibition of LTB4 production in vivo may help elucidate its role in the pathogenesis of lung damage in cystic fibrosis. PMID:1322257

  18. Failure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Conduct ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. M.; Quinton, P. M.; Haws, C.; Wine, J. J.; Grygorczyk, R.; Tabcharani, J. A.; Hanrahan, J. W.; Gunderson, K. L.; Kopito, R. R.

    1996-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is chloride ion channel regulated by protein kinase A and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Loss of CFTR-mediated chloride ion conductance from the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells is a primary physiological lesion in cystic fibrosis. CFTR has also been suggested to function as an ATP channel, although the size of the ATP anion is much larger than the estimated size of the CFTR pore. ATP was not conducted through CFTR in intact organs, polarized human lung cell lines, stably transfected mammalian cell lines, or planar lipid bilayers reconstituted with CFTR protein. These findings suggest that ATP permeation through the CFTR is unlikely to contribute to the normal function of CFTR or to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis.

  19. Ciprofloxacin-induced phototoxicity in an adult cystic fibrosis population.

    PubMed

    Tolland, Julia P; Murphy, Bryan P; Boyle, Julie; Hall, Valerie; McKenna, Kevin E; Elborn, J Stuart

    2012-10-01

    The incidence of phototoxicity as a side effect of ciprofloxacin appears to be increased in patients with cystic fibrosis compared to the general population (approximately 2.4%). We used an interview-based questionnaire to determine the incidence of such phototoxic skin reactions in cystic fibrosis patients. Results from 105 respondents revealed the incidence of ciprofloxacin-induced phototoxicity in the adult cystic fibrosis population in Northern Ireland to be 48.4% with only 66% of the patients recalling being given sun care information beforehand. We concluded that the incidence of phototoxicity is increased in patients with cystic fibrosis and that it is important for all to receive good sun care information prior to taking ciprofloxacin given the high risk of developing phototoxic rash. PMID:22971191

  20. Cystic fibrosis in adults. From researcher to practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Marelich, G P; Cross, C E

    1996-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation currently tracks about 20,000 Americans with cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive genetic disease that leads to multisystem complications. With the institution of better therapeutic regimens over the past 2 decades, more patients with this disease are surviving to adulthood. Within the past decade, both clinical and basic science research in the field of cystic fibrosis has progressed at a rapid rate. The intent of this review is to introduce readers to the molecular, cellular, and systemic disorders of this disease. We discuss treatment strategies involving antibiotics, nutrition, immune-response mediators, chest physiotherapy, and sputum-active agents with respect to the airway dysfunction of cystic fibrosis. Other common complications, recent developments, transplantation, and gene therapy are also reviewed. PMID:8732732

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and ... mucus that contains blood and bacteria. Respiratory System Signs and Symptoms People who have CF have thick, ...

  2. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases that may require a lung transplant are: Cystic fibrosis Damage to the arteries of the lung because ... BC; Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Therapies Committee; ... Therapies Committee. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: ...

  3. Increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Christensson, B A; Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ljungberg, B; Lindblad, A; Malmborg, A S; Hjelte, L; Strandvik, B

    1992-01-01

    The altered pharmacokinetic properties of, e.g., aminoglycosides in cystic fibrosis patients have to be considered when pulmonary exacerbations are treated. Since reported data on ciprofloxacin, a fluorinated quinolone, are conflicting, we compared intravenous and oral administration in cystic fibrosis patients when treating them for mild symptoms of pulmonary infection. All of the patients were colonized with Pseudomonas species. Ciprofloxacin was administered orally (15 mg/kg of body weight) or intravenously (6 mg/kg) twice a day for at least 10 days during separate treatment periods. Five healthy volunteers received single intravenous and oral doses. Pharmacokinetic evaluations were performed at first dose and at steady state. The results showed that cystic fibrosis patients have increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin (80% in cystic fibrosis patients versus 57% in volunteers) and increased total clearance (688 ml/min in CF patients versus 528 ml/min in volunteers). Our data indicate that the pharmacokinetic properties of ciprofloxacin are altered in cystic fibrosis patients with mild symptoms of pulmonary exacerbations and that the changes most probably are due to cystic fibrosis per se or to the impact of chronic infection. PMID:1489195

  4. Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, James F.; Konstan, Michael W.; Elborn, J. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from <6 mo in 1940 to >38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  5. Antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chmiel, James F; Konstan, Michael W; Elborn, J Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from <6 mo in 1940 to >38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  6. Phenotypic abnormalities in long-term surviving cystic fibrosis mice.

    PubMed

    Kent, G; Oliver, M; Foskett, J K; Frndova, H; Durie, P; Forstner, J; Forstner, G G; Riordan, J R; Percy, D; Buchwald, M

    1996-08-01

    Mouse models for cystic fibrosis (CF) with no CFTR function (Cftr-/-) have the disadvantage that most animals die of intestinal obstruction shortly after weaning. The objective of this research was to extend the lifespan of CF mice and characterize their phenotype. Weanlings were placed on a nutrient liquid diet, and histologic and functional aspects of organs implicated in the disease were subsequently examined. Approximately 90% of Cftr-/- mice survived to 60 d, the majority beyond 100 d. Cftr-/- mice were underweight and had markedly abnormal intestinal histology. The intestinal epithelia did not respond to challenges with agents that raised intracellular cAMP, consistent with the absence of functional CFTR. No lesions or functional abnormalities were evident in the lungs. Liquid-fed Cftr-/- mice were infertile, although some males weaned to a solid diet were fertile before they died. Thus, we have succeeded in using dietary means to prolong the lives of Cftr-/- mice. PMID:8827771

  7. Outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in cystic fibrosis patients, France.

    PubMed

    Bittar, Fadi; Cassagne, Carole; Bosdure, Emmanuelle; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean Christophe; Sarles, Jacques; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2010-08-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that nondiphtheria corynebacteria may be responsible for respiratory tract infections. We report an outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). To identify 18 C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains isolated from 13 French children with CF, we used molecular methods (partial rpoB gene sequencing) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Clinical symptoms were exhibited by 10 children (76.9%), including cough, rhinitis, and lung exacerbations. The results of MALDI-TOF identification matched perfectly with those obtained from molecular identification. Retrospective analysis of sputum specimens by using specific real-time PCR showed that approximately 20% of children with CF were colonized with these bacteria, whereas children who did not have CF had negative test results. Our study reemphasizes the conclusion that correctly identifying bacteria at the species level facilitates detection of an outbreak of new or emerging infections in humans. PMID:20678316

  8. Hepatopulmonary Syndrome in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Oded; Shteyer, Eyal; Wilschanski, Michael; Perles, Zeev; Cohen-Cymberknoh, Malena; Kerem, Eitan; Shoseyov, David

    2016-02-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a liver-induced lung disorder defined as a triad of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatation, and a defect in oxygenation. It can complicate chronic liver disease of any etiology, but is most commonly associated with portal hypertension. Severe liver disease with portal hypertension is present in 2% to 8% of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), but to date, to our knowledge, only one patient with CF has been reported to suffer from HPS. Here, we describe two patients with CF diagnosed with HPS, one subsequent to unresolved hypoxemia and the other following screening for HPS performed in our center. We speculate that HPS is underdiagnosed in patients with CF because of their coexisting respiratory morbidity, and we advocate routine screening for every patient with CF who has liver disease and portal hypertension. PMID:26867851

  9. Outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum Infection in Cystic Fibrosis Patients, France

    PubMed Central

    Bittar, Fadi; Cassagne, Carole; Bosdure, Emmanuelle; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Sarles, Jacques; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that nondiphtheria corynebacteria may be responsible for respiratory tract infections. We report an outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). To identify 18 C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains isolated from 13 French children with CF, we used molecular methods (partial rpoB gene sequencing) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Clinical symptoms were exhibited by 10 children (76.9%), including cough, rhinitis, and lung exacerbations. The results of MALDI-TOF identification matched perfectly with those obtained from molecular identification. Retrospective analysis of sputum specimens by using specific real-time PCR showed that ≈20% of children with CF were colonized with these bacteria, whereas children who did not have CF had negative test results. Our study reemphasizes the conclusion that correctly identifying bacteria at the species level facilitates detection of an outbreak of new or emerging infections in humans. PMID:20678316

  10. Epigenetics in Cystic Fibrosis: Epigenetic Targeting of a Genetic Disease.

    PubMed

    Sirinupong, Nualpun; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a deadly genetic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system. A mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene is the cause of the disease. How epigenetics contributes to CFTR expression is still poorly understood. Epigenetics is a mechanism that alters gene expression without changing the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and histone modification. Both mechanisms have been implicated in CFTR gene regulation. Here we review epigenetic regulation of CFTR transcription while discussing potential epigenetic targeting strategies including DNA methyltransferase, histone deacetylase, and histone methyltransferase and demethylase inhibition. Because of the reversibility of epigenetics, targeting epigenetic mechanisms has been an attractive therapeutic approach. However, epigenetic targeting of CF disease is still at its infant stage. PMID:25882215

  11. ENaC inhibitors for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Butler, Rebecca; Hunt, Thomas; Smith, Nichola J

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel, ENaC, is a key regulator of the volume of airway surface liquid in the human airway epithelium. In cystic fibrosis (CF), Na(+) hyperabsorption through ENaC in the absence of CFTR-mediated anion secretion results in the dehydration of respiratory secretions and the impairment of mucociliary clearance. The hypothesis of utilizing an ENaC-blocking molecule to facilitate restoration of the airway surface liquid volume sufficiently to allow normal mucociliary clearance is of interest in the management of lung disease in CF patients. This article summarizes the published patent applications from 2010 that claim approaches to inhibit the function of ENaC for utility in the treatment of CF. Patents were located though SciFinder(®), using "ENaC" as the keyword from 2010 onwards; documents not relevant to CF were then manually removed. PMID:25565157

  12. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator corrects defective chloride channel regulation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Devra P.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Gregory, Richard J.; Cheng, Seng H.; Paul, Sucharita; Jefferson, Douglas M.; McCann, John D.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Smith, Alan E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was expressed in cultured cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells and Cl- channel activation assessed in single cells using a fluorescence microscopic assay and the patch-clamp technique. Expression of CFTR, but not of a mutant form of CFTR (ΔF508), corrected the Cl- channel defect. Correction of the phenotypic defect demonstrates a causal relationship between mutations in the CFTR gene and defective Cl- transport which is the hallmark of the disease.

  13. Drug management of noninfective complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, I; Guiraldes, E

    1995-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the commonest lethal hereditary disease in Caucasians. The disease involves a gene mutation located at the long arm of chromosome 7, and more than 300 mutations have been identified. CF is a systemic illness affecting the upper respiratory tract and airways, sweat and salivary glands, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and male reproductive system. The course is highly variable depending on the specific molecular abnormalities in the mutant gene. The current approach to therapy now involves the use of: (i) chest physiotherapy; (ii) bronchodilators when there is evidence of airways hyperreactivity; (iii) oral and intravenous antibiotics for acute pulmonary exacerbations and aerosolised antibiotics for prevention; (iv) recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I (dornase alfa) to promote airways clearance; (v) amiloride to improve sputum viscosity; (vi) pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy along with nutritional support and supplements; (vi) vitamins; and (vii) ursodeoxycholic acid in selected patients. The use of antiprotease and anti-inflammatory agents has been shown to be useful in preventing the damage secondary to chronic lung infection. In patients with severely impaired lung function, lung transplantations have been performed with good results. Finally, it seems probable that lung disease in CF patients will be ameliorated or prevented in the future with early gene therapy, using vectors such as recombinant adenoviruses, adeno-associated virus, lipofection or retrovirus. However, this require extensive basic and clinical research. PMID:8536551

  14. Long-term improvement of lung clearance index in patients with mild cystic fibrosis lung disease: Does hypertonic saline play a role?

    PubMed

    Ellemunter, Helmut; Eder, Johannes; Fuchs, Susanne; Gappa, Monika; Steinkamp, Gratiana

    2016-01-01

    To assess whether long-term inhalation with hypertonic saline is able to halt the progression of mild CF lung disease, we analysed longitudinal data of lung clearance index (LCI) and spirometry. A total of 34 patients with mild lung disease (FEV1 ≥ 70% of predicted) had at least one LCI result before and ≥2 LCI measurements after start of hypertonic saline (HS) therapy. After a mean follow-up of 39.7 (SD 7.4) months after starting HS, LCI improved significantly from 7.89 (SD 1.35) at baseline to 6.96 (SD 1.03), and 19/34 patients had a normal LCI value at the last measurement. No decrease in mean FEV1 was observed. Thus, ventilation inhomogeneity can improve in patients with mild lung disease. PMID:26190829

  15. Mechanisms of Lung Fibrosis Resolution.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephan W; Hagood, James S; Wong, Simon; Taype, Carmen A; Madala, Satish K; Hardie, William D

    2016-05-01

    Fibrogenesis involves a dynamic interplay between factors that promote the biosynthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix along with pathways that degrade the extracellular matrix and eliminate the primary effector cells. Opposing the often held perception that fibrotic tissue is permanent, animal studies and clinical data now demonstrate the highly plastic nature of organ fibrosis that can, under certain circumstances, regress. This review describes the current understanding of the mechanisms whereby the lung is known to resolve fibrosis focusing on degradation of the extracellular matrix, removal of myofibroblasts, and the role of inflammatory cells. Although there are significant gaps in understanding lung fibrosis resolution, accelerated improvements in biotechnology and bioinformatics are expected to improve the understanding of these mechanisms and have high potential to lead to novel and effective restorative therapies in the treatment not only of pulmonary fibrosis, but also of a wide-ranging spectrum of chronic disorders. PMID:27021937

  16. Cystic Fibrosis Heterozygote Resistance to Cholera Toxin in the Cystic Fibrosis Mouse Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Sherif E.; Brigman, Kristen N.; Koller, Beverly H.; Boucher, Richard C.; Stutts, M. Jackson

    1994-10-01

    The effect of the number of cystic fibrosis (CF) alleles on cholera toxin (CT)-induced intestinal secretion was examined in the CF mouse model. CF mice that expressed no CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein did not secrete fluid in response to CT. Heterozygotes expressed 50 percent of the normal amount of CFTR protein in the intestinal epithelium and secreted 50 percent of the normal fluid and chloride ion in response to CT. This correlation between CFTR protein and CT-induced chloride ion and fluid secretion suggests that CF heterozygotes might possess a selective advantage of resistance to cholera.

  17. Cystic fibrosis and estrogens: a perfect storm

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    Irreversible destruction and widening of the airways due to acquired infections or genetic mutations as well as those of unknown cause are more severe in females. Differences between male and female anatomy, behavior, and hormonal state have been proposed to explain the increased incidence and severity in females with airway disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF); however, a mechanism to explain a sex-related difference has remained elusive. In this issue of the JCI, Coakley et al. report that elevations in the major estrogen hormone in humans — 17β-estradiol — reduce Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion by airway epithelial cells in culture, thereby disrupting ion and water balance (see the related article beginning on page 4025). They measure a similar diminution of nasal epithelial Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion in women with CF during the menstrual cycle phase at which 17β-estradiol level is at its highest. These data suggest that for about one week of a four-week menstrual cycle, women with CF will have a reduced ability to efficiently clear airway secretions, the buildup of which is a hallmark of CF. The authors suggest that these data warrant the testing of antiestrogen therapy in females with CF and propose an alternative avenue for CF therapeutic development. PMID:19033654

  18. Cephalexin pharmacokinetics in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nahata, M C; Lubin, A H; Visconti, J A

    1984-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of cephalexin were studied in 7 pediatric and 4 adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 4 normal adult volunteers. Cephalexin, 250-500 mg, was given as a single dose in suspension. The area under the cephalexin serum concentration-time curve normalized for dose per kilogram averaged 0.185, 0.242, and 0.272 ml/min/kg-1 in pediatric CF patients, adult CF patients, and normal adults, respectively (p greater than 0.05). A threefold interindividual variation was observed in cephalexin renal clearance in CF patients. Renal clearance of cephalexin averaged 5.85 ml/min/kg in pediatric and 4.61 ml/min/kg in adult CF patients (p greater than 0.05). Elimination half-life of cephalexin averaged 0.74, 0.76, and 1.04 h in pediatric patients, adult patients, and normal adults (p greater than 0.05). Cephalexin was well absorbed based on a mean 24-hour urinary recovery of 89 and 93% in pediatric and adult patients. A trend for higher renal clearance of cephalexin was observed among pediatric compared to adult patients. These results indicate that clearance of cephalexin may not increase in patients with CF of minimal severity characterized by an excellent Shwachman score. PMID:6468223

