Science.gov

Sample records for cystic fibrosis support

  1. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease that ... quality of life has improved. Learn About Cystic Fibrosis Cystic fibrosis is a genetic (inherited) condition that ...

  2. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000107.htm Cystic fibrosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystic fibrosis is a disease that causes thick, sticky mucus ...

  3. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » Cystic Fibrosis Explore Cystic Fibrosis What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Bronchiectasis ...

  4. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or three times each week. Swimming, jogging, and cycling are good options. Clearing or bringing up mucus ... cannot be prevented. Screening those with a family history of the disease may detect the cystic fibrosis ...

  5. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  6. Increased Congregational Support for Parents of Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Szczesniak, Rhonda D.; Zou, Yuanshu; Wetzel, J. Denise; Krause, Neal; Grossoehme, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Positive health outcomes are related to adults’ religious congregational participation. For parents of children with chronic disease, structured daily care routines and or strict infection-control precautions may limit participation. For this exploratory study, we examined the relationship between congregational support and religious coping by parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) compared to parents for whom child health issues were not significant stressors. CF parents reported higher levels of emotional support from congregation members and use of religious coping. Within-group differences were found for CF parents by denominational affiliation. Congregational support for parents dealing with child chronic disease is important. PMID:25119628

  7. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. The mucus clogs the lungs, causing breathing problems ...

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  9. Supporting parents in managing drugs for children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Slatter, Amanda; Francis, Sally-Anne; Smith, Felicity; Bush, Andrew

    A semi-structured interview guide was used to interview 17 parents of children with cystic fibrosis identified through a shared care patient database at a London hospital to examine parents' medication-related roles and problems. Parents described their responsibilities in the home and the problems experienced, including adherence to regiments, involvement in decision-making, and relationships with the hospital teams and other healthcare professionals. The findings confirmed medication management as an integral part of the informal caring role. Many practical problems of ensuring the availability and administration of medication on a regular basis were described. Information gaps and problems with medication adherence increased the stress of providing effective care. The involvement of healthcare professionals across primary, secondary and tertiary care sectors in supporting parents in all aspects of medication management, including the development of strategies for transferring the responsibility for medication to their children, must be improved. PMID:15573006

  10. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic fibrosis (CF). This gene makes ... and very salty sweat. Research suggests that the CFTR protein also affects the body in other ways. ...

  11. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you ... about CF Care Centers, go to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's Care Center Network Web page. It's standard ...

  12. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... order to digest food. Cystic Fibrosis: A Single Gene Disease Mutations in a single gene - the Cystic ... the defective gene, or correcting the defective protein. Gene Therapy Research Offers Promise of a Cure for ...

  13. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed? Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) based on ... to see whether the baby has CF. Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Testing People who have one normal CFTR ...

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco. PMID:23276843

  15. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  16. Diagnostic Testing in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brewington, John; Clancy, J P

    2016-03-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a rare, multisystem disease leading to significant morbidity and mortality. CF is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), a chloride and bicarbonate transporter. Early diagnosis and access to therapies provides benefits in nutrition, pulmonary health, and cognitive ability. Several screening and diagnostic tests are available to support a diagnosis. We discuss the characteristics of screening and diagnostic tests for CF and guideline-based algorithms using these tools to establish a diagnosis. We discuss classification and management of common "diagnostic dilemmas," including the CFTR-related metabolic syndrome and other CFTR-associated diseases. PMID:26857766

  17. Value versus Use for Patients: Findings from an ICT supported Cystic Fibrosis Self-Management Project.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Erin; Cummings, Elizabeth; Ellis, Leonie; Turner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents findings from the implementation of an online symptom monitoring diary that was part of a broader project aimed to support self-management of cystic fibrosis and the development of an online community of practice (CoP). The findings challenge conventional perspectives on how value is acquired by patients and their families from electronic tools designed to provide them with support. Additionally, the findings highlight complex relationships between user needs and subsequent tool use that challenge approaches to the measurement of value from ehealth projects. PMID:25676995

  18. [News in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Delaisi, B

    2013-08-01

    The improvement over the last two decades in the treatment of cystic fibrosis led to an increase in life expectancy approaching 40 years at birth. Logically, the population of adult patients has been increasing and is currently 50% of patients followed in France. These therapeutic advances have justified the establishment in 2003 of a generalized neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis. The latest data of this screening show an incidence of CF of 1/5359 live births, far below the incidence of 1/2500 which was widely accepted twenty years ago. The performance of this screening is currently based on the dosage of trypsin immuno reactive, followed in case of exceeding the threshold of a search of the 30 most common mutations, can detect around 96% of 150 to 200 CF cases every year. Therefore, the possibility of a false negative of the screening cannot be excluded and evocative symptoms of cystic fibrosis, even for children born after 2003, will lead to prescribe a sweat test. While treatments available so far goal consequences of cystic fibrosis, a new therapeutic class to correct the functional defect of the mutated protein, called CFTR modulators, is emerging. Ivacaftor, leader of this new class, belonging to the category of "CFTR potentiator" got its access on the market in September 2012 for patients carrying the G551D mutation. New other molecules, named "CFTR correctors" which can have synergistic effect with ivacaftor and concern patients carrying the most common mutation--DF 508--are under development. PMID:23856023

  19. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  20. Epidemiology of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Spoonhower, Kimberly A; Davis, Pamela B

    2016-03-01

    Improved quality of care and rapidly emerging therapeutic strategies to restore chloride transport profoundly impact the epidemiology and pathobiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) in the twenty-first century. CF now serves as a model for chronic illness management, continuous quality improvement via registry data, and a seamless link between basic science research, translational studies, clinical trials, and outcomes research to enable rapid expansion of treatment options. PMID:26857763

  1. Chronic illness: the importance of support for families caring for a child with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Coyne, I T

    1997-03-01

    The effect of chronic life-threatening illness on the family is one of the major problems confronting the health-care system today. Increasingly, parents have the major responsibility for the daily management of their child's condition. There is evidence that many parents lack the professional help and support which could ameliorate some of their problems. It is important that nurses have an understanding of how families cope with the burden of caring for a chronically ill child. Health professionals need clear guidelines on how to support these families in their role as primary care-givers. This paper examines how families of children with cystic fibrosis adapt to the illness in order to provide indicators for nursing practice and to enhance the care and support provided for these families. Effective coping strategies include: assigning meaning to the illness, sharing the burden, denial of diagnosis and incorporating therapy in a schedule. PMID:9188350

  2. Chloride impermeability in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinton, Paul M.

    1983-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal genetic disease affecting Caucasians and is perhaps best characterized as an exocrinopathy involving a disturbance in fluid and electrolyte transport1. A high NaCl concentration in the sweat is characteristic of patients with this disease; the basic physiological reason for this abnormality is unknown. We have microperfused isolated sweat ducts from control subjects and cystic fibrosis patients, and report here results which suggest that abnormally low Cl- permeability in cystic fibrosis leads to poor reabsorption of NaCl in the sweat duct, and hence to a high concentration of NaCl in the sweat.

  3. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  4. Neutrophils in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Laval, Julie; Ralhan, Anjali; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. Among inflammatory cells, neutrophils represent the major cell population accumulating in the airways of CF patients. While neutrophils provide the first defensive cellular shield against bacterial and fungal pathogens, in chronic disease conditions such as CF these short-lived immune cells release their toxic granule contents that cause tissue remodeling and irreversible structural damage to the host. A variety of human and murine studies have analyzed neutrophils and their products in the context of CF, yet their precise functional role and therapeutic potential remain controversial and incompletely understood. Here, we summarize the current evidence in this field to shed light on the complex and multi-faceted role of neutrophils in CF lung disease. PMID:26854289

  5. [Rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Mainz, J G; Gerber, A; Arnold, C; Baumann, J; Baumann, I; Koitschev, A

    2015-11-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) mucociliary clearance of the entire respiratory system is impaired. This allows pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa to persist and proliferate, which by progressive pulmonary destruction causes 90 % of premature deaths due to this inherited disease. The dramatic improvement in life expectation of patients due to intensive therapy has resulted in the inevitable but variably expressed sinonasal involvement coming into the clinical and scientific focus. Thereby, almost all CF patients reveal sinonasal pathology and many suffer from chronic rhinosinusitis. Recently, the sinonasal niche has been recognized as a site of initial and persistent colonization by pathogens. This article presents the pathophysiological background of this multiorgan disease as well as general diagnostic and therapeutic standards. The focus of this article is on sinonasal involvement and conservative and surgical options for treatment. Prevention of pathogen acquisition is an essential issue in the otorhinolaryngological treatment of CF patients. PMID:26495450

  6. Cystic fibrosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, N E; Farquharson, D F

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the outcomes of pregnancies in women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to address issues pertinent to the obstetric care of such women. DATA SOURCES: English-language case reports and case series published from 1960 to 1991 identified through a search of MEDLINE and Index Medicus. The terms of reference were "cystic fibrosis" and "pregnancy". Not all the reports reviewed addressed all the outcomes under consideration. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 20 reports citing cases of pregnancy in women with CF. DATA EXTRACTION: Outcomes included the number of spontaneous abortions, pregnancies continued beyond 20 weeks, preterm deliveries, maternal deaths at 6 months and 2 years after delivery and perinatal deaths. Breast-feeding was addressed. Measures to assess the severity of maternal disease included the mean age at diagnosis of CF, weight gain during pregnancy, pulmonary function studies if available and the need for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 217 pregnancies in 162 women spontaneous abortion occurred in 10 (4.6%). Pregnancy progressed beyond 20 weeks in 81.6% of cases; 24.3% of the deliveries were preterm. The maternal death rate did not exceed that among age-related women with CF who were not pregnant. The rate of perinatal death was 7.9%. Breast milk was not hypernatremic. Poor outcomes were associated with a weight gain of less than 4.5 kg and a forced vital capacity of less than 50% of the predicted value. CONCLUSIONS: Premature labour and delivery remain a significant risk for pregnant women with CF, contributing to a high rate of perinatal death. Maternal illness and death result from deteriorating pulmonary function. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated. Attention to energy intake and pulmonary function is important. PMID:8374843

  7. Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... age 2, he grew up playing everything from football and lacrosse to ice hockey and golf. And ... Who's at Risk? Cystic fibrosis affects males and females from all racial and ethnic groups. It is ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... protects the linings of the airways, digestive system, reproductive system, and other organs and tissues. In people with ... experience health problems affecting the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems. Most men with cystic fibrosis have congenital bilateral ...

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Le, Christopher; McCrary, Hilary C; Chang, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene(CFTR) resulting in impaired ion transport. Nearly all people with CF will develop chronic rhino-sinusitis (CRS) and present with the characteristic viscous mucus, impaired mucociliary clearance and chronic inflammation/infection of the sinonasal cavity. While some individuals with CF can appear relatively asymptomatic in terms of their sinus disease, commonly reported symptoms include anosmia, headache, facial pain, nasal obstruction, chronic congestion and nasal discharge. Nasal endoscopy typically reveals mucosal edema, purulent discharge and nasal polyposis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging classically demonstrates the distinguishing findings of sinus hypoplasia or aplasia with generalized opacification, medial bulging of the lateral sinonasal sidewall and a demineralized uncinate process. Current treatment for CF sinusitis includes the use of hypertonic saline, topical and systemic steroids, antibiotics and endoscopic surgery. Research investigating novel therapies designed at targeting the primary defect of CF is showing promise for reversal of CF sinus disease, in addition to potential for disease prevention. PMID:27466844

  10. Mucolytics in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Henke, Markus O; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-03-01

    Mucus accumulation in the lower airways is a key feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The major component of mucus in CF is not mucin derived from mucus producing cells but rather pus that includes viscous material such as polymerized DNA derived from degraded neutrophils. This has important implications for mucolytic therapy aiming to improve mucus clearance from the airways, since degradation of mucin may not be a suitable treatment strategy. In addition, thinning of secretions may not always be beneficial, since it may negatively affect certain aspects of mucus transport such as cough clearance. While inhaled N-acetylcysteine has been used as a mucolytic drug in CF for decades, there is little evidence that it has any beneficial effect. Dornase alfa has been shown to reduce pulmonary exacerbations and improve lung function and is currently the only mucolytic agent with proven efficacy in CF. Newer agents targeting other components of CF mucus, such as filamentous actin, are currently in development. Ultimately, drugs that are mucokinetic, which preserve viscoelasticity, rather than mucolytic may prove to be beneficial for CF lung disease in the future. PMID:17419975

  11. Using Cystic Fibrosis Therapies for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    ElMaraachli, Wael; Conrad, Douglas J; Wang, Angela C C

    2016-03-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is an increasingly prevalent disease that places a significant burden on patients and health systems globally. Although many of the therapies used to treat NCFB were originally developed as cystic fibrosis (CF) therapies, not all of them have been demonstrated to be efficacious in NCFB and some may even be harmful. This article explores the evidence for which therapeutic strategies used to treat CF have been translated into the care of NCFB. The conclusion is that therapies for adult NCFB cannot be simply extrapolated from CF clinical trials, and in some instances, doing so may actually result in harm. PMID:26857775

  12. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future. PMID:26070393

  13. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  14. Cutaneous manifestations of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Megan L; McCusker, Meagen M; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disease reported in 1 in 2500 live births in Northern American and Northern European Caucasian populations. Classic disease findings include chronic bacterial infection of airways and sinuses, malabsorption of fat, infertility in men, and elevated concentrations of chloride in sweat. Less well-recognized findings associated with cystic fibrosis include cutaneous findings, which can be primary or secondary manifestations of the disease process. Patients demonstrate more atopic and drug hypersensitivity reactions than the general population, but have similar rates of urticaria compared with the general population. In atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis, the nutrient deficiency dermatitis of the disease may aid with diagnosis, and notably can be the presenting sign. Other dermatologic manifestations of cystic fibrosis include early aquagenic skin wrinkling and cutaneous vasculitis, which can be associated with arthralgias. Familiarity with the nutrient deficiency dermatitis of this entity may play a role in the timely diagnosis of the disease, and the other cutaneous findings add to our understanding of the protean nature of its manifestations. PMID:18429769

  15. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype. PMID:24309546

  16. Pharmacogenetics of cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Suzanne C; McKone, Edward F

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is genetic autosomal recessive disease caused by reduced or absent function of CFTR protein. Treatments for patients with CF have primarily focused on the downstream end-organ consequences of defective CFTR. Since the discovery of the CFTR gene that causes CF in 1989 there have been tremendous advances in our understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of CF. This has recently led to the development of new CFTR mutation-specific targeted therapies for select patients with CF. This review will discuss the characteristics of the CFTR gene, the CFTR mutations that cause CF and the new mutation specific pharmacological treatments including gene therapy that are contributing to the dawning of a new era in cystic fibrosis care. PMID:27490265

  17. [Cystic fibrosis and associated complications].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, C; Staab, D

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease. The mutation is located on the long arm of chromosome 7. Due to a defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, chloride ion transport is reduced across the cell membrane. As a result, the disease can be described as an exocrinopathy. In all organs with exocrine glands, disorders occur in association with the defective chloride transport. The main impact of this defect is manifested in the lungs. Therefore, the most common cause of death is pulmonary disease with respiratory insufficiency due to recurrent infections. Unfortunately, a cure for the disease is still not available. However, new therapies that may affect the CFTR mutation more specifically give new hope for better therapeutic options in the future. The long-term goal of therapy is to develop a causal therapy for all six different mutation classes and thus for about 2000 mutations. PMID:25693903

  18. Cystic fibrosis presenting with bilateral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anna P; Kumar, Prashant; Devlin, Anita M; O'Brien, Christopher J

    2007-07-01

    A 15-week old male infant presented with bilateral lower motor neuron facial palsy of unknown cause. Subsequently his growth deteriorated and he developed progressively worsening cough and wheeze. A diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was confirmed and hypovitaminosis A detected. Improvement of the facial palsy was noted following standard management of cystic fibrosis including vitamin A supplementation. PMID:17287135

  19. A combination therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2015-09-24

    The most prevalent form of cystic fibrosis arises from an amino acid deletion in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. A recently approved treatment for individuals homozygous for this mutation combines a chemical corrector, which helps CFTR fold, and a potentiator that increases CFTR channel activity. PMID:26406363

  20. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. PMID:27469183

  1. Pancreatic pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas is one of the earliest, and most commonly affected, organs in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Studying the pathogenesis of pancreatic disease is limited in CF patients, due to its early clinical onset, co-morbidities and lack of tissue samples from the early phases of disease. In recent years, several new CF animal models have been developed that have advanced our understanding of both CF exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease. Additionally, these models have helped us to better define the influence of pancreatic lesions on CF disease progression in other organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and lung. PMID:26365583

  2. Pulmonary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, M Y; Flight, W; Smith, E

    2014-03-01

    The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has steadily increased over recent decades with a corresponding increase in the frequency of complications of the disease. Radiologists are increasingly involved with managing and identifying the pulmonary complications of CF. This article reviews the common manifestations of CF lung disease as well as updating radiologists with a number of less well-known complications of the condition. Early and accurate detection of the pulmonary effects of CF are increasingly important to prevent irreversible lung damage and give patients the greatest possibility of benefiting from the new therapies becoming available, which correct the underlying defect causing CF. PMID:24361142

  3. Cystic Fibrosis: Brazilian ENT Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sih, Tania; Godinho, Ricardo; Franco, Leticia Paiva; Piltcher, Otávio

    2012-01-01

    Most published studies about Cystic Fibrosis (CF) are European or North American. There are still few publications about the characteristics of fibrocystic populations in developing countries. The incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF) in Brazil varies among different regions (1 : 10,000 in Minas Gerais, 1 : 9,500 in Paraná, 1 : 8,700 in Santa Catarina, and 1 : 1600 in Rio Grande do Sul). The prevalence of the DF508 mutation also varies according to population: 33% in Sao Paulo, 49% in Rio Grande do Sul, 27% in Santa Catarina, and 52% in Minas Gerais. Cough and nasal obstruction are the most common symptoms. The variation in nasal polyposis prevalence may be explained by population genotypic characteristics in a country that spans a continent. Findings on nasal endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) have better correlation than do this information compared with surgical and clinical history. Microbiologic studies suggest a high level of early contamination of the airways. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurs in these patients as a result of ototoxic antibiotics. The data compiled in this paper is useful, but also lead to the general agreement that more research would be welcome due to the unique characteristics of this country. PMID:22611403

  4. Aspergillus infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    King, Jill; Brunel, Shan F; Warris, Adilia

    2016-07-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic lung infection and airway inflammation. Respiratory failure secondary to chronic or recurrent infection remains the commonest cause of death and accounts for over 90% of mortality. Bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex have been regarded the main CF pathogens and their role in progressive lung decline has been studied extensively. Little attention has been paid to the role of Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi in the pathogenesis of non-ABPA (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis) respiratory disease in CF, despite their frequent recovery in respiratory samples. It has become more apparent however, that Aspergillus spp. may play an important role in chronic lung disease in CF. Research delineating the underlying mechanisms of Aspergillus persistence and infection in the CF lung and its link to lung deterioration is lacking. This review summarizes the Aspergillus disease phenotypes observed in CF, discusses the role of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator)-protein in innate immune responses and new treatment modalities. PMID:27177733

  5. Managing diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Laguna, T A; Nathan, B M; Moran, A

    2010-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is the most common co-morbidity in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). As the life expectancy of persons with CF continues to increase, the need to proactively diagnose and aggressively treat CFRD and its potential complications has become more apparent. CFRD negatively impacts lung function, growth and mortality, making its diagnosis and management crucial in a population already at high risk for early mortality. Compared to type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD is a unique entity, requiring a thorough understanding of its unique pathophysiology to facilitate the creation and utilization of an effective medical treatment plan. The physiology of CFRD is complex, likely consisting of a combination of insulin deficiency, insulin resistance and a genetic predisposition towards the development of diabetes. However, the hallmark of CFRD is insulin deficiency, necessitating the use of exogenous insulin as the mainstay of therapy. Insulin administration, in combination with a multidisciplinary team of health professionals with expertise in the care of patients with CF and CFRD, is the cornerstone of the care for these patients. The goals of treatment of the CFRD population are to reverse protein catabolism, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce acute and chronic diabetes complications. Creating a partnership between the treatment team and the patient is the ideal way to accomplish these goals and is essential for successful diabetes care. PMID:20920037

  6. Biliary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S; Keogan, M; Casey, M; Duffy, G; McErlean, D; Fitzgerald, M X; Hegarty, J E

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and four adult patients with cystic fibrosis were evaluated for the presence of liver disease as defined by abnormal liver function tests of six months' duration, histological evidence of fibrosis or cirrhosis, or the presence of portal hypertension, or both. Twenty patients fulfilled these criteria and were evaluated further for the presence of biliary tract abnormalities with biliary scintigraphy using 99Tc diisopropylphenyl-carboxymethyl iminodiacetic acid (DISIDA) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Clearance of 99Tc DISIDA from the liver and biliary tree was diminished at 45 (E45) and 60 (E60) minutes in the patients with liver disease compared with those without liver disease; E45 = 37.8% and 65.8%, p less than 0.01; E60 = 48.2% and 77.5%, p less than 0.01 respectively. Serial analogue images of the extrahepatic biliary tree were consistent with common bile duct obstruction with retention of DISIDA and tapering of the common bile duct in seven of 18 patients with and two of 10 patients without liver disease. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed changes consistent with sclerosing cholangitis, with beading and stricturing of the intrahepatic ducts in 12 of the 14 patients. In all 14 patients, including those in whom biliary scintigraphy had suggested obstruction, no abnormality of the common bile duct was identified. These results indicate that abnormalities of the bile ducts in patients with cystic fibrosis related liver disease are confined to the intrahepatic biliary tree and that common bile duct strictures do not contribute to either the progression or development of liver disease in these patients. Images Figure 2 PMID:1568661

