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Sample records for cystic pancreatic neoplasms

  1. Current perspectives on pancreatic serous cystic neoplasms: Diagnosis, management and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Yu, Zhong-Xun; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Dai, Meng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms have been increasingly recognized recently. Comprising about 16% of all resected pancreatic cystic neoplasms, serous cystic neoplasms are uncommon benign lesions that are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. Despite overall low risk of malignancy, these pancreatic cysts still generate anxiety, leading to intensive medical investigations with considerable financial cost to health care systems. This review discusses the general background of serous cystic neoplasms, including epidemiology and clinical characteristics, and provides an updated overview of diagnostic approaches based on clinical features, relevant imaging studies and new findings that are being discovered pertaining to diagnostic evaluation. We also concisely discuss and propose management strategies for better quality of life. PMID:27022447

  2. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms: Review of current knowledge, diagnostic challenges, and management options

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Tanima; Shroff, Jennifer; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions are being detected with increasing frequency, largely due to advances in cross-sectional imaging. The most common neoplasms include serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, and cystic pancreatic endocrine neoplasms. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are currently used as imaging modalities. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration has proved to be a useful diagnostic tool, and enables an assessment of tumor markers, cytology, chemistries, and DNA analysis. Here, we review the current literature on pancreatic cystic neoplasms, including classification, diagnosis, treatment, and recommendations for surveillance. Data for this manuscript was acquired via searching the literature from inception to December 2014 on PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE. PMID:25821410

  3. Prevalence, Diagnosis and Management of Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are found with increasing prevalence, especially in elderly asymptomatic individuals. Although the overall risk of malignancy is very low, the presence of these pancreatic cysts is associated with a large degree of anxiety and further medical investigation due to concerns about malignancy. This review discusses the different cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and reports diagnostic strategies based on clinical features and imaging data. Surgical and nonsurgical management of the most common cystic neoplasms, based on the recently revised Sendai guidelines, is also discussed, with special reference to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN; particularly the branch duct variant), which is the lesion most frequently identified incidentally. IPMN pathology, its risk for development into pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the pros and cons of current guidelines for management, and the potential role of endoscopic ultrasound in determining cancer risk are discussed. Finally, surgical treatment, strategies for surveillance of pancreatic cysts, and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:26343068

  4. Overweight increases the risk of malignancy in patients with pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Tien, Yu-Wen; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Yang, Ching-Yao; Liang, Po-Chin; Wong, Jau-Min; Chang, Ming-Chu

    2015-05-01

    Distinguishing between benign and malignant pancreatic cysts remains a clinical challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of body mass index (BMI) and preoperative clinical and cyst features, as described by the International Consensus Guidelines, on malignancy in patients with pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (PMCNs).A retrospective cohort study was performed on patients with PMCNs who underwent surgical resection between January 1994 and June 2014. Preoperative BMI, clinical demographic data, cystic features, tumor markers, and surgical pathology results were analyzed. Predictors of malignancy were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis using logistic regression.One hundred sixty-four cases of PMCNs, including 106 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and 58 mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), were analyzed. On univariate analysis, older age (P = 0.008), male sex (P = 0.007), high-risk stigmata (P = 0.007), diabetes mellitus (DM; P = 0.008), and BMI >25 (P < 0.001) were associated with malignancy. Multivariate analysis found that BMI >25 (odds ratio, 3.99; 95% confidence interval: 1.60-10) was an independent predictor of malignancy. In subgroup analysis, BMI >25 was an independent predictor of malignancy in IPMNs but not in MCNs.Overweight patients with IPMNs have a higher risk of malignancy and should be followed closely or undergo resection. The operative strategy for PMCNs should consider cyst-related and patient-related risk factors. PMID:25997051

  5. Overweight Increases the Risk of Malignancy in Patients with Pancreatic Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Tien, Yu-Wen; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Yang, Ching-Yao; Liang, Po-Chin; Wong, Jau-Min; Chang, Ming-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Distinguishing between benign and malignant pancreatic cysts remains a clinical challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of body mass index (BMI) and preoperative clinical and cyst features, as described by the International Consensus Guidelines, on malignancy in patients with pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (PMCNs). A retrospective cohort study was performed on patients with PMCNs who underwent surgical resection between January 1994 and June 2014. Preoperative BMI, clinical demographic data, cystic features, tumor markers, and surgical pathology results were analyzed. Predictors of malignancy were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis using logistic regression. One hundred sixty-four cases of PMCNs, including 106 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and 58 mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), were analyzed. On univariate analysis, older age (P = 0.008), male sex (P = 0.007), high-risk stigmata (P = 0.007), diabetes mellitus (DM; P = 0.008), and BMI >25 (P < 0.001) were associated with malignancy. Multivariate analysis found that BMI >25 (odds ratio, 3.99; 95% confidence interval: 1.60–10) was an independent predictor of malignancy. In subgroup analysis, BMI >25 was an independent predictor of malignancy in IPMNs but not in MCNs. Overweight patients with IPMNs have a higher risk of malignancy and should be followed closely or undergo resection. The operative strategy for PMCNs should consider cyst-related and patient-related risk factors. PMID:25997051

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation, for pancreatic cystic neoplasms and neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Madhava; Habib, Nagy; Senturk, Hakan; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Reddy, Nageshwar; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kaba, Iyad; Beckebaum, Susanne; Drymousis, Panagiotis; Kahaleh, Michel; Brugge, William

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To outline the feasibility, safety, adverse events and early results of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in pancreatic neoplasms using a novel probe. METHODS: This is a multi-center, pilot safety feasibility study. The intervention described was radiofrequency ablation (RF) which was applied with an innovative monopolar RF probe (1.2 mm Habib EUS-RFA catheter) placed through a 19 or 22 gauge fine needle aspiration (FNA) needle once FNA was performed in patients with a tumor in the head of the pancreas. The Habib™ EUS-RFA is a 1 Fr wire (0.33 mm, 0.013”) with a working length of 190 cm, which can be inserted through the biopsy channel of an echoendoscope. RF power is applied to the electrode at the end of the wire to coagulate tissue in the liver and pancreas. RESULTS: Eight patients [median age of 65 (range 27-82) years; 7 female and 1 male] were recruited in a prospective multicenter trial. Six had a pancreatic cystic neoplasm (four a mucinous cyst, one had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and one a microcystic adenoma) and two had a neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in the head of pancreas. The mean size of the cystic neoplasm and NET were 36.5 mm (SD ± 17.9 mm) and 27.5 mm (SD ± 17.7 mm) respectively. The EUS-RFA was successfully completed in all cases. Among the 6 patients with a cystic neoplasm, post procedure imaging in 3-6 mo showed complete resolution of the cysts in 2 cases, whilst in three more there was a 48.4% reduction [mean pre RF 38.8 mm (SD ± 21.7 mm) vs mean post RF 20 mm (SD ± 17.1 mm)] in size. In regards to the NET patients, there was a change in vascularity and central necrosis after EUS-RFA. No major complications were observed within 48 h of the procedure. Two patients had mild abdominal pain that resolved within 3 d. CONCLUSION: EUS-RFA of pancreatic neoplasms with a novel monopolar RF probe was well tolerated in all cases. Our preliminary data suggest that the procedure is straightforward and safe. The

  7. Cytopathological Analysis of Cyst Fluid Enhances Diagnostic Accuracy of Mucinous Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Utomo, Wesley K.; Braat, Henri; Bruno, Marco J.; van Eijck, Casper H.J.; Koerkamp, Bas Groot; Krak, Nanda C.; van de Vreede, Adriaan; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Biermann, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Widespread use of cross-sectional imaging and increasing age of the general population has increased the number of detected pancreatic cystic lesions. However, several pathological entities with a variety in malignant potential have to be discriminated to allow clinical decision making. Discrimination between mucinous pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs) and nonmucinous pancreatic lesions is the primary step in the clinical work-up, as malignant transformation is mostly associated with mucinous PCN. We performed a retrospective analysis of all resected PCN in our tertiary center from 2000 to 2014, to evaluate preoperative diagnostic performance and the results of implementation of the consensus guidelines over time. This was followed by a prospective cohort study of patients with an undefined pancreatic cyst, where the added value of cytopathological mucin evaluation to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in cyst fluid for the discrimination of mucinous PCN and nonmucinous cysts was investigated. Retrospective analysis showed 115 patients operated for a PCN, with a correct preoperative classification in 96.2% of the patients. High-grade dysplasia or invasive carcinoma was observed in only 32.3% of mucinous PCN. In our prospective cohort (n = 71), 57.7% of patients were classified as having a mucinous PCN. CEA ≥192 ng/mL had an accuracy of 63.4%, and cytopathological mucin evaluation an accuracy of 73.0%. Combining these 2 tests further improved diagnostic accuracy of a mucinous PCN to 76.8%. CEA level and mucin evaluation were not predictive of the degree of dysplasia. These findings show that adding cytopathology to cyst fluid biochemistry improves discrimination between mucinous PCN and nonmucinous cysts.

  8. Managing incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms with integrated molecular pathology is a cost-effective strategy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ananya; Brugge, William; Mishra, Girish; Smith, Dennis M.; Sachdev, Mankanwal; Ellsworth, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Current guidelines recommend using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) testing and cytology to manage incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCN); however, studies suggest a strategy including integrated molecular pathology (IMP) of cyst fluid may further aid in predicting risk of malignancy. Here, we evaluate several strategies for diagnosing and managing asymptomatic PCN using healthcare economic modeling. Patients and methods: A third-party-payer perspective Markov decision model examined four management strategies in a hypothetical cohort of 1000 asymptomatic patients incidentally found to have a 3 cm solitary pancreatic cystic lesion. Strategy I used cross-sectional imaging, recommended surgery only if symptoms or risk factors emerged. Strategy II considered patients for resection without initial EUS. Strategy III (EUS + CEA + Cytology) referred only those with mucinous cysts (CEA > 192 ng/mL) for resection. Strategy IV implemented IMP; a commercially available panel provided a “Benign,” “Mucinous,” or “Aggressive” classification based on the level of mutational change in cyst fluid. “Benign” and “Mucinous” patients were followed with surveillance; “Aggressive” patients were referred for resection. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALY), relative risk with 95 %CI, Number Needed to Treat (NNT), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated. Results: Strategy IV provided the greatest increase in QALY at nearly identical cost to the cheapest approach, Strategy I. Relative risk of malignancy compared to the current standard of care and nearest competing strategy, Strategy III, was 0.18 (95 %CI 0.06 – 0.53) with an NNT of 56 (95 %CI 34 – 120). Conclusions: Use of IMP was the most cost-effective strategy, supporting its routine clinical use. PMID:26528505

  9. Determining the natural history of pancreatic cystic neoplasms: a Manitoban cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Jon; Lipschitz, Jeremy; Cantor, Michael; Moffatt, Dana; Abdoh, Ahmed; McKay, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Most pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCN) are thought to harbor a low malignant potential. This historical cohort study attempts to describe the natural history of these lesions in a provincial cohort, to assess the safety of non-surgical management. Pathological diagnosis of malignancy was the primary outcome measure of interest. Methods All adult patients (age 18+) with PCN seen between 2000 and 2012 by the two main institutions in Manitoba were included in this study. PCN were graded as high and low risk, which dictated initial treatment plan (surgery or observation). Predictors of initial surgical treatment, delayed surgery in the observation group and the clinical/radiological predictors of malignancy were determined. Results 497 patients were included in this study. 43 (8.7%) high-risk lesions underwent initial surgery, with 13 (30.2%) cases of malignancy discovered. 450 (90.5%) low-risk cysts were observed for a median of 17.3 months (range: 0.00–142.3). 29 (6.4%) cases of delayed surgery occurred, with malignancy discovered in five (17.2%). Conclusions This study supports current selection criteria for management of PCNs. Due to the low incidence of malignancy in low-risk PCN, it appears that long-term observation is safe and should be the treatment modality of choice in the absence of high-risk features. PMID:27037209

  10. [Cystic lymphangioma of the transverse mesocolon simulating neoplasm of the pancreatic tail].

    PubMed

    Zago, A; Tosi, D; Portuese, D; Rosa, G

    1997-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are uncommon lesions interesting surgeons above all for frequently difficulties in the preoperatory diagnosis. The role of radiology is to demonstrate the nature of these abdominal masses, but only with surgery we can establish a definitive histologic diagnosis. The authors report a case of a lynphangioma of the transverso mesocolon, miming a pancreatic neoplasm. PMID:9235871

  11. Premalignant cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Vikas; Allen, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Due to increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are frequently being diagnosed. Many of these cysts have premalignant potential and offer a unique opportunity for cancer prevention. Mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm are the major premalignant cystic neoplasms of pancreas. The prediction of the risk of malignancy (incidental and future risk of malignant transformation) and balancing the risks of watchful waiting with that of operative management with associated mortality and morbidity is the key to the management of these lesions. We review the literature that has contributed to the development of our approach to the management of these cystic neoplasms. We provide an overview of the key features used in diagnosis and in predicting malignancy. Particular attention is given to the natural history and management decision making. PMID:25726053

  12. Anaplastic Carcinoma Arising in a Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm Masquerading as Pancreatic Pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Aldaoud, Najla; Joudeh, Amani; Al-Momen, Sami; Alnahawi, Mamdouh; Al-Abbadi, Mousa A

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) of the pancreas can vary from benign to premalignant and malignant. Preoperative diagnosis is essential to offer the patient appropriate treatment. Occasionally these cases may harbor anaplastic carcinoma while clinically masquerade as a pseudocyst. Here in, we report an unusual case of a 37-year old female presented with recurrent abdominal pain that was suspected clinically and by imaging studies to have a pseudocyst. EUS-FNA with internal drainage of the cyst was performed. Cytological evaluation of the cyst fluid showed numerous inflammatory cells composed mainly of many neutrophils admixed with macrophages reminiscent of the usual pseudocyst content but there were scattered rare dyscohesive malignant cells which were highly pleomorphic with multinucleation. Immunostains on the cell block showed immunoreactivity of these cells including the multinucleated cells for Cam 5.2 and AE1/AE3 and focally for Ber-Ep4, Moc -31, and CA19-9. The subsequent resection confirmed the presence of anaplastic (undifferentiated) carcinoma (AC) arising in a MCN of the pancreas. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:538-542. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028547

  13. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Beiderwellen, K; Sabet, A; Lauenstein, T C; Lahner, H; Poeppel, T D

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. PMID:27003413

  14. Uncommon presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; De Robertis, Riccardo; Capelli, Paola; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Crosara, Stefano; Gobbo, Stefano; Butturini, Giovanni; Salvia, Roberto; Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms are a wide group of solid and cystic lesions with different and often characteristic imaging features, clinical presentations, and management. Among solid tumors, ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common: it arises from exocrine pancreas, comprises about 90% of all pancreatic neoplasms, and generally has a bad prognosis; its therapeutic management must be multidisciplinary, involving surgeons, oncologists, gastroenterologists, radiologists, and radiotherapists. The second most common solid pancreatic neoplasms are neuroendocrine tumors: they can be divided into functioning or non-functioning and present different degrees of malignancy. Cystic pancreatic neoplasms comprise serous neoplasms, which are almost always benign, mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, which can vary from benign to frankly malignant lesions, and solid pseudopapillary tumors. Other pancreatic neoplasms, such as lymphoma, metastases, or pancreatoblastoma, are rarely seen in clinical practice and have different and sometimes controversial managements. Rare clinical presentations and imaging appearance of the most common pancreatic neoplasms, both solid and cystic, are more frequently seen and clinically relevant than rare pancreatic tumors; their pathologic and radiologic appearances must be known to improve their management. The purpose of this paper is to present some rare or uncommon clinical and radiological presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms providing examples of multi-modality imaging approach with pathologic correlations, thus describing the histopathological bases that can explain the peculiar imaging features, in order to avoid relevant misdiagnosis and to improve lesion management. PMID:25772002

  15. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases. PMID:26675058

  16. Cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands with concomitant perihilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Tsuneyuki; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ito, Takaaki; Okamura, Yukiyasu; Sugiura, Teiichi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old man with cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands detected preoperatively by radiologic examination. Enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density mass 2.2 cm in diameter in the right hepatic hilum and a cystic lesion around the common hepatic duct. Under a diagnosis of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma, right hepatectomy with caudate lobectomy and bile duct resection were performed. Pathological examination revealed perihilar cholangiocarcinoma mainly involving the right hepatic duct. The cystic lesion was multilocular and covered by columnar lining epithelia exhibiting increased proliferative activity and p53 nuclear expression; it also contained foci of micropapillary and glandular proliferation. Therefore, the lesion was diagnosed as a cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands and resembled flat branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. Histological examination showed the lesion was discontinuous with the perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed the cystic neoplasm was strongly positive for MUC6 and that the cholangiocarcinoma was strongly positive for MUC5AC and S100P. These results suggest these two lesions have different origins. This case warrants further study on whether this type of neoplasm is associated with concomitant cholangiocarcinoma as observed in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with concomitant pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma. PMID:26900302

  17. Cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands with concomitant perihilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tsuneyuki; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ito, Takaaki; Okamura, Yukiyasu; Sugiura, Teiichi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2016-02-21

    We report a case of a 75-year-old man with cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands detected preoperatively by radiologic examination. Enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density mass 2.2 cm in diameter in the right hepatic hilum and a cystic lesion around the common hepatic duct. Under a diagnosis of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma, right hepatectomy with caudate lobectomy and bile duct resection were performed. Pathological examination revealed perihilar cholangiocarcinoma mainly involving the right hepatic duct. The cystic lesion was multilocular and covered by columnar lining epithelia exhibiting increased proliferative activity and p53 nuclear expression; it also contained foci of micropapillary and glandular proliferation. Therefore, the lesion was diagnosed as a cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands and resembled flat branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. Histological examination showed the lesion was discontinuous with the perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed the cystic neoplasm was strongly positive for MUC6 and that the cholangiocarcinoma was strongly positive for MUC5AC and S100P. These results suggest these two lesions have different origins. This case warrants further study on whether this type of neoplasm is associated with concomitant cholangiocarcinoma as observed in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with concomitant pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma. PMID:26900302

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Recently, with the rapid scanning time and improved image quality, outstanding advances in magnetic resonance (MR) methods have resulted in an increase in the use of MRI for patients with a variety of pancreatic neoplasms. MR multi-imaging protocol, which includes MR cross-sectional imaging, MR cholangiopancreatography and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography, integrates the advantages of various special imaging techniques. The non-invasive all-in-one MR multi-imaging techniques may provide the comprehensive information needed for the preoperative diagnosis and evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms. Pancreatic neoplasms include primary tumors and pancreatic metastases. Primary tumors of the pancreas may be mainly classified as ductal adenocarcinomas, cystic tumors and islet cell tumors (ICT). Pancreatic adenocarcinomas can be diagnosed in a MRI study depending on direct evidence or both direct and indirect evidence. The combined MRI features of a focal pancreatic mass, pancreatic duct dilatation and parenchymal atrophy are highly suggestive of a ductal adenocarcinoma. Most cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are either microcystic adenomas or mucinous cystic neoplasms. Intraductal papillary mucinous tumors are the uncommon low-grade malignancy of the pancreatic duct. ICT are rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells in the pancreas or the periampullary region. ICT are classified as functioning and non-functioning. The most frequent tumors to metastasize to the pancreas are cancers of the breast, lung, kidney and melanoma. The majority of metastases present as large solitary masses with well-defined margins. PMID:17650223

  19. Clinicopathologic Characteristics of 29 Invasive Carcinomas Arising in 178 Pancreatic Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms With Ovarian-type Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kee-Taek; Park, Sang Mo; Basturk, Olca; Bagci, Pelin; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Stelow, Edward B.; Walters, Dustin M.; Choi, Dong Wook; Choi, Seoung Ho; Heo, Jin Seok; Sarmiento, Juan M.; Reid, Michelle D.; Adsay, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Information on the clinicopathologic characteristics of invasive carcinomas arising from mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) is limited, because in many early studies they were lumped and analyzed together with noninvasive MCNs. Even more importantly, many of the largest prior studies did not require ovarian-type stroma (OTS) for diagnosis. We analyzed 178 MCNs, all strictly defined by the presence of OTS, 98% of which occurred in perimenopausal women (mean age, 47 y) and arose in the distal pancreas. Twenty-nine (16%) patients had associated invasive carcinoma, and all were female with a mean age of 53. Invasion was far more common in tumors with grossly visible intracystic papillary nodule formation ≥ 1.0 cm (79.3% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.000) as well as in larger tumors (mean cyst size: 9.4 vs. 5.4 cm, P = 0.006); only 4/29 (14%) invasive carcinomas occurred in tumors that were < 5 cm; however, none were < 3 cm. Increased serum CA19-9 level (> 37 U/L) was also more common in the invasive tumors (64% vs. 23%, P = 0.011). Most invasive carcinomas (79%) were of tubular type, and the remainder (5 cases) were mostly undifferentiated carcinoma (2, with osteoclast-like giant cells), except for 1 with papillary features. Interestingly, there were no colloid carcinomas; 2 patients had nodal metastasis at the time of diagnosis, and both died of disease at 10 and 35 months, respectively. While noninvasive MCNs had an excellent prognosis (100% at 5 y), tumors with invasion often had an aggressive clinical course with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 44% and 26%, respectively (P = 0.000). The pT2 (> 2 cm) invasive tumors had a worse prognosis than pTl (≤ 2 cm) tumors (P = 0.000), albeit 3 patients with T1a (< 0.5 cm) disease also died of disease. In conclusion, invasive carcinomas are seen in 16% of MCNs and are mostly of tubular (pancreatobiliary) type; colloid carcinoma is not seen in MCNs. Serum CA19-9 is often higher in invasive carcinomas, and invasion is typically seen in OTS

  20. Cystic renal neoplasms and renal neoplasms associated with cystic renal diseases in adults: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Garg, Deepak; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Vikram, Raghu

    2012-01-01

    Cystic renal neoplasms in adults are a heterogeneous group of tumors with characteristic histogenesis, pathological findings, and variable biological profiles. They include disparate entities that are either biologically benign (lymphangioma, cystic nephroma, and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor) or malignant (cystic renal cell carcinoma, multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma, and primary renal synovial sarcoma). Renal cystic diseases are characterized by cystic changes of the kidneys due to hereditary, developmental, or acquired etiology. Cystic renal diseases such as acquired cystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis are associated with the development of a wide spectrum of benign and malignant renal neoplasms. Most cystic renal tumors and cystic disease-associated renal neoplasms show characteristic cross-sectional imaging findings that permit accurate diagnosis. In addition, cross-sectional imaging is pivotal in the follow-up and surveillance of adult cystic tumors of the kidney. PMID:23192202

  1. Pancreatic pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas is one of the earliest, and most commonly affected, organs in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Studying the pathogenesis of pancreatic disease is limited in CF patients, due to its early clinical onset, co-morbidities and lack of tissue samples from the early phases of disease. In recent years, several new CF animal models have been developed that have advanced our understanding of both CF exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease. Additionally, these models have helped us to better define the influence of pancreatic lesions on CF disease progression in other organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and lung. PMID:26365583

  2. Cystic Neoplasms of the Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ribaux, C.; Schnyder, P.

    1990-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare and their diagnosis and treatment can be difficult. This report details 7 patients who had histologically proven serous cystadenoma4, mucinous cystadenoma2 and cystadeno carcinoma1. Computed tomography and sonography allowed excellent preoperative assessment but to attempt a distinction between the histological variants may be hazardous. Two tumours were only autopsy findings and 5 patients underwent laparotomy. It is confirmed that potentially malignant mucinous cystadenomas and cytadenocarcinomas should be resected whenever possible; serous cystadenomas are always benign and should therefore be resected only when the diagnosis is doubtful or if they cause symptoms. PMID:2278913

  3. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  4. [A case of mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver].