  19. Infection, inflammation and exercise in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Regular exercise is positively associated with health. It has also been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects. In healthy subjects, a single exercise session results in immune cell activation, which is characterized by production of immune modulatory peptides (e.g. IL-6, IL-8), a leukocytosis and enhanced immune cell functions. Upon cessation of exercise, immune activation is followed by a tolerizing phase, characterized by a reduced responsiveness of immune cells. Regular exercise of moderate intensity and duration has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects and is associated with a reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Specific exercise programs may therefore be used to modify the course of chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF suffer from severe and chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation, leading to obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease, exercise intolerance and muscle cachexia. Inflammation is characterized by a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Patients are encouraged to engage in exercise programs to maintain physical fitness, quality of life, pulmonary function and health. In this review, we present an overview of available literature describing the association between regular exercise, inflammation and infection susceptibility and discuss the implications of these observations for prevention and treatment of inflammation and infection susceptibility in patients with CF. PMID:23497303

  20. Cystic fibrosis on the African continent.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cheryl; Pepper, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF; OMIM 219700) is a life-shortening and costly autosomal recessive disease that has been most extensively studied in individuals of Caucasian descent. There is ample evidence, however, that it also affects other ethnicities. In Africa there have been several reports of CF, but there has been no concerted effort toward establishing the molecular epidemiology of this disease on the continent, which is the first step toward outlining a public health strategy to effectively address the needs of these patients. A literature search revealed reports from only 12 of the 54 African states on the molecular analysis of the mutations present in suspected CF patients, resulting in the identification of 79 mutations. Based on previous functional investigations, 39 of these cause CF, 10 are of varying clinical consequence, 4 have no associated evidence regarding whether they cause CF, 4 are synonymous, 5 are novel, and 21 are unique to Africa. We propose that CF be more thoroughly investigated on the continent to ensure that the public health needs of African CF patients-both those in Africa and those of African descent living elsewhere-are met.Genet Med 18 7, 653-662. PMID:26656651

  1. New and Emerging Treatments for Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barry, Peter J; Jones, Andrew M

    2015-07-01

    Recently, a significant number of additional key medications have become licensed in Europe for the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), including a number of inhaled antibiotics, such as nebulised aztreonam and dry powder versions of colistin and tobramycin for inhalation; dry powder inhaled mannitol, an agent to improve airway hydration and aid airway clearance; and ivacaftor, an oral therapy that directly acts on dysfunctional CFTR to correct the basic defect encountered in CF patients with the G551D CF gene mutation. The marked success of ivacaftor both in clinical trials and in post-licensing evaluation studies in treating patients with G551D and other gating mutations has greatly encouraged the ongoing development of similar therapies that can directly target the underlying cause of CF. Other therapies, including a number of anti-infectives, anti-inflammatories and replacement pancreatic enzymes, are currently undergoing clinical studies. This article reviews those treatments that have been recently licensed for CF and highlights some of the exciting emerging therapies presently under evaluation in clinical trials. In addition, it discusses some of the potential challenges being encountered by research and clinical teams in developing and delivering treatments for this condition. PMID:26091951

  2. Patient-reported Outcomes in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Christopher H.; Quittner, Alexandra L.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been tremendous progress in the area of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). A PRO instrument is defined as any measure of a patient's health status that is elicited directly from the patient and assesses how the patient “feels or functions with respect to his or her health condition.” The advances seen in clinical research regarding PROs has been mirrored in research in cystic fibrosis (CF). A large number of instruments have been used for both therapeutic and nontherapeutic clinical research for many chronic conditions. This review will summarize a history of the development of PROs and how PROs are viewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We will then review the current state of the art of patient-reported outcomes in CF, specifically addressing the evaluation of different PRO instruments in terms of their reliability and validity. Finally, we will delineate further areas for development of PROs in CF. We believe that the future of CF research will incorporate a more diverse selection of PRO outcome measures; these outcome measures ultimately may be incorporated into clinical care to standardize symptom assessment and provide information regarding the need for specific clinical interventions to improve the quality of care delivered to these patients. PMID:17652505

  3. Inhaled therapies, azithromycin and Mycobacterium abscessus in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Catherinot, Emilie; Roux, Anne-Laure; Vibet, Marie-Anne; Bellis, Gil; Lemonnier, Lydie; Le Roux, Evelyne; Bernède-Bauduin, Claire; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Guillemot, Didier; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are at particularly high risk of developing lung disease caused by Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC). Over the last 10 years, changes in CF treatment, with increasing use of inhaled therapies and low-dose azithromycin, have been accompanied by an increase in the prevalence of MABSC infections in CF patients. There is therefore some concern about the role of new CF treatments in the emergence of MABSC infections. We addressed this issue by means of a case-control study including 30 MABSC-positive cases and 60 nontuberculous mycobacteria-negative CF controls matched for age, sex and centre. We also compared practices at the CF centres with the highest prevalence of MABSC with those at the other centres. No positive association was found between MABSC lung disease and the use of inhaled therapies or low-dose azithromycin in the 4 years preceding MABSC isolation. These treatments were not significantly more frequently used at the CF centres with the highest MABSC prevalence rates. In conclusion, there is no evidence for a link between M. abscessus complex lung disease and inhaled therapies or low-dose azithromycin in patients with CF. PMID:22936714

  4. Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Surface Liquid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tarran, Robert; Button, Brian; Picher, Maryse; Paradiso, Anthony M.; Ribeiro, Carla M.; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Zhang, Liqun; Collins, Peter L.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian airways normally regulate the volume of a thin liquid layer, the periciliary liquid (PCL), to facilitate the mucus clearance component of lung defense. Studies under standard (static) culture conditions revealed that normal airway epithelia possess an adenosine-regulated pathway that blends Na+ absorption and Cl− secretion to optimize PCL volume. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the absence of CF transmembrane conductance regulator results in a failure of adenosine regulation of PCL volume, which is predicted to initiate mucus stasis and infection. However, under conditions that mimic the phasic motion of the lung in vivo, ATP release into PCL was increased, CF ion transport was rebalanced, and PCL volume was restored to levels adequate for lung defense. This ATP signaling system was vulnerable, however, to insults that trigger CF bacterial infections, such as viral (respiratory syncitial virus) infections, which up-regulated extracellular ATPase activity and abolished motion-dependent ATP regulation of CF PCL height. These studies demonstrate (i) how the normal coordination of opposing ion transport pathways to maintain PCL volume is disrupted in CF, (ii) the hitherto unknown role of phasic motion in regulating key aspects of normal and CF innate airways defense, and (iii) that maneuvers directed at increasing motion-induced nucleotide release may be therapeutic in CF patients. PMID:16087672

  5. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Derichs, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine. PMID:23457166

  6. CFTR, Mucins, and Mucus Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kreda, Silvia M.; Davis, C. William; Rose, Mary Callaghan

    2012-01-01

    Mucus pathology in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been known for as long as the disease has been recognized and is sometimes called mucoviscidosis. The disease is marked by mucus hyperproduction and plugging in many organs, which are usually most fatal in the airways of CF patients, once the problem of meconium ileus at birth is resolved. After the CF gene, CFTR, was cloned and its protein product identified as a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel, causal mechanisms underlying the strong mucus phenotype of the disease became obscure. Here we focus on mucin genes and polymeric mucin glycoproteins, examining their regulation and potential relationships to a dysfunctional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Detailed examination of CFTR expression in organs and different cell types indicates that changes in CFTR expression do not always correlate with the severity of CF disease or mucus accumulation. Thus, the mucus hyperproduction that typifies CF does not appear to be a direct cause of a defective CFTR but, rather, to be a downstream consequence. In organs like the lung, up-regulation of mucin gene expression by inflammation results from chronic infection; however, in other instances and organs, the inflammation may have a non-infectious origin. The mucus plugging phenotype of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse is proving to be an archetypal example of this kind of inflammation, with a dehydrated airway surface/concentrated mucus gel apparently providing the inflammatory stimulus. Data indicate that the luminal HCO3 − deficiency recently described for CF epithelia may also provide such a stimulus, perhaps by causing a mal-maturation of mucins as they are released onto luminal surfaces. In any event, the path between CFTR dysfunction and mucus hyperproduction has proven tortuous, and its unraveling continues to offer its own twists and turns, along with fascinating glimpses into biology. PMID:22951447

  7. Does the FEF25-75 or the FEF75 have any value in assessing lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis or asthma?

    PubMed

    Lukic, Karl Z; Coates, Allan L

    2015-09-01

    While the FEV1 had been recognized as an excellent indicator of disability, it is not very sensitive to early and mild disease. In cystic fibrosis (CF) small airway disease is believed to be one of the early hallmarks and indices such as the FEF25-75 and FEF75 have been proposed as sensitive markers of early disease. The site of early disease in asthma is not as well worked out. Recently a study of more than 20,000 spirometries found that neither of these indices added anything to the FEV1 /FVC but that study was not disease specific and contained both adults and children and the adults were the most numerous. To see if this would be true in children, 1,175 spirograms from children 6 to 18 years of age with CF or asthma whose FEV1 and FVC were above the lower limit of normal were taken from sequential studies. The data expressed in z scores was plotted with either the FEF25-75 or FEF75 plotted against FEV1 /FVC. In both diseases, but particularly in asthma, the FEV1 /FVC was more likely to be abnormal than either of the other two indices for suggesting that for children, early, or mild disease will be more apparent using the FEV1 /FVC than any other index. PMID:26079395

  8. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use. PMID:26452630

  9. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use. PMID:26452630

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Allelic Variants Relate to Shifts in Faecal Microbiota of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Floriana; Gagliardi, Antonella; De Biase, Riccardo Valerio; Stamato, Antonella; Bertasi, Serenella; Lucarelli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study we investigated the effects of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene variants on the composition of faecal microbiota, in patients affected by Cystic Fibrosis (CF). CFTR mutations (F508del is the most common) lead to a decreased secretion of chloride/water, and to mucus sticky secretions, in pancreas, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Intestinal manifestations are underestimated in CF, leading to ileum meconium at birth, or small bowel bacterial overgrowth in adult age. Methods Thirty-six CF patients, fasting and under no-antibiotic treatment, were CFTR genotyped on both alleles. Faecal samples were subjected to molecular microbial profiling through Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis and species-specific PCR. Ecological parameters and multivariate algorithms were employed to find out if CFTR variants could be related to the microbiota structure. Results Patients were classified by two different criteria: 1) presence/absence of F508del mutation; 2) disease severity in heterozygous and homozygous F508del patients. We found that homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients exhibited an enhanced dysbiotic faecal microbiota composition, even within the CF cohort itself, with higher biodiversity and evenness. We also found, by species-specific PCR, that potentially harmful species (Escherichia coli and Eubacterium biforme) were abundant in homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients, while beneficial species (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium limosum) were reduced. Conclusions This is the first report that establishes a link among CFTR variants and shifts in faecal microbiota, opening the way to studies that perceive CF as a ‘systemic disease’, linking the lung and the gut in a joined axis. PMID:23613805

  11. Paranasal mucoceles in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Di Cicco, Maurizio; Costantini, Diana; Padoan, Rita; Colombo, Carla

    2005-10-01

    Sinus mucocele is rare in the paediatric age, and so far no prevalence data have been reported in children with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Moreover, safety and efficacy of endoscopic management of sinus mucoceles has been widely proven but only in the adult population. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of this complication and the efficacy of endoscopic sinus surgery in CF patients during the initial years of life. Among the 242 CF patients born in the period between 1990 and 2001 and in regular follow up at our CF Centre, 90 patients with possible symptoms of chronic upper airways disease (CUAD) underwent a comprehensive ENT examination including rhinofibroscopy. In selected cases a CT scan of the paranasal sinuses was also performed. CUAD was diagnosed in 55/90 because of the consistent presence of nasal obstruction, combined with at least two other nasal symptoms such as chronic nasal discharge, snoring, epiphora. Diagnosis of mucoceles (five maxillary bilateral mucoceles, one maxillary unilateral, three maxillary and etmoidal mucoceles) was done by means of CT scan in 9/15 who performed the examination. Median age at the diagnosis was 4+/-0.5 years, ranging from 0.5+/-7 years, showing a prevalence of 16.4% (9/55) among patients with symptoms. Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in all the cases. The follow-up period ranged from 3 months to 6 years with no recurrence observed. Sinus mucocele in CF population is less unusual than expected and a high degree of suspicion is needed. Endoscopic sinus surgery seems to be a safe and efficient treatment of this complication also in a paediatric population at a high risk as for the CF patients. PMID:15939485

  12. Chronic rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis (mucoviscidosis).

    PubMed

    Brihaye, P; Jorissen, M; Clement, P A

    1997-01-01

    The authors present two clinical studies performed in the ENT departments of two Belgian Universities. A total of 248 patients with mucoviscidosis (cystic fibrosis, CF) were assessed by means of nasal endoscopy. One hundred eighteen underwent computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses (CT) and 55 were endoscopically operated. This allowed the observation of different clinical patterns of rhinosinusitis: mucopyosinusitis (pseudomucocele) of the maxillary antrum with bulging of the lateral nasal wall (LNW), nasal polyposis with erosion of the LNW, and chronic purulent rhinosinusitis with an isolated prominent uncinate process. The treatment of those patients could be tailored to the individual clinical pattern. Medical therapy consisted of systemic antibiotics and topical drugs delivered by sprays or by lavages with a nose can. Surgery was mainly aimed at removing the massive polyposis when it interfered with the daily life activities. The use of the endoscope enabled to perform safely more extensive procedures resulting in a lower recurrence rate. In patients with chronic rhinosinusitis without polyposis, yet presenting ostiomeatal obstruction, a limited and more functional endoscopic surgery was indicated in order to restore some drainage and to improve the penetration of topical drugs into the affected sinus. A short addendum presents two studies: one about genetics and the other about prevalence of middle ear disease in CF. The first concluded that no clear correlation was found between DF508 (the most common CF mutation) and nasal polyposis. The second revealed that in contrast with the extremely high prevalence of sinus problems, there was no clear evidence of an increased prevalence of middle ear disease in CF. PMID:9444379

  13. Mechanisms of the noxious inflammatory cycle in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rottner, Mathilde; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie; Martínez, M Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Multiple evidences indicate that inflammation is an event occurring prior to infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. The self-perpetuating inflammatory cycle may play a pathogenic part in this disease. The role of the NF-κB pathway in enhanced production of inflammatory mediators is well documented. The pathophysiologic mechanisms through which the intrinsic inflammatory response develops remain unclear. The unfolded mutated protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTRΔF508), accounting for this pathology, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), induces a stress, and modifies calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, CFTR is implicated in the transport of glutathione, the major antioxidant element in cells. CFTR mutations can alter redox homeostasis and induce an oxidative stress. The disturbance of the redox balance may evoke NF-κB activation and, in addition, promote apoptosis. In this review, we examine the hypotheses of the integrated pathogenic processes leading to the intrinsic inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis. PMID:19284656

  14. Breakthrough therapies: Cystic fibrosis (CF) potentiators and correctors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Marshall, Susan G; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Rowe, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators are also emphasized. PMID:26097168

  15. Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Collaborative Clinical and School Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawhacker, MaryAnn Tapper; Wellendorf, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments have improved both morbidity and mortality associated with cystic fibrosis, making regular school attendance a reality. School nurses have a unique opportunity to assist students with cystic fibrosis successfully manage their disease. Medical treatment for cystic fibrosis can be complex, leaving…

  16. Recombinant human DNase I reduces the viscosity of cystic fibrosis sputum.

    PubMed

    Shak, S; Capon, D J; Hellmiss, R; Marsters, S A; Baker, C L

    1990-12-01

    Respiratory distress and progressive lung destruction in cystic fibrosis can be attributed to bacterial persistence and the accumulation of viscous purulent secretions in the airways. More than 30 yr ago it was suggested that the large amounts of DNA in purulent secretions contribute to its viscosity and that bovine pancreatic DNase I could reduce the viscosity. To evaluate the potential clinical utility of recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) in the treatment of cystic fibrosis, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed rhDNase. Catalytic amounts of rhDNase greatly reduce the viscosity of purulent cystic fibrosis sputum, transforming it within minutes from a nonflowing viscous gel to a flowing liquid. The reduction in viscosity is associated with a decrease in size of DNA in the sputum. Inhalation of a rhDNase aerosol may be a simple direct approach that will help individuals with cystic fibrosis and other patients with pneumonia or bronchitis to clear their airways of purulent secretions. PMID:2251263

  17. Antifungal treatment in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis with and without cystic fibrosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moreira, A S; Silva, D; Ferreira, A Reis; Delgado, L

    2014-10-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a rare disease that affects patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Its debilitating course has led to the search for new treatments, including antifungals and monoclonal antibodies. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of antifungal treatments in patients with ABPA and either asthma or cystic fibrosis, we performed a systematic review of the literature on the effects of antifungal agents in ABPA using three biomedical databases. Quality assessment was performed using the GRADE methodology and, where appropriate, studies with comparable outcomes were pooled for meta-analysis. Thirty-eight studies - four randomized controlled trials and 34 observational studies - met the eligibility criteria. The antifungal interventions described were itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, ketoconazole, natamycin, nystatin and amphotericin B. An improvement in symptoms, frequency of exacerbations and lung function was reported in most of the studies and was more common with oral azoles. Antifungals also had a positive impact on biomarkers and radiological pulmonary infiltrates, but adverse effects were also common. The quality of the evidence supporting these results was low or very low due to a shortage of controlled studies, heterogeneity between studies and potential bias. Antifungal interventions in ABPA improved patient and disease outcomes in both asthma and cystic fibrosis. However, the recommendation for their use is weak and clinicians should therefore weigh up desirable and undesirable effects on a case-by-case basis. More studies with a better methodology are needed, especially in cystic fibrosis, to increase confidence in the effects of antifungal treatments in ABPA. PMID:24809846

