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Sample records for cytokines content irradiated

  1. Profiling of Cytokines Secreted by Conventional Aqueous Outflow Pathway Endothelial Cells Activated In Vitro and Ex Vivo With Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Jorge A.; Chau, Phuonglan; Wu, Jianfeng; Juster, Richard; Shifera, Amde Selassie; Geske, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To profile which cytokine genes are differentially expressed (DE) as up- or downregulated by cultured human trabecular meshwork (TMEs) and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells (SCEs) after three experimental treatments consisting of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) irradiation, exposure to media conditioned either by SLT-irradiated TMEs (TME-cm) or by SCEs (SCE-cm). Also, to profile which cytokines are upregulated ex vivo in SLT-irradiated human conventional aqueous outflow pathway (CAOP) tissues. Methods After each treatment, Affymetrix microarray assays were used to detect upregulated and downregulated genes for cytokines and their receptors in TMEs and SCEs. ELISA and protein antibody arrays were used to detect upregulated cytokines secreted in SLT-irradiated CAOP tissues ex vivo. Results The SLT irradiation upregulated numerous cytokine genes in TMEs, but only a few in SCEs. Exposure to TME- and SCE-cm induced SCEs to upregulate many more cytokine genes than TMEs. Selective laser trabeculoplasty irradiation and exposure to TME-cm downregulated several cytokine genes in TMEs but none in SCEs. Selective laser trabeculoplasty irradiation induced one upregulated and three downregulated cytokine-receptor genes in TMEs but none in SCEs. Exposure to TME-cm induced upregulation of one and downregulation of another receptor gene in TMEs, whereas two unique cytokine-receptor genes were upregulated in SCEs. Cytokine protein expression analysis showed that at least eight cytokines were upregulated in SLT-irradiated human CAOP tissues in situ/ex vivo. Conclusions This study has helped us identify a cytokine signaling pathway and to consider newly identified mechanisms regulating aqueous outflow that may lay the foundation for the future development of cytokine-based glaucoma therapies. PMID:26529044

  2. Cytokine production of the neutrophils and macrophages in time of phagocytosis under influence of infrared low-level laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudik, Dmitry V.; Tikhomirova, Elena I.; Tuchina, Elena S.

    2006-08-01

    Influence of infrared low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on induction of synthesis of some cytokines such as interleykin-1 (Il-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (INF-γ), interleykin-8 (Il-8) and interleykin-4 (Il-4) by the neutrophils and macrophages in time of bacterial cells phagocytosis that was searched. As the object of analysis we used peritoneal macrophages from white mice and neutrophils from peripheral blood of healthy donors. We used the laser diod with spectrum maximum of 850 nm with doses 300, 900 and 1500 mJ (exposition -60, 180 and 300 s respectively; capacity - 5 mW). We carried out the Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay (ELISA) to determine cytokine content during phagocytosis after 3 h and 6 h. We found dynamics in production of the cytokines, which was different for the neutrophils and macrophages. We showed that the infrared LLLI has significant stimulating activity on the proinflammatory cytokines production by neutrophils and macrophages. Moreover we revealed dynamics changing in the Il-8 and Il-4 production.

  3. Evaluation of low level laser therapy irradiation parameters on rat muscle inflammation through systemic blood cytokines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, Matias; Pinheiro, João. P.; Morgado, António M.

    2014-02-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used for inflammation treatment. Here, we evaluate the effect of different doses, using continuous (830 and 980 nm) and pulsed illumination (830 nm), in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats, through cytokines concentration in systemic blood and histological analysis of muscle tissue. Animals were randomly divided into five groups per wavelength (5 animals per group: 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mW) plus a control group. LLLT was applied during five days, with constant exposure time and irradiated area (3 minutes; 0.5026 cm2). Blood was collected on days 0, 3 and 6. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2 and IL-6 cytokines were quantified by ELISA. Rats were killed on day 6. Muscle inflammatory cells were counted using optical microscopy. Treatment effects occurred for all applied doses (largest effect at 40 mW: 7.2 J, 14 J/cm2 per irradiation), with reduction of proinflammatory TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 cytokines and lower number of inflammatory cells. Results were better for 830 nm. Identical methodology was used with pulsed illumination. Average power (40 mW) and duty cycle were kept constant (80%) at five frequencies (5, 25, 50, 100 and 200 Hz). Treatment effects were observed at higher frequencies, with no significant differences between them. However, the treatment effect was lower than for continuous illumination. LLLT effect on inflammation treatment can be monitored by measuring systemic blood cytokines. A larger treatment effect was observed with continuous illumination, where results seem to be compatible with a biphasic dose response.

  4. Effect of low-energy laser irradiation on cytokine secretion from skeletal muscle cells: involvement of calcium in the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Fidi; Adamek, Mariusz; Brodie, C.; Shainberg, Asher

    1997-12-01

    Low energy laser irradiation has an effect on Nerve Growth Factor and anti mitotic factors release from rat and mouse skeletal muscle cultures. It was found that there is a transient elevation of intracellular calcium in the myotubes immediately after irradiation. Calcium changes were detected by dynamic video imaging systems and with a photometric system. Pre incubation of the myotubes with photosensitizers enhance the elevation of both cytosolic calcium and cytokines release from the cells after Helium/Neon irradiation with energy of 3-10 J/cm2. These findings can lead to an hypothesis that transient changes in calcium can accelerate cytokines release from the myotubes.

  5. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Increases Cytokine Production and Cutaneous Inflammation in Response to Ultraviolet Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Abaseri, Taghrid Bahig; Repertinger, Susan K.; Hansen, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is activated in cutaneous keratinocytes upon ultraviolet (UV) exposure and has been implicated in ultraviolet-(UV-)induced inflammation and skin tumorigenesis. Egfr mutant mice and EGFR inhibitors were used to investigate the hypothesis that EGFR activation augments inflammation following UV irradiation. Topical treatment of mouse skin with the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 before UV exposure suppressed UV-induced erythema, edema, mast cell infiltration, and neutrophil infiltration. Genetic ablation of Egfr and EGFR inhibition by AG1478 also suppressed the increase in the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α, KC (murine IL-8), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) after UV exposure of cultured keratinocytes. Finally, genetic ablation of inhibition of EGFR in cultured keratinocytes decreased p38 activation after UV, while inhibition of p38 kinase reduced COX-2 expression after UV. These data demonstrate that EGFR regulates multiple aspects of UV-induced inflammation and suggest activation of p38 kinase leading to increased COX-2 and cytokine expression as one mechanism through which it acts. PMID:23878744

  6. [THE INFLUENCE OF EXTRACT FROM EMBRYONIC CHICKEN TISSUE ON THE DYNAMIC CHANGES OF MICE BLOOD SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AND CYTOKINES AFTER γ-IRRADIATION].

    PubMed

    Pogorelaya, M S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of preparations from embryonic chicken tissue on the dynamic changes in the levels of interleukins: 1β (IL-1 β), 6 (IL-6), 4 (IL-4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were investigated in vivo, in the blood serum of white female laboratory mice exposed to single total γ-irradiation in a dose of 5 Gy. The experiments found that during the first days after the action of γ-radiation the indices of resistance of the organism undergoe significant destabilizing changes. These changes are manifested by an increase in IL-1β proinflammatory cytokine in response to external influences. However, the rapid decline in its level during the first days after irradiation reflects alterations in its production. The content of the serum IL-4 in all time points was higher than in the intact group. Moreover, the dynamics of its level during the first days after the irradiation was observed. An increased level of CRP was detected 6 hours after the exposure, indicating the dynamic changes of the severity of the inflammatory process. Administration of preparations from embryonic chicken tissue causes a considerable increase in the content of IL-1β and IL-6 in 3 and 6 hours after the r-irradiation, with stabilization after 12 hours. When using the preparations before an irradiation, a significantly lower level of CRP was detected in comparison to animals that did not get the preparations. When using the embryonic preparations, the stimulation of synthesis of IL-4 was observed, whose level increased in every time of taking blood samples. Possibility for induction of row of cytokines, in particular, IL-1β and IL-6, plays an important role in stimulation of hematopoiesis and provides a basis to consider this substance as an immunomodulator in pathologic immunosuppressive states. The decrease of serum CRP level can indicate the ability to reduce the severity of radiation injury. In the experimental conditions, an embryonic preparation exhibits inertness relative to the healthy

  7. Corrugated Waveguide Mode Content Analysis Using Irradiance Moments

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer K.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Idei, Hiroshi; Temkin, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel, relatively simple method for determining the mode content of the linearly polarized modes of a corrugated waveguide using the moments of the intensity pattern of the field radiated from the end of the waveguide. This irradiance moment method is based on calculating the low-order irradiance moments, using measured intensity profiles only, of the radiated field from the waveguide aperture. Unlike the phase retrieval method, this method does not use or determine the phase distribution at the waveguide aperture. The new method was benchmarked numerically by comparison with sample mode mixtures. The results predict less than ±0.7% error bar in the retrieval of the mode content. The method was also tested using high-resolution experimental data from beams radiated from 63.5 mm and 19 mm corrugated waveguides at 170 and 250 GHz, respectively. The results showed a very good agreement of the mode content retrieved using the irradiance moment method versus the phase retrieval technique. The irradiance moment method is most suitable for cases where the modal power is primarily in the fundamental HE11 mode, with <8% of the power in high-order modes. PMID:25821260

  8. [Characteristics of high solid content sludge with microwave irradiation].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Xun, Rui; Zhou, Gang; Wan, Xiao; Xia, Zhou

    2008-06-01

    This paper focus on changes of high solid content sludge (7%, 9% and 13%) hydrolysis with microwave irradiation also anaerobic biodegradation of treated sludge was tested by biochemical methane potential (BMP) procedure. Results showed that microwave irradiation provided a rapid temperature increasing. Hydrolysis accelerated the solubilization of volatile suspended solid (VSS) and suspended solid (SS). COD, TOC, NH4+-N, TN, and TP concentration of liquor sludge increased, while pH decreased. Sludge solid content was found to be the most influential parameter. VSS and SS dissolving ratio of sludge with 13% solid content were lower than sludge with 7% and 9% solid content. 23% of VSS and 18% of SS dissolved for 9% sludge at 170 degrees C with 5 min, SCOD of liquor was 41 g/L, and concentration of TOC and NH4+-N were 30 g/L and 1 g/L respectively. Biodegradation of treated sludge improved. Methane production of 9% sludge at 170 degrees C with 5 min and 10 min were 27% and 30.8% higher than that of untreated sludge. Hydrolysis time increasing from 5 min to 10 min brought an improvement of 4%, 3.6% and 5.7% methane production at 120 degrees C, 150 degrees C and 170 degrees C. PMID:18763510

  9. Role of Cytokines in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pain and Disc-content

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving. M

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is the major contributor to back/neck and radicular pain. It is characterized by an elevation in levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1 α/β, IL-6 and IL-17 secreted by the disc cells themselves; these cytokines promote matrix degradation, chemokine production and changes in cell phenotype. The resulting imbalance between catabolic and anabolic responses leads to degeneration, as well as herniation and radicular pain. Release of chemokines from degenerating discs promote infiltration and activation of T and B cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and mast cells further amplifying the inflammatory cascade. Immunocyte migration into the disc is accompanied by the appearance of microvasculature and nerve fibers arising from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In this inflammatory milieu, neurogenic factors in particular nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) generated by disc and immune cells induce expression of pain associated cation channels in DRGs. Depolarization of these channels is likely to promote discogenic and radicular pain and reinforce the cytokine-mediated degenerative cascade. Taken together, the enhanced understanding of the contribution of cytokines and immune cells to catabolic and nociceptive processes provide new targets for treating symptomatic disc disease. PMID:24166242

  10. ESR detection procedure of irradiated papaya containing high water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2011-05-01

    ESR signals were recorded from irradiated papaya at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and freeze-dried irradiated papaya at room temperature (295 K). Two side peaks from the flesh at the liquid nitrogen temperature indicated a linear dose response for 3-14 days after the γ-irradiation. The line shapes recorded from the freeze-dried specimens were sharper than those at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  11. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Gridley, D S; Pecaut, M J; Miller, G M; Moyers, M F; Nelson, G A

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements. PMID:11491015

  12. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  13. Effects of γ-irradiation on phenolics content, antioxidant activity and physicochemical properties of whole grainrice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yafang; Tang, Fufu; Xu, Feifei; Wang, Yuefei; Bao, Jinsong

    2013-04-01

    Three rice genotypes with different color were gamma irradiated at a dose of 2, 4, 6, 8and 10 kGy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the phenolics content and the antioxidant activity, as well as physicochemical properties of whole grain rice. The bound phenolics content in all the genotypes were significantly increased with the increase of dose of irradiation. Gamma irradiation at high dose significantly increased the free, bound and total antioxidant activities of three rice genotypes except for the free antioxidant activities of red rice. Though the color parameters were slightly changed, these changes could not be visibly identified. Rapid visco-analyzer (RVA) viscosities and gel hardness decreased continuously with the increase of the irradiation doses. It is suggested that gamma irradiation enhanced the antioxidant potential and eating quality of whole grainrice.

  14. The Effect of Solar Irradiated Vibrio cholerae on the Secretion of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines by the JAWS II Dendritic Cell Line In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ssemakalu, Cornelius Cano; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice; Motaung, Keolebogile Shirley; Pillay, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The use of solar irradiation to sterilize water prior to its consumption has resulted in the reduction of water related illnesses in waterborne disease endemic communities worldwide. Currently, research on solar water disinfection (SODIS) has been directed towards understanding the underlying mechanisms through which solar irradiation inactivates the culturability of microorganisms in water, enhancement of the disinfection process, and the health impact of SODIS water consumption. However, the immunological consequences of SODIS water consumption have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the effect that solar irradiated V. cholerae may have had on the secretion of cytokines and chemokines by the JAWS II dendritic cell line in vitro. The JAWS II dendritic cell line was stimulated with the different strains of V. cholerae that had been: (i) prepared in PBS, (ii) inactivated through a combination of heat and chemical, (iii) solar irradiated, and (iv) non-solar irradiated, in bottled water. As controls, LPS (1 μg/ml) and CTB (1 μg/ml) were used as stimulants. After 48 hours of stimulation the tissue culture media from each treatment was qualitatively and quantitatively analysed for the presence of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-15, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MIP-2, RANTES, TNF-α, IL-23 and IL-27. Results showed that solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae induced dendritic cells to secrete significant (p<0.05) levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in comparison to the unstimulated dendritic cells. Furthermore, the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by the dendritic cells in response to solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae was not as high as observed in treatments involving non-solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae or LPS. Our results suggest that solar irradiated microorganisms are capable of inducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This novel finding is key towards understanding the

  15. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. Immunomodulatory effect of mushrooms on cytotoxic activity and cytokine production of intestinal lamina propria leukocytes does not necessarily depend on β-glucan contents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Sung; Oka, Kohsuke; Watanabe, Osamu; Hara, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Satoshi

    2011-06-15

    We evaluated the effects of seven mushroom extracts (Grifola frondosa, Pholiota nameko, Panellus serotinus, Hypsizygus marmoreus, Pleurotus cornucopiae, Armillaria mellea, and Flammulina velutipes) on cytotoxic activity and cytokine production of lamina propria leukocytes (LPLs) isolated from rat small (S) and large (L) intestinal mucosa. Boiling water extracts from seven species of mushrooms showed no direct cytotoxicity against the YAC-1 target cells. However, prominent increases of cytotoxicity were observed in S- and L-LPLs co-cultured with P. serotinus extract. Cytokine production (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-12 p70, and IL-4) of S- and L-LPLs was stimulated in response to P. cornucopiae extract. Mushroom extracts contributed to target cell adhesion and/or cytokine production in the effector cells. The promotion of cytotoxic activity in S- and L-LPLs was not necessarily related to β-glucan content of the mushroom. PMID:25213921

  17. Irradiation Effect on Oxidative Condition and Tocopherol Content of Vegetable Oils

    PubMed Central

    Lalas, Stavros; Gortzi, Olga; Tsaknis, John; Sflomos, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    The effect on induction period and tocopherol content after γ-irradiation on samples of olive oil and seed oils (sunflower and soybean) was determined. In seed oil samples 0, 100, 200 and 300 ppm of δ-tocopherol were added before irradiation with 1, 2 and 3kGy. The results of induction period showed that, after irradiation, all samples presented a significant decreased in resistance to oxidation. However, this decrease was minimized when δ-tocopherol was added. Irradiation significantly decreased the level of tocopherols. δ-Tocopherol appeared more sensitive in irradiation process than α- and γ-tocopherol. The addition of δ-tocopherol significantly reduced, in most cases, the depletion of the other tocopherols.