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Ryoji; Amizuka, Hisato; Matsubara, Yu; Yoshizaki, Koji; Sakamoto, Jun; Sato, Ryu; Kimura, Keisuke; Nishimori, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Tomoyuki

    2015-07-01

    We present a case of resected mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver in a 71-year-old woman admitted to our hospital with epigastric discomfort. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a multi-locular cystic tumor measuring 35 mm in diameter in segment IV of the liver. Left hepatic lobectomy was performed based on the diagnosis of mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver; subsequent histology revealed that the tumor was multi-locular, cystic, and lined with a single layer of columnar epithelium with low-grade atypia and was associated with a typical ovarian-like stroma. There was no evidence (imaging or histological) to support communication of the cyst with the intrahepatic bile duct, despite modest bile deposition being observed in the cystic wall. The definitive diagnosis was mucinous cystic neoplasm with low-grade intrahepatic epithelial neoplasia. PMID:26155869

  5. Immunohistochemical analysis of steroidogenic enzymes in ovarian-type stroma of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms: Comparative study of subepithelial stromal cells in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuyuki; Sasano, Hironobu; Moriya, Takuya; Takahashi, Yayoi; Sugimoto, Ryo; Mue, Yoshiharu; Murakami, Keigo; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Morikawa, Takanori; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Suzuki, Takashi; Unno, Michiaki; Sugai, Tamotsu

    2016-05-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) are generally defined as cyst-forming epithelial neoplasms that arise in the pancreas and harbor characteristic ovarian-type stroma beneath the epithelium. In this study, we compared the immunoreactivity of steroid-related factors in these subepithelial stromal cells in MCNs to those in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) to further characterize this unique MCN ovarian-type stroma through evaluation of sex steroid biosynthesis. Twenty MCNs and twenty IPMNs were examined. Immunoreactivity of steroid hormone receptors, including estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR, PR-A, and PR-B), and androgen receptor (AR), was more frequently detected in MCN ovarian-type stromal cells than in IPMN stromal cells (P < 0.01). The H-scores (mean ± SD) of steroidogenic factor (SF)-1 were also significantly higher in MCNs (112.3 ± 33.1) than in IPMNs (0.9 ± 1.2) (P < 0.01). The steroidogenic enzymes cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (P450c17) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) showed immunoreactivity in 9/20 (45.0 %), 15/20 (75.0 %) and 13/20 (65.0 %), respectively, of ovarian-type stroma from MCN cases. These results demonstrate that the ovarian-type stroma of MCNs can express steroidogenic enzymes. Thus, the ovarian-type stroma of MCNs can produce sex steroids that may also act on these cells. PMID:27060902

  6. [Modern imaging of liver and pancreatic neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Mátéka, Ilona; Bikhazi, Ziad; Bartha, Éva; Palkó, András

    2015-03-01

    Modern imaging modalities play an outstanding role in the detection, characterization, staging, therapy planning, treatment outcome evaluation and follow-up of patients with liver and pancreatic neoplasms. Diagnostic performance and accuracy of the available modalities are continuously improving therefore, it is necessary to overview from time to time the diagnostic protocols and algorithms. PMID:25763911

  7. Assessment of pancreatic neoplasms: review of biopsy techniques.

    PubMed

    Goldin, Steven B; Bradner, Michael W; Zervos, Emmanuel E; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2007-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the 4th leading cause of cancer death annually. Recent technological advances in imaging have led to non-uniformity in the evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms. The following article describes the history behind various biopsy techniques and the rationale for obtaining a biopsy of a pancreatic neoplasm and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of the various pancreatic biopsy techniques, including fine needle aspiration biopsy, Tru-cut needle biopsy, endoscopic brushings/cytology, and endoscopic ultrasound guided biopsies. A treatment algorithm for pancreatic neoplasms is then presented. PMID:17562121

  8. Follicular pancreatitis: a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis-an additional mimic of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajib K; Xie, Bill H; Patton, Kurt T; Lisovsky, Mikhail; Burks, Eric; Behrman, Stephen W; Klimstra, David; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Follicular pancreatitis is a recently described variant of chronic pancreatitis characterized clinically by the formation of a discrete pancreatic mass and histologically by the presence of florid lymphoid aggregates with reactive germinal centers. Our aim was to study the clinical and histologic features of follicular pancreatitis, as well as to critically examine potential overlap with autoimmune pancreatitis. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, CD21, κ and λ light chains as well as IgG4 and IgG were performed. We found a total of 6 patients (male-female ratio, 2:1; mean age, 57 years) who fulfilled the diagnosis of follicular pancreatitis in our institutions. Four had an incidental diagnosis, while two presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, and elevated liver enzymes. On imaging, 3 patients had a discrete solid mass, whereas 2 cases showed a dilated main pancreatic duct, mimicking an intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm on imaging. One patient had a lesion in the intra-pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. On histopathology, all cases showed numerous lymphoid follicles with Bcl-2-negative germinal centers either in a periductal or in a more diffuse (periductal and intra-parenchymal) fashion, but without attendant storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, or granulocytic epithelial lesions. IgG4-to-IgG ratio was <40% in 5 cases. A comparison cohort revealed germinal centers in 25% of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis and 2% of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis cases, but none were periductal in location. In conclusion, follicular pancreatitis, an under-recognized mimic of pancreatic neoplasms is characterized by intrapancreatic lymphoid follicles with reactive germinal centers. PMID:26563969

  9. Periampullary Diverticula Misdiagnosed as Cystic Pancreatic Lesions: A Review of 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chee Hui; Lee, Chau Hung

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Female, 67 • Male, 69 • Female, 65 Final Diagnosis: Periampullary diverticulum Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Specialty: Radiology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Cystic lesions on the pancreatic head can mimic fluid-filled duodenal or periampullary diverticula. We reviewed a series of cases in which periampullary diverticula were misdiagnosed as cystic pancreatic lesions. Case Report: Case 1. A Chinese woman presented to the surgical outpatient clinic for intermittent upper abdominal discomfort. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the abdomen revealed a cystic-appearing lesion in the region of the pancreatic head, which was reported as a cystic pancreatic lesion. A follow-up scan showed this lesion to be filled with fluid, gas, and debris, suggestive of a periampullary diverticulum. Review of a prior CT scan confirmed a periampullary diverticulum. Case 2. A Chinese man with a history of chronic hepatitis B infection underwent an MRI of the liver, which revealed a cystic-appearing lesion in the region of the pancreatic head, reported as a cystadenoma or pseudocyst. The patient underwent an endoscopic ultrasound. A large periampullary diverticulum was discovered but there was no pancreatic head lesion. Case 3. A Chinese woman with a history total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for ovarian malignancy underwent an MRI of the abdomen and pelvis. A cystic-appearing lesion was found in the region of the pancreatic head, which was reported as a cystadenoma or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Follow-up magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed a signal void within, suggestive of gas within a periampullary diverticulum. Review of a prior CT scan showed a periampullary diverticulum. Conclusions: Periampullary diverticula, when fluid-filled, can be confused with cystic lesions in the pancreatic head. Radiologists should be aware of this potential pitfall

  10. Pancreatic Cystosis in Two Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kampouras, Asterios; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Markou, Andreas; Anastasiou, Athanasia; Tsanakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present pancreatic cystosis in two adolescents with cystic fibrosis, a 13-year-old girl and an 18-year-old boy. In pancreatic cystosis, which is a rare manifestation of CF, the pancreatic parenchyma is replaced with multiple cysts of different sizes. Pancreatic cystosis is mainly an imaging based diagnosis and frequent follow-up should be recommended. PMID:27110419

  11. Pancreatic Cystosis in Two Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kampouras, Asterios; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Markou, Andreas; Anastasiou, Athanasia; Tsanakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present pancreatic cystosis in two adolescents with cystic fibrosis, a 13-year-old girl and an 18-year-old boy. In pancreatic cystosis, which is a rare manifestation of CF, the pancreatic parenchyma is replaced with multiple cysts of different sizes. Pancreatic cystosis is mainly an imaging based diagnosis and frequent follow-up should be recommended. PMID:27110419

  12. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Therapies in Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; DiMaio, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from being primarily a diagnostic modality into an interventional endoscopic tool for the management of both benign and malignant gastrointestinal illnesses. EUS-guided therapy has garnered particular interest as a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a disease often complicated by its aggressive course and poor survival. The potential advantage of an EUS-guided approach revolves around real-time imaging for targeted therapy of a difficult to reach organ. In this review, we focus on EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:25802863

  13. Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Georgios; Tangalos, Athanasios; Pappa, Polyxeni; Papageorgiou, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Background Mucinous cystic neoplasms arise in the ovary and various extra-ovarian sites. While their pathogenesis remains conjectural, their similarities suggest a common pathway of development. There have been rare reports involving the mesentery as a primary tumour site. Case presentation A cystic mass of uncertain origin was demonstrated radiologically in a 22 year old female with chronic abdominal pain. At laparotomy, the mass was fixed within the colonic mesentery. Histology demonstrated a benign mucinous cystadenoma. Methods and results We review the literature on mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery and report on the pathogenesis, biologic behavior, diagnosis and treatment of similar extra-ovarian tumors. We propose an updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors. Conclusion Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery present almost exclusively in women and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenteric tumors. Only full histological examination of a mucinous cystic neoplasm can exclude a borderline or malignant component. An updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors is proposed. PMID:19454018

  14. Endoscopic approach to the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Mine, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Because of the aging of the population, prevalence of medical checkups, and advances in imaging studies, the number of pancreatic cystic lesions detected has increased. Once these lesions are detected, neoplastic cysts should be differentiated from non-neoplastic cysts. Furthermore, because of the malignant potential of some neoplastic pancreatic cysts, further differentiation between benign and malignant cysts should be made regardless of their size. Although endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has a very high diagnostic performance for pancreatic cystic lesions among the various imaging modalities, EUS findings alone are insufficient for the differentiation of pancreatic cysts and diagnosis of malignancy. In addition, cytology by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has a high specificity but a low sensitivity for diagnosing malignancy in pancreatic cystic tumors. The levels of amylase, lipase, and tumor markers in pancreatic cystic fluid are considered auxiliary parameters for diagnosis of benign and malignant cysts, and a definitive diagnosis of malignancy using these parameters is difficult. Thus, in addition to EUS, cytology by EUS-FNA, and cystic fluid analysis, new techniques based on EUS-guided through-the-needle imaging, such as confocal laser endomicroscopy and cystoscopy, have been explored in recent years. PMID:26909130

  15. Endoscopic approach to the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic tumor.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Mine, Tetsuya

    2016-02-15

    Because of the aging of the population, prevalence of medical checkups, and advances in imaging studies, the number of pancreatic cystic lesions detected has increased. Once these lesions are detected, neoplastic cysts should be differentiated from non-neoplastic cysts. Furthermore, because of the malignant potential of some neoplastic pancreatic cysts, further differentiation between benign and malignant cysts should be made regardless of their size. Although endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has a very high diagnostic performance for pancreatic cystic lesions among the various imaging modalities, EUS findings alone are insufficient for the differentiation of pancreatic cysts and diagnosis of malignancy. In addition, cytology by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has a high specificity but a low sensitivity for diagnosing malignancy in pancreatic cystic tumors. The levels of amylase, lipase, and tumor markers in pancreatic cystic fluid are considered auxiliary parameters for diagnosis of benign and malignant cysts, and a definitive diagnosis of malignancy using these parameters is difficult. Thus, in addition to EUS, cytology by EUS-FNA, and cystic fluid analysis, new techniques based on EUS-guided through-the-needle imaging, such as confocal laser endomicroscopy and cystoscopy, have been explored in recent years. PMID:26909130

  16. Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm of the Liver Masquerading as an Echinococcal Cyst: Radiologic-pathologic Differential of Complex Cystic Liver Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Daniel; Jiang, Kun; Anaya, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Although simple liver cysts are common, complex cystic liver lesions are infrequent and represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The differential diagnosis of complex cystic liver lesions can be grouped into neoplastic, infectious or inflammatory, and miscellaneous pathologic entities. Clinicians should remember to consider mucinous cystic neoplasm and echinococcal cysts in the differential, which are uncommon etiologies for liver lesions but may expose unique challenges. We present a case of a 49-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of a new complex cystic liver lesion. The following brief review describes how radiologic imaging and pathologic testing can help distinguish between the broad spectrum of diseases that may produce cystic liver lesions. PMID:27195178

  17. Update on surgical treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Jan G; Tosolini, Chiara; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Kong, Bo; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Kleeff, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare and account for only 2%-4% of all pancreatic neoplasms. All PNENs are potential (neurendocrine tumors PNETs) or overt (neuroendocrine carcinomas PNECs) malignant, but a subset of PNETs is low-risk. Even in case of low-risk PNETs surgical resection is frequently required to treat hormone-related symptoms and to obtain an appropriate pathological diagnosis. Low-risk PNETs in the body and the tail are ideal for minimally-invasive approaches which should be tailored to the individual patient. Generally, surgeons must aim for parenchyma sparing in these cases. In high-risk and malignant PNENs, indications for tumor resection are much wider than for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, in many cases due to the relatively benign tumor biology. Thus, patients with locally advanced and metastatic PNETs may benefit from extensive resection. In experienced hands, even multi-organ resections are accomplished with acceptable perioperative morbidity and mortality rates and are associated with excellent long term survival. However, poorly differentiated neoplasms with high proliferation rates are associated with a dismal prognosis and may frequently only be treated with chemotherapy. The evidence on surgical treatment of PNENs stems from reviews of mostly single-center series and some analyses of nation-wide tumor registries. No randomized trial has been performed to compare surgical and non-surgical therapies in potentially resectable PNEN. Though such a trial would principally be desirable, ethical considerations and the heterogeneity of PNENs preclude realization of such a study. In the current review, we summarize recent advances in the surgical treatment of PNENs. PMID:25320524

  18. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.

  19. 64-Slice spiral computed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction in the diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    WEN, ZHAOXIA; YAO, FENGQING; WANG, YUXING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of cystic pancreatic tumors using computed tomography (CT) and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of post-imaging three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Clinical and imaging data, including multi-slice spiral CT scans, enhanced scans and multi-faceted reconstruction, from 30 patients with pathologically confirmed cystic pancreatic tumors diagnosed at the Linyi People's Hospital between August 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Following the injection of Ultravist® 300 contrast agent, arterial, portal venous and parenchymal phase scans were obtained at 28, 60 and 150 sec, respectively, and 3D reconstructions of the CT images were generated. The average age of the patients was 38.4 years (range, 16–77 years), and the cohort included 5 males and 25 females (ratio, 1:5). The patients included 8 cases of mucinous cystadenoma (DA), 80%]; 9 cases of cystadenocarcinoma (DA, 84%); 6 cases of serous cystadenoma (DA, 100%); 3 cases of solid pseudopapillary tumor (DA, 100%); and 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (DA, 100%). 3D reconstructions of CT images were generated and, in the 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, the tumor was connected to the main pancreatic duct and multiple mural nodules were detected in one of these cases. The DA of the 3D-reconstructed images of cystic pancreatic tumors was 89.3%. The 64-slice spiral CT and 3D-reconstructed CT images facilitated the visualization of cystic pancreatic tumor characteristics, in particular the connections between the tumor and the main pancreatic duct. In conclusion, the 3D reconstruction of multi-slice CT data may provide an important source of information for the surgical team, in combination with the available clinical data. PMID:27073473

  20. Pancreatic Cystic Fluid Reference Set — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The proposed reference set will be designed to evaluate biomarkers for the following applications aimed at determining whether a patient would benefit from surgical resection of their cystic lesion: 1. Distinguish between pancreatic cysts that have high-malignant potential and cysts that have low or no malignant potential at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a. By analysis of blood b. By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 2. Distinguish between cysts that have any malignant potential (high and low) and cysts that have no malignant potential (benign lesions) at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a. By analysis of blood b. By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 3. Distinguish between a cyst that is mucinous (malignant potential) or non-mucinous (no malignant potential) at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a. By analysis of blood b. By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 4. Distinguish between pancreatic cysts that have high-malignant potential and cysts that have low or no malignant potential at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a. By analysis of blood 5. Distinguish between cysts that have any malignant potential (high and low) and cysts that have no malignant potential (benign lesions) at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a. By analysis of blood 6. Distinguish between a cyst that is mucinous (malignant potential) or non-mucinous (no malignant potential) at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a. By analysis of blood If successful in meeting these afore-mentioned objectives, these results can then be used in the development of future studies at identifying the need for additional evaluation (i.e., endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration) of an incidental cyst

  1. Gastrointestinal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Meghana Nitin; Freeman, Alvin Jay

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis (CF), but significant involvement within gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems occurs as well. As in the airways, defects in CFTR alter epithelial surface fluid, mucus viscosity, and pH, increasing risk of stasis through the various hollow epithelial-lined structures of the gastrointestinal tract. This exerts secondary influences that are responsible for most gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary manifestations of CF. Understanding these gastrointestinal morbidities of CF is essential in understanding and treating CF as a multisystem disease process and improving overall patient care. PMID:27469182

  2. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC NEOPLASMS IN THE MUMMICHOG (FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS) FROM A CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high prevalence of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms occurred in mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, from a creosote-contaminated site in the Elizabeth River, Virginia. otal of 20 neoplasms occurred in a group of about 1 100 fish evaluated histologically. f 240 adult fish collected d...

  3. Cystic acantholytic dyskeratosis of the vulva: An unusual presentation of a follicular adnexal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Kara Melissa Tiangco; Junkins-Hopkins, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Acantholytic dyskeratosis (AD) is a histologic pattern seen in Darier's disease or dyskeratosis follicularis, warty dyskeratoma, and transient AD. This pattern is characterized by suprabasilar clefting, acantholysis, and formation of corps ronds and grains. We present a case of AD that is unique based on its genital location and cystic architecture. A 53-year-old woman presented with an otherwise asymptomatic cyst on her left vulva of uncertain duration. On microscopic examination, there were fragments of cystic epithelium with areas of hypergranulosis, acantholysis, corps ronds, and corps grains formation. These features are felt by the authors to be a unique presentation of a follicular adnexal neoplasm. PMID:27559500

  4. A case of pancreatic heterotopy of duodenal wall, intraductal papillary mucinous tumor and intraepithelial neoplasm of pancreas, papillary carcinoma of kidney in a single patient.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Cinzia; Franciosi, Claudio; Degrate, Luca; Caprotti, Roberto; Romano, Fabrizio; Perego, Elisa; Trezzi, Rosangela; Leone, Biagio Eugenio; Uggeri, Franco

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of the contemporaneous presence of two histologically different pancreatic neoplasms, one renal cancer and one embryogenic duodenal anomaly in a single patient. A 66-year-old man underwent ultrasound examination because of urinary disorders; a solid neoformation within the inferior pole of the left kidney was observed. Computed tomography confirmed the renal lesion, but also a heterogeneous mass within the pancreatic head appeared without bile ducts dilatation. Abdominal magnetic resonance revealed a multiloculated cystic component of the pancreatic mass. A second CT scan confirmed the renal and biliary findings, but it revealed a modest enlargement of the pancreatic asymptomatic mass. A resection of the left kidney inferior pole and a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy were performed. Histopathologic analysis of the surgical specimen revealed mild differentiated papillary renal carcinoma, intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma of the pancreatic head, foci of intraepithelial pancreatic neoplasm and pancreatic heterotopy of duodenal muscular and submucosal layers. The coexistence of several primaries and anomalies in one patient led us to suppose a genetic predisposition to different lesions, even in the absence of known familial genetic syndromes. The study of such cases may help to improve the investigation of molecular correlations and etiological factors of different solid tumors. Nowadays, surgery is the only effective cure. PMID:17168444

  5. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of benign or malignant cystic lesions can be observed in the pancreas. Pancreatic cystic lesions are classified under pathology terms into simple retention cysts, pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasm is a frequent type of cystic neoplasm and has a malignant potential. Serous cystadenoma follows in frequency and is usually benign. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are the most commonly resected cystic pancreatic neoplasms characterized by dilated segments of the main pancreatic duct and/or side branches, the wall of which is covered by mucus secreting cells. These neoplasms can occupy the pancreatic head or any part of the organ. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is rare, has a low tendency for malignancy, and is usually located in the pancreatic body or tail. Endoscopic ultrasound with the use of fine-needle aspiration and cytology permits discrimination of those lesions. In this review, the main characteristics of those lesions are presented, as well as recommendations regarding their follow up and management according to recent guidelines. PMID:27065727

  6. Cystic lesions of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K

    2016-01-01

    Different types of benign or malignant cystic lesions can be observed in the pancreas. Pancreatic cystic lesions are classified under pathology terms into simple retention cysts, pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasm is a frequent type of cystic neoplasm and has a malignant potential. Serous cystadenoma follows in frequency and is usually benign. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are the most commonly resected cystic pancreatic neoplasms characterized by dilated segments of the main pancreatic duct and/or side branches, the wall of which is covered by mucus secreting cells. These neoplasms can occupy the pancreatic head or any part of the organ. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is rare, has a low tendency for malignancy, and is usually located in the pancreatic body or tail. Endoscopic ultrasound with the use of fine-needle aspiration and cytology permits discrimination of those lesions. In this review, the main characteristics of those lesions are presented, as well as recommendations regarding their follow up and management according to recent guidelines. PMID:27065727

  7. Pancreatic Cystic Fluid Reference Set — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The proposed reference set will be designed to evaluate biomarkers for the following applications aimed at determining whether a patient would benefit from surgical resection of their cystic lesion: 1.   Distinguish between pancreatic cysts that have high-malignant potential and cysts that have low or no malignant potential at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a.   By analysis of blood b.   By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 2.   Distinguish between cysts that have any malignant potential (high and low) and cysts that have no malignant potential (benign lesions) at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a.   By analysis of blood b.   By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 3.   Distinguish between a cyst that is mucinous (malignant potential) or non-mucinous (no malignant potential) at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a.   By analysis of blood b.   By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 4.   Distinguish between pancreatic cysts that have high-malignant potential and cysts that have low or no malignant potential at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a.   By analysis of blood 5.   Distinguish between cysts that have any malignant potential (high and low) and cysts that have no malignant potential (benign lesions) at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a.   By analysis of blood 6.   Distinguish between a cyst that is mucinous (malignant potential) or non-mucinous (no malignant potential) at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a.   By analysis of blood If successful in meeting these afore-mentioned objectives, these results can then be used in the development of future studies at identifying the need for additional evaluation (i.e., endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration) of an incidental cystic lesion identified on abdominal imaging.

  8. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  9. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear–cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections. PMID:25216027

  10. Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy After Pancreatic Resection for Invasive Carcinoma Associated With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Michael J.; Hsu, Charles C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guler, Mehmet; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. One-third are associated with invasive carcinoma. We examined the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for this cohort. Methods and Materials: Patients who had undergone pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed. Of these patients, 83 with a resected pancreatic mass were found to have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma, 70 of whom met inclusion criteria for the present analysis. Results: The median age at surgery was 68 years. The median tumor size was 3.3 cm, and invasive carcinoma was present at the margin in 16% of the patients. Of the 70 patients, 50% had metastases to the lymph nodes and 64% had Stage II disease. The median survival was 28.0 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57% and 45%, respectively. Of the 70 patients, 40 had undergone adjuvant CRT. Those receiving CRT were more likely to have lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and Stage II-III disease. The 2-year survival rate after surgery with vs. without CRT was 55.8% vs. 59.3%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with lymph node metastases or positive surgical margins benefited significantly from CRT (p = .047 and p = .042, respectively). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT was associated with improved survival, with a relative risk of 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.95; p = .044) after adjusting for major confounders. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT conferred a 57% decrease in the relative risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with an associated invasive component after adjusting for major confounders. Patients with lymph node metastases or positive margins appeared to particularly benefit from CRT after definitive surgery.

  11. Cystic nephroma/mixed epithelial stromal tumor: a benign neoplasm with potential for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Belinda L; Abern, Michael; Garzon, Steven; Setty, Suman

    2015-05-01

    Cystic nephroma (CN) is a rare, benign, renal neoplasm composed of epithelial and stromal elements. Only about 200 cases have been reported since 1892 and recurrence has rarely been observed. We report a 32-year-old Hispanic woman, with a history of a right, complex cystic, renal mass treated by robotic decortication 2 years ago, who presented with flank pain, hematuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection. A magnetic resonance imaging study showed a 3.4-cm multicystic lesion with thickened septa and enhancement at the right kidney. The partial nephrectomy specimen revealed a well-circumscribed, multicystic tumor abutting the renal pelvis, with thick septa and smooth walls, filled with clear fluid. Microscopic examination showed variably sized cysts lined by cuboidal epithelium with focal hobnailing, without significant cytologic atypia and mitosis. The epithelial lining was positive for CK19, high molecular weight cytokeratin, and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase suggesting a primitive tubular epithelial phenotype. Primitive glomeruli-like structures were also present. The ovarian-like stroma was condensed around the cysts and was variably cellular with areas of muscle differentiation and thick-walled vessels. The stroma was positive for desmin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and CD10. We suggest that CN represents a variable mixture of epithelial and stromal elements, immature glomerular, tubular, muscle, and vascular elements, which may be present in variable proportions creating a spectrum of lesions previously described as CN and mixed epithelial and stromal tumors (MEST). This case emphasizes that CN/MEST clinically/radiologically mimics other cystic renal neoplasms, especially cystic renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma, necessitating histopathological examination and immunohistochemial studies for definitive diagnosis. Additionally, CN has the tendency to recur when not completely excised initially. PMID:25525149

  12. Safety and Efficacy of EUS-Guided Ethanol Ablation for Treating Small Solid Pancreatic Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Paik, Woo Hyun; Seo, Dong Wan; Dhir, Vinay; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2016-01-01

    The strategy for treating small borderline malignant pancreatic neoplasms--such as neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN)--is surgical resection. However, pancreatic resection of these lesions still causes significant morbidity. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of EUS-guided ethanol ablation to treat small solid pancreatic neoplasms. A total of 8 patients with small borderline malignant pancreatic neoplasms and co-morbidities who refused surgery were included. We identified 2 cases of nonfunctioning NET, 3 cases of insulinomas, 1 case of gastrinoma, and 2 cases of SPN. EUS-guided ethanol ablation was performed, and treatment outcomes were assessed with clinical symptom, hormone assay, and imaging study. The mean tumor diameter was 15  mm (range, 7-29  mm), and the median volume of injected ethanol was 2.8  mL (range, 1.2-10.5  mL). There was 1 severe acute pancreatitis after EUS-guided ethanol ablation with 20-gauge CPN needle. During follow-up (median 16.5 months), 6 patients achieved treatment success; however, 2 patients (1 nonfunctioning NET and 1 SPN) still had persistent tumors. The patient with persistent SPN underwent surgical resection and the histopathological results showed peripancreatic infiltration with perineural invasion. Among 6 patients who achieved initial treatment success, 1 patient experienced tumor recurrence within 15 months and underwent repeated EUS-guided ethanol ablation. In conclusion, EUS-guided ethanol ablation therapy is a promising option for patients with small solid pancreatic neoplasm. Multiple sessions or surgical interventions may be required if there is a recurrent or persistent mass, and procedure-related adverse events must be carefully monitored. PMID:26825894

  13. Glandular neoplasms of the urachus: a report of 55 cases emphasizing mucinous cystic tumors with proposed classification.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mahul B; Smith, Steven C; Eble, John N; Rao, Priya; Choi, William W L; Tamboli, Pheroze; Young, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    Published experience remains limited for glandular neoplasms of the urachus, especially mucinous cystic tumors. We reviewed 55 glandular urachal neoplasms to evaluate their clinical features and histopathologic spectrum and to devise a classification system for the mucinous cystic forms. Within the 55 cases studied, we observed 2 groups with differing clinical, gross, and histopathologic features. The first group, invasive, noncystic adenocarcinomas (n=24), had clinicopathologic features in accord with the known spectrum of urachal adenocarcinoma (mean age 50 y, female:male ratio 1.7, with recurrence or death from disease in 9/16 cases over a 45 mo mean follow-up). The second group, mucinous cystic tumors (n=31), morphologically resembled mucinous cystic tumors of the ovary and appeared classifiable by the same approach (mean age 47 y, female:male ratio 1.4) and included mucinous cystadenoma (n=4), mucinous cystic tumor of low malignant potential (n=22, including 2 cases with intraepithelial carcinoma), and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma with microscopic (n=4) or frank invasion (n=1). Follow-up information was available for 13 patients with mucinous cystic tumors (mean 41 mo); we observed no local recurrence or distant metastasis. This experience suggests that there is a distinct group of glandular, cystic tumors of the urachus that is classifiable in a manner similar to ovarian neoplasms and that has a favorable prognosis after complete excision. As with cystic neoplasms of other organs, rigorous sampling is recommended to identify potentially small foci of carcinoma that could be missed by inadequate sampling. Accordingly, classification based on methods other than complete surgical excision may be hazardous. PMID:25025366

  14. Successful Control of Liver Metastases From Pancreatic Solid-Pseudopapillary Neoplasm (SPN) Using Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Violari, Elena G. Brody, Lynn A.; Covey, Anne M.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Getrajdman, George I.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Reidy, Diane L.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brown, Karen T.