  18. Monitoring of lobectomy in cystic fibrosis with electrical impedance tomography - a new diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Sylvia; Tenbrock, Klaus; Schrading, Simone; Pikkemaat, Robert; Antink, Christoph Hoog; Santos, Susana; Spillner, Jan Wilhelm; Wagner, Norbert; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2014-12-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a radiation-free technique generating cross-sectional images of the lung. EIT visualizes global and regional ventilation by illustrating the distribution of electrical bioimpedance. With an electrode belt around the patient's thorax, rotating injection-couples of a harmless alternating current allow voltage measurement of the remaining electrodes. This enables the reconstruction of a tomogram with highly dynamic changes within ventilation. We report on a female six-year-old patient with cystic fibrosis and complete destruction of the upper and middle lobe of the right lung. Lobectomy, a rare therapeutic option in patients with cystic fibrosis that needs to be considered in cases of severe localized destruction, was performed. We show a pre- and postoperative documentation of static (radiology) and dynamic investigation tools (spirometry) in correlation with EIT as a new non-invasive and radiation-free diagnostic tool for this patient group. PMID:25153206

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Nasal Epithelial Cells from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Papon, Jean-François; Chhuon, Cerina; Zadigue, Patricia; Prulière-Escabasse, Virginie; Amselem, Serge; Escudier, Estelle; Coste, André; Edelman, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease remains incompletely understood. New explanations for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease may be discovered by studying the patterns of protein expression in cultured human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC). To that aim, we compared the level of protein expressions in primary cultures of HNEC from nasal polyps secondary to CF (CFNP, n = 4), primary nasal polyps (NP, n = 8) and control mucosa (CTRL, n = 4) using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with liquid chromatography (LC)-MS-MS. The analysis of the data revealed 42 deregulated protein expressions in CFNP compared to NP and CTRL, suggesting that these alterations are related to CF. Overall, AmiGo analysis highlighted six major pathways important for cell functions that seem to be impaired: metabolism, G protein process, inflammation and oxidative stress response, protein folding, proteolysis and structural proteins. Among them, glucose and fatty acid metabolic pathways could be impaired in CF with nine deregulated proteins. Our proteomic study provides a reproducible set of differentially expressed proteins in airway epithelial cells from CF patients and reveals many novel deregulated proteins that could lead to further studies aiming to clarify the involvement of such proteins in CF pathophysiology. PMID:25268127

  20. Nocturnal hypoxemia in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Regina Terse Trindade; Santana, Maria Angélica Pinheiro; Almeida, Priscila de Carvalho; Machado, Almério de Souza; Araújo-Filho, José Bouzas; Salles, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of nocturnal hypoxemia and its association with pulmonary function, nutritional status, sleep macrostructure, and obstructive respiratory events during sleep in a population of clinically stable children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 67 children and adolescents with CF between 2 and 14 years of age. All of the participants underwent polysomnography, and SpO2 was measured by pulse oximetry. We also evaluated the Shwachman-Kulczycki (S-K) scores, spirometry findings, and nutritional status of the patients. RESULTS: The study involved 67 patients. The mean age of the patients was 8 years. The S-K scores differed significantly between the patients with and without nocturnal hypoxemia, which was defined as an SpO2 < 90% for more than 5% of the total sleep time (73.75 ± 6.29 vs. 86.38 ± 8.70; p < 0.01). Nocturnal hypoxemia correlated with the severity of lung disease, FEV1 (rs = −0.42; p = 0.01), FVC (rs = −0.46; p = 0.01), microarousal index (rs = 0.32; p = 0.01), and apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.56; p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of patients with CF and mild-to-moderate lung disease, nocturnal oxygenation correlated with the S-K score, spirometry variables, sleep macrostructure variables, and the apnea-hypopnea index. PMID:24473760

  1. Physiologic endpoints for clinical studies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stanojevic, Sanja; Ratjen, Felix

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) drug development pipeline promises many exciting new treatments for patients with CF, all which will require clinical studies to prove their benefits on CF lung disease. Historically many pivotal CF studies have used the Forced Expiratory Volume in 1s (FEV1) as the primary outcome measure, and after demonstrating significant improvements in the treatment group relative to placebo have led to regulatory approval of therapies for routine clinical care. Widespread implementation of these therapies has subsequently led to significant improvements in outcomes for patients with CF. While preserving lung function has obvious benefits to CF patients, as more patients maintain FEV1 in the normal range, it has become increasingly difficult to conduct clinical trials using FEV1 as the primary outcome measure. With multiple concurrent trials competing to enroll from the same pool of patients, there is a need for novel approaches to study end points as well as new physiological outcomes for CF therapeutic trials. In this review we will discuss some of the limitations of FEV1 in the current era of CF care, describe alternative physiological endpoints and outline areas for further research. PMID:27316663

  2. Interactions Between DNA and Actin in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Hee; Sanders, Lori; Angelini, Thomas; Butler, John; Wong, Gerard

    2003-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid which has a high concentration of DNA and F-actin, two anionic biological polyelectrolytes. In this work, we study the interactions between DNA and actin in an aqueous environment over a wide range of polyelectrolyte lengths and salt levels, using synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering(SAXS) and confocal microscopy. Perliminary results indicate the existence of a compressed phase of nematic F-actin in the presence of DNA. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  3. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Garry R.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethalautosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the d iscove1y of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  4. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Cutting, Garry R

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethal autosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the discovery of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  5. Celiac Disease and Cystic Fibrosis: Challenges to Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alessandra Teixeira Pessoa; Figueirêdo, Manuella Machado; Aguiar, Ana Paula de B; Almeida, Carolina de Godoy; Mendes, Patrícia S A; Souza, Edna Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis and celiac disease were considered a single clinical entity for many years. Differentiation between the diseases occurred some time in the 1930s of the 20th Century. Both diseases may present the intestinal malabsorption syndrome and similar clinical manifestations that contribute to difficulties with clinical distinction. We describe a report of two patients with initial diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, who were subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease. These case reports emphasize the possibility of false positivity being shown in the sweat test in CD, which may result in delayed diagnosis and inadequate management of this disease. PMID:27552792

  6. Cystic Fibrosis: A Novel Pharmacologic Approach to Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Modulation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Virant-Young, Deborah; Thomas, Justin; Woiderski, Sarah; Powers, Michelle; Carlier, Joseph; McCarty, James; Kupchick, Tyler; Larder, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) has progressed during the past several decades. Much of this progress is because of advances in genetic testing to precisely identify the underlying cause of CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) dysfunction. However, with more than 1900 mutations that can produce a faulty CFTR, the management of CF can remain a challenge. Several innovative drugs recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration, termed genetic modulators, target the underlying disease by modulating the CFTR defect. This review provides physicians with an established simple classification scheme to guide their use of these drugs. The treatment challenge of 1900 CFTR mutations has been simplified into 6 physiologic classes, each paired with an available therapy to offer patients the most functional improvement. Drug therapy monitoring, adverse effects, and indications for discontinuation must also be considered. PMID:26322933

  7. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.

  8. Pulmonary exacerbation due to colistin-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in a Bulgarian cystic fibrosis patient.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Gergana P; Strateva, Tanya V; Atanasova, Svetlana T; Miteva, Dimitrinka S; Papochieva, Vera E; Perenovska, Penka I

    2016-01-01

    In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung damage secondary to chronic infection is the main cause of death. Treatment of lung disease to reduce the impact of infection, inflammation and subsequent lung injury is therefore of major importance. As Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant pathogen in CF patients it has been the major target of all treatment strategies, possible antibiotic regimens and recommendations for years. More sophisticated antibiotic therapies introduced over the last decades have helped to improve the prognosis in cystic fibrosis, but then new multidrug-resistant pathogens emerged. We present a case of cystic fibrosis in a 16-year-old boy with pulmonary exacerbation due to colistin-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. This case raises some interesting questions regarding the antibiotic policy and treatment options in our country for patients with CF and multidrug-resistant strains. Colistin is used at present in Bulgaria as a strategic last option for the CF patients but with the advent of new more drug-resistant strains therapeutic approach should change - for instance, there should be restrictions imposed on the use of levofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole which are regarded as "cheap and not so potent" antibiotics suitable for any infection and use them only in strict dependence on the respective culture results. PMID:27552791

  9. Heterogeneity of the cystic fibrosis phenotype in a large kindred family in Qatar with cystic fibrosis mutation (I1234V).

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Al Thani, G; Dawod, S T; Kambouris, M; Al Hamed, M

    2001-04-01

    Twenty-nine subjects (17 families) with cystic fibrosis belonging to the same Bedouin tribe were screened for cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR). Homozygous I1234V mutation in exon 19 was identified in all families with a relatively high rate of consanguinity (96.6 per cent). The homozygous I1234V mutation tended to present with a variable degree of pulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency and electrolyte imbalance. Homozygous I1234V was found to be a common mutation in the studied Bedouin tribe in Qatar. PMID:11336127

  10. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part I.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-06-15

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases (DCLDs) are a group of pathophysiologically heterogenous processes that are characterized by the presence of multiple spherical or irregularly shaped, thin-walled, air-filled spaces within the pulmonary parenchyma. Although the mechanisms of cyst formation remain incompletely defined for all DCLDs, in most cases lung remodeling associated with inflammatory or infiltrative processes results in displacement, destruction, or replacement of alveolar septa, distal airways, and small vessels within the secondary lobules of the lung. The DCLDs can be broadly classified according to underlying etiology as those caused by low-grade or high-grade metastasizing neoplasms, polyclonal or monoclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, infections, interstitial lung diseases, smoking, and congenital or developmental defects. In the first of a two-part series, we present an overview of the cystic lung diseases caused by neoplasms, infections, smoking-related diseases, and interstitial lung diseases, with a focus on lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:25906089

  11. L206W mutation of the cystic fibrosis gene, relatively frequent in French Canadians, is associated with atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rozen, R.; Ferreira-Rajabi, L.; Robb, L.

    1995-07-03

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Over 400 mutations have been reported at this locus. Although severe forms of cystic fibrosis are usually associated with pancreatic insufficiency, pulmonary dysfunction, and elevated sweat chloride, there is a wide range of phenotypes, including congenital absence of the vas deferens, observed with some of the milder mutations. The L206W mutation, which was first identified in patients from South France, is relatively frequent in French Canadians from Quebec. In this report, we document the atypical form of cystic fibrosis associated with this mutation in a cohort of 7 French Canadian probands. 20 refs.

  12. Pancreatic Cystosis in Two Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kampouras, Asterios; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Markou, Andreas; Anastasiou, Athanasia; Tsanakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present pancreatic cystosis in two adolescents with cystic fibrosis, a 13-year-old girl and an 18-year-old boy. In pancreatic cystosis, which is a rare manifestation of CF, the pancreatic parenchyma is replaced with multiple cysts of different sizes. Pancreatic cystosis is mainly an imaging based diagnosis and frequent follow-up should be recommended. PMID:27110419

  13. THE METABOLIC EFFECTS OF PREGNANCY IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to determine glucose tolerance in pregnant women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to relate glucose tolerance to insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, and protein turnover. We studied 8 CF women during pregnancy (CFPreg). Results were compared with those from 9 pregnant contr...

  14. Treatment of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis - could do better?

    PubMed

    Smyth, Alan

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the nature and significance of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis (CF). The effectiveness and safety of current exacerbation treatment are explored. The article concludes with a summary of clinical trials (completed and ongoing) which aim to improve the efficacy and safety of exacerbation treatment. PMID:27349725

  15. Delayed diagnosis of cystic fibrosis due to normal sweat electrolytes.

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, I M; Ward, I; Schwarz, M; David, T J

    1995-01-01

    The sweat test, if properly performed, is a reliable tool to assist in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. In practice, most errors arise from false positive results. This case serves as a reminder that false negatives may also occur. PMID:7562815

  16. CFTR Modulators for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Rebecca S; Fellner, Chris

    2014-07-01

    Defects in a single gene lead to the defective proteins that cause cystic fibrosis, making the disease an ideal candidate for mutation-targeted therapy. Although ivacaftor is currently the only FDA-approved CFTR modifier, others are in development. PMID:25083129

  17. Strength and Conditioning for the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how a strength and conditioning program can be safety incorporated into the daily life of people with cystic fibrosis as a complementary therapy to medications, regular checkups, bronchial drainage, and respiratory therapy, examining physical restrictions and guidelines, exercise prescriptions, and exercise applications, and explaining…

  18. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25053610

  19. Students as Technicians: Screening Newborns for Cystic Fibrosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, freshman college students learn biotechnology techniques while playing the role of a laboratory technician. They perform simulations of three diagnostic tests used to screen newborns for cystic fibrosis. By performing an ELISA, a PCR analysis, and a conductivity test, students learn how biotechnology techniques can be used to…

  20. Pancreatic Cystosis in Two Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kampouras, Asterios; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Markou, Andreas; Anastasiou, Athanasia; Tsanakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present pancreatic cystosis in two adolescents with cystic fibrosis, a 13-year-old girl and an 18-year-old boy. In pancreatic cystosis, which is a rare manifestation of CF, the pancreatic parenchyma is replaced with multiple cysts of different sizes. Pancreatic cystosis is mainly an imaging based diagnosis and frequent follow-up should be recommended. PMID:27110419

  1. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70 000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development. PMID:27030675

  2. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70,000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development. PMID:27030675

  3. 78 FR 26681 - Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... we published in the Federal Register on February 4, 2013 (78 FR 7968). We use Listings 3.04 and 103... ADMINISTRATION RIN 0960-AF58 Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis AGENCY: Social Security... additional information regarding this teleconference, please contact Cheryl Williams, Office of...

  4. Vocational Rehabilitation of the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isralsky, Marc; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explored vocational development, self-concept, and vocational adjustment of persons with cystic fibrosis. The following measures of vocational development correlated with work adjustment: vocational plans, educational plans, initiative, occupational information, and average vocational development score. Vocational development did not correlate…

  5. The Cystic Fibrosis Database: Content and Research Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, William M., Jr.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the files contained in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) database and discusses educational and research opportunities using this database. Topics discussed include queries, evaluating the relevance of items retrieved, and use of the database in an online searching course in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North…

  6. Psychological Concomitants of Cystic Fibrosis in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashani, Javad H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Administered several psychiatric inventories to 30 cystic fibrosis and 30 matched control children and their parents. Data analysis revealed few differences in either psychopathological symptoms or psychiatric diagnoses between groups. Differences were either physical in nature or did not depart enough from normal scores to merit label of high…

  7. CFTR expression and organ damage in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tizzano, E.; Chitayat, D.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    To assist our understanding of the origin of organ damage caused by cystic fibrosis (CF) disease, we have analyzed the pattern of expression of the CF gene (CFTR). mRNA in situ hybridization analysis was carried out in human fetal, newborn, infant and adult tissues and the abundance of the mRNA was correlated with the known pathology at the various stages of human development. Analysis of the pattern of expression indicates a constitutive level of mRNA in gastrointestinal tissues starting during early development and maintained throughout life. Prenatal respiratory tissues show qualitative and quantitative major differences in comparison to postnatal lung samples. Male reproductive tissues show high levels of expression in the head of the epididymis compared with the rest of the male ducts. Female reproductive tissues show a variable pattern of expression at different stages during fetal development and during puberty probably due to changes in hormonal levels. Gastrointestinal and male reproductive tissues have a consistent pathology at birth, whereas no lung abnormalities have been described in newborns affected by CF. Our results show that there is no exact correlations between organ damage present at birth and the degree of CFTR expression. To explain these observations, we hypothesize that the pathogenesis of organ damage in CF depend on at least three factors: the rate of CFTR-mediated fluid secretion, differences in genotype and environmental factors, such as the amount of macromolecules in the lumen of the ducts. This last element predicts that damage will occur in tissues with high protein loads and low flow rates (e.g. pancreas, epididymis), where the absence of CFTR function leads to obstruction and pathology. Organs that express CFTR but with no significant damage (e.g. prenatal lung, female reproductive tissues), will have a low protein load and a high flow rates.