  18. Influence of nickel and beryllium content on swelling behavior of copper irradiated with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.; Edwards, D.J.; Evans, J.H.

    1996-10-01

    In the 1970`s, the effects of nickel content on the evolution of dislocation microstructures and the formation and growth of voids in Cu-Ni alloys were studied using 1 MeV electrons in a high voltage electron microscope. The swelling rate was found to decrease rapidly with increasing nickel content. The decrease in the swelling rate was associated with a decreasing void growth rate with increasing nickel content at irradiation temperatures up to 450{degrees}C. At 500{degrees}C, both void size and swelling rate were found to peak at 1 and 2% Ni, respectively, and then to decrease rapidly with increasing nickel content. However, recent work has demonstrated that the swelling behavior of Cu-5%Ni irradiated with fission neutrons is very similar for that of pure copper. The present experiments were designed to investigate this apparent discrepancy.

  19. The effects of gamma irradiation on the vitamin E content and sensory qualities of pecan nuts ( Carya illinoensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taipina, Magda S.; Lamardo, Leda C. A.; Rodas, Maria A. B.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2009-07-01

    Pecan nuts ( Carya illinoensis) were treated with gamma irradiation and evaluated for changes in vitamin E content and sensory properties. Irradiation at 1 and 3 kGy resulted in no changes in vitamin E content measured as α-tocopherol equivalents by a colorimetric method. A trained sensory panel found that irradiation at 1 kGy produced no significant changes in appearance, aroma, texture and flavor attributes. The vitamin E content of irradiated pecan nuts remained stable, but from the point of view of sensory quality a dose of merely 1 kGy can be considered as recommendable.

  20. Literature review of United States utilities computer codes for calculating actinide isotope content in irradiated fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, W.C.; Lu, Ming-Shih

    1991-12-01

    This paper reviews the accuracy and precision of methods used by United States electric utilities to determine the actinide isotopic and element content of irradiated fuel. After an extensive literature search, three key code suites were selected for review. Two suites of computer codes, CASMO and ARMP, are used for reactor physics calculations; the ORIGEN code is used for spent fuel calculations. They are also the most widely used codes in the nuclear industry throughout the world. Although none of these codes calculate actinide isotopics as their primary variables intended for safeguards applications, accurate calculation of actinide isotopic content is necessary to fulfill their function.

  1. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Natesan, K.

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  2. Enhancing the growth, photosynthetic capacity and artemisinin content in Artemisia annua L. by irradiated sodium alginate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftab, Tariq; Khan, M. Masroor A.; Idrees, M.; Naeem, M.; Moinuddin; Hashmi, Nadeem; Varshney, Lalit

    2011-07-01

    Degrading the natural bioactive agents by ionizing radiation and then using them as growth promoting substances is a novel emerging technology to exploit the genetic potential of crops in terms of growth, yield and quality. Polysaccharides, such as sodium alginate, have proven to be wonderful growth promoting substances in their depolymerized form for various plants. The effect of depolymerized form of sodium alginate, produced by irradiating the latter by 60Co gamma rays, was studied on Artemisia annua L. with regard to growth attributes, physiological and biochemical parameters and artemisinin content. The study revealed that the irradiated sodium alginate (ISA), applied as leaf-sprays at a concentration of 20-120 mg L -1, improved the growth attributes, photosynthetic capability, enzyme activities and artemisinin content of the plant significantly. Application of ISA at 80 mg L -1 increased the values of the attributes studied to the maximum extent. The enhancement of leaf-artemisinin content was ascribed to the ISA-enhanced H 2O 2 content in the leaves.

  3. The megakaryocyte DNA content and platelet formation after the sublethal whole body irradiation of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tanum, G.

    1984-04-01

    The DNA content of rat bone marrow megakaryocytes (MK) was studied by Feulgen photometry, following whole body irradiation with 2 Gy. The DNA measurements were preceded by acetylcholinesterase staining to avoid missing the smaller 2N-8N MK. The number of 2N-8N MK declined immediately following irradiation, whereas the number of 16N-64N MK remained normal for 4 days before decreasing. The number of 2N-8N and 16N-64N MK reached minimum around days 7 and 10, respectively, and thereafter increased to supranormal values at days 14 and 20, respectively. Platelet production, measured by /sup 35/S incorporation into platelets, increased during the first 4 days, then decreased to minimum about day 10. A rise to supranormal values was present at day 20. All values were about normal 30 days after exposure. The observed pattern may be explained as follows: Most of the 16N-64N MK survive the applied dose and maintain their ability to produce platelets. Some of the 2N-4N and 8N MK survive irradiation and transform into platelet-producing MK. No influx of cells from the MK stem cell compartment into the MK compartment can be observed before day 7 after irradiation. One explanation for this time lag may be that thrombocytopenia, which does not occur before then, is an essential stimulus for MK stem cell activation.

  4. Effect of oat bran on time to exhaustion, glycogen content and serum cytokine profile following exhaustive exercise

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oat bran supplementation on time to exhaustion, glycogen stores and cytokines in rats submitted to training. The animals were divided into 3 groups: sedentary control group (C), an exercise group that received a control chow (EX) and an exercise group that received a chow supplemented with oat bran (EX-O). Exercised groups were submitted to an eight weeks swimming training protocol. In the last training session, the animals performed exercise to exhaustion, (e.g. incapable to continue the exercise). After the euthanasia of the animals, blood, muscle and hepatic tissue were collected. Plasma cytokines and corticosterone were evaluated. Glycogen concentrations was measured in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, and liver. Glycogen synthetase-α gene expression was evaluated in the soleus muscle. Statistical analysis was performed using a factorial ANOVA. Time to exhaustion of the EX-O group was 20% higher (515 ± 3 minutes) when compared with EX group (425 ± 3 minutes) (p = 0.034). For hepatic glycogen, the EX-O group had a 67% higher concentrations when compared with EX (p = 0.022). In the soleus muscle, EX-O group presented a 59.4% higher glycogen concentrations when compared with EX group (p = 0.021). TNF-α was decreased, IL-6, IL-10 and corticosterone increased after exercise, and EX-O presented lower levels of IL-6, IL-10 and corticosterone levels in comparison with EX group. It was concluded that the chow rich in oat bran increase muscle and hepatic glycogen concentrations. The higher glycogen storage may improve endurance performance during training and competitions, and a lower post-exercise inflammatory response can accelerate recovery. PMID:20955601

  5. Effect of oat bran on time to exhaustion, glycogen content and serum cytokine profile following exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Donatto, Felipe F; Prestes, Jonato; Frollini, Anelena B; Palanch, Adrianne C; Verlengia, Rozangela; Cavaglieri, Claudia Regina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oat bran supplementation on time to exhaustion, glycogen stores and cytokines in rats submitted to training. The animals were divided into 3 groups: sedentary control group (C), an exercise group that received a control chow (EX) and an exercise group that received a chow supplemented with oat bran (EX-O). Exercised groups were submitted to an eight weeks swimming training protocol. In the last training session, the animals performed exercise to exhaustion, (e.g. incapable to continue the exercise). After the euthanasia of the animals, blood, muscle and hepatic tissue were collected. Plasma cytokines and corticosterone were evaluated. Glycogen concentrations was measured in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, and liver. Glycogen synthetase-α gene expression was evaluated in the soleus muscle. Statistical analysis was performed using a factorial ANOVA. Time to exhaustion of the EX-O group was 20% higher (515 ± 3 minutes) when compared with EX group (425 ± 3 minutes) (p = 0.034). For hepatic glycogen, the EX-O group had a 67% higher concentrations when compared with EX (p = 0.022). In the soleus muscle, EX-O group presented a 59.4% higher glycogen concentrations when compared with EX group (p = 0.021). TNF-α was decreased, IL-6, IL-10 and corticosterone increased after exercise, and EX-O presented lower levels of IL-6, IL-10 and corticosterone levels in comparison with EX group. It was concluded that the chow rich in oat bran increase muscle and hepatic glycogen concentrations. The higher glycogen storage may improve endurance performance during training and competitions, and a lower post-exercise inflammatory response can accelerate recovery. PMID:20955601

  6. Effects of PVA, agar contents, and irradiation doses on properties of PVA/ws-chitosan/glycerol hydrogels made by γ-irradiation followed by freeze-thawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaomin; Zhu, Zhiyong; Liu, Qi; Chen, Xiliang; Ma, Mingwang

    2008-08-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/water soluble chitosan (ws-chitosan)/glycerol hydrogels were prepared by γ-irradiation and γ-irradiation followed by freeze-thawing, respectively. The effects of irradiation dose and the contents of PVA and agar on the swelling, rheological, and thermal properties of these hydrogels were investigated. The swelling capacity decreases while the mechanical strength increases with increasing PVA or agar content. Increasing the irradiation dose leads to an increase in chemical crosslinking density but a decrease in physical crosslinking density. Hydrogels made by irradiation followed by freeze-thawing own smaller swelling capacity but larger mechanical strength than those made by pure irradiation. The storage modulus of the former hydrogels decreases above 50 °C and above 70 °C it comes to the same value as that prepared by irradiation. The ordered association of PVA is influenced by both chemical and physical crosslinkings and by the presence of ws-chitosan and glycerol. These hydrogels are high sensitive to pH and ionic strength, indicating that they may be useful in stimuli-responsive drug release system.

  7. Ciprofloxacin increases survival after ionizing irradiation combined injury: γ-H2AX formation, cytokine/chemokine, and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Juliann G; Fukumoto, Risaku

    2014-06-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation alone (radiation injury, RI) or combined with traumatic tissue injury (radiation combined injury, CI) is a crucial life-threatening factor in nuclear and radiological accidents. It is well documented that RI and CI occur at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and system levels. However, their mechanisms remain largely unclear. It has been observed in dogs, pigs, rats, guinea pigs, and mice that radiation exposure combined with burns, wounds, or bacterial infection results in greater mortality than radiation exposure alone. In this laboratory, the authors found that B6D2F1/J female mice exposed to 9.75 Gy ⁶⁰Co-γ photon radiation followed by 15% total body surface area wounds experienced 50% higher mortality (over a 30-d observation period) compared to irradiation alone. CI enhanced DNA damages, amplified iNOS activation, induced massive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, overexpressed MMPs and TLRs, and aggravated sepsis that led to cell death. In the present study, B6D2F1/J mice that received CI were treated with ciprofloxacin (CIP, 90 mg/kg p.o., q.d. within 2 h after CI through day 21). At day 1, CIP treatment reduced CI-induced γ-H2AX formation significantly. At day 10, CIP treatment not only reduced cytokine/chemokine concentrations significantly, including IL-6 and KC (i.e., IL-8 in humans), but also enhanced IL-3 production compared to vehicle-treated controls. CIP also elevated red blood cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and hematocrits. At day 30, CIP treatment increased 45% survival after CI (i.e., 2.3-fold increase over vehicle treatment). The results suggest that CIP may prove to be an effective therapeutic drug for CI. PMID:24776905

  8. Effects of a Diet Enriched with Polyunsaturated, Saturated, or Trans Fatty Acids on Cytokine Content in the Liver, White Adipose Tissue, and Skeletal Muscle of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Bruno; Estadella, Debora; Hachul, Ana Cláudia Losinskas; Okuda, Marcos Hiromu; Moreno, Mayara Franzoi; Oyama, Lila Missae; Ribeiro, Eliane Beraldi; Oller do Nascimento, Claudia Maria da Penha

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the effect of diet enriched with 30% lipids on cytokines content in different tissues. Swiss male mice were distributed into four groups treated for 8 weeks with control (C, normolipidic diet); soybean oil (S); lard (L); and hydrogenated vegetable fat (H). We observed an increase in carcass fat in groups S and L, and the total amount of fatty deposits was only higher in group L compared with C group. The serum levels of free fatty acids were lower in the L group, and insulin, adiponectin, lipid profile, and glucose levels were similar among the groups. IL-10 was lower in group L in mesenteric and retroperitoneal adipose tissues. H reduced IL-10 only in retroperitoneal adipose tissue. There was an increase in IL-6 in the gastrocnemius muscle of the L group, and a positive correlation between TNF-α and IL-10 was observed in the livers of groups C, L, and H and in the muscles of all groups studied. The results suggested relationships between the quantity and quality of lipids ingested with adiposity, the concentration of free fatty acids, and cytokine production in white adipose tissue, gastrocnemius muscle, and liver. PMID:24027356

  9. Paramagnetic defects in electron-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia: Effect of yttria content

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Morrison-Smith, Sarah E.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.

    2011-12-20

    We have studied the effect of the yttria content on the paramagnetic centres in electron-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2: Y3+) or YSZ. Single crystals with 9.5 mol% or 18 mol% Y2O3 were irradiated with electrons of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 MeV. The paramagnetic centre production was studied by X-band EPR spectroscopy. The same paramagnetic centres were identified for both chemical compositions, namely two electron centres, i.e. i) F+-type centres (involving singly ionized oxygen vacancies), and ii) so-called T centres (Zr3+ in a trigonal symmetry site), and hole-centres. A strong effect is observed on the production of hole-centres which are strongly enhanced when doubling the yttria content. However, no striking effect is found on the electron centres (except the enhancement of an extra line associated to the F+-type centres). It is concluded that hole-centres are produced by inelastic interactions, whereas F+-type centres are produced by elastic collisions with no effect of the yttria content on the defect production rate. In the latter case, the threshold displacement energy (Ed) of oxygen is estimated from the electron-energy dependence of the F+-type centre production rate, with no significant effect of the yttria content on Ed. An Ed value larger than 120 eV is found. Accordingly, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a Buckingham-type potential show that Ed values for Y and O are likely to be in excess of 200 eV. It is concluded that F+-type centres might be actually oxygen divacancies (F2+-type centres). Due to the difficulty in displacing O or Y atoms, the radiation-induced defects may alternatively be a result of Zr atom displacements for Ed = 80 ± 1 eV with subsequent defect re-arrangement.

  10. Paramagnetic Defects in Electron-Irradiated Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia: Effect of Yttria Content

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Morrison-Smith, Sarah; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the yttria content on the paramagnetic centres in electron-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2: Y3+) or YSZ. Single crystals with 9.5 mol% or 18 mol% Y2O3 were irradiated with electrons of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 MeV. The paramagnetic centre production was studied by X-band EPR spectroscopy. The same paramagnetic centres were identified for both chemical compositions, namely two electron centres, i.e. i) F+-type centres (involving singly ionized oxygen vacancies), and ii) so-called T centres (Zr3+ in a trigonal symmetry site), and hole-centres. A strong effect is observed on the production of hole-centres which are strongly enhanced when doubling the yttria content. However, no striking effect is found on the electron centres (except the enhancement of an extra line associated to the F+-type centres). It is concluded that hole-centres are produced by inelastic interactions, whereas F+-type centres are produced by elastic collisions with no effect of the yttria content on the defect production rate. In the latter case, the threshold displacement energy (Ed) of oxygen is estimated from the electron-energy dependence of the F+-type centre production rate, with no significant effect of the yttria content on Ed. An Ed value larger than 120 eV is found. Accordingly, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a Buckingham-type potential show that Ed values for Y and O are likely to be in excess of 200 eV. Due to the difficulty in displacing O or Y atoms, the radiation-induced defects may alternatively be a result of Zr atom displacements for Ed = 80 1 eV with subsequent defect re-arrangement.