  7. Heart involvement in cystic fibrosis: A specific cystic fibrosis-related myocardial changes?

    PubMed

    Labombarda, Fabien; Saloux, Eric; Brouard, Jacques; Bergot, Emmanuel; Milliez, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a complex multi-systemic chronic disease characterized by progressive organ dysfunction with development of fibrosis, possibly affecting the heart. Over the last four decades pathological, experimental, and clinical evidence points towards the existence of a specific myocardial involvement in cystic fibrosis. Multi-modality cardiac imaging, especially recent echocardiographic techniques, evidenced diastolic and/or systolic ventricular dysfunction in cystic fibrosis leading to the concept of a cystic fibrosis-related cardiomyopathy. Hypoxemia and inflammation are among the most important factors for heart involvement in cystic fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator was found to be involved in the regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction and may also account for cystic fibrosis-related myocardial dysfunction. This review, mainly focused on echocardiographic studies, seeks to synthesize the existing literature for and against the existence of heart involvement in cystic fibrosis, its mechanisms and prognostic implications. Careful investigation of the heart function may be helpful for risk stratification and therapeutic decisions in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27578468

  8. Targeted therapies to improve CFTR function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brodlie, Malcolm; Haq, Iram J; Roberts, Katie; Elborn, J Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetically determined, life-limiting disorder in populations of European ancestry. The genetic basis of cystic fibrosis is well established to be mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that codes for an apical membrane chloride channel principally expressed by epithelial cells. Conventional approaches to cystic fibrosis care involve a heavy daily burden of supportive treatments to combat lung infection, help clear airway secretions and maintain nutritional status. In 2012, a new era of precision medicine in cystic fibrosis therapeutics began with the licensing of a small molecule, ivacaftor, which successfully targets the underlying defect and improves CFTR function in a subgroup of patients in a genotype-specific manner. Here, we review the three main targeted approaches that have been adopted to improve CFTR function: potentiators, which recover the function of CFTR at the apical surface of epithelial cells that is disrupted in class III and IV genetic mutations; correctors, which improve intracellular processing of CFTR, increasing surface expression, in class II mutations; and production correctors or read-through agents, which promote transcription of CFTR in class I mutations. The further development of such approaches offers great promise for future therapeutic strategies in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26403534

  9. Aspergillus bronchitis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shoseyov, David; Brownlee, Keith G; Conway, Steven P; Kerem, Eitan

    2006-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a widely distributed spore-bearing fungus, is commonly grown in sputum cultures of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A fumigatus may cause allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), a complex condition that leads to worsening of airway inflammation and progressive damage and is diagnosed by specific criteria. In this report, we present six CF patients with respiratory deterioration that did not respond to appropriate antibiotic treatment. All had had A fumigatus in sputum cultures but did not fulfill the criteria of ABPA. Treatment with antifungal agents was followed by improvement in clinical condition. We suggest that in patients with CF, A fumigatus should be considered as a pathogen that may directly cause respiratory exacerbations. Antifungal therapy should be considered when deteriorating respiratory function is not responding to antibacterial therapy and A fumigatus is growing in sputum cultures. PMID:16840406

  10. Cystic fibrosis from the gastroenterologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chee Y; Durie, Peter R

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting, recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Increased survival outcomes and the multisystem nature of the disease, including the involvement of hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts, now require the need for more extensive knowledge and expertise in cystic fibrosis among gastroenterologists. Manifestations are either a direct consequence of the primary defect in cystic fibrosis or a secondary complication of the disease or therapy. Adult patients with cystic fibrosis also have an increased risk of malignancy in the gastrointestinal and pancreatico-biliary tracts compared with the general population. Novel treatments that target the basic defects in the CFTR protein have emerged, but to date not much is known about their effects on the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary systems. The introduction of such therapies has provided new opportunities for the application of intestinal endpoints in clinical trials and the understanding of underlying disease mechanisms that affect the gut in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26790364

  11. Abnormal Ion Permeation through Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Spock, A.; Fischer, N.; Gatzy, J. T.; Boucher, R. C.

    1983-09-01

    The epithelium of nasal tissue excised from subjects with cystic fibrosis exhibited higher voltage and lower conductance than tissue from control subjects. Basal sodium ion absorption by cystic fibrosis and normal nasal epithelia equaled the short-circuit current and was amiloride-sensitive. Amiloride induced chloride ion secretion in normal but not cystic fibrosis tissue and consequently was more effective in inhibiting the short-circuit current in cystic fibrosis epithelia. Chloride ion-free solution induced a smaller hyperpolarization of cystic fibrosis tissue. The increased voltage and amiloride efficacy in cystic fibrosis reflect absorption of sodium ions across an epithelium that is relatively impermeable to chloride ions.

  12. Cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Kejner, Alexandra; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Advances in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have improved pulmonary outcomes and survival. In addition, rapid developments regarding the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the disease have led to numerous novel targets for treatment. However, clinical and basic scientific research focusing on therapeutic strategies for CF-associated chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) lags behind the evidence-based approaches currently used for pulmonary disease. Methods: This review evaluates the available literature and provides an update concerning the pathophysiology, current treatment approaches, and future pharmaceutical tactics in the management of CRS in patients with CF. Results: Optimal medical and surgical strategies for CF CRS are lacking because of a dearth of well-performed clinical trials. Medical and surgical interventions are supported primarily by level 2 or 3 evidence and are aimed at improving clearance of mucus, infection, and inflammation. A number of novel therapeutics that target the basic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel are currently under investigation. Ivacaftor, a corrector of the G551D mutation, was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, sinonasal outcomes using this and other novel drugs are pending. Conclusion: CRS is a lifelong disease in CF patients that can lead to substantial morbidity and decreased quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach will be necessary to develop consistent and evidence-based treatment paradigms. PMID:24119602

  13. Antibiotic allergy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Parmar, J S; Nasser, S

    2005-06-01

    Allergic reactions to antibiotics are more common in cystic fibrosis (CF) than in the general population. This in part is due to the improving survival in adults with CF and the increased use of high dose intravenous antibiotics. While some are immediate anaphylaxis type (IgE mediated) reactions, the majority are late onset and may have non-specific features such as rash and fever. Piperacillin has consistently been found to have the highest rate of reported reactions (30-50%). There is a low risk of cross reactions between penicillins and other non-beta-lactam classes of antibiotics in penicillin skin prick positive patients. Carbapenems should only be used with extreme caution in patients with positive skin prick tests to penicillin. However, aztreonam can be used safely in patients who are penicillin allergic with positive skin prick reactions. The aminoglycosides are a relatively uncommon cause of allergic reactions, but patients who react to one member of the family may cross react with other aminoglycosides. Desensitisation relies on the incremental introduction of small quantities of the allergen and has been used for penicillins, ceftazidime, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin and must be repeated before each course. Personalized cards should be regularly updated for patients who develop allergic reactions. Written instructions on the emergency treatment of allergic reactions should be provided to patients self-administering intravenous antibiotics at home. Further research is required to identify risk factors and predictors for antibiotic allergy. PMID:15923254

  14. Respiratory Conditions Update: Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Lyle L

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease that occurs in approximately 1 in 2,500 white live births. It is less common in nonwhite individuals. A dysfunctional epithelial chloride channel leads to excessively thick mucus affecting multiple organ systems. Common issues include mucous plugging of the airway, lung inflammation, chronic pulmonary infections, intestinal malabsorption, and malnutrition. Universal screening of newborns for CF is recommended in many countries. CF can be diagnosed based on clinical evidence of disease along with genetic testing or other laboratory evidence of chloride channel dysfunction. Pulmonary system dysfunction causes the most morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary function testing is the primary modality used to monitor CF progression. Therapies include chest physiotherapy, mucolytics, antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, targeted therapies, and vaccines. Dysfunction of the exocrine pancreas and gastrointestinal tract leads to malabsorption, malnutrition, and intestinal obstruction. Nutrition should be optimized with adequate calories, pancreatic enzymes, and appropriate dietary supplements. Complications, including acute pulmonary exacerbations, gastrointestinal conditions, chronic rhinosinusitis, CF-related diabetes, osteoporosis, infertility, and psychosocial issues, must be managed. At the appropriate time, lung transplantation and end-of-life issues must be addressed. PMID:27576234

  15. Cell therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Currently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis (CF). Treatments are focused on addressing the disease symptoms, with varying degrees of success. Regenerative medicine holds the promise of regenerating dysfunctional or damaged tissues and to enhance the body's own endogenous repair mechanisms. The discovery of endogenous and exogenous stem cells has provided valuable tools for development of novel treatments for CF. The ability of stem cells to differentiate into functional pulmonary cells, modulate inflammatory responses and contribute to pulmonary function has provided researchers with multiple approaches to develop effective treatment strategies. Several approaches show promise to produce viable therapeutic treatments to treat the underlying cause of CF, reduce the symptoms and mitigate long-term damage, and generate functional replacement organs for end-stage transplantation. This review provides an overview of the rapidly progressing field of cell therapy for CF, focusing on the various cell types utilized and current strategies that show promise to improve life expectancy and quality of life for CF patients. PMID:23894126

  16. Infection Control in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Saiman, Lisa; Siegel, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 20 years there has been a greater interest in infection control in cystic fibrosis (CF) as patient-to-patient transmission of pathogens has been increasingly demonstrated in this unique patient population. The CF Foundation sponsored a consensus conference to craft recommendations for infection control practices for CF care providers. This review provides a summary of the literature addressing infection control in CF. Burkholderia cepacia complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus have all been shown to spread between patients with CF. Standard precautions, transmission-based precautions including contact and droplet precautions, appropriate hand hygiene for health care workers, patients, and their families, and care of respiratory tract equipment to prevent the transmission of infectious agents serve as the foundations of infection control and prevent the acquisition of potential pathogens by patients with CF. The respiratory secretions of all CF patients potentially harbor clinically and epidemiologically important microorganisms, even if they have not yet been detected in cultures from the respiratory tract. CF patients should be educated to contain their secretions and maintain a distance of >3 ft from other CF patients to avoid the transmission of potential pathogens, even if culture results are unavailable or negative. To prevent the acquisition of pathogens from respiratory therapy equipment used in health care settings as well as in the home, such equipment should be cleaned and disinfected. It will be critical to measure the dissemination, implementation, and potential impact of these guidelines to monitor changes in practice and reduction in infections. PMID:14726455

  17. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H.; Barr, Mark L.; Blackwell, Laura S.; Bosma, Otto H.; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D. R.; Jensen, Judy L.; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Robinson, Walter M.; Romero, Sandy L.; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C.; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Vrijlandt, Elianne J. L. E.; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing and transplantation on the patient's quality of life. Although recent population-based analyses of the US lung allocation system for the CF population have raised controversies about the survival benefits of transplantation, studies from the United Kingdom and Canada have suggested a definite survival advantage for those receiving transplants. In response to these and other controversies, leaders in transplantation and CF met together in Lansdowne, Virginia, to consider the state of the art in lung transplantation for CF in an international context, focusing on advances in surgical technique, measurement of outcomes, use of prognostic criteria, variations in local control over listing, and prioritization among the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and The Netherlands, patient adherence before and after transplantation and other issues in the broader context of lung transplantation. Finally, the conference members carefully considered how efforts to improve outcomes for lung transplantation for CF lung disease might best be studied. This Roundtable seeks to communicate the substance of our discussions. PMID:20008865

  18. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease. PMID:25929952

  19. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen S.; Steinle, Erich D.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Dawson, David C.

    1999-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channel exhibits lyotropic anion selectivity. Anions that are more readily dehydrated than Cl exhibit permeability ratios (PS/PCl) greater than unity and also bind more tightly in the channel. We compared the selectivity of CFTR to that of a synthetic anion-selective membrane [poly(vinyl chloride)–tridodecylmethylammonium chloride; PVC-TDMAC] for which the nature of the physical process that governs the anion-selective response is more readily apparent. The permeability and binding selectivity patterns of CFTR differed only by a multiplicative constant from that of the PVC-TDMAC membrane; and a continuum electrostatic model suggested that both patterns could be understood in terms of the differences in the relative stabilization of anions by water and the polarizable interior of the channel or synthetic membrane. The calculated energies of anion–channel interaction, derived from measurements of either permeability or binding, varied as a linear function of inverse ionic radius (1/r), as expected from a Born-type model of ion charging in a medium characterized by an effective dielectric constant of 19. The model predicts that large anions, like SCN, although they experience weaker interactions (relative to Cl) with water and also with the channel, are more permeant than Cl because anion–water energy is a steeper function of 1/r than is the anion–channel energy. These large anions also bind more tightly for the same reason: the reduced energy of hydration allows the net transfer energy (the well depth) to be more negative. This simple selectivity mechanism that governs permeability and binding acts to optimize the function of CFTR as a Cl filter. Anions that are smaller (more difficult to dehydrate) than Cl are energetically retarded from entering the channel, while the larger (more readily dehydrated) anions are retarded in their passage by “sticking” within the channel. PMID:10578016

  1. Drug disposition in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rey, E; Tréluyer, J M; Pons, G

    1998-10-01

    There are many pathological changes in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) which can lead to alterations in drug disposition. Although, in patients with CF, the extent of drug absorption varies widely and the rate of absorption is slower, bioavailability is not altered. Plasma protein binding for the majority of drugs studied did not differ in patients with CF compared with control groups. The difference in volume of distribution of most drugs between patients with CF and healthy individuals vanished when corrected for lean body mass. Despite hepatic dysfunction, patients with CF have enhanced clearance of many, but not all, drugs. Phase I mixed-function oxidases are selectively affected: cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP2C8 have enhanced activity, while other CYP isoforms such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are unaffected. Increased phase II activities are also demonstrated: glucuronyl transferase, acetyl transferase (NAT1) and sulfotransferase. The increased hepatic clearance of drugs in the presence of CF may be the consequence of disease-specific changes in both enzyme activity and/or drug transport within the liver. The renal clearance (CLR) of many drugs in patients with CF is enhanced although there has been no pathological abnormality identified which could explain this finding: glomerular filtration rate and tubular secretion appear normal in patients with CF. The precise mechanisms for enhanced drug clearance in patients with CF remain to be elucidated. The optimisation of antibiotic therapy in patients with CF includes increasing the dose of beta-lactams by 20 to 30% and monitoring plasma concentrations of aminoglycosides. The appropriate dosage of quinolones has not been definitively established. PMID:9812180

  2. Clinical Significance of Microbial Infection and Adaptation in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Alan R.; Jain, Manu; Bar-Meir, Maskit; McColley, Susanna A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: A select group of microorganisms inhabit the airways of individuals with cystic fibrosis. Once established within the pulmonary environment in these patients, many of these microbes adapt by altering aspects of their structure and physiology. Some of these microbes and adaptations are associated with more rapid deterioration in lung function and overall clinical status, whereas others appear to have little effect. Here we review current evidence supporting or refuting a role for the different microbes and their adaptations in contributing to poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis. PMID:21233507

  3. Interactions Between DNA and Actin in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Hee; Sanders, Lori; Angelini, Thomas; Butler, John; Wong, Gerard

    2003-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid which has a high concentration of DNA and F-actin, two anionic biological polyelectrolytes. In this work, we study the interactions between DNA and actin in an aqueous environment over a wide range of polyelectrolyte lengths and salt levels, using synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering(SAXS) and confocal microscopy. Perliminary results indicate the existence of a compressed phase of nematic F-actin in the presence of DNA. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  4. Do brine shrimp diagnose cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Hodes, M E; Thomas, J; Morgan, S; Merritt, A D

    1975-11-01

    The nauplii of the brine shrimp Artemia salina are dependent upon the function of their salt gland to maintain osmotic pressure within narrow limits. A number of drugs interfere with this function and are lethal to the nauplii. Saliva and serum from normal persons, patients with cystic fibrosis, and obligate heterozygotes were tested for lethal effect against brine shrimp nauplii. At salt concentrations between 100 mM and 2.5 no difference was found among the phenotypes. At lower concentrations a difference was noted occasionally between some normal subjects and some individuals carrying one or two genes for cystic fibrosis. Data from an independent series of experiments indicate that the naupliar deaths result from distorted ratios of Na+/K+ and not from a specific gene product. No difference was noted in the O2 uptake of nauplii treated with saliva or serum obtained from normal subjects, patients with cystic fibrosis, or obligate heterozygotes. PMID:1187245

  5. Acute Scedosporium apiospermum Endobronchial Infection in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Padoan, Rita; Poli, Piercarlo; Colombrita, Domenico; Borghi, Elisa; Timpano, Silviana; Berlucchi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Fungi are known pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients. A boy with cystic fibrosis boy presented with acute respiratory distress. Bronchoscopy showed airways obstruction by mucus plugs and bronchial casts. Scedosporium apiospermum was identified as the only pathogen. Bronchoalveolar lavage successfully resolved the acute obstruction. Plastic bronchitis is a new clinical picture of acute Scedosporium endobronchial colonization in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:26967814

  6. Living with Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for the Young Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Atlanta, GA.

    Intended for the young adult with cystic fibrosis, the booklet provides information on dealing with problems and on advances in treatment and detection related to the disease. Addressed are the following topics: description of cystic fibrosis; inheritance of cystic fibrosis; early diagnosis; friends, careers, and other matters; treatment;…

  7. Chronic Rhinosinusitis in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hamilos, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is highly prevalent in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and accounts for significant morbidity and contribution to CF lung disease. Mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene occur with increased prevalence in patients with CRS without CF, suggesting some contribution to CRS pathophysiology. Nasal polyps (NPs) occur with increased prevalence in patients with CF of all ages and have a more neutrophilic appearance with fewer eosinophils and increased submucosal glandular elements in comparison to NPs from patients without CF. Mainstays of medical treatment include isotonic saline irrigations and topical intranasal glucocorticoids, with some evidence that topical intranasal glucocorticoids reduce NP size. Although inhaled hypertonic saline (7%) has been widely studied as a mucolytic agent for CF lung disease, there are no reports of its use in CF CRS. Mucolytics have also not been studied as a treatment for CRS in CF, and most evidence does not support their use for CF lung disease. Nasally nebulized dornase alfa (recombinant human deoxyribonuclease) following sinus surgery shows promise for treatment. Other unproven therapies include addition of baby shampoo to isotonic saline to potentially thin mucus and help prevent biofilm formation. There are no data to support the use of low-dose oral macrolide antibiotics or the use of prophylactic oral antibiotics for CRS in patients with CF. However, there is some support for the use of topical antibiotics, including colistimethate sodium or tobramycin, administered as a sinus irrigation or antral lavage in patients following sinus surgery when susceptible bacteria are cultured. Key components of CF sinus surgical management include extensive surgery to ensure that the maxillary, frontal, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinuses are all widely opened with smoothing of bony overhangs to prevent mucus retention and bacterial recolonization, postoperative meticulous daily nasal irrigations

  8. Cystic fibrosis, intravenous antibiotics, and home therapy.

    PubMed

    Hammond, L J; Caldwell, S; Campbell, P W

    1991-01-01

    The survival rate of patients with cystic fibrosis has improved considerably in the last 20 years. Although not all of the factors accounting for this change are understood, aggressive nutritional management and treatment of pulmonary exacerbations certainly play a role. Home intravenous (IV) antibiotic delivery for pulmonary exacerbation has proved to be as effective as hospital treatment and offers significant advantages to the patient and family. This article examines the microbiology of pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, as well as antimicrobial therapy, methods of IV administration, home IV therapy, and the nurse practitioner's role in this home program in the future. PMID:1990112

  9. Management issues for adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Withers, Adelaide Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The healthy adolescent will encounter major changes in biological and psychosocial domains. The adolescent period can be greatly affected by a chronic illness. Cystic fibrosis is a terminal illness that can significantly affect an adolescent's biological, mental and psychosocial health. This paper discusses general issues to consider when managing an adolescent with a chronic medical condition, and specifically how cystic fibrosis may impact upon puberty, body image, risk-taking behaviours, mental health, independence, nonadherence, reproductive health, transition, lung transplantation, and end of life care. PMID:22991662

  10. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis. PMID:26857767

  11. Genetics of Cystic Fibrosis: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Egan, Marie E

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Almost 2000 variants in the CFTR gene have been identified. The mutational classes are based on the functional consequences on CFTR. New therapies are being developed to target mutant CFTR and restore CFTR function. Understanding specific CF genotypes is essential for providing state-of-the art care to patients. In addition to the variation in CFTR genotype, there are several modifier genes that contribute to the respiratory phenotype. PMID:26857764

  12. Precision Genomic Medicine in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene H; Zabner, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    The successful application of precision genomic medicine requires an understanding of how a person's genome can influence his or her disease phenotype and how medical therapies can provide personalized therapy to one's genotype. In this review, we highlight advances in precision genomic medicine in cystic fibrosis (CF), a classic autosomal recessive genetic disorder. We discuss genotype-phenotype correlations in CF, genetic and environmental modifiers of disease, and pharmacogenetic therapies that target specific genetic mutations thereby addressing the primary defect of cystic fibrosis. PMID:26073768

  13. Zinc supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Symptomatic zinc deficiency has been reported in CF but little is known about zinc homeostasis in children with CF. Zinc supplementation (Zn suppl) is increasingly common in children with CF but it is not without theoretcial r...