    2015-04-15

    No systemic agents that are known to be effective for the treatment of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) are available. We report the prolonged and sustained control of metastatic pancreatic SPN to the liver using hepatic arterial embolization (HAE), where a total of 13 HAE sessions were performed over a 6-year period.

  15. [Intestinal occlusion due to pancreatitis mimicking stenosing neoplasm of the splenic angle of the colon].

    PubMed

    Pascual, M; Pera, M; Martínez, I; Miquel, R; Grande, L

    2005-01-01

    Colonic involvement in patients with severe acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis is common and complications such as paralytic ileus, segmental necrosis and pancreatic-colonic fistulae have been described. However, mechanical occlusion of the colon due to pancreatitis is infrequent. We present the case of a 45-year-old man with occlusion of the colon secondary to asymptomatic pancreatitis mimicking a locally advanced stenosing neoplasm of the splenic angle. Ten years prior to the present episode the patient had presented acute alcoholic pancreatitis complicated by a pseudocyst requiring surgery. The current reason for admission was abdominal colic pain and constipation with onset 5 days previously. Contrast enema was administered showing colonic occlusion caused by stenosis at the splenic flexure, suggesting the presence of a neoplasm. Urgent laparotomy showed the presence of a tumor originating in the colon that infiltrated the splenic hilum. Subtotal colectomy and en-bloc splenectomy were performed. Histopathological analysis showed pericolonic inflammation and fibrosis secondary to pancreatitis; the colonic mucosa showed no tumoral infiltration. To date, fewer than 30 cases of this infrequent complication have been published. PMID:15989813

  16. Spread of Intraductal Papillary Neoplasm Arising from the Cystic Duct of the Biliary Tree

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Yoshihiko; Yokota, Yuki; Komoto, Satoshi; Kubota, Nobuhito; Okamoto, Takahiro; Ishido, Nobuhiro; Okino, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) is a variant type of the bile duct carcinoma characterized by intraductal growth. IPNB is also recognized as a precursor of invasive carcinoma. We describe herein an extremely rare case of IPNB arising from the cystic duct. A 68-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for investigation of epigastralgia and abnormal levels of biliary tract enzyme. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass lesion spreading from the cystic duct to the upper-middle bile duct. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography demonstrated diffuse duct dilation with a grossly visible intraductal mass and amorphous blobs, suggesting the presence of mucobilia or scattered tumors. We performed extrahepatic bile duct resection with lymphadenectomy. Macroscopically, a friable papillary tumor originated from the cystic duct grows intraluminally into the bile duct. Pathologically, the tumor was found to be intramucosal adenocarcinoma spreading to the whole extrahepatic bile duct, which was compatible with IPNB. We should discuss the features and progression processes of IPNB through this precious case.

  17. Pancreatic lipoma with a solid nodule mimicking invasion from adjoining intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Yoko; Maeda, Eriko; Gonoi, Wataru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Ikemura, Masako; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-06-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital for a mass in the pancreatic head found during screening chest computed tomography. Contrast computed tomography showed a 5-cm multicystic mass with an irregular border containing a solid component showing contrast enhancement. Caudal to this mass, a 5-cm solid mass of fat density with a nodular soft-tissue component was found. Cytology of the aspirated pancreatic fluid revealed malignant cells, and surgery was performed for suspected intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma. Pathologic analysis of the resected specimen revealed a collision tumor of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with high-grade dysplasia and pancreatic lipoma. The soft-tissue component within the lipoma was a nodule consisting of pancreatic tissue with inflammatory infiltration and hyalinization and was not associated with IPMN invasion. PMID:27257448

  18. Elevated Erythropoietin and Multicystic Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Nai, Qiang; Regeti, Kalyani; Arshed, Sabrina; Hossain, Mohammed Amzad; Zhang, Ping; Luo, Hongxiu; Singh, Shilpi; Mathew, Teena; Islam, Mohammed; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla M.; Duhl, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are more frequently recognized due to the widespread use of improved imaging techniques. There are a variety of pancreatic cystic lesions with different clinical presentations and malignant potentials, and their management depends on the type of the cysts. Although the early recognition of a cystic neoplasm with malignant potential provides an opportunity of early surgical treatment, the precise diagnosis of the cystic neoplasm can be a challenge, largely due to the lack of reliable biomarkers of malignant transformation. We report a case of a large, multicystic neoplasm within the body and tail of the pancreas complicated by elevated erythropoietin, which is likely related to the malignant transformation of the pancreatic neoplasm. PMID:25873882

  19. Elevated erythropoietin and multicystic neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Nai, Qiang; Regeti, Kalyani; Arshed, Sabrina; Hossain, Mohammed Amzad; Zhang, Ping; Luo, Hongxiu; Singh, Shilpi; Mathew, Teena; Islam, Mohammed; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla M; Duhl, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are more frequently recognized due to the widespread use of improved imaging techniques. There are a variety of pancreatic cystic lesions with different clinical presentations and malignant potentials, and their management depends on the type of the cysts. Although the early recognition of a cystic neoplasm with malignant potential provides an opportunity of early surgical treatment, the precise diagnosis of the cystic neoplasm can be a challenge, largely due to the lack of reliable biomarkers of malignant transformation. We report a case of a large, multicystic neoplasm within the body and tail of the pancreas complicated by elevated erythropoietin, which is likely related to the malignant transformation of the pancreatic neoplasm. PMID:25873882

  20. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Treatment of Pancreatic Cystic and Solid Masses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic tumor is one of the most difficult diseases to diagnose and treat because of its anatomical location and characteristics. Recently, there have been several innovative trials on the treatment of pancreatic tumors using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) because it allows selective access to the difficult to reach target organ along the gastrointestinal tract and can differentiate vessels by color Doppler. Among these trials, several have investigated EUS-guided ethanol lavage with or without paclitaxel for pancreatic cystic tumors. These studies show a 33% to 79% complete resolution rate with a favorable safety profile. Compared to EUS-guided ethanol lavage for pancreatic cystic tumors, EUS-guided radiofrequency ablation is considered a less invasive treatment method for pancreatic cancer. Although there are still several difficulties and concerns about complications, one clinical study reported 72.8% feasibility with favorable safety, and therefore, we anticipate the results of ongoing studies with these new less invasive techniques. PMID:26240804

  1. Solid tumors of the pancreas can put on a mask through cystic change

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Solid pancreatic tumors such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT), and pancreatic endocrine tumor (PET) may occasionally manifest as cystic lesions. In this study, we have put together our accumulated experience with cystic manifestations of various solid tumors of the pancreas. Methods From 2000 to 2006, 376 patients with pancreatic solid tumor resections were reviewed. Ten (2.66%) of these tumors appeared on radiological imaging studies as cystic lesions. We performed a retrospective review of medical records and pathologic findings of these 10 cases. Results Of the ten cases in which solid tumors of the pancreas manifested as cystic lesions, six were PDAC with cystic degeneration, two were SPT undergone complete cystic change, one was cystic PET, and one was a cystic schwannoma. The mean tumor size of the cystic portion in PDAC was 7.3 cm, and three patients were diagnosed as 'pseudocyst' with or without cancer. Two SPT were found incidentally in young women and were diagnosed as other cystic neoplasms. One cystic endocrine tumor was preoperatively suspected as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm or mucinous cystic neoplasm. Conclusions Cystic changes of pancreas solid tumors are extremely rare. However, the possibility of cystic manifestation of pancreas solid tumors should be kept in mind. PMID:21771323

  2. Pancreatic and biliary secretion are both altered in cystic fibrosis pigs

    PubMed Central

    Giriyappa, Radhamma; Meyerholz, David K.; Griffin, Michelle; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Stoltz, David A.; Ludwig, Paula; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Taft, Peter; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The pancreas, liver, and gallbladder are commonly involved in cystic fibrosis (CF), and acidic, dehydrated, and protein-rich secretions are characteristic findings. Pancreatic function studies in humans have been done by sampling the jejunal fluid. However, it has been difficult to separately study the function of pancreatic and biliary systems in humans with CF, because jejunal fluid contains a mixture of bile and pancreatic fluids. In contrast, pancreatic and biliary ducts open separately into the porcine intestine; therefore, biliary and pancreatic fluid can be individually analyzed in CF pigs. We studied newborn wild-type (WT) and CF pigs and found that CFTR was localized to the pancreatic ducts. We collected bile and pancreatic fluid and analyzed pancreatic enzymes with activity assays and immunoblot. Pancreatic enzyme expression was significantly decreased in CF compared with WT pigs. The volume and pH of pancreatic fluid were significantly lower and protein concentration was >5-fold higher in CF pigs. Secretin stimulation increased pancreatic fluid volume and pH in WT, but not CF, pigs. Baseline bile volume did not differ between WT and CF pigs, but volume did not increase in response to secretin in CF pigs. Bile pH was lower and protein concentration was twofold higher in CF pigs. These results indicate that pancreatic and biliary secretions are altered in CF pigs. Abnormal pancreatic and biliary secretion in CF may have important implications in disease pathogenesis. PMID:22936270

  3. Pancreatic and biliary secretion are both altered in cystic fibrosis pigs.

    PubMed

    Uc, Aliye; Giriyappa, Radhamma; Meyerholz, David K; Griffin, Michelle; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Stoltz, David A; Ludwig, Paula; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Taft, Peter; Welsh, Michael J

    2012-10-15

    The pancreas, liver, and gallbladder are commonly involved in cystic fibrosis (CF), and acidic, dehydrated, and protein-rich secretions are characteristic findings. Pancreatic function studies in humans have been done by sampling the jejunal fluid. However, it has been difficult to separately study the function of pancreatic and biliary systems in humans with CF, because jejunal fluid contains a mixture of bile and pancreatic fluids. In contrast, pancreatic and biliary ducts open separately into the porcine intestine; therefore, biliary and pancreatic fluid can be individually analyzed in CF pigs. We studied newborn wild-type (WT) and CF pigs and found that CFTR was localized to the pancreatic ducts. We collected bile and pancreatic fluid and analyzed pancreatic enzymes with activity assays and immunoblot. Pancreatic enzyme expression was significantly decreased in CF compared with WT pigs. The volume and pH of pancreatic fluid were significantly lower and protein concentration was >5-fold higher in CF pigs. Secretin stimulation increased pancreatic fluid volume and pH in WT, but not CF, pigs. Baseline bile volume did not differ between WT and CF pigs, but volume did not increase in response to secretin in CF pigs. Bile pH was lower and protein concentration was twofold higher in CF pigs. These results indicate that pancreatic and biliary secretions are altered in CF pigs. Abnormal pancreatic and biliary secretion in CF may have important implications in disease pathogenesis. PMID:22936270

  4. Candida albicans pancreatitis in a child with cystic fibrosis post lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Mark M; Zhang, Lingxin; Stoll, Janis M; Sheybani, Elizabeth F

    2016-04-01

    We present a case of Candida albicans infection of a previously intact pancreas in a child with cystic fibrosis status post lung transplantation. Although Candida superinfection in necrotizing pancreatitis is not uncommon, this is a unique case of Candida infection of non-necrotic pancreatic parenchyma. This case presented a diagnostic dilemma for radiologists because it appeared virtually identical to acute interstitial edematous pancreatitis on imaging. Ultimately, endoscopic US-based biopsy was pursued for diagnosis. Although difficult to treat and compounded by the immunocompromised status of the child, the pancreatic infection improved with antifungal therapy. PMID:26546567

  5. GNAS(R201H) and Kras(G12D) cooperate to promote murine pancreatic tumorigenesis recapitulating human intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Taki, K; Ohmuraya, M; Tanji, E; Komatsu, H; Hashimoto, D; Semba, K; Araki, K; Kawaguchi, Y; Baba, H; Furukawa, T

    2016-05-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), the most common pancreatic cystic neoplasm, is known to progress to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma. IPMNs commonly harbor activating somatic mutations in GNAS and KRAS, primarily GNAS(R201H) and KRAS(G12D). GNAS encodes the stimulatory G-protein α subunit (Gsα) that mediates a stimulatory signal to adenylyl cyclase to produce cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), subsequently activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. The GNAS(R201H) mutation results in constitutive activation of Gsα. To study the potential role of GNAS in pancreatic tumorigenesis in vivo, we generated lines of transgenic mice in which the transgene consisted of Lox-STOP-Lox (LSL)-GNAS(R201H) under the control of the CAG promoter (Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS)). These mice were crossed with pancreatic transcription factor 1a (Ptf1a)-Cre mice (Ptf1a(Cre/+)), generating Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS);Ptf1a(Cre/+) mice. This mouse line showed elevated cAMP levels, small dilated tubular complex formation, loss of acinar cells and fibrosis in the pancreas; however, no macroscopic tumorigenesis was apparent by 2 months of age. We then crossed Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS);Ptf1a(Cre/+) mice with LSL-Kras(G12D) mice, generating Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS);LSL-Kras(G12D);Ptf1a(Cre/+) mice. We used these mice to investigate a possible cooperative effect of GNAS(R201H) and Kras(G12D) in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Within 5 weeks, Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS);LSL-Kras(G12D);Ptf1a(Cre/+) mice developed a cystic tumor consisting of marked dilated ducts lined with papillary dysplastic epithelia in the pancreas, which closely mimicked the human IPMN. Our data strongly suggest that activating mutations in GNAS and Kras cooperatively promote murine pancreatic tumorigenesis, which recapitulates IPMN. Our mouse model may serve as a unique in vivo platform to find biomarkers and effective drugs for diseases associated with GNAS mutations. PMID:26257060

  6. Non-pancreatic retroperitoneal mucinous neoplasms and a discussion of the differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Camilla; Raza, Anwar Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal mucinous neoplasms are common and have a wide range of differential diagnoses to consider. It is of utmost importance to maintain a multidisciplinary approach when evaluating these lesions. Clinical history, surgical impression and radiographic studies should be obtained and used in conjunction with morphology and immunohistochemistry to help guide the pathologist to the correct diagnosis. We recently encountered a case of a 51-year-old man who presented with an 11.5 cm left-sided retroperitoneal mucinous neoplasm. This lesion was initially diagnosed as a low-grade mucinous carcinoma of probable pancreatic origin at an outside facility, and he was subsequently treated with chemotherapy. One year later he presented to our institution and underwent retroperitoneal en bloc resection of the 7-cm residual multiloculated mucinous neoplasm. When discussed at tumor board additional medical history was obtained, and review of the patient’s chart revealed a remote history of left orchiectomy for a mixed malignant germ cell tumor and metastatic embryonal carcinoma in 2 of 34 retroperitoneal/para-aortic lymph nodes. With no clinical evidence of tumor in the pancreas or extension from it, the predominately para-aortic location of the tumor favors a mucinous carcinoma arising from a rest of mature metastatic/proliferating teratoma that persisted after chemotherapy. This case illustrates the importance of a thorough history, however remote, and correlation with imaging in the development of differential diagnoses, as well as, the need to consider non-pancreaticobiliary sources of retroperitoneal mucinous tumors. PMID:27034817

  7. Pancreatic mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm with clear cells leading to diagnosis of von Hippel Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Sharma, Mehar C; Yadav, Rajni; Panwar, Rajesh; Mathur, Sandeep R; Iyer, Venkateswaran K; Sahni, Peush

    2016-08-01

    Mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasms are extremely rare tumors that are usually seen in female patients and are often associated with von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease. We describe the case of a 38-year-old male who presented with complaints of anorexia, weight loss, and abdominal pain. CT abdomen showed a mass in the head of the pancreas, multiple small nodules in the body of pancreas, and bilateral adrenal masses. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) from the mass showed features of a neuroendocrine tumor, with many of the cells demonstrating abundant clear cytoplasm. Histopathological examination of the pancreaticoduodenectomy specimen showed a mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm with two components viz. serous cystadenoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) World Health Organization (WHO) grade 2. In addition, he was diagnosed to have bilateral pheochromocytomas and a paraganglioma. The synchronicity of these tumors suggested the possibility of VHL disease. Thus, identification of a NET with clear cells or of a mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm should raise suspicion of VHL disease. In a mixed tumor, FNAC may identify only one of the two components. Thorough processing of all pancreatic serous tumors for pathological examination is recommended, as NET may occur as a small nodule within the serous cystadenoma. PMID:27161305

  8. [Pancreatic cystic fibrosis in Mexicans over 15 years of age].

    PubMed

    Quezada, R; Hernandez, N; Sada, E

    1990-01-01

    A better knowledge of cystic fibrosis of the pancreas has contributed to raise the detection of cystic fibrosis in adults. We describe nine Mexican patients older than 15 years with cystic fibrosis. Respiratory symptoms were predominant and they were secondary to bronchiectasis. All patients were infected by mucoid Pseudomona aeruginosa and in some cases, the finding of this microorganism in sputum suggested the diagnosis. In Mexican population the cystyc fibrosis of the pancreas can be found in adult patients, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic respiratory diseases in adults. PMID:2125356

  9. The chromatin regulator Brg1 suppresses formation of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    von Figura, Guido; Fukuda, Akihisa; Roy, Nilotpal; Liku, Muluye E.; Morris, John P.; Kim, Grace E.; Russ, Holger A.; Firpo, Matthew A.; Mulvihill, Sean J.; Dawson, David W.; Ferrer, Jorge; Mueller, William F.; Busch, Anke; Hertel, Klemens J.; Hebrok, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) develops through distinct precursor lesions, including pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN). However, genetic features resulting in IPMN-associated PDA (IPMN–PDA) versus PanIN-associated PDA (PanIN-PDA) are largely unknown. Here we find that loss of Brg1, a core subunit of SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complexes, cooperates with oncogenic Kras to form cystic neoplastic lesions that resemble human IPMN and progress to PDA. Although Brg1-null IPMN–PDA develops rapidly, it possesses a distinct transcriptional profile compared with PanIN-PDA driven by mutant Kras and hemizygous p53 deletion. IPMN–PDA also is less lethal, mirroring prognostic trends in PDA patients. In addition, Brg1 deletion inhibits Kras-dependent PanIN development from adult acinar cells, but promotes Kras-driven preneoplastic transformation in adult duct cells. Therefore, this study implicates Brg1 as a determinant of context-dependent Kras-driven pancreatic tumorigenesis and suggests that chromatin remodelling may underlie the development of distinct PDA subsets. PMID:24561622

  10. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:27543868

  11. Nonepithelial Neoplasms of the Pancreas: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation, Part 1--Benign Tumors: From the Radiologic Pathology Archives.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Srivastava, Amogh; Paal, Edina E; Gould, Charles F; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2016-01-01

    Solid and cystic pancreatic neoplasms are being recognized more frequently with increasing utilization and spatial resolution of modern imaging techniques. In addition to the more common primary pancreatic solid (ductal adenocarcinoma) and cystic neoplasms of epithelial origin, nonepithelial neoplasms of the pancreas may appear as well-defined solid or cystic neoplasms. Most of these lesions have characteristic imaging features, such as a well-defined border, which allows differentiation from ductal adenocarcinoma. Solid masses include neurofibroma, ganglioneuroma, leiomyoma, lipoma, and perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa). Schwannomas and desmoid tumors can be solid or cystic. Cystic tumors include mature cystic teratoma and lymphangioma. Lipoma, PEComa, and mature cystic teratoma can contain fat, and ganglioneuroma and mature cystic teratoma may contain calcification. Although these unusual benign neoplasms are rare, the radiologist should at least consider them in the differential diagnosis of well-defined lesions of the pancreas. The goal of this comprehensive review is to improve understanding of these rare primary pancreatic mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26761535

  12. Immunobiology and immunosurveillance in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), premalignant precursors of pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Pamela L; van der Geest, Rick; Hashash, Jana G; Kimura, Takashi; Gutkin, Dmitriy; Brand, Randall E; Finn, Olivera J

    2016-07-01

    Premalignant lesions for many cancers have been identified, and efforts are currently directed toward identification of antigens expressed on these lesions that would provide suitable targets for vaccines for cancer prevention. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are premalignant pancreatic cysts of which a subset has the potential to progress to cancer. Currently, there are no validated predictive markers for progression to malignancy. We hypothesized that the presence or absence of immune surveillance of these lesions would be one such factor. Here we show that the tumor antigen MUC1, which is abnormally expressed on pancreatic cancer and is a target for cancer immunosurveillance, is also abnormally expressed on premalignant IPMN. We show that some IPMN patients make MUC1-specific IgG. Moreover, we show evidence of CD4 and CD8 T cell infiltration into IPMN areas of high dysplasia suggesting an ongoing immune response within the lesions. We also found, however, increased levels of circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in some IPMN patients as well as evidence of T cell exhaustion. Further studies correlating immunosurveillance or immunosuppression with IPMN progression to malignancy will help define the immune response as a biomarker of risk, leading potentially to a vaccine to boost spontaneous immunity and prevent progression to cancer. PMID:27106024

  13. Nab-paclitaxel and Gemcitabine vs Gemcitabine Alone as Adjuvant Therapy for Patients With Resected Pancreatic Cancer (the "Apact" Study)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-22

    Pancreatic Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Neoplasms; Endocrine Gland Neoplasms; Pancreatic Diseases; Digestive System Diseases; Endocrine System Diseases; Gemcitabine; Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic

  14. The effect of exocrine pancreatic function on chloramphenicol pharmacokinetics in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, C J; Reed, M D; Stern, R C; Aronoff, S C; Yamashita, T S; Blumer, J L

    1988-04-01

    The effect of exocrine pancreatic function on the pharmacokinetics of the choramphenicol oral capsule (CAP-base), chloramphenicol palmitate oral liquid (CAP-P), and chloramphenicol succinate intravenous (CAP-S) formulations was evaluated in 10 patients, aged 16-30 yr, with cystic fibrosis. Pancreatic insufficiency was assessed in each patient by measuring the absorption of p-amino-benzoic acid after oral administration of N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid which requires chymotrypsin to cleave p-aminobenzoic from the parent molecule. In a controlled cross-over design, the overall biodisposition of each formulation was assessed in each patient with or without concurrent administration of oral pancreatic enzymes. The relative amounts of active chloramphenicol available in systemic circulation was CAP-base greater than CAP-S greater than CAP-P. Pancreatic enzyme replacement had little effect on the biodisposition parameters for the CAP-base and CAP-S formulation, but significantly increased the peak concentration and bioavailability of the CAP-P formulation. Although pancreatic enzyme replacement improved the absorption characteristics of the CAP-P formulation, absorption remained prolonged and unreliable. Serum concentration-time profiles for either CAP-base or CAP-S consistently exceeded the MIC of important nonpseudomonal pathogens. This finding was not observed after CAP-P administration independent of pancreatic enzyme replacement. The results of this study support the continued clinical use of either CAP-base or CAP-S, but the cautious use of CAP-P formulations in CF patients with concurrent pancreatic insufficiency. PMID:3374992

  15. A Sporadic Desmoid Tumor: an Exceptional Pancreatic Cystic-Solid Mass.

    PubMed

    Ardakani, Jalal Vahedian; Mehrjardi, Ali Zare; Wadji, Massoud Baghai; Saraee, Amir

    2016-08-01

    Desmoid tumors are locally aggressive and non-metastatic neoplasms with a high rate of recurrence. Desmoid tumors of the pancreas are, however, very rare, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. This paper reports an anecdotal case of a diffuse pancreatic desmoid tumor with the involvement of the pancreatic head, body, and-partially-tail. The patient underwent the Whipple procedure and subtotal pancreatectomy. Histopathological assessment showed that the tissues were partly positive for smooth muscle actin, but not for S100 or PanCK. The Ki67 index of the cells was only 1 %. Unfortunately, the patient died on the 10th postoperative day due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:27574352

  16. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment. PMID:24333829

  17. Molecular Diagnostics in the Evaluation of Pancreatic Cysts.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Brian K; Wald, Abigail I; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-09-01

    Within the past few decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the detection of incidental pancreatic cysts. It is reported a pancreatic cyst is identified in up to 2.6% of abdominal scans. Many of these cysts, including serous cystadenomas and pseudocysts, are benign and can be monitored clinically. In contrast, mucinous cysts, which include intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms, have the potential to progress to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we discuss the current management guidelines for pancreatic cysts, their underlying genetics, and the integration of molecular testing in cyst classification and prognostication. PMID:27523971

  18. Eosinophilic, Solid, and Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Clinicopathologic Study of 16 Unique, Sporadic Neoplasms Occurring in Women.