  11. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  12. Irradiation of mechanically-injured human arterial endothelial cells leads to increased gene expression and secretion of inflammatory and growth promoting cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wondergem, J; Wedekind, L E; Bart, C I; Chin, A; van der Laarse, A; Beekhuizen, H

    2004-07-01

    induced a 2.3 +/- 0.3-fold increase (P < 0.05) in Fas surface expression only. In conclusion, irradiation of mechanically-injured human EC leads to increased gene expression and protein secretion of inflammatory and growth promoting cytokines. PMID:15186947

  13. Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Extracts from Whole Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) With or Without Microwave Irradiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of extracting phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity from buckwheat with water, 50% aqueous ethanol, or 100% ethanol using microwave irradiation or a water bath for 15 min at various temperatures (23 – 150 °C). The phenolic content of...

  14. Effects of irradiation and semistarvation on rat thyrotropin beta subunit messenger ribonucleic acid, pituitary thyrotropin content, and thyroid hormone levels

    SciTech Connect

    Litten, R.Z. ); Carr, F.E. ); Fein, H.G.; Smallridge, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of radiation-induced anorexia on serum thyrotropin (TSH), pituitary TSH-{beta} mRNA, pituitary TSH content, serum thyroxine (T{sub 4}), and serum 3,5,3{prime}-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) was investigated using feed-matched controls. Rats received 10 Gy gamma whole-body irradiation and were examined 1-3 days postirradiation. Feed-matched and untreated controls were also studied. The average food intake of the irradiated and feed-matched groups was approximately 18% of the untreated controls. Over the three day period both the irradiated and feed-matched groups lost a significant amount of body weight. The serum T{sub 4} levels of both the irradiated and feed-matched groups were not significantly different from each other, but were significantly depressed when compared to the untreated control group. The serum TSH and T{sub 3} were, however, significantly greater in the irradiated than the feed-matched groups at day 3 posttreatment. To determine if the difference in the serum TSH level between the two groups was due to a pretranslational alteration in TSH production, we measured the TSH-{beta} mRNA using an RNA blot hybridization assay. We found that the TSH-{beta} mRNA level was the same in the irradiated and feed-matched groups, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the radiation-induced increase in the serum TSH level is posttranscriptional. Pituitary TSH content in the irradiated rats was significantly less than in pair-fed controls, suggesting that irradiation may permit enhanced secretion of stored hormone.

  15. Cytokines, phagocytes, and pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Mandell, G L

    1995-01-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as polymorphonuclear neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, are essential for defense against infection caused by a variety of microorganisms. The mechanisms used by these cells to destroy microbes comprise a potent oxidative armamentarium including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hypochlorous acid. In addition, granule contents such as proteolytic enzymes, lysozyme, lactoferrin, and myeloperoxidase are released into the phagosome to destroy ingested microorganisms. Inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6, enhance the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of the cells and increase their stickiness. It has been demonstrated in a variety of animal and clinical studies that activated phagocytes can damage the host they are designed to protect, using the mechanisms described above. Alkylxanthines, including pentoxifylline, are potent inhibitors of this inflammatory damage by two major actions: (a) reduction of the production of inflammatory cytokines (especially TNF) by phagocytes stimulated with a variety of microbial products (e.g., endotoxin); and (b) reversal of the effect of these cytokines on phagocytes. Thus, pentoxifylline counteracts the following effects of inflammatory cytokines on phagocytes: increased adherence, shape change resulting in larger size and rigidity, increased oxidative burst, priming for an enhanced oxidative burst, increased degranulation, and decreased chemotactic movement. In addition, these activities synergize with the normal anti-inflammatory mediator adenosine. Alkylxanthines have the potential to be effective therapy for conditions in which inflammatory cytokines and phagocytes cause damage, including the sepsis syndrome, ARDS, AIDS, and arthritis. PMID:8699856

  16. Effect of various laser irradiations on the mineral content of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Erhan; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ozturk, A. Nilgun; Ozturk, Firat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineral content of dentin irradiation with Erbium: yttrium-aliminum-garnet (Er:YAG), Neodmiyum:yttrium-aliminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and potassium titanium phosphate (KTP) laser used for in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Methods: Six extracted wisdom, unerupted molar teeth were used in this study. The enamel of the teeth was removed with a conventional bur under water cooling to expose the dentin surface. The teeth were mounted in a slow-speed, diamond-saw, sectioning machine. Two dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth and each slab was sectioned so that 4 slabs were made from each teeth. Then dentin slabs were randomly divided into four groups. Group A: Control Group, Group B: Er:YAG laser, Group C: Nd:YAG laser, Group D: KTP laser. The levels of Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. One sample from each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: There were no significant differences between the groups for Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio (P>.05). SEM photographs indicated that there were melted areas around the exposed dentin tubules in groups treated with Er:YAG and KTP lasers. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that laser etching with the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, KTP laser systems did not affect the compositional structure of the dentin surfaces. PMID:23407579

  17. Irradiation creep and microstructural changes of ODS steels of different Cr-contents during helium implantation under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Henry, J.; de Carlan, Y.; Sauvage, T.; Duval, F.; Barthe, M. F.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-06-01

    Irradiation creep and microstructural changes of two ferritic ODS steels with 12% and 14% Cr have been studied by homogeneously implantation with helium under uniaxial tensile stresses from 40 to 300 MPa. The maximum dose was about 1.2 dpa (5000 appm-He) with displacement damage rates of 1 × 10-5 dpa/s at a temperature of 300 °C. Irradiation creep compliances were measured to be 4.0 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 and 10 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 for 12 and 14Cr ODS, respectively. Subsequently, microstructural evolution was studied in detail by TEM observations, showing dislocation loops and bubbles distributed homogenously in the matrix. Some bubbles were attached to ODS particles. Finally, the effects of Cr content on irradiation creep and microstructural changes are discussed, including earlier results of a 19Cr ODS and a PM2000 ferritic steel. Irradiation creep rates of both 12Cr and 14Cr-ODS ferritic steels a temperature of 300 °C show linear stress dependence up to 300 MPa at. Irradiation creep rate per dose rate and stress at a temperature of 300 °C amounts to 4.0 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 and 10 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 for 12Cr- and 14Cr-ODS, respectively. Irradiation creep properties are remarkably insensitive to Cr content, grain size and dispersoid size. Dislocation loops and helium bubbles are distributed homogenously in the matrix. In the case of high density fine dispersoids, most bubbles are attached to ODS particles. This may suppress loop formation as well as growth of bubbles, thereby increasing the resistance of ODS ferritic steels against helium embrittlement.

  18. Effect of supplemental UV-A irradiation in solid-state lighting on the growth and phytochemical content of microgreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazaitytė, A.; Viršilė, A.; Jankauskienė, J.; Sakalauskienė, S.; Samuolienė, G.; Sirtautas, R.; Novičkovas, A.; Dabašinskas, L.; Miliauskienė, J.; Vaštakaitė, V.; Bagdonavičienė, A.; Duchovskis, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sought to find and employ positive effects of UV-A irradiation on cultivation and quality of microgreens. Therefore, the goal of our study was to investigate the influence of 366, 390, and 402 nm UV-A LED wavelengths, supplemental for the basal solid-state lighting system at two UV-A irradiation levels on the growth and phytochemical contents of different microgreen plants. Depending on the species, supplemental UV-A irradiation can improve antioxidant properties of microgreens. In many cases, a significant increase in the investigated phytochemicals was found under 366 and 390 nm UV-A wavelengths at the photon flux density (12.4 μmol m-2 s-1). The most pronounced effect of supplemental UV-A irradiation was detected in pak choi microgreens. Almost all supplemental UV-A irradiation treatments resulted in increased leaf area and fresh weight, in higher 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free-radical scavenging activity, total phenols, anthocyanins, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol.

  19. Evaluation of protein content, lysine and sulfur-containing amino acids content and electrophoretic patterns of soluble proteins for gamma-irradiated semolina before and after milling of durum wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzeh, F. S.; Amr, A. S.

    2009-11-01

    Influenced of gamma irradiation (0, 0.25, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on total nitrogen, lysine and sulfur-containing amino acids content and electrophoretic patterns of soluble proteins of semolina was studied. The effect of irradiation before and after milling on previous parameters was also investigated. Protein content of semolina was not affected with gamma irradiation before and after milling. Up to 10 kGy dose, cystine and methionine were not significantly changed, although they increased slightly with increasing irradiation dose. Lysine content decreased significantly ( P≤0.05) at irradiation dose higher than 5 kGy. At 10 kGy dose, lysine decreased 5% and 14% for irradiated semolina and that obtained from irradiated wheat grains, respectively. The bands number and intensity of soluble proteins decreased with increasing irradiation dose higher than 5 kGy, as shown on SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Irradiated semolina and semolina obtained from irradiated wheat grains at 10 kGy showed 13 and 15 bands, respectively. Unirradiated sample showed 19 bands.

  20. Effect of initial oxygen content on the void swelling behavior of fast neutron irradiated copper

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    Density measurements were performed on high purity copper specimens containing {le}10 wt.ppm and {approximately}120 wt.ppm oxygen following irradiation in FFTF MOTA 2B. Significant amounts of swelling were observed in both the oxygen-free and oxygen-doped specimens following irradiation to {approximately}17 dpa at 375 C and {approximately}47 dpa at 430 C. Oxygen doping up to 360 appm (90 wt.ppm) did not significantly affect the void swelling of copper for these irradiation conditions.

  1. Radiological risks from irradiation of cargo contents with EURITRACK neutron inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroletti, E.; Bonomi, G.; Donzella, A.; Viesti, G.; Zenoni, A.

    2012-07-01

    The radiological risk for the population related to the neutron irradiation of cargo containers with a tagged neutron inspection system has been studied. Two possible effects on the public health have been assessed: the modification of the nutritional and organoleptic properties of the irradiated materials, in particular foodstuff, and the neutron activation of consumer products (i.e. food and pharmaceuticals). The result of this study is that irradiation of food and foodstuff, pharmaceutical and medical devices in container cargoes would neither modify the properties of the irradiated material nor produce effective doses of concern for public health. Furthermore, the dose received by possible stowaways present inside the container during the inspection is less than the annual effective dose limit defined by European Legislation for the public.

  2. Effect of initial oxygen content on the void swelling behavior of fast neutron irradiated copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Garner, F. A.

    2004-08-01

    Density measurements were performed on high purity copper specimens containing ⩽10 and ˜90 wt ppm oxygen following irradiation in FFTF MOTA 2B. Significant amounts of swelling were observed in both the low-oxygen and oxygen-doped specimens following irradiation to ˜17 dpa at 375 °C and ˜47 dpa at 430 °C. Oxygen doping up to 360 appm (˜90 wt ppm) did not significantly affect the void swelling of copper for these irradiation conditions. This implies that surface energy reduction associated with oxygen segregation and chemisorption on void surfaces is not a significant factor controlling the void swelling behavior in copper irradiated with neutrons to high doses at ˜400 °C.

  3. Ship-borne measurements of erythemal UV irradiance and ozone content in various climate zones.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Sigrid; El Naggar, Saad; Bluszcz, Thaddäus; Schrems, Otto

    2007-10-01

    Ship-borne measurements of spectral as well as biologically effective UV irradiance have been performed on the German research vessel Polarstern during the Atlantic transect from Bremerhaven, Germany (53.5 degrees N, 8.5 degrees E), to Cape Town, South Africa (33.6 degrees S, 18.3 degrees E), from 13 October to 17 November 2005. Such measurements are required to study UV effects on marine organisms. They are also necessary to validate satellite-derived surface UV irradiance. Cloud free radiative transfer calculations support the investigation of this latitudinal dependence. Input parameters, such as total ozone column and aerosol optical depth have been measured on board as well. Using these measured parameters, the modelled cloudless noontime UVA irradiance (320-400 nm) shows the expected dependence on varying minimum solar zenith angles (SZA) at different latitudes. The modelled cloudless noontime UVB irradiance (290-320 nm) does not show this clear dependence on SZA due to the strong influence of ozone absorption in this spectral range. The maximum daily dose of erythemal irradiance of 5420 J m(-1) was observed on 14 November 2005, when the ship was in the tropical Atlantic south of the equator. The expected UV maximum should have been observed with the sun in the zenith during local noon (11 November). Stratiform clouds reduced the dose to 3835 J m(-1). In comparison, the daily erythemal doses in the mid-latitudinal Bay of Biscay only reached values between 410 and 980 J m(-1) depending on cloud conditions. The deviation in daily erythemal dose derived from different instruments is around 5%. The feasibility to perform ship-borne measurements of spectral UV irradiance is demonstrated. PMID:17914482

  4. Effect of Cr content on the nanostructural evolution of irradiated ferritic/martensitic alloys: An object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Malerba, L.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-10-01

    Self-interstitial cluster diffusivity in Fe-Cr alloys, model materials for high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels, is known to be reduced in a non-monotonic way as a function of Cr concentration: it first decreases, then increases. This non-monotonic behaviour is caused by a relatively long-ranged attractive interaction between Cr atoms and crowdions and correlates well with the experimentally observed swelling in these alloys under neutron irradiation, also seen to first decrease and then increase with increasing Cr content, under comparable irradiation conditions. Moreover, recent studies reveal that C atoms dispersed in the Fe matrix form under irradiation complexes with vacancies which, in turn, act as trap for one-dimensionally migrating self-interstitial clusters. The mobility of one-dimensional migrating clusters is considered key to determine swelling susceptibility. However, no model has ever been built that quantitatively describes the dependence of swelling on Cr content, allowing for the presence of C in the matrix. In this work we developed physically-based sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations intended to study the nanostructure evolution under irradiation in Fe-Cr-C alloys. The nanostructural evolution in Fe-C and in four Fe-Cr-C alloys (containing 2.5, 5, 9 and 12 wt.% Cr) neutron irradiated up to ∼0.6 dpa at 563 K was simulated according to the model and reference experiments were reproduced. Our model shows that the SIA cluster reduced mobility has a major influence on the nanostructural evolution: it increases the number of vacancy-SIA recombinations and thus leads to the suppression of voids formation. This provides a clear framework to interpret the non-monotonic dependence of swelling in Fe-Cr alloys versus Cr content. Our model also suggests that the amount of C in the matrix has an equally important role: high amounts of it may counteract the beneficial effect that Cr has in reducing swelling.

  5. Evaluation of photon irradiation treatment upon calcium content of ribs of Wistar rats using micro-XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Parreiras Nogueira, Liebert; Barroso, Regina Cely; Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Braz, Delson; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Salata, Camila; Andrade, Cherley Borba; Silva, Claudia Marcello da

    2012-05-17

    Therapeutic doses of radiation have been shown to have deleterious consequences on bone health. Among the treatment strategies used for breast cancer treatment, the most used are radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy may be given to destroy the cancer cells using high-dose x-rays. Protocols vary considerably, but generally whole body irradiation totals from 10 to 15 Gy, whereas local therapy totals from 40 to 70 Gy. In clinical practice, the quantitative evaluation of bone tissue relies on measurements of bone mineral density values, which are closely associated with the risk of osteoporotic fracture. Improved survivorship rates of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy increase the importance of understanding the mechanisms and long-term effects of radiation-induced bone loss. In this work, we investigated the variation on calcium distribution in ribs of female Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) submitted to photon irradiation with a single dose of 20 Gy. The determination of the calcium distribution was performed using synchrotron radiation microfluorescence (SR-{mu}XRF) at the X-ray Fluorescence beamline at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Animals were irradiated using the linear accelerator Varian registered (CLINAC 2100) at the University Centre for Cancer Control of the State University of Rio de Janeiro (CUCC/UERJ). The total dose delivered was 20 Gy. The animals were about three months old and weighting about 200g. They were distributed into two groups (seven per group): control (did not receive any treatment) and irradiated (submitted to irradiation procedure) groups. Results showed that calcium content decreased within the dorsal ribs of rats submitted to radiotherapy in comparison to the control group.