  8. Qualitative dimensions of exertional dyspnea in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Ramsook, Andrew H; Schaeffer, Michele R; Puyat, Joseph H; Wilcox, Pearce G; Guenette, Jordan A

    2016-08-01

    No studies of cystic fibrosis (CF) have systematically characterized the evolution of the qualitative dimensions of exertional dyspnea. Adults with CF (n = 25) and control individuals matched for sex, age, and body mass index (n = 25) underwent cardiopulmonary cycle exercise testing with a detailed evaluation of ventilatory and dyspnea responses. The qualitative dimensions of dyspnea were examined during each exercise stage by having subjects select phrases that best described their breathing (i.e., "work/effort," "unsatisfied inspiration," and "unsatisfied expiration"). Subjects also selected phrases that described the quality of their breathing at peak exercise using an established 15-item questionnaire, which was then clustered into different categories. Subjects with CF had greater ventilatory requirements, higher end-inspiratory and end-expiratory lung volumes (% total lung capacity), and an earlier inflection/plateau in tidal volume during exercise compared with control subjects. Increased work/effort was the dominant qualitative descriptor in both groups throughout exercise. Unsatisfied inspiration was selected by 48% of subjects with CF and 40% of controls at some point during exercise. The onset of unsatisfied inspiration in these subjects occurred at a significantly lower relative exercise intensity in subjects with CF vs. controls (72 ± 21 vs. 94 ± 11% Wmax, P < 0.01). Chest tightness was the only qualitative descriptor cluster that was selected more frequently by subjects with CF vs. controls (36 vs. 0%, respectively, P < 0.05) at peak exercise. Therapeutic interventions that reduce ventilatory requirements and improve lung volumes may delay the onset of distressing sensations such as unsatisfied inspiration and chest tightness in adults with CF. PMID:27311438

  9. Determination of right ventricular ejection fraction in children with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R.; Millet, E.; Dab, I.

    1987-01-01

    The radionuclide right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) determined by means of Krypton-81m represents a simple, noninvasive, and accurate procedure to quantify the right ventricular contractility. This procedure was applied to 25 young patients with cystic fibrosis. The RVEF tended to decrease with the progression of the lung disease, as assessed by the clinical S-K score, the degree of the defects on lung scintigraphy, the PaO/sub 2/, and the lung function tests. However, the decrease of RVEF in patients with marked lung function tests. However, the decrease of RVEF in patients with marked lung involvement was moderate, and terminal lung disease was sometimes associated with normal right heart contractility.

  10. Phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of bacteria associated with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Guss, Adam M; Roeselers, Guus; Newton, Irene L G; Young, C Robert; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Lory, Stephen; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2011-01-01

    In patients afflicted with cystic fibrosis (CF), morbidity and mortality are primarily associated with the adverse consequences of chronic microbial bronchial infections, which are thought to be caused by a few opportunistic pathogens. However, recent evidence suggests the presence of other microorganisms, which may significantly affect the course and outcome of the infection. Using a combination of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, bacterial culturing and pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA amplicons, the microbial communities present in CF patient sputum samples were examined. In addition to previously recognized CF pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, >60 phylogenetically diverse bacterial genera that are not typically associated with CF pathogenesis were also detected. A surprisingly large number of fermenting facultative and obligate anaerobes from multiple bacterial phyla was present in each sample. Many of the bacteria and sequences found were normal residents of the oropharyngeal microflora and with many containing opportunistic pathogens. Our data suggest that these undersampled organisms within the CF lung are part of a much more complex microbial ecosystem than is normally presumed. Characterization of these communities is the first step in elucidating potential roles of diverse bacteria in disease progression and to ultimately facilitate advances in CF therapy. PMID:20631810

  11. Ibuprofen regulation of microtubule dynamics in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rymut, Sharon M; Kampman, Claire M; Corey, Deborah A; Endres, Tori; Cotton, Calvin U; Kelley, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    High-dose ibuprofen, an effective anti-inflammatory therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), has been shown to preserve lung function in a pediatric population. Despite its efficacy, few patients receive ibuprofen treatment due to potential renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. The mechanism of ibuprofen efficacy is also unclear. We have previously demonstrated that CF microtubules are slower to reform after depolymerization compared with respective wild-type controls. Slower microtubule dynamics in CF cells are responsible for impaired intracellular transport and are related to inflammatory signaling. Here, it is identified that high-dose ibuprofen treatment in both CF cell models and primary CF nasal epithelial cells restores microtubule reformation rates to wild-type levels, as well as induce extension of microtubules to the cell periphery. Ibuprofen treatment also restores microtubule-dependent intracellular transport monitored by measuring intracellular cholesterol transport. These effects are specific to ibuprofen as other cyclooxygenase inhibitors have no effect on these measures. Effects of ibuprofen are mimicked by stimulation of AMPK and blocked by the AMPK inhibitor compound C. We conclude that high-dose ibuprofen treatment enhances microtubule formation in CF cells likely through an AMPK-related pathway. These findings define a potential mechanism to explain the efficacy of ibuprofen therapy in CF. PMID:27317686

  12. Impact of gene editing on the study of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Patrick T; Sanz, David J; Hollywood, Jennifer A

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic and progressive autosomal recessive disorder of secretory epithelial cells, which causes obstructions in the lung airways and pancreatic ducts of 70,000 people worldwide (for recent review see Cutting Nat Rev Genet 16(1):45-56, 2015). The finding that mutations in the CFTR gene cause CF (Kerem et al. Science 245(4922):1073-1080, 1989; Riordan et al. Science 245(4922):1066-1073, 1989; Rommens et al. Science 245(4922):1059-1065, 1989), was hailed as the very happy middle of a story whose end is a cure for a fatal disease (Koshland Science 245(4922):1029, 1989). However, despite two licensed drugs (Ramsey et al. N Engl J Med 365(18):1663-1672, 2011; Wainwright et al. N Engl J Med 373(3):220-231, 2015), and a formal demonstration that repeated administration of CFTR cDNA to patients is safe and effects a modest but significant stabilisation of disease (Alton et al. Lancet Respir Med 3(9):684-691, 2015), we are still a long way from a cure, with many patients taking over 100 tablets per day, and a mean age at death of 28 years. The aim of this review is to discuss the impact on the study of CF of gene-editing techniques as they have developed over the last 30 years, up to and including the possibility of editing as a therapeutic approach. PMID:27325484

  13. [Insights into cystic fibrosis-related bone disease].

    PubMed

    Braun, C; Bacchetta, J; Reix, P

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), prevalence of late complications such as CF-related bone disease (CFBD) has increased. It was initially described in 24% of the adult population with CF and has also been reported in the pediatric population. CFBD is multifactorial and progresses in different steps. Both decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption (in different amounts) are observed. CFBD is likely primitive (directly related to the CFTR defect itself), but is also worsened by acquired secondary factors such as lung infections, chronic inflammation, denutrition, vitamin deficiency, and decreased physical activity. CFBD may be clinically apparent (i.e., mainly vertebral and costal fractures), or clinically asymptomatic (therefore corresponding to abnormalities in bone density and architecture). CFBD management mainly aims to prevent the occurrence of fractures. Prevention and regular monitoring of bone disease as early as 8 years of age is of the utmost importance, as is the control of possible secondary deleterious CFBD factors. New radiological tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, allow an accurate evaluation of cortical and trabecular bone micro-architecture in addition to compartmental density; as such, they will likely improve the assessment of the bone fracture threat in CF patients in the near future. PMID:27345551

  14. Intestinal CFTR expression alleviates meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, David A.; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Ernst, Sarah E.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Karp, Philip H.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Rector, Michael V.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H. Abou; Hoegger, Mark J.; Ludwig, Paula S.; Taft, Peter J.; Wallen, Tanner J.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; McMenimen, James D.; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Bogan, Katrina L.; Adam, Ryan J.; Hornick, Emma E.; Nelson, George A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Chang, Eugene H.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Prather, Randall S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs develop disease with features remarkably similar to those in people with CF, including exocrine pancreatic destruction, focal biliary cirrhosis, micro-gallbladder, vas deferens loss, airway disease, and meconium ileus. Whereas meconium ileus occurs in 15% of babies with CF, the penetrance is 100% in newborn CF pigs. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of porcine CF transmembrane conductance regulator (pCFTR) cDNA under control of the intestinal fatty acid–binding protein (iFABP) promoter would alleviate the meconium ileus. We produced 5 CFTR–/–;TgFABP>pCFTR lines. In 3 lines, intestinal expression of CFTR at least partially restored CFTR-mediated anion transport and improved the intestinal phenotype. In contrast, these pigs still had pancreatic destruction, liver disease, and reduced weight gain, and within weeks of birth, they developed sinus and lung disease, the severity of which varied over time. These data indicate that expressing CFTR in intestine without pancreatic or hepatic correction is sufficient to rescue meconium ileus. Comparing CFTR expression in different lines revealed that approximately 20% of wild-type CFTR mRNA largely prevented meconium ileus. This model may be of value for understanding CF pathophysiology and testing new preventions and therapies. PMID:23676501

  15. Intestinal CFTR expression alleviates meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis pigs.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, David A; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Ernst, Sarah E; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Karp, Philip H; Samuel, Melissa S; Reznikov, Leah R; Rector, Michael V; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Bouzek, Drake C; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H Abou; Hoegger, Mark J; Ludwig, Paula S; Taft, Peter J; Wallen, Tanner J; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; McMenimen, James D; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Bogan, Katrina L; Adam, Ryan J; Hornick, Emma E; Nelson, George A; Hoffman, Eric A; Chang, Eugene H; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B; Prather, Randall S; Meyerholz, David K; Welsh, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs develop disease with features remarkably similar to those in people with CF, including exocrine pancreatic destruction, focal biliary cirrhosis, micro-gallbladder, vas deferens loss, airway disease, and meconium ileus. Whereas meconium ileus occurs in 15% of babies with CF, the penetrance is 100% in newborn CF pigs. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of porcine CF transmembrane conductance regulator (pCFTR) cDNA under control of the intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (iFABP) promoter would alleviate the meconium ileus. We produced 5 CFTR-/-;TgFABP>pCFTR lines. In 3 lines, intestinal expression of CFTR at least partially restored CFTR-mediated anion transport and improved the intestinal phenotype. In contrast, these pigs still had pancreatic destruction, liver disease, and reduced weight gain, and within weeks of birth, they developed sinus and lung disease, the severity of which varied over time. These data indicate that expressing CFTR in intestine without pancreatic or hepatic correction is sufficient to rescue meconium ileus. Comparing CFTR expression in different lines revealed that approximately 20% of wild-type CFTR mRNA largely prevented meconium ileus. This model may be of value for understanding CF pathophysiology and testing new preventions and therapies. PMID:23676501

  16. Population Pharmacokinetics of Inhaled Tobramycin Powder in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ting, L; Aksenov, S; Bhansali, S G; Ramakrishna, R; Tang, P; Geller, D E

    2014-01-01

    Tobramycin powder for inhalation (TOBI Podhaler or TIP) is approved for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A population pharmacokinetic model for tobramycin inhalation powder (TIP) in CF patients was developed to characterize the effect of covariates including body mass index (BMI) and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s as percent of the predicted value (FEV1% predicted) at baseline) on the serum exposure parameters. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination and first-order absorption was developed. Across a range of baseline demographic values in the study population, the predicted mean values for the maximum (Cmax) and trough (Ctrough) plasma concentrations at steady state were at least 7.5 and 5-fold lower, respectively, than the recommended thresholds for tobramycin toxicity (12 µg/ml for Cmax and 2 µg/ml for Ctrough). This model adequately described the tobramycin serum concentration–time course in CF patients following inhalation of TIP. The results indicate that no BMI- or FEV1-based dose adjustment is needed for use of TIP in CF patients. PMID:24522146

  17. Translating the genetics of cystic fibrosis to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Thompson, Kristin E; Tabary, Olivier; le Rouzic, Philippe; Guillot, Loïc

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening recessive genetic disease in the Caucasian population. This multiorgan disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a chloride channel recognized as regulating several apical ion channels. The gene mutations result either in the lack of the protein at the apical surface or in an improperly functioning protein. Morbidity and mortality because of the mutation of CFTR are mainly attributable to lung disease resulting from chronic infection and inflammation. Since its discovery as the causative gene in 1989, much progress has been achieved not only in clinical genetics but also in basic science studies. Recently, combinations of these efforts have been successfully translated into development and availability for patients of new therapies targeting specific CFTR mutations to correct the CFTR at the protein level. Current technologies such as next gene sequencing and novel genomic editing tools may offer new strategies to identify new CFTR variants and modifier genes, and to correct CFTR to pursue personalized medicine, which is already developed in some patient subsets. Personalized medicine or P4 medicine ("personalized," "predictive," "preventive," and "participatory") is currently booming for CF. The various current and future challenges of personalized medicine as they apply to the issues faced in CF are discussed in this review. PMID:25940043

  18. New insights about miRNAs in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sonneville, Florence; Ruffin, Manon; Guillot, Loïc; Rousselet, Nathalie; Le Rouzic, Philippe; Corvol, Harriet; Tabary, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    The molecular basis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is a mutation-related defect in the epithelial-cell chloride channel called CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This defect alters chloride ion transport and impairs water transport across the cell membrane. Marked clinical heterogeneity occurs even among patients carrying the same mutation in the CFTR gene. Recent studies suggest that such heterogeneity could be related to epigenetic factors and/or miRNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs that modulate the expression of various proteins via post-transcriptional inhibition of gene expression. In the respiratory system, it has been shown that the dysregulation of miRNAs could participate in and lead to pathogenicity in several diseases. In CF airways, recent studies have proposed that miRNAs may modulate disease progression by affecting the production of either CFTR or various proteins that are dysregulated in the CF lung. Herein, we provide an overview of studies showing how miRNAs may modulate CF pathology and the efforts to develop miRNA-based treatments and/or to consider miRNAs as biomarkers. The identification of miRNAs involved in CF disease progression opens up new avenues toward treatments targeting selected clinical components of CF, independently from the CFTR mutation. PMID:25687559

  19. Quantitative imaging of airway liquid absorption in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Harding, Thomas J; Brown, Stefanie L; Nero, Joseph A; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    New measures are needed to rapidly assess emerging treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Using an imaging approach, we evaluated the absorptive clearance of the radiolabeled small molecule probe diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) as an in vivo indicator of changes in airway liquid absorption. DTPA absorption and mucociliary clearance rates were measured in 21 patients with CF (12 adults and nine children) and nine adult controls using nuclear imaging. The effect of hypertonic saline on DTPA absorption was also studied. In addition, in vitro studies were conducted to identify the determinants of transepithelial DTPA absorption. CF patients had significantly increased rates of DTPA absorption compared with control subjects but had similar mucociliary clearance rates. Treatment with hypertonic saline resulted in a decrease in DTPA absorption and an increase in mucociliary clearance in 11 out of 11 adult CF patients compared with treatment with isotonic saline. In vitro studies revealed that ∼ 50% of DTPA absorption can be attributed to transepithelial fluid transport. Apically applied mucus impedes liquid and DTPA absorption. However, mucus effects become negligible in the presence of an osmotic stimulus. Functional imaging of DTPA absorption provides a quantifiable marker of immediate response to treatments that promote airway surface liquid hydration. PMID:24743971

  20. Long-Term Effects of Exercise Training and Hyperalimentation in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Severe Pulmonary Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heijerman, Harry G. M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study, with 10 adult patients with cystic fibrosis, found that the improvement in lung function and ergometry parameters obtained by a short in-patient training program could be maintained on an out-patient basis through a voluntary self-treatment program. (DB)

  1. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part II.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-07-01

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases have a broad differential diagnosis. A wide variety of pathophysiological processes spanning the spectrum from airway obstruction to lung remodeling can lead to multifocal cyst development in the lung. Although lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis are perhaps more frequently seen in the clinic, disorders such as Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, follicular bronchiolitis, and light-chain deposition disease are increasingly being recognized. Obtaining an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, and management approaches are highly disease dependent. Unique imaging features, genetic tests, serum studies, and clinical features provide invaluable clues that help clinicians distinguish among the various etiologies, but biopsy is often required for definitive diagnosis. In part II of this review, we present an overview of the diffuse cystic lung diseases caused by lymphoproliferative disorders, genetic mutations, or aberrant lung development and provide an approach to aid in their diagnosis and management. PMID:25906201

  2. Molecular Characterization of Achromobacter Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis and Non-Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Barrado, Laura; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Martínez, M. Teresa; García, Gloria; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and nrdA sequence analysis identified 6 different species or genogroups and 13 sequence types (STs) among 15 Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 7 species or genogroups and 11 STs among 11 isolates from non-CF patients. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the most frequently isolated species among CF patients. PMID:23536401

  3. Raman spectroscopy as a new tool for early detection of bacteria in patients with cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusciano, Giulia; Capriglione, Paola; Pesce, Giuseppe; Abete, Pasquale; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Sasso, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major threat for people affected by cystic fibrosis, leading to pulmonary deterioration and lung transplantation as a therapeutic option for end-stage patients. A fast and correct identification of pathogens in airway fluid of these patients is crucial to establish appropriate therapies, to prevent cross-infections and, ultimately, to preserve lung function. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy to reveal bacteria in the sputa of patients such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which are among the earliest and the most frequent bacteria affecting cystic fibrosis patients. We found that Raman analysis, combined with principal component analysis, is able to provide a correct identification of these bacteria, with a global accuracy higher than 95%. Interestingly, bacterial identification is performed by analysing patients’ sputa as a whole, avoiding, therefore, time-consuming procedures involving bacterial isolation or even bacterial cultures. This study suggests that Raman spectroscopy could be a suitable candidate for the development of innovative and non-invasive procedures for a fast and reliable identification of respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis patients.