    PubMed

    Trpkov, Kiril; Hes, Ondrej; Bonert, Michael; Lopez, Jose I; Bonsib, Stephen M; Nesi, Gabriella; Comperat, Eva; Sibony, Mathilde; Berney, Daniel M; Martinek, Petr; Bulimbasic, Stela; Suster, Saul; Sangoi, Ankur; Yilmaz, Asli; Higgins, John P; Zhou, Ming; Gill, Anthony J; Przybycin, Christopher G; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; McKenney, Jesse K

    2016-01-01

    A unique renal neoplasm characterized by eosinophilic cytoplasm and solid and cystic growth was recently reported in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). We searched multiple institutional archives and consult files in an attempt to identify a sporadic counterpart. We identified 16 morphologically identical cases, all in women, without clinical features of TSC. The median age was 57 years (range, 31 to 75 y). Macroscopically, tumors were tan and had a solid and macrocystic (12) or only solid appearance (4). Average tumor size was 50 mm (median, 38.5 mm; range, 15 to 135 mm). Microscopically, the tumors showed solid areas admixed with variably sized macrocysts and microcysts that were lined by cells with a pronounced hobnail arrangement. The cells had voluminous eosinophilic cytoplasm with prominent granular cytoplasmic stippling and round to oval nuclei with prominent nucleoli. Scattered histiocytes and lymphocytes were invariably present. Thirteen of 16 patients were stage pT1; 2 were pT2, and 1 was pT3a. The cells demonstrated a distinct immunoprofile: nuclear PAX8 expression, predominant CK20-positive/CK7-negative phenotype, patchy AMACR staining, but no CD117 reactivity. Thirteen of 14 patients with follow-up were alive and without disease progression after 2 to 138 months (mean: 53 mo; median: 37.5 mo); 1 patient died of other causes. Although similar to a subset of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) seen in TSC, we propose that sporadic "eosinophilic, solid, and cystic RCC," which occurs predominantly in female individuals and is characterized by distinct morphologic features, predominant CK20-positive/CK7-negative immunophenotype, and indolent behavior, represents a novel subtype of RCC. PMID:26414221

  19. Characterization of intraductal papillary neoplasm of bile duct with respect to histopathologic similarities to pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kakuda, Yuko; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Miyata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Fukumura, Yuki; Sato, Yasunori; Sasaki, Motoko; Harada, Kenichi; Takase, Masaru

    2016-05-01

    Intraductal papillary neoplasm of bile duct (IPNB) is a papillary tumor covered by well-differentiated neoplastic epithelium with fine fibrovascular cores in the dilated bile ducts. It reportedly shows similarities to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of pancreas (IPMN), to various degrees. Herein, IPNB was pathologically analyzed by classifying 52 cases into 4 groups based on the histopathologic similarities to IPMN: group A (identical to IPMN, 19 cases), group B (similar to but slightly different from IPMN, 18 cases), group C (vaguely similar to IPMN, 5 cases), and group D (different from IPMN, 10 cases). In group A, intrahepatic and perihilar regions were mainly affected, most cases were of low/intermediate or high grade without invasion, and gastric type was the most common phenotype, followed by oncocytic and intestinal types. In groups C and D, perihilar and distal bile ducts were affected, almost all cases were of high grade with invasion, and most of them were of intestinal and pancreatobiliary phenotypes. Most group B cases were of intestinal phenotype, and all were of high grade with or without invasion. In conclusion, these 4 groups of IPNB showed unique pathologic features and behaviors. Group A cases were less aggressive and shared many features with IPMN, whereas group C and D cases were more aggressive and mainly found in perihilar and distal bile ducts. Group B resembling IPMN was intermediate between them. This classification may be useful in clinical practice and holds promise for a novel approach to analyze IPNB tumorigenesis. PMID:27067788

  20. Plexiform Angiomyxoid Myofibroblastic Tumor (PAMT) of Stomach with Synchronous Bilateral Cystic Ovarian Neoplasms, a Rare Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Jagannath Dattatreya; Sharief, Shiraz Ahamed; Goyal, Manish Kumar; Khan, Sameeha; Kauser, Lubna

    2016-03-01

    Plexiform Angiomyxoid Myofibroblastic Tumor (PAMT) is a recently identified mesenchymal tumor of the stomach, which was first described in the year 2007 and was added in the 2010 WHO classification of tumors of the digestive system World J Gastroenterol 16(6): 2835-2840, 2010. It closely resembles with other gastric tumors but distinctly varies in clinical management as well as the histopathology. We had a 51 year, female patient, laborer by profession with low socio economic status, who had abdominal pain with vomiting since 6 months. She had similar complaints 3 years ago for which she was evaluated and presumed to have Carcinoma Stomach and underwent laparotomy which ended up only with Gastro- Jejunal anastomosis. She was admitted at our institution. Endoscopy revealed antral bulge with central area ulceration and biopsy was taken which was not confirmatory for malignancy. CT images showed heterogeneous mass with necrotic changes arising from the duodenum favored the diagnosis of perigastric neoplasm. PET CT was done, 8.4 × 5 × 6.1 cm exophytic mass in the pyloric region of stomach with solid and cystic components causing significant gastric outlet obstruction. She underwent exploratory laparotomy and complete excision of mass with achievement of R0 clearance. Histopathology was reported as Plexiform angiomyxoid myofibroblastic tumor (PAMT). PMID:27065688

  1. Diagnostic imaging of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNEN): tumor detection, staging, prognosis, and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Baur, Alexander D J; Pavel, Marianne; Prasad, Vikas; Denecke, Timm

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNEN) are rare malignancies arising from neuroendocrine cells of the pancreas. Functional tumors can present with specific clinical syndromes due to hormonal secretion. These tumors can present as incidental findings on imaging performed for unrelated purposes or they are diagnosed when workup is initiated in patients with specific syndromes or metastases. This article presents an overview of available imaging techniques focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Recommendations regarding examination protocols are given. Typical imaging features of pNEN and metastases are described. Their potential value for the evaluation of prognosis as well as tumor response under treatment is discussed. PMID:25855665

  2. Pancreatic Hepatoid Carcinoma Mimicking a Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm: A Challenging Case on Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yutaka; Kato, Hironari; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Harada, Ryo; Oda, Shinsuke; Fushimi, Soichiro; Mizukawa, Shou; Yabe, Shuntaro; Uchida, Daisuke; Seki, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Yagi, Takahito; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of a 45 mm pancreatic mass found during a medical examination. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology showed polygonal cells with pseudopapillary structures. The tumor cells were positive for nuclear/cytoplasmic β-catenin and CD10, and negative for chromogranin A. After a tentative diagnosis of a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm, middle pancreatectomy was performed. Histologically, polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm formed in the trabeculae and were immunohistochemically positive for HepPar1 and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II. The tumor was finally diagnosed to be pancreatic hepatoid carcinoma. No recurrence occurred for 12 months, even without adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27580541

  3. P53 expression in invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma and precursor lesions.

    PubMed

    Norfadzilah, M Y; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Retneswari, M; Chinna, K; Noor, Laili M M

    2011-12-01

    Patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma are known to have a high mortality rate. The 5-year survival rate still remains low even now compared to that of the 1960's despite new advances in management including surgery, chemotherapy, pathological classification and molecular diagnostic technologies. Precursors to invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma have been identified in the last ten years that include mucinous cystic neoplasm, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. p53 protein accumulation in the nuclei is a common molecular event in most human neoplasms. Our objective is to investigate p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and precursor lesions and their significance. The selected study material encompassed 31 invasive ductal adenocarcinoma, 15 mucinous cystic neoplasm and papillary mucinous neoplasm, and 27 cases of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia including grade 1, 2 and 3. Immunoscore was given for each case based on intensity of staining and percentage of cells positive and compared between precursor lesions and invasive adenocarcinoma. A score of 50 and above was considered significant. The results showed that p53 expression increased progressively and significantly with the grade of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma (p-value < 0.001). These findings support the concept of multistep carcinogenesis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and suggest that p53 inactivation occurs in the progression of precursors to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:22299208

  4. Immunohistochemical analysis of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Vivian; Dueber, Julie; Wright, Jesse P; Cates, Justin; Revetta, Frank; Parikh, Alexander A; Merchant, Nipun B; Shi, Chanjuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). METHODS Tissue microarrays containing 88 PanNENs were immunohistochemically labeled with antibodies to β-catenin, E-cadherin, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), chromogranin and synaptophysin. One case had only metastatic tumors resected, whereas others (n = 87) received pancreatectomy with or without partial hepatectomy. Pathology slides, demographic, clinicopathologic, and follow up data were reviewed. Patients’ demographics, clinicopathologic features, and immunohistochemical results from 87 primary tumors were compared between patients with low stage (stage I/II) and high stage (stage III/IV) tumors. In addition, correlation of immunohistochemical results from primary tumors with disease-specific survival (DSS) was evaluated. RESULTS Strong membranous β-catenin staining in the primary tumor was observed in all 13 stage III/IV PanNENs as compared to 47% (35/74) of stage I/II tumors (P < 0.01). However, the strong membranous β-catenin staining was unassociated with tumor grade or DSS. Decreased membranous β-catenin staining was associated with decreased membranous E-cadherin labeling. Nuclear β-catenin staining was seen in 15% (2/13) of stage III/IV PanNENs as compared to 0% (0/74) of stage I/II tumors (P = 0.02). The case with metastasectomy only also showed nuclear β-catenin staining. Two of the three cases with nuclear β-catenin staining were familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. Lack of APC expression was seen in 70% (57/81) of the cases, including the 3 cases with nuclear β-catenin staining. Expression of E-cadherin and APC in primary tumor was not correlated with tumor grade, tumor stage, or disease specific survival. CONCLUSION The Wnt/β-catenin pathway was altered in some PanNENs, but did not Impact DSS. PanNENs in FAP patients demonstrated nuclear β-catenin accumulation and loss of APC. PMID:27574554

  5. Alcohol Disrupts Levels and Function of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Promote Development of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Maléth, József; Balázs, Anita; Pallagi, Petra; Balla, Zsolt; Kui, Balázs; Katona, Máté; Judák, Linda; Németh, István; Kemény, Lajos V.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Venglovecz, Viktória; Földesi, Imre; Pető, Zoltán; Somorácz, Áron; Borka, Katalin; Perdomo, Doranda; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Gray, Mike A.; Monterisi, Stefania; Zaccolo, Manuela; Sendler, Matthias; Mayerle, Julia; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Hegyi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Excessive consumption of ethanol is one of the most common causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Alterations to the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) also cause pancreatitis. However, little is known about the role of CFTR in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced pancreatitis. METHODS We measured CFTR activity based on chloride concentrations in sweat from patients with cystic fibrosis, patients admitted to the emergency department because of excessive alcohol consumption, and healthy volunteers. We measured CFTR levels and localization in pancreatic tissues and in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis induced by alcohol. We studied the effects of ethanol, fatty acids, and fatty acid ethyl esters on secretion of pancreatic fluid and HCO3− , levels and function of CFTR, and exchange of Cl− for HCO3− in pancreatic cell lines as well as in tissues from guinea pigs and CFTR knockout mice after administration of alcohol. RESULTS Chloride concentrations increased in sweat samples from patients who acutely abused alcohol but not in samples from healthy volunteers, indicating that alcohol affects CFTR function. Pancreatic tissues from patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis had lower levels of CFTR than tissues from healthy volunteers. Alcohol and fatty acids inhibited secretion of fluid and HCO3− , as well as CFTR activity, in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. These effects were mediated by sustained increases in concentrations of intracellular calcium and adenosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate, depletion of adenosine triphosphate, and depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In pancreatic cell lines and pancreatic tissues of mice and guinea pigs, administration of ethanol reduced expression of CFTR messenger RNA, reduced the stability of CFTR at the cell surface, and disrupted folding of CFTR at the endoplasmic reticulum. CFTR knockout mice given ethanol or fatty acids developed more

  6. Proteomic Mucin Profiling for the Identification of Cystic Precursors of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) are increasingly frequent radiological incidentalomas, with a considerable proportion representing precursors of pancreatic cancer. Better diagnostic tools are required for patients to benefit from this development. Methods To evaluate whether cyst fluid mucin expression could predict malignant potential and/or transformation in PCLs, a proteomic method was devised and prospectively evaluated in consecutive patients referred to our tertiary center for endoscopic ultrasound-guided aspiration of cystic lesions from May 2007 through November 2008 (discovery cohort) and from December 2008 through October 2012 (validation cohort). Cytology and cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; premalignancy > 192ng/mL, malignancy > 1000ng/mL) were routinely analyzed, and samples were further processed as follows: one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, excision of high-mass areas, tryptic digestion and nano-liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, with peptide identification by Mascot software and an in-house mucin database. All diagnostic evaluations were blinded to proteomics results. Histology was required to confirm the presence/absence of malignant transformation. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Proteomic mucin profiling proved statistically significantly more accurate (97.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 90.3% to 99.6%) than cytology (71.4%; 95% CI = 59.8% to 80.9%; P < .001) and cyst fluid CEA (78.0%; 95% CI = 65.0% to 87.3%; P < .001) in identifying the 37 (out of 79; 46.8%) lesions with malignant potential (ie, premalignant or malignant tumors). The accuracy of proteomics was nearly identical (96.6% vs 98.0%) between the discovery (n = 29) and validation (n = 50) cohorts. Furthermore, mucin profiling predicted malignant transformation, present in 16 out of 29 (discovery cohort: 9, validation cohort: 20) lesions with available histology, with 89.7% accuracy (95% CI = 71.5% to 97.3%) (for the validation

  7. Detection of Circulating Pancreas Epithelial Cells in Patients with Pancreatic Cystic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rhim, Andrew D.; Thege, Fredrik I.; Santana, Steven M.; Lannin, Timothy B.; Saha, Trisha N.; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R.; Kochman, Michael L.; Ginsberg, Gregory G.; Lieb, John G.; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J.; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2014-01-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We showed recently that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation, in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells (CECs) in patient blood samples. We captured >3 CECs/ml in 7 of 21 (33%) of patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with PDAC, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors develop, which might be used in risk assessment. PMID:24333829

  8. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas. PMID:27575268

  9. A Transient Metabolic Recovery from Early Life Glucose Intolerance in Cystic Fibrosis Ferrets Occurs During Pancreatic Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yaling; Sun, Xingshen; Gibson-Corley, Katherine; Xie, Weiliang; Liang, Bo; He, Nan; Tyler, Scott R; Uc, Aliye; Philipson, Louis H; Wang, Kai; Hara, Manami; Ode, Katie Larson; Norris, Andrew W; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF)-related diabetes in humans is intimately related to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, yet little is known about how these 2 disease processes simultaneously evolve in CF. In this context, we examined CF ferrets during the evolution of exocrine pancreatic disease. At 1 month of age, CF ferrets experienced a glycemic crisis with spontaneous diabetic-level hyperglycemia. This occurred during a spike in pancreatic inflammation that was preceded by pancreatic fibrosis and loss of β-cell mass. Surprisingly, there was spontaneous normalization of glucose levels at 2-3 months, with intermediate hyperglycemia thereafter. Mixed meal tolerance was impaired at all ages, but glucose intolerance was not detected until 4 months. Insulin secretion in response to hyperglycemic clamp and to arginine was impaired. Insulin sensitivity, measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, was normal. Pancreatic inflammation rapidly diminished after 2 months of age during a period where β-cell mass rose and gene expression of islet hormones, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, and adiponectin increased. We conclude that active CF exocrine pancreatic inflammation adversely affects β-cells but is followed by islet resurgence. We predict that very young humans with CF may experience a transient glycemic crisis and postulate that pancreatic inflammatory to adipogenic remodeling may facilitate islet adaptation in CF. PMID:26862997

  10. Intrapancreatic accessory spleen: utilization of fine needle aspiration for diagnosis of a potential mimic of a pancreatic neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Tara A.; Miller, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Accessory spleen (AS) is not a rare occurrence, and with the second most common site being the tail of the pancreas, intrapancreatic AS (IPAS) can easily mimic a pancreatic neoplasm. Together with radiologic imaging findings, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) can be used to assist in the diagnosis, preventing potentially unnecessary surgical procedures. The most common cytologic findings that have been described in the literature include a heterogenous population of small lymphocytes along with traversing small vessels. Immunohistochemical staining for CD8 has also been documented as a useful tool to support the diagnosis as it specifically highlights the endothelial cells of the splenic sinus. Here, we report two additional cases of IPAS diagnosed by FNA and discuss the potential pitfalls in diagnosis of this entity. PMID:27034814

  11. "Biliary Diseases with Pancreatic Counterparts": Cross-sectional Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Flaherty, Erin M; Dasyam, Anil K; Menias, Christine O; Riddle, Nicole D; Lath, Narayan; Kozaka, Kazuto; Matsui, Osamu; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of the similarities in the histopathologic findings and the clinical-biologic behaviors of select biliary and pancreatic conditions, a new disease concept, "biliary diseases with pancreatic counterparts," has been proposed. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic pathologic conditions of the biliary tract have their counterparts in the pancreas. Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing cholangitis is the biliary manifestation of IgG4-related sclerosing disease, and type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is its pancreatic counterpart. People with chronic alcoholism can develop peribiliary cysts and fibrosis as well as pancreatic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis simultaneously. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and mucinous cystic neoplasm are considered pancreatic counterparts for the biliary neoplasms of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, intraductal papillary neoplasm of the biliary tract, and hepatic mucinous cystic neoplasm, respectively. The anatomic proximity of the biliary tract and the pancreas, the nearly simultaneous development of both organs from the endoderm of the foregut, and the presence of pancreatic exocrine acini within the peribiliary glands surrounding the extrahepatic bile ducts are suggested as causative factors for these similarities. Interestingly, these diseases show "nearly" identical findings at cross-sectional imaging, an observation that further supports this new disease concept. New information obtained with regard to biliary diseases can be used for evaluation of pancreatic abnormalities, and vice versa. In addition, combined genetic and molecular studies may be performed to develop novel therapeutic targets. For both biliary and pancreatic diseases, imaging plays a pivotal role in initial diagnosis, evaluation of treatment response, efficacy testing of novel drugs, and long-term surveillance. PMID:26824512

  12. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the detection and characterization of solid pancreatic nodules: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Najwa Al; Ramalho, Miguel; Semelka, Richard C; Buonocore, Valeria; Gigli, Silvia; Maccioni, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common malignant tumor of the pancreas. The remaining pancreatic tumors are a diverse group of pancreatic neoplasms that comprises cystic pancreatic neoplasms, endocrine tumors and other uncommon pancreatic tumors. Due to the excellent soft tissue contrast resolution, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently able to readily separate cystic from noncystic tumors. Cystic tumors are often easy to diagnose with MRI; however, noncystic non-adenocarcinoma tumors may show a wide spectrum of imaging features, which can potentially mimic ductal adenocarcinoma. MRI is a reliable technique for the characterization of pancreatic lesions. The implementation of novel motion-resistant pulse sequences and respiratory gating techniques, as well as the recognized benefits of MR cholangiopancreatography, make MRI a very accurate examination for the evaluation of pancreatic masses. MRI has the distinctive ability of non-invasive assessment of the pancreatic ducts, pancreatic parenchyma, neighbouring soft tissues, and vascular network in one examination. MRI can identify different characteristics of various solid pancreatic lesions, potentially allowing the differentiation of adenocarcinoma from other benign and malignant entities. In this review we describe the MRI protocols and MRI characteristics of various solid pancreatic lesions. Recognition of these characteristics may establish the right diagnosis or at least narrow the differential diagnosis, thus avoiding unnecessary tests or procedures and permitting better management. PMID:26644822

  13. Solid adenoma with exclusive hepatocellular differentiation: a new variant among pancreatic benign neoplasms?

    PubMed

    Cuilliere, Peggy; Lazure, Thierry; Bui, Matthieu; Fabre, Monique; Buffet, Catherine; Gayral, François; Bedossa, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    We report a unique, previously unreported pancreatic tumor with hepatoid differentiation associated with serous microcystic adenoma in a 70-year-old man. These two lesions localized, respectively, at the body and the tail of the pancreas, were found incidentally on abdominal ultrasonography. Serum alpha-fetoprotein was not increased and no hepatic lesion was displayed on computed tomography. A subtotal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. The patient is alive and well 12 months after resection. Pathological examination showed a very unusual encapsulated solid tumor with hepatocytic differentiation, bile production and immunoreactivity for hepatocyte paraffin-1 antibody. The tumor cells were negative for endocrine (neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A, synaptophysin) and acinar (amylase, trypsin) markers. Ultrastructurally, zymogen and neurosecretory granules were absent. The features of the tumor were almost indistinguishable from those of hepatocellular adenoma; therefore, we believe that this solid hepatoid tumor may represent a variant of pancreatic adenoma. Recognition of this entity is important because the only reported pancreatic hepatoid tumors to date have been malignant. The main differential diagnoses include hepatoid ductal adenocarcinoma, hepatoid acinar cell carcinoma, primitive hepatoid endocrine tumor, and metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:12447684

  14. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Alicia K; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K

    2015-03-15

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF. PMID:25591863

  15. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Alicia K.; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF. PMID:25591863

  16. Deep Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes Revealed GNAS Mutations to Be Associated with Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms and Its Main Pancreatic Duct Dilation

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shinichi; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Maekawa, Shinya; Kadokura, Makoto; Miura, Mika; Shindo, Hiroko; Takahashi, Ei; Sato, Tadashi; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background To clarify the genetic mutations associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and IPMN-related pancreatic tumours, we conducted cancer-related gene profiling analyses using pure pancreatic juice and resected pancreatic tissues. Methods Pure pancreatic juice was collected from 152 patients [nine with a normal pancreas, 22 with chronic pancreatitis (CP), 39 with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and 82 with IPMN], and resected tissues from the pancreas were collected from 48 patients (six IPMNs and 42 PDACs). The extracted DNA was amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 46 cancer-related genes containing 739 mutational hotspots. The mutations were analysed using a semiconductor-based DNA sequencer. Results Among the 46 cancer-related genes, KRAS and GNAS mutations were most frequently detected in both PDAC and IPMN cases. In pure pancreatic juice, GNAS mutations were detected in 7.7% of PDAC cases and 41.5% of IPMN cases (p<0.001 vs. others). All PDAC cases with GNAS mutations (n = 3) were accompanied by IPMN. Multivariate analysis revealed that GNAS mutations in IPMN cases were associated with dilated main pancreatic ducts (MPD, p = 0.016), while no statistically independent associations with clinical variables were observed for KRAS mutations. In the resected pancreatic tissues, GNAS mutations were detected in 50% of PDAC cases concomitant with IPMN, 33.3% of PDAC cases derived from IPMN, and 66.7% of IPMN cases, while no GNAS mutations were detected in cases of PDAC without IPMN. Conclusions The GNAS mutation was specifically found in the cases with IPMN and it was speculated that some PDACs might be influenced by the concomitant but separately-located IPMN in their pathogenic mechanism. Furthermore, the GNAS mutation was significantly associated with MPD dilatation in IPMN cases, suggesting its role in mucus hypersecretion. PMID:24897499

  17. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  18. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  19. Polarization of the Vacuolar Adenosine Triphosphatase Delineates a Transition to High-Grade Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasm Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, Bharath K.; Belinsky, Glenn S.; Einwachter, Henrik; Rhim, Andrew D.; Schmid, Roland; Chung, Chuhan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A functional vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase (v-ATPase) complex regulates canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The goal of this study was to identify the distribution of the v-ATPase in human and murine models of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) and assess its role in Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Methods We evaluated the immunolabeling pattern of the v-ATPase in human PanIN specimens and murine PanIN-1 and PanIN-2 lesions obtained from Ptf1aCre/+; LSL-KrasG12D mice. Wnt/β-catenin signaling was interrogated in primary PanIN cells by examining the phosphorylated levels of its surface coreceptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6), and its intracellular effector, nonphosphorylated β-catenin. The response of primary PanIN cells to epidermal growth factor (EGF) was assessed in the absence and presence of the v-ATPase inhibitor, concanamycin. Results In advanced (PanIN-2), but not early (PanIN-1), lesions, the v-ATPase assumed a polarized phenotype. Blocking the v-ATPase disrupted Wnt/β-catenin signaling in primary PanIN cells despite significantly higher levels of the total and activated Wnt cell surface coreceptor, LRP6. Vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase blockade significantly decreased the total and activated levels of EGF receptor, a determinant of PanIN progression. The activation of EGF receptor and its intracellular mediator, p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase, was also reduced by v-ATPase blockade. This led to diminished proliferation in response to EGF ligand. Conclusions The v-ATPase regulates Wnt/β-catenin and EGF receptor signaling in PanINs. PMID:25072283