  6. Evaluation of photon irradiation treatment upon calcium content of ribs of Wistar rats using micro-XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Liebert Parreiras; Barroso, Regina Cély; de Almeida, André Pereira; Braz, Delson; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Salata, Camila; Andrade, Cherley Borba; da Silva, Claudia Marcello

    2012-05-01

    Therapeutic doses of radiation have been shown to have deleterious consequences on bone health. Among the treatment strategies used for breast cancer treatment, the most used are radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy may be given to destroy the cancer cells using high-dose x-rays. Protocols vary considerably, but generally whole body irradiation totals from 10 to 15 Gy, whereas local therapy totals from 40 to 70 Gy. In clinical practice, the quantitative evaluation of bone tissue relies on measurements of bone mineral density values, which are closely associated with the risk of osteoporotic fracture. Improved survivorship rates of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy increase the importance of understanding the mechanisms and long-term effects of radiation-induced bone loss. In this work, we investigated the variation on calcium distribution in ribs of female Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) submitted to photon irradiation with a single dose of 20 Gy. The determination of the calcium distribution was performed using synchrotron radiation microfluorescence (SR-μXRF) at the X-ray Fluorescence beamline at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Animals were irradiated using the linear accelerator Varian® (CLINAC 2100) at the University Centre for Cancer Control of the State University of Rio de Janeiro (CUCC/UERJ). The total dose delivered was 20 Gy. The animals were about three months old and weighting about 200g. They were distributed into two groups (seven per group): control (did not receive any treatment) and irradiated (submitted to irradiation procedure) groups. Results showed that calcium content decreased within the dorsal ribs of rats submitted to radiotherapy in comparison to the control group.

  7. Irradiation with a low-level diode laser induces the developmental endothelial locus-1 gene and reduces proinflammatory cytokines in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takeki; Mitani, Akio; Fukuda, Mitsuo; Mogi, Makio; Osawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Shinko; Aino, Makoto; Iwamura, Yuki; Miyajima, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Noguchi, Toshihide

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated previously that low-level diode laser irradiation with an indocyanine green-loaded nanosphere coated with chitosan (ICG-Nano/c) had an antimicrobial effect, and thus could be used for periodontal antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT). Since little is known about the effects of aPDT on periodontal tissue, we here investigated the effect of low-level laser irradiation, with and without ICG-Nano/c, on cultured epithelial cells. Human oral epithelial cells were irradiated in a repeated pulse mode (duty cycle, 10 %; pulse width, 100 ms; peak power output, 5 W). The expression of the developmental endothelial locus 1 (Del-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were evaluated in Ca9-22 cells stimulated by laser irradiation and Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A wound healing assay was carried out on SCC-25 cells irradiated by diode laser with or without ICG-Nano/c. The mRNA expression of Del-1, which is known to have anti-inflammatory activity, was significantly upregulated by laser irradiation (p < 0.01). Concurrently, LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 expression was significantly suppressed in the LPS + laser group (p < 0.01). ICAM-1 expression was significantly higher in the LPS + laser group than in the LPS only or control groups. Finally, compared with the control, the migration of epithelial cells was significantly increased by diode laser irradiation with or without ICG-Nano/c. These results suggest that, in addition to its antimicrobial effect, low-level diode laser irradiation, with or without ICG-Nano/c, can suppress excessive inflammatory responses via a mechanism involving Del-1, and assists in wound healing. PMID:24197516

  8. Comparative effects of irradiation, fumigation, and storage on the free amino acids and sugar contents of green, black and oolong teas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausar, Tusneem; Akram, Kashif; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-05-01

    Food irradiation or chemical fumigation can be used to ensure the hygienic quality of teas. The comparative effects of gamma irradiation (5 and 10 kGy) and fumigation (MeBr and PH3) were investigated on the amino acids and sugar contents of Camellia sinensis (green, black and oolong teas) during storage (15±12 °C). The major amino acids found in teas were theanine and glutamic acid. Irradiation increased amino acids such as, leucine, alanine, and glutamic acid, and decreased the histidine. PH3 fumigation resulted in a decrease of tyrosine content; however, the effect of MeBr fumigation was negligible. Storage showed no significant effect on the amino acid content of the irradiated and fumigated teas. Sucrose, glucose, and fructose contents significantly increased upon gamma irradiation (p≤0.05). However, fumigation and subsequent storage did not affect the sugar contents. Irradiation could be a preferred alternative choice to address food safety problems as fumigation is restricted in many countries.

  9. Charging process of polyurethane based composites under electronic irradiation: Effects of cellulose fiber content

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjadj, Aomar; Jbara, Omar; Tara, Ahmed; Gilliot, Mickael; Dellis, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-23

    The study deals with the charging effect of polyurethanes-based composites reinforced with cellulose fibers, under electronic beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the leakage current and the trapped charge as well as the kinetics of charging process significantly change beyond a critical concentration of 10% cellulose fibers. These features are correlated with the cellulose concentration-dependence of the electrical properties, specifically resistivity and capacitance, of the composite.

  10. Colour centre production in yttria-stabilized zirconia by X-ray and electron irradiations: effect of yttria content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Fasoli, Mauro; Beuneu, François; Boizot, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystals (for 9.5 and 18 mol% yttria) were irradiated at room temperature (RT) by X-rays (W white spectrum) and 2.5-MeV electrons. The growth curves of the so-called T-centre (for trigonal centre, i.e. Zr3+ sitting in a trigonal symmetry site) were studied as a function of absorbed dose, or irradiation time, by UV-visible optical absorption (OA) spectroscopy and X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The defect concentration at saturation and the production rate are increased by a factor around two for 18 mol% yttria with respect to 9.5 mol%. Defect decay was then followed after irradiation by OA spectroscopy as a function of ageing time at RT. Growth and decay curves of the T-centre are modelled on the basis of rate equations of charge-exchange reactions with the zirconium lattice ions. Increase in yttrium content is thought to decrease hole trapping on Zr3+ ions, thereby enhancing T-centre formation.

  11. Peripheral blood corticotropin-releasing factor, adrenocorticotropic hormone and cytokine (Interleukin Beta, Interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha) levels after high- and low-dose total-body irradiation in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Girinsky, T.A.; Pallardy, M.; Comoy, E.; Benassi, T.; Roger, R.; Ganem, G.; Socie, G.; Cossett, J.M.; Magdelenat, H.

    1994-09-01

    Total-body irradiation (TBI) induces an increase in levels of granulocytes and cortisol in blood. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we studied 26 patients who had TBI prior to bone marrow transplantation. Our findings suggest that only a high dose of TBI (10 Gy) was capable of activating the hypothalamopituitary area since corticotropin-releasing factor and blood adrenocorticotropic hormone levels increased at the end of the TBI. There was a concomitant increase in the levels of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor in blood, suggesting that these cytokines might activate the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis. Interleukin 1 was not detected. Since vascular injury is a common after radiation treatment, it is possible that interleukin 6 was secreted by endothelial cells. The exact mechanisms of the production of cyctokines induced by ionizing radiation remain to be determined. 25 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Annealing of paramagnetic centres in electron- and ion-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia: effect of yttria content

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Weber, William J

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the yttria content on the recovery of paramagnetic centres in electron-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2: Y3+). Single crystals with 9.5 mol% or 18 mol% Y2O3 were irradiated with electrons of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 MeV. Paramagnetic centre thermal annealing was studied by X-band EPR spectroscopy. Hole-centres are found to be annealed more quickly, or at a lower temperature, for 18 mol% than for 9.5 mol% Y2O3. At long annealing times, a non-zero asymptotic behaviour is observed in the isothermal annealing curves of hole-centres and F+-type centres between 300 and 500 K. The normalized asymptotic concentration of both defects has a maximum value of about 0.5 for annealing temperatures near 375 K, below the onset of the (isochronal) recovery stage, regardless of the yttria content. Such an uncommon behaviour is analyzed on the basis of either kinetic rate equations of charge transfer or equilibria between point defects with different charge states.

  13. Influence of CuO content on the structure of lithium fluoroborate glasses: Spectral and gamma irradiation studies.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; ElBatal, H A; EzzElDin, F M

    2015-10-01

    Glasses of lithium fluoroborate of the composition LiF 15%-B2O3 85% with increasing CuO as added dopant were prepared and characterized by combined optical and FTIR spectroscopy before and after gamma irradiation. The optical spectrum of the undoped glass reveals strong UV absorption with two distinct peaks at about 235 and 310 nm and with no visible bands. This strong UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurity (Fe(3+)) within the materials used for the preparation of this glass. After irradiation, the spectrum of the undoped glass shows a decrease of the intensity of the UV bands together with the resolution of an induced visible broad band centered at about 520 nm. The CuO doped glasses reveal the same UV absorption beside a very broad visible band centered at 780 nm and this band shows extension and splitting to several component peaks with higher CuO contents. Upon gamma irradiation, the spectra of all CuO-doped glasses reveal pronounced decrease of their intensities. The response of irradiation on the studied glasses is correlated with suggested photochemical reactions together with some shielding effect of the copper ions. The observed visible band is related to the presence of copper as distorted octahedral Cu(2+) ions. Infrared absorption spectra of the prepared glasses show repetitive characteristic triangular and tetrahedral borate units similar to that published from alkali or alkaline earth oxides B2O3 glasses. A suggested formation of (BO3/2F) tetrahedral units is advanced through action of LiF on B2O3 and these suggested units showing the same position and number as BO4 tetrahedra. PMID:25989616

  14. Antioxidant Capacities and Total Phenolic Contents Enhancement with Acute Gamma Irradiation in Curcuma alismatifolia (Zingiberaceae) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Sima; Abdullah, Thohirah Lee; Karimi, Ehsan; Oskoueian, Ehsan; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to assess the effect of various doses of acute gamma irradiation (0, 10, 15, and 20 Gy) on the improvement of bioactive compounds and their antioxidant properties of Curcuma alismatifolia var. Sweet pink. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) analysis uncovered that various types of phenolic, flavonoid compounds, and fatty acids gradually altered in response to radiation doses. On the other hand, antioxidant activities determined by 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reduction, antioxidant power (FRAP), and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging assay showed a higher irradiation level significantly increased the antioxidant properties. This study revealed an efficient effect of varying levels of gamma radiation, based on the pharmaceutical demand to enhance the accumulation and distribution of bioactive compounds such as phenolic and flavonoid compounds, fatty acids, as well as their antioxidant activities in the leaves of C. alismatifolia var. Sweet pink. PMID:25056545

  15. Development and calibration of the shielded measurement system for fissile contents measurements on irradiated nuclear fuel in dry storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Mosby, W. R.; Jensen, B. A.

    2002-05-31

    In recent years there has been a trend towards storage of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel (INF) in dry conditions rather than in underwater environments. At the same time, the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun encouraging custodians of INF to perform measurements on INF for which no recent fissile contents measurement data exists. INF, in the form of spent fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-II), has been stored in close-fitting, dry underground storage locations at the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) for many years. In Fiscal Year 2000, funding was obtained from the DOE Office of Safeguards and Security Technology Development Program to develop and prepare for deployment a Shielded Measurement System (SMS) to perform fissile content measurements on INF stored in the RSWF. The SMS is equipped to lift an INF item out of its storage location, perform scanning neutron coincidence and high-resolution gamma-ray measurements, and restore the item to its storage location. The neutron and gamma-ray measurement results are compared to predictions based on isotope depletion and Monte Carlo neutral-particle transport models to provide confirmation of the accuracy of the models and hence of the fissile material contents of the item as calculated by the same models. This paper describes the SMS and discusses the results of the first calibration and validation measurements performed with the SMS.

  16. Storage temperature and UV-irradiation influence on the ergosterol content in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura; García-Lafuente, Ana; Guillamón, Eva

    2014-03-15

    Ergosterol (5,7,22-ergostatrien-3β-ol) and ergosteryl derivatives from different genera of edible mushrooms were separated and quantified by an isocratic reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The technique allowed a rapid separation of free ergosterol and two ergosteryl derivatives occurring in mushrooms. The ergosterol content varied considerably depending on the fungus. Thus, the species Agaricus bisporus and Hygrophorus marzuolus presented high quantities of ergosterol (6.4-6.8 mg/g, dry matter) followed by Pleurotus ostreatus, Calocybe gambosa, Lentinus edodes, and Boletus edulis (3.3-4.0mg/g). In contrast, other species, such as Cantharellus cibarius, Lactarius deliciosus and Craterellus cornucopioides, contained significantly lower ergosterol amounts (0.2-0.4 mg/g). Two ergosteryl derivatives were found in mushrooms and also the content depended on the fungus. The stability of ergosterol, in terms of the formation of ergosterol peroxide, was evaluated under different storage temperatures and UV radiation. The lower the temperature (-20°C) and the radiation time (10 min), the lower ergosterol oxidation was observed. PMID:24206714

  17. Effect of gamma irradiation on the thiamine, riboflavin and vitamin B 6 content in two varieties of Brazilian beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio, A. L. C. H. A. L. C. H.; Mancini-Filho, J. J.; Delincée, H. H.; Bognár, A. A.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of 60Co gamma rays on the content of several B-vitamins in two varieties of Brazilian beans has been studied. Carioca ( Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Carioca) and Macaçar beans ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp, var. Macaçar) were irradiated at doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy, and subsequently stored at ambient temperature for 6 months. The content of vitamin B 1, B 2 and B 6 was analysed by HPLC. In addition, the optimum cooking time was established for each dose and bean variety. A taste panel evaluated sensory properties. Only slight changes were measured for thiamine and riboflavin, whereas a dose-dependent decrease was noted for pyridoxine, which, however, was significant only at the highest doses of 5 and 10 kGy. Cooking time was considerably reduced with increasing radiation dose, but accompanied by a loss of the sensory quality. However, at the disinfestation dose up to 1 kGy, acceptable ratings were obtained for the sensory evaluation. In conclusion, for insect disinfestation of Brazilian beans radiation processing is a promising technology.

  18. Modulation of Extracellular ATP Content of Mast Cells and DRG Neurons by Irradiation: Studies on Underlying Mechanism of Low-Level-Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lei; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Shen, Xueyong; Schwarz, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Low-level-laser therapy (LLLT) is an effective complementary treatment, especially for anti-inflammation and wound healing in which dermis or mucus mast cells (MCs) are involved. In periphery, MCs crosstalk with neurons via purinergic signals and participate in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Whether extracellular ATP, an important purine in purinergic signaling, of MCs and neurons could be modulated by irradiation remains unknown. In this study, effects of red-laser irradiation on extracellular ATP content of MCs and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were investigated and underlying mechanisms were explored in vitro. Our results show that irradiation led to elevation of extracellular ATP level in the human mast cell line HMC-1 in a dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied by elevation of intracellular ATP content, an indicator for ATP synthesis, together with [Ca2+]i elevation, a trigger signal for exocytotic ATP release. In contrast to MCs, irradiation attenuated the extracellular ATP content of neurons, which could be abolished by ARL 67156, a nonspecific ecto-ATPases inhibitor. Our results suggest that irradiation potentiates extracellular ATP of MCs by promoting ATP synthesis and release and attenuates extracellular ATP of neurons by upregulating ecto-ATPase activity. The opposite responses of these two cell types indicate complex mechanisms underlying LLLT. PMID:25691809

  19. Soil microbial biomass carbon measurement using microwave irradiation: effects of soil water content, texture and temperature on microbial cell kill and C release

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumigation-based methods of soil microbial biomass carbon (C) have been replaced in many labs by microwave (MW) irradiation-based methods to reduce hazardous chemical use. Sine the introduction of the MW method concerns have been raised about the use of water filled porosity (WFP) for water content...

  20. PHENOLIC CONTENT AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE-TREATED AND AIR-CLASSIFIED OAT BRAN CONCENTRATE MICROWAVE-IRRADIATED IN WATER OR ETHANOL AT VARYING TEMPERATURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oat bran concentrate (OBC) was defatted with supercritical carbon dioxide (SCD), then microwave-irradiated at 50, 100 or 150 deg C for 10 min in water, 50% or 100% ethanol, and extract pH, soluble solids, phenolic content and antioxidant activity were analyzed. OBC was air-classified into five frac...

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation on phenol content, antioxidant activity and biological activity of black maca and red maca extracts (Lepidium meyenii walp).