  14. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  15. [Macrolides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Guillot, M; Amiour, M; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Paris, C

    2006-10-01

    Long-term low dose azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is safe and reduces the decline in lung function, the number of acute exacerbations and improves nutritional status; underlying efficacy mechanisms are multiple and synergistic. PMID:17370396

  16. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio de Aragão Dantas; Aguiar, Renata Arruti; Alves, Ana Cláudia S; Santana, Maria Angélica

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the principal extra-pulmonary complication of cystic fibrosis, occurring in 15-30% of adult cystic fibrosis patients. The number of cystic fibrosis patients who develop diabetes is increasing in parallel with increases in life expectancy. The aim of this study was to review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CFRD. A bibliographic search of the Medline and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature databases was made. Articles were selected from among those published in the last twenty years. Insulin deficiency, caused by reduced beta-cell mass, is the main etiologic mechanism, although insulin resistance also plays a role. Presenting features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD typically affects individuals of approximately 20 years of age. It can also be accompanied by fasting, non-fasting or intermittent hyperglycemia. Glucose intolerance is associated with worsening of nutritional status, increased morbidity, decreased survival and reduced pulmonary function. Microvascular complications are always present, although macrovascular complications are rarely seen. An oral glucose tolerance test is recommended annually for patients > or = 10 years of age and for any patients presenting unexplained weight loss or symptoms of diabetes. Patients hospitalized with severe diseases should also be screened. If fasting hyperglycemia persists for more than 48 h, insulin therapy is recommended. Insulin administration remains the treatment of choice for diabetes and fasting hyperglycemia. Calories should not be restricted, and patients with CFRD should be managed by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:17724542

  17. Nutrient Status of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    GORDON, CATHERINE M.; ANDERSON, ELLEN J.; HERLYN, KAREN; HUBBARD, JANE L.; PIZZO, ANGELA; GELBARD, RONDI; LAPEY, ALLEN; MERKEL, PETER A.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition is thought to influence disease status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This cross-sectional study sought to evaluate nutrient intake and anthropometric data from 64 adult outpatients with cystic fibrosis. Nutrient intake from food and supplements was compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes for 16 nutrients and outcomes influenced by nutritional status. Attention was given to vitamin D and calcium given potential skeletal implications due to cystic fibrosis. Measurements included weight, height, body composition, pulmonary function, and serum metabolic parameters. Participants were interviewed about dietary intake, supplement use, pulmonary function, sunlight exposure, and pain. The participants’ mean body mass index (±standard deviation) was 21.8±4.9 and pulmonary function tests were normal. Seventy-eight percent used pancreatic enzyme replacement for malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD)<37.5 nmol/L] was common: 25 (39%) were deficient despite adequate vitamin D intake. Lipid profiles were normal in the majority, even though total and saturated fat consumption represented 33.0% and 16.8% of energy intake, respectively. Reported protein intake represented 16.9% of total energy intake (range 10%–25%). For several nutrients, including vitamin D and calcium, intake from food and supplements in many participants exceeded recommended Tolerable Upper Intake Levels. Among adults with cystic fibrosis, vitamin D deficiency was common despite reported adequate intake, and lipid profiles were normal despite a relatively high fat intake. Mean protein consumption was adequate, but the range of intake was concerning, as both inadequate or excessive intake may have deleterious skeletal effects. These findings call into question the applicability of established nutrient thresholds for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18060897

  18. Systemic inflammatory mediators and cystic fibrosis genotype.

    PubMed

    Augarten, A; Paret, G; Avneri, I; Akons, H; Aviram, M; Bentur, L; Blau, H; Efrati, O; Szeinberg, A; Barak, A; Kerem, E; Yahav, J

    2004-10-01

    Morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis patients is mainly attributed to pulmonary infection and inflammation. Chemokines play a pivotal role in the inflammatory process. Although genotype-phenotype correlation in cystic fibrosis patients has been defined, a clear relationship between the defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene and pulmonary inflammation has not been established. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum chemokines levels in cystic fibrosis patients correlate with genotype and pulmonary function tests, as well as with other clinical characteristics. Serum levels of interleukin-8, RANTES, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were measured in 36 cystic fibrosis patients grouped according to their genotype. Group A included 25 patients who carried two mutations associated with a pathological sweat test and pancreatic insufficiency (deltaF508, W1282X, G542X, N1303K, S549R). Group B included 11 compound heterozygote patients who carried one mutation known to cause mild disease with borderline or normal sweat test and pancreatic sufficiency (3849+10kb C to T, 5T). Associations between chemokine levels, genotype, pulmonary function, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, age, sweat chloride level, and pancreatic and nutritional status were examined. Mean interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels were significantly higher in group A than group B (11.4 +/- 2.1 pg/ml vs. 5 +/- 0.9 pg/ml and 157 +/- 16 pg/ml vs. 88.8 +/- 16.4 pg/ml, respectively) (P < 0.01). No difference in RANTES levels were found between groups. interleukin-8 levels were inversely related to forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = -0.37, P < 0.02), while there was no association between the latter and RANTES and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. The Pseudomonas colonization rate was higher among group A patients than group B (88% vs. 40%, P < 0.01). No relationship was found between measured chemokines and age, sweat chloride

  19. Inflammation and its genesis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David P; Chmiel, James F

    2015-10-01

    The host inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has long been recognized as a central pathological feature and an important therapeutic target. Indeed, many believe that bronchiectasis results largely from the oxidative and proteolytic damage comprised within an exuberant airway inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils. In this review, we address the longstanding argument of whether or not the inflammatory response is directly attributable to impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or only secondary to airway obstruction and chronic bacterial infection and challenge the importance of this distinction in the context of therapy. We also review the centrality of neutrophils in CF lung pathophysiology and highlight more recent data that suggest the importance of other cell types and signaling beyond NF-κB activation. We discuss how protease and redox imbalance are critical factors in CF airway inflammation and end by reviewing some of the more promising therapeutic approaches now under development. PMID:26335954

  20. Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-01-01

    In the genetic airway disease cystic fibrosis (CF), deficiency or dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis membrane conductance regulator (CFTR) alters anion transport in respiratory epithelium and consequently disrupts mucociliary clearance. An enriched understanding of the role of CFTR in the maintenance of normal epithelial function has revealed that mild and variable CFTR mutations play a causative role in a number of diseases not classically associated with CF. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that acquired defects in wild-type CFTR protein processing, endocytic recycling and function can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this chapter, we discuss emerging findings implicating acquired CFTR dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis and propose a new and leading edge approach to future CRS therapy using CFTR potentiators. PMID:27466849

  1. MicroRNA Dysregulation in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    McKiernan, Paul J.; Greene, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis lung is a complex milieu comprising multiple factors that coordinate its physiology. MicroRNAs are regulatory factors involved in most biological processes and it is becoming increasingly clear that they play a key role in the development and manifestations of CF lung disease. These small noncoding RNAs act posttranscriptionally to inhibit protein production. Their involvement in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease stems from the fact that their expression is altered in vivo in the CF lung due to intrinsic and extrinsic factors; to date defective chloride ion conductance, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, and infection have been implicated in altering endogenous miRNA expression in this setting. Here, the current state-of-the-art and biological consequences of altered microRNA expression in cystic fibrosis are reviewed. PMID:26185362

  2. Pregnancy and cystic fibrosis: Approach to contemporary management.

    PubMed

    Geake, James; Tay, George; Callaway, Leonie; Bell, Scott C

    2014-12-01

    Over the previous 50 years survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has progressively increased. As a result of improvements in health care, increasing numbers of patients with cystic fibrosis are now considering starting families of their own. For the health care professionals who look after these patients, the assessment of the potential risks, and the process of guiding prospective parents through pregnancy and beyond can be both challenging and rewarding. To facilitate appropriate discussions about pregnancy, health care workers must have a detailed understanding of the various important issues that will ultimately need to be considered for any patient with cystic fibrosis considering parenthood. This review will address these issues. In particular, it will outline pregnancy outcomes for mothers with cystic fibrosis, issues that need to be taken into account when planning a pregnancy and the management of pregnancy for mothers with cystic fibrosis or mothers who have undergone organ transplantation as a result of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27512443

  3. Pregnancy and cystic fibrosis: Approach to contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Tay, George; Callaway, Leonie; Bell, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Over the previous 50 years survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has progressively increased. As a result of improvements in health care, increasing numbers of patients with cystic fibrosis are now considering starting families of their own. For the health care professionals who look after these patients, the assessment of the potential risks, and the process of guiding prospective parents through pregnancy and beyond can be both challenging and rewarding. To facilitate appropriate discussions about pregnancy, health care workers must have a detailed understanding of the various important issues that will ultimately need to be considered for any patient with cystic fibrosis considering parenthood. This review will address these issues. In particular, it will outline pregnancy outcomes for mothers with cystic fibrosis, issues that need to be taken into account when planning a pregnancy and the management of pregnancy for mothers with cystic fibrosis or mothers who have undergone organ transplantation as a result of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27512443

  4. Progress in therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Kris; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-08-01

    Standard follow-up and symptomatic treatment have allowed most patients with cystic fibrosis to live to young adulthood. However, many patients still die prematurely from respiratory insufficiency. Hence, further investigations to improve these therapies are important and might have relevance for other diseases-eg, exploring how to increase airway hydration, how to safely downscale the increased inflammatory response in the lung, and how to better combat lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis. In parallel, development of modulators that target the underlying dysfunction in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is fast moving forward. Existing treatments are specific to certain mutations, or mutation class, in CFTR. An effective, although not yet entirely corrective, treatment is available for patients with class III mutations, and a treatment with modest effectiveness is available for patients who are homozygous for Phe508del, albeit at a very high cost. Corrective treatments that are non-specific to mutation class and thus applicable to all patients-eg, gene therapy, cell-based therapies, and activation of alternative ion channels that bypass CFTR-are being explored, but they are still in early stages of development. In view of the large number of patients with very rare mutations, a plan to advance personalised biomarkers to predict treatment effect is also being investigated and validated. PMID:27053340

  5. [Molecular epidemiology of cystic fibrosis in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Messaoud, T; Bel Haj Fredj, S; Bibi, A; Elion, J; Férec, C; Fattoum, S

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent autosomal recessive genetic disease in North European population. This pathology seems to not be rare in Tunisia. On another hand, development of molecular biology techniques has largely contributed to implement the study of the different mutations in the CFTR gene where over 1,300 mutations were reported. Herein, we describe the strategy used to detect molecular defects responsible of cystic fibrosis on 390 children (383 families) in Tunisian population. Several techniques were performed for genotype diagnosis: DNA extraction was from peripheral blood. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacylamide gel electrophoresis, and reverse dot blot procedures were used to detect known point mutations. Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used in a next step searching for the unknown point mutations that are later identified by automated sequencing on ABIprism 310. This strategy allowed us to detect 17 different mutations located on the different exons of the CFTR gene. The most frequent was the F508del (50.74%) followed by three other mutations (G542X, W1282X and N1303K) known to be common in the Mediterranean area. For mutations (T665S, 2766 del8, F1166C, L1043R) were exclusively found, up to now, in the Tunisian population. Our results permitted to establish cystic fibrosis mutations and their distribution in Tunisia and to implement an appropriate prevention program of these diseases through the genetic council and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:16330381

  6. [Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis with CFTR Modulators].

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B

    2016-05-01

    Personalized medicine promises that medical decisions, practices and products are tailored to the individual patient. Cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder of chloride and bicarbonate transport in exocrine glands, is the first successful example of customized drug development for mutation-specific therapy. There are two classes of CFTR modulators: potentiators that increase the activity of CFTR at the cell surface, and correctors that either promote the read-through of nonsense mutations or facilitate the translation, folding, maturation and trafficking of mutant CFTR to the cell surface. The potentiator ivacaftor and the corrector lumacaftor are approved in Germany for the treatment of people with cystic fibrosis who carry a gating mutation such as p.Gly551Asp or who are homozygous for the most common mutation p.Phe508del, respectively. This report provides an overview of the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, the population genetics of CFTR mutations in Germany and the bioassays to assess CFTR function in humans together with the major achievements of preclinical research and clinical trials to bring CFTR modulators to the clinic. Some practical information on the use of ivacaftor and lumacaftor in daily practice and an update on pitfalls, challenges and novel strategies of bench-to-bedside development of CFTR modulators are also provided. PMID:26894479

  7. Azithromycin reduces spontaneous and induced inflammation in ΔF508 cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Legssyer, Rachida; Huaux, François; Lebacq, Jean; Delos, Monique; Marbaix, Etienne; Lebecque, Patrick; Lison, Dominique; Scholte, Bob J; Wallemacq, Pierre; Leal, Teresinha

    2006-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays a critical role in lung disease development and progression in cystic fibrosis. Azithromycin is used for the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease, although its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that azithromycin modulates lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis mice. Methods We monitored cellular and molecular inflammatory markers in lungs of cystic fibrosis mutant mice homozygous for the ΔF508 mutation and their littermate controls, either in baseline conditions or after induction of acute inflammation by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which would be independent of interactions of bacteria with epithelial cells. The effect of azithromycin pretreatment (10 mg/kg/day) given by oral administration for 4 weeks was evaluated. Results In naive cystic fibrosis mice, a spontaneous lung inflammation was observed, characterized by macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, and increased intra-luminal content of the pro-inflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2. After induced inflammation, cystic fibrosis mice combined exaggerated cellular infiltration and lower anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 production. In cystic fibrosis mice, azithromycin attenuated cellular infiltration in both baseline and induced inflammatory condition, and inhibited cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) release in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. Conclusion Our findings further support the concept that inflammatory responses are upregulated in cystic fibrosis. Azithromycin reduces some lung inflammation outcome measures in cystic fibrosis mice. We postulate that some of the benefits of azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients are due to modulation of lung inflammation. PMID:17064416

  8. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  9. Cystic fibrosis, atopy, and airways lability.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, M; Hobbs, F D; Gordon, I R; Carswell, F

    1978-01-01

    In a survey of cystic fibrosis (CF) in the Avon area, 48 children with CF from 40 families together with 71 of their parents were studied by spirometry, exercise tests, and pinch tests. A control group of 42 young adults was similarly tested; control data for children were taken from previously published work. The prevalence of atopy (any positive prick test) in children with CF was 48%. Sensitivity to grass pollens and house dust mite was no more common in these children (29%) than in a normal population (34%). Hypersensitivity to Aspergillus fumigatus was found in 35% of children with CF and was associated with severe lung disease. The parents had a normal pattern and prevalence of atopy. Exercise-induced airways obstruction was present in only 22% of children with CF; its association with severe lung disease rendered interpretation difficult. The parents had a normal response to exercise. Both hypersensitivity to A. fumigatus and exercise-induced airways lability had the features of acquired characteristics. There was nothing in the present study to support the hypothesis that the possession of a CF gene predisposed to atopy. PMID:365112

  10. Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... being active in sports. Photo: Boomer Esiason Foundation Fast Facts Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease ... 2; his parents launched a foundation to raise money for CF research and to support the CF ...

  11. Actin - Lysozyme Interactions in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lori; Slimmer, Scott; Angelini, Thomas; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2003-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid consisting of mucin (a glycoprotein), lysozyme (a cationic polypeptide), water, salt, as well as a high concentration of a number of anionic biological polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin. The interactions governing these components are poorly understood, but may have important clinical consequences. For example, the formation of these biological polyelectrolytes into ordered gel phases may contribute significantly to the observed high viscosity of CF sputum. In this work, a number of model systems containing actin, lysozyme, and KCl were created to simulate CF sputum in vitro. These model systems were studied using small angle x-ray scattering and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  12. Polyelectrolyte Structure and Interactions in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slimmer, Scott; Angelini, Thomas; Liang, Hongjun; Butler, John; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2002-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid consisting of a number of components, including mucin (a glycoprotein), lysozyme (a cationic polypeptide), water, salt, as well as a high concentration of a number of anionic biological polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin. The interactions governing these components are poorly understood, but may have important clinical consequences. For example, the formation of these biological polyelectrolytes into ordered gel phases may contribute significantly to the observed high viscosity of CF sputum. In this work, a number of model systems were created to simulate CF sputum in vitro, in order to elucidate the contributions of the different components. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, DOE DEFG02-91ER45439, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  13. Natural Compounds as Therapeutic Agents in the Treatment Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Isha; Shah, Kalpit; Bradbury, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of two drugs to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis has given hope to patients and their families battling this devastating disease. Over many years, with heavy financial investment from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, pre-clinical evaluation of thousands of synthetic drugs resulted in the production of Kalydeco and Orkambi. Yet, despite the success of this endeavor, many other compounds have been proposed as therapeutic agents in the treatment of CF. Of note, several of these compounds are naturally occurring, and are present in spices from the grocery store and over the counter preparations in health food stores. In this short review, we look at three such compounds, genistein, curcumin, and resveratrol, and evaluate the scientific support for their use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of patients with CF. PMID:27081574

  14. Pandoraea pulmonicola chronic colonization in a cystic fibrosis patient, France

    PubMed Central

    Kokcha, S; Bittar, F; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Mely, L; Gomez, C; Gaubert, J-Y; Thomas, P; Rolain, J-M

    2013-01-01

    Pandoraea are considered emerging multidrug resistant pathogens in the context of cystic fibrosis. We report herein for the first time the case of a 30-year-old woman with cystic fibrosis, living in France, who was chronically infected with Pandoraea pulmonicola and who died of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis 3 weeks after bilateral lung transplantation. PMID:25356323

  15. The Spectrum of Nocardia Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mei-Zahav, Meir; Livnat, Galit; Bentur, Lea; Mussaffi, Huda; Prais, Dario; Stafler, Patrick; Bar-On, Ophir; Steuer, Guy; Blau, Hannah

    2015-08-01

    We reviewed all cases of Nocardia infection in cystic fibrosis patients at 2 centers. Eight of 200 patients had Nocardia in sputum. Four developed severe lung disease, including 3 with associated allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis; 4 remained clinically stable. Nocardia is often associated with significant lung disease in cystic fibrosis, possibly associated with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or steroids. PMID:25973994

  16. First isolations of Segniliparus rugosus from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Butler, W Ray; Sheils, Catherine A; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Charles, Nadege; Colin, Andrew A; Gant, Mary J; Goodill, John; Hindman, Diane; Toney, Sean R; Wallace, Richard J; Yakrus, Mitchell A

    2007-10-01

    We report three cases of the new genus Segniliparus isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis. All isolates were unambiguously identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Segniliparus rugosus (GenBank accession no. AY 60892). Drug susceptibility results that may enhance treatment for cystic fibrosis patients with this opportunistic pathogen are presented. PMID:17670929

  17. Vaccine strategies against cystic fibrosis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Le Moigne, Vincent; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    A great number of cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Burkholderia cepacia and the Mycobacterium abscessus complex raised difficult therapeutic problems due to their intrinsic multi-resistance to numerous antibiotics. Vaccine strategies represent one of the key weapons against these multi-resistant bacteria in a number of clinical settings like CF. Different strategies are considered in order to develop such vaccines, linked either to priming the host response, or by exploiting genomic data derived from the bacterium. Interestingly, virulence factors synthesized by various pathogens might serve as targets for vaccine development and have been, for example, evaluated in the context of CF. PMID:26618824

  18. Cystic Fibrosis: Microbiology and Host Response.

    PubMed

    Zemanick, Edith T; Hoffman, Lucas R

    2016-08-01

    The earliest descriptions of lung disease in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) showed the involvement of 3 interacting pathophysiologic elements in CF airways: mucus obstruction, inflammation, and infection. Over the past 7 decades, our understanding of CF respiratory microbiology and inflammation has evolved with the introduction of new treatments, increased longevity, and increasingly sophisticated laboratory techniques. This article reviews the current understanding of infection and inflammation and their roles in CF lung disease. It also discusses how this constantly evolving information is used to inform current therapeutic strategies, measures and predictors of disease severity, and research priorities. PMID:27469179

  19. Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis and Newborn Screening.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sontag, Marci K; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) has evolved over the past decade as newborn screening has become universal in the United States and elsewhere. The heterogeneity of phenotypes associated with CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and mutations in the CFTR gene has become clearer, ranging from classic pancreatic-insufficient CF to manifestations in only 1 organ system to indeterminate diagnoses identified by newborn screening. The tools available for diagnosis have also expanded. This article reviews the newest diagnostic criteria for CF, newborn screening, prenatal screening and diagnosis, and indeterminate diagnoses in newborn-screened infants and symptomatic adults. PMID:27469178

  20. Nutrition and Growth in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lusman, Sarah; Sullivan, Jillian

    2016-08-01

    Close attention to nutrition and growth is essential in caring for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Growth and nutritional status should be monitored as part of routine CF care. Children with CF should achieve growth and nutritional status comparable with that of well-nourished children without CF. Children with CF are at risk for nutritional deficiencies. Optimal nutritional and growth status may be difficult to attain in this population given risk of insufficient caloric intake and likelihood of increased caloric expenditure. Various methods to attain optimal nutritional status may be used, including oral supplementation, behavioral treatment, pharmacotherapy, and enteral nutrition. PMID:27469181