  4. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator - an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuning; Guan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Zhe; Li, Chunying

    2016-03-15

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially in gastroenterological cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging findings that link CFTR with various cancers, with focus on the association between CFTR defects and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the underlying mechanisms. Further study of CFTR in cancer biology may help pave a new way for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26989463

  5. Genetic adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis: strong and weak mutators with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds emerge in mucA and/or lasR mutants.

    PubMed

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Wassermann, Tina; Høiby, Niels

    2010-04-01

    During the chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods due to adaptive evolution mediated by genetic variation. Hypermutability is considered to play an important role in this adaptive evolution and it has been demonstrated that mutator populations are amplified in the CF lung by hitchhiking with adaptive mutations. Two of the genes that are frequently mutated in isolates from chronic infection are mucA and lasR. Loss-of-function mutations in these genes determine the phenotypic switch to mucoidy and loss of quorum sensing, which are considered hallmarks of chronic virulence. The aims of our study were to investigate (1) the genetic background of the P. aeruginosa subpopulations with non-mutator, weak or strong mutator phenotype and their dynamics during the chronic lung infection, and (2) the time sequence in which the hypermutable, mucoid and quorum-sensing-negative phenotypes emerge during chronic lung infection. For these purposes the sequences of mutS, mutL, uvrD, mutT, mutY and mutM anti-mutator genes as well as of mucA and lasR were analysed in 70 sequential P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from the respiratory secretions of 10 CF patients (one to three isolates per time point). Analysis of the genetic background of the mutator phenotype showed that mutS was the most commonly affected gene followed by mutL in isolates with strong mutator phenotype. The mutT, mutY, mutM genes were affected in isolates with low fold-changes in the mutation frequencies compared to the reference strain PAO1. Isolates with non-mutator, weak or strong mutator phenotype were represented at all time points showing co-existence of these subpopulations, which suggests parallel evolution of the various mutators in the different focal niches of infection in the CF lung. Mutations in mucA and lasR occurred earlier than mutations in the anti-mutator genes, showing that hypermutability is not a prerequisite for the

  6. Shwachman-Kulczycki score still useful to monitor cystic fibrosis severity

    PubMed Central

    Stollar, Fabíola; Villac Adde, Fabíola; Cunha, Maristela T; Leone, Claudio; Rodrigues, Joaquim C

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Shwachman-Kulczycki score was the first scoring system used in cystic fibrosis to assess disease severity. Despite its subjectivity, it is still widely used. OBJECTIVE: To study correlations among forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), chest radiography, chest computed tomography, 6-minute walk test, and Shwachman-Kulczycki score in patients with cystic fibrosis and to test whether the Shwachman-Kulczycki score is still useful in monitoring the severity of the disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional prospective study was performed to analyze the correlations (Spearman). Patients with clinically stable cystic fibrosis, aged 3-21 years, were included. RESULTS: 43 patients, 19F/24M, mean age 10.5 ± 4.7 years, with a median Shwachman-Kulczycki score of 70 were studied. The median Brasfield and Bhalla scores were 17 and 10, respectively. The mean Z score for the 6-minute walk test was −1.1 ± 1.106 and the mean FEV1 was 59 ± 26 (as percentage of predicted values). The following significant correlations versus the Shwachman-Kulczycki score were found: FEV1 (r  =  0.76), 6-minute walk test (r  =  0.71), chest radiography (r  =  0.71) and chest computed tomography (r  =  −0.78). When patients were divided according to FEV1, a statistically significantly correlation with the Shwachman-Kulczycki score was found only in patients with FEV1 <70% (r  =  0.67). CONCLUSIONS: The Shwachman-Kulczycki score remains an useful tool for monitoring the severity of cystic fibrosis, adequately reflecting the functional impairment and chest radiography and tomography changes, especially in patients with greater impairment of lung function. When assessing patients with mild lung disease its limitations should be considered and its usefulness in such patients should be evaluated in larger populations. PMID:21808862

  7. Cystic Fibrosis below the Diaphragm: Abdominal Findings in Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Lisa P; McEvoy, Sinead H; Ni Mhurchu, Elaine; Gibney, Robert G; McMahon, Colm J; Heffernan, Eric J; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disease in the white population. Mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene on chromosome 7 results in production of abnormally viscous mucus and secretions in the lungs of patients with CF. A similar pathologic process occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary system. Inspissated mucus causes luminal obstruction and resultant clinical and radiologic complications associated with the disease process. Pancreatic involvement can result in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, pancreatic atrophy, fatty replacement, or lipomatous pseudohypertrophy. Acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic calcification, cysts, and cystosis also occur. Hepatic manifestations include hepatic steatosis, focal biliary and multilobular cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Biliary complications include cholelithiasis, microgallbladder, and sclerosing cholangitis. The entire digestive tract can be involved. Distal ileal obstruction syndrome, intussusception, appendicitis, chronic constipation, colonic wall thickening, fibrosing colonopathy, pneumatosis intestinalis, gastroesophageal reflux, and peptic ulcer disease have been described. Renal manifestations include nephrolithiasis and secondary amyloidosis. The educational objectives of this review are to reveal the abdominal manifestations of CF to facilitate focused analysis of cross-sectional imaging in adult patients. Life expectancy in patients with CF continues to improve because of a combination of aggressive antibiotic treatment, improved emphasis on nutrition and physiotherapy, and development of promising new CF transmembrane conductance regulator modulators. As lung function and survival improve, extrapulmonary conditions, including hepatic and gastrointestinal malignancy, will be an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the expected abdominal manifestations of CF may assist radiologists in identifying

  8. Anoctamin 1 dysregulation alters bronchial epithelial repair in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Manon; Voland, Mélanie; Marie, Solenne; Bonora, Monique; Blanchard, Elise; Blouquit-Laye, Sabine; Naline, Emmanuel; Puyo, Philippe; Le Rouzic, Philippe; Guillot, Loic; Corvol, Harriet; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelium is constantly subjected to injury events due to chronic infection and inflammation. Moreover, abnormalities in CF airway epithelium repair have been described and contribute to the lung function decline seen in CF patients. In the last past years, it has been proposed that anoctamin 1 (ANO1), a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel, might offset the CFTR deficiency but this protein has not been characterized in CF airways. Interestingly, recent evidence indicates a role for ANO1 in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Our aims were to study non-CF and CF bronchial epithelial repair and to determine whether ANO1 is involved in airway epithelial repair. Here, we showed, with human bronchial epithelial cell lines and primary cells, that both cell proliferation and migration during epithelial repair are delayed in CF compared to non-CF cells. We then demonstrated that ANO1 Cl(-) channel activity was significantly decreased in CF versus non-CF cells. To explain this decreased Cl(-) channel activity in CF context, we compared ANO1 expression in non-CF vs. CF bronchial epithelial cell lines and primary cells, in lung explants from wild-type vs. F508del mice and non-CF vs. CF patients. In all these models, ANO1 expression was markedly lower in CF compared to non-CF. Finally, we established that ANO1 inhibition or overexpression was associated respectively with decreases and increases in cell proliferation and migration. In summary, our study demonstrates involvement of ANO1 decreased activity and expression in abnormal CF airway epithelial repair and suggests that ANO1 correction may improve this process. PMID:24080196

  9. Cough in adult cystic fibrosis: diagnosis and response to fundoplication

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Hosnieh; Moon, Tanya; Donaldson, Jo; Jackson, Warren; Sedman, Peter; Morice, Alyn H

    2009-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux is one of the most common causes of chronic cough in the general population. Reflux occurs frequently in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We undertook laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in adult CF patients with a clinical diagnosis of reflux cough who had failed conventional medical therapies. Objective We determined the response to the surgical route in the treatment of intractable reflux cough in CF. Method Patients with refractory cough were assessed by 24 h pH monitoring and oesophageal manometry. Pre-and post-operation cough, lung function and exacerbation frequency were compared. Cough was assessed by the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ), lung function by spirometry and exacerbation frequency was defined by comparing the postoperative epoch with a similar preoperatively. Results Significant abnormalities of oesophageal function were seen in all patients studied. 6 patients (2 females), with the mean age of 34.5 years consented to surgery. Their mean number of reflux episodes was 144.4, mean DeMeester score was 39.2, and mean lower oesophageal sphincter pressure 12.4 mmHg. There was a small change in the FEV1 from 1.03 L to 1.17 (P = 0.04), and FVC improved from 2.62 to 2.87 (P = 0.05). Fundoplication lead to a marked fall in cough with the total LCQ score increasing from 11.9 to 18.3 (P = 0.01). Exacerbation events were reduced by 50% post operatively. Conclusion Whilst there is an obvious attention to respiratory causes of cough in CF, reflux is also a common cause. Fundoplication is highly effective in the control of reflux cough in CF. Significant reduction in exacerbation frequency may indicate that reflux with possible aspiration is a major unrecognised contributor to airway disease. PMID:19149907

  10. Quantitative deposition of aerosolized gentamicin in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ilowite, J.S.; Gorvoy, J.D.; Smaldone, G.C.

    1987-12-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), the clinical effectiveness of aerosolized antibiotics is controversial. Previous investigators have not considered the type of nebulizer, droplet size, and dose to the lung in assessing the results of aerosol therapy. The present study tests the importance of these factors by standardizing an aerosol system for delivery of antibiotics and other agents to patients with CF. Particle size, distribution, and output from a commercially available nebulizer were measured. Thirteen patients with CF inhaled aerosol (MMAD = 1.1 micron) containing gentamicin (160 mg in nebulizer) and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled human serum albumin. Patients' sputum and serum were analyzed for gentamicin levels by immunoenzymatic assay. Using a gamma camera and suitable filters, central versus peripheral deposition (C/P ratio) and whole lung deposition were measured and related to sputum gentamicin levels. Gentamicin deposit averaged 12.3 mg +/- 5.9 (SD) or 7.69% of the original amount placed in the nebulizer. Peak sputum levels averaged 376.6 micrograms/ml +/- 275, whereas serum levels were undetectable in all patients. When peak sputum levels were normalized for the amount deposited, a close correlation with C/P ratio was obtained (r = 0.88, p less than 0.05). Furthermore, an inverse relationship was found between the C/P ratio and the %FEV1 (r = 0.76, p less than 0.05). Finally, a bell-shaped relationship between deposited dose and minute ventilation was seen in the patients (r = 0.88, p less than 0.05), i.e., an optimal minute ventilation was shown. These relationships may be important when designing future clinical studies.

  11. Cystic fibrosis database (CFDB): a new web-based tool for cystic fibrosis specialists.

    PubMed

    Buzzetti, Roberto; Cirilli, Natalia; Minicucci, Laura; Raia, Valeria; Salvatore, Donatello; Maffeis, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    In order to help specialists involved in CF care and clinical research to know the current best evidence about clinical effectiveness of interventions in CF, we designed and developed a web-based, free access tool called "CFDB"--Cystic Fibrosis DataBase (www.inetflow.it/CFDB). The database was built by searching in Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and worldwide trials registries all studies involving clinical interventions in CF. The tool lets the user define queries starting from one or more types of pathological conditions and one or more interventions. The output of the queries is structured in three levels: (1) how many and which studies deal with the conditions formulated in the query; (2) which are the main results of these studies; (3) a critical summary of the literature related to the query. This tool, providing a quick overview of the available evidence in clinical research in CF, may help clinical decision making, designing of new trials and building guidelines. PMID:24532370

  12. Airway inflammatory markers in individuals with cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Bergin, David A; Hurley, Killian; Mehta, Adwait; Cox, Stephen; Ryan, Dorothy; O’Neill, Shane J; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2013-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is an airway disease characterized by thickening of the bronchial wall, chronic inflammation , and destruction of affected bronchi. Underlying etiologies include severe pulmonary infection and cystic fibrosis (CF); however, in a substantial number of patients with non-CF-related bronchiectasis (NCFB), no cause is found. The increasing armamentarium of therapies now available to combat disease in CF is in stark contrast to the limited tools employed in NCFB. Our study aimed to evaluate similarities and differences in airway inflammatory markers in patients with NCFB and CF, and to suggest potential common treatment options. The results of this study show that NCFB bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples possessed significantly increased NE activity and elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01); however, the levels detected were lower than in CF (P < 0.01). Interleukin-8 (IL-8) concentrations were significantly elevated in NCFB and CF compared to controls (P < 0.05), but in contrast, negligible levels of IL-18 were detected in both NCFB and CF. Analogous concentrations of IL-10 and IL-4 measured in NCFB and CF were statistically elevated above the healthy control values (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). These results indicate high levels of important proinflammatory markers in both NCFB and CF and support the use of appropriate anti-inflammatory therapies already employed in the treatment of CF bronchiectasis in NCFB. PMID:23426081

  13. Targets for cystic fibrosis therapy: proteomic analysis and correction of mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Collawn, James F; Fu, Lianwu; Bebok, Zsuzsa

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic analysis has proved to be an important tool for understanding the complex nature of genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis (CF), by defining the cellular protein environment (proteome) associated with wild-type and mutant proteins. Proteomic screens identified the proteome of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and provided fundamental information to studies designed for understanding the crucial components of physiological CFTR function. Simultaneously, high-throughput screens for small-molecular correctors of CFTR mutants provided promising candidates for therapy. The majority of CF cases are caused by nucleotide deletions (ΔF508 CFTR; >75%), resulting in CFTR misfolding, or insertion of premature termination codons (~10%), leading to unstable mRNA and reduced levels of truncated dysfunctional CFTR. In this article, we review recent results of proteomic screens, developments in identifying correctors for the most frequent CFTR mutants, and comment on how integration of the knowledge gained from these studies may aid in finding a cure for CF and a number of other genetic disorders. PMID:20653506

  14. A woman with cystic fibrosis, severe hypoxaemia, an atrial thrombus and a patent foramen ovale: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Cystic fibrosis is usually associated with chronic pulmonary sepsis and frequent infective exacerbations. We report a very unusual cause of severe hypoxaemia in a woman with cystic fibrosis caused by thrombus formation in the right atrium. Case presentation A 21-year-old Caucasian woman with cystic fibrosis and a totally implantable venous access device presented with severe hypoxaemia. This was initially treated with antibiotics but her oxygen levels did not improve significantly. Subsequently, a transient ischaemic attack occurred. Further investigations, including a contrast echocardiogram and a cardiac magnetic resonance scan, revealed the presence of a large right atrial thrombus and right-to-left intracardiac shunt through a patent foramen ovale. Conclusion This case highlights the need to consider a right-to-left shunt in chronic respiratory diseases when hypoxaemia is out of proportion to the degree of lung function impairment. Totally implantable venous access devices should always be considered as a source of thrombus formation. PMID:19830232

  15. Congenital Cystic Lesions of the Lung: Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation and Bronchopulmonary Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Sfakianaki, Anna K; Copel, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cystic lesions of the lung in fetuses are rare. The most common malformations of the lower respiratory tract are congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation and bronchopulmonary sequestration. With the increased use of obstetric ultrasound, cystic lung lesions are detected more often antenatally, which allows for proper planning of peripartum and neonatal management. This article discusses a range of diagnostic and management options. PMID:22866187

  16. Cystic fibrosis in a large kindred family in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Dawod, S T; al Thani, G

    2000-09-01

    We describe 45 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), diagnosed between June 1987 and May 1999, seen at the Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar in the Arabian Gulf. Twenty-six of 32 families in the study were related and belonged to the same Bedouin tribe. The parents of 98% of these cases were consanguineous. Metabolic alkalosis and/or hypo-electrolytaemia were found in a large proportion of infants with CF. Cystic fibrosis in Qatari children is phenotypically variable with mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, and none of them died during this study. Among the non-Arabic-Asian patients, pulmonary symptoms were more severe, Pseudomonas colonization was earlier, pancreatic insufficiency occurred in infancy and four died in early life. PMID:11064773

  17. Emergent properties of proteostasis in managing cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Balch, William E; Roth, Daniela M; Hutt, Darren M

    2011-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a consequence of defective recognition of the multimembrane spanning protein cystic fibrosis conductance transmembrane regulator (CFTR) by the protein homeostasis or proteostasis network (PN) (Hutt and Balch (2010). Like many variant proteins triggering misfolding diseases, mutant CFTR has a complex folding and membrane trafficking itinerary that is managed by the PN to maintain proteome balance and this balance is disrupted in human disease. The biological pathways dictating the folding and function of CFTR in health and disease are being studied by numerous investigators, providing a unique opportunity to begin to understand and therapeutically address the role of the PN in disease onset, and its progression during aging. We discuss the general concept that therapeutic management of the emergent properties of the PN to control the energetics of CFTR folding biology may provide significant clinical benefit. PMID:21421917