    PubMed

    Zevallos-Concha, A; Nuñez, D; Gasco, M; Vasquez, C; Quispe, M; Gonzales, G F

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of gamma irradiation on UV spectrum on maca, total content of polyphenols, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activities and in vivo biological activities of red and black maca extracts (Lepidium meyenii). Adult mice of the strain Swiss aged 3 months and weighing 30-35 g in average were used to determine biological activities. Daily sperm production, effect on testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia and forced swimming test were used to determine the effect of irradiation on biological activities of maca extracts. Irradiation did not show differences in UV spectrum but improves the amount of total polyphenols in red maca as well as in black maca extracts. In both cases, black maca extract has more content of polyphenols than red maca extract (p < 0.01). Gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant capacity (p < 0.05). No difference was observed in daily sperm production when irradiated and nonirradiated maca extract were administered to mice (p > 0.05). Black maca extract but not red maca extract has more swimming endurance capacity in the forced swimming test. Irradiation of black maca extract increased the swimming time to exhaustion (p < 0.05). This is not observed with red maca extract (p > 0.05). Testosterone enanthate (TE) increased significantly the ventral prostate weight. Administration of red maca extract in animals treated with TE prevented the increase in prostate weight. Irradiation did not modify effect of red maca extract on prostate weight (p > 0.05). In conclusion, irradiation does not alter the biological activities of both black maca and red maca extracts. It prevents the presence of microorganisms in the extracts of black or red maca, but the biological activities were maintained. PMID:26633045

  2. Cytokines and fever.

    PubMed

    Conti, Bruno; Tabarean, Iustin; Andrei, Cristina; Bartfai, Tamas

    2004-05-01

    Cytokines are highly inducible, secreted proteins mediating intercellular communication in the nervous and immune system. Fever is the multiphasic response of elevation and decline of the body core temperature regulated by central thermoregulatory mechanisms localized in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. The discovery that several proinflammatory cytokines act as endogenous pyrogens and that other cytokines can act as antipyretic agents provided a link between the immune and the central nervous systems and stimulated the study of the central actions of cytokines. The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) as well as the antiinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) have been most investigated for their pyrogenic or antipyretic action. The experimental evidence demonstrating the role of these secreted proteins in modulating the fever response is as follows: 1) association between cytokine levels in serum and CSF and fever; 2) finding of the presence of cytokine receptors on various cell types in the brain and demonstration of the effects of pharmacological application of cytokines and of their neutralizing antibodies on the fever response; 3) fever studies on cytokine- and cytokine receptor- transgenic models. Studies on the peripheral and the central action of cytokines demonstrated that peripheral cytokines can communicate with the brain in several ways including stimulation of afferent neuronal pathways and induction of the synthesis of a non cytokine pyrogen, i.e. PGE2, in endothelial cells in the periphery and in the brain. Cytokines synthesized in the periphery may act by crossing the blood brain barrier and acting directly via neuronal cytokine receptors. The mechanisms that ultimately mediate the central action of cytokines and of LPS on the temperature-sensitive neurons in the preoptic hypothalamic region involved in

  3. Characteristics of human CD34+ cells exposed to ionizing radiation under cytokine-free conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Junya; Hayashi, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Monzen, Satoru; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced hematopoietic stem cell death, we investigated the effects of excessive ionizing radiation on the clonogenic potential of CD34+ cells obtained from human umbilical cord blood under cytokine-free conditions. The CD34+ cells were X-ray–irradiated (up to 2 Gy) and were cultured for 0–48 h under cytokine-free conditions. At various time-points, the CD34+ cells were investigated for survival, clonogenic potential and the generation of mitochondrial superoxide. At 12 h after X-ray irradiation, the number of viable cells had decreased to ∼70–80% compared with the 0-h non-irradiated control, whereas the clonogenic potential in the X-ray–irradiated cells had decreased to ∼50%–60% compared with the 0-h non-irradiated control. Furthermore, significant generation of mitochondrial superoxide was observed at 6 h, and reached a maximum value between 12 and 24 h after X-ray irradiation. However, no significant differences were observed between non-irradiated and X-ray–irradiated cells in terms of the generation of reactive oxygen species or in the intracellular mitochondrial contents. In addition, a cDNA microarray analysis showed that the majority of the altered genes in the CD34+ cells at 6 h after X-ray irradiation were apoptosis-related genes. These results suggest the possibility that the elimination of the clonogenic potentials of CD34+ cells involves the generation of mitochondrial superoxide induced by ionizing radiation. PMID:25877692

  4. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, John R.; Halbig, James K.; Menlove, Howard O.; Klosterbuer, Shirley F.

    1985-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  5. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  6. Discrepant responses of the global electron content to the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of EUV irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiding; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Zhang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the responses of the ionosphere to the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance are comparatively investigated using daily mean global electron content (GEC) and 0.1-50 nm EUV daily flux. GEC is well correlated with EUV on both the solar cycle and solar rotation timescales; however, the responses of GEC to the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of EUV are significantly different in terms of the following two aspects: (1) There is a significant time lag between the solar rotation variations of GEC and EUV; the lag is dominated by a 1-day lag and generally presents a decrease trend with solar activity decreasing. For the solar cycle variations of GEC and EUV, however, there are no evident time lags. (2) The GEC versus EUV slopes are different for the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of GEC and EUV; the solar cycle GEC versus EUV slope is higher than the solar rotation GEC versus EUV slope, and this difference occurs in different seasons and latitudinal bands. The results present an aspect of the difference between ionospheric climatology and weather.

  7. Post-harvest UV-B irradiation induces changes of phenol contents and corresponding biosynthetic gene expression in peaches and nectarines.

    PubMed

    Scattino, Claudia; Castagna, Antonella; Neugart, Susanne; Chan, Helen M; Schreiner, Monika; Crisosto, Carlos H; Tonutti, Pietro; Ranieri, Annamaria

    2014-11-15

    In the present study the possibility of enhancing phenolic compound contents in peaches and nectarines by post-harvest irradiation with UV-B was assessed. Fruits of 'Suncrest' and 'Babygold 7' peach and 'Big Top' nectarine cultivars were irradiated with UV-B for 12 h, 24 h and 36 h. Control fruits underwent the same conditions but UV-B lamps were screened by benzophenone-treated polyethylene film. The effectiveness of the UV-B treatment in modulating the concentration of phenolic compounds and the expression of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes, was genotype-dependent. 'Big Top' and 'Suncrest' fruits were affected by increasing health-promoting phenolics whereas in 'Babygold 7' phenolics decreased after UV-B irradiation. A corresponding trend was exhibited by most of tested phenylpropanoid biosynthesis genes. Based on these results UV-B irradiation can be considered a promising technique to increase the health-promoting potential of peach fruits and indirectly to ameliorate the aesthetic value due to the higher anthocyanin content. PMID:24912695

  8. The dependence of helium generation rate on nickel content of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated at high dpa levels in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Oliver, B.M.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1997-04-01

    With a few exceptions in the literature, it is generally accepted that it is nickel in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys that produces most of the transmutant helium and that the helium generation rate should scale linearly with the nickel content. Surprisingly, this assumption is based only on irradiations of pure nickel and has never been tested in an alloy series. There have also been no extensive tests of the predictions for helium production in alloys in various fast reactors spectra.

  9. Space weathering of silicate regoliths with various FeO contents: New insights from laser irradiation experiments and theoretical spectral simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Lyuba V.; Starukhina, Larissa V.; Rout, Surya Snata; Sasaki, Sho; Helbert, Jörn; Baither, Dietmar; Bischoff, Addi; Hiesinger, Harald

    2014-06-01

    To investigate effects of micrometeorite bombardment on optical spectra and composition of planetary and asteroid regoliths with low Fe contents, we irradiated samples of a Fe-poor plagioclase feldspar (andesine-labradorite) using a nanosecond pulsed laser. We measured reflectance spectra of irradiated and non-irradiated areas of the samples (pressed pellets) between 0.5 and 18 μm and performed SEM/EDS and TEM studies of the samples. Bulk FeO content of 0.72 wt.% in the samples is comparable, for example, to FeO content in silicates on the surface of Mercury, that was recently mapped by NASA's MESSENGER mission and will be spectrally mapped by remote sensing instruments MERTIS and SYMBIO-SYS on board the ESA BepiColombo spacecraft. We also employed theoretical spectral modeling to characterize optical alteration caused by formation of nano- and submicrometer Fe0 inclusions within space-weathered surface layers and grain rims of a Fe-poor regolith. The laser-irradiated surface layer of plagioclase reveals significant melting, while reflectance spectra show mild darkening and reddening in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR). Our spectral modeling indicates that the optical changes observed in the visible require reduction of bulk FeO (including Fe from mineral impurities found in the sample) and formation of nanophase (np) Fe0 within the glassy surface layer. A vapor deposit, if present, is optically too thin to contribute to optical modification of the investigated samples or to cause space weathering-induced optical alteration of Fe-poor regoliths in general. Due to low thickness of vapor deposits, npFe0 formation in the latter can cause darkening and reddening only for a regolith with rather high bulk Fe content. Our calculations show that only a fraction of bulk Fe is likely to be converted to npFe0 in nanosecond laser irradiation experiments and probably in natural regolith layers modified by space weathering. The previously reported differences in response of

  10. Cytokines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sylvia; Margolin, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines are molecular messengers that allow the cells of the immune system to communicate with one another to generate a coordinated, robust, but self-limited response to a target antigen. The growing interest over the past two decades in harnessing the immune system to eradicate cancer has been accompanied by heightened efforts to characterize cytokines and exploit their vast signaling networks to develop cancer treatments. The goal of this paper is to review the major cytokines involved in cancer immunotherapy and discuss their basic biology and clinical applications. The paper will also describe new cytokines in pre-clinical development, combinations of biological agents, novel delivery mechanisms, and potential directions for future investigation using cytokines. PMID:24213115

  11. [Cytokines and osteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Makoto; Ozono, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Many cytokines associate with proliferation, differentiation and activation of osteoblasts which have an important role in osteogenesis. TGF-β, BMP, IGF, FGF, Hedgehog, Notch, IL and WNT signaling pathways and their inhibitors have been revealed to correlate to osteogenesis, and those gene mutations have been shown to cause various bone disorders. It has been suggested that there are common pathways or crosstalk in these cytokine signaling each other, but mechanism of their complicated regulation on osteogenesis has been unclear. It was expected that the knowledge about these cytokines will apply to clinical therapies of bone diseases. PMID:24870835

  12. [Immunostimulating drugs and cytokines].

    PubMed

    Lehners, Nicola; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Raab, Marc S

    2011-11-01

    Cytokines are essential regulators of hematopoesis and the immune system. Genetic engineering of recombinant cytokines has facilitated their implementation in many clinical areas. In the field of oncology the granulopoetic human growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF are of particular importance. They can be applied to prevent chemotherapy induced neutropenia. Furthermore, they allow for mobilization of hematopoetic stem cells in order to obtain peripheral blood stem cell transplants. Another class of cytokines, the interferons, possess immunomodulating, antiproliferative, and antiviral properties. While the significance of interferon alfa as an antitumor agent is dwindling, it still plays a very important role in the therapy of chronic hepatitis b and c. Interferon beta is successfully used to treat multiple sclerosis. Among the heterogenous group of interleukines in particular interleukin 2 has reached clinical practice as an immunostimulating agent in the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Many other cytokines have yet to undergo clinical trials. PMID:22045528

  13. Cytokines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Pozzilli, P; Thorpe, R

    1994-01-01

    Although the immunopathology of most autoimmune diseases has been well defined, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown of self-tolerance and which lead to the development of systemic and organ-specific autoaggression are still unclear. Evidence has accumulated which supports a role for a disregulated production of cytokines by leucocytes and possibly other cells in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of cytokine effects in the regulation of the immune response, it is difficult to determine whether abnormalities in the patterns of cytokine production are primary or secondary to the pathological process. Confusion is also caused by the fact that the biological activities of cytokines are multiple and often overlapping, and consequently it is difficult to focus on a unique effect of any one cytokine. Characterization of the potential and actual involvement of cytokines is important not only for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions, but particularly because of the implications for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the diseases. PMID:8149655

  14. Hydrogen production via reforming of biogas over nanostructured Ni/Y catalyst: Effect of ultrasound irradiation and Ni-content on catalyst properties and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, Mahdi; Haghighi, Mohammad; Abdollahifar, Mozaffar

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of nanostructured Ni/Y catalyst by sonochemical and impregnation methods. • Enhancement of size distribution and active phase dispersion by employing sonochemical method. • Evaluation of biogas reforming over Ni/Y catalyst with different Ni-loadings. • Preparation of highly active and stable catalyst with low Ni content for biogas reforming. • Getting H{sub 2}/CO very close to equilibrium ratio by employing sonochemical method. - Abstract: The effect of ultrasound irradiation and various Ni-loadings on dispersion of active phase over zeolite Y were evaluated in biogas reforming for hydrogen production. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, Fourier transform infrared analysis and TEM analysis were employed to observe the characteristics of nanostructured catalysts. The characterizations implied that utilization of ultrasound irradiation enhanced catalyst physicochemical properties including high dispersion of Ni on support, smallest particles size and high catalyst surface area. The reforming reactions were carried out at GHSV = 24 l/g.h, P = 1 atm, CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} = 1 and temperature range of 550–850 °C. Activity test displayed that ultrasound irradiated Ni(5 wt.%)/Y had the best performance and the activity remained stable during 600 min. Furthermore, the proposed reaction mechanism showed that there are three major reaction channels in biogas reforming.

  15. Experimental and Model Study of Changes in Spectral Solar Irradiance in the Atmosphere of Large City due to Tropospheric NO2 Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, N. Ye.; Larin, I. K.; Lebedev, V. V.; Partola, V. S.; Lezina, Ye. A.; Rublev, A. N.

    2009-03-01

    An experimental and model approach has been used to study the NO2 vertical profiles and its effect on solar irradiance. The profiles of NO2 were obtained using gas analyzers, which had been installed at different levels at the Moscow State University (MSU) located at the south-western part of Moscow and at the Ostankino tower located at the north of Moscow up to the height of 350 m. Using these data diurnal and spatial variability of the NO2 content in the most polluted part of planetary boundary layer (PBL) has been analyzed within the large megalopolis. On the base of photochemical modeling we have simulated the diurnal cycle of NO2 vertical profiles for summer and winter conditions and have compared the results with the experimental ones. Using the RT modeling with input gaseous and aerosol parameters of the atmosphere obtained from the MSU Meteorological Observatory we have estimated the attenuation of spectral solar irradiance in UV and visible region of spectrum due to the NO2 content in the polluted atmosphere for different seasons.

  16. Experimental and Model Study of Changes in Spectral Solar Irradiance in the Atmosphere of Large City due to Tropospheric NO{sub 2} Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarova, N. Ye.; Lebedev, V. V.; Partola, V. S.; Larin, I. K.; Lezina, Ye. A.; Rublev, A. N.

    2009-03-11

    An experimental and model approach has been used to study the NO{sub 2} vertical profiles and its effect on solar irradiance. The profiles of NO{sub 2} were obtained using gas analyzers, which had been installed at different levels at the Moscow State University (MSU) located at the south-western part of Moscow and at the Ostankino tower located at the north of Moscow up to the height of 350 m. Using these data diurnal and spatial variability of the NO{sub 2} content in the most polluted part of planetary boundary layer (PBL) has been analyzed within the large megalopolis. On the base of photochemical modeling we have simulated the diurnal cycle of NO{sub 2} vertical profiles for summer and winter conditions and have compared the results with the experimental ones. Using the RT modeling with input gaseous and aerosol parameters of the atmosphere obtained from the MSU Meteorological Observatory we have estimated the attenuation of spectral solar irradiance in UV and visible region of spectrum due to the NO{sub 2} content in the polluted atmosphere for different seasons.

  17. Effect of maleic acid content on the thermal stability, swelling behaviour and network structure of gelatin-based hydrogels prepared by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, M.; Abdel-Ghaffar, M. A.; Dessouki, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    The highly swelling Poly (acrylamide/maleic acid/gelatin) P(AAm/MA/G) hydrogels were prepared by gamma-irradiation at low dose rate (0.94 kGy/h) and moderate dose rate (3.84 kGy/h). The hydrogels were confirmed by FTIR. The effect of copolymer composition, dose and dose rate on the swelling behaviour was discussed. Increasing of MA content and G in the initial mixture leads to an increase in the amount of MA and G in the gel system and decrease in the gelation %. The swelling behaviours of the hydrogel prepared at moderate dose rate increased with increasing MA mole content in the gel system but, there is no systematic dependence of swelling on MA content was observed for the hydrogels obtained at low dose rate. Pore structure of the hydrogels was monitored by using scanning electron microscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the rate of the thermal decomposition of P(AAm/MA/G) hydrogels has been evaluated to give a better understanding of the thermal stability of polymers, The X-ray data of P(AAm/MA/G) hydrogels was discussed to investigate some features namely the degree of ordering and crystallite size.