  1. Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Thaker, Vidhu; Chang, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder which can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. Malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may occur and can cause subclinical deficiencies of some of these vitamins. Vitamin K is known to play an important role in both blood coagulation and bone formation. Supplementation with vitamin K appears to be one way of addressing the deficiency, but there is very limited agreement on the appropriate dose and frequency of use of these supplements. Objectives To assess the effects of vitamin K supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis and to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of vitamin K for both routine and therapeutic use. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group’s Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Most recent search: 08 October 2014. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of vitamin K used as a supplement compared to either no supplementation (or placebo) at any dose or route and for any duration, in children or adults diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Main results Two trials (total of 32 participants) each lasting one month were included in the review and were assessed as having a moderate risk of bias. One was a dose-ranging parallel group trial in children (aged 8 to 18 years); and the other (with an older cohort) had a crossover design comparing supplements to no treatment, but no separate data were reported for the first intervention period. Neither of the trials addressed any of the primary outcomes (coagulation, bone formation and quality of life). Both trials reported the restoration

  2. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martiniano, Stacey L; Nick, Jerry A; Daley, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are important emerging cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens, with estimates of prevalence ranging from 6% to 13%. Diagnosis of NTM disease in patients with CF is challenging, as the infection may remain indolent in some, without evidence of clinical consequence, whereas other patients suffer significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment requires prolonged periods of multiple drugs and varies depending on NTM species, resistance pattern, and extent of disease. The development of a disease-specific approach to the diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in CF patients is a research priority, as a lifelong strategy is needed for this high-risk population. PMID:26857770

  3. Targeting the Root Cause of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Trescott, Laura; Holcomb, Joshua; Spellmon, Nicholas; Mcleod, Cathy; Aljehane, Leala; Sun, Fei; Li, Chunying; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a serious genetic condition caused by CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation. CF patients have shortened lifespan due to airway obstruction, infection, and end-stage lung failure. However, recent development in CF therapy suggests a brighter future for CF patients. Targeting specific CFTR mutations aims to potentiate the channel gating activity of impaired CFTR and restore protein trafficking to the plasma membrane. Gene therapy introduces correct CFTR gene into the affected airway epithelium leading to the functional expression of CFTR in CF patients. This review will sum up the current status in CF-cause targeting therapy. PMID:25316272

  4. The Changing Microbial Epidemiology in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    LiPuma, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Infection of the airways remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). This review describes salient features of the epidemiologies of microbial species that are involved in respiratory tract infection in CF. The apparently expanding spectrum of species causing infection in CF and recent changes in the incidences and prevalences of infection due to specific bacterial, fungal, and viral species are described. The challenges inherent in tracking and interpreting rates of infection in this patient population are discussed. PMID:20375354

  5. Optimising inhaled mannitol for cystic fibrosis in an adult population

    PubMed Central

    Flume, Patrick A.; Aitken, Moira L.; Agent, Penny; Charlton, Brett; Forster, Emma; Fox, Howard G.; Hebestreit, Helge; Kolbe, John; Zuckerman, Jonathan B; Button, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has been remarkable progress in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients over the past 20 years. However, limitations of standard therapies have highlighted the need for a convenient alternative treatment to effectively target the pathophysiologic basis of CF-related disease by improving mucociliary clearance of airway secretions and consequently improve lung function and reduce respiratory exacerbations. Mannitol is an osmotic agent available as a dry powder, dispensed in a convenient disposable inhaler device for the treatment of adult patients with CF. Inhalation of mannitol as a dry powder is thought to change the viscoelastic properties of airway secretions, increase the hydration of the airway surface liquid and contribute to increased mucociliary and cough clearance of retained secretions. In two large phase 3 studies [1, 2], long-term use of inhaled mannitol resulted in a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in lung function relative to control in adult CF subjects and had an acceptable safety profile. Clinical experience with inhaled mannitol confirms that it is safe and effective. A minority of patients are unable to tolerate the medication. However, through training in proper inhaler technique and setting clear expectations regarding therapeutic effects, both the tolerance and adherence necessary for long term efficacy can be positively influenced. Educational aims To discuss the importance of airway clearance treatments in the management of cystic fibrosis. To describe the clinical data that supports the use of mannitol in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. To highlight the role of mannitol tolerance testing in screening for hyperresponsiveness. To provide practical considerations for patient education in use of mannitol inhaler. Key points Inhaled mannitol is a safe and effective option in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. Mannitol tolerance testing effectively screens for hyperresponsiveness prior to initiation

  6. Cystic fibrosis: need for mass deployable screening methods.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Aditya Singh; Agarwal, Anirudh; Singh, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette superfamily of proteins and it functions as a chloride channel. CFTR largely controls the working of epithelial cells of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, exocrine glands, and genitourinary system. Cystic fibrosis is responsible for severe chronic pulmonary disorders in children. Other maladies in the spectrum of this life-limiting disorder include nasal polyposis, pansinusitis, rectal prolapse, pancreatitis, cholelithiasis, insulin-dependent hyperglycemia, and cirrhosis. This review summarizes the recent state of art in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnostic methods with the help of CF literature published so far and proposes new research domains in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnosis. PMID:24880895

  7. Improving care at cystic fibrosis centers through quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Kraynack, Nathan C; McBride, John T

    2009-10-01

    Quality improvement (QI) using a clinical microsystems approach provides cystic fibrosis (CF) centers the opportunity to make a significant positive impact on the health of their patients. The availability of center-specific outcomes data and the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation are important advantages for these quality improvement efforts. This article illustrates how the clinical microsystems methodology can improve care delivery and outcomes by describing the gradual application of quality improvement principles over the past 5 years by the CF team at the Lewis Walker Cystic Fibrosis Center at Akron Children's Hospital in Akron, Ohio. Using the example of a project to improve the pulmonary function of the pediatric patients at our center as a framework, we describe the QI process from the initial team-building phase, through the assessment of care processes, standardization of care, and developing a culture of continuous improvement. We outline how enthusiastic commitment from physician leadership, clinical managers and central administration, the availability of coaches, and an appreciation of the importance of measurement, patient involvement, communication, and standardization are critical components for successful process improvement. PMID:19760542

  8. [Pancreatic cystic fibrosis in Mexicans over 15 years of age].

    PubMed

    Quezada, R; Hernandez, N; Sada, E

    1990-01-01

    A better knowledge of cystic fibrosis of the pancreas has contributed to raise the detection of cystic fibrosis in adults. We describe nine Mexican patients older than 15 years with cystic fibrosis. Respiratory symptoms were predominant and they were secondary to bronchiectasis. All patients were infected by mucoid Pseudomona aeruginosa and in some cases, the finding of this microorganism in sputum suggested the diagnosis. In Mexican population the cystyc fibrosis of the pancreas can be found in adult patients, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic respiratory diseases in adults. PMID:2125356

  9. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... techniques Breathing strategies Psychological counseling and/or group support PR has many benefits. It can improve your ability to function and your quality of life. The program also may help relieve your breathing ...

  10. Moving cystic fibrosis care from rescue to prevention by embedding adherence measurement in routine care.

    PubMed

    Wildman, Martin J; Hoo, Zhe Hui

    2014-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis [CF] is a chronic disease in which preventative treatment with nebulised antibiotics can reduce pulmonary exacerbations that otherwise require rescue therapy. However, adherence is low. Making adherence to maintenance treatment visible is a crucial step towards improving adherence. In this article, we discuss how adherence data can be used to support Quality Improvement in CF through behaviour change in both people with cystic fibrosis and their clinical teams. PMID:24835307

  11. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required. PMID:24095197

  12. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  13. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype. PMID:26115565

  14. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; O'Ryan, Liam P.; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Riordan, John R.; Ford, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located). PMID:21931164

  15. Lung Infections Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lyczak, Jeffrey B.; Cannon, Carolyn L.; Pier, Gerald B.

    2002-01-01

    While originally characterized as a collection of related syndromes, cystic fibrosis (CF) is now recognized as a single disease whose diverse symptoms stem from the wide tissue distribution of the gene product that is defective in CF, the ion channel and regulator, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Defective CFTR protein impacts the function of the pancreas and alters the consistency of mucosal secretions. The latter of these effects probably plays an important role in the defective resistance of CF patients to many pathogens. As the modalities of CF research have changed over the decades from empirical histological studies to include biophysical measurements of CFTR function, the clinical management of this disease has similarly evolved to effectively address the ever-changing spectrum of CF-related infectious diseases. These factors have led to the successful management of many CF-related infections with the notable exception of chronic lung infection with the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The virulence of P. aeruginosa stems from multiple bacterial attributes, including antibiotic resistance, the ability to utilize quorum-sensing signals to form biofilms, the destructive potential of a multitude of its microbial toxins, and the ability to acquire a mucoid phenotype, which renders this microbe resistant to both the innate and acquired immunologic defenses of the host. PMID:11932230

  16. Development of cystic fibrosis and noncystic fibrosis airway cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zabner, Joseph; Karp, Phil; Seiler, Michael; Phillips, Stacia L; Mitchell, Calista J; Saavedra, Mimi; Welsh, Michael; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we utilized the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, hTERT, and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 and E7 genes to transform normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human airway epithelial (HAE) cells. One cell line, designated NuLi-1 (normal lung, University of Iowa), was derived from HAE of normal genotype; three cell lines, designated CuFi (cystic fibrosis, University of Iowa)-1, CuFi-3, and CuFi-4, were derived from HAE of various CF genotypes. When grown at the air-liquid interface, the cell lines were capable of forming polarized differentiated epithelia that exhibited transepithelial resistance and maintained the ion channel physiology expected for the genotypes. The CF transmembrane conductance regulator defect in the CuFi cell lines could be corrected by infecting from the basolateral surface using adenoviral vectors. Using nuclear factor-kappaB promoter reporter constructs, we also demonstrated that the NuLi and CuFi cell lines retained nuclear factor-kappaB responses to lipopolysaccharide. These cell lines should therefore be useful as models for studying ion physiology, therapeutic intervention for CF, and innate immunity. PMID:12676769

  17. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator. Implications in Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Cantin, André M

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have traditionally been viewed as two distinct entities of unrelated origins. However, molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have revealed that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein dysfunction is common to both conditions, one (CF) being defined genetically and the other (COPD) as an acquired CFTR deficiency. Multiple molecular mechanisms of cigarette smoke-induced CFTR dysfunction have been reported. More importantly, considerable evidence of cigarette smoke-induced CFTR dysfunction in several respiratory and nonrespiratory tissues have been confirmed, making CFTR a target that cannot be overlooked in our quest to understand COPD and improve therapies for individuals affected by this disease. This review summarizes the molecular, cellular, and clinical evidence that CFTR dysfunction is induced by cigarette smoke exposure both in vitro and in vivo, and explores how this may contribute to the development of COPD. PMID:27115950

  18. Air Trapping and Airflow Obstruction in Newborn Cystic Fibrosis Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Bauer, Christian; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Gross, Thomas J.; Awadalla, Maged S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Diwakar, Amit; Ochs, Matthias; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Beichel, Reinhard R.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Air trapping and airflow obstruction are being increasingly identified in infants with cystic fibrosis. These findings are commonly attributed to airway infection, inflammation, and mucus buildup. Objectives: To learn if air trapping and airflow obstruction are present before the onset of airway infection and inflammation in cystic fibrosis. Methods: On the day they are born, piglets with cystic fibrosis lack airway infection and inflammation. Therefore, we used newborn wild-type piglets and piglets with cystic fibrosis to assess air trapping, airway size, and lung volume with inspiratory and expiratory X-ray computed tomography scans. Micro–computed tomography scanning was used to assess more distal airway sizes. Airway resistance was determined with a mechanical ventilator. Mean linear intercept and alveolar surface area were determined using stereologic methods. Measurements and Main Results: On the day they were born, piglets with cystic fibrosis exhibited air trapping more frequently than wild-type piglets (75% vs. 12.5%, respectively). Moreover, newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis had increased airway resistance that was accompanied by luminal size reduction in the trachea, mainstem bronchi, and proximal airways. In contrast, mean linear intercept length, alveolar surface area, and lung volume were similar between both genotypes. Conclusions: The presence of air trapping, airflow obstruction, and airway size reduction in newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis before the onset of airway infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation indicates that cystic fibrosis impacts airway development. Our findings suggest that early airflow obstruction and air trapping in infants with cystic fibrosis might, in part, be caused by congenital airway abnormalities. PMID:24168209

  19. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein repair as a therapeutic strategy in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, Peter A.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent progress in understanding the production, processing, and function of the cystic fibrosis gene product, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), has revealed new therapeutic targets to repair the mutant protein. Classification of CFTR mutations and new treatment strategies to address each will be described here. Recent findings High-throughput screening and other drug discovery efforts have identified small molecules that restore activity to mutant CFTR. Compounds such as VX-770 that potentiate CFTR have demonstrated exciting results in recent clinical trials and demonstrate robust effects across several CFTR mutation classes in the laboratory. A number of novel F508del CFTR processing correctors restore protein to the cell surface and improve ion channel function in vitro and are augmented by coadministration of CFTR potentiators. Ongoing discovery efforts that target protein folding, CFTR trafficking, and cell stress have also indicated promising results. Aminoglycosides and the novel small molecule ataluren induce translational readthrough of nonsense mutations in CFTR and other genetic diseases in vitro and in vivo and have shown activity in proof of concept trials, and ataluren is now being studied in confirmatory trials. Summary An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the basic genetic defect in cystic fibrosis have led to new treatment strategies to repair the mutant protein. PMID:20829696

  20. Informing children of their newborn screening carrier result for sickle cell or cystic fibrosis: qualitative study of parents' intentions, views and support needs.

    PubMed

    Ulph, Fiona; Cullinan, Tim; Qureshi, Nadeem; Kai, Joe

    2014-06-01

    Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease enables the early identification and treatment of affected children, prolonging and enhancing their quality of life. Screening, however, also identifies carriers. There are minimal or no health concerns for carriers. There are, however, potential implications when carriers reach reproductive age, and thus research attention has been given to how best to convey information about these implications in a meaningful, balanced way which does not raise undue anxieties. Most research focuses on the communication from health professional to parent, yet ultimately this information is of greatest significance to the child. This study examines parents' intentions to inform their child of newborn screening carrier results. Semi-structured interviews with 67 family members explored their intentions to inform the child, and related views and support needs. Parents almost unanimously indicated they planned to inform the child themselves. Health professionals were expected, however, to provide guidance on this process either to parents through advice and provision of written materials, or directly to the child. Although parents initially stated that they would convey the result once their child had developed the ability to understand the information, many appeared to focus on discrete life events linked to informed reproductive decision making. The results highlight ways in which health care providers may assist parents, including providing written material suitable for intergenerational communication and ensuring that cascade screening is accessible for those seeking it. Priorities for further research are identified in light of the results. PMID:24306142

  1. Quorum-sensing signals indicate that cystic fibrosis lungs are infected with bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Schaefer, A L; Parsek, M R; Moninger, T O; Welsh, M J; Greenberg, E P

    2000-10-12

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa permanently colonizes cystic fibrosis lungs despite aggressive antibiotic treatment. This suggests that P. aeruginosa might exist as biofilms--structured communities of bacteria encased in a self-produced polymeric matrix--in the cystic fibrosis lung. Consistent with this hypothesis, microscopy of cystic fibrosis sputum shows that P. aeruginosa are in biofilm-like structures. P. aeruginosa uses extracellular quorum-sensing signals (extracellular chemical signals that cue cell-density-dependent gene expression) to coordinate biofilm formation. Here we found that cystic fibrosis sputum produces the two principal P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing signals; however, the relative abundance of these signals was opposite to that of the standard P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 in laboratory broth culture. When P. aeruginosa sputum isolates were grown in broth, some showed quorum-sensing signal ratios like those of the laboratory strain. When we grew these isolates and PAO1 in a laboratory biofilm model, the signal ratios were like those in cystic fibrosis sputum. Our data support the hypothesis that P. aeruginosa are in a biofilm in cystic fibrosis sputum. Moreover, quorum-sensing signal profiling of specific P. aeruginosa strains may serve as a biomarker in screens to identify agents that interfere with biofilm development. PMID:11048725

  2. Paediatric nasal polyps in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mohd Slim, Mohd Afiq; Dick, David; Trimble, Keith; McKee, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of nasal polyps. We present the case of a 17-month-old Caucasian patient with CF who presented with hypertelorism causing cycloplegic astigmatism, right-sided mucoid discharge, snoring and noisy breathing. Imaging suggested bilateral mucoceles in the ethmoid sinuses. Intraoperatively, bilateral soft tissue masses were noted, and both posterior choanae were patent. Polypectomy and bilateral mega-antrostomies were performed. Histological examination revealed inflammatory nasal polyposis typical of CF. The role of early functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) in children with CF nasal polyposis remains questionable as the recurrence rate is higher, and no improvement in pulmonary function has been shown. Our case, however, clearly demonstrates the beneficial upper airway symptom relief and normalisation of facial appearance following FESS in a child with this condition. PMID:27329094

  3. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator correctors and potentiators.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven M; Verkman, Alan S

    2013-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Correctors and Potentiators

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  5. Developmental and psychosocial issues in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Michelle M; Johnson, Mark C; Stark, Lori J

    2011-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystemic life-limiting genetic disorder, primarily affecting respiratory functioning. Most patients with CF are diagnosed by 2 years of age, and the current median predicted survival rate is 37.4 years old, with 95% of patients dying from complications related to pulmonary infection. Given the chronic, progressive, and disabling nature of CF, multiple treatments are prescribed, most on a daily basis. Thus, this illness requires children, with the aid of their families, to adopt multiple health-related behaviors in addition to managing more typical developmental demands. The morbidity and mortality factors pose cognitive, emotional, and behavioral challenges for many children with CF and their families. This article applies a developmental perspective to describing the psychosocial factors affecting psychological adjustment and health-related behaviors relevant to infants, preschool and school-age children, and adolescents with CF. Topics particularly pertinent to developmental periods and medical milestones are noted, with clinical implications highlighted. PMID:21855711

  6. Imaging of Cystic Fibrosis and Pediatric Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kevin P; Maher, Michael M; O'Connor, Owen J

    2016-03-01

    1. CT is superior to pulmonary function tests and chest radiography for the assessment and monitoring of cystic fibrosis (CF)-related lung disease and, also, of pediatric bronchiectasis not caused by CF (hereafter referred to as non-CF bronchiectasis). 2. Low-dose CT protocols that impart radiation doses similar to those used in chest radiography are feasible for the surveillance of patients with bronchiectasis. 3. Chest radiography is still most commonly used as the first-line imaging examination of choice for the assessment of acute complications related to bronchiectasis. 4. Pulmonary MRI, with or without the use of inhaled hyperpolarized gas, can be performed to obtain functional information, and, in dedicated centers, it may yield imaging results comparable to those obtained by CT. 5. Gastrointestinal and pancreaticobiliary manifestations of CF are observed with greater frequency in adults, because of increased life expectancy. PMID:26901001

  7. Scoliosis in cystic fibrosis - an appraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Spasovsky-Chernick, M.

    1982-03-01

    An unusually high prevalence (10%) of scoliosis is described in a series of 151 patients aged four years and older with cystic fibrosis. The scolioses were of the late onset (juvenile and adolescent) type, being typically thoracic with the curve convex to the right, although there was no significant preference for either sex. No direct relationship was found between the spinal curvature and the severity or distribution of the lung disease, although the worse scolioses tended to occur in patients with relatively severe pulmonary involvement. There was no evidence of metabolic bone disease as a predisposing cause. Some indication of a familial tendency towards scoliosis was apparent, and a genetic or constitutional basis is postulated with an unknown precipitating factor.

  8. Clinical monitoring of steatorrhoea in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M P; Kelleher, J; Gilbert, J; Littlewood, J M

    1990-01-01

    In 100 patients with cystic fibrosis the severity of steatorrhoea was assessed by three separate methods. Using chemical faecal fat assay as the gold standard, two other rapid and inexpensive methods were compared with it. The steatocrit method proved unreliable in our hands and gave little indication of the presence or severity of steatorrhoea. The more simple microscopy method was highly sensitive (97%) and only three of 80 patients with steatorrhoea were missed. All patients with severe steatorrhoea (greater than 60 mmol fat/day) were clearly demonstrated. The method is applicable to spot faecal samples and can readily be carried out on an outpatient basis. In centres where faecal fat assays are not available, the simple and cheap microscopic examination will give some indication of the response to enzyme treatment and may also help to identify non-compliant individuals. PMID:2301990

  9. Airway inflammatory markers in individuals with cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Bergin, David A; Hurley, Killian; Mehta, Adwait; Cox, Stephen; Ryan, Dorothy; O’Neill, Shane J; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2013-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is an airway disease characterized by thickening of the bronchial wall, chronic inflammation , and destruction of affected bronchi. Underlying etiologies include severe pulmonary infection and cystic fibrosis (CF); however, in a substantial number of patients with non-CF-related bronchiectasis (NCFB), no cause is found. The increasing armamentarium of therapies now available to combat disease in CF is in stark contrast to the limited tools employed in NCFB. Our study aimed to evaluate similarities and differences in airway inflammatory markers in patients with NCFB and CF, and to suggest potential common treatment options. The results of this study show that NCFB bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples possessed significantly increased NE activity and elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01); however, the levels detected were lower than in CF (P < 0.01). Interleukin-8 (IL-8) concentrations were significantly elevated in NCFB and CF compared to controls (P < 0.05), but in contrast, negligible levels of IL-18 were detected in both NCFB and CF. Analogous concentrations of IL-10 and IL-4 measured in NCFB and CF were statistically elevated above the healthy control values (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). These results indicate high levels of important proinflammatory markers in both NCFB and CF and support the use of appropriate anti-inflammatory therapies already employed in the treatment of CF bronchiectasis in NCFB. PMID:23426081

  10. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and ... mucus that contains blood and bacteria. Respiratory System Signs and Symptoms People who have CF have thick, ...