  18. Actin - Lysozyme Interactions in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lori; Slimmer, Scott; Angelini, Thomas; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2003-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid consisting of mucin (a glycoprotein), lysozyme (a cationic polypeptide), water, salt, as well as a high concentration of a number of anionic biological polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin. The interactions governing these components are poorly understood, but may have important clinical consequences. For example, the formation of these biological polyelectrolytes into ordered gel phases may contribute significantly to the observed high viscosity of CF sputum. In this work, a number of model systems containing actin, lysozyme, and KCl were created to simulate CF sputum in vitro. These model systems were studied using small angle x-ray scattering and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  19. Polyelectrolyte Structure and Interactions in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slimmer, Scott; Angelini, Thomas; Liang, Hongjun; Butler, John; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2002-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid consisting of a number of components, including mucin (a glycoprotein), lysozyme (a cationic polypeptide), water, salt, as well as a high concentration of a number of anionic biological polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin. The interactions governing these components are poorly understood, but may have important clinical consequences. For example, the formation of these biological polyelectrolytes into ordered gel phases may contribute significantly to the observed high viscosity of CF sputum. In this work, a number of model systems were created to simulate CF sputum in vitro, in order to elucidate the contributions of the different components. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, DOE DEFG02-91ER45439, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  20. Progress in cystic fibrosis and the CF Therapeutics Development Network

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M; Borowitz, Drucy S; Burns, Jane L; Clancy, John P; Donaldson, Scott H; Retsch-Bogart, George; Sagel, Scott D; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-shortening genetic disorder in Caucasians, affects approximately 70 000 individuals worldwide. In 1998, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) launched the CF Therapeutics Development Network (CF-TDN) as a central element of its Therapeutics Development Programme. Designed to accelerate the clinical evaluation of new therapies needed to fulfil the CFF mission to control and cure CF, the CF-TDN has conducted 75 clinical trials since its inception, and has contributed to studies as varied as initial safety and proof of concept trials to pivotal programmes required for regulatory approval. This review highlights recent and significant research efforts of the CF-TDN, including a summary of contributions to studies involving CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators, airway surface liquid hydrators and mucus modifiers, anti-infectives, anti-inflammatories, and nutritional therapies. Efforts to advance CF biomarkers, necessary to accelerate the therapeutic goals of the network, are also summarised. PMID:22960984

  1. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Gillian M; White, Michelle M; Browne, Niall; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  2. Natural Compounds as Therapeutic Agents in the Treatment Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Isha; Shah, Kalpit; Bradbury, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of two drugs to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis has given hope to patients and their families battling this devastating disease. Over many years, with heavy financial investment from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, pre-clinical evaluation of thousands of synthetic drugs resulted in the production of Kalydeco and Orkambi. Yet, despite the success of this endeavor, many other compounds have been proposed as therapeutic agents in the treatment of CF. Of note, several of these compounds are naturally occurring, and are present in spices from the grocery store and over the counter preparations in health food stores. In this short review, we look at three such compounds, genistein, curcumin, and resveratrol, and evaluate the scientific support for their use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of patients with CF. PMID:27081574

  3. Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes in Children: An Update.

    PubMed

    Kim, Roy J

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes mellitus (CFRD) is the most common endocrine complication of cystic fibrosis (CF), affecting more than 50% of patients by the 4th decade of life. CFRD is often preceded by worsening pulmonary status and nutritional decline. Treatment of CFRD is associated with improvements in body weight and pulmonary function and a reduction in pulmonary exacerbations. Because of the clinical significance of CFRD, diabetes screening with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is recommended annually for all patients with CF starting at age 10 years. The OGTT detects CFRD with greater sensitivity than random glucose or hemoglobin A1c testing. The first-line treatment for CFRD is insulin. The use of other treatments such as oral medications remains under study. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(9):e321-e326.]. PMID:27622916

  4. Analysis of 16 cystic fibrosis mutations in Mexican patients

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Torres, C.; Rojas-Martinez, A.; Barrera-Saldana, H.A.

    1997-04-14

    We carried out molecular analysis of 80 chromosomes from 40 unrelated Mexican patients with a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. The study was performed in two PCR steps: a preliminary one to identify mutation AF508, the most frequent cause of cystic fibrosis worldwide, and the second a reverse dot-blot with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes to detect 15 additional common mutations in the Caucasian population. A frequency of 45% for AF508 was found, making it the most common in our sample of Mexican patients. Another five mutations (G542X, 3849 + 10 kb C{r_arrow}T, N1303K, S549N, and 621 + 1 G{r_arrow}T) were detected, and these accounted for 11.25%. The remaining mutations (43.75%) were undetectable with the methodology used. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences

    PubMed Central

    McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  6. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Firmida, M.C.; Pereira, R.H.V.; Silva, E.A.S.R.; Marques, E.A.; Lopes, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10), intermittently colonized/infected (n=15), and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18) were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group). Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002). Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033). In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A. xylosoxidans

  7. Sexual and reproductive health in cystic fibrosis: a life-course perspective.

    PubMed

    Frayman, Katherine B; Sawyer, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents and adults with cystic fibrosis now approach developmental milestones, including sexual and reproductive ones, at a similar time to their healthy peers. Yet, their sexual and reproductive health (SRH) is profoundly affected by their disease, and their SRH decisions can substantially affect their health. Navigation of SRH milestones in the context of cystic fibrosis needs education, guidance, and access to SRH services. In this Review, we discuss scientific knowledge of SRH in patients with cystic fibrosis across the life course and clinical practices for SRH within cystic fibrosis care. We identify crucial gaps in SRH education of patients and their access to resources and then present a model of care for provision of developmentally appropriate SRH education and care within cystic fibrosis services across the life course. This model emphasises the central importance of the cystic fibrosis team and service links to primary and specialist SRH care. PMID:25529340

  8. Allele frequency for Cystic fibrosis in Indians vis-a/-vis global populations.

    PubMed

    Bepari, Karnajit Kumar; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Paul, Prosenjit; Halder, Binata; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This gene encodes a protein involved in epithelial anion channel. Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-limiting genetic disorder in Caucasians; it also affects other ethnic groups like the Blacks and the Native Americans. Cystic fibrosis is considered to be rare among individuals from the Indian subcontinent. We analyzed a total of 29 world׳s populations for cystic fibrosis on the basis of gene frequency and heterozygosity. Among 29 countries Switzerland revealed the highest gene frequency and heterozygosity for CF (0.022, 0.043) whereas Japan recorded the lowest values (0.002, 0.004) followed by India (0.004, 0.008). Our analysis suggests that the prevalence of cystic fibrosis is very low in India. PMID:26339151

  9. Is deafness mutation screening required in cystic fibrosis patients?

    PubMed

    Abusamra, Rania; McShane, Donna

    2016-08-01

    Aminoglycosides are widely used in cystic fibrosis management. The m.1555A>G mutation predisposes to aminoglycoside ototoxicity. It may cause later onset hearing loss in the absence of aminoglycosides use and gradual hearing loss may be an inevitable consequence of the mutation. Given that aminoglycoside therapy forms the backbone of IV protocols in CF, this article recommends screening for this mutation to allow informed decision-making prior to aminoglycoside administration, to avoid preventable deafness. PMID:27427311

  10. Bilateral paranasal sinus mucopyoceles in a child with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Aubry, K; Orsel, S; Menetrey, C; Bessède, J P; Sauvage, J P

    2009-01-01

    Mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses are well-described complication of chronic sinusitis in adults. They are extremely rare in children and the main predisposing factor is cystic fibrosis (CF). We report a case of bilateral ethmoid and maxillary sinus mucopyoceles, associated with CF occurring in a six months old boy. The main symptom was a complete nasal obstruction. The marsupialization of mucocele was performed by endoscopic surgery. One year follow-up showed no recurrence. PMID:20597414

  11. Amyloid goitre and hypothyroidism secondary to cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sala, R.; Prados, C.; Sastre Marcos, J.; García Río, F.; Vicandi, B.; de Ramón, A.; Villamor, J.

    1995-01-01

    Although cystic fibrosis (CF) is still the most frequently fatal childhood disease, many adults now survive into their third and fourth decades. Uncommon complications of chronic diseases, such as amyloidosis, while infrequent, may now appear during the course of CF in adulthood. We present a case of a patient with CF who was diagnosed with hypothyroidism due to amyloid deposits in the thyroid. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7596942

  12. Partial splenectomy in cystic fibrosis patients with hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, G H; Eber, E; Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Zach, M S

    2003-02-01

    We report three cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with hypersplenism who underwent partial splenectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful in two patients; one patient developed a complication necessitating resection of the rest of the spleen. Haematological parameters improved and oesophageal varices regressed in all patients. On follow up, one patient showed a normal spleen, the other a normally functioning accessory spleen; the third patient again developed splenomegaly with hypersplenism. Partial splenectomy is a promising therapeutic option for CF patients with hypersplenism. PMID:12538318

  13. Impaired Cell Volume Regulation in Intestinal Crypt Epithelia of Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, M. A.; O'Brien, J. A.; Sepulveda, F. V.; Ratcliff, R. A.; Evans, M. J.; Colledge, W. H.

    1995-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a disease characterized by abnormalities in the epithelia of the lungs, intestine, salivary and sweat glands, liver, and reproductive systems, often as a result of inadequate hydration of their secretions. The primary defect in cystic fibrosis is the altered activity of a cAMP-activated Cl^- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. However, it is not clear how a defect in the CFTR Cl^- channel function leads to the observed pathological changes. Although much is known about the structural properties and regulation of the CFTR, little is known of its relationship to cellular functions other than the cAMP-dependent Cl^- secretion. Here we report that cell volume regulation after hypotonic challenge is also defective in intestinal crypt epithelial cells isolated from CFTR -/- mutant mice. Moreover, the impairment of the regulatory volume decrease in CFTR -/- crypts appears to be related to the inability of a K^+ conductance to provide a pathway for the exit of this cation during the volume adjustments. This provides evidence that the lack of CFTR protein may have additional consequences for the cellular function other than the abnormal cAMP-mediated Cl^- secretion.

  14. Reduced histone deacetylase 7 activity restores function to misfolded CFTR in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Darren M; Herman, David; Rodrigues, Ana P C; Noel, Sabrina; Pilewski, Joseph M; Matteson, Jeanne; Hoch, Ben; Kellner, Wendy; Kelly, Jeffery W; Schmidt, Andre; Thomas, Philip J; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Skach, William R; Gentzsch, Martina; Riordan, John R; Sorscher, Eric J; Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Yates, John R; Lukacs, Gergely L; Frizzell, Raymond A; Manning, Gerard; Gottesfeld, Joel M; Balch, William E

    2010-01-01

    Chemical modulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity by HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) is an increasingly important approach for modifying the etiology of human disease. Loss-of-function diseases arise as a consequence of protein misfolding and degradation, which lead to system failures. The DeltaF508 mutation in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) results in the absence of the cell surface chloride channel and a loss of airway hydration, leading to the premature lung failure and reduced lifespan responsible for cystic fibrosis. We now show that the HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) restores surface channel activity in human primary airway epithelia to levels that are 28% of those of wild-type CFTR. Biological silencing of all known class I and II HDACs reveals that HDAC7 plays a central role in restoration of DeltaF508 function. We suggest that the tunable capacity of HDACs can be manipulated by chemical biology to counter the onset of cystic fibrosis and other human misfolding disorders. PMID:19966789

  15. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations at a referral center for cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Cyntia Arivabeni de Araújo Correia; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of six mutations (F508del, G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed, at a referral center, on the basis of abnormal results in two determinations of sweat sodium and chloride concentrations. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 patients with CF. The mean age of the patients was 12.38 ± 9.00 years, 51.43% were female, and 94.29% were White. Mutation screening was performed with polymerase chain reaction (for F508del), followed by enzymatic digestion (for other mutations). Clinical analysis was performed on the basis of gender, age, ethnicity, pulmonary/gastrointestinal symptoms, and Shwachman-Kulczycki (SK) score. RESULTS: All of the patients showed pulmonary symptoms, and 8 had no gastrointestinal symptoms. On the basis of the SK scores, CF was determined to be mild, moderate, and severe in 22 (42.3%), 17 (32.7%), and 13 (25.0%) of the patients, respectively. There was no association between F508del mutation and disease severity by SK score. Of the 140 alleles analyzed, F508del mutation was identified in 70 (50%). Other mutations (G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) were identified in 12 (7.93%) of the alleles studied. In F508del homozygous patients with severe disease, the OR was 0.124 (95% CI: 0.005-0.826). CONCLUSIONS: In 50% of the alleles studied, the molecular diagnosis of CF was confirmed by identifying a single mutation (F508del). If we consider the analysis of the six most common mutations in the Brazilian population (including F508del), the molecular diagnosis was confirmed in 58.57% of the alleles studied. PMID:24310628

  16. Nontuberculous mycobacteria in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Park, In Kwon; Olivier, Kenneth N

    2015-04-01

    Increasing numbers of cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis patients are affected by pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection worldwide. Two species of NTM account for up to 95% of the pulmonary NTM infections: Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC). Diagnosis of pulmonary NTM infection is based on criteria specified in the 2007 American Thoracic Society/Infectious Disease Society of America (ATS/IDSA) guidelines. While many initial positive cultures do not progress to active NTM disease, even a single positive NTM sputum culture obtained from higher risk groups such as classic CF or older women with bronchiectasis and very low body mass index should be closely monitored for progressive disease. Macrolides remain the most effective agents available against MAC and MABSC. Infection with MABSC may be associated with worse clinical outcomes, as more than half of MABSC isolates have inducible macrolide resistance conferred by an active erm(41) gene. Of growing concern in CF is that MABSC is becoming more common than MAC, seems to target younger patients with classic CF, and is more difficult to manage, often requiring prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics. Recurrence rates of NTM after initial successful treatment remain high, likely due to nonmodifiable risk factors raising the question of whether secondary prophylaxis is feasible. More rapid and readily available methods for detecting inducible macrolide resistance and better in vitro susceptibility testing methods for other drugs that correlate with clinical responses are needed. This is crucial to identify more effective regimens of existing drugs and for development of novel drugs for NTM infection. PMID:25826589

  17. Improving care at cystic fibrosis centers through quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Kraynack, Nathan C; McBride, John T

    2009-10-01

    Quality improvement (QI) using a clinical microsystems approach provides cystic fibrosis (CF) centers the opportunity to make a significant positive impact on the health of their patients. The availability of center-specific outcomes data and the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation are important advantages for these quality improvement efforts. This article illustrates how the clinical microsystems methodology can improve care delivery and outcomes by describing the gradual application of quality improvement principles over the past 5 years by the CF team at the Lewis Walker Cystic Fibrosis Center at Akron Children's Hospital in Akron, Ohio. Using the example of a project to improve the pulmonary function of the pediatric patients at our center as a framework, we describe the QI process from the initial team-building phase, through the assessment of care processes, standardization of care, and developing a culture of continuous improvement. We outline how enthusiastic commitment from physician leadership, clinical managers and central administration, the availability of coaches, and an appreciation of the importance of measurement, patient involvement, communication, and standardization are critical components for successful process improvement. PMID:19760542

  18. A haplotype framework for cystic fibrosis mutations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R; Sanati, Mohammad H; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R

    2006-02-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, DeltaF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  19. A Haplotype Framework for Cystic Fibrosis Mutations in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G.; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R.; Sanati, Mohammad H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, ΔF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  20. Management of adolescent and adult inpatients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sterner-Allison, J L

    1999-01-15

    A program in which pharmacists help care for cystic fibrosis patients is described. The Egleston Cystic Fibrosis Center at Emory University houses outpatient clinic facilities and a 10-bed inpatient unit and is affiliated with Egleston Children's Hospital. The center provides full-service care for nearly 500 patients. Patients with mild to moderate exacerbations of pulmonary problems can receive their entire course of therapy at the center, and those with severe illness may complete their hospital stay there. A care team consisting of pharmacists, physicians, nurses, and others provides preventive and acute care. Patients can choose a "care partner" who will assist them with their care during any hospitalizations and at home. Both patient and care partner are taught drug administration, nutrition, and physical therapy and meet regularly with the care team. Patients must receive their medication education from a pharmacist before they can administer their own drugs. Pharmacists at the center also evaluate serum drug concentrations, stock the automated dispensing device, monitor for drug interactions, answer drug information questions, and attend multidisciplinary rounds. Pharmacy residents can work with the care team through rotations and clinic experience. Pharmacists at a cystic fibrosis center provide clinical services to patients and promote self-care. PMID:10030531

  1. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. PMID:26335952

  2. Recent advances in understanding and managing cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in Caucasians and has been extensively studied for many decades. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene was identified in 1989. It encodes a complex protein which has numerous cellular functions. Our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathophysiology and genetics is constantly expanding and being refined, leading to improved management of the disease and increased life expectancy in affected individuals. PMID:26097737

  3. Recent advances in understanding and managing cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in Caucasians and has been extensively studied for many decades. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene was identified in 1989. It encodes a complex protein which has numerous cellular functions. Our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathophysiology and genetics is constantly expanding and being refined, leading to improved management of the disease and increased life expectancy in affected individuals. PMID:26097737

  4. Determination of right ventricular ejection fraction in children with cystic fibrosis, using krypton-81m

    SciTech Connect

    Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R.; Millet, E.; Dab, I.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of cor pulmonale and incipient heart failure remains difficult to assess in cystic fibrosis (CF) on the basis of the clinical as well as the biological parameters. The measurement of the right ventricular ejection fraction has been facilitated these last years by the introduction of the radionuclide methods. Methodological difficulties are however encountered when Tc-99m RBC are used, and are mainly related to heart chambers superposition (equilibrium method) or the low count density (first pass method). Few papers have been published on RVEF in cystic fibrosis and the results are somewhat contradictory. The authors have recently introduced a new method for the determination of RVEF, using equilibrium study during continuous injection of Kr-81m in glucose solution. This method offers several advantages related to an increased accuracy and a favorable dosimetry. In 25 patients aged 2 to 23 years with CF, one or more RVEF studies were performed. The severity of the disease was evaluated on the basis of the clinical Schwachman score, the lung function tests, the ventilation scan and the pa02. RVEF tended to decrease with the progression of the lung disease, although, owing to the spread of the results, no RVEF could be predicted on the basis of the other parameters. The decrease of RVEF in patients with advanced lung disease was moderate and terminal lung disease was sometimes associated with normal right heart contractility.