  18. Cytokines and antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ludmila; Pawelec, Graham

    2003-06-01

    Currently, the notion of immunosurveillance against tumors is enjoying something of a renaissance. Even if we still refuse to accept that tumors arising in the normal host are unable to trigger an immune response because of the lack of initiation ("danger") signals, there is no doubt that the immune system can be manipulated experimentally and by implication therapeutically to exert anti-tumor effects. For this activity to be successful, the appropriate cytokine milieu has to be provided, making cytokine manipulation central to immunotherapy. On the other hand, the major hurdle currently preventing successful immunotherapy is the ability of tumors to evolve resistant variants under the pressure of immune selection. Here, too, the cytokine milieu plays an essential role. The purpose of this brief review is to consider the current status of the application of cytokines in facilitating antitumor immunity, as well their role in inhibiting responses to tumors. Clearly, encouraging the former but preventing the latter will be the key to the effective clinical application of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:12779349

  19. The effects of γ-irradiation on garlic oil content in garlic bulbs and on the radiolysis of allyl trisulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genshuan, Wei; Guanghui, Wang; Ruipu, Yang; Jilan, Wu

    1996-02-01

    A study of the effects of γ-radiation on garlic oil content in garlic bulbs and on the radiolysis of allyl trisulfide and disulfide was carried out. The content of garlic oil in fresh garlic bulbs treated by gamma ray keeps nearly constant when stored for 10 months. The main components of garlic oil are allyl trisulfide (about 60%) and allyl disulfide (about 30%). The G values of radiolysis products of allyl disulfide and trisulfide in ethanol system were determined. The results show that allyl trisulfide is a very effective solvated electron scavenger and can oxidize CH 3CHOH radical into acetaldehyde, which means that the formation of 2,3-butanediol is extensively inhibited.

  20. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  1. Modification of the radiosensitivity of barley seed by post-treatment with caffein. IV. Effect of the moisture content of seed and storage temperature after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kesavan, P C; Nadkarni, S

    1977-02-01

    The oxygen-dependent damage which develops in barley seeds with approximately 7-8 per cent moisture content disappears after post-irradiation storage in vacuo for 48 hours at 40 degrees C and for 24 hours at 50 degrees C. When the diration of storage at 40 degrees C is extended to 384 hours, oxygen-independent damage becomes potentiated. There is oxygen-dependent damage in seeds of approximately 13.3 per cent moisture content and after the seeds have been stored in vacuo at 50 degrees C, the oxygen-dependent damage begins to increase by 168 hours, and it is very significantly potentiated by 192 hours. Under these circumstances, caffeine acts as a radioprotector only as long as the precursors of oxic damage are present in the seeds. Once these sites are lost, caffeine acts only as a radiosensitizer. The oxygen-independent damage which increases with storage at high temperature is further potentiated by caffeine. PMID:300722

  2. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  3. Proteomic analysis of Spirogyra varians mutant with high starch content and growth rate induced by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minchul; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Gwang Hoon; Kim, Dong-Ho; Park, Don-Hee

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a high-efficiency strain of Spirogyra varians for the production of biomass by radiation breeding. The characteristics of wild-type and mutant S. varians were analyzed through phenomenological and proteomic observations. The results of our phenomenological observations of the S. varians mutant demonstrated increases in growth rate and content of chlorophyll a, b, and a + b; in particular, a significant threefold increase was observed in starch accumulation. Proteomic analysis to investigate the differences in expression between wild-type and mutant proteins identified 18 proteins with significantly different expressions. From the literature review, it was confirmed that the up-regulated proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate biosynthesis, and energy metabolism. These results suggest the possibility of algae development by radiation breeding for the production of biofuel. PMID:23370702

  4. Cytokine Therapies in Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Azodi, Shila; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of glycoproteins that coordinate physiological functions. Cytokine deregulation is observed in many neurological diseases. This article reviews current research focused on human clinical trials of cytokine and anticytokine therapies in the treatment of several neurological disease including stroke, neuromuscular diseases, neuroinfectious diseases, demyelinating diseases, and neurobehavioral diseases. This research suggests that cytokine therapy applications may play an important role in offering new strategies for disease modulation and treatment. Further, this research provides insights into the causal link between cytokine deregulation and neurological diseases. PMID:27388288

  5. Accelerated hydrolysis method to estimate the amino acid content of wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) flour using microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kabaha, Khaled; Taralp, Alpay; Cakmak, Ismail; Ozturk, Levent

    2011-04-13

    The technique of microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis was applied to wholegrain wheat (Triticum durum Desf. cv. Balcali 2000) flour in order to speed the preparation of samples for analysis. The resultant hydrolysates were chromatographed and quantified in an automated amino acid analyzer. The effect of different hydrolysis temperatures, times and sample weights was examined using flour dispersed in 6 N HCl. Within the range of values tested, the highest amino acid recoveries were generally obtained by setting the hydrolysis parameters to 150 °C, 3 h and 200 mg sample weight. These conditions struck an optimal balance between liberating amino acid residues from the wheat matrix and limiting their subsequent degradation or transformation. Compared to the traditional 24 h reflux method, the hydrolysates were prepared in dramatically less time, yet afforded comparable ninhydrin color yields. Under optimal hydrolysis conditions, the total amino acid recovery corresponded to at least 85.1% of the total protein content, indicating the efficient extraction of amino acids from the flour matrix. The findings suggest that this microwave-assisted method can be used to rapidly profile the amino acids of numerous wheat grain samples, and can be extended to the grain analysis of other cereal crops. PMID:21375298

  6. The dependence of helium generation rate on nickel content of Fe Cr Ni alloys irradiated to high dpa levels in EBR-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, F. A.; Oliver, B. M.; Greenwood, L. R.

    1998-10-01

    Fusion-relevant helium-effects experiments conducted on austenitic steels in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fast reactor had to recognize the contributions of both the high neutron energy (n,α) reactions and that of the 58Ni(n,γ) 59Ni(n,α) reaction sequence with low energy neutrons. An experiment conducted in the harder neutron spectra found within the core of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has shown that the helium in this reactor was generated almost exclusively from the interaction of high energy neutrons with the natural isotopes of nickel. There was very little contribution from 59Ni. The helium production was found to scale directly with the nickel content over the range 25-75% Ni. Even at very high neutron exposures, the helium production in such reactors can be predicted within 5% accuracy on the basis of high energy reactions, as demonstrated by an experiment conducted on three Fe-15Cr-Ni ternary alloys irradiated to doses of 75-131 dpa in EBR-II.

  7. Interactive Cytokine Regulation of Synoviocyte Lubricant Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Blewis, Megan E.; Lao, Brian J.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Bugbee, William D.; Firestein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine regulation of synovial fluid (SF) lubricants, hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is important in health, injury, and disease of synovial joints, and may also provide powerful regulation of lubricant secretion in bioreactors for articulating tissues. This study assessed lubricant secretion rates by human synoviocytes and the molecular weight (MW) of secreted lubricants in response to interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-17, IL-32, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), applied individually and in all combinations. Lubricant secretion rates were assessed using ELISA and binding assays, and lubricant MW was assessed using gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. HA secretion rates were increased ∼40-fold by IL-1β, and increased synergistically to ∼80-fold by the combination of IL-1β + TGF-β1 or TNF-α + IL-17. PRG4 secretion rates were increased ∼80-fold by TGF-β1, and this effect was counterbalanced by IL-1β and TNF-α. HA MW was predominantly <1 MDa for controls and individual cytokine stimulation, but was concentrated at >3 MDa after stimulation by IL-1β + TGF-β1 + TNF-α to resemble the distribution in human SF. PRG4 MW was unaffected by cytokines and similar to that in human SF. These results contribute to an understanding of the relationship between SF cytokine and lubricant content in health, injury, and disease, and provide approaches for using cytokines to modulate lubricant secretion rates and MW to help achieve desired lubricant composition of fluid in bioreactors. PMID:19908966

  8. Cytokines and therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Hacker, U; Endres, S

    1997-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides - short strands of synthetic nucleic acids - encompass antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides. Antisense oligonucleotides are designed to bind to target RNA by complementary base pairing and to inhibit translation of the target protein. Antisense oligonucleotides enable specific inhibition of cytokine synthesis. In contrast, aptamer oligonucleotides are able to bind directly to specific proteins. This binding depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide. Aptamer oligonucleotides with CpG motifs can exert strong immunostimulatory effects. Both kinds of therapeutic oligonucleotides - antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides - provide promising tools to modulate immunological functions. Recently, therapeutic oligonucleotides have moved towards clinical application. An antisense oligonucleotide directed against the proinflammatory intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is currently being tested in clinical trials for therapy of inflammatory disease. Immunostimulatory aptamer oligonucleotides are in preclinical development for immunotherapy. In the present review we summarize the application of therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate immunological functions. We include technological aspects as well as current therapeutic concepts and clinical studies. PMID:9740353

  9. Effect of electron beam irradiation and storage at 5 degrees C on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and carbonyl contents in chicken breast meat infused with antioxidants and selected plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Rababah, Taha; Hettiarachchy, Navam; Horax, Ronny; Eswaranandam, Satchithanandam; Mauromoustakos, Andronikos; Dickson, James; Niebuhr, Steven

    2004-12-29

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of synthetic and natural antioxidants, green tea, commercial grape seed extracts/combinations, and TBHQ, with varying concentrations of lipid oxidation of nonirradiated and irradiated chicken breast meats stored at 5 degrees C for 12 days. Fresh boneless and skinless chicken breast meats were vacuum-infused with varying concentrations of antioxidants: green tea, grape seed extracts alone/in combination, and TBHQ. The irradiation dosage was 3.0 kGy. Carbonyl values of raw chicken meat and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw and cooked chicken meat were determined for 0-12 days at 5 degrees C storage. TBARS values for 0-12 days of storage at 5 degrees C ranged from 1.21 to 7.3 and 1.22 to 8.51 mg malondialdehyde/100 g chicken for nonirradiated and irradiated raw chicken, respectively. TBARS values of cooked chicken ranged from 2.19 to 35.83 and 2.45 to 45.72 mg malondialdehyde/100 g chicken for nonirradiated and irradiated chicken, respectively. Irradiation increased TBARS values of both controls and plant extracts. The carbonyl content in meat lipid ranged from 1.7 to 2.9 and 1.7 to 4.41 micromol acetophenone/10 g of nonirradiated and irradiated chicken meat, respectively, and meat protein ranged from 1.4 to 2.07 and 1.41 to 2.72 micromol/10 g meat. Infusion of chicken meat with selected plant extracts is an effective method to minimize lipid oxidation and volatiles developments caused by irradiation. PMID:15612823

  10. The Function of Fish Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    What is known about the biological activity of fish cytokines is reviewed. Most of the functional studies performed to date have been in teleost fish, and have focused on the induced effects of cytokine recombinant proteins, or have used loss- and gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish. Such studies begin to tell us about the role of these molecules in the regulation of fish immune responses and whether they are similar or divergent to the well-characterised functions of mammalian cytokines. This knowledge will aid our ability to determine and modulate the pathways leading to protective immunity, to improve fish health in aquaculture. PMID:27231948

  11. The Function of Fish Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    What is known about the biological activity of fish cytokines is reviewed. Most of the functional studies performed to date have been in teleost fish, and have focused on the induced effects of cytokine recombinant proteins, or have used loss- and gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish. Such studies begin to tell us about the role of these molecules in the regulation of fish immune responses and whether they are similar or divergent to the well-characterised functions of mammalian cytokines. This knowledge will aid our ability to determine and modulate the pathways leading to protective immunity, to improve fish health in aquaculture. PMID:27231948

  12. Evolution of Cytokine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; Sertori, Robert; Ward, Alister C

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines represent essential mediators of cell-cell communication with particularly important roles within the immune system. These secreted factors are produced in response to developmental and/or environmental cues and act via cognate cytokine receptors on target cells, stimulating specific intracellular signaling pathways to facilitate appropriate cellular responses. This review describes the evolution of cytokine receptor signaling, focusing on the class I and class II receptor families and the downstream JAK-STAT pathway along with its key negative regulators. Individual components generated over a long evolutionary time frame coalesced to form an archetypal signaling pathway in bilateria that was expanded extensively during early vertebrate evolution to establish a substantial "core" signaling network, which has subsequently undergone limited diversification within discrete lineages. The evolution of cytokine receptor signaling parallels that of the immune system, particularly the emergence of adaptive immunity, which has likely been a major evolutionary driver. PMID:27317733

  13. Potassium content of irradiated packed red blood cells in different storage media: is there a need for additive solution-dependent recommendations for infant transfusion?

    PubMed

    El Kenz, H; Corazza, F; Van Der Linden, P; Chabab, S; Vandenvelde, C

    2013-10-01

    Prevention of transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD) by gamma irradiation is known to induce increased K+ in supernatant of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) stored in CPDA-1 and SAGM conservative solutions. However, no data exist for PRBCs in AS-3 medium which is considered safe for neonatal transfusion. We evaluated haemolysis and K+ release from irradiated AS-3 PRBCs and compared our results with reported data for SAGM and CPDA-1 PRBCs. Our results indicate that irradiated PRBCs stored in AS-3 after more than 7 days post-irradiation should not be used in massive and/or rapidly infused transfusions in neonates and infants. PMID:23711835

  14. Use of cytokines in infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Naoko; Xing, Zhou

    2004-11-01

    Infectious disease remains an ever-growing health concern worldwide due to increasing antibiotic-resistant microbial strains, immune-compromised populations, international traffic and globalisation, and bioterrorism. There exists an urgent need to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. In addition to classic antibiotic therapeutics, immune-modulatory molecules such as cytokines or their inhibitors represent a promising form of antimicrobial therapeutics or immune adjuvant used for the purpose of vaccination. These molecules, in the form of either recombinant protein or transgene, exert their antimicrobial effect by enhancing infectious agent-specific immune activation or memory development, or by dampening undesired inflammatory and immune responses resulting from infection and host defence mechanisms. In the last two decades, a number of cytokine therapy-based experimental and clinical trials have been conducted, and some of these efforts have led to the routine clinical use of cytokines. For instance, although IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis C with great success, many other cytokines are yet to be fully evaluated for their antimicrobial potential. This review discusses the biology and therapeutic potential of selected immune modulatory cytokines and their inhibitors, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IFN-gamma, IL-12 and TNF. PMID:15571481

  15. Depositional and irradiational history and noble gas contents of orange-black droplets in the 74002/1 core from Shorty Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Hirsch, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Isotopic concentrations of noble gases were assessed in grain size separates of 14 soils from a 67-cm section of lunar regolith taken on the rim of Shorty Crater. The orange-black droplets in this section were probably formed from pyroclastic eruptions about 3.6 billion years ago; they give little indication of surface exposure. The isotopic concentrations suggest that cosmic ray irradiation of the core occurred in two stages and that the core stratigraphy was inverted between stages. The first irradiation stage may have taken place immediately after pyroclastic deposition of the droplets and could have lasted about 20 million years.

  16. Cytokines and persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and B or Epstein-Barr virus often cause chronic viral infections in humans. Persistence of these viruses in the host is associated with a dramatic loss of T-cell immune response due to functional T-cell exhaustion. Developing efficient immunotherapeutic approaches to prevent viral persistence and/or to restore a highly functional T-cell mediated immunity remains a major challenge. During the last two decades, numerous studies aimed to identify relevant host-derived factors that could be modulated to achieve this goal. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the role of cytokines in preventing or facilitating viral persistence. We concentrate on the impact of multiple relevant cytokines in T-cell dependent immune response to chronic viral infection and the potential for using cytokines as therapeutic agents in mice and humans. PMID:26907634

  17. Antioxidant Activity and Phenolic Content of Defatted Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) Flour in Water or Ethanol Heated using Microwave Irradiation at Varying Temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) has potential to be a nutritionally beneficial crop due to its high phenolic content and antioxidant activity. We explored new technologies to enhance buckwheat phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Buckwheat achenes were ground and flour was extracted for 15 ...