  20. Prolapse into the bile duct and expansive growth is characteristic behavior of mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuichi; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Yamamura, Eiichi; Maruoka, Naotaka; Mizukami, Hiroki; Tanaka, Jun-ichi; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver (MCN-L) is a very rare tumor whose detailed behavior is still unknown. We describe two cases of MCN-L that exhibited extremely interesting growth patterns, and discuss the characteristics of MCN-Ls. Both cases exhibited MCN-L that originated from the left hepatic lobe (Segment 4) and then prolapsed into the left hepatic duct and common bile duct, resulting in obstructive jaundice due to expansive growth. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies showed the characteristic oval-shaped filling defects in the bile ducts. Endoscopic ultrasound and intraductal ultrasound were useful for differentiating the tumors from stones, since multiple septal formations were observed inside the tumors. A literature search revealed that, over the past 10 years, 15 cases of MCN-L (biliary cystadenomas with ovarian-like stroma) that showed expansive growth in the bile duct had been reported. Prolapse into the bile duct and expansive growth appear to be characteristic behavior of MCN-L. In the future, additional data on more cases needs to be collected to further elucidate MCN-L pathophysiology. PMID:25951998

  1. MRI findings of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs).

    PubMed

    Lana, Silvia; Vallara, Manuela; Bono, Nicola Emanuele; Russo, Giuseppe; Artioli, Giulia; Capretti, Giovanni; Paladini, Ilaria; Pesce, Antonella; Ruggirello, Margherita; Barbalace, Sandro; Mostardi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are relatively frequent imaging findings due to the improvement of imaging technologies. They may be secondary to both benign and malignant disease processes and their prevalence increases with age. In most cases, these lesions are detected incidentally by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed for other reasons. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) represent 25% of the cystic neoplasms, morphologically classified into "main pancreatic duct IPMN" (MPD-IPMN), "side branches IPMN" (SB-IPMN) and mixed forms. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a multiparametricity not invasive radiological technique that doesn't use ionizing radiation or organ iodinized contrast agents; it allows an accurate characterization of the lesions (number and size of cystic lesions, internal features of a cyst, ducts dilation, communication with main pancreatic duct) that is important to guide the differential diagnosis and establish a correct follow-up. International guidelines consider IPMN of MPD and mixed forms to be an indication for surgery, while clinical and radiological follow-up is indicated in asymptomatic patients with SB-IPMN, especially when lesions are < 2,5-3 cm in diameter and there are no mural nodules or dilation of MPD. PMID:27467864

  2. Pancreatic Pseudocysts: Advances in Endoscopic Management.

    PubMed

    Ge, Phillip S; Weizmann, Mikhayla; Watson, Rabindra R

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic drainage is the first-line therapy in the management of pancreatic pseudocysts. Before endoscopic drainage, clinicians should exclude the presence of pancreatic cystic neoplasms and avoid drainage of immature peripancreatic fluid collections or pseudoaneurysms. The indication for endoscopic drainage is not dependent on absolute cyst size alone, but on the presence of attributable signs or symptoms. Endoscopic management should be performed as part of a multidisciplinary approach in close cooperation with surgeons and interventional radiologists. Drainage may be performed either via a transpapillary approach or a transmural approach; additionally, endoscopic necrosectomy may be performed for patients with walled-off necrosis. PMID:26895678

  3. Whole-exome sequencing identified the genetic origin of a mucinous neoplasm in a mature cystic teratoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Lee, Sung Hak; Kim, Min Sung; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Hur, Soo Young; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous tumour arising from a mature cystic teratoma associated with pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare disease and its tissue origin is not easy to specify by conventional histological and immunohistochemical analyses. To identify the origin of a secondary tumour arising from a mature teratoma, we performed whole-exome sequencing of a PMP secondary to a primary ovarian mucinous tumour. The mucinous tumour was CK20 (+), CK7 (-) and CDX2 (+). Its genome harboured 28 somatic non-silent mutations (27 missense and 1 nonsense) that included eight putative driver gene mutations catalogued in COSMIC database (KRAS, GNAS, ZBTB38, ENAM, HTR5A, BAI1, ADAMTS8 and RASA3). KRAS mutation as well as mutations in genes that antagonise RAS signalling (RASA3 and ADAMTS8) suggest that alterations in RAS signalling may play a role in its development. More importantly, the concurrent KRAS and GNAS hotspot mutations, and CK20 (+), CK7 (-) and CDX2 (+) expression strongly indicated its appendiceal origin. Our results indicate that next-generation sequencing combined with histological and immunohistochemical analyses may be a better strategy than the conventional analyses alone to identify the origin of a secondary tumour arising from a mature teratoma. Also, the data suggest that a PMP secondary to a primary ovarian mucinous tumour genome arising in the teratoma may recapitulate the mutational features of appendiceal mucinous tumours. PMID:27114374

  4. Pancreatic damage in fetal and newborn cystic fibrosis pigs involves the activation of inflammatory and remodeling pathways.

    PubMed

    Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Ramachandran, Shyam; Meyerholz, David K; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Griffin, Michelle; Giriyappa, Radhamma L; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J; McCray, Paul B; Uc, Aliye

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic disease has onset in utero in humans with cystic fibrosis (CF), and progresses over time to complete destruction of the organ. The exact mechanisms leading to pancreatic damage in CF are incompletely understood. Inflammatory cells are present in the pancreas of newborn pigs with CF (CF pigs) and humans, which suggests that inflammation may have a role in the destructive process. We wondered whether tissue inflammation and genes associated with inflammatory pathways were increased in the pancreas of fetal CF pigs [83 to 90 days gestation (normal pig gestation is ~114 days)] and newborn pigs. Compared with fetal pigs without CF (non-CF pigs), in fetal CF pigs, the pancreas exhibited patchy inflammation and acinar atrophy, with progression in distribution and severity in neonatal CF pigs. Large-scale transcript profiling revealed that the pancreas in fetal and newborn CF pigs exhibited significantly increased expression of proinflammatory, complement cascade, and profibrotic genes when compared with fetal and newborn non-CF pigs. Acinar cells exhibited increased apoptosis in the pancreas of fetal and newborn CF pigs. α-Smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 were increased in both fetal and newborn CF pig pancreas, suggesting activation of profibrotic pathways. Cell proliferation and mucous cell metaplasia were detected in newborn, but not fetal, CF pigs, indicating that they were not an initiator of pathogenesis but a response. Proinflammatory, complement cascade, proapoptotic, and profibrotic pathways are activated in CF pig pancreas, and likely contribute to the destructive process. PMID:22683312

  5. Pancreatic Damage in Fetal and Newborn Cystic Fibrosis Pigs Involves the Activation of Inflammatory and Remodeling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Ramachandran, Shyam; Meyerholz, David K.; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Griffin, Michelle; Giriyappa, Radhamma L.; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.; McCray, Paul B.; Uc, Aliye

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic disease has onset in utero in humans with cystic fibrosis (CF), and progresses over time to complete destruction of the organ. The exact mechanisms leading to pancreatic damage in CF are incompletely understood. Inflammatory cells are present in the pancreas of newborn pigs with CF (CF pigs) and humans, which suggests that inflammation may have a role in the destructive process. We wondered whether tissue inflammation and genes associated with inflammatory pathways were increased in the pancreas of fetal CF pigs [83 to 90 days gestation (normal pig gestation is ∼114 days)] and newborn pigs. Compared with fetal pigs without CF (non-CF pigs), in fetal CF pigs, the pancreas exhibited patchy inflammation and acinar atrophy, with progression in distribution and severity in neonatal CF pigs. Large-scale transcript profiling revealed that the pancreas in fetal and newborn CF pigs exhibited significantly increased expression of proinflammatory, complement cascade, and profibrotic genes when compared with fetal and newborn non-CF pigs. Acinar cells exhibited increased apoptosis in the pancreas of fetal and newborn CF pigs. α-Smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 were increased in both fetal and newborn CF pig pancreas, suggesting activation of profibrotic pathways. Cell proliferation and mucous cell metaplasia were detected in newborn, but not fetal, CF pigs, indicating that they were not an initiator of pathogenesis but a response. Proinflammatory, complement cascade, proapoptotic, and profibrotic pathways are activated in CF pig pancreas, and likely contribute to the destructive process. PMID:22683312

  6. Cytopathologic Diagnosis of Oncocytic Type Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm: Criteria and Clinical Implications of Accurate Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michelle D.; Stallworth, Christina R.; Lewis, Melinda M.; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Basturk, Olca; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytologic findings of pancreatic oncocytic-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs)/intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are largely unknown. METHODS Five IOPNs encountered by the authors were analyzed. RESULTS Four IOPNs were located in the pancreatic head, and 1 was located in the pancreatic body/tail in 2 men and 3 women ages 56 to 84 years (mean age, 66 years). Radiologic diagnoses included pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in 2 patients, invasive cancer associated with IPMN in 1 patient, IPMN versus mucinous cystic neoplasm in 1 patient, and cystic mass in 1 patient. Cytologic findings included: hypercellular smears (4 of 5 cases) containing well formed clusters of oncocytic cells (5 of 5 cases) with prominent, slightly eccentric nucleoli (4 of 5 cases), predominantly arranged in sheets/papillary units (5 of 5 cases), with punched-out intercytoplasmic spaces (4 of 5 cases), and with occasional 3-dimensional groups and focal necrosis (3 of 5 cases). The intracytoplasmic mucin and thick extracellular mucin typical of other IPMNs were observed only in 2 cases and were very limited. The mean size on resection was 4.5 cm. Invasion was observed in 3 cases (0.1, 0.3, and 2.0 cm) of tubular-type IPMN. Initial cytologic evaluation was performed by the authors in 4 of 5 cases, which were diagnosed as IOPN (n = 3) and IPMN versus cystic PDAC (n = 1). One case was initially misdiagnosed as PDAC and, on resection, proved to be noninvasive IOPN. CONCLUSIONS Cytologic features of IOPNs are classical, similar to their histologic counterparts, and differ significantly from other IPMN subtypes. Because of their highly complex appearance, they are often radiologically misdiagnosed as PDAC; thus, failure to recognize their characteristic features on fine-needle aspiration may lead to inappropriate treatment. Patients with IOPN have an incomparably better prognosis than patients with ordinary PDAC, even when their neoplasms are invasive

  7. Mechanisms of CFTR Functional Variants That Impair Regulated Bicarbonate Permeation and Increase Risk for Pancreatitis but Not for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michele D.; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E.; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A.; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M. Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005) and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001). WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in CFTR

  8. Multi-detector row CT of pancreatic islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Hruban, Ralph H; Yeo, Charles; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) are neuroendocrine neoplasms that produce and secrete hormones to a variable degree. These neoplasms can present a diagnostic challenge, both clinically and radiologically. ICTs can be classified as either syndromic or nonsyndromic on the basis of their clinical manifestations. Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of both syndromic and nonsyndromic ICTs. In general, syndromic ICTs are less than 3 cm in size. They are typically hyperenhancing and are usually best seen on CT scans obtained during the arterial phase. Nonsyndromic ICTs tend to be larger than syndromic ICTs at presentation and are more likely to be cystic or necrotic. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with appropriate CT protocol for the evaluation of patients with suspected pancreatic ICT and to understand the variable CT appearances of these neoplasms. PMID:16549609

  9. Role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Ashry, Mahmoud; Imam, Hala M. K.; Ezzat, Reem; Naguib, Mohamed; Farag, Ali H.; Gemeie, Emad H.; Khattab, Hani M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The addition of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) to different imaging modalities has raised the accuracy for diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions. We aim to differentiate benign from neoplastic pancreatic cysts by evaluating cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA19-9), and amylase levels and cytopathological examination, including mucin stain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study included 77 patients with pancreatic cystic lesions. Ultrasound-FNA (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-FNA (EUS-FNA) was done according to the accessibility of the lesion. The aspirated specimens were subjected to cytopathological examination (including mucin staining), tumor markers (CEA, CA19-9), and amylase level. Results: Cyst CEA value of 279 or more showed high statistical significance in differentiating mucinous from nonmucinous lesions with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of 73%, 60%, 50%, 80%, and 65%, respectively. Cyst amylase could differentiate between neoplastic and nonneoplastic cysts at a level of 1043 with sensitivity of 58%, specificity of 75%, PPV of 73%, NPV of 60%, and accuracy of 66%. CA19-9 could not differentiate between neoplastic and nonneoplastic cysts. Mucin examination showed a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 95%, PPV of 92%, NPV of 91%, and accuracy of 91% in differentiating mucinous from non-mucinous lesions. Cytopathological examination showed a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 94%, PPV of 94%, NPV of 83%, and accuracy of 88%. Conclusion: US or EUS-FNA with analysis of cyst CEA level, CA19-9, amylase, mucin stain, and cytopathological examination increases the diagnostic accuracy of cystic pancreatic lesions. PMID:26020048

  10. High Rate of Exophiala dermatitidis Recovery in the Airways of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Is Associated with Pancreatic Insufficiency▿

    PubMed Central

    Kondori, Nahid; Gilljam, Marita; Lindblad, Anders; Jönsson, Bodil; Moore, Edward R. B.; Wennerås, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The black-pigmented fungus Exophiala dermatitidis is considered to be a harmless colonizer of the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The aim of this study was to establish the recovery rate of E. dermatitidis in respiratory specimens from CF patients, transplant recipients, and subjects with other respiratory disorders in Sweden. Second, we wished to determine if particular clinical traits were associated with E. dermatitidis colonization of the airways and the antifungal susceptibility profiles of Exophiala strains. Sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples (n = 492) derived from 275 patients were investigated. E. dermatitidis was isolated in respiratory specimens from 19% (18/97) of the CF patients but in none of the other patient categories. All isolates were recovered after 6 to 25 days of incubation on erythritol-chloramphenicol agar (ECA) medium. Morphological and genetic analyses confirmed species identity. Pancreatic insufficiency was positively associated with the presence of E. dermatitidis in sputum samples (P = 0.0198). Antifungal susceptibility tests demonstrated that voriconazole and posaconazole had the lowest MICs against E. dermatitidis. In conclusion, E. dermatitidis is a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract in CF patients in Sweden and appears to be associated with more advanced disease. Whether E. dermatitidis is pathogenic remains to be elucidated. PMID:21209163

  11. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-07

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  12. Renal cystic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of renal cystic disease and a presentation of simple renal cysts. Subsequent chapters cover cystic disease in association with renal neoplasms and medullary sponge kidney. The chapters addressing autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease discuss and differentiate the infantile and adult forms of the disease. There are also separate discussions of medullary cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and cysts of the renarenal sinus.

  13. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  14. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Blockage of the tubes (ducts) that drain enzymes from the pancreas Cystic fibrosis High levels of a fat, called ... Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. You must take these medicines with every meal. ...

  15. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  16. Are Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm Applicable to Other Malignancies—Assessment of Nodal Distribution in Gynecological Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Fulay, Suyash; Beriwal, Sushil

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy is used to reduce dose to adjacent critical structures while maintaining adequate target coverage, but it requires precise target localization. We report the 3-dimensional distribution of para-aortic (PA) lymph nodes (LN) in pelvic malignancies. We propose a guideline to accurately define the PA LN by anatomic landmarks and compare our data with published guidelines for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 46 patients with pelvic malignancies and positive PA LNs. Positive LNs were defined based on size and morphology or fluorodeoxyglucose avidity. All PA LNs were characterized into 3 groups based on location: left PA (between aorta and left psoas muscle), aortocaval (between aorta and inferior vena cava), and right paracaval (between inferior vena cava and right psoas muscle). Patients with retrocrural LNs were also analyzed. Results: One hundred thirty-three positive PA LNs were evaluated. The majority of the PA LNs were in the left PA (59%) and aortocaval (35) regions, and only 8% were in the right paracaval region. All patients with positive right paracaval LNs also had involved left PA LNs, with only 1 exception. The highest PA LN involvement was at the level of the renal vessels and was seen in 28% of patients. Of these patients with disease extending to renal vessels, 38% had retrocrural LN involvement. Conclusions: The nodal contouring for the PA region should not be defined by a fixed circumferential margin around the vessels. The left PA and aortocaval spaces should be covered adequately because these are common locations of PA LNs. For microscopic disease superiorly, contouring should extend up to renal vessels rather than a fixed bony landmark. For patients who have nodal involvement at renal vessels, one can consider including retrocrural LNs. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm are not applicable to

  17. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with high-grade dysplasia is a risk factor for the subsequent development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Neda; Barbon, Carlotta; Zaki, Ahmed; He, Jin; Salman, Bulent; Hruban, Ralph H.; Cameron, John L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Ahuja, Nita; Lennon, Anne Marie; Weiss, Matthew J.; Wood, Laura D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with high-grade dysplasia and IPMN-associated invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently included under the term “malignancy”. The goal of this study is to clarify the difference between these two entities. Methods From 1996 to 2013, data of 616 patients who underwent pancreatic resection for an IPMN were reviewed. Results The median overall survival for patients with IPMN with high-grade dysplasia (92 months) was similar to survival for patients with IPMN with low/intermediate-grade dysplasia (118 months, p = 0.081), and superior to that of patients with IPMN-associated PDAC (29 months, p < 0.001). IPMN-associated PDAC had lymph node metastasis in 53%, perineural invasion in 58%, and vascular invasion in 33%. In contrast, no lymph node metastasis, perineural or vascular invasion was observed with high-grade dysplasia. None of the patients with IPMN with high-grade dysplasia developed recurrence outside the remnant pancreas. In stark contrast 58% of patients with IPMN-associated PDAC recurred outside the remnant pancreas. The rate of progression within the remnant pancreas was significant in patients with IPMN with high-grade (24%) and with low/intermediate dysplasia (22%, p = 0.816). Conclusion Non-invasive IPMN with high-grade dysplasia should not be considered a malignant entity. Compared to patients with IPMN with low/intermediate-grade dysplasia, those with high-grade dysplasia have an increased risk of subsequent development of PDAC in the remnant pancreas. PMID:27017163

  18. Grading of EUS-FNA cytologic specimens from patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: it is time move to tissue core biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Vinayek, Rakesh; Capurso, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (p-NENs) are rare and characterized by an indolent course, with a much better prognosis than non-neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas. In the non-functional class of p-NENS, surgery remains the only curative treatment for early localized disease, but there are few therapeutic options for advanced disease. The prognosis of non-functional p-NENs is determined by many clinical criteria. In 2010, however, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced a grading system in which determination of the Ki-67 proliferative index has become essential with key role in determining therapeutic decision in both advanced and early diseases. Conventionally, Ki-67 has been assessed on surgical specimens. In last decade, however, the availability of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has provided the opportunity to sample pancreatic lesions and to assess the value of this parameter pre-operatively. The few studies reporting the use of EUS-FNA cytological specimens for Ki-67 measurement showed promising results. As shown by Weynand and colleagues FNA-cytology may underestimate the staging and caution in using this method to classify tumors as low-grade (G1) should be adopted. Thus, Ki-67 expression on cytological specimens remains unsatisfactory and the need for tissue biopsy specimens has been strongly advocated. Based on a recent study that has reported a high concordance of EUS-guided core biopsy for histologic examination and surgical specimens, especially when a cut-off of 5% is used to differentiate G1 and G2 tumors, EUS tissue acquisition by core biopsy is ready for prime time and should be adopted as a standard of practice. PMID:25493252

  19. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Erlotinib Hydrochloride Followed By the Same Chemotherapy Regimen With or Without Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine or Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary-Mucinous Neoplasm; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer

  20. Symptomatic lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas: successful treatment without pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Ruggero, John M; Prakash, Shivana N

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) of the pancreas are rare benign lesions with unknown pathogenesis. LECs are true cysts that mimic pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms making diagnosis challenging. We report a case of a symptomatic LEC of the pancreas in a 67-year-old man who had severe epigastric pain. Workup including computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound were non-diagnostic. The patient underwent attempted surgical resection; however, the mass was unresectable. The mass was enucleated and drained, and pathology returned LEC. The patient underwent a normal postoperative course and remained symptom free. Most LECs are diagnosed after an extensive pancreatic resection for suspicious cystic masses. The aim of this report is to show that operative management of LECs should not be limited to pancreatic resections. Excision and enucleation of LEC of the pancreas is a better alternative than an extensive pancreatic resection. Preoperative diagnosis of LECs appears to be the limiting factor. PMID:27141046

  1. Epidural Cystic Spinal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zheng-he; Wang, Zi-feng; Sun, Peng; Jin, Jie-tian; Zhang, Xiang-heng; Zhao, Yi-ying; Wang, Jian; Mou, Yong-gao; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cystic spinal meningioma (CSM) is an uncommon meningioma variant. Extradural CSMs are particularly rare and difficult to distinguish from other intraaxial tumors. This study presents a case of a 36-year-old woman with intraspinal extradual CSM at the thoracolumbar spine. She experienced persistent weakness, progressive numbness, and sensory disturbance in the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patient revealed an irregular cystic mass at the thoracic 11 to lumbar 3 levels dorsally. This case was misdiagnosed as other neoplasms prior to surgery because of the atypical radiographic features and location of the tumor. Extradural CSMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal extradural cystic neoplasms. Complete removal of cystic wall provides an optimal outcome, rendering the lesion curable. PMID:26986119

  2. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... open. Balloon dilatation. Some endoscopes have a small balloon that the doctor uses to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Screening of High-Risk Individuals in Arkansas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Pancreatic Neoplasms; Peutz-Jegher's Syndrome; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Ataxia Telangiectasia; Familial Atypical Mole-Malignant Melanoma Syndrome; Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis; Hereditary Pancreatitis

  4. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  5. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  6. Computed tomography examination of periampullary neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Darweesh, R M; Thorsen, M K; Dodds, W J; Kishk, S M; Lawson, T L; Stewart, E T

    1988-01-01

    The hospital records of 24 patients with periampullary neoplasms were reviewed. The clinical triad of jaundice, pain, and weight loss and the radiographic imaging triad of dilated biliary ducts, dilated pancreatic duct, and periampullary mass should suggest the diagnosis of periampullary neoplasm. PMID:3349797

  7. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  8. Pancreatic Schwannoma - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    R, Sathyalakshmi; K, Chandramouleeswari; Devi, Nalli R. Sumitra

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic schwannomas are rare neoplasms. Only 47 cases have been reported in literature as of date. Age group that is commonly involved varies between the range of 20-87 years, with an almost equal sex ratio. Tumour size ranges from 1-20 cm. Locations where schwannomas can be encountered in the pancreas are in the vast majority, the head and body, the incidence being: head-40 %, junction of head and body-6 %, body-21 %, body and tail-15 %, tail-4 % and uncinate process-13 %, 60 % of the tumours are cystic, the rest being solid tumours. We hereby report a case where in total gastrectomy with distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was done for carcinoma stomach involving the stomach bed and pancreatic schwannoma was an incidental finding in this case. PMID:25177575

  9. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease that ... quality of life has improved. Learn About Cystic Fibrosis Cystic fibrosis is a genetic (inherited) condition that ...

  10. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  11. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-03

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  12. Calcified Cystic Lesion of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Meng, Zhi-Xin; Hong, Jian-Guo; Zhi, Xu-Ting

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesion is a relatively uncommon condition with an estimated prevalence of 2 % in the general population. In the past two decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the prevalence of pancreatic cystic lesions because of the widespread use of high-resolution imaging, as well as the aging of the population. Pancreatic cystic lesions cover a wide spectrum of pathology and can range from obviously benign to borderline malignant potential lesions to overt malignancy. Though the presence of mural nodules, septa-like structures, or calcification on imaging examination contributes to the differential diagnosis, preoperatively determining the biological nature of these cystic lesions is sometimes challenging. In this paper, we report a rare case of pancreatic cystic lesion with an egg-shell like calcification. Complete resection was performed and histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of calcified pancreatic pseudocyst. PMID:26992398

  13. Pancreatic cystic lesions: How endoscopic ultrasound morphology and endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration help unlock the diagnostic puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Barresi, Luca; Tarantino, Ilaria; Granata, Antonino; Curcio, Gabriele; Traina, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are being diagnosed with increasing frequency, covering a vast spectrum from benign to malignant and invasive lesions. Numerous investigations can be done to discriminate between benign and non-evolutive lesions from those that require surgery. At the moment, there is no single test that will allow a correct diagnosis in all cases. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) morphology, cyst fluid analysis and cytohistology with EUS-guided fine needle aspiration can aid in this difficult diagnosis. PMID:22720127

  14. Detection of Hot-Spot Mutations in Circulating Cell-Free DNA From Patients With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Berger, Andreas W; Schwerdel, Daniel; Costa, Ivan G; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Lam, Sandra; Barth, Thomas F; Schröppel, Bernd; Meining, Alexander; Büchler, Markus W; Zenke, Martin; Hermann, Patrick C; Seufferlein, Thomas; Kleger, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are the most frequent cystic pancreatic tumors. Little is known about their molecular alterations, but mutations in GNAS have been reported to promote IPMN formation. A tumor-derived fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA), isolated from blood samples, contains many of the same mutations as the primary tumor, and could be a tool for noninvasive disease monitoring. We found that the total amount of cfDNA can discriminate between individuals without pancreatic lesions (controls) and patients with Fukuoka-negative branch-duct IPMN or pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, we detected GNAS mutations in cfDNA from patients with IPMN, but not in patients with serous cystadenoma or controls. Analyses of cfDNA might therefore be used in the diagnosis of patients with IPMN or in monitoring disease progression. PMID:27343369

  15. Staging of neoplasms. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is divided into ten chapters. The first, an overview of the importance of staging, is followed by separate chapters on computed tomographic (CT) evaluation of lymph node metastases; metastatic disease to the thorax; staging of laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, esophageal, non-small cell lung, and renal carcinoma; and pediatric abdominal malignancies. CT staging of lymphomas is dealt with in a separate chapter. The final chapter summarizes initial experiences with staging of neoplasms by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Other neoplasms, such as pelvic, pancreatic, and gastrointestinal, are not discussed in depth. The book concludes with ten case studies, most of which deal with pelvic and gastrointestinal malignancies.