  5. Thioredoxin liquefies and decreases the viscoelasticity of cystic fibrosis sputum.

    PubMed

    Rancourt, Raymond C; Tai, Shusheng; King, Malcolm; Heltshe, Sonya L; Penvari, Churee; Accurso, Frank J; White, Carl W

    2004-05-01

    The persistent and viscous nature of airway secretions in cystic fibrosis (CF) disease leads to airway obstruction, opportunistic infection, and deterioration of lung function. Thioredoxin (Trx) is a protein disulfide reductase that catalyzes numerous thiol-dependent cellular reductive processes. To determine whether Trx can alter the rheological properties of mucus, sputum obtained from CF patients was treated with TRX and its reducing system (0.1 microM thioredoxin reductase + 2 mM NADPH), and liquid phase-gel phase ratio (percent liquid phase) was assessed by compaction assay. Exposure to low Trx concentrations (1 microM) caused significant increases in the percentage of liquid phase of sputum. Maximal increases in percent liquid phase occurred with 30 microM Trx. Additional measurements revealed that sputum liquefaction by the Trx reducing system is dependent on NADPH concentration. The relative potency of the Trx reducing system also was compared with other disulfide-reducing agents. In contrast with Trx, glutathione and N-acetylcysteine were ineffective in liquefying sputum when used at concentrations <1 mM. Sputum viscoelasticity, measured by magnetic microrheometry, also was diminished significantly following 20-min treatment with 3, 10, or 30 microM Trx. Similarly, this reduction in viscoelasticty also was dependent on NADPH concentration. Further investigation has indicated that Trx treatment increases the solubility of high-molecular-weight glycoproteins and causes redistribution of extracellular DNA into the liquid phase of sputum. Recognizing that mucins are the major gel-forming glycoproteins in mucus, we suggest that Trx alters sputum rheology by enzymatic reduction of glycoprotein polymers present in sputum. PMID:14695120

  6. Cat and Dog Exposure and Respiratory Morbidities in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Christopher B.; Raraigh, Karen S.; Green, Deanna M.; Blackman, Scott M.; Cutting, Garry R.; Collaco, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the triggers that may impact respiratory health in cystic fibrosis (CF), including the effects of pets, because environmental factors contribute to one-half of the variation in lung function in patients with CF. Study design A total of 703 subjects with CF were recruited through the U.S. CF Twin-Sibling Study. Questionnaires were used to determine the presence/absence of cats and dogs in households with a child with CF. Questionnaires, chart review, and U.S. CF Foundation Patient Registry data were used to track respiratory and infection outcomes. Results Within the sample 47% of subjects reported owning a dog, and 28% reported owning a cat. After adjustment for demographic factors, dog ownership was not associated with any adverse clinical outcomes, and cat ownership was associated an increased risk in developing nasal polyps (adjusted OR 1.66; p=0.024) compared with non-cat owners. Subjects who owned both cats and dogs were twice as likely to report wheezing compared with other subjects (adjusted OR: 2.01; p=0.009). There were no differences in prevalence and age of acquisition for the common CF respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus between cat/dog owners and non-cat/dog owners. Conclusions Cat ownership was associated with a higher frequency of developing nasal polyps and combined cat-dog ownership was associated with a higher rate of wheezing. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations and the potential psychosocial benefits of cat and/or dog ownership. PMID:25027361

  7. Dietary supplementation with pressurized whey in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lands, L C; Iskandar, M; Beaudoin, N; Meehan, B; Dauletbaev, N; Berthiuame, Y

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by malnutrition, chronic pulmonary inflammation, and oxidative stress. Whey protein is rich in sulfhydryl groups and is recognized for its ability to increase glutathione and reduce oxidative stress. Previously, we have shown that supplementation with whey increased intracellular glutathione levels in patients with CF. We have subsequently shown that hyperbaric pressure treatment of whey protein promotes the release of novel peptides for absorption, increases intracellular glutathione in healthy subjects, and reduces in vitro production of interleukin (IL)-8. We hypothesized that pressurized whey supplementation in children and adults with CF could have significant nutritional and anti-inflammatory benefits. A pilot open-label study of 1-month dietary supplementation with pressurized whey in CF patients was undertaken to assess the effects. Twenty-seven patients with CF (nine children, 18 adults) were enrolled. The dose of pressurized whey was 20 g/day in patients less than 18 years of age and 40 g/day in older patients. Anthropometric measures, pulmonary function, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), whole blood glutathione, and whole blood IL-8 and IL-6 responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation were measured at baseline and at 1 month. Three adults withdrew (one with gastrointestinal side effects, two with acute infection). Both children and adults showed enhancements in nutritional status, as assessed by body mass index. Children showed improvement in lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second). The majority of patients with an initially elevated CRP showed a decrease. PHA-stimulated IL-8 responses tended to decrease in the adults. Whole blood glutathione levels did not change. Thus, oral supplementation with pressurized whey improves nutritional status and can have additional beneficial effects on inflammation in patients with CF. PMID:20136439

  8. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression in the male excretory duct system during development.

    PubMed

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Gillet, Danièle; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Ledé, Françoise; Samaison, Laura; Huguen, Geneviève; Ferec, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Sterility due to bilateral destruction in utero or in early infancy resulting in congenital absence of the vas deferens is the rule in male patients with cystic fibrosis. To understand the developmental pattern of this anomaly, the microscopic morphology of the male excretory system was analyzed during development and the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was explored by immunohistochemistry. We observed that cystic fibrosis fetuses had no excretory ducts agenesis or obstruction until 22 weeks of gestation. However, a focal inflammatory pattern and mucinous plugs in the oldest cystic fibrosis case suggested a disruptive mechanism. Immunolabeling of cytoplasmic epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was demonstrated in all cystic fibrosis and control cases with a similar pattern of expression of the protein between age-matched controls and cystic fibrosis cases. At midgestation, an apical intensification appeared in both cystic fibrosis and control cases and was stable during the remainder of fetal life. No gradient of intensity could be detected between the different segments of the excretory tract. These findings are different from those reported in adults. The absence of any morphologic anomaly until 22 weeks of gestation, the focal destruction of the epithelial structures during the second trimester, and the chronological pattern of expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are of interest for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:21840567

  9. The Cystic Fibrosis-causing Mutation ΔF508 Affects Multiple Steps in Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Richardson, John M.; Wang, Wei; Millen, Linda; Watson, Jarod; Mendoza, Juan L.; Du, Kai; Fischman, Sharon; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Kirk, Kevin; Thomas, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    The deletion of phenylalanine 508 in the first nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is directly associated with >90% of cystic fibrosis cases. This mutant protein fails to traffic out of the endoplasmic reticulum and is subsequently degraded by the proteasome. The effects of this mutation may be partially reversed by the application of exogenous osmolytes, expression at low temperature, and the introduction of second site suppressor mutations. However, the specific steps of folding and assembly of full-length cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) directly altered by the disease-causing mutation are unclear. To elucidate the effects of the ΔF508 mutation, on various steps in CFTR folding, a series of misfolding and suppressor mutations in the nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains were evaluated for effects on the folding and maturation of the protein. The results indicate that the isolated NBD1 responds to both the ΔF508 mutation and intradomain suppressors of this mutation. In addition, identification of a novel second site suppressor of the defect within the second transmembrane domain suggests that ΔF508 also effects interdomain interactions critical for later steps in the biosynthesis of CFTR. PMID:20667826

  10. Reliability and validity of a single item measure of quality of life scale for adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is important to monitor health related quality of life in order to determine the efficacy of interventions and physical functioning of patients with cystic fibrosis in their daily activities. There is no a single-item global quality of life scale for routine clinical practice for adult patients with cystic fibrosis. We assessed the reliability and validity of a single-item global quality of life scale and compared with the Cystic Fibrosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (CF-QOL) for adult patients with cystic fibrosis. Method 121 (men = 66, women = 55) adult cystic fibrosis patients self-completed the CF-QOL, the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, and the single item global quality of life scale at the out patient clinic. 33 (17 women) completed the repeat questionnaires at home within two weeks. Socio-demographic characteristic and lung function data were extracted from the recent medical notes. Results Mean (SD) age was 29.6 (8.9) years and mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 2.20 (0.94) litres. The test-retest reproducibility using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for the CF-QOL was 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.68 to 0.91. The single item global quality of life ICC score was 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.88. Concurrent validity of the single-item global quality of life was examined in relation to all items of the CF-QOL, frequent episodes of readmission, anxiety and depression (all, p < 0.01) were moderately correlated. Conclusion The study provides preliminary evidence that the single-item quality of life scale is acceptable, valid and repeatable for adult patients with cystic fibrosis. It is a promising tool that can be easily incorporated into a routine clinical practice to assess patients' quality of life. PMID:22117573

  11. Diffuse Cystic Lung Diseases: Diagnostic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai-Feng; Feng, Ruie; Cui, Han; Tian, Xinlun; Wang, Hanping; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Weihong; Lo, Bee Hong

    2016-06-01

    Diffuse cystic lung disease (DCLD) is a group of heterogeneous diseases that present as diffuse cystic changes in the lung on computed tomography of the chest. Most DCLD diseases are rare, although they might resemble common diseases such as emphysema and bronchiectasis. Main causes of DCLD include lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, amyloidosis, light-chain deposition disease, Sjögren syndrome, and primary or metastatic neoplasm. We discuss clinical factors that are helpful in the differential diagnosis of DCLDsuch as sex and age, symptoms and signs, extrapulmonary presentations, cigarette smoking, and family history. Investigations for DCLD include high-resolution computed tomography, biochemical and histopathological studies, genetic tests, pulmonary function tests, and bronchoscopic and video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsies. A proposed diagnostic algorithm would enhance ease of diagnosing most cases of DCLD. PMID:27231867

  12. Moving forward: cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2013-10-15

    Since cloning of the CFTR gene more than 20 years ago a large number of pre-clinical and clinical CF gene therapy studies have been performed and a vast amount of information and know-how has been generated. Here, we will review key studies with a particular emphasis on clinical findings. We have learnt that the lung is a more difficult target than originally anticipated, and we describe the strength and weaknesses of the most commonly used airway gene transfer agents (GTAs). In our view, one of the most significant developments in recent years is the generation of lentiviral vectors, which efficiently transduce lung tissue. However, focused and co-ordinated efforts assessing lentiviral vector safety and scaling up of production will be required to move this vector into clinical lung gene therapy studies. PMID:23918661

  13. Physiological Impact of Abnormal Lipoxin A4 Production on Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelium and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; Urbach, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and reduction of the airway surface liquid layer (ASL) height which favour chronic lung infection and neutrophil based inflammation leading to progressive lung destruction and early death of people with CF. This review highlights the unique ability of LXA4 to restore airway surface hydration, to stimulate airway epithelial repair, and to antagonise the proinflammatory program of the CF airway, circumventing some of the most difficult aspects of CF pathophysiology. The report points out novel aspects of the cellular mechanism involved in the physiological response to LXA4, including release of ATP from airway epithelial cell via pannexin channel and subsequent activation of and P2Y11 purinoreceptor. Therefore, inadequate endogenous LXA4 biosynthesis reported in CF exacerbates the ion transport abnormality and defective mucociliary clearance, in addition to impairing the resolution of inflammation, thus amplifying the vicious circle of airway dehydration, chronic infection, and inflammation. PMID:25866809

  14. The Potential of Wharton's Jelly Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Boruczkowski, D; Gładysz, D; Demkow, U; Pawelec, K

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening autosomal recessive multi-organ disorder with the mean incidence of 0.737 per 10,000 people worldwide. Despite many advances in therapy, patients fail to have a satisfactory quality of life. The end-stage lung disease still accounts for significant mortality and puts patients in the need of lung transplantation. Even though the disease is monogenic, the trials of topical gene transfer into airway epithelial cells have so far been disappointing. It is proven that stem cells can be differentiated into type II alveolar epithelial cells. Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from non-CF carrier third-party donors could be an effective alternative to bone marrow or embryonic stem cells. The harvesting process is an easy and ethically uncontroversial procedure. The MSC cell should be applied through repetitive infusions due to rapid lung epithelial cell turnover. However, the low stem cell incorporation remains a problem. Pre-clinical studies imply that even 6-10% of the wild-type cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression could be enough to restore chloride secretion. The route of administration, the optimal dose, as well as the intervals between infusions have yet to be determined. This review discusses the clinical potential of mesenchymal stem cell in CF patients. PMID:25248343

  15. Expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene in the respiratory tract of normal individuals and individuals with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Trapnell, B.C.; Chinshyan Chu; Paakko, P.K.; Banks, T.C.; Yoshimura, Kunihiko; Ferrans, V.J.; Chernick, M.S.; Crystal, R.G. )

    1991-08-01

    The most common mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene, CFTR, associated with the clinical disorder cystic fibrosis (CF) is called {Delta}Phe{sup 508}, a triple-base deletion resulting in loss of phenylalanine at residue 508 of the predicted 1480-amino acid CFTR protein. In the context that the lung is the major site of morbidity and mortality in CF, the authors evaluated airway epithelial cells for CFTR mRNA transcripts in normal individuals, normal-{Delta}Phe{sup 508} heterozygotes, and {Delta}Phe{sup 508} homozygotes to determine if the normal and {Delta}Phe{sup 508} CFTR alleles are expressed in the respiratory epithelium, to what extent they are expressed, and whether there are relative differences in the expression of the normal and abnormal alleles at the mRNA level. Respiratory tract epithelial cells recovered by fiberoptic bronchoscopy with a cytology brush demonstrated CFTR mRNA transcripts with sequences appropriately reflecting the normal and {Delta}Phe{sup 508} CFTR alleles of the various study groups. CFTR gene expression quantified by limited polymerase chain reaction amplification showed that in normal individuals, CFTR mRNA transcripts are expressed in nasal, tracheal, and bronchial epithelial cells.