  18. Cytokine Signature in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Izabella Rodrigues; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Luan Vieira; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Barros, Thais Lins Souza; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease with high mortality rate. Cytokines participate in its pathogenesis and may contribute to early diagnosis improving the outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile in IE. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by cytometric bead array (CBA) at diagnosis in 81 IE patients, and compared with 34 healthy subjects and 30 patients with non-IE infections, matched to the IE patients by age and gender. Mean age of the IE patients was 47±17 years (range, 15–80 years), and 40 (50%) were male. The IE patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α as compared to the healthy individuals. The median levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 were higher in the IE than in the non-IE infections group. TNF-α and IL-12 levels were higher in staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. There was a higher proportion of both low IL-10 producers and high producers of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 in the staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. This study reinforces a relationship between the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α, and the pathogenesis of IE. A lower production of IL-10 and impairment in cytokine network may reflect the severity of IE and may be useful for risk stratification. PMID:26225421

  19. Cytokine Signature in Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Izabella Rodrigues; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Luan Vieira; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Barros, Thais Lins Souza; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease with high mortality rate. Cytokines participate in its pathogenesis and may contribute to early diagnosis improving the outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile in IE. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by cytometric bead array (CBA) at diagnosis in 81 IE patients, and compared with 34 healthy subjects and 30 patients with non-IE infections, matched to the IE patients by age and gender. Mean age of the IE patients was 47±17 years (range, 15-80 years), and 40 (50%) were male. The IE patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α as compared to the healthy individuals. The median levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 were higher in the IE than in the non-IE infections group. TNF-α and IL-12 levels were higher in staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. There was a higher proportion of both low IL-10 producers and high producers of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 in the staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. This study reinforces a relationship between the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α, and the pathogenesis of IE. A lower production of IL-10 and impairment in cytokine network may reflect the severity of IE and may be useful for risk stratification. PMID:26225421

  20. Comparison of endpoints relevant to toxicity assessments in 3 generations of CD-1 mice fed irradiated natural and purified ingredient diets with varying soy protein and isoflavone contents.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Luísa; Lewis, Sherry M; Vanlandingham, Michelle M; Juliar, Beth E; Olson, Greg R; Patton, Ralph E; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Woodling, Kellie; Sepehr, Estatira; Bryant, Matthew S; Doerge, Daniel R; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S; Felton, Robert P; Delclos, K Barry

    2016-08-01

    Diet is an important variable in toxicology. There are mixed reports on the impact of soy components on energy utilization, fat deposition, and reproductive parameters. Three generations of CD-1 mice were fed irradiated natural ingredient diets with varying levels of soy (NIH-41, 5K96, or 5008/5001), purified irradiated AIN-93 diet, or the AIN-93 formulation modified with ethanol-washed soy protein concentrate (SPC) or SPC with isoflavones (SPC-IF). NIH-41 was the control for pairwise comparisons. Minimal differences were observed among natural ingredient diet groups. F0 males fed AIN-93, SPC, and SPC-IF diets had elevated glucose levels and lower insulin levels compared with the NIH-41 group. In both sexes of the F1 and F2 generations, the SPC and SPC-IF groups had lower body weight gains than the NIH-41 controls and the AIN-93 group had an increased percent body fat at postnatal day 21. AIN-93 F1 pups had higher baseline glucose than NIH-41 controls, but diet did not significantly affect breeding performance or responses to glucose or uterotrophic challenges. Reduced testes weight and sperm in the AIN-93 group may be related to low thiamine levels. Our observations underline the importance of careful selection, manufacturing procedures, and nutritional characterization of diets used in toxicological studies. PMID:27234134

  1. Neutrophil Elastase Modulates Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Benabid, Rym; Wartelle, Julien; Malleret, Laurette; Guyot, Nicolas; Gangloff, Sophie; Lebargy, François; Belaaouaj, Azzaq

    2012-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that following bacterial infection, the massive recruitment and activation of the phagocytes, neutrophils, is accompanied with the extracellular release of active neutrophil elastase (NE), a potent serine protease. Using NE-deficient mice in a clinically relevant model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia, we provide compelling in vivo evidence that the absence of NE was associated with decreased protein and transcript levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-6 in the lungs, coinciding with increased mortality of mutant mice to infection. The implication of NE in the induction of cytokine expression involved at least in part Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). These findings were further confirmed following exposure of cultured macrophages to purified NE. Together, our data suggest strongly for the first time that NE not only plays a direct antibacterial role as it has been previously reported, but released active enzyme can also modulate cytokine expression, which contributes to host protection against P. aeruginosa. In light of our findings, the long held view that considers NE as a prime suspect in P. aeruginosa-associated diseases will need to be carefully reassessed. Also, therapeutic strategies aiming at NE inhibition should take into account the physiologic roles of the enzyme. PMID:22927440

  2. Hypothalamic neuronal responses to cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fever has been extensively studied in the past few decades. The hypothesis that hypothalamic thermosensitive neurons play a major role in both normal thermoregulation and in fever production and lysis has particularly helped to advance our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the response to pyrogens. Furthermore, new data in the study of host defense responses induced by pyrogenic cytokines such as interleukin 1, interferon alpha 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6 have demonstrated that those factors have multiple, yet coordinated, regulatory activities in the central nervous system, so that our understanding of the role of the brain in the activity of these agents requires a new perspective and dimension. Thus, recent evidence from our laboratory indicates that blood-borne cytokines may be detected in the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis and transduced there into neuronal signals. Such signals may then affect distinct, but partially overlapping, sets of neuronal systems in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, mediating directly and/or indirectly the array of various host defense responses characteristic of infection that are thought to be induced by blood-borne cytokines. PMID:2205055

  3. Cytokines in the blood and semen of infertile patients

    PubMed Central

    Havrylyuk, Anna; Chopyak, Valentyna; Boyko, Yaryna; Kril, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines have been important mediators of the immunity and can be involved in numerous processes in the male genital tract including acting as immunomodulatory elements within the male gonad. The aims of this study were: 1) to detect pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in the control group and subgroups of infertile men; and 2) to set up the practical recommendations concerning determination of cytokine levels for the male infertility diagnosis. Observations were performed in a group of 82 men: healthy controls (n = 27) and infertile patients (n = 55). The male infertility group was further subdivided into patients with: varicocele (n = 22), idiopathic infertility (n = 13) and partners of couples with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA; n = 20). Semen analysis was determined following WHO criteria. The cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, IL-18; tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interferon g (IFN-g) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) contents in serum and seminal plasma were determined by quantitative ELISA. An interesting marker of male infertility appears to be TGF-β1 (blood) significantly elevated in idiopathically infertile males and in the RSA group. Besides elevated TGF-β1 in a group of idiopathic infertility significantly elevated IL-10, IL-18, IFN-g (blood) and statistically decreased IL-1β while increased IFN-g were revealed in seminal plasma compared to healthy controls. We may postulate novel cytokine micropatterns for patients with different background of infertility. Therefore, circulating cytokines: IL-1β, IL-10, IL-18, TGF-β1, IFN-g and IL-1β, IFN-g and TGF-β1 in seminal plasma should be extended in evaluation of specific types of male infertility. PMID:26648778

  4. Cytokines in immunity and allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Louis C; Allan, James S; Madsen, Joren C

    2002-01-01

    Cytokines are highly potent regulatory molecules that are secreted by a variety of cells into the local microenvironment. These chemical messengers participate in the activation and regulation of immune function by a variety of mechanisms, including the stimulation and inhibition of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Cytokines also may have chemotactic activity. Six cytokine receptor families have been described, on the basis of their conserved structural features. Many cytokines are classified as proinflammatory cytokines, which promote both innate and adaptive immune responses. Solid-organ transplantation presents several unique challenges to the immune system, and cytokines play an important role in both antigen-dependent and antigen-independent immune recognition. The selective blockade of cytokine-mediated immune responses is a cornerstone of modern immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:12678428

  5. Photocatalytic performance of the SiO2 sphere/ n-type TiO2/ p-type CuBiS2 composite catalysts coated with different contents of Ag nanoparticles under ultraviolet and visible light irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Hairus; Kuo, Dong-Hau

    2016-08-01

    Photocatalytic performance of the SiO2 sphere/ n-type TiO2/ p-type CuBiS2 composite catalysts with different contents of silver nanoparticles (abbreviated as SiO2/ n-TiO2/ p-CuBiS2/Ag) toward the photodegradation of Acid Black 1 ( AB 1) dye under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light was investigated. The composite catalyst spheres were analyzed their crystal structure, microstructure, optical absorbance capabilities, and photodegradation capabilities of AB 1 dye. The best photodegradation performances of the 20 mg composite powder with only ~5 mg photoactive catalysts showed the degradation of AB 1 dye in 5 min under UV and 60 min under visible light irradiations. The concept of composite catalyst with numerous nano p- n diodes and its photodegradation mechanism were proposed.

  6. Viruses, cytokines, antigens, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Gianani, R; Sarvetnick, N

    1996-01-01

    To explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, we hypothesize that following an infection the immune response spreads to tissue-specific autoantigens in genetically predisposed individuals eventually determining progression to disease. Molecular mimicry between viral and self antigens could, in some instances, initiate autoimmunity. Local elicitation of inflammatory cytokines following infection probably plays a pivotal role in determining loss of functional tolerance to self autoantigens and the destructive activation of autoreactive cells. We also describe the potential role of interleukin 10, a powerful B-cell activator, in increasing the efficiency of epitope recognition, that could well be crucial to the progression toward disease. PMID:8637859

  7. Cytokine profiles in axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Madej, Marta; Nowak, Beata; Sokolik, Renata; Chlebicki, Arkadiusz; Korman, Lucyna; Woytala, Patryk; Lubiński, Łukasz; Wiland, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Current studies concentrate on the cytokine network and its role in the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis (SpA). In this study, we analyzed whether the serum cytokine profile (interleukins: IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33) correlates with demographic data, clinical manifestations, disease activity and treatment outcome in a group of patients with axial spondyloarthritis. Material and methods Forty-nine patients with an established diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (aSpA) and 19 healthy volunteers as controls were enrolled in the study. Clinical evaluation included patient's medical history, 44 joint count, back pain intensity and global disease activity in the preceding week (VAS), the duration of morning stiffness and blood tests. Disease activity was assessed using BASDAI and ASDAS-CRP. Serum concentration of IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33 was determined. Results In patients with aSpA, elevated serum concentration of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 was detected. In the aSpA group we detected higher values of serum concentration of IL-23 and IL-33 in the subgroup with anterior uveitis (83.1 ±184.0 pg/ml vs. 14.0 ±17.1 pg/ml, p < 0.0001 and 45.5 ±71.9 pg/ml vs. 18.4 ±14.3 pg/ml, p < 0.0001, respectively). Additionally, in the subgroup with peripheral arthritis, elevation of serum concentration of IL-12 (249.3 ±246.9 pg/ml vs. 99.9 ±105.9 pg/ml, p = 0.0001) was detected. Patients with preradiological SpA had higher serum concentration of IL-17 than patients with established diagnosis of AS (6.37 ±8.50 pg/ml vs. 2.04 ±2.98 pg/ml, p = 0.0295). No differences in serum concentration of analyzed cytokines were found between the subgroup with low to moderate disease activity and the subgroup with high to very high disease activity. Conclusions We report that in aSpA patients, compared to controls, elevated serum concentrations of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 were observed. Some cytokines may predispose to a more

  8. Granzymes regulate proinflammatory cytokine responses.

    PubMed

    Wensink, Annette C; Hack, C Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2015-01-15

    Granzymes (Grs) are serine proteases mainly produced by cytotoxic lymphocytes and are traditionally considered to cause apoptosis in tumor cells and virally infected cells. However, the cytotoxicity of several Grs is currently being debated, and additional, predominantly extracellular, functions of Grs in inflammation are emerging. Extracellular soluble Grs are elevated in the circulation of patients with autoimmune diseases and infections. Additionally, Grs are expressed by several types of immune cells other than cytotoxic lymphocytes. Recent research has revealed novel immunomodulatory functions of Grs. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview on the role of Grs in inflammation, highlighting their role in cytokine induction and processing. PMID:25556251

  9. Clinical implication of perioperative inflammatory cytokine alteration.

    PubMed

    Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Cytokines are key modulators of inflammatory responses, and play an important role in the defense and repair mechanisms following trauma. After traumatic injury, an immuno-inflammatory response is initiated immediately, and cytokines rapidly appear and function as a regulator of immunity. In pathologic conditions, imbalanced cytokines may provide systemic inflammatory responses or immunosuppression. Expression of perioperative cytokines vary by different intensities of surgical trauma and types of anesthesia and anesthetic agents. Inflammatory cytokines play important roles in postoperative organ dysfunction including central nervous system, cardiovascular, lung, liver, and kidney injury. Inhibition of cytokines could protect against traumatic injury in some circumstances, therefore cytokine inhibitors or antagonists might have the potential for reducing postoperative tissue/organ dysfunction. Cytokines are also involved in wound healing and post-traumatic pain. Application of cytokines for the improvement of surgical wound healing has been reported. Anesthesia-related immune response adjustment might reduce perioperative morbidity because it reduces proinflammatory cytokine expression; however, the overall effects of anesthetics on postoperative immune-inflammatory responses needs to be further investigated. PMID:25837846

  10. Cytoplasmic and nuclear cytokine receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Mertani, H C; Morel, G; Lobie, P E

    1999-01-01

    Much of our understanding on how hormones and cytokines transmit their message into the cell is based on the receptor activation at the plasma membrane. Many experimental in vitro models have established the paradigm for cytokine action based upon such activation of their cell surface receptor. The signaling from the plasma membrane activated cytokine receptor is driven to the nucleus by a rapid ricochet of protein phosphorylation, ultimately integrated as a differentiative, proliferative, or transcriptional message. The Janus kinase (JAK)--signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathway that was first thought to be cytokine receptor specific now appears to be activated by other noncytokine receptors. Also, evidence is accumulating showing that cytokines modulate the signal transduction machinery of the tyrosine kinase receptors and that of the heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein-coupled receptors. Thus cytokine receptor signaling has become much more complex than originally hypothesized, challenging the established model of specificity of the action of a given cytokine. This review is focused on another level of complexity emerging within cytokine receptor superfamily signaling. Over the past 10 years, data from different laboratories have shown that cytokines and their receptors localize to intracellular compartments including the nucleus, and, in some cases, biological responses have been correlated with this unexpected location, raising the possibility that cytokines act as their own messenger through inter-actions with nuclear proteins. Thus, the interplay between cytokine receptor engagement and cellular signaling turns out to be more dynamic than originally suspected. The mechanisms and regulations of intracellular translocation of the cytokines, their receptors, and their signaling proteins are discussed in the context that such compartmentalization provides some of the specificity of the responses mediated by each

  11. Analysis of intracellular cytokines using flowcytometry.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sunil K

    2002-01-01

    Characterization of T-cell clones and identification of functional subsets of the helper T-cells with polarized cytokine production is based on testing of cytokine expression. Several methods have been developed that allow cytokine expression to be measured like ELISA, RT-PCR, ELISPOT, ISH and flowcytometry. Among all these methods, monitoring of cytokine production using flowcytometric analysis has its own advantages and disadvantages. Multi-parametric characterization of cytokine production on single cell basis, without long-term culture and cloning along with high throughput of samples is main feature attached to flowcytometric analysis. The interpretation may be difficult at times due to change in the phenotype of the cells. Cells with similar surface phenotype but synthesizing different cytokines and having different functional characteristics can be analyzed with this technique. PMID:12815288

  12. Bioanalytical Chemistry of Cytokines-A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stenken, Julie A.; Poschenrieder, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are bioactive proteins produced by many different cells of the immune system. Due to their role in different inflammatory disease states and maintaining homeostasis, there is enormous clinical interest in the quantitation of cytokines. The typical standard methods for quantitation of cytokines are immunoassay-based techniques including enzyme-linked immusorbent assays (ELISA) and bead-based immunoassays read by either standard or modified flow cytometers. A review of recent developments in analytical methods for measurements of cytokine proteins is provided. This review briefly covers cytokine biology and the analysis challenges associated with measurement of these biomarker proteins for understanding both health and disease. New techniques applied to immunoassay-based assays are presented along with the uses of aptamers, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry, optical resonator-based methods. Methods used for elucidating the release of cytokines from single cells as well as in vivo collection methods are described. PMID:25467452

  13. DNA Repair and Cytokines: TGF-β, IL-6, and Thrombopoietin as Different Biomarkers of Radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Centurione, Lucia; Aiello, Francesca B

    2016-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by radiotherapy are highly cytotoxic lesions, leading to chromosomal aberrations and cell death. Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-dependent DNA-damage response, non-homologous end joining, and homologous recombination pathways coordinately contribute to repairing DSBs in higher eukaryotes. It is known that the expression of DSB repair genes is increased in tumors, which is one of the main reasons for radioresistance. The inhibition of DSB repair pathways may be useful to increase tumor cell radiosensitivity and may target stem cell-like cancer cells, known to be the most radioresistant tumor components. Commonly overexpressed in neoplastic cells, cytokines confer radioresistance by promoting proliferation, survival, invasion, and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, tumor irradiation increases the expression of various cytokines displaying these effects, including transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-6. Recently, the capabilities of these cytokines to support DNA repair pathways and the ATM-dependent DNA response have been demonstrated. Thrombopoietin, essential for megakaryopoiesis and very important for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis, has also been found to promote DNA repair in a highly selective manner. These findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying cytokine-related radioresistance, which may be clinically relevant. Therapies targeting specific cytokines may be used to improve radiosensitivity. Specific inhibitors may be chosen in consideration of different tumor microenvironments. Thrombopoietin may be useful in fending off irradiation-induced loss of HSCs. PMID:27500125

  14. DNA Repair and Cytokines: TGF-β, IL-6, and Thrombopoietin as Different Biomarkers of Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Centurione, Lucia; Aiello, Francesca B.