  16. Mechanism of dysfunction of two nucleotide binding domain mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator that are associated with pancreatic sufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, D N; Ostedgaard, L S; Winter, M C; Welsh, M J

    1995-01-01

    Variability in the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) is in part due to specific mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. To understand better how mutations in CFTR disrupt Cl- channel function and to learn about the relationship between genotype and phenotype, we studied two CF mutants, A455E and P574H, that are associated with pancreatic sufficiency. A455E and P574H are located close to conserved ATP binding motifs in CFTR. Both mutants generated cAMP-stimulated apical membrane Cl- currents in heterologous epithelial cells, but current magnitudes were reduced compared with wild-type. Patch-clamp analysis revealed that both mutants had normal conductive properties and regulation by phosphorylation and nucleotides. These mutants had normal or increased Cl- channel activity: A455E had an open-state probability (Po) similar to wild-type, and P574H had an increased Po because bursts of activity were prolonged. However, both mutants produced less mature glycosylated protein, although levels were greater than observed with the delta F508 mutant. These changes in channel activity and processing provide a quantitative explanation for the reduced apical Cl- current. These data also dissociate structural requirements for channel function from features that determine processing. Finally, the results suggest that the residual function associated with these two mutants is sufficient to confer a milder clinical phenotype and infer approaches to developing treatments. Images PMID:7534226

  17. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a cystic tumor of the pancreas. The etiology is unknown, but increasing evidence suggests the involvement of several tumorigenesis pathways, including an association with hereditary syndromes. IPMN occurs more commonly in men, with the mean age at diagnosis between 64 and 67 years old. At the time of diagnosis, it may be benign, with or without dysplasia, or frankly malignant with an invasive carcinoma. Tumors arising from the main pancreatic duct are termed main-duct IPMNs, those involving the branch ducts, branch-duct IPMNs. In general, small branch-duct IPMNs are benign, particularly in asymptomatic patients, and can be safely followed. In contrast, main-duct tumors should be surgically resected and examined carefully for an invasive component. In the absence of invasion, patient's survival is excellent, from 94 to 100%. For patients with an IPMN-associated invasive carcinoma, the prognosis overall is better than those with a de novo pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, with a 5-year survival of 40% to 60% in some series. However, no survival advantage can be demonstrated if the invasive component in an IPMN patient is that of the conventional tubular type (versus mucinous carcinoma). Several histomorphologic variants are recognized, although the clinical significance of this “subtyping” is not well defined. PMID:24278753

  18. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  19. Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.C.; Lichtenstein, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Oertel, J.E.; Dachman, A.H.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-02-01

    Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas is an uncommon low grade malignant tumor histologically distinct from the usual ductal adenocarcinoma and amenable to cure by surgical excision. It tends to occur in black women in their second or third decade of life and has often been misclassified as nonfunctional islet cell tumor or as cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. Twelve cases were reviewed. Sonography and CT of solid and pipillary epithelial neoplasms depict a well-demarcated mass that can be solid, mixed cystic and solid, or largely cystic. The radiologic appearance is dependent on the maintenance of the integrity of the neoplasm versus the extent of retrogressive changes that have occurred.

  20. Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  1. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  2. K-Ras and cyclooxygenase-2 coactivation augments intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and Notch1 mimicking human pancreas lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chiblak, Sara; Steinbauer, Brigitte; Pohl-Arnold, Andrea; Kucher, Dagmar; Abdollahi, Amir; Schwager, Christian; Höft, Birgit; Esposito, Irene; Müller-Decker, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Mutational activation of K-Ras is an initiating event of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) that may develop either from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is causally related to pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here, we deciphered the impact of COX-2, a key modulator of inflammation, in concert with active mutant K-RasG12D on tumor burden and gene expression signature using compound mutant mouse lines. Concomitant activation of COX-2 and K-RasG12D accelerated the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial lesions predominantly with a cystic papillary phenotype resembling human IPMN. Transcriptomes derived from laser capture microdissected preneoplastic lesions of single and compound mutants revealed a signature that was significantly enriched in Notch1 signaling components. In vitro, Notch1 signaling was COX-2-dependent. In line with these findings, human IPMN stratified into intestinal, gastric and pancreatobillary types displayed Notch1 immunosignals with high prevalence, especially in the gastric lesions. In conclusion, a yet unknown link between activated Ras, protumorigenic COX-2 and Notch1 in IPMN onset was unraveled. PMID:27381829

  3. K-Ras and cyclooxygenase-2 coactivation augments intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and Notch1 mimicking human pancreas lesions.

    PubMed

    Chiblak, Sara; Steinbauer, Brigitte; Pohl-Arnold, Andrea; Kucher, Dagmar; Abdollahi, Amir; Schwager, Christian; Höft, Birgit; Esposito, Irene; Müller-Decker, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Mutational activation of K-Ras is an initiating event of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) that may develop either from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is causally related to pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here, we deciphered the impact of COX-2, a key modulator of inflammation, in concert with active mutant K-Ras(G12D) on tumor burden and gene expression signature using compound mutant mouse lines. Concomitant activation of COX-2 and K-Ras(G12D) accelerated the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial lesions predominantly with a cystic papillary phenotype resembling human IPMN. Transcriptomes derived from laser capture microdissected preneoplastic lesions of single and compound mutants revealed a signature that was significantly enriched in Notch1 signaling components. In vitro, Notch1 signaling was COX-2-dependent. In line with these findings, human IPMN stratified into intestinal, gastric and pancreatobillary types displayed Notch1 immunosignals with high prevalence, especially in the gastric lesions. In conclusion, a yet unknown link between activated Ras, protumorigenic COX-2 and Notch1 in IPMN onset was unraveled. PMID:27381829

  4. [Cutaneous neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Dummer, R; Beyeler, M; Morcinek, J; Burg, G

    2003-09-01

    The skin is the organ most commonly affected by malignancies. Various cancers of the skin show a dramatic increase in incidence over the last decades. Epithelial skin tumors are most frequently, e.g., basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma with its precursors, the actinic keratoses. Melanoma, which is extremely difficult to treat in advanced tumor stages, is dreaded. Besides that, there are other epithelial malignant diseases, e.g. Morbus Bowen and adnexal tumors originating from the skin appendices. Mesenchymal malignant neoplasias such as Morbus Kaposi, angiosarcomas and other dermal sarcomas, are rare. Since the majority of malignant neoplasms is removable and curable by a simple surgical intervention, the knowledge of the different skin tumors is essential for non-dermatologist. PMID:14526630

  5. Recently described neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal region (i.e., nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses) is notoriously difficult, due in part to the remarkable diversity of neoplasms that may be encountered in this area. In addition, a number of neoplasms have been only recently described in the sinonasal tract, further compounding the difficulty for pathologists who are not yet familiar with them. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the recently described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and adamantinoma-like Ewing family tumor. PMID:26776744

  6. Cyst infection of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: management of a rare complication: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenji; Karasaki, Hidenori; Mizukami, Yusuke; Kawamoto, Toru; Kono, Toru; Imai, Koji; Einama, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Kohgo, Yutaka; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the cyst infection of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in 2 patients. The patients were 62- and 74-year-old men. The initial symptom was acute febrile abdominal pain. Laboratory tests revealed severe infection (C-reactive protein concentrations were 23.3 µg/mL in patient 1 and 22.3 µg/mL in patient 2) and multilocular cystic masses (the diameters were 70 mm in patient 1 and 50 mm in patient 2) at the pancreatic head that involved peripancreatic vessels were demonstrated by computed tomography. Laboratory and radiographic findings were markedly improved by endoscopic transpapillary drainage. The enteric bacteria were detected in the drainage specimens. Curative resection was achieved, and histological findings indicated a carcinoma in situ in patient 1 and an invasive carcinoma in patient 2. Neither hyperamylasemia nor histological fat necrosis, frequently observed in acute pancreatitis, was evident. Both patients were free from recurrence after surgery (17 months in patient 1, and 18 months in patient 2). Cyst infection is an unknown complication of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Transpapillary drainage is highly recommended as an initial intervention. It is difficult to distinguish between cyst infection and unresectable invasive carcinoma with imaging modalities; however, surgical intervention after drainage may contribute to long-term survival. PMID:24622083

  7. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000107.htm Cystic fibrosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystic fibrosis is a disease that causes thick, sticky mucus ...

  8. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » Cystic Fibrosis Explore Cystic Fibrosis What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Bronchiectasis ...

  9. Endoscopic ultrasonography for surveillance of individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lami, Gabriele; Biagini, Maria Rosa; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease with a genetic susceptibility and familial aggregation found in 3%-16% of patients. Early diagnosis remains the only hope for curative treatment and improvement of prognosis. This can be reached by the implementation of an intensive screening program, actually recommended for individuals at high-risk for pancreatic cancer development. The aim of this strategy is to identify pre-malignant precursors or asymptomatic pancreatic cancer lesions, curable by surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with or without fine needle aspiration (FNA) seems to be the most promising technique for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It has been described as a highly sensitive and accurate tool, especially for small and cystic lesions. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a precursor lesion which is highly represented in high-risk individuals, seems to have characteristics chronic pancreatitis-like changes well detected by EUS. Many screening protocols have demonstrated high diagnostic yields for pancreatic pre-malignant lesions, allowing prophylactic pancreatectomies. However, it shows a high interobserver variety even among experienced endosonographers and a low sensitivity in case of chronic pancreatitis. Some new techniques such as contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS, computer-aided diagnostic techniques, confocal laser endomicroscopy miniprobe and the detection of DNA abnormalities or protein markers by FNA, promise improvement of the diagnostic yield of EUS. As the resolution of imaging improves and as our knowledge of precursor lesions grows, we believe that EUS could become the most suitable method to detect curable pancreatic neoplasms in correctly identified asymptomatic at-risk patients. PMID:25031786

  10. Childhood ovarian neoplasms in Ibadan, South-western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ajani, Mustapha Akanji; Aramide, Kolawole Olanrewaju; Ajani, Tinuade Adesola; Salami, Ayodeji A.; Okolo, Clement Abu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Childhood ovarian neoplasms are very rare. Little information is available on the relative pattern and frequency of these tumors in Nigerian children. Earlier study done in Ibadan involved ovarian neoplasms in children and adolescents. The aim of this study is to review cases of ovarian neoplasms in children <15 years over a 22½ years period. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study. Twenty-four cases of childhood ovarian neoplasms were seen in patients <15 years of age. These cases were classified using the current World Health Organization histological classification of ovarian tumors. Results: Childhood ovarian neoplasms accounted for 2.8% of all cases of ovarian tumors seen in this period. Fourteen (58.3%) cases of childhood ovarian neoplasms were benign, and 10 (41.7%) were malignant. Mature cystic teratoma occurring in 13 (54.2%) was the most common childhood ovarian neoplasm and was most prevalent between 10 and 14 years of age. Burkitt lymphoma was the most common 4 (40%) malignant childhood ovarian tumor and prevalent between 5 and 14 years of age. Conclusion: Mature cystic teratoma remains the single most common childhood ovarian neoplasms, and Burkitt's lymphoma is the most malignant childhood ovarian tumor in Ibadan, South-western Nigeria. PMID:27397956

  11. Epidural Cystic Spinal Meningioma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zheng-He; Wang, Zi-Feng; Sun, Peng; Jin, Jie-Tian; Zhang, Xiang-Heng; Zhao, Yi-Ying; Wang, Jian; Mou, Yong-Gao; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Cystic spinal meningioma (CSM) is an uncommon meningioma variant. Extradural CSMs are particularly rare and difficult to distinguish from other intraaxial tumors. This study presents a case of a 36-year-old woman with intraspinal extradual CSM at the thoracolumbar spine. She experienced persistent weakness, progressive numbness, and sensory disturbance in the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patient revealed an irregular cystic mass at the thoracic 11 to lumbar 3 levels dorsally. This case was misdiagnosed as other neoplasms prior to surgery because of the atypical radiographic features and location of the tumor.Extradural CSMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal extradural cystic neoplasms. Complete removal of cystic wall provides an optimal outcome, rendering the lesion curable. PMID:26986119

  12. CT and MR Imaging Findings of Pancreatic Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Xu, Shunliang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies on pancreatic paraganglioma, a rare neoplasm, have primarily reported its ultrasound and routine and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) findings. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequence findings of pancreatic paraganglioma. A male patient, ages 41 years, was admitted to our hospital due to a pancreatic space-occupying lesion that had been present for more than 10 days. The patient had no obvious discomfort. He had a history of hypertension and hyperthyroidism. Physical examination revealed upper abdominal tenderness without a palpable mass. Routine and contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed a soft tissue mass at the pancreatic head/uncinate process, with patchy calcification within the lesion. On a contrast-enhanced CT scan, severe enhancement of the mass in the arterial phase was noted, as was slightly reduced but still marked enhancement in the venous phase. The celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery segment were wrapped by the tumor. Thickened, tortuous vessels were observed at the lesion edges, around which there were multiple enlarged lymph nodes. The main pancreatic duct was markedly dilated. Routine and contrast-enhanced pancreatic MRI demonstrated an abnormal nodular signal in the pancreatic head/uncinate process that was approximately 4.3 × 6.4 cm2 in size. T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) revealed hypointensity, whereas T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) revealed nonhomogeneous, slight hyperintensity. Patchy hypointensity on both T1WI and T2WI was observed within the lesion. DWI showed slight hyperintensity. Grossly heterogeneous enhancement of the mass was observed on a contrast-enhanced MRI scan, with the tumor wrapped around the adjacent vasculature, and multiple enlarged lymph nodes were observed peripherally. After preoperative preparation, the patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy. Histopathology and

  13. Characterization of gene expression and activated signaling pathways in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Park, Minhee; Kim, Minhyung; Hwang, Daehee; Park, Misun; Kim, Won Kyu; Kim, Sang Kyum; Shin, Jihye; Park, Eun Sung; Kang, Chang Moo; Paik, Young-Ki; Kim, Hoguen

    2014-04-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm is an uncommon pancreatic tumor with distinct clinicopathologic features. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms are characterized by mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1. However, little is known about the gene and microRNA expression profiles of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. Thus, we sought to characterize solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific gene expression and identify the signaling pathways activated in these tumors. Comparisons of gene expression in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm to pancreatic ductal carcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, and non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues identified solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific mRNA and microRNA profiles. By analyzing 1686 (1119 upregulated and 567 downregulated) genes differentially expressed in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, we found that the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, and androgen receptor signaling pathways, as well as genes involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition, are activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. We validated these results experimentally by assessing the expression of β-catenin, WIF-1, GLI2, androgen receptor, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related markers with western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our analysis also revealed 17 microRNAs, especially the miR-200 family and miR-192/215, closely associated with the upregulated genes associated with the three pathways activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm and epithelial mesenchymal transition. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm tumorigenesis and its characteristic less epithelial cell differentiation than the other common pancreatic tumors. PMID:24072181

  14. Pancreatic Lymphangioma as a Rare Pancreatic Mass: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Talaiezadeh, Abdolhasan; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Bakhtiari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cystic lymphangiomas of abdomen has mostly involved mesentery and retro peritoneum that should be considered as a differential diagnosis of abdominal masses. Pancreatic lymphangiomas were extremely rare that should be differentiated from neoplastic pancreatic cysts. Patients have commonly presented with epigastric pain and a relevant palpable epigastric mass. Case Presentation A 65-year-old lady who has presented with epigastric pain, then during investigations, a cystic tumor which located in the tail of pancreas, has found. Whereas definite diagnosis of tumor with routine procedures was impossible, the tumor has completely resected by distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. Pathology and IHC was suggestive of benign lymphangioma. Conclusions According to this presentation diagnosis of cystic lymphangioma of the tail of pancreas should be considered as a differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions and complete excision has been the treatment of choice. PMID:27366308

  15. MicroRNA in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Yasmin G; Lucas, Aimee L

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the 4th deadliest cancer in the United States, due to its aggressive nature, late detection, and resistance to chemotherapy. The majority of PDAC develops from 3 precursor lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanIN), intraductual papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), and mucinous cystic neoplasm. Early detection and surgical resection can increase PDAC 5-year survival rate from 6% for Stage IV to 50% for Stage I. To date, there are no reliable biomarkers that can detect PDAC. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small noncoding RNAs (18-25 nucleotides) that regulate gene expression by affecting translation of messenger RNA (mRNA). A large body of evidence suggests that miRNAs are dysregulated in various types of cancers. MiRNA has been profiled as a potential biomarker in pancreatic tumor tissue, blood, cyst fluid, stool, and saliva. Four miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, miR-155, miR-196, and miR-210) have been consistently dysregulated in PDAC. MiR-21, miR-155, and miR-196 have also been dysregulated in IPMN and PanIN lesions suggesting their use as early biomarkers of this disease. In this review, we explore current knowledge of miRNA sampling, miRNA dysregulation in PDAC and its precursor lesions, and advances that have been made in using miRNA as a biomarker for PDAC and its precursor lesions. PMID:26798434

  16. Cystic Lymphangioma of Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Chhagan; Rastogi, Archana; Rajesh, S; Arora, Ankur; Arora, Asit; Kumar, Nikhil

    2016-03-01

    Lymphangiomas are benign hamartomatous malformations which can arise either from congenitally sequestered lymphatic channels or due to acquired obstruction caused by fibrosis of lymph channels. They are common in the pediatric age group in the soft tissue of neck and the axilla. Abdominal lymphangiomas are rare; even rarer is the primary involvement of pancreas. It occurs more frequently in females and is often located in the distal pancreas. The authors report the case of cystic lymphangioma of pancreas in a 26-year old female presenting with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain that was treated with laparoscopic cyst excision. Although exceptionally rare, lymphangioma of the pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions, especially in young women. PMID:27065694

  17. Giant cystic pheochromocytoma: A silent entity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Bains, Lovenish; Agarwal, Manish Kumar; Gupta, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a catecholamine secreting tumor that originate from chromaffin cells. Usually, it is solid neoplasm of the adrenal medulla, however cystic pheochromocytoma is a rare neuro-endocrine tumour that is frequently asymptomatic and often diagnosed incidentally on imaging or intra-operatively. Only a few cases of cystic pheochromocytomas have been reported in the world literature. We present a case of giant cystic pheochromocytoma in a 65 years old lady who presented with a large retroperitoneal lump, which is probably the world's third largest pheochromocytoma as per the available indexed literature. PMID:27453669

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound characteristics of pancreatic lymphoepithelial cysts: A case series from a large referral center

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Kunal S.; DeWitt, John M.; Sherman, Stuart; Cramer, Harvey M.; Tirkes, Temel; Al-Haddad, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) of the pancreas are benign lesions that can mimic cystic neoplasms on imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) features have not been well described. We aimed to describe the clinical and EUS characteristics of LECs and the present outcomes of management at a high-volume referral center. Materials and Methods: We identified patients who underwent EUS and were found to have LECs based on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology or surgical pathology from existing databases. EUS features, imaging characteristics, and pathology results were described. Results: Sixteen patients were found to have 17 LECs. The mean size was 33 mm ± 15 mm. Locations within the pancreas included 10 lesions in the tail, 3 in the body, 1 in the uncinate process; the remaining 3 were exophytic. Six lesions were anechoic, 6 were hypoechoic, and 5 had mixed echogenicity. Nine lesions had mixed solid/cystic components, 7 were purely cystic, and 1 was solid. Cyst fluid was thick or viscous in six cases and thin in three. Eleven patients had diagnostic cytopathology. Six patients ultimately underwent surgery due to symptoms, nondiagnostic FNA, or other clinical concerns for malignancy. Conclusions: Pancreatic LECs have variable morphology and echogenicity on EUS, but the appearance of a cyst with variable solid and cystic components combined with the appearance of thick, turbid, and viscous aspirate should raise suspicion for an LEC. The majority of patients with LECs at our center avoided surgery for LECs on the basis of diagnostic EUS-FNA. PMID:27503157

  19. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  20. Endosonography in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cysts.

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Vivek; Lee, Linda S

    2015-03-16

    Rapid advances in radiologic technology and increased cross-sectional imaging have led to a sharp rise in incidental discoveries of pancreatic cystic lesions. These cystic lesions include non-neoplastic cysts with no risk of malignancy, neoplastic non-mucinous serous cystadenomas with little or no risk of malignancy, as well as neoplastic mucinous cysts and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms both with varying risk of malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as management is guided by symptoms and risk of malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows high resolution evaluation of cyst morphology and precise guidance for fine needle aspiration (FNA) of cyst fluid for cytological, chemical and molecular analysis. Initially, clinical evaluation and radiologic imaging, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, are performed. In asymptomatic patients where diagnosis is unclear and malignant risk is indeterminate, EUS-FNA should be used to confirm the presence or absence of high-risk features, differentiate mucinous from non-mucinous lesions, and diagnose malignancy. After analyzing the cyst fluid for viscosity, cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen, amylase, and cyst wall cytology should be obtained. DNA analysis may add useful information in diagnosing mucinous cysts when the previous studies are indeterminate. New molecular biomarkers are being investigated to improve diagnostic capabilities and management decisions in these challenging cystic lesions. Current guidelines recommend surgical pancreatic resection as the standard of care for symptomatic cysts and those with high-risk features associated with malignancy. EUS-guided cyst ablation is a promising minimally invasive, relatively low-risk alternative to both surgery and surveillance. PMID:25789091

  1. A case of MUC5AC-positive intraductal neoplasm of the pancreas classified as an intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm?

    PubMed

    Muraki, Takashi; Uehara, Takeshi; Sano, Kenji; Oota, Hiroyoshi; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Asaka, Shiho; Tateishi, Ayako; Otsuki, Toshiaki; Shingu, Kunihiko; Matoba, Hisanori; Kobayashi, Shota; Ichimata, Shojiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Itou, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    This report describes a unique case of intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm (ITPN) of the pancreas in order to clarify its oncogenesis and more precisely classify pancreatic intraductal neoplasms. A 74-year-old man visited our institution for follow-up of acute pancreatitis. Imaging examinations revealed a hypovascular intraductal mass in the head of the pancreas with progressive dilation of the pancreatic duct, atrophy of the pancreatic parenchyma, and a non-mucinous appearance. A pancreatoduodenectomy was performed to identify this pancreatic intraductal neoplasm. Macroscopically, the tumor was a solid nodular mass with no visibly secreted mucin obstructing the dilated ducts. Histologically, it had a homogeneous appearance with nodules of back-to-back tubular glands and occasional papillary elements, and there were no apparent transitions to areas with less marked cytoarchitectural atypia. Although the intraductal neoplastic growth corresponded to an ITPN, immunohistochemical staining revealed partial positivity for MUC5AC, for which ITPNs are characteristically negative. Somatic mutations in KRAS, GNAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA were not detected. A loss of MUC5AC expression and mutations in KRAS and GNAS are key elements in the diagnosis of ITPN. Thus, it was difficult to distinguish the present case as a pancreatobiliary-type (PB-type) intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) or a phenotypic variant of ITPN. As it is possible that some cases of PB-type IPMN and ITPN overlap, the precise classification of these rare lesions may require re-evaluation. PMID:26586167

  2. General Information about Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  3. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  6. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  7. General Information about Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  8. Diagnostic Approach to Eosinophilic Renal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Jorda, Merce; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    Context Eosinophilic renal neoplasms include a spectrum of solid and papillary tumors ranging from indolent benign oncocytoma to highly aggressive malignancies. Recognition of the correct nature of the tumor, especially in biopsy specimens, is paramount for patient management. Objective To review the diagnostic approach to eosinophilic renal neoplasms with light microscopy and ancillary techniques. Data Sources Review of the published literature and personal experience. Conclusions The following tumors are in the differential diagnosis of oncocytic renal cell neoplasm: oncocytoma, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC), hybrid tumor, tubulocystic carcinoma, papillary RCC, clear cell RCC with predominant eosinophilic cell morphology, follicular thyroid-like RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC, acquired cystic disease–associated RCC, rhabdoid RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor translocation RCC, epithelioid angiomyolipoma, and unclassified RCC. In low-grade nonpapillary eosinophilic neoplasms, distinction between oncocytoma and low-grade RCC mostly rests on histomorphology; however, cytokeratin 7 immunostain may be helpful. In high-grade nonpapillary lesions, there is more of a role for ancillary techniques, including immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin 7, CA9, CD10, racemase, HMB45, and Melan-A. In papillary eosinophilic neoplasms, it is important to distinguish sporadic type 2 papillary RCC from microphthalmia transcription factor translocation and hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC. Histologic and cytologic features along with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization tests for TFE3 (Xp11.2) and TFEB [t(6;11)] are reliable confirmatory tests. Eosinophilic epithelial neoplasms with architecture, cytology, and/or immunoprofile not qualifying for either of the established types of RCC should be classified as unclassified eosinophilic RCC and arbitrarily assigned a grade (low or high). PMID:25357116

  9. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or three times each week. Swimming, jogging, and cycling are good options. Clearing or bringing up mucus ... cannot be prevented. Screening those with a family history of the disease may detect the cystic fibrosis ...