  16. Molecular and cell biology of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, P B

    1991-05-01

    The questions emerged in better focus: we need to know, definitively, what CFTR is and what it does. We need to know how mutant CFTR expression leads to the relentless lung disease that takes the lives of the patients. We need to know how the different mutations in CFTR behave functionally. Much more information is needed on the pathways for ion transport in the airways in order for us to consider therapeutic alternatives. Better information on CFTR expression, particularly in the lung, would greatly facilitate consideration of pathophysiology as well as gene therapy. Many of these questions can be attacked by imaginative use of the tools already in hand. The need is urgent. The wondrous scientific advancements of the last five years and the additional money being spent on CF research have bought no dramatic increase in life expectancy for the patients. Every day, three more succumb. PMID:1713908

  17. In vivo effects of recombinant human DNase I on sputum in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, P. L.; Scott, S. F.; Knight, R. A.; Marriott, C.; Ranasinha, C.; Hodson, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viscoelastic secretions in cystic fibrosis cause impaired mucus clearance and persistence of bacteria within the lung. The abnormal rheology is partly due to the presence of high molecular weight deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) has been shown to depolymerise DNA and thereby reduce the in vitro viscoelasticity of sputum in patients with cystic fibrosis. A phase II double blind placebo controlled study showed that rhDNase improved pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis. The object of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of rhDNase on sputum rheology and to determine whether these were correlated with changes in pulmonary function. METHODS: Patients were randomised to receive either placebo or rhDNase 2.5 mg twice daily for 10 days. Sputum samples were collected in sterile containers during screening and during treatment with the study drug. Pulmonary function and rheological analysis were the primary outcomes evaluated. Other parameters assessed were quantitative sputum bacteriology, sputum DNA concentration, and change in molecular mass of DNA polymers. RESULTS: The viscoelasticity of the sputum in untreated patients with cystic fibrosis was high and treatment with rhDNase reduced all the rheological parameters measured: dynamic storage modulus (a measure of elasticity), dynamic loss modulus (a measure of viscosity), and log complex modulus (a measure of mucus rigidity). The calculated cough clearance index was also improved following treatment with rhDNase. These rheological parameters showed a correlation with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) which was improved by a mean (SE) of 13.3 (5.6)% on day 10 of treatment with rhDNase compared with a change of 0.2 (3.1)% in the placebo group. There was no change in bacterial colony counts or sputum DNA concentrations following treatment with rhDNase, but a small decrease in high molecular weight DNA was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Patients

  18. Host-pathogen interplay in the respiratory environment of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Bryan P.; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of disease progression in cystic fibrosis (CF), revealing a complex interplay between host and pathogenic organisms. The diverse CF microbiota within the airway activates an aberrant immune response that is ineffective in clearing infection. An appreciation of how the CF host immune system interacts with these organisms is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis of CF pulmonary disease. Here we discuss the microbial complexity present in the lungs of individuals with CF, review emerging concepts of innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens that chronically inhabit the CF lung, and discuss therapies that target the aberrant inflammatory response that characterizes CF. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms will shed light on pathogenesis and guide more targeted therapies in the future that serve to reduce infection, minimize lung pathology, and improve the quality of life for patients with CF. PMID:25800687

  19. Chronic Aspergillus fumigatus colonization of the pediatric cystic fibrosis airway is common and may be associated with a more rapid decline in lung function.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Rosalind V; Modha, Deborah E; Claydon, Alison; Gaillard, Erol A

    2016-07-01

    Filamentous fungi are commonly isolated from the respiratory tract of CF patients, but their clinical significance is uncertain and the reported incidence variable. We report on the degree of Aspergillus fumigatus airway colonization in a tertiary pediatric CF cohort, evaluate the sensitivity of routine clinical sampling at detecting A. fumigatus, and compare lung function of A. fumigatus-colonized and non-colonized children.We carried out an 8-year retrospective cohort analysis using local databases, examining 1024 respiratory microbiological specimens from 45 children. Nineteen (42%) had a positive A. fumigatus culture at least once during the 8-year period, with 10 (22%) children persistently colonized. Overall, 29% of 48 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples tested positive for A. fumigatus, compared with 14% of 976 sputum samples. Of 33 children for whom lung function data were available during the study period, seven were classed as having severe lung disease, of whom four (57%) were persistently colonized with A. fumigatus.We conclude that chronic A. fumigatus colonization of the CF airway is common, and may be associated with worse lung function. In our practice, BAL appears superior at detecting lower airway A. fumigatus compared to sputum samples. PMID:26782645

  20. Archetypal analysis of diverse Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptomes reveals adaptation in cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Analysis of global gene expression by DNA microarrays is widely used in experimental molecular biology. However, the complexity of such high-dimensional data sets makes it difficult to fully understand the underlying biological features present in the data. The aim of this study is to introduce a method for DNA microarray analysis that provides an intuitive interpretation of data through dimension reduction and pattern recognition. We present the first “Archetypal Analysis” of global gene expression. The analysis is based on microarray data from five integrated studies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from the airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Results Our analysis clustered samples into distinct groups with comprehensible characteristics since the archetypes representing the individual groups are closely related to samples present in the data set. Significant changes in gene expression between different groups identified adaptive changes of the bacteria residing in the cystic fibrosis lung. The analysis suggests a similar gene expression pattern between isolates with a high mutation rate (hypermutators) despite accumulation of different mutations for these isolates. This suggests positive selection in the cystic fibrosis lung environment, and changes in gene expression for these isolates are therefore most likely related to adaptation of the bacteria. Conclusions Archetypal analysis succeeded in identifying adaptive changes of P. aeruginosa. The combination of clustering and matrix factorization made it possible to reveal minor similarities among different groups of data, which other analytical methods failed to identify. We suggest that this analysis could be used to supplement current methods used to analyze DNA microarray data. PMID:24059747

  1. Pathology of gastrointestinal organs in a porcine model of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K; Stoltz, David A; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Welsh, Michael J

    2010-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), which is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), is characterized by multiorgan pathology that begins early in life. To better understand the initial stages of disease, we studied the gastrointestinal pathology of CFTR-/- pigs. By studying newborns, we avoided secondary changes attributable to environmental interactions, infection, or disease progression. Lesions resembling those in humans with CF were detected in intestine, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, and cystic duct. These organs had four common features. First, disease was accelerated compared with that in humans, which could provide a strategy to discover modifying factors. Second, affected organs showed variable hyperplastic, metaplastic, and connective tissue changes, indicating that remodeling was a dynamic component of fetal life. Third, cellular inflammation was often mild to moderate and not always present, which raises new questions as to the role of cellular inflammation in early disease pathogenesis. Fourth, epithelial mucus-producing cells were often increased, producing a striking accumulation of mucus with a layered appearance and resilient structure. Thus, mucus cell hyperplasia and mucus accumulation play prominent roles in early disease. Our findings also have implications for CF lung disease, and they lay the foundation for a better understanding of CF pathogenesis. PMID:20110417

  2. Pathology of Gastrointestinal Organs in a Porcine Model of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Meyerholz, David K.; Stoltz, David A.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), which is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), is characterized by multiorgan pathology that begins early in life. To better understand the initial stages of disease, we studied the gastrointestinal pathology of CFTR−/− pigs. By studying newborns, we avoided secondary changes attributable to environmental interactions, infection, or disease progression. Lesions resembling those in humans with CF were detected in intestine, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, and cystic duct. These organs had four common features. First, disease was accelerated compared with that in humans, which could provide a strategy to discover modifying factors. Second, affected organs showed variable hyperplastic, metaplastic, and connective tissue changes, indicating that remodeling was a dynamic component of fetal life. Third, cellular inflammation was often mild to moderate and not always present, which raises new questions as to the role of cellular inflammation in early disease pathogenesis. Fourth, epithelial mucus-producing cells were often increased, producing a striking accumulation of mucus with a layered appearance and resilient structure. Thus, mucus cell hyperplasia and mucus accumulation play prominent roles in early disease. Our findings also have implications for CF lung disease, and they lay the foundation for a better understanding of CF pathogenesis. PMID:20110417

  3. Cystic Fibrosis in a Female Infant with Cardiac, Ocular, and Musculoskeletal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Azhar; Eldin, Susan Gamal; Ali, Muna Dawood; AlTalhi, Ali; AlDigheari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) remains the most common hereditary disease in the western population. Its concomitant presence with other congenital abnormalities is a rare phenomenon with very little documentation. In this case report we describe a case of cystic fibrosis in a female infant with cardiac, ocular, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. A brief literature review is also provided. PMID:26693372

  4. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  5. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  6. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  7. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  8. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by... testing. This type of device includes recombinant, synthetic, and cell line-based DNA controls....

  9. Self-Efficacy, Pulmonary Function, Perceived Health and Global Quality of Life of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Astrid K.; Rustoen ,Tone; Hanestad, Berit R.; Gjengedal, Eva; Moum, Torbjorn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the extent that pulmonary function is related to perceived health status and global quality of life in adults suffering from cystic fibrosis, and the extent that self-efficacy modifies these relationships. Our sample comprised 86 adults (48% female; mean age, 29 years; age range, 18-54 years) with cystic fibrosis, recruited…

  10. Epidemiological evaluation regarding the role of cystic fibrosis as a risk factor for child malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Florescu, Laura; Paduraru, Dana Teodora Anton; Mîndru, Dana Elena; Temneanu, Oana Raluea; Petrariu, F D; Matei, Mioara Calipsoana

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common monogenic autosomal recessive disorder with progressive chronic evolution which is potentially lethal. Poor growth is a characteristic of children suffering from cystic fibrosis. A poor nutritional status is an independent risk factor for inadequate survival in cystic fibrosis and is associated with disease complications. The appropriate nutritional management is an important part of the treatment so that the patient with cystic fibrosis can achieve normal growth and development and maintain the best possible health status. A balanced diet supplemented with snacks high in fat and calories is necessary to increase the caloric intake in children with cystic fibrosis. Children with cystic fibrosis have higher caloric needs than healthy children of the same age and sex. Malnutrition in CF is multifactorial. Cystic fibrosis is a complex multisystem disorder affecting mainly the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. In the past, malnutrition was an inevitable consequence of disease progression, leading to poor growth, impaired respiratory muscle function, decreased exercise tolerance and immunological impairment. A positive association between body weight and height and survival has been widely reported. The energy requirements of patients with CF vary widely and generally increase with age and disease severity. Cystic fibrosis remains a paediatric disorder which is often underdiagnosed but which, if therapeutically managed properly (by means of drug therapy as well as by appropriate physiotherapy techniques), can lead to improved quality of life and, thus, to a bigger life expectancy. PMID:25076714

  11. Diabetes as a Determinant of Mortality in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chamnan, Parinya; Shine, Brian S.F.; Haworth, Charles S.; Bilton, Diana; Adler, Amanda I.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes is increasingly common in cystic fibrosis, but little information describing its influence on mortality exists. Using national U.K. data, in this study we document diabetes-specific mortality rates, estimate the impact of diabetes on survival, and estimate population-attributable fractions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This retrospective cohort study identified 8,029 individuals aged 0–65 years from the U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Registry (1996–2005). A total of 5,892 patients were included in analyses of mortality rates, and 4,234 were included in analyses of risk factors. We calculated age-adjusted mortality rates using Poisson regression, standardized mortality ratios using the population of England and Wales, and relative risks using proportional hazards modeling. RESULTS During 17,672 person-years of follow-up, 393 subjects died. The age-adjusted mortality rate was 1.8 per 100 person-years (95% CI 1.6–2.0). The age-adjusted mortality rates per 100 person-years were 2.0 (1.8–2.4) in female subjects and 1.6 (1.4–1.9) in male subjects, and 4.2 (3.4–5.1) in individuals with diabetes vs. 1.5 (1.3–1.7) in those without diabetes. Independent risk factors for death included diabetes (hazard ratio 1.31 [95% CI 1.03–1.67], female sex (1.71 [1.36–2.14]) plus poorer pulmonary function, lower BMI, Burkholderia cepacia infection, absence of Staphylococcus aureus infection, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, liver disease, prior organ transplantation, and corticosteroid use. CONCLUSIONS Individuals with cystic fibrosis die earlier if they have diabetes, which, if delayed or better treated, might reasonably extend survival; this hypothesis merits testing. PMID:19918014

  12. Genome-wide association and linkage identify modifier loci of lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis at 11p13 and 20q13.2

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Fred A.; Strug, Lisa J.; Doshi, Vishal K.; Commander, Clayton W.; Blackman, Scott M.; Sun, Lei; Berthiaume, Yves; Cutler, David; Cojocaru, Andreea; Collaco, J. Michael; Corey, Mary; Dorfman, Ruslan; Goddard, Katrina; Green, Deanna; Kent, Jack W.; Lange, Ethan M.; Lee, Seunggeun; Li, Weili; Luo, Jingchun; Mayhew, Gregory M.; Naughton, Kathleen M.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Paré, Peter; Rommens, Johanna M.; Sandford, Andrew; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Sun, Wei; Taylor, Chelsea; Vanscoy, Lori L.; Zou, Fei; Blangero, John; Zielenski, Julian; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Durie, Peter R.; Knowles, Michael R.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2012-01-01

    A combined genome-wide association and linkage study was used to identify loci causing variation in CF lung disease severity. A significant association (P=3. 34 × 10-8) near EHF and APIP (chr11p13) was identified in F508del homozygotes (n=1,978). The association replicated in F508del homozygotes (P=0.006) from a separate family-based study (n=557), with P=1.49 × 10-9 for the three-study joint meta-analysis. Linkage analysis of 486 sibling pairs from the family-based study identified a significant QTL on chromosome 20q13.2 (LOD=5.03). Our findings provide insight into the causes of variation in lung disease severity in CF and suggest new therapeutic targets for this life-limiting disorder. PMID:21602797

  13. Cystic fibrosis and beckwith-wiedemann syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Claudia; Correia-Costa, Liane; Eden, Paulo; Guedes-Vaz, Luisa

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease of exocrine gland function that involves multiple systems but chiefly results in chronic respiratory infections, the major cause of death, pancreatic enzyme deficiency and severe malnutrition, mostly in untreated patients. The association between CF and other inherited diseases or congenital anomalies is rare. We describe for the first time the association of CF and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). BWS is a genetic disorder commonly characterized by overgrowth. The most common features of BWS include macrosomia, macroglossia, abdominal wall defects, an increased risk for childhood tumors, kidney abnormalities, hypoglycemia in the newborn period and unusual ear creases or pits. PMID:25584105

  14. Cystic Fibrosis and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Claudia; Correia-Costa, Liane; Eden, Paulo; Guedes-Vaz, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease of exocrine gland function that involves multiple systems but chiefly results in chronic respiratory infections, the major cause of death, pancreatic enzyme deficiency and severe malnutrition, mostly in untreated patients. The association between CF and other inherited diseases or congenital anomalies is rare. We describe for the first time the association of CF and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). BWS is a genetic disorder commonly characterized by overgrowth. The most common features of BWS include macrosomia, macroglossia, abdominal wall defects, an increased risk for childhood tumors, kidney abnormalities, hypoglycemia in the newborn period and unusual ear creases or pits. PMID:25584105

  15. Developing a handheld record for patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Omendra; Davies, Siobhan; Tibbins, Carly; Rees, JH Martyn; Lenney, Warren; Gilchrist, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Patient handheld records (PHHRs) promote self-management and empower the holder to take a more active role in the management of their disease. They have been used successfully in improving preventative care for children and have contributed to improved adherence in a number of chronic illnesses. Despite the potential advantages, there are no standard PHHRs for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We report the consultation process that led to the development of a CF PHHR, describe the final document, and analyze the feedback from their use at our center. We have made the CF PHHR freely available online. PMID:26316833

  16. Gastrointestinal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Meghana Nitin; Freeman, Alvin Jay

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis (CF), but significant involvement within gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems occurs as well. As in the airways, defects in CFTR alter epithelial surface fluid, mucus viscosity, and pH, increasing risk of stasis through the various hollow epithelial-lined structures of the gastrointestinal tract. This exerts secondary influences that are responsible for most gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary manifestations of CF. Understanding these gastrointestinal morbidities of CF is essential in understanding and treating CF as a multisystem disease process and improving overall patient care. PMID:27469182

  17. Highlights from the 2015 North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference.

    PubMed

    Zemanick, Edith T; Ong, Thida; Daines, Cori L; Dellon, Elisabeth P; Muhlebach, Marianne S; Esther, Charles R

    2016-06-01

    The 29th Annual North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference was held in Phoenix, Arizona on October 8-10, 2015. Abstracts were published in a supplement to Pediatric Pulmonology.(1) In this review, we summarize presentations in several of the topic areas addressed at the conference. Our goal is to provide an overview of presentations with relevance to emerging or changing concepts in several areas rather than a comprehensive review. Citations from the conference are by first author and abstract number or symposium number, as designated in the supplement. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:650-657. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27074261

  18. Increased Congregational Support for Parents of Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Szczesniak, Rhonda D.; Zou, Yuanshu; Wetzel, J. Denise; Krause, Neal; Grossoehme, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Positive health outcomes are related to adults’ religious congregational participation. For parents of children with chronic disease, structured daily care routines and or strict infection-control precautions may limit participation. For this exploratory study, we examined the relationship between congregational support and religious coping by parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) compared to parents for whom child health issues were not significant stressors. CF parents reported higher levels of emotional support from congregation members and use of religious coping. Within-group differences were found for CF parents by denominational affiliation. Congregational support for parents dealing with child chronic disease is important. PMID:25119628

  19. Familial non-cystic fibrosis mucus inspissation of respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, M; Williams, J; Hirsch, M; Bar-Ziv, J

    1975-01-01

    Perlman, M., Williams, J., Hirsch, M., and Bar-Ziv, J. (1975). Archives of Disease in Childhood, 50, 727. Familial non-cystic fibrosis mucus inspissation of respiratory tract. Two sibs, whose parents are first cousins, have had chronic obstructive airways disease from birth with recurrent otitis media, sinusitis, and mastoiditis. The disease, associated with clinically abnormal mucus, differs from other familial obstructive airways diseases and probably constitutes a new entity. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:1190822

  20. Genetics and epithelial cell dysfunction in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, J.R.; Buchwald, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the advances being made in the study of the physiology, cell biology, and molecular genetics of cystic fibrosis. Emphasis is placed on various areas of research that involve epithelial cells (e.g., the CF-specific phenotypes exhibited by epithelial cells, abnormalities in epithelium ion transport, chloride channel regulation in CF epithelial.) Coverage is presented on the current status of CF, including data on the incidence of the disease, its mode of inheritance, chromosomal localization, genetic heterogeneity, and screening and management.