  11. Ciprofloxacin-induced phototoxicity in an adult cystic fibrosis population.

    PubMed

    Tolland, Julia P; Murphy, Bryan P; Boyle, Julie; Hall, Valerie; McKenna, Kevin E; Elborn, J Stuart

    2012-10-01

    The incidence of phototoxicity as a side effect of ciprofloxacin appears to be increased in patients with cystic fibrosis compared to the general population (approximately 2.4%). We used an interview-based questionnaire to determine the incidence of such phototoxic skin reactions in cystic fibrosis patients. Results from 105 respondents revealed the incidence of ciprofloxacin-induced phototoxicity in the adult cystic fibrosis population in Northern Ireland to be 48.4% with only 66% of the patients recalling being given sun care information beforehand. We concluded that the incidence of phototoxicity is increased in patients with cystic fibrosis and that it is important for all to receive good sun care information prior to taking ciprofloxacin given the high risk of developing phototoxic rash. PMID:22971191

  12. Cystic fibrosis in adults. From researcher to practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Marelich, G P; Cross, C E

    1996-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation currently tracks about 20,000 Americans with cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive genetic disease that leads to multisystem complications. With the institution of better therapeutic regimens over the past 2 decades, more patients with this disease are surviving to adulthood. Within the past decade, both clinical and basic science research in the field of cystic fibrosis has progressed at a rapid rate. The intent of this review is to introduce readers to the molecular, cellular, and systemic disorders of this disease. We discuss treatment strategies involving antibiotics, nutrition, immune-response mediators, chest physiotherapy, and sputum-active agents with respect to the airway dysfunction of cystic fibrosis. Other common complications, recent developments, transplantation, and gene therapy are also reviewed. PMID:8732732

  13. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Martini, S V; Rocco, P R M; Morales, M M

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR) to the affected organ (lung). Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy. PMID:21952739

  14. AEROSOL DEPOSITION AS A FUNCTION OF AIRWAY DISEASE: CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Progressive lung disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a continuous interaction of the processes of airway obstruction, infection and inflammation. ecent literature has suggested that the manifestation of CF could compromise the successful administration of pharmacologi...

  15. Cystic fibrosis--what are the prospects for a cure?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shankar; Tana, Anand; Shankar, Anu

    2014-11-01

    Significant improvements in the treatment of cystic fibrosis over the last few decades have altered this lethal disease in children to a multisystem disorder with survival into adult life now common. In most developed countries the numbers of adult cystic fibrosis patients outnumber children. This is mainly due to improvements in care during early life. The principal cause of morbidity and mortality is pulmonary disease, and so the focus of new treatments has targeted the lungs. Identification of the underlying gene defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator has ushered in a new era in cystic fibrosis research, with prospects of a cure. In this article, we review the most exciting recent advances that correct defects in cellular processing, chloride channel function and gene therapy. PMID:25447947

  16. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a distinct condition.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; González Albarrán, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, affecting approximately one out of every 2,000 births. Survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has significantly improved due to advances in respiratory and nutritional care, and their current average life expectancy is 30-40 years. Development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a comorbidity that increases with age and may reach a prevalence up to 50% in adults. Its development is associated to impaired lung function and nutritional status, and early diagnosis and treatment are therefore essential to improve quality of life and performance status. Insulin therapy for diabetes and other early carbohydrate metabolism disorders may improve lung function and nutritional status of patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:25151429

  17. Hydrator Therapies for Chronic Bronchitis. Lessons from Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William D; Henderson, Ashley G; Donaldson, Scott H

    2016-04-01

    Patients with the chronic bronchitis form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis share similar clinical features, including mucus obstruction of airways and the development of chronic/recurrent airways infections that often manifest as disease exacerbations. There is growing evidence that these diseases may have parallels in disease pathogenesis as well, including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction, mucus dehydration, and defective mucociliary clearance. As progress is made in the development of therapies that target the basic defects that lead to cystic fibrosis lung disease, it is possible that similar approaches could also benefit patients with chronic bronchitis. A deeper understanding of how tobacco smoke and other triggers of chronic bronchitis actually lead to disease, and exploration of the concept that therapies that restore cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function, mucus hydration, and/or mucociliary clearance may benefit patients with chronic bronchitis, hold the prospect of significant progress in treating this prevalent disease. PMID:27115955

  18. [Isolation of Geosmithia argillacea in a cystic fibrosis patient].

    PubMed

    Labbé, F; Babchia, S; Evreux, F; Chenal, P

    2013-09-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old child with cystic fibrosis where Geosmithia argillacea has been isolated from sputum. This is a filamentous fungus (mold) recently described as emergent infectious agent in cystic fibrosis patients. In our case, the presence of G. argillacea was not associated with clinical disorder. However, recent evidence shows that it can be responsible for very serious invasive infection, especially in chronic granulomatous disease and may be, after lung transplantation. PMID:23856446

  19. Increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Christensson, B A; Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ljungberg, B; Lindblad, A; Malmborg, A S; Hjelte, L; Strandvik, B

    1992-01-01

    The altered pharmacokinetic properties of, e.g., aminoglycosides in cystic fibrosis patients have to be considered when pulmonary exacerbations are treated. Since reported data on ciprofloxacin, a fluorinated quinolone, are conflicting, we compared intravenous and oral administration in cystic fibrosis patients when treating them for mild symptoms of pulmonary infection. All of the patients were colonized with Pseudomonas species. Ciprofloxacin was administered orally (15 mg/kg of body weight) or intravenously (6 mg/kg) twice a day for at least 10 days during separate treatment periods. Five healthy volunteers received single intravenous and oral doses. Pharmacokinetic evaluations were performed at first dose and at steady state. The results showed that cystic fibrosis patients have increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin (80% in cystic fibrosis patients versus 57% in volunteers) and increased total clearance (688 ml/min in CF patients versus 528 ml/min in volunteers). Our data indicate that the pharmacokinetic properties of ciprofloxacin are altered in cystic fibrosis patients with mild symptoms of pulmonary exacerbations and that the changes most probably are due to cystic fibrosis per se or to the impact of chronic infection. PMID:1489195

  20. Management of the Upper Airway in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Elisa A.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Upper airway disease engenders significant morbidity for patients with cystic fibrosis and is increasingly recognized as having a much greater role in pulmonary outcomes and quality of life than originally believed. Widespread disparate therapeutic strategies for cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis underscore the absence of a standardized treatment paradigm. This review outlines the most recent evidence-based trends in the management of upper airway disease in cystic fibrosis. Recent Findings The unified airway theory proposes that the sinuses are a focus of initial bacterial colonization which seeds the lower airway and may play a large role in maintaining lung infections. Mounting evidence suggests more aggressive treatment of the sinuses may confer significant improvement in pulmonary disease and quality of life outcomes in cystic fibrosis patients. However, there is a lack of high-level evidence regarding medical and surgical management of cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis that makes generalizations difficult. Summary Well designed clinical trials with long-term follow-up concerning medical and surgical interventions for cystic fibrosis sinus disease are required to establish standardized treatment protocols, but increased interest in the sinuses as a bacterial reservoir for pulmonary infections has generated considerable attention. PMID:25250804

  1. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26678435

  2. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator corrects defective chloride channel regulation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Devra P.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Gregory, Richard J.; Cheng, Seng H.; Paul, Sucharita; Jefferson, Douglas M.; McCann, John D.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Smith, Alan E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was expressed in cultured cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells and Cl- channel activation assessed in single cells using a fluorescence microscopic assay and the patch-clamp technique. Expression of CFTR, but not of a mutant form of CFTR (ΔF508), corrected the Cl- channel defect. Correction of the phenotypic defect demonstrates a causal relationship between mutations in the CFTR gene and defective Cl- transport which is the hallmark of the disease.

  3. Facilitating Positive Psychosocial Adaptation in Children with Cystic Fibrosis by Increasing Family Communication and Problem-Solving Skills. A Research Report to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stabler, Brian; And Others

    This study tested the effects of two group-oriented supportive and educational approaches on the parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Thirteen families were randomly assigned either to a group which received information on medical and technical aspects of CF or to a group which received instruction in communication skills in addition to…

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Heterozygote Resistance to Cholera Toxin in the Cystic Fibrosis Mouse Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Sherif E.; Brigman, Kristen N.; Koller, Beverly H.; Boucher, Richard C.; Stutts, M. Jackson

    1994-10-01

    The effect of the number of cystic fibrosis (CF) alleles on cholera toxin (CT)-induced intestinal secretion was examined in the CF mouse model. CF mice that expressed no CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein did not secrete fluid in response to CT. Heterozygotes expressed 50 percent of the normal amount of CFTR protein in the intestinal epithelium and secreted 50 percent of the normal fluid and chloride ion in response to CT. This correlation between CFTR protein and CT-induced chloride ion and fluid secretion suggests that CF heterozygotes might possess a selective advantage of resistance to cholera.

  5. Liver and lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis: an adult cystic fibrosis centre's experience.

    PubMed

    Sivam, S; Al-Hindawi, Y; Di Michiel, J; Moriarty, C; Spratt, P; Jansz, P; Malouf, M; Plit, M; Pleass, H; Havryk, A; Bowen, D; Haber, P; Glanville, A R; Bye, P T P

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease develops in one-third of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). It is rare for liver disease to have its onset after 20 years of age. Lung disease, however, is usually more severe in adulthood. A retrospective analysis was performed on nine patients. Three patients required lung transplantation approximately a decade after liver transplant, and another underwent combined liver and lung transplants. Four additional patients with liver transplants are awaiting assessment for lung transplants. One patient is awaiting combined liver and lung transplants. With increased survival in CF, several patients may require more than single organ transplantation. PMID:27405894

  6. Fully automated scoring of chest radiographs in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Zhao; Cai, Weidong; Song, Yang; Selvadurai, Hiran; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-01-01

    We present a prototype of a fully automated scoring system for chest radiographs (CXRs) in cystic fibrosis. The system was used to analyze real, clinical CXR data, to estimate the Shwachman-Kulczycki score for the image. Images were resampled and normalized to a standard size and intensity level, then segmented with a patch-based nearest-neighbor mapping algorithm. Texture features were calculated regionally and globally, using Tamura features, local binary patterns (LBP), gray-level co-occurrence matrix and Gabor filtering. Feature selection was guided by current understanding of the disease process, in particular the reorganization and thickening of airways. Combinations of these features were used as inputs for support vector machine (SVM) learning to classify each CXR, and evaluated using two-fold cross-validation for agreement with clinician scoring. The final computed score for each image was compared with the score assigned by a physician. Using this prototype system, we analyzed 139 CXRs from an Australian pediatric cystic fibrosis registry, for which texture directionality showed greatest discriminating power. Computed scores agreed with clinician scores in 75% of cases, and up to 90% of cases in discriminating severe disease from mild disease, similar to the level of human interobserver agreement for this dataset. PMID:24110600

  7. Cystic fibrosis and estrogens: a perfect storm

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    Irreversible destruction and widening of the airways due to acquired infections or genetic mutations as well as those of unknown cause are more severe in females. Differences between male and female anatomy, behavior, and hormonal state have been proposed to explain the increased incidence and severity in females with airway disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF); however, a mechanism to explain a sex-related difference has remained elusive. In this issue of the JCI, Coakley et al. report that elevations in the major estrogen hormone in humans — 17β-estradiol — reduce Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion by airway epithelial cells in culture, thereby disrupting ion and water balance (see the related article beginning on page 4025). They measure a similar diminution of nasal epithelial Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion in women with CF during the menstrual cycle phase at which 17β-estradiol level is at its highest. These data suggest that for about one week of a four-week menstrual cycle, women with CF will have a reduced ability to efficiently clear airway secretions, the buildup of which is a hallmark of CF. The authors suggest that these data warrant the testing of antiestrogen therapy in females with CF and propose an alternative avenue for CF therapeutic development. PMID:19033654

  8. Cephalexin pharmacokinetics in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nahata, M C; Lubin, A H; Visconti, J A

    1984-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of cephalexin were studied in 7 pediatric and 4 adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 4 normal adult volunteers. Cephalexin, 250-500 mg, was given as a single dose in suspension. The area under the cephalexin serum concentration-time curve normalized for dose per kilogram averaged 0.185, 0.242, and 0.272 ml/min/kg-1 in pediatric CF patients, adult CF patients, and normal adults, respectively (p greater than 0.05). A threefold interindividual variation was observed in cephalexin renal clearance in CF patients. Renal clearance of cephalexin averaged 5.85 ml/min/kg in pediatric and 4.61 ml/min/kg in adult CF patients (p greater than 0.05). Elimination half-life of cephalexin averaged 0.74, 0.76, and 1.04 h in pediatric patients, adult patients, and normal adults (p greater than 0.05). Cephalexin was well absorbed based on a mean 24-hour urinary recovery of 89 and 93% in pediatric and adult patients. A trend for higher renal clearance of cephalexin was observed among pediatric compared to adult patients. These results indicate that clearance of cephalexin may not increase in patients with CF of minimal severity characterized by an excellent Shwachman score. PMID:6468223

  9. Lessons learned from the cystic fibrosis pig.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K

    2016-07-01

    Deficient function in the anion channel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator is the fundamental cause for CF. This is a monogenic condition that causes lesions in several organs including the respiratory tract, pancreas, liver, intestines, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is most notable, given it is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with CF. Shortly after the identification of CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CF mouse models were developed that did not show spontaneous lung disease as seen in humans, and this spurred development of additional CF animal models. Pig models were considered a leading choice for several reasons including their similarity to humans in respiratory anatomy, physiology, and in size for translational imaging. The first CF pig models were reported in 2008 and have been extremely valuable to help clarify persistent questions in the field and advance understanding of disease pathogenesis. Because CF pigs are susceptible to lung disease like humans, they have direct utility in translational research. In addition, CF pig models are useful to compare and contrast with current CF mouse models, human clinical studies, and even newer CF animal models being characterized. This "triangulation" strategy could help identify genetic differences that underlie phenotypic variations, so as to focus and accelerate translational research. PMID:27142487

  10. New antimicrobial strategies in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    van Westreenen, Mireille; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2010-12-01

    With more antibiotic resistance and emerging pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, the need for new strategies in the lifelong treatment of pulmonary infection has increased. Most of the focus is on chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is still thought to be the main pathogen leading to advanced CF lung disease. Other bacterial species are also recognized in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease, even though their definitive role is not well established yet. Clearly, expansion of treatment options is urgently needed. This article focuses on recent developments in the field of new antimicrobial strategies for CF. It is clear that studies on new classes of antibiotics or antimicrobial-like drugs are scarce, and that most studies involve new (inhalation) formulations, new routes of delivery, or analogs of existing classes of antibiotics. Studies of new antibiotic-like drugs are, in most cases, in preclinical phases of development and only a few of these agents may reach the market. Importantly, new inhaled antibiotics, e.g. aztreonam, levofloxacin, and fosfomycin, and new, more efficient delivery systems such as dry powder inhalation and liposomes for current antibiotics are in the clinical phase of development. These developments will be of great importance in improving effective treatment and reducing the treatment burden for CF patients in the near future. PMID:21028914

  11. Cystic fibrosis: newborn screening in America.

    PubMed

    Kleven, Daniel T; McCudden, Christopher R; Willis, Monte S

    2008-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, manifesting as progressive lung dysfunction, pancreatic insufficiency, and intestinal disease. CF was traditionally diagnosed clinically, either because of a family history or occurrence of meconium ileus, or as a result of intestinal malabsorption and chronic pulmonary disease. In 1979, it was discovered that immunoreactive trypsinogen was increased in neonatal dried-blood specimens on Guthrie cards, making it possible to screen neonates. During the past decades, survival rates of patients with CF have improved significantly (see Figure 5). To continue this progress, universal newborn screening has been implemented in many states as an addition to the arsenal of therapies and strategies to improve survival. National newborn-screening programs to identify CF patients after birth have been adopted for a number of years in Europe, Australia, and Canada. As expected, many benefits have been seen due to the early identification of CF patients, including improved survival, better lung function and growth with less intensive therapy, and reduced cost of therapy. To date, 37 states in the United States have adopted similar programs, in the hopes of improving CF outcomes. This welcome trend should help improve the lives of CF patients living in America. PMID:18717498

  12. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  13. Cystic fibrosis on the African continent.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cheryl; Pepper, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF; OMIM 219700) is a life-shortening and costly autosomal recessive disease that has been most extensively studied in individuals of Caucasian descent. There is ample evidence, however, that it also affects other ethnicities. In Africa there have been several reports of CF, but there has been no concerted effort toward establishing the molecular epidemiology of this disease on the continent, which is the first step toward outlining a public health strategy to effectively address the needs of these patients. A literature search revealed reports from only 12 of the 54 African states on the molecular analysis of the mutations present in suspected CF patients, resulting in the identification of 79 mutations. Based on previous functional investigations, 39 of these cause CF, 10 are of varying clinical consequence, 4 have no associated evidence regarding whether they cause CF, 4 are synonymous, 5 are novel, and 21 are unique to Africa. We propose that CF be more thoroughly investigated on the continent to ensure that the public health needs of African CF patients-both those in Africa and those of African descent living elsewhere-are met.Genet Med 18 7, 653-662. PMID:26656651

  14. Patient-reported Outcomes in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Christopher H.; Quittner, Alexandra L.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been tremendous progress in the area of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). A PRO instrument is defined as any measure of a patient's health status that is elicited directly from the patient and assesses how the patient “feels or functions with respect to his or her health condition.” The advances seen in clinical research regarding PROs has been mirrored in research in cystic fibrosis (CF). A large number of instruments have been used for both therapeutic and nontherapeutic clinical research for many chronic conditions. This review will summarize a history of the development of PROs and how PROs are viewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We will then review the current state of the art of patient-reported outcomes in CF, specifically addressing the evaluation of different PRO instruments in terms of their reliability and validity. Finally, we will delineate further areas for development of PROs in CF. We believe that the future of CF research will incorporate a more diverse selection of PRO outcome measures; these outcome measures ultimately may be incorporated into clinical care to standardize symptom assessment and provide information regarding the need for specific clinical interventions to improve the quality of care delivered to these patients. PMID:17652505

  15. The Evolution of Cystic Fibrosis Care.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Jessica E; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting inherited illness of whites. Most of the morbidity and mortality in CF stems from impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic, progressive airways obstruction and damage. Significant progress has been made in the care of patients with CF, with advances focused on improving mucociliary clearance, minimizing inflammatory damage, and managing infections; these advances include new antimicrobial therapies, mucolytic and osmotic agents, and antiinflammatory treatments. More recently, researchers have targeted disease-causing mutations using therapies to promote gene transcription and improve channel function, which has led to impressive physiologic changes in some patients. As we develop more advanced, allele-directed therapies for the management of CF, it will become increasingly important to understand the specific genetic and environmental interactions that cause the significant heterogeneity of lung disease seen in the CF population. This understanding of CF endotypes will allow for more targeted, personalized therapies for future patients. This article reviews the genetic and molecular basis of CF lung disease, the treatments currently available, and novel therapies that are in development. PMID:25764168

  16. New and Emerging Treatments for Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barry, Peter J; Jones, Andrew M

    2015-07-01

    Recently, a significant number of additional key medications have become licensed in Europe for the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), including a number of inhaled antibiotics, such as nebulised aztreonam and dry powder versions of colistin and tobramycin for inhalation; dry powder inhaled mannitol, an agent to improve airway hydration and aid airway clearance; and ivacaftor, an oral therapy that directly acts on dysfunctional CFTR to correct the basic defect encountered in CF patients with the G551D CF gene mutation. The marked success of ivacaftor both in clinical trials and in post-licensing evaluation studies in treating patients with G551D and other gating mutations has greatly encouraged the ongoing development of similar therapies that can directly target the underlying cause of CF. Other therapies, including a number of anti-infectives, anti-inflammatories and replacement pancreatic enzymes, are currently undergoing clinical studies. This article reviews those treatments that have been recently licensed for CF and highlights some of the exciting emerging therapies presently under evaluation in clinical trials. In addition, it discusses some of the potential challenges being encountered by research and clinical teams in developing and delivering treatments for this condition. PMID:26091951

  17. Infection, inflammation and exercise in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Regular exercise is positively associated with health. It has also been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects. In healthy subjects, a single exercise session results in immune cell activation, which is characterized by production of immune modulatory peptides (e.g. IL-6, IL-8), a leukocytosis and enhanced immune cell functions. Upon cessation of exercise, immune activation is followed by a tolerizing phase, characterized by a reduced responsiveness of immune cells. Regular exercise of moderate intensity and duration has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects and is associated with a reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Specific exercise programs may therefore be used to modify the course of chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF suffer from severe and chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation, leading to obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease, exercise intolerance and muscle cachexia. Inflammation is characterized by a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Patients are encouraged to engage in exercise programs to maintain physical fitness, quality of life, pulmonary function and health. In this review, we present an overview of available literature describing the association between regular exercise, inflammation and infection susceptibility and discuss the implications of these observations for prevention and treatment of inflammation and infection susceptibility in patients with CF. PMID:23497303

  18. Guidelines for Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Newborns through Older Adults: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Report

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Philip M.; Rosenstein, Beryl J.; White, Terry B.; Accurso, Frank J.; Castellani, Carlo; Cutting, Garry R.; Durie, Peter R.; Legrys, Vicky A.; Massie, John; Parad, Richard B.; Rock, Michael J.; Campbell, Preston W.