  10. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  11. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  12. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan CSPG4 as a Novel Hypoxia-Sensitive Marker in Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Keleg, Shereen; Titov, Alexandr; Heller, Anette; Giese, Thomas; Tjaden, Christine; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Gaida, Matthias M.; Bauer, Andrea S.; Werner, Jens; Giese, Nathalia A.

    2014-01-01

    CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4) might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4) due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83) and validation (n = 221) cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26) and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20) or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma SCA, n = 13+20), premalignant (intraductal dysplastic IPMNs, n = 9+55), and malignant (IPMN-associated invasive carcinomas, n = 4+14; ductal adenocarcinomas, n = 35+86). Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR (n = 139), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. sCSPG4 was found in circulation, but its level was significantly lower in pancreatic patients than in donors. Selective maintenance was observed in advanced IPMNs and PDACs and showed a nodal association while lacking prognostic relevance. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was preserved or elevated, whereby neoplastic cells lacked pCSPG4 or tended to overexpress without shedding. Extreme pancreatic overexpression, membranous exposure and tissuehigh/seralow-discordance highlighted stroma-poor benign cystic neoplasm. SCA is known to display hypoxic markers and coincide with von-Hippel-Lindau and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes, in which pVHL and LBK1 mutations affect hypoxic signaling pathways. In vitro testing confined pCSPG4 overexpression to normal mesenchymal but not epithelial cells, and a third of tested carcinoma cell lines; however, only the latter showed pCSPG4-responsiveness to chronic hypoxia. siRNA-based knockdowns failed to reduce the malignant potential of either normoxic or hypoxic cells. Thus, overexpression of the newly established conditional hypoxic indicator, CSPG4, is apparently non-pathogenic in pancreatic malignancies but might mark distinct epithelial

  13. Genomic Landscapes of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with a dismal prognosis. However, recent advances in sequencing and bioinformatic technology have led to the systematic characterization of the genomes of all major tumor types in the pancreas. This characterization has revealed the unique genomic landscape of each tumor type. This knowledge will pave the way for improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to pancreatic tumors that take advantage of the genetic alterations in these neoplasms. PMID:25812653

  14. Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Béchade, Dominique; Desjardin, Marie; Salmon, Emma; Désolneux, Grégoire; Bécouarn, Yves; Evrard, Serge; Fonck, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant neoplasm that accounts for 1–2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Here we report two cases of ACC and describe their clinical features, the therapies used to treat them, and their prognosis. The first patient was a 65-year-old woman who had an abdominal CT scan for a urinary infection. Fortuitously, a rounded and well-delimited corporeal pancreatic tumor was discovered. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration revealed an ACC. During the puncture, a hypoechoic cavity appeared inside the lesion, corresponding to a probable necrotic area. Treatment consisted of a distal splenopancreatectomy. The second patient was a 75-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain. An abdominal CT scan showed a cephalic pancreatic lesion and two hepatic metastases. An EUS-guided fine needle aspiration showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which enabled an objective response after 6 cycles.

  15. Pyruvate Kinase M2 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A Are Overexpressed in Pancreatic Cancer and Correlate with Poor Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Goran Hamid; Olde Damink, S. W. M.; Malago, Massimo; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Despite advances in diagnostic technology, pancreatic cancer continues to be diagnosed at a late and incurable stage. Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis and to predict treatment response are urgently needed. Since alteration of glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, we proposed that pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2PK) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) enzymes could represent novel diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. In 266 tissue sections from normal pancreas, pancreatic cystic neoplasms, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer, we evaluated the expression of PKM2, LDHA, Ki-67 and CD8+ by immunohistochemistry and correlated these markers with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival. PKM2 and LDHA expression was also assessed by Western blot in 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PKM2 expression increased progressively from cyst through PanIN to cancer, whereas LDHA was overexpressed throughout the carcinogenic process. All but one cell line showed high expression of both proteins. Patients with strong PKM2 and LDHA expression had significantly worse survival than those with weak PKM2 and/or LDHA expression (7.0 months vs. 27.9 months, respectively, p = 0.003, log rank test). The expression of both PKM2 and LDHA correlated directly with Ki-67 expression, and inversely with intratumoral CD8+ cell count. PKM2 was significantly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumours and both PKM2 and LDHA were overexpressed in larger tumours. Multivariable analysis showed that combined expression of PKM2 and LDHA was an independent poor prognostic marker for survival. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a high expression pattern of two major glycolytic enzymes during pancreatic carcinogenesis, with increased expression in aggressive tumours and a significant adverse effect on survival. PMID:26989901

  16. Cystic Change in Pleomorphic Adenoma: A Rare Finding and a Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Khetrapal, Shaan; Jetley, Sujata; Hassan, Mohd. Jaseem

    2015-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma forms the majority of salivary gland neoplasms. Cystic change in pleomorphic adenomas is a diagnostic dilemma and can mimic mucoepidermoid carcinoma, mucocele or carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Hereby we report this interesting and rare case of cystic pleomorphic adenoma in a 32-year-old male. PMID:26675071

  17. Cystic Change in Pleomorphic Adenoma: A Rare Finding and a Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Khetrapal, Shaan; Jetley, Sujata; Hassan, Mohd Jaseem; Jairajpuri, Zeeba

    2015-11-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma forms the majority of salivary gland neoplasms. Cystic change in pleomorphic adenomas is a diagnostic dilemma and can mimic mucoepidermoid carcinoma, mucocele or carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Hereby we report this interesting and rare case of cystic pleomorphic adenoma in a 32-year-old male. PMID:26675071

  18. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  19. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. PMID:21734390

  20. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part I.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-06-15

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases (DCLDs) are a group of pathophysiologically heterogenous processes that are characterized by the presence of multiple spherical or irregularly shaped, thin-walled, air-filled spaces within the pulmonary parenchyma. Although the mechanisms of cyst formation remain incompletely defined for all DCLDs, in most cases lung remodeling associated with inflammatory or infiltrative processes results in displacement, destruction, or replacement of alveolar septa, distal airways, and small vessels within the secondary lobules of the lung. The DCLDs can be broadly classified according to underlying etiology as those caused by low-grade or high-grade metastasizing neoplasms, polyclonal or monoclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, infections, interstitial lung diseases, smoking, and congenital or developmental defects. In the first of a two-part series, we present an overview of the cystic lung diseases caused by neoplasms, infections, smoking-related diseases, and interstitial lung diseases, with a focus on lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:25906089

  1. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. The mucus clogs the lungs, causing breathing problems ...

  2. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Buccal Mucosa: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    S, Vidyalakshmi; R, Aravindhan

    2014-01-01

    Minor salivary gland neoplasms of the buccal mucosa are relatively uncommon. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), a well-defined entity, occurs most of the times in the parotid, submandibular glands and palate, as far as the intraoral site is concerned. Adenoid cystic carcinoma tends to have an indolent, extended clinical course with wide local infiltration and late distant metastases. We are presenting a case of an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the buccal mucosa in a 48-year-old female patient. PMID:24783155

  3. Cysts and cystic-appearing lesions of the knee: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Telischak, Nicholas A; Wu, Jim S; Eisenberg, Ronald L

    2014-01-01

    Cysts and cystic-appearing lesions around the knee are common and can be divided into true cysts (synovial cysts, bursae, ganglia, and meniscal cysts) and lesions that mimic cysts (hematomas, seromas, abscesses, vascular lesions, and neoplasms). The specific anatomic location of the cystic lesion often permits the correct diagnosis. In difficult cases, identifying a cystic mass in an atypical location and/or visualizing internal solid contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should raise concern for a neoplasm and the need for further evaluation and intervention. PMID:25024531

  4. Glycomic and Proteomic Profiling of Pancreatic Cyst Fluids Identifies Hyperfucosylated Lactosamines on the N-linked Glycans of Overexpressed Glycoproteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Benjamin F.; Goetz, John A.; House, Michael G.; Schmidt, C. Max; Novotny, Milos V.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and it is associated with an alarmingly low 5-year survival rate of 5%. However, a patient's prognosis is considerably improved when the malignant lesions are identified at an early stage of the disease and removed by surgical resection. Unfortunately, the absence of a practical screening strategy and clinical diagnostic test for identifying premalignant lesions within the pancreas often prevents early detection of pancreatic cancer. To aid in the development of a molecular screening system for early detection of the disease, we have performed glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling experiments on 21 pancreatic cyst fluid samples, including fluids from mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, two types of mucinous cysts that are considered high risk to undergo malignant transformation. A total of 80 asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycans, including high mannose and complex structures, were identified. Of special interest was a series of complex N-linked glycans containing two to six fucose residues, located predominantly as substituents on β-lactosamine extensions. Following the observation of these “hyperfucosylated” glycans, bottom-up proteomics experiments utilizing a label-free quantitative approach were applied to the investigation of two sets of tryptically digested proteins derived from the cyst fluids: 1) all soluble proteins in the raw samples and 2) a subproteome of the soluble cyst fluid proteins that were selectively enriched for fucosylation through the use of surface-immobilized Aleuria aurantia lectin. A comparative analysis of these two proteomic data sets identified glycoproteins that were significantly enriched by lectin affinity. Several candidate glycoproteins that appear hyperfucosylated were identified, including triacylglycerol lipase and pancreatic α-amylase, which were 20- and 22-fold more abundant, respectively

  5. Surgery for Malignant Sublingual and Minor Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Patrick J; Ferris, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Malignant sublingual gland neoplasms are rare, early-stage neoplasms presenting as painless non-ulcerated masses in the antero-lateral floor of the mouth. The majority of patients present with advanced disease, with symptoms of pain or anaesthesia of the tongue. Malignant minor salivary gland neoplasms are more common, the majority (>80%) of which present in the oral cavity, most frequently in the palatal area, as painless masses or as obstructive symptoms in the head and neck region. The most frequent pathologies are adenoid cystic carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (>85%), with the majority presenting at an advanced stage (III/IV). Wide tumour-free surgical margin excision is the treatment of choice, followed by radiotherapy, after discussion of the multidisciplinary head and neck cancer tumour board. Improvements in survival and quality of life have been achieved since the introduction of endoscopic and robotic surgeries for many minor salivary gland malignancies. PMID:27092950

  6. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. PMID:27469183

  7. Cystic renal tumors: new entities and novel concepts.

    PubMed

    Moch, Holger

    2010-05-01

    Cystic renal neoplasms and renal epithelial stromal tumors are diagnostically challenging and represent some novel tumor entities. In this article, clinical and pathologic features of established and novel entities are discussed. Predominantly cystic renal tumors include cystic nephroma/mixed epithelial and stromal tumor, synovial sarcoma, and multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma. These entities are own tumor entities of the 2004 WHO classification of renal tumors. Tubulocystic carcinoma and acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma are neoplasms with an intrinsically cystic growth pattern. Both tumor types should be included in a future WHO classification as novel entities owing to their characteristic features. Cysts and clear cell renal cell carcinoma frequently coexist within the kidneys of patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease. Sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinomas often contain cysts, usually as a minor component. Some clear cell renal cell carcinomas have prominent cysts, and multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma is composed almost exclusively of cysts. Recent molecular findings suggest that clear cell renal cancer may develop through cyst-dependent and cyst-independent molecular pathways. PMID:20418675

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  9. Common and uncommon pitfalls in pancreatic imaging: it is not always cancer.

    PubMed

    Vernuccio, F; Borhani, A A; Dioguardi Burgio, M; Midiri, M; Furlan, A; Brancatelli, G

    2016-02-01

    Despite advances in multimodality imaging of pancreas, there is still overlap between imaging findings of several pancreatic/peripancreatic disease processes. Pancreatic and peripancreatic non-neoplastic entities may mimic primary pancreatic neoplasms on ultrasound, CT, and MRI. On the other hand, primary pancreatic cancer may be overlooked on imaging because of technical and inherent factors. The purpose of this pictorial review is to describe and illustrate pancreatic imaging pitfalls and highlight the basic radiological features for proper differential diagnosis. PMID:26867910

  10. Three cases of mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Yoshio; Maeda, Kazunori; Okamoto, Masaru; Yanagitani, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    A rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis is the formation of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst (MPP), which is caused by tracking of pancreatic fluids through anatomical openings of the diaphragm into the mediastinum. Herein, we report the imaging characteristics of three cases of this condition. Our results revealed three features in common: (i) the connection between the mediastinum and the pancreatic cystic lesion; (ii) the presence of pleural effusions; and (iii) imaging findings consistent with chronic pancreatitis, such as pancreatic atrophy and calcifications and dilatation and/or stricture of main pancreatic duct (MPD). Serial diameter changes of the MPD and of the adjacent pseudocysts were necessary for the determination of the therapeutic strategy used in each case. PMID:27330827

  11. Three cases of mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Matsusue, Eiji; Fujihara, Yoshio; Maeda, Kazunori; Okamoto, Masaru; Yanagitani, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-06-01

    A rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis is the formation of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst (MPP), which is caused by tracking of pancreatic fluids through anatomical openings of the diaphragm into the mediastinum. Herein, we report the imaging characteristics of three cases of this condition. Our results revealed three features in common: (i) the connection between the mediastinum and the pancreatic cystic lesion; (ii) the presence of pleural effusions; and (iii) imaging findings consistent with chronic pancreatitis, such as pancreatic atrophy and calcifications and dilatation and/or stricture of main pancreatic duct (MPD). Serial diameter changes of the MPD and of the adjacent pseudocysts were necessary for the determination of the therapeutic strategy used in each case. PMID:27330827

  12. Calcium- and CaMKII-dependent chloride secretion induced by the microsomal Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor 2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone in cystic fibrosis pancreatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, A C; Kouyama, K; Heist, E K; Dong, Y J; Gardner, P

    1995-01-01

    Microsomal Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors such as thapsigargin (THG), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and 2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone (DBHQ) have been shown to inhibit Ca2+ reuptake by the intracellular stores and increase cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). DBHQ is a commercially available non-toxic synthetic compound chemically unrelated to THG and CPA. In this study, we tested the feasibility of utilizing DBHQ to improve Cl- secretion via the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway, in the cystic fibrosis (CF)-derived pancreatic epithelial cell line CFPAC-1. DBHQ stimulated 125I efflux and mobilized intracellular free Ca2+ in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal effects were seen at concentrations of 25-50 microM. DBHQ (25 microM) caused a short-term rise in [Ca2+]i in the absence of ambient Ca2+, and a sustained elevation of [Ca2+]i in cell monolayers bathed in the efflux solution (1.2 mM Ca2+), which was largely attenuated by Ni2+ (5 mM). Bath-application of DBHQ induced an outwardly-rectifying whole-cell Cl- current, which was abolished by pipette addition of BAPTA (5 mM) or CaMK [273-302] (20 microM), an inhibitory peptide of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). Pretreatment of monolayers of CFPAC-1 cells with DBHQ for 4-5 min significantly increased the Ca(2+)-independent or autonomous activity of CaMKII assayed in the cell homogenates. Thus, DBHQ appears to enhance Cl- channel activity via a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism involving CaMKII. Pretreatment of CFPAC-1 cells with up to 50 microM DBHQ for 6 h did not cause any detectable change in cell viability and did not significantly affect the cell proliferation rate. These results suggest that appropriate selective microsomal Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors may be therapeutically useful in improving Cl- secretion in CF epithelial cells. Images PMID:7560071

  13. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of Accessory Parotid Gland: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Das, Somdipto; Nayak, Umanath K; Buggavetti, Rahul; Sekhar, Shobana

    2016-05-01

    The accessory parotid gland is salivary gland tissue separated from the main gland at a variable distance. This gland is histologically similar to the main gland, but has a higher incidence of malignant neoplasms than the main gland. Regarding the various malignant neoplasms, studies have shown higher incidences of mucoepidermoid carcinoma, with less than 2% being adenoid cystic carcinoma. We present a case of swelling in the midcheek region that, after clinical examination, was diagnosed as a case of neoplasm of the accessory parotid gland. On the basis of auxiliary investigations including intraoperative frozen section, it was concluded that it was adenoid cystic carcinoma, grade I, and after wide surgical resection, the tumor was removed without undergoing superficial parotidectomy. The patient received postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and was followed for 14 months without any recurrence or substantial facial asymmetry. PMID:26851989

  14. Cystic fibrosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, N E; Farquharson, D F

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the outcomes of pregnancies in women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to address issues pertinent to the obstetric care of such women. DATA SOURCES: English-language case reports and case series published from 1960 to 1991 identified through a search of MEDLINE and Index Medicus. The terms of reference were "cystic fibrosis" and "pregnancy". Not all the reports reviewed addressed all the outcomes under consideration. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 20 reports citing cases of pregnancy in women with CF. DATA EXTRACTION: Outcomes included the number of spontaneous abortions, pregnancies continued beyond 20 weeks, preterm deliveries, maternal deaths at 6 months and 2 years after delivery and perinatal deaths. Breast-feeding was addressed. Measures to assess the severity of maternal disease included the mean age at diagnosis of CF, weight gain during pregnancy, pulmonary function studies if available and the need for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 217 pregnancies in 162 women spontaneous abortion occurred in 10 (4.6%). Pregnancy progressed beyond 20 weeks in 81.6% of cases; 24.3% of the deliveries were preterm. The maternal death rate did not exceed that among age-related women with CF who were not pregnant. The rate of perinatal death was 7.9%. Breast milk was not hypernatremic. Poor outcomes were associated with a weight gain of less than 4.5 kg and a forced vital capacity of less than 50% of the predicted value. CONCLUSIONS: Premature labour and delivery remain a significant risk for pregnant women with CF, contributing to a high rate of perinatal death. Maternal illness and death result from deteriorating pulmonary function. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated. Attention to energy intake and pulmonary function is important. PMID:8374843

  15. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  16. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. What do we know of their history?].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Starting with Paul Langerhans, who first described pancreatic islets in 1869, this article reviews the various protagonists who, in the last century and a half, have contributed to the discovery of the main hormones originating in the pancreas, the analytical methods for their measurement, the imaging techniques for identifying tumoural location, and the various pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:26684677

  17. Genetic aspects of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis are complex inflammatory disorders of the pancreas with unpredictable severity, complications, and clinical courses. Growing evidence for genetic risk and modifying factors, plus strong evidence that only a minority of patients with these disorders are heavy alcohol drinkers, has revolutionized our concept of these diseases. Once considered a self-inflicted injury, pancreatitis is now recognized as a complex inflammatory condition like inflammatory bowel disease. Genetic linkage and candidate gene studies have identified six pancreas-targeting factors that are associated with changes in susceptibility to acute and/or chronic pancreatitis, including cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2), serine protease inhibitor Kazal 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC) and calcium-sensing receptor (CASR). Patients with mutations in these genes are at increased risk of pancreatitis caused by a variety of stresses including hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Multiple studies are reporting new polymorphisms, as well as complex gene x gene and gene x environmental interactions. PMID:20059346

  18. Cystic fibrosis: need for mass deployable screening methods.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Aditya Singh; Agarwal, Anirudh; Singh, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette superfamily of proteins and it functions as a chloride channel. CFTR largely controls the working of epithelial cells of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, exocrine glands, and genitourinary system. Cystic fibrosis is responsible for severe chronic pulmonary disorders in children. Other maladies in the spectrum of this life-limiting disorder include nasal polyposis, pansinusitis, rectal prolapse, pancreatitis, cholelithiasis, insulin-dependent hyperglycemia, and cirrhosis. This review summarizes the recent state of art in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnostic methods with the help of CF literature published so far and proposes new research domains in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnosis. PMID:24880895

  19. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  20. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas: case series and literature review on an enigmatic entity.

    PubMed

    Vassos, Nikolaos; Agaimy, Abbas; Klein, Peter; Hohenberger, Werner; Croner, Roland S

    2013-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is a rare tumor which typically affects young women without significant clinical symptoms. SPN usually shows an indolent behavior and only rare cases recur and/or metastasize after complete resection. We report our experience with four cases of SPN of the pancreas. All four patients were female with an age range of 15-42 years (mean age: 24.5 years). Two patients presented with abdominal pain, one with abdominal mass and one with acute abdominal signs following blunt trauma. Tumor's size ranged from 1 to 16 cm (mean size: 5.5 cm). Two tumors were diagnosed preoperatively through percutaneous core needle biopsy and two underwent surgery without preoperative diagnosis because of high suspicion of SPN based on clinical and radiological findings. By immunohistochemistry, all cases stained strongly for vimentin, progesterone-receptor and beta-catenin (nuclear) and variably with pankeratin and neuroendocrine markers. The proliferation index (Ki-67) was <2% in all cases. After a median follow-up of 40 months (range: 24-57 months), all patients were alive with no evidence of recurrence or metastatic disease. In conclusion, SPN of the pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any solid and partly cystic pancreatic or upper abdominal mass, particularly in young females. SPN possesses a low malignant potential and complete surgical resection with clear margins is the treatment of choice. Following R0 resection, SPN has an excellent prognosis. PMID:23696922

  1. L206W mutation of the cystic fibrosis gene, relatively frequent in French Canadians, is associated with atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rozen, R.; Ferreira-Rajabi, L.; Robb, L.

    1995-07-03

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Over 400 mutations have been reported at this locus. Although severe forms of cystic fibrosis are usually associated with pancreatic insufficiency, pulmonary dysfunction, and elevated sweat chloride, there is a wide range of phenotypes, including congenital absence of the vas deferens, observed with some of the milder mutations. The L206W mutation, which was first identified in patients from South France, is relatively frequent in French Canadians from Quebec. In this report, we document the atypical form of cystic fibrosis associated with this mutation in a cohort of 7 French Canadian probands. 20 refs.

  2. Systemic inflammatory mediators and cystic fibrosis genotype.

    PubMed

    Augarten, A; Paret, G; Avneri, I; Akons, H; Aviram, M; Bentur, L; Blau, H; Efrati, O; Szeinberg, A; Barak, A; Kerem, E; Yahav, J

    2004-10-01

    Morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis patients is mainly attributed to pulmonary infection and inflammation. Chemokines play a pivotal role in the inflammatory process. Although genotype-phenotype correlation in cystic fibrosis patients has been defined, a clear relationship between the defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene and pulmonary inflammation has not been established. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum chemokines levels in cystic fibrosis patients correlate with genotype and pulmonary function tests, as well as with other clinical characteristics. Serum levels of interleukin-8, RANTES, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were measured in 36 cystic fibrosis patients grouped according to their genotype. Group A included 25 patients who carried two mutations associated with a pathological sweat test and pancreatic insufficiency (deltaF508, W1282X, G542X, N1303K, S549R). Group B included 11 compound heterozygote patients who carried one mutation known to cause mild disease with borderline or normal sweat test and pancreatic sufficiency (3849+10kb C to T, 5T). Associations between chemokine levels, genotype, pulmonary function, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, age, sweat chloride level, and pancreatic and nutritional status were examined. Mean interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels were significantly higher in group A than group B (11.4 +/- 2.1 pg/ml vs. 5 +/- 0.9 pg/ml and 157 +/- 16 pg/ml vs. 88.8 +/- 16.4 pg/ml, respectively) (P < 0.01). No difference in RANTES levels were found between groups. interleukin-8 levels were inversely related to forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = -0.37, P < 0.02), while there was no association between the latter and RANTES and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. The Pseudomonas colonization rate was higher among group A patients than group B (88% vs. 40%, P < 0.01). No relationship was found between measured chemokines and age, sweat chloride

  3. The value of KRAS mutation testing with CEA for the diagnosis of pancreatic mucinous cysts

    PubMed Central

    Kadayifci, Abdurrahman; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Atar, Mustafa; Dewitt, John M.; Forcione, David G.; Sherman, Stuart; Casey, Brenna W.; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Schmidt, C. Max; Pitman, Martha B.; Brugge, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Pancreatic cyst fluid (PCF) CEA has been shown to be the most accurate preoperative test for detection of cystic mucinous neoplasms (CMNs). This study aimed to assess the added value of PCF KRAS mutational analysis to CEA for diagnosis of CMNs. Patients and methods: This is a retrospective study of prospectively collected endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) fine-needle aspiration (FNA) data. KRAS mutation was determined by direct sequencing or equivalent methods. Cysts were classified histologically (surgical cohort) or by clinical (EUS or FNA) findings (clinical cohort). Performance characteristics of KRAS, CEA and their combination for detection of a cystic mucinous neoplasm (CMN) and malignancy were calculated. Results: The study cohort consisted of 943 patients: 147 in the surgical cohort and 796 in the clinical cohort. Overall, KRAS and CEA each had high specificity (100 % and 93.2 %), but low sensitivity (48.3 % and 56.3 %) for the diagnosis of a CMN. The positivity of KRAS or CEA increased the diagnostic accuracy (80.8 %) and AUC (0.84) significantly compared to KRAS (65.3 % and 0.74) or CEA (65.8 % and 0.74) alone, but only in the clinical cohort (P < 0.0001 for both). KRAS mutation was significantly more frequent in malignant CMNs compared to histologically confirmed non-malignant CMNs (73 % vs. 37 %, P = 0.001). The negative predictive value of KRAS mutation was 77.6 % in differentiating non-malignant cysts. Conclusions: The detection of a KRAS mutation in PCF is a highly specific test for mucinous cysts. It outperforms CEA for sensitivity in mucinous cyst diagnosis, but the data does not support its routine use. PMID:27092317

  4. Digestive neuroendocrine neoplasms: A 2016 overview.

    PubMed

    Merola, Elettra; Rinzivillo, Maria; Cicchese, Noemi; Capurso, Gabriele; Panzuto, Francesco; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2016-08-01

    Digestive neuroendocrine neoplasms (DNENs) have an incidence of 2.39 per 100,000 inhabitants per year, and a prevalence of 35 cases per 100,000; the gap between these rates is to be referred to the relatively long survival that characterizes the majority of these tumors, which can be thus considered as chronic oncological diseases. Up to 80% of patients are stage IV since the first diagnosis, presenting a 5-yr overall survival rate of 35%-55% and a twice higher mortality than limited disease. DNENs express somatostatin receptors in more than 80% of cases, detected through immunohistochemistry or functional imaging tests (FITs). This feature identifies patients who may benefit from "cold" somatostatin analogs (SSAs) or peptide receptors radionuclide therapy, although SSAs are sometimes used also with a negative uptake at FITs. The therapeutic options have been recently increased after the identification of molecular pathways involved in DNENs pathogenesis, and the subsequent use of targeted therapies (i.e., Everolimus and Sunitinib) for these neoplasms. This review offers an overview about pancreatic and small bowel NENs, critically underlining the issues that still need to be clarified and the future perspectives to be investigated. PMID:27212431

  5. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... order to digest food. Cystic Fibrosis: A Single Gene Disease Mutations in a single gene - the Cystic ... the defective gene, or correcting the defective protein. Gene Therapy Research Offers Promise of a Cure for ...