    2009-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasingly being implemented and is soon likely to be in use throughout the United States, because early detection permits access to specialized medical care and improves outcomes. The diagnosis of CF is not always straightforward, however. The sweat chloride test remains the gold standard for CF diagnosis but does not always give a clear answer. Genotype analysis also does not always provide clarity; more than 1500 mutations have been identified in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, not all of which result in CF. Harmful mutations in the gene can present as a spectrum of pathology ranging from sinusitis in adulthood to severe lung, pancreatic, or liver disease in infancy. Thus, CF identified postnatally must remain a clinical diagnosis. To provide guidance for the diagnosis of both infants with positive NBS results and older patients presenting with an indistinct clinical picture, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened a meeting of experts in the field of CF diagnosis. Their recommendations, presented herein, involve a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory testing, and genetics to confirm a diagnosis of CF. PMID:18639722

  19. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Derichs, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine. PMID:23457166

  20. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad A.; Everest, Francesca L. C.; Cowley, Lauren A.; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S.; Bridge, Simon H.; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D.; Bourke, Stephen J.; Cummings, Stephen P.; Lanyon, Clare V.; Barr, Jeremy J.; Smith, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  1. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohammad A; Everest, Francesca L C; Cowley, Lauren A; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S; Bridge, Simon H; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D; Bourke, Stephen J; Cummings, Stephen P; Lanyon, Clare V; Barr, Jeremy J; Smith, Darren L

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  2. Parent routines for managing cystic fibrosis in children.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Filigno, Stephanie Spear; Bishop, Meredith

    2014-06-01

    Management of cystic fibrosis (CF) is burdensome and adherence is often suboptimal. Family routines are associated with adherence and health outcomes in other disease populations. Few studies have examined routines in CF. The study's aim was to describe parent experiences developing and utilizing CF care routines. Semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of 25 parents of children under 13 years of age with CF were analyzed using phenomenological analysis. Three domains emerged: parent experiences developing a routine, support systems facilitating maintenance of routines, and challenges with maintaining care routines. Parents found routines difficult to establish, used trial and error, encountered barriers, and found support helpful to manage care demands. Some parents chose to deviate from their routine. Providing anticipatory guidance to promote the use of care routines and strategies to manage potential challenges may facilitate use of routines and improve CF management. PMID:24838648

  3. Paranasal mucoceles in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Di Cicco, Maurizio; Costantini, Diana; Padoan, Rita; Colombo, Carla

    2005-10-01

    Sinus mucocele is rare in the paediatric age, and so far no prevalence data have been reported in children with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Moreover, safety and efficacy of endoscopic management of sinus mucoceles has been widely proven but only in the adult population. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of this complication and the efficacy of endoscopic sinus surgery in CF patients during the initial years of life. Among the 242 CF patients born in the period between 1990 and 2001 and in regular follow up at our CF Centre, 90 patients with possible symptoms of chronic upper airways disease (CUAD) underwent a comprehensive ENT examination including rhinofibroscopy. In selected cases a CT scan of the paranasal sinuses was also performed. CUAD was diagnosed in 55/90 because of the consistent presence of nasal obstruction, combined with at least two other nasal symptoms such as chronic nasal discharge, snoring, epiphora. Diagnosis of mucoceles (five maxillary bilateral mucoceles, one maxillary unilateral, three maxillary and etmoidal mucoceles) was done by means of CT scan in 9/15 who performed the examination. Median age at the diagnosis was 4+/-0.5 years, ranging from 0.5+/-7 years, showing a prevalence of 16.4% (9/55) among patients with symptoms. Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in all the cases. The follow-up period ranged from 3 months to 6 years with no recurrence observed. Sinus mucocele in CF population is less unusual than expected and a high degree of suspicion is needed. Endoscopic sinus surgery seems to be a safe and efficient treatment of this complication also in a paediatric population at a high risk as for the CF patients. PMID:15939485

  4. Chronic rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis (mucoviscidosis).

    PubMed

    Brihaye, P; Jorissen, M; Clement, P A

    1997-01-01

    The authors present two clinical studies performed in the ENT departments of two Belgian Universities. A total of 248 patients with mucoviscidosis (cystic fibrosis, CF) were assessed by means of nasal endoscopy. One hundred eighteen underwent computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses (CT) and 55 were endoscopically operated. This allowed the observation of different clinical patterns of rhinosinusitis: mucopyosinusitis (pseudomucocele) of the maxillary antrum with bulging of the lateral nasal wall (LNW), nasal polyposis with erosion of the LNW, and chronic purulent rhinosinusitis with an isolated prominent uncinate process. The treatment of those patients could be tailored to the individual clinical pattern. Medical therapy consisted of systemic antibiotics and topical drugs delivered by sprays or by lavages with a nose can. Surgery was mainly aimed at removing the massive polyposis when it interfered with the daily life activities. The use of the endoscope enabled to perform safely more extensive procedures resulting in a lower recurrence rate. In patients with chronic rhinosinusitis without polyposis, yet presenting ostiomeatal obstruction, a limited and more functional endoscopic surgery was indicated in order to restore some drainage and to improve the penetration of topical drugs into the affected sinus. A short addendum presents two studies: one about genetics and the other about prevalence of middle ear disease in CF. The first concluded that no clear correlation was found between DF508 (the most common CF mutation) and nasal polyposis. The second revealed that in contrast with the extremely high prevalence of sinus problems, there was no clear evidence of an increased prevalence of middle ear disease in CF. PMID:9444379

  5. Evidence for a Cystic Fibrosis Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adriaanse, Marlou P. M.; van der Sande, Linda J. T. M.; van den Neucker, Anita M.; Menheere, Paul P. C. A.; Dompeling, Edward; Buurman, Wim A.; Vreugdenhil, Anita C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested the existence of enteropathy in cystic fibrosis (CF), which may contribute to intestinal function impairment, a poor nutritional status and decline in lung function. This study evaluated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF and studied its associations with nutritional status, CF-related morbidities such as impaired lung function and diabetes, and medication use. Methods Sixty-eight CF patients and 107 controls were studied. Levels of serum intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), a specific marker for enterocyte damage, were retrospectively determined. The faecal intestinal inflammation marker calprotectin was prospectively studied. Nutritional status, lung function (FEV1), exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), CF-related diabetes (CFRD) and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) were obtained from the medical charts. Results Serum I-FABP levels were elevated in CF patients as compared with controls (p<0.001), and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in children (r-.734, p<0.05). Faecal calprotectin level was elevated in 93% of CF patients, and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in adults (r-.484, p<0.05). No correlation was found between calprotectin levels in faeces and sputum. Faecal calprotectin level was significantly associated with the presence of CFRD, EPI, and PPI use. Conclusion This study demonstrated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF patients, and provides evidence for an inverse correlation between enteropathy and lung function. The presented associations of enteropathy with important CF-related morbidities further emphasize the clinical relevance. PMID:26484665

  6. Cystic fibrosis: nutritional consequences and management.

    PubMed

    Dodge, John A; Turck, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Life expectancy for patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) has steadily improved during the last three decades, and death in childhood is now uncommon. Nutrition is a critical component of the management of CF, and nutritional status is directly associated with both pulmonary status and survival. Expert dietetic care is necessary, and attention must be given to ensuring an adequate energy intake in the face of demands which may be increased by inadequately controlled malabsorption, chronic broncho-pulmonary colonisation by bacteria and fungi, exacerbations of acute lung infection, impaired lung function, and the need for rehabilitation, repair and growth. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is needed by up to 90% of CF patients in Northern Europe, where the 'severe' mutation deltaF508 predominates, but a smaller proportion in Mediterranean countries and elsewhere, because pancreatic insufficiency is one of few features of CF which correlate with genotype. Complications of CF including liver disease and CF-related diabetes pose further challenges. In addition, deficiency of specific nutrients including fat soluble vitamins (particularly A, E and K) essential fatty acids and occasionally minerals occur for a variety of reasons. Osteopenia is common and poorly understood. Liver disease increases the likelihood of vitamin D deficiency. Glucose intolerance and diabetes affect at least 25% of CF adults, and the diabetes differs from both types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, but it inversely correlates with prognosis. Management consists of anticipating problems and addressing them vigorously as soon as they appear. Supplements of vitamins are routinely given. Energy supplements can be oral, enteral or, rarely, parenteral. All supplements, including PERT, are adjusted to individual needs. PMID:16782527

  7. The diffusing capacity in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, J D; Ruppel, G; Shrestha, Y; Kleinhenz, M E

    2003-06-01

    The value of adjusting the diffusing capacity for the lung volume has been demonstrated in a large number of patients with other lung diseases but has not been validated in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary function test results on a cohort of 52 adult CF patients were analyzed to determine whether the diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide by single breath method (DLCO(SB)) when adjusted for alveolar volume (V(A)%), correlated with the severity of pulmonary dysfunction. The DLCO(SB) remained within the reference range except in those with severe lung impairment (61.88 +/- 15.48%). DLCO(SB) has a significant (P < 0.05) positive correlation (0.70, 0.67, 048, 0.69 and 0.31, respectively) with measures of airflow limitation (FVC%, FEV1%, FEV1/FVC%, MVV%, and sGaw) and negative correlation (-0.36 and -0.21, respectively) with measures of air trapping (RV% and RV/TLC%). DLCO(SB)/V(A) remained above 100% of predicted despite worsening lung disease and did not correlate with other measures of lung function. On the other hand, the DLCO(SB) and DLCO(SB)/V(A), when adjusted for V(A)%, decreased and were significantly correlated with worsening airflow limitation and, to a lesser extent, air trapping. The relatively preserved adjusted DLCO(SB) and DLCO(SB)/V(A) values in CF patients up until late in its course may be explained the predominant airway involvement, minimal loss of alveolar-capillary units, and enhanced V/Q relationship due to claustration in CF. PMID:12814143

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Therapy: A Community Ecology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Matthew; Salamon, Peter; Rainey, Paul B.; Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    Current therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) focuses on minimizing the microbial community and the host’s immune response through the aggressive use of airway clearance techniques, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and treatments that break down the pervasive endobronchial biofilm. Antibiotic selection is typically based on the susceptibility of individual microbial strains to specific antibiotics in vitro. Often this approach cannot accurately predict medical outcomes because of factors both technical and biological. Recent culture-independent assessments of the airway microbial and viral communities demonstrated that the CF airway infection is considerably more complex and dynamic than previously appreciated. Understanding the ecological and evolutionary pressures that shape these communities is critically important for the optimal use of current therapies (in both the choice of therapy and timing of administration) and the development of newer strategies. The climax–attack model (CAM) presented here, grounded in basic ecological principles, postulates the existence of two major functional communities. The attack community consists of transient viral and microbial populations that induce strong innate immune responses. The resultant intense immune response creates microenvironments that facilitate the establishment of a climax community that is slower-growing and inherently resistant to antibiotic therapy. Newer methodologies, including sequence-based metagenomic analysis, can track not only the taxonomic composition but also the metabolic capabilities of these changing viral and microbial communities over time. Collecting this information for CF airways will enable the mathematical modeling of microbial community dynamics during disease progression. The resultant understanding of airway communities and their effects on lung physiology will facilitate the optimization of CF therapies. PMID:23103995

  9. Poetry, Music, Writing and Painting; Developing the artistic talents of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Anthony Kevin; Fitzjohn, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Art is an expressive outlet for the physical limitations and emotional frustrations of living with a life limiting condition such cystic fibrosis. In the Manchester Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre we have facilitated the sharing of the inherent artistic talent of our patients with the support of painters, musicians, potters, creative writers, photographers and textile specialists and our own ward staff in our dedicated 22 bed CF inpatient unit. The programme has provided some splendid works that enliven our ward and, more importantly, continue to inspire our patients as they attempt to overcome the socially limiting consequences of hospital admission. PMID:26527357

  10. Mechanisms of the noxious inflammatory cycle in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rottner, Mathilde; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie; Martínez, M Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Multiple evidences indicate that inflammation is an event occurring prior to infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. The self-perpetuating inflammatory cycle may play a pathogenic part in this disease. The role of the NF-κB pathway in enhanced production of inflammatory mediators is well documented. The pathophysiologic mechanisms through which the intrinsic inflammatory response develops remain unclear. The unfolded mutated protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTRΔF508), accounting for this pathology, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), induces a stress, and modifies calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, CFTR is implicated in the transport of glutathione, the major antioxidant element in cells. CFTR mutations can alter redox homeostasis and induce an oxidative stress. The disturbance of the redox balance may evoke NF-κB activation and, in addition, promote apoptosis. In this review, we examine the hypotheses of the integrated pathogenic processes leading to the intrinsic inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis. PMID:19284656

  11. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  12. Breakthrough therapies: Cystic fibrosis (CF) potentiators and correctors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Marshall, Susan G; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Rowe, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators are also emphasized. PMID:26097168

  13. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto Junior, Walter; Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel de; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  14. Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Collaborative Clinical and School Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawhacker, MaryAnn Tapper; Wellendorf, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments have improved both morbidity and mortality associated with cystic fibrosis, making regular school attendance a reality. School nurses have a unique opportunity to assist students with cystic fibrosis successfully manage their disease. Medical treatment for cystic fibrosis can be complex, leaving…

  15. Novel molecular approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tim W. R.; Matthews, David A.; Blair, G. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of a range of inherited diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. However, efficient delivery and expression of the therapeutic transgene at levels sufficient to result in phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease has proved elusive. There are many reasons for this lack of progress, both macroscopically in terms of airway defence mechanisms and at the molecular level with regard to effective cDNA delivery. This review of approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy covers these areas in detail and highlights recent progress in the field. For gene therapy to be effective in patients with cystic fibrosis, the cDNA encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein must be delivered effectively to the nucleus of the epithelial cells lining the bronchial tree within the lungs. Expression of the transgene must be maintained at adequate levels for the lifetime of the patient, either by repeat dosage of the vector or by targeting airway stem cells. Clinical trials of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis have demonstrated proof of principle, but gene expression has been limited to 30 days at best. Results suggest that viral vectors such as adenovirus and adeno-associated virus are unsuited to repeat dosing, as the immune response reduces the effectiveness of each subsequent dose. Nonviral approaches, such as cationic liposomes, appear more suited to repeat dosing, but have been less effective. Current work regarding non-viral gene delivery is now focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in cell entry, endosomal escape and nuclear import of the transgene. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that additional ligands that facilitate endosomal escape or contain a nuclear localization signal may enhance liposome-mediated gene delivery. Much progress in this area has been informed by advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nuclei of host

  16. Cystic fibrosis in Sudanese children: First report of 35 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Salah A; Fadl Elmola, Munadhil A; Karrar, Zain A; Arabi, Ali M E; Abdullah, Mohamed A; Ali, Sulafa K; Elawad, Fathelrahman; Ali, Tag Elsir A; Abdulrahman, Mashair B; Ahmed, Salma O; Gundi, Abelrazzag S

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common severe genetic disorder among children of European descent. It is much less common in Africans and Asians. It affects most critically the lungs causing chronic lung disease, failure to thrive and social deprivation. This is a retrospective review of 35 Sudanese patients with confirmed cystic fibrosis. About 60% of cases presented before the age of 5 years and male to female ratio was 1.7:1.0. Consanguinity was reported in 25 of the families. The main presenting features were productive cough, wheeze and clubbing. The chest X-ray showed variable degrees of hyperinflation, collapse, cystic, fibrotic changes and bronchiectasis involving both upper and lower lobes with blurring of cardiac border and hilar vasculature in the majority of cases. The sweat chloride was between 70 and 140 mmol/l in 83% of the patients (positive > 60 mmol/l). Three patients underwent DNA study and confirmed to have cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations. Gene study was not available for the rest of the patients. To our knowledge this is the first report of confirmed cases of cystic fibrosis in Sudanese patients. PMID:27493388

  17. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Garry R.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethalautosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the d iscove1y of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  18. Celiac Disease and Cystic Fibrosis: Challenges to Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alessandra Teixeira Pessoa; Figueirêdo, Manuella Machado; Aguiar, Ana Paula de B; Almeida, Carolina de Godoy; Mendes, Patrícia S A; Souza, Edna Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis and celiac disease were considered a single clinical entity for many years. Differentiation between the diseases occurred some time in the 1930s of the 20th Century. Both diseases may present the intestinal malabsorption syndrome and similar clinical manifestations that contribute to difficulties with clinical distinction. We describe a report of two patients with initial diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, who were subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease. These case reports emphasize the possibility of false positivity being shown in the sweat test in CD, which may result in delayed diagnosis and inadequate management of this disease. PMID:27552792

  19. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Cutting, Garry R

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethal autosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the discovery of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  20. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Christopher S.; Abraham, William M.; Brogden, Kim A.; Engelhardt, John F.; Fisher, John T.; McCray, Paul B.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K.; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Prather, Randall S.; Sabater, Juan R.; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  1. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S; Abraham, William M; Brogden, Kim A; Engelhardt, John F; Fisher, John T; McCray, Paul B; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Prather, Randall S; Sabater, Juan R; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2008-08-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines From the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation for Preschoolers With Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Thomas; Hempstead, Sarah E; Brady, Cynthia; Cannon, Carolyn L; Clark, Kelli; Condren, Michelle E; Guill, Margaret F; Guillerman, R Paul; Leone, Christina G; Maguiness, Karen; Monchil, Lisa; Powers, Scott W; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Tompkins, Connie L; Zemanick, Edith T; Davis, Stephanie D

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) clinical care guidelines exist for the care of infants up to age 2 years and for individuals ≥6 years of age. An important gap exists for preschool children between the ages of 2 and 5 years. This period marks a time of growth and development that is critical to achieve optimal nutritional status and maintain lung health. Given that disease often progresses in a clinically silent manner, objective and sensitive tools that detect and track early disease are important in this age group. Several challenges exist that may impede the delivery of care for these children, including adherence to therapies. A multidisciplinary committee was convened by the CF Foundation to develop comprehensive evidence-based and consensus recommendations for the care of preschool children, ages 2 to 5 years, with CF. This document includes recommendations in the following areas: routine surveillance for pulmonary disease, therapeutics, and nutritional and gastrointestinal care. PMID:27009033

  3. Cystic Fibrosis: A Novel Pharmacologic Approach to Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Modulation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Virant-Young, Deborah; Thomas, Justin; Woiderski, Sarah; Powers, Michelle; Carlier, Joseph; McCarty, James; Kupchick, Tyler; Larder, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) has progressed during the past several decades. Much of this progress is because of advances in genetic testing to precisely identify the underlying cause of CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) dysfunction. However, with more than 1900 mutations that can produce a faulty CFTR, the management of CF can remain a challenge. Several innovative drugs recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration, termed genetic modulators, target the underlying disease by modulating the CFTR defect. This review provides physicians with an established simple classification scheme to guide their use of these drugs. The treatment challenge of 1900 CFTR mutations has been simplified into 6 physiologic classes, each paired with an available therapy to offer patients the most functional improvement. Drug therapy monitoring, adverse effects, and indications for discontinuation must also be considered. PMID:26322933

  4. Unplugging Mucus in Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A

    2016-04-01

    Airway mucus obstruction is a key feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The thin layer of mucus that covers healthy airway surfaces has important protective functions in lung defense. However, excess mucus produces airflow obstruction and provides a nidus for bacterial infection and inflammation. Despite its importance in pathogenesis, understanding of the mechanisms underlying airway mucus obstruction, as well as therapeutic options, remain limited. Studies in the rare genetic disease CF identified airway surface dehydration due to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene dysfunction as an important disease mechanism that may explain mucus stasis and plugging in a spectrum of muco-obstructive lung diseases, including COPD. This concept is supported by the phenotype of the β-epithelial Na(+) channel-transgenic mouse that exhibits airway surface dehydration and develops a spontaneous lung disease that shares key features with CF and COPD, such as airway mucus plugging, chronic neutrophilic inflammation, and structural lung damage. Furthermore, preclinical testing demonstrated that hydration strategies, including osmotically active hypertonic saline and preventive inhibition of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel are effective in unplugging airways in this mouse model of chronic obstructive lung disease. On the other hand, genetic deletion of neutrophil elastase, a potent stimulus for mucus hypersecretion, reduced goblet cell metaplasia and mucin expression but had no effect on mucus obstruction in vivo. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that airway surface dehydration is sufficient to produce mucus obstruction even in the absence of mucus hypersecretion and support further clinical testing of hydrating agents as a promising therapeutic strategy to unplug mucus in CF and COPD. PMID:27115954

  5. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.

  6. Heterogeneity of the cystic fibrosis phenotype in a large kindred family in Qatar with cystic fibrosis mutation (I1234V).

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Al Thani, G; Dawod, S T; Kambouris, M; Al Hamed, M

    2001-04-01

    Twenty-nine subjects (17 families) with cystic fibrosis belonging to the same Bedouin tribe were screened for cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR). Homozygous I1234V mutation in exon 19 was identified in all families with a relatively high rate of consanguinity (96.6 per cent). The homozygous I1234V mutation tended to present with a variable degree of pulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency and electrolyte imbalance. Homozygous I1234V was found to be a common mutation in the studied Bedouin tribe in Qatar. PMID:11336127

  7. Community-based care in cystic fibrosis: role of the cystic fibrosis nurse specialist and implications for patients and families.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, J; Burrows, E

    1998-01-01

    Improved survival for cystic fibrosis has rapidly increased over the past four decades, with patients now living well into adult life. With changes in the structure of the National Health Service and the formation of provider units and general practitioner (GP) fund-holding practices, it is important to strengthen links between the hospital and community teams to ensure that the CF patient receives adequate care. Increasingly, treatment is being carried out at home, and this emphasis on home-based therapy demands that parents/carers and patients must acquire the skills and knowledge of complex therapies in order to optimize health. It is the role of the CF nurse specialist (NS) to educate those who will deliver the care, co-ordinate the provision of services at home, liaise with the CF team and community health-care professionals and to support the patient and their carers. PMID:9637934

  8. L206W mutation of the cystic fibrosis gene, relatively frequent in French Canadians, is associated with atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rozen, R.; Ferreira-Rajabi, L.; Robb, L.

    1995-07-03

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Over 400 mutations have been reported at this locus. Although severe forms of cystic fibrosis are usually associated with pancreatic insufficiency, pulmonary dysfunction, and elevated sweat chloride, there is a wide range of phenotypes, including congenital absence of the vas deferens, observed with some of the milder mutations. The L206W mutation, which was first identified in patients from South France, is relatively frequent in French Canadians from Quebec. In this report, we document the atypical form of cystic fibrosis associated with this mutation in a cohort of 7 French Canadian probands. 20 refs.

  9. Microbiology of airway disease in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, P H

    1991-01-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis have abbreviated life spans primarily due to chronic airway infection. A limited number of types of organisms are responsible for these infections, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being of primary importance. In the pre-antibiotic era, greater than 90% of deaths due to infection were caused by S. aureus and death usually occurred in the first 2 years of life. With the advent of effective antistaphylococcal therapy, life spans increased and P. aeruginosa became the pathogen of primary importance. P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with cystic fibrosis have a unique phenotypic characteristic referred to as "mucoid." The mucoid phenotype is due to the production of a mucoid exopolysaccharide. A mucoid exopolysaccharide is believed to play a central role in the establishment of chronic pseudomonal lung infection in these patients. A third organism, Pseudomonas cepacia, has recently been detected in the airways of older patients with cystic fibrosis and is associated with increased mortality. The virulence of P. cepacia is not understood, but the organism is extremely refractory to antimicrobial therapy. Other bacteria, including Haemophilus influenzae and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, appear to play a secondary role in airway infection. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important fungal agent causing allergic bronchopulmonary disease. The role of viruses has only recently been examined. At least in some patients with cystic fibrosis, respiratory syncytial virus may be important in predisposing to subsequent bacterial infections. PMID:1900735

  10. Strength and Conditioning for the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how a strength and conditioning program can be safety incorporated into the daily life of people with cystic fibrosis as a complementary therapy to medications, regular checkups, bronchial drainage, and respiratory therapy, examining physical restrictions and guidelines, exercise prescriptions, and exercise applications, and explaining…

  11. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25053610

  12. Students as Technicians: Screening Newborns for Cystic Fibrosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, freshman college students learn biotechnology techniques while playing the role of a laboratory technician. They perform simulations of three diagnostic tests used to screen newborns for cystic fibrosis. By performing an ELISA, a PCR analysis, and a conductivity test, students learn how biotechnology techniques can be used to…

  13. Pancreatic Cystosis in Two Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kampouras, Asterios; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Markou, Andreas; Anastasiou, Athanasia; Tsanakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present pancreatic cystosis in two adolescents with cystic fibrosis, a 13-year-old girl and an 18-year-old boy. In pancreatic cystosis, which is a rare manifestation of CF, the pancreatic parenchyma is replaced with multiple cysts of different sizes. Pancreatic cystosis is mainly an imaging based diagnosis and frequent follow-up should be recommended. PMID:27110419

  14. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70 000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development. PMID:27030675

  15. Pancreatic Cystosis in Two Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kampouras, Asterios; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Markou, Andreas; Anastasiou, Athanasia; Tsanakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present pancreatic cystosis in two adolescents with cystic fibrosis, a 13-year-old girl and an 18-year-old boy. In pancreatic cystosis, which is a rare manifestation of CF, the pancreatic parenchyma is replaced with multiple cysts of different sizes. Pancreatic cystosis is mainly an imaging based diagnosis and frequent follow-up should be recommended. PMID:27110419

  16. THE METABOLIC EFFECTS OF PREGNANCY IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to determine glucose tolerance in pregnant women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to relate glucose tolerance to insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, and protein turnover. We studied 8 CF women during pregnancy (CFPreg). Results were compared with those from 9 pregnant contr...

  17. Treatment of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis - could do better?

    PubMed

    Smyth, Alan

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the nature and significance of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis (CF). The effectiveness and safety of current exacerbation treatment are explored. The article concludes with a summary of clinical trials (completed and ongoing) which aim to improve the efficacy and safety of exacerbation treatment. PMID:27349725

  18. Delayed diagnosis of cystic fibrosis due to normal sweat electrolytes.

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, I M; Ward, I; Schwarz, M; David, T J

    1995-01-01

    The sweat test, if properly performed, is a reliable tool to assist in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. In practice, most errors arise from false positive results. This case serves as a reminder that false negatives may also occur. PMID:7562815

  19. CFTR Modulators for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Rebecca S; Fellner, Chris

    2014-07-01

    Defects in a single gene lead to the defective proteins that cause cystic fibrosis, making the disease an ideal candidate for mutation-targeted therapy. Although ivacaftor is currently the only FDA-approved CFTR modifier, others are in development. PMID:25083129

  20. Predictive 5-Year Survivorship Model of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; FitzSimmons, Stacey C.; Cahill, Barbara C.; Hibbs, Jonathan R.; Marshall, Bruce C.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create a 5-year survivorship model to identify key clinical features of cystic fibrosis. Such a model could help researchers and clinicians to evaluate therapies, improve the design of prospective studies, monitor practice patterns, counsel individual patients, and determine the best candidates for lung transplantation. The authors used information from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR), which has collected longitudinal data on approximately 90% of cystic fibrosis patients diagnosed in the United States since 1986. They developed multivariate logistic regression models by using data on 5,820 patients randomly selected from 11,630 in the CFFPR in 1993. Models were tested for goodness of fit and were validated for the remaining 5,810 patients for 1993. The validated 5-year survivorship model included age, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as a percentage of predicted normal, gender, weight-for-age z score, pancreatic sufficiency, diabetes mellitus, Staphylococcus aureus infection, Burkerholderia cepacia infection, and annual number of acute pulmonary exacerbations. The model provides insights into the complex nature of cystic fibrosis and supplies a rigorous tool for clinical practice and research. PMID:11207152

  1. Vocational Rehabilitation of the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isralsky, Marc; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explored vocational development, self-concept, and vocational adjustment of persons with cystic fibrosis. The following measures of vocational development correlated with work adjustment: vocational plans, educational plans, initiative, occupational information, and average vocational development score. Vocational development did not correlate…

  2. The Cystic Fibrosis Database: Content and Research Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, William M., Jr.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the files contained in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) database and discusses educational and research opportunities using this database. Topics discussed include queries, evaluating the relevance of items retrieved, and use of the database in an online searching course in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North…

  3. Psychological Concomitants of Cystic Fibrosis in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashani, Javad H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Administered several psychiatric inventories to 30 cystic fibrosis and 30 matched control children and their parents. Data analysis revealed few differences in either psychopathological symptoms or psychiatric diagnoses between groups. Differences were either physical in nature or did not depart enough from normal scores to merit label of high…

  4. 78 FR 26681 - Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... we published in the Federal Register on February 4, 2013 (78 FR 7968). We use Listings 3.04 and 103... ADMINISTRATION RIN 0960-AF58 Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis AGENCY: Social Security... additional information regarding this teleconference, please contact Cheryl Williams, Office of...

  5. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70,000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development. PMID:27030675

  6. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered 'good' agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  7. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered ‘good’ agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  8. miR-17 overexpression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells decreases interleukin-8 production.

    PubMed

    Oglesby, Irene K; Vencken, Sebastian F; Agrawal, Raman; Gaughan, Kevin; Molloy, Kevin; Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; McElvaney, Noel G; Mall, Marcus A; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 levels are higher than normal in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, causing neutrophil infiltration and non-resolving inflammation. Overexpression of microRNAs that target IL-8 expression in airway epithelial cells may represent a therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis. IL-8 protein and mRNA were measured in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial brushings (n=20 per group). miRNAs decreased in the cystic fibrosis lung and predicted to target IL-8 mRNA were quantified in βENaC-transgenic, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-/- and wild-type mice, primary cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and a range of cystic fibrosis versus non-cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell lines or cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas-conditioned medium or cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The effect of miRNA overexpression on IL-8 protein production was measured. miR-17 regulates IL-8 and its expression was decreased in adult cystic fibrosis bronchial brushings, βENaC-transgenic mice and bronchial epithelial cells chronically stimulated with Pseudomonas-conditioned medium. Overexpression of miR-17 inhibited basal and agonist-induced IL-8 protein production in F508del-CFTR homozygous CFTE29o(-) tracheal, CFBE41o(-) and/or IB3 bronchial epithelial cells. These results implicate defective CFTR, inflammation, neutrophilia and mucus overproduction in regulation of miR-17. Modulating miR-17 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells may be a novel anti-inflammatory strategy for cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26160865

  9. Molecular Characterization of Achromobacter Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis and Non-Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Barrado, Laura; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Martínez, M. Teresa; García, Gloria; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and nrdA sequence analysis identified 6 different species or genogroups and 13 sequence types (STs) among 15 Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 7 species or genogroups and 11 STs among 11 isolates from non-CF patients. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the most frequently isolated species among CF patients. PMID:23536401

  10. Antifungal treatment in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis with and without cystic fibrosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moreira, A S; Silva, D; Ferreira, A Reis; Delgado, L

    2014-10-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a rare disease that affects patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Its debilitating course has led to the search for new treatments, including antifungals and monoclonal antibodies. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of antifungal treatments in patients with ABPA and either asthma or cystic fibrosis, we performed a systematic review of the literature on the effects of antifungal agents in ABPA using three biomedical databases. Quality assessment was performed using the GRADE methodology and, where appropriate, studies with comparable outcomes were pooled for meta-analysis. Thirty-eight studies - four randomized controlled trials and 34 observational studies - met the eligibility criteria. The antifungal interventions described were itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, ketoconazole, natamycin, nystatin and amphotericin B. An improvement in symptoms, frequency of exacerbations and lung function was reported in most of the studies and was more common with oral azoles. Antifungals also had a positive impact on biomarkers and radiological pulmonary infiltrates, but adverse effects were also common. The quality of the evidence supporting these results was low or very low due to a shortage of controlled studies, heterogeneity between studies and potential bias. Antifungal interventions in ABPA improved patient and disease outcomes in both asthma and cystic fibrosis. However, the recommendation for their use is weak and clinicians should therefore weigh up desirable and undesirable effects on a case-by-case basis. More studies with a better methodology are needed, especially in cystic fibrosis, to increase confidence in the effects of antifungal treatments in ABPA. PMID:24809846

  11. Cystic fibrosis database (CFDB): a new web-based tool for cystic fibrosis specialists.

    PubMed

    Buzzetti, Roberto; Cirilli, Natalia; Minicucci, Laura; Raia, Valeria; Salvatore, Donatello; Maffeis, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    In order to help specialists involved in CF care and clinical research to know the current best evidence about clinical effectiveness of interventions in CF, we designed and developed a web-based, free access tool called "CFDB"--Cystic Fibrosis DataBase (www.inetflow.it/CFDB). The database was built by searching in Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and worldwide trials registries all studies involving clinical interventions in CF. The tool lets the user define queries starting from one or more types of pathological conditions and one or more interventions. The output of the queries is structured in three levels: (1) how many and which studies deal with the conditions formulated in the query; (2) which are the main results of these studies; (3) a critical summary of the literature related to the query. This tool, providing a quick overview of the available evidence in clinical research in CF, may help clinical decision making, designing of new trials and building guidelines. PMID:24532370

  12. Targets for cystic fibrosis therapy: proteomic analysis and correction of mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Collawn, James F; Fu, Lianwu; Bebok, Zsuzsa

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic analysis has proved to be an important tool for understanding the complex nature of genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis (CF), by defining the cellular protein environment (proteome) associated with wild-type and mutant proteins. Proteomic screens identified the proteome of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and provided fundamental information to studies designed for understanding the crucial components of physiological CFTR function. Simultaneously, high-throughput screens for small-molecular correctors of CFTR mutants provided promising candidates for therapy. The majority of CF cases are caused by nucleotide deletions (ΔF508 CFTR; >75%), resulting in CFTR misfolding, or insertion of premature termination codons (~10%), leading to unstable mRNA and reduced levels of truncated dysfunctional CFTR. In this article, we review recent results of proteomic screens, developments in identifying correctors for the most frequent CFTR mutants, and comment on how integration of the knowledge gained from these studies may aid in finding a cure for CF and a number of other genetic disorders. PMID:20653506

  13. Progress in cystic fibrosis and the CF Therapeutics Development Network

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M; Borowitz, Drucy S; Burns, Jane L; Clancy, John P; Donaldson, Scott H; Retsch-Bogart, George; Sagel, Scott D; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-shortening genetic disorder in Caucasians, affects approximately 70 000 individuals worldwide. In 1998, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) launched the CF Therapeutics Development Network (CF-TDN) as a central element of its Therapeutics Development Programme. Designed to accelerate the clinical evaluation of new therapies needed to fulfil the CFF mission to control and cure CF, the CF-TDN has conducted 75 clinical trials since its inception, and has contributed to studies as varied as initial safety and proof of concept trials to pivotal programmes required for regulatory approval. This review highlights recent and significant research efforts of the CF-TDN, including a summary of contributions to studies involving CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators, airway surface liquid hydrators and mucus modifiers, anti-infectives, anti-inflammatories, and nutritional therapies. Efforts to advance CF biomarkers, necessary to accelerate the therapeutic goals of the network, are also summarised. PMID:22960984

  14. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Gillian M; White, Michelle M; Browne, Niall; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  15. Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes in Children: An Update.

    PubMed

    Kim, Roy J

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes mellitus (CFRD) is the most common endocrine complication of cystic fibrosis (CF), affecting more than 50% of patients by the 4th decade of life. CFRD is often preceded by worsening pulmonary status and nutritional decline. Treatment of CFRD is associated with improvements in body weight and pulmonary function and a reduction in pulmonary exacerbations. Because of the clinical significance of CFRD, diabetes screening with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is recommended annually for all patients with CF starting at age 10 years. The OGTT detects CFRD with greater sensitivity than random glucose or hemoglobin A1c testing. The first-line treatment for CFRD is insulin. The use of other treatments such as oral medications remains under study. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(9):e321-e326.]. PMID:27622916

  16. Cystic fibrosis in a large kindred family in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Dawod, S T; al Thani, G

    2000-09-01

    We describe 45 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), diagnosed between June 1987 and May 1999, seen at the Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar in the Arabian Gulf. Twenty-six of 32 families in the study were related and belonged to the same Bedouin tribe. The parents of 98% of these cases were consanguineous. Metabolic alkalosis and/or hypo-electrolytaemia were found in a large proportion of infants with CF. Cystic fibrosis in Qatari children is phenotypically variable with mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, and none of them died during this study. Among the non-Arabic-Asian patients, pulmonary symptoms were more severe, Pseudomonas colonization was earlier, pancreatic insufficiency occurred in infancy and four died in early life. PMID:11064773

  17. Emergent properties of proteostasis in managing cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Balch, William E; Roth, Daniela M; Hutt, Darren M

    2011-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a consequence of defective recognition of the multimembrane spanning protein cystic fibrosis conductance transmembrane regulator (CFTR) by the protein homeostasis or proteostasis network (PN) (Hutt and Balch (2010). Like many variant proteins triggering misfolding diseases, mutant CFTR has a complex folding and membrane trafficking itinerary that is managed by the PN to maintain proteome balance and this balance is disrupted in human disease. The biological pathways dictating the folding and function of CFTR in health and disease are being studied by numerous investigators, providing a unique opportunity to begin to understand and therapeutically address the role of the PN in disease onset, and its progression during aging. We discuss the general concept that therapeutic management of the emergent properties of the PN to control the energetics of CFTR folding biology may provide significant clinical benefit. PMID:21421917

  18. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences

    PubMed Central

    McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  19. Is there a role for stool metabolomics in cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Pickford, Russell; Jaffe, Adam; Ooi, Chee Y

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies utilizing metabolomics have focused on the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Here, we performed fecal metabolomics on pancreatic insufficient (PI) and sufficient (PS) children with CF and compared them with healthy controls (HC). Fecal metabolomics can differentiate between PS-CF and PI-CF. We identified a potential biomarker of disease severity or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function (m/z, 463.247; retention time, 0.570717 min) that discriminates between HC versus PS-CF versus PI-CF. We also identified lipoyl-GMP as a potential novel inflammatory biomarker, and elevation in fecal glycerol 1,2-didodecanoate 3-tetradecanoate may provide clues to the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. For the first time, we demonstrate the potential applications of fecal metabolomics in CF. PMID:27553892

  20. Analysis of 16 cystic fibrosis mutations in Mexican patients

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Torres, C.; Rojas-Martinez, A.; Barrera-Saldana, H.A.

    1997-04-14

    We carried out molecular analysis of 80 chromosomes from 40 unrelated Mexican patients with a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. The study was performed in two PCR steps: a preliminary one to identify mutation AF508, the most frequent cause of cystic fibrosis worldwide, and the second a reverse dot-blot with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes to detect 15 additional common mutations in the Caucasian population. A frequency of 45% for AF508 was found, making it the most common in our sample of Mexican patients. Another five mutations (G542X, 3849 + 10 kb C{r_arrow}T, N1303K, S549N, and 621 + 1 G{r_arrow}T) were detected, and these accounted for 11.25%. The remaining mutations (43.75%) were undetectable with the methodology used. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced drug transport in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Plumley, John B.; Withers, Nathan J.; Kopciuch, Michael; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Huber, Dale L.; Smyth, Hugh D.; Osinski, Marek

    2012-10-01

    Iron oxide colloidal nanoparticles (ferrofluids) are investigated for application in the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung infections, the leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. We investigate the use of iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the effectiveness of administering antibiotics through aerosol inhalation using two mechanisms: directed particle movement in the presence of an inhomogeneous static external magnetic field and magnetic hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia is an effective method for decreasing the viscosity of the mucus and biofilm, thereby enhancing drug, immune cell, and antibody penetration to the affected area. Iron oxide nanoparticles of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power). Nanoparticles in the superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited excellent heating power. Additionally, iron oxide / zinc selenide core/shell nanoparticles were prepared, in order to enable imaging of the iron oxide nanoparticles. We also report on synthesis and characterization of MnSe/ZnSeS alloyed quantum dots.

  2. Sexual and reproductive health in cystic fibrosis: a life-course perspective.

    PubMed

    Frayman, Katherine B; Sawyer, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents and adults with cystic fibrosis now approach developmental milestones, including sexual and reproductive ones, at a similar time to their healthy peers. Yet, their sexual and reproductive health (SRH) is profoundly affected by their disease, and their SRH decisions can substantially affect their health. Navigation of SRH milestones in the context of cystic fibrosis needs education, guidance, and access to SRH services. In this Review, we discuss scientific knowledge of SRH in patients with cystic fibrosis across the life course and clinical practices for SRH within cystic fibrosis care. We identify crucial gaps in SRH education of patients and their access to resources and then present a model of care for provision of developmentally appropriate SRH education and care within cystic fibrosis services across the life course. This model emphasises the central importance of the cystic fibrosis team and service links to primary and specialist SRH care. PMID:25529340

  3. Allele frequency for Cystic fibrosis in Indians vis-a/-vis global populations.

    PubMed

    Bepari, Karnajit Kumar; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Paul, Prosenjit; Halder, Binata; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This gene encodes a protein involved in epithelial anion channel. Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-limiting genetic disorder in Caucasians; it also affects other ethnic groups like the Blacks and the Native Americans. Cystic fibrosis is considered to be rare among individuals from the Indian subcontinent. We analyzed a total of 29 world׳s populations for cystic fibrosis on the basis of gene frequency and heterozygosity. Among 29 countries Switzerland revealed the highest gene frequency and heterozygosity for CF (0.022, 0.043) whereas Japan recorded the lowest values (0.002, 0.004) followed by India (0.004, 0.008). Our analysis suggests that the prevalence of cystic fibrosis is very low in India. PMID:26339151

  4. Bilateral paranasal sinus mucopyoceles in a child with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Aubry, K; Orsel, S; Menetrey, C; Bessède, J P; Sauvage, J P

    2009-01-01

    Mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses are well-described complication of chronic sinusitis in adults. They are extremely rare in children and the main predisposing factor is cystic fibrosis (CF). We report a case of bilateral ethmoid and maxillary sinus mucopyoceles, associated with CF occurring in a six months old boy. The main symptom was a complete nasal obstruction. The marsupialization of mucocele was performed by endoscopic surgery. One year follow-up showed no recurrence. PMID:20597414

  5. Is deafness mutation screening required in cystic fibrosis patients?

    PubMed

    Abusamra, Rania; McShane, Donna

    2016-08-01

    Aminoglycosides are widely used in cystic fibrosis management. The m.1555A>G mutation predisposes to aminoglycoside ototoxicity. It may cause later onset hearing loss in the absence of aminoglycosides use and gradual hearing loss may be an inevitable consequence of the mutation. Given that aminoglycoside therapy forms the backbone of IV protocols in CF, this article recommends screening for this mutation to allow informed decision-making prior to aminoglycoside administration, to avoid preventable deafness. PMID:27427311

  6. Partial splenectomy in cystic fibrosis patients with hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, G H; Eber, E; Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Zach, M S

    2003-02-01

    We report three cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with hypersplenism who underwent partial splenectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful in two patients; one patient developed a complication necessitating resection of the rest of the spleen. Haematological parameters improved and oesophageal varices regressed in all patients. On follow up, one patient showed a normal spleen, the other a normally functioning accessory spleen; the third patient again developed splenomegaly with hypersplenism. Partial splenectomy is a promising therapeutic option for CF patients with hypersplenism. PMID:12538318

  7. Amyloid goitre and hypothyroidism secondary to cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sala, R.; Prados, C.; Sastre Marcos, J.; García Río, F.; Vicandi, B.; de Ramón, A.; Villamor, J.