  6. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic fibrosis (CF). This gene makes ... and very salty sweat. Research suggests that the CFTR protein also affects the body in other ways. ...

  7. Diffuse Cystic Lung Diseases: Diagnostic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai-Feng; Feng, Ruie; Cui, Han; Tian, Xinlun; Wang, Hanping; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Weihong; Lo, Bee Hong

    2016-06-01

    Diffuse cystic lung disease (DCLD) is a group of heterogeneous diseases that present as diffuse cystic changes in the lung on computed tomography of the chest. Most DCLD diseases are rare, although they might resemble common diseases such as emphysema and bronchiectasis. Main causes of DCLD include lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, amyloidosis, light-chain deposition disease, Sjögren syndrome, and primary or metastatic neoplasm. We discuss clinical factors that are helpful in the differential diagnosis of DCLDsuch as sex and age, symptoms and signs, extrapulmonary presentations, cigarette smoking, and family history. Investigations for DCLD include high-resolution computed tomography, biochemical and histopathological studies, genetic tests, pulmonary function tests, and bronchoscopic and video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsies. A proposed diagnostic algorithm would enhance ease of diagnosing most cases of DCLD. PMID:27231867

  8. SOLID PSEUDOPAPILLARY NEOPLASM OF THE PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; TORREZ, Franz Robert Apodaca; GONZALEZ, Adriano Miziara; LINHARES, Marcelo Moura; TRIVIÑO, Tarcisio; HERANI-FILHO, Benedito; GOLDENBERG, Alberto; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; LOBO, Edson José

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare tumor of the pancreas. However, it´s etiology still maintain discussions. Aim: To analyze it´s clinical data, diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A retrospective study of medical records of all patients treated from January 1997 until July 2015. Results: Were identified 17 cases. Most patients were women (94.11%) and the average age was 32.88 years. The main complaint was abdominal mass (47.05%). The most frequent location was in the body/tail of the pancreas (72.22%) and the most frequently performed surgery was distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (64.70%). No patient had metastases at diagnosis. Conservative surgery for pancreatic parenchyma was performed in only three cases. The rate of complications in the postoperative period was 35.29% and the main complication was pancreatic fistula (29.41%). No patient underwent adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: The treatment is surgical and the most common clinical presentation is abdominal mass. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was the most frequently performed surgery for its treatment. PMID:27438034

  9. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you ... about CF Care Centers, go to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's Care Center Network Web page. It's standard ...

  10. Peripheral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shenoi, Ramakrishna; Gadve, Vandana; Rajderkar, Anand; Dive, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic lesions are derived from remnants of the components of the developing tooth germ. The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin that is characterized by ameloblastoma-like epithelial cells and ghost cells. Most peripheral CCOTs are located in the anterior gingiva of the mandible or maxilla. This is a rare case report of CCOT. The rare feature in our case was its peripheral nature of existence and its location in the left buccal vestibule and retromolar region. Based on the radiological, cytological and histopathological findings the lesion was surgically excised. PMID:26393218

  11. Echocardiographic features of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst.

    PubMed Central

    Aroney, C N; Nicholson, M R; Shevland, J E

    1985-01-01

    Cross sectional echocardiography detected a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst which caused extracardiac compression in a 49 year old man. Computed tomography confirmed the presence of a cystic lesion lying behind the heart and extending from the pancreas to above the carina. Surgical decompression resulted in resolution of the clinical and echocardiographic findings. Images PMID:3994874

  12. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  13. Apoptosis deregulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Raquel; Nunes, Natália de Souza; de Castro, Fabíola Attié

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Philadelphia-chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are clonal hematologic diseases characterized by hematopoietic progenitor independence from or hypersensitivity to cytokines. The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms have not yet been fully clarified. Pathophysiologic findings relevant for myeloproliferative neoplasms are associated with genetic alterations, such as, somatic mutation in the gene that codifies JAK-2 (JAK V617F). Deregulation of the process of programmed cellular death, called apoptosis, seems to participate in the pathogenesis of these disorders. It is known that expression deregulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes promotes cell resistance to apoptosis, culminating with the accumulation of myeloid cells and establishing neoplasms. This review will focus on the alterations in apoptosis regulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms, and the importance of a better understanding of this mechanism for the development of new therapies for these diseases. PMID:24488400

  14. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  15. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Martini, S V; Rocco, P R M; Morales, M M

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR) to the affected organ (lung). Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy. PMID:21952739

  16. Pancreatic body hydatid cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sorogy, Mohamed El; El-Hemaly, Mohamed; Aboelenen, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hydatid disease is a parasitic infestation caused by the cystic stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatid cysts are commonly located in the liver and lung. Pancreatic affection by hydatid cysts is very rare even in endemic areas. PRESENTATION OF CASE Our case is a 34-year-old male patient referred to our centre with a pancreatic body cyst diagnosed by abdominal CT scan. The patient gave 3 months history of epigastric pain. He also gave history of travelling to Saudi Arabia and China. His enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELIZA) test for echinococcal antigens was positive. Surgical exploration revealed a 7 cm cyst in the body of the pancreas separable from the surroundings. Endocystectomy and deroofing of the cyst was done. DISCUSSION Due to its rarity and similarity with more common pancreatic cystic conditions, diagnosis of pancreatic hydatid cyst may be challenging. Abdmonial sonography and CT scan together with enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELIZA) test for echinococcal antigens are helpful diagnostic tools. Therapeutic options include endocystectomy and deroofing, albendazol therapy with percutaneous drainage or laparoscopic excision of the cyst. CONCLUSION Even in non-endemic areas, past history of travelling abroad in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions should raise the suspicion of hydatid disease as a possible diagnosis. PMID:25528027

  17. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms. PMID:27602165

  18. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of less common pancreatic malignancies and pancreatic tumors with malignant potential

    PubMed Central

    Franz, D.; Esposito, I.; Kapp, A.-C.; Gaa, J.; Rummeny, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are an increasingly common finding in abdominal imaging. Various kinds of pathologies of the pancreas are well known, but it often remains difficult to classify the lesions radiologically in respect of type and grade of malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for the evaluation of pancreatic pathologies due to its superior soft tissue contrast. In this article we present a selection of less common malignant and potentially malignant pancreatic neoplasms with their characteristic appearance on established MRI sequences with and without contrast enhancement. PMID:26937427

  20. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Most people with pancreatic abscesses have had pancreatitis. However, the complication often takes 7 or more days to develop. Signs of an abscess can be seen on: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of the abdomen Ultrasound of the abdomen

  1. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatitis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  2. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood. ... located behind the stomach. It produces chemicals (called enzymes) ... Pancreatic pseudocysts most often develop after an episode of ...

  3. A rare case of three different tumors in the same pancreatic specimen: a case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Paiella, Salvatore; Luchini, Claudio; Amodio, Antonio; Rusev, Borislav; Bassi, Claudio; Manfredi, Riccardo; Frulloni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPT) of the pancreas are rare neoplasms mainly affecting young women. Pancreatic serous cystadenomas (SCAs) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) account for about 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. The combination of these three lesions, to our knowledge, has never been described in literature. Here we report a case of combined SPT, SCA and PanNET affecting a 33-year-old woman. PMID:27284489

  4. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25053610

  5. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by aberrant proliferation of one or more myeloid lineages often with increased immature cells in the peripheral blood. The three classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs are: 1) polycythemia vera (PV), 2) essential thrombocythemia (ET), and 3) primary myelofibrosis (PMF), which are typically disorders of older adults and are exceedingly rare in children. The diagnostic criteria for MPNs remain largely defined by clinical, laboratory and histopathology assessments in adults, but they have been applied to the pediatric population. The discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation, and more recently, MPL and CALR mutations, are major landmarks in the understanding of MPNs. Nevertheless, they rarely occur in children, posing a significant diagnostic challenge given the lack of an objective, clonal marker. Therefore, in pediatric patients, the diagnosis must rely heavily on clinical and laboratory factors, and exclusion of secondary disorders to make an accurate diagnosis of MPN. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, diagnostic work up, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs (PV, ET and PMF) in children and highlights key differences to the adult diseases. Particular attention will be given to pediatric PMF, as it is the only disorder of this group that is observed in infants and young children, and in many ways appears to be a unique entity compared to adult PMF. PMID:26609329

  6. Myeloproliferative neoplasms and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Barbui, Tiziano; Finazzi, Guido; Falanga, Anna

    2013-09-26

    Major causes of morbidity and mortality in myeloproliferative neoplasms are represented by arterial and venous complications, progression to myelofibrosis, and transformation to acute leukemia. The pathogenesis of thrombosis results from a complex interplay of clinical and disease-related factors. Abnormalities of blood cells arising from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells involve not only quantitative changes but also qualitative modifications that characterize the switch of these cells from a resting to a procoagulant phenotype. According to age and previous thrombosis, patients are classified in a "high risk" or "low risk". Novel disease-related determinants such as leukocytosis and JAK2V617F mutational status and/or mutational burden are now under active investigation. In low-risk polycythemia vera patients, only phlebotomy and primary antithrombotic prophylaxis with aspirin is recommended, while in high-risk patients cytotoxic therapy is considered. Whether novel drugs targeting the constitutively active JAK2/STAT pathway will improve the management of thrombosis is a challenge for future studies. PMID:23823316

  7. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) Patient Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-28

    Primary Myelofibrosis; Polycythemia Vera; Essential Thrombocythemia; Mastocytosis; Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic, Atypical, BCR-ABL Negative; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Juvenile; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia-not Otherwise Specified; Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases; Neoplasms; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic

  8. [Cystic renal pathology].

    PubMed

    Rosi, P; Cesaroni, M; Bracarda, S; Rociola, W; Virgili, G

    1993-08-01

    Ultrasonography has a great interest in diagnosis of cystic kidney disorders for typical eco-pattern of this pathology. In this work we show the eco-pattern of the most common cystic kidney disorders. Particularly we examine simple cysts (typical, atypical, complicated), multicystic kidney dysplasia, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (infantile) autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (adult age). The so-called neoplastic cysts (multiloculated cysts, multiloculated cysts nephroma, cystic nephroblastoma), medullar cysts (medullary sponge kidney, medullary cystic disease), parapyelic cysts, acquired cystic kidney disease in renal failure patients, parasitic cysts, epidermoid cysts. About this disorders we present the more typical and expressive ultrasonographic appearance and we define the role and the opportunity of diagnostic setting by echography, moreover ultrasonography allows us to make a differential diagnosis between cystic kidney disorders and other kidney disease. PMID:8353538

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis and Newborn Screening.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sontag, Marci K; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) has evolved over the past decade as newborn screening has become universal in the United States and elsewhere. The heterogeneity of phenotypes associated with CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and mutations in the CFTR gene has become clearer, ranging from classic pancreatic-insufficient CF to manifestations in only 1 organ system to indeterminate diagnoses identified by newborn screening. The tools available for diagnosis have also expanded. This article reviews the newest diagnostic criteria for CF, newborn screening, prenatal screening and diagnosis, and indeterminate diagnoses in newborn-screened infants and symptomatic adults. PMID:27469178

  10. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed? Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) based on ... to see whether the baby has CF. Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Testing People who have one normal CFTR ...

  11. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Christopher S.; Abraham, William M.; Brogden, Kim A.; Engelhardt, John F.; Fisher, John T.; McCray, Paul B.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K.; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Prather, Randall S.; Sabater, Juan R.; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  12. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S; Abraham, William M; Brogden, Kim A; Engelhardt, John F; Fisher, John T; McCray, Paul B; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Prather, Randall S; Sabater, Juan R; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2008-08-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  13. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Wood, Laura D; Itoi, Takao; Takaori, Kyoichi

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, for which mortality closely parallels incidence. Most patients with pancreatic cancer remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no standard programme for screening patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer (eg, those with a family history of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis). Most pancreatic cancers arise from microscopic non-invasive epithelial proliferations within the pancreatic ducts, referred to as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias. There are four major driver genes for pancreatic cancer: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4. KRAS mutation and alterations in CDKN2A are early events in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration offer high diagnostic ability for pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is regarded as the only potentially curative treatment, and adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine or S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, is given after surgery. FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, folinic acid [leucovorin], irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) are the treatments of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates but have good performance status. PMID:26830752

  14. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  15. Surgical Management of Minor Salivary Gland Neoplasms of the Palate

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian A.; Burkey, Brian B.; Netterville, James L.; Butcher, R. Brent; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Minor salivary gland tumors are uncommon, accounting for up to 15% of salivary gland neoplasms. We describe our experience with both benign and malignant tumors of the palatal minor salivary glands, focusing on the extent of resection and options for defect reconstruction. Study Design: Retrospective review of medical records. Results: From 1994 to 2002, 37 patients with primary neoplasms originating in the palatal minor salivary glands were treated at a single institution. Patients ranged in age from the second to the seventh decades, with a female preponderance. Twenty-four percent of the lesions were benign. The most common malignant tumor encountered was low grade polymorphous adenocarcinoma, followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma. The extent of surgical resection was dictated by tumor pathology and evidence of perineural spread, and defects were reconstructed with a variety of techniques. Postoperative complications included velopharyngeal insufficiency, flap fistulization or loss, and trismus. After 1 month to 8 years of follow-up, 1 patient has died with regional and systemic metastases. Conclusions: Neoplasms of the minor salivary glands in the palate may be excised, with limits dictated by tumor histopathology and perineural invasion. Improved functional results may be achieved by immediately reconstructing the defects with rotational flaps, reserving free flaps for more extensive defects of the maxilla and infratemporal fossa. PMID:21603498

  16. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  17. Heterogeneity of the cystic fibrosis phenotype in a large kindred family in Qatar with cystic fibrosis mutation (I1234V).

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Al Thani, G; Dawod, S T; Kambouris, M; Al Hamed, M

    2001-04-01

    Twenty-nine subjects (17 families) with cystic fibrosis belonging to the same Bedouin tribe were screened for cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR). Homozygous I1234V mutation in exon 19 was identified in all families with a relatively high rate of consanguinity (96.6 per cent). The homozygous I1234V mutation tended to present with a variable degree of pulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency and electrolyte imbalance. Homozygous I1234V was found to be a common mutation in the studied Bedouin tribe in Qatar. PMID:11336127

  18. The Pancreatic Duct Ligated (Mini)pig as a Model for Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Man.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Peter Colin; Hoffmann, Katrin; Kamphues, Josef; Möeler, Anne

    2016-10-01

    Modern therapy of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) using pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) has largely been very effective and has greatly helped in improving the nutritional status of patients with PEI and in increasing the life expectancy in cystic fibrosis. It is believed that the use of predictable large animal models could play an important role in assessing and developing new therapies. This article reviews the pancreatic duct ligated (adult) minipig as a chronic model of total PEI, with a detailed look at the influence of PEI and response to PERT on prececal compared to fecal digestibility, to directly investigate effects on protein and starch digestion and absorption. In addition, the piglet with PEI is reviewed as a model for PEI in young patients with the aim of further improving the therapy and nutritional status of young patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27623555

  19. Clinical Impact of the KL-6 Concentration of Pancreatic Juice for Diagnosing Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuya; Takeda, Yohei; Harada, Kenichi; Onoyama, Takumi; Kawata, Soichiro; Horie, Yasushi; Sakamoto, Teruhisa; Ueki, Masaru; Miura, Norimasa; Murawaki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Pancreatic juice cytology (PJC) is considered optimal for differentially diagnosing pancreatic masses, but the accuracy of PJC ranges from 46.7% to 93.0%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of measuring the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice for diagnosing pancreatic masses. Methods. PJC and the KL-6 concentration measurements of pancreatic juice were performed for 70 consecutive patients with pancreatic masses (39 malignancies and 31 benign). Results. The average KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice was significantly higher for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) (167.7 ± 396.1 U/mL) and intraductal papillary mucinous carcinomas (IPMCs) (86.9 ± 21.1 U/mL) than for pancreatic inflammatory lesions (17.5 ± 15.7 U/mL, P = 0.034) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (14.4 ± 2.0 U/mL, P = 0.026), respectively. When the cut-off level of the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice was 16 U/mL, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice alone were 79.5%, 64.5%, and 72.9%, respectively. Adding the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice to PJC when making a diagnosis caused the values of sensitivity and accuracy of PJC to increase by 15.3% (P = 0.025) and 8.5% (P = 0.048), respectively. Conclusions. The KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice may be as useful as PJC for diagnosing PDACs. PMID:26451373

  20. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  1. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  2. Nutrient Status of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    GORDON, CATHERINE M.; ANDERSON, ELLEN J.; HERLYN, KAREN; HUBBARD, JANE L.; PIZZO, ANGELA; GELBARD, RONDI; LAPEY, ALLEN; MERKEL, PETER A.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition is thought to influence disease status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This cross-sectional study sought to evaluate nutrient intake and anthropometric data from 64 adult outpatients with cystic fibrosis. Nutrient intake from food and supplements was compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes for 16 nutrients and outcomes influenced by nutritional status. Attention was given to vitamin D and calcium given potential skeletal implications due to cystic fibrosis. Measurements included weight, height, body composition, pulmonary function, and serum metabolic parameters. Participants were interviewed about dietary intake, supplement use, pulmonary function, sunlight exposure, and pain. The participants’ mean body mass index (±standard deviation) was 21.8±4.9 and pulmonary function tests were normal. Seventy-eight percent used pancreatic enzyme replacement for malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD)<37.5 nmol/L] was common: 25 (39%) were deficient despite adequate vitamin D intake. Lipid profiles were normal in the majority, even though total and saturated fat consumption represented 33.0% and 16.8% of energy intake, respectively. Reported protein intake represented 16.9% of total energy intake (range 10%–25%). For several nutrients, including vitamin D and calcium, intake from food and supplements in many participants exceeded recommended Tolerable Upper Intake Levels. Among adults with cystic fibrosis, vitamin D deficiency was common despite reported adequate intake, and lipid profiles were normal despite a relatively high fat intake. Mean protein consumption was adequate, but the range of intake was concerning, as both inadequate or excessive intake may have deleterious skeletal effects. These findings call into question the applicability of established nutrient thresholds for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18060897

  3. Refractory Jaundice From Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Treated With Cholangioscopy-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nicholas G.; Camilo, Joel; McCarter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are epithelial neoplasms treated with surgical resection when appropriate. We present a 79-year-old man with jandice refractory to endoscopic stenting. Biliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with cholangioscopy was used as palliation of obstructive jaundice due to a mucin-producing pancreatic IPMN with fistulous biliary communication. Clinical improvement permitted surgery, and he returned to pre-illness status at 17 months. The use of cholangioscopy in the setting of mucinous filling defects can guide over-the-wire RFA for palliation and may be a bridge to surgery. PMID:27144205

  4. Refractory Jaundice From Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Treated With Cholangioscopy-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicholas G; Camilo, Joel; McCarter, Martin; Shah, Raj J

    2016-04-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are epithelial neoplasms treated with surgical resection when appropriate. We present a 79-year-old man with jandice refractory to endoscopic stenting. Biliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with cholangioscopy was used as palliation of obstructive jaundice due to a mucin-producing pancreatic IPMN with fistulous biliary communication. Clinical improvement permitted surgery, and he returned to pre-illness status at 17 months. The use of cholangioscopy in the setting of mucinous filling defects can guide over-the-wire RFA for palliation and may be a bridge to surgery. PMID:27144205

  5. Myxoma of the upper leg originating from an appendiceal mucinous neoplasm: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHANG, XUE-YAN; WANG, BIN; CAO, QING-YONG

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma is rare in the upper leg. The current study presents the case of a large tumor in the right upper leg. The tumor extended to pelvic cavity and was found to be connected with a cystic and solid neoplasm that was adjacent to the ascending colon in the right lower quadrant. The large tumor of the upper leg had existed for 15 years and had ulcerated through the skin 4 days prior to admittance. Palliative surgery was performed, with histological findings of a myxoma. Since appendiceal mucinous neoplasms may invade organizations outside of the mucous layer of the appendix and cause secondary peritoneal myxoma, this myxoma of the upper leg probably originated from an appendiceal mucinous neoplasm. PMID:26622844

  6. Role of emerging molecular markers in pancreatic cyst fluid.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas (CLPs) are increasingly diagnosed due to the growing utilization of cross-sectional imaging modalities. The differentiation between true cysts (epithelial tumors) and nonepithelial lesions (such as pseudocysts) relies on clinical and imaging characteristics, but more reliably obtained by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) fine-needle aspiration. Due to their malignant potential, some of the true pancreatic cysts require further assessment and periodic follow-up. Therefore, it is important to establish a solid diagnosis at the time of detection of the various types of pancreatic cysts. Due to the limitations of cytology and biochemical markers in accurately classifying cyst pathology, the search for specific molecular markers associated with each type of cyst is ongoing. In this chapter, we will review some of the emerging molecular markers in pancreatic cystic fluid and their potential impact on endosonography and pancreatic cyst management. PMID:26643693

  7. Time to reconsider Spitzoid neoplasms?

    PubMed Central

    Urso, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background: Spitzoid neoplasms may pose significant diagnostic problems because in a fraction of them it is quite difficult or impossible to establish if they are benign or malignant lesions. An extraordinarily large number of studies have been made in attempts to solve this problem; regrettably, the histological criteria proposed and the various special sophisticated techniques employed have proven to be ineffective in making this distinction with confidence. Objectives: To explore the possible causes for this diagnostic failure and an attempt to identify the source of this problem. Method: A historical and technical analysis of the specialized literature is performed, critically evaluating the main points of this controversial topic. Results: The reasons for the diagnostic failure in Spitzoid neoplasms are not clear but could be the result of inappropriate conceptual representation. The analysis of available data and a rational review of old and new assumptions and concepts may suggest a different representation for Spitzoid neoplasms: Spitz nevus, atypical Spitz tumor and Spitzoid melanoma, rather than being three different tumors that are difficult or impossible to distinguish with assurance, could be viewed as one unique entity, Spitz tumor (ST). This tumor is a low-grade malignant neoplasm, in which the amount of intrinsic risk is variable, ranging from very low to high (ST1, ST2, ST3), and malignant potential could be estimated. Conclusions: The proposed alternative representation of Spitzoid neoplasms as a unique tumor may help in overcoming the difficulty in diagnosis of these tumors. PMID:27222771

  8. Pleuropulmonary blastoma in a young adult presenting as a ruptured cystic teratoma in radiology.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, Keun Il; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Min Ki; Kim, Jee Yeon; Park, Do Youn; Sol, Mee Young; Suh, Kang Suek

    2003-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare malignant dysontogenetic neoplasm primarily affecting children and is characterized histologically by a variably mixed blastematous and sarcomatous patterns. We herein report a very exceptional adult case of PPB. A 21-yr-old male patient presented with a left chest pain of two weeks' duration. A computed tomography scan revealed a large, multicystic tumor occupying the left lower hemithorax, leading to the impression of a ruptured mediastinal cystic teratoma. A thoracotomy for resection of the tumor was performed. On histologic examination, the tumor consisted of cystic walls and associated solid lesions which showed undifferentiated blastemal tissues with focal fibrosarcomatous and rhabdoid features. Immunohistochemically the tumor cells only showed diffuse strong positivity for vimentin. The histologic findings corresponded to a type II PPB. The authors suggest that PPB, especially of type I or II, should be included in the radiologic differential diagnosis of mediastinal cystic neoplasms in a young adult. PMID:12923341

  9. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) made in the past year. Recent findings Tropical pancreatitis associates with SPINK1 and/or CFTR gene mutations in approximately 50% of patients, similar to the frequency in idiopathic CP. Corticosteroids increase secretin-stimulated pancreatic bicarbonate concentrations in AIP by restoring mislocalized CFTR protein to the apical ductal membrane. Most patients with asymptomatic hyperenzymemia have pancreatic lesions of unclear significance or no pancreatic lesions. Common pitfalls in the use of diagnostic tests for EPI confound interpretation of findings in IBS and severe renal insufficiency. Further study is needed to improve the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) to diagnose CP. Celiac plexus block provides short term pain relief in a subset of patients. Summary Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the genetic associations of tropical pancreatitis, a reversible mislocalization of ductal CFTR in AIP, the association of asymptomatic pancreatic hyperenzymemia with pancreatic disorders, limitations of diagnostic tests for EPI, diagnosis of CP by EUS and endoscopic pancreatic function testing and treatment of pain. PMID:21844753