    1995-01-01

    Although cystic fibrosis (CF) is still the most frequently fatal childhood disease, many adults now survive into their third and fourth decades. Uncommon complications of chronic diseases, such as amyloidosis, while infrequent, may now appear during the course of CF in adulthood. We present a case of a patient with CF who was diagnosed with hypothyroidism due to amyloid deposits in the thyroid. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7596942

  8. Nontuberculous mycobacteria in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Park, In Kwon; Olivier, Kenneth N

    2015-04-01

    Increasing numbers of cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis patients are affected by pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection worldwide. Two species of NTM account for up to 95% of the pulmonary NTM infections: Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC). Diagnosis of pulmonary NTM infection is based on criteria specified in the 2007 American Thoracic Society/Infectious Disease Society of America (ATS/IDSA) guidelines. While many initial positive cultures do not progress to active NTM disease, even a single positive NTM sputum culture obtained from higher risk groups such as classic CF or older women with bronchiectasis and very low body mass index should be closely monitored for progressive disease. Macrolides remain the most effective agents available against MAC and MABSC. Infection with MABSC may be associated with worse clinical outcomes, as more than half of MABSC isolates have inducible macrolide resistance conferred by an active erm(41) gene. Of growing concern in CF is that MABSC is becoming more common than MAC, seems to target younger patients with classic CF, and is more difficult to manage, often requiring prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics. Recurrence rates of NTM after initial successful treatment remain high, likely due to nonmodifiable risk factors raising the question of whether secondary prophylaxis is feasible. More rapid and readily available methods for detecting inducible macrolide resistance and better in vitro susceptibility testing methods for other drugs that correlate with clinical responses are needed. This is crucial to identify more effective regimens of existing drugs and for development of novel drugs for NTM infection. PMID:25826589

  9. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations at a referral center for cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Cyntia Arivabeni de Araújo Correia; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of six mutations (F508del, G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed, at a referral center, on the basis of abnormal results in two determinations of sweat sodium and chloride concentrations. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 patients with CF. The mean age of the patients was 12.38 ± 9.00 years, 51.43% were female, and 94.29% were White. Mutation screening was performed with polymerase chain reaction (for F508del), followed by enzymatic digestion (for other mutations). Clinical analysis was performed on the basis of gender, age, ethnicity, pulmonary/gastrointestinal symptoms, and Shwachman-Kulczycki (SK) score. RESULTS: All of the patients showed pulmonary symptoms, and 8 had no gastrointestinal symptoms. On the basis of the SK scores, CF was determined to be mild, moderate, and severe in 22 (42.3%), 17 (32.7%), and 13 (25.0%) of the patients, respectively. There was no association between F508del mutation and disease severity by SK score. Of the 140 alleles analyzed, F508del mutation was identified in 70 (50%). Other mutations (G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) were identified in 12 (7.93%) of the alleles studied. In F508del homozygous patients with severe disease, the OR was 0.124 (95% CI: 0.005-0.826). CONCLUSIONS: In 50% of the alleles studied, the molecular diagnosis of CF was confirmed by identifying a single mutation (F508del). If we consider the analysis of the six most common mutations in the Brazilian population (including F508del), the molecular diagnosis was confirmed in 58.57% of the alleles studied. PMID:24310628

  10. A haplotype framework for cystic fibrosis mutations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R; Sanati, Mohammad H; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R

    2006-02-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, DeltaF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  11. A Haplotype Framework for Cystic Fibrosis Mutations in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G.; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R.; Sanati, Mohammad H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, ΔF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  12. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere

    PubMed Central

    Pytel, Kamila M.; Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  13. The Dynamics of Disease Progression in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis, statistical models have been more successful in predicting mortality than the time course of clinical status. We develop a system of partial differential equations that simultaneously track mortality and patient status, with all model parameters estimated from the extensive and carefully maintained database from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disease that leads to loss of lung function, most commonly assessed using the Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1%). This loss results from inflammation secondary to chronic bacterial infections, particularly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and members of the virulent Burkholderia complex. The model tracks FEV1% and carriage of these three bacteria over the course of a patient’s life. Analysis of patient state changes from year to year reveals four feedback loops: a damaging positive feedback loop between P. aeruginosa carriage and lower FEV1%, negative feedback loops between P. aeruginosa and MSSA and between P. aeruginosa and Burkholderia, and a protective positive feedback loop between MSSA carriage and higher FEV1%. The partial differential equations built from this data analysis accurately capture the life-long progression of the disease, quantify the key role of high annual FEV1% variability in reducing survivorship, the relative unimportance of short-term bacterial interactions for long-term survival, and the potential benefits of eradicating the most harmful bacteria. PMID:27248696

  14. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. PMID:26335952

  15. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Pytel, Kamila M; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-05-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  16. Model of mucociliary clearance in cystic fibrosis lungs.

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, P; Bessonov, N; Volpert, V; Tiddens, H A W M; Cornu, C; Nony, P; Caudri, D

    2015-05-01

    Mucus clearance is a primary innate defense mechanism in the human airways. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CF is characterized by dehydration of airway surface liquid and impaired mucociliary clearance. As a result, microorganisms are not efficiently removed from the airways, and patients experience chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation. We propose a new physiologically based mathematical model of muco-ciliary transport consisting of the two major components of the mucociliary clearance system: (i) periciliary liquid layer (PCL) and (ii) mucus layer. We study mucus clearance under normal conditions and in CF patients. Restoring impaired clearance of airway secretions in one of the major goals of therapy in patients with CF. We consider the action of the aerosolized and inhaled medication dornase alfa, which reduces the viscosity of cystic fibrosis mucus, by selectively cleaving the long DNA strands it contains. The results of the model simulations stress the potential relevance of the location of the drug deposition in the central or peripheral airways. Mucus clearance was increased in case the drug was primarily deposited peripherally, i.e. in the small airways. PMID:25746843

  17. Management of adolescent and adult inpatients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sterner-Allison, J L

    1999-01-15

    A program in which pharmacists help care for cystic fibrosis patients is described. The Egleston Cystic Fibrosis Center at Emory University houses outpatient clinic facilities and a 10-bed inpatient unit and is affiliated with Egleston Children's Hospital. The center provides full-service care for nearly 500 patients. Patients with mild to moderate exacerbations of pulmonary problems can receive their entire course of therapy at the center, and those with severe illness may complete their hospital stay there. A care team consisting of pharmacists, physicians, nurses, and others provides preventive and acute care. Patients can choose a "care partner" who will assist them with their care during any hospitalizations and at home. Both patient and care partner are taught drug administration, nutrition, and physical therapy and meet regularly with the care team. Patients must receive their medication education from a pharmacist before they can administer their own drugs. Pharmacists at the center also evaluate serum drug concentrations, stock the automated dispensing device, monitor for drug interactions, answer drug information questions, and attend multidisciplinary rounds. Pharmacy residents can work with the care team through rotations and clinic experience. Pharmacists at a cystic fibrosis center provide clinical services to patients and promote self-care. PMID:10030531

  18. Pseudomonas siderophores in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lois W; Reid, David W; Sharples, Katrina J; Lamont, Iain L

    2011-12-01

    The lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis become chronically infected with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which heralds progressive lung damage and a decline in health. Iron is a crucial micronutrient for bacteria and its acquisition is a key factor in infection. P. aeruginosa can acquire this element by secreting pyoverdine and pyochelin, iron-chelating compounds (siderophores) that scavenge iron and deliver it to the bacteria. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is generally considered a key factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to cause infection. We have investigated the amounts of pyoverdine in 148 sputum samples from 36 cystic fibrosis patients (30 infected with P. aeruginosa and 6 as negative controls). Pyoverdine was present in 93 samples in concentrations between 0.30 and 51 μM (median 4.6 μM) and there was a strong association between the amount of pyoverdine and the number of P. aeruginosa present. However, pyoverdine was not present, or below the limits of detection (~0.3 μM), in 21 sputum samples that contained P. aeruginosa. Pyochelin was also absent, or below the limits of detection (~1 μM), in samples from P. aeruginosa-infected patients with little or no detectable pyoverdine. Our data show that pyoverdine is an important iron-scavenging molecule for P. aeruginosa in many cystic fibrosis patients, but other P. aeruginosa iron-uptake systems must be active in some patients to satisfy the bacterial need for iron. PMID:21643731

  19. Recent advances in understanding and managing cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in Caucasians and has been extensively studied for many decades. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene was identified in 1989. It encodes a complex protein which has numerous cellular functions. Our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathophysiology and genetics is constantly expanding and being refined, leading to improved management of the disease and increased life expectancy in affected individuals. PMID:26097737

  20. Recent advances in understanding and managing cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in Caucasians and has been extensively studied for many decades. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene was identified in 1989. It encodes a complex protein which has numerous cellular functions. Our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathophysiology and genetics is constantly expanding and being refined, leading to improved management of the disease and increased life expectancy in affected individuals. PMID:26097737

  1. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression in the male excretory duct system during development.

    PubMed

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Gillet, Danièle; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Ledé, Françoise; Samaison, Laura; Huguen, Geneviève; Ferec, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Sterility due to bilateral destruction in utero or in early infancy resulting in congenital absence of the vas deferens is the rule in male patients with cystic fibrosis. To understand the developmental pattern of this anomaly, the microscopic morphology of the male excretory system was analyzed during development and the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was explored by immunohistochemistry. We observed that cystic fibrosis fetuses had no excretory ducts agenesis or obstruction until 22 weeks of gestation. However, a focal inflammatory pattern and mucinous plugs in the oldest cystic fibrosis case suggested a disruptive mechanism. Immunolabeling of cytoplasmic epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was demonstrated in all cystic fibrosis and control cases with a similar pattern of expression of the protein between age-matched controls and cystic fibrosis cases. At midgestation, an apical intensification appeared in both cystic fibrosis and control cases and was stable during the remainder of fetal life. No gradient of intensity could be detected between the different segments of the excretory tract. These findings are different from those reported in adults. The absence of any morphologic anomaly until 22 weeks of gestation, the focal destruction of the epithelial structures during the second trimester, and the chronological pattern of expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are of interest for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:21840567

  2. Drug management of noninfective complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, I; Guiraldes, E

    1995-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the commonest lethal hereditary disease in Caucasians. The disease involves a gene mutation located at the long arm of chromosome 7, and more than 300 mutations have been identified. CF is a systemic illness affecting the upper respiratory tract and airways, sweat and salivary glands, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and male reproductive system. The course is highly variable depending on the specific molecular abnormalities in the mutant gene. The current approach to therapy now involves the use of: (i) chest physiotherapy; (ii) bronchodilators when there is evidence of airways hyperreactivity; (iii) oral and intravenous antibiotics for acute pulmonary exacerbations and aerosolised antibiotics for prevention; (iv) recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I (dornase alfa) to promote airways clearance; (v) amiloride to improve sputum viscosity; (vi) pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy along with nutritional support and supplements; (vi) vitamins; and (vii) ursodeoxycholic acid in selected patients. The use of antiprotease and anti-inflammatory agents has been shown to be useful in preventing the damage secondary to chronic lung infection. In patients with severely impaired lung function, lung transplantations have been performed with good results. Finally, it seems probable that lung disease in CF patients will be ameliorated or prevented in the future with early gene therapy, using vectors such as recombinant adenoviruses, adeno-associated virus, lipofection or retrovirus. However, this require extensive basic and clinical research. PMID:8536551

  3. Pathogenesis and management of nasal polyposis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Jochen G; Koitschev, Assen

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in preschool age, during their lives, up to 50% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients experience obstructing nasal polyposis (NP), which is rare in non-CF children. Pathogenetic factors of NP in general and especially in CF are still obscure. However, defective epithelial ion transport from mucosal glands plays a central role in CF, and viscous secretions impair mucociliary clearance, promoting chronic pathogen colonization and neutrophil-dominated chronic inflammation. Presently, CF-NP is not curable but can be clinically stabilized, though the large variety of proposed treatment modalities indicates a lack of standardization and of evidence of treatment efficacy. When conservative measures are exhausted, surgical intervention combining individually adapted endoscopic sinus surgery and supportive conservative treatment is performed. Topical steroids, approved as the gold standard for non-CF NP, may be beneficial, but they are discussed to be less effective in neutrophilic inflammation, and CF-specific antimicrobial and mucolytic therapy, as is true of all treatment modalities, urgently requires evaluation by controlled clinical trials within interdisciplinary networks. PMID:22350539

  4. Pathogenesis and management of nasal polyposis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Jochen G; Koitschev, Assen

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in preschool age, during their lives, upto 50% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients experience obstructing nasal polyposis (NP), which is rare in non-CF children. Pathogenetic factors of NP in general and especially in CF are still obscure. However, defective epithelial ion transport from mucosal glands plays a central role in CF, and viscous secretions impair mucociliary clearance, promoting chronic pathogen colonization and neutrophil-dominated chronic inflammation.Presently, CF-NP is not curable but can be clinically stabilized,though the large variety of proposed treatment modalities indicates a lack of standardization and of evidence of treatment efficacy. When conservative measures are exhausted, surgical intervention combining individually adapted endoscopic sinus surgery and supportive conservative treatment is performed. Topical steroids, approved as the gold standard for non-CF NP, may be beneficial, but they are discussed to be less effective in neutrophilic inflammation,and CF-specific antimicrobial and mucolytic therapy, as is true of all treatment modalities, urgently requires evaluation by controlled clinical trials within interdisciplinary networks. PMID:23520643

  5. Attitudes toward abortion among parents of children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, D C; Rosenfield, J M; Janes, S R; Erbe, R W

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA prenatal diagnosis for cystic fibrosis (CF) has been available for parents of affected children since late 1985. METHODS: Using anonymous questionnaires, we surveyed 395 parents of children with CF at 12 New England CF centers with regard to 12 maternal or family situations and 11 fetal characteristics; 271 (68%) responded. RESULTS: The majority supported legal abortion in the first trimester for all 23 situations; 58% would abort for severe mental retardation (MR), 40% would abort for a genetic disorder leading to death before age five years, 41% for a child bedridden for life, 35% for moderate MR, 20% for CF and 17% for a severe incurable disorder starting at age 40 years. Few would abort for a disorder starting at age 60 years, for genetic susceptibility to alcoholism or for sex selection. Variables most strongly related to abortion for CF were attitudes of spouse, respondent's siblings, and CF doctor toward abortion for CF as well as infrequent attendance at religious services. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal diagnosis may not reduce substantially the number of CF births to parents of CF children because most do not accept abortion for CF. PMID:1854017

  6. Considerations for the Conduct of Clinical Trials with Antiinflammatory Agents in Cystic Fibrosis. A Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Torphy, Theodore J; Allen, Janet; Cantin, André M; Konstan, Michael W; Accurso, Frank J; Joseloff, Elizabeth; Ratjen, Felix A; Chmiel, James F

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation leads to lung destruction and loss of pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Drugs that modulate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have recently been approved. Although the impact of CFTR modulators on sweat chloride and lung function are exciting, they have not yet demonstrated an effect on inflammation. Therefore, CF antiinflammatory drug development must continue. Unfortunately, the lack of clarity with this process has left investigators and industry sponsors frustrated. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation established a working group in early 2014 to address this issue. There are many inflammatory processes disrupted in CF, and, therefore, there are many potential targets amenable to antiinflammatory therapy. Regardless of a drug's specific mechanism of action, it must ultimately affect the neutrophil or its products to impact CF. The working group concluded that before bringing new antiinflammatory drugs to clinical trial, preclinical safety studies must be conducted in disease-relevant models to assuage safety concerns. Furthermore, although studies of antiinflammatory therapies must first establish safety in adults, subsequent studies must involve children, as they are most likely to reap the most benefit. The working group also recommended that pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies and early-phase safety studies be performed before proceeding to larger studies of longer duration. In addition, innovative study designs may improve the likelihood of adequately assessing treatment response and mitigating risk before conducting multiyear studies. Learning from past experiences and incorporating this knowledge into new drug development programs will be instrumental in bringing new antiinflammatory therapies to patients. PMID:26146892

  7. The Cystic Fibrosis-causing Mutation ΔF508 Affects Multiple Steps in Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Richardson, John M.; Wang, Wei; Millen, Linda; Watson, Jarod; Mendoza, Juan L.; Du, Kai; Fischman, Sharon; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Kirk, Kevin; Thomas, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    The deletion of phenylalanine 508 in the first nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is directly associated with >90% of cystic fibrosis cases. This mutant protein fails to traffic out of the endoplasmic reticulum and is subsequently degraded by the proteasome. The effects of this mutation may be partially reversed by the application of exogenous osmolytes, expression at low temperature, and the introduction of second site suppressor mutations. However, the specific steps of folding and assembly of full-length cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) directly altered by the disease-causing mutation are unclear. To elucidate the effects of the ΔF508 mutation, on various steps in CFTR folding, a series of misfolding and suppressor mutations in the nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains were evaluated for effects on the folding and maturation of the protein. The results indicate that the isolated NBD1 responds to both the ΔF508 mutation and intradomain suppressors of this mutation. In addition, identification of a novel second site suppressor of the defect within the second transmembrane domain suggests that ΔF508 also effects interdomain interactions critical for later steps in the biosynthesis of CFTR. PMID:20667826

  8. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients. PMID:26895996

  9. Physiological levels of nitrate support anoxic growth by denitrification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at growth rates reported in cystic fibrosis lungs and sputum

    PubMed Central

    Line, Laura; Alhede, Morten; Kolpen, Mette; Kühl, Michael; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus; Toyofuku, Masanori; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Høiby, Niels; Jensen, Peter Ø.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the most severe complication in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The infection is characterized by the formation of biofilm surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and strong O2 depletion in the endobronchial mucus. We have reported that O2 is mainly consumed by the activated PMNs, while O2 consumption by aerobic respiration is diminutive and nitrous oxide (N2O) is produced in infected CF sputum. This suggests that the reported growth rates of P. aeruginosa in lungs and sputum may result from anaerobic respiration using denitrification. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa achieved by denitrification at physiological levels (~400 μM) of nitrate (NO−3) is however, not known. Therefore, we have measured growth rates of anoxic cultures of PAO1 and clinical isolates (n = 12) in LB media supplemented with NO−3 and found a significant increase of growth when supplementing PAO1 and clinical isolates with ≥150 μM NO−3 and 100 μM NO−3, respectively. An essential contribution to growth by denitrification was demonstrated by the inability to establish a significantly increased growth rate by a denitrification deficient ΔnirS-N mutant at <1 mM of NO−3. Activation of denitrification could be achieved by supplementation with as little as 62.5 μM of NO−3 according to the significant production of N2O by the nitrous oxide reductase deficient ΔnosZ mutant. Studies of the promoter activity, gene transcripts, and enzyme activity of the four N-oxide reductases in PAO1 (Nar, Nir, Nor, Nos) further verified the engagement of denitrification, showing a transient increase in activation and expression and rapid consumption of NO−3 followed by a transient increase of NO−2. Growth rates obtained by denitrification in this study were comparable to our reported growth rates in the majority of P. aeruginosa cells in CF lungs and sputum. Thus, we have demonstrated that denitrification is required for P

  10. Parents’ Religious Coping Styles in the First Year After Their Child’s Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    GROSSOEHME, DANIEL H.; RAGSDALE, JUDY; COTTON, SIAN; WOOLDRIDGE, JAMIE L.; GRIMES, LISA; SEID, MICHAEL

    2015-01-01

    Parents of children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis described it as “devastating.” Given religion’s importance to many Americans, parents may utilize religious coping. Relatively little is known about parents’ use of religious coping to handle their child’s illness. Interviews with 15 parents about their use of religion in the year following their child’s cystic fibrosis diagnosis were coded for religious coping styles. Sixteen styles were identified. Positive religious coping styles were more frequent than negative styles (previously associated with poorer health outcomes), and occurred more frequently than in other studies. Religious coping styles used to make meaning, gain control, or seek comfort/intimacy with God were equally prevalent. The most common styles were: Pleading, Collaboration, Benevolent Religious Reappraisals, and Seeking Spiritual Support. Parents described active rather than passive coping styles. Religious coping involving religious others was rare. Clinical attention to negative religious coping may prevent it becoming chronic and negatively affecting health. PMID:20658425