    2016-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by radiotherapy are highly cytotoxic lesions, leading to chromosomal aberrations and cell death. Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-dependent DNA-damage response, non-homologous end joining, and homologous recombination pathways coordinately contribute to repairing DSBs in higher eukaryotes. It is known that the expression of DSB repair genes is increased in tumors, which is one of the main reasons for radioresistance. The inhibition of DSB repair pathways may be useful to increase tumor cell radiosensitivity and may target stem cell-like cancer cells, known to be the most radioresistant tumor components. Commonly overexpressed in neoplastic cells, cytokines confer radioresistance by promoting proliferation, survival, invasion, and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, tumor irradiation increases the expression of various cytokines displaying these effects, including transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-6. Recently, the capabilities of these cytokines to support DNA repair pathways and the ATM-dependent DNA response have been demonstrated. Thrombopoietin, essential for megakaryopoiesis and very important for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis, has also been found to promote DNA repair in a highly selective manner. These findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying cytokine-related radioresistance, which may be clinically relevant. Therapies targeting specific cytokines may be used to improve radiosensitivity. Specific inhibitors may be chosen in consideration of different tumor microenvironments. Thrombopoietin may be useful in fending off irradiation-induced loss of HSCs. PMID:27500125

  15. Cytokine-Modulating Strategies and Newer Cytokine Targets for Arthritis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Dudics, Steven; Acharya, Bodhraj; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are the key mediators of inflammation in the course of autoimmune arthritis and other immune-mediated diseases. Uncontrolled production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-17 can promote autoimmune pathology, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokines including IL-4, IL-10, and IL-27 can help control inflammation and tissue damage. The pro-inflammatory cytokines are the prime targets of the strategies to control rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For example, the neutralization of TNFα, either by engineered anti-cytokine antibodies or by soluble cytokine receptors as decoys, has proven successful in the treatment of RA. The activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines can also be downregulated either by using specific siRNA to inhibit the expression of a particular cytokine or by using small molecule inhibitors of cytokine signaling. Furthermore, the use of anti-inflammatory cytokines or cytokine antagonists delivered via gene therapy has proven to be an effective approach to regulate autoimmunity. Unexpectedly, under certain conditions, TNFα, IFN-γ, and few other cytokines can display anti-inflammatory activities. Increasing awareness of this phenomenon might help develop appropriate regimens to harness or avoid this effect. Furthermore, the relatively newer cytokines such as IL-32, IL-34 and IL-35 are being investigated for their potential role in the pathogenesis and treatment of arthritis. PMID:25561237

  16. Current status and challenges of cytokine pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Zídek, Z; Anzenbacher, P; Kmoníčková, E

    2009-01-01

    The major concern of pharmacology about cytokines has originated from plentiful data showing association between gross changes in their production and pathophysiological processes. Despite the enigmatic role of cytokines in diseases, a number of them have become a subject of cytokine and anti-cytokine immunotherapies. Production of cytokines can be influenced by many endogenous and exogenous stimuli including drugs. Cells of the immune system, such as macrophages and lymphocytes, are richly endowed with receptors for the mediators of physiological functions, such as biogenic amines, adenosine, prostanoids, steroids, etc. Drugs, agonists or antagonists of these receptors can directly or indirectly up- and down-regulate secretion of cytokines and expression of cytokine receptors. Vice versa, cytokines interfere with drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics through the interactions with cytochrome P450 and multiple drug resistance proteins. The aim of the review is to encourage more intensive studies in these fields of cytokine pharmacology. It also outlines major areas of searching promising candidates for immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:19371342

  17. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to further explore the effects of space flight on cytokines and cytokine-directed immunological function.

  18. Effect of space flight on cytokine production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    Space flight has been shown to alter many immunological responses. Among those affected are the production of cytokines, Cytokines are the messengers of the immune system that facilitate communication among cells that allow the interaction among cells leading to the development of immune responses. Included among the cytokines are the interferons, interleukins, and colony stimulating factors. Cytokines also facilitate communication between the immune system and other body systems, such as the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal systems. Some cytokines also have direct protective effects on the host, such as interferon, which can inhibit the replication of viruses. Studies in both humans and animals indicate that models of space flight as well as actual space flight alter the production and action of cytokines. Included among these changes are altered interferon production, altered responsiveness of bone marrow cells to granulocyte/monocyte-colony stimulating factor, but no alteration in the production of interleukin-3. This suggests that there are selective effects of space flight on immune responses, i.e. not all cytokines are affected in the same fashion by space flight. Tissue culture studies also suggest that there may be direct effects of space flight on the cells responsible for cytokine production and action. The results of the above study indicate that the effects of space flight on cytokines may be a fundamental mechanism by which space flight not only affects immune responses, but also other biological systems of the human.

  19. Photodegradation of ibuprofen by TiO2 co-doping with urea and functionalized CNT irradiated with visible light - Effect of doping content and pH.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ching; Hung, Chung-Hsuang; Li, Huei-Wen; Chang, Wei-Hsian

    2016-07-01

    Ibuprofen (IBP) is one kind of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are classified as Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs). IBP possesses bioactive property and the substantial use of IBP results in a harmful impact on bioreceptors even in small concentrations. Accordingly, the treatment of these wastewaters is important before discharging them into the ecosystem. The photodegradation of IBP with TiO2 co-doped with functionalized CNTs (CNT-COOH and CNT-COCl) and urea, named as N-doping CNT/TiO2, irradiated with visible light of 410 nm was investigated in this study. The titanium tetrachloride was used as the precursor of Ti. The N-doping CNT-COCl/TiO2 photocatalysts exhibited a better crystalline structure and smaller crystal size than the N-doping CNT-COOH/TiO2 photocatalyst. It might largely ascribe to strong binding between acyl chloride functional group and TiO2. About 85.0%-86.0% of IBP was degraded with N-doping CNT/TiO2 within 120 min at natural condition, which obeyed the pseudo first order reaction and the rate constant was 4.45 × 10(-3)-1.22 × 10(-2) min(-1) and 5.03 × 10(-3)-1.47 × 10(-2) min(-1) for N-doping CNT-COOH/TiO2 and N-doping CNT-COCl/TiO2, respectively. The best IBP degradation of 87.9%-89.0% was found at pH 5, which indicated superoxide radicals (O2(-)) played a key role. The optimal pH was majorly dominated by the nature of IBP and N-doping CNT/TiO2. A successful synergy effect of TiO2 and dopants was exhibited and this mainly attributed to the strong binding strength by functional group of acyl chloride (COCl) and carboxylic acid (COOH). In summary, IBP could be effectively photodegraded by the fabricated N-doping CNT/TiO2 photocatalysts. PMID:27145421

  20. A Generic Mechanism for Enhanced Cytokine Signaling via Cytokine-Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Shulgin, Boris; Helmlinger, Gabriel; Kosinsky, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement or inhibition of cytokine signaling and corresponding immune cells responses are critical factors in various disease treatments. Cytokine signaling may be inhibited by cytokine-neutralizing antibodies (CNAs), which prevents further activation of cytokine receptors. However, CNAs may result in enhanced—instead of inhibitory—cytokine signaling (an “agonistic effect”) in various in vitro and in vivo experiments. This may lead to lack of efficacy or adverse events for cytokine-inhibiting based medicines. Alternatively, cytokine-antibody complexes may produce stronger signaling vs. cytokine alone, thereby increasing the efficacy of stimulating cytokine-based drugs, at equal or lower cytokine doses. In this paper, the effect of cytokine signaling enhancement by a CNA was studied in a generic mathematical model of interleukin-4 (IL-4) driven T-cell proliferation. The occurrence of the agonistic effect depends upon the antibody-to-cytokine binding affinity and initial concentrations of antibody and cytokine. Model predictions were in agreement with experimental studies. When the cytokine receptor consists of multiple subunits with substantially differing affinities (e.g., IL-4 case), the choice of the receptor chain to be blocked by the antibody is critical, for the agonistic effect to appear. We propose a generic mechanism for the effect: initially, binding of the CNA to the cytokine reduces free cytokine concentration; yet, cytokine molecules bound within the cytokine-CNA complex—and released later and over time—are “rescued” from earlier clearance via cellular internalization. Hence, although free cytokine-dependent signalling may be less potent initially, it will also be more sustained over time; and given non-linear dynamics, it will lead ultimately to larger cellular effector responses, vs. the same amount of free cytokine in the absence of CNA. We suggest that the proposed mechanism is a generic property of {cytokine, CNA, receptor

  1. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  2. Interleukin-6, a mental cytokine.

    PubMed

    Spooren, Anneleen; Kolmus, Krzysztof; Laureys, Guy; Clinckers, Ralph; De Keyser, Jacques; Haegeman, Guy; Gerlo, Sarah

    2011-06-24

    Almost a quarter of a century ago, interleukin-6 (IL-6) was discovered as an inflammatory cytokine involved in B cell differentiation. Today, IL-6 is recognized to be a highly versatile cytokine, with pleiotropic actions not only in immune cells, but also in other cell types, such as cells of the central nervous system (CNS). The first evidence implicating IL-6 in brain-related processes originated from its dysregulated expression in several neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In addition, IL-6 was shown to be involved in multiple physiological CNS processes such as neuron homeostasis, astrogliogenesis and neuronal differentiation. The molecular mechanisms underlying IL-6 functions in the brain have only recently started to emerge. In this review, an overview of the latest discoveries concerning the actions of IL-6 in the nervous system is provided. The central position of IL-6 in the neuroinflammatory reaction pattern, and more specifically, the role of IL-6 in specific neurodegenerative processes, which accompany Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and excitotoxicity, are discussed. It is evident that IL-6 has a dichotomic action in the CNS, displaying neurotrophic properties on the one hand, and detrimental actions on the other. This is in agreement with its central role in neuroinflammation, which evolved as a beneficial process, aimed at maintaining tissue homeostasis, but which can become malignant when exaggerated. In this perspective, it is not surprising that 'well-meant' actions of IL-6 are often causing harm instead of leading to recovery. PMID:21238488

  3. Study of correlation of deuterium content in a-C:D dust induced by laser irradiation from the co-deposited surface with the grain size and velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alegre, Daniel; Bergsåker, Henric; Bykov, Igor; Gąsior, Paweł; Kubkowska, Monika; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, Ewa; Petersson, Per; Tabares, Francisco L.

    2014-05-01

    In the study described here, the laser ablation method was applied to clean thick (40-60 μm) a-C:D co-deposits on the ALT-II limiter blade from the TEXTOR tokamak, and at the same time to characterize the ejected particles formed during ablation and measure the amount of fuel carried by them. Ablation was accomplished by ˜ 3.5 ns, 0.5 J Nd:YAG laser pulses in either vacuum or an O2 atmosphere at different pressures. Fast camera tracking of the process provided an estimate of the population and velocity of up to 100 m s-1 for larger dust particles. In the same experiment, the dust particles were caught using ultra-light Si aerogel collectors placed in front of the ablation target. SEM analysis of aerogel surfaces verified the speed estimate, providing the trapped particles’ size distribution and particle yield during ablation. The D/C atomic concentration ratio was measured with the 3HE ion beam nuclear reaction analysis method in deposited layers before ablation and with a micro-ion beam in individual particles on aerogel collectors. This indicated that most of the D was thermally released during ablation, leaving no more than 5% of its original amount in the particles. The effect of ablation conditions on the acceleration of ejected particles, their population, composition and D content is the main subject of this paper.

  4. [The role of cytokines in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Ishida, N; Yoshida, T

    1987-05-01

    A variety of normal tissue or malignant cells can produce and/or release various biologically active substances (hormone-like mediators) now collectively called cytokines. Because immunological and non-immunological responses of malignant cells were modified by many of them, some cytokines have been employed as so-called Biological Response Modifiers (BRM) in the treatment of cancers in animals and humans. This overview discussed a few of the difficulties, probably inherent in cytokine therapy, that have already been encountered in early clinical trials as well as some of those that can be anticipated in future work. These include unexpected and undesirable reactions due to the systemic administration in relatively large amounts of a cytokine that is, under physiological conditions, supposed to act as a paracrine and/or autocrine among cells located within a limited distance. Even a pure recombinant preparation of a cytokine is now known to affect multiple target cells if they are accessible to it. Furthermore, this kind of therapy may sometimes be little more than a shot in the dark, since the physiological balance (homeostasis) among many of the cytokines present or produced in a host receiving a large quantity of exogenous cytokines is not well understood. Making the situation still more complicated, many types of tumor cells are known to release some of these cytokines spontaneously. Many challenging problems remain to be solved before we can confidently prescribe a cocktail of cytokines precisely suitable for a given patient according to the individual's in vivo cytokine profile. Nevertheless, in spite of all these reservations, cytokine therapy has been too frequently beneficial to be allowed to be discouraged. "Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety". PMID:3034167

  5. Early Alterations in Cytokine Expression in Adult Compared to Developing Lung in Mice after Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Carl J.; Hernady, Eric; Reed, Christina; Thurston, Sally W.; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Williams, Jacqueline P.

    2010-01-01

    To assess early changes in the lung after low-dose radiation exposure that may serve as targets for mitigation of lung injury in the aftermath of a terrorist event, we analyzed cytokine expression after irradiation. Adult mice were studied after whole-lung or total-body irradiation. Mouse pups of different ages were also investigated after total-body irradiation. mRNA abundance was analyzed in tissue and plasma, and pathological changes were assessed. In lung tissue, dose-related changes were seen in IL1B, IL1R2 and CXCR2 mRNA expression at 1 and 6 h after irradiation, concurrent with increases in plasma protein levels of KC/CXCL1 and IL6. However, in the pups, changes in IL1 abundance were not detected until 28 days of age, coincident with the end of postnatal lung growth, although apoptosis was detected at all ages. In conclusion, although cytokines were expressed after low doses of radiation, their role in the progression of tissue response is yet to be determined. They may be candidates for use in marker-based biodosimetry. However, the lack of cytokine induction in early life suggests that different end points (and mitigating treatments) may be required for children. PMID:20334525

  6. Cytokine Regulation of Metastasis and Tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Brummer, G; Acevedo, D; Cheng, N

    2016-01-01

    The human body combats infection and promotes wound healing through the remarkable process of inflammation. Inflammation is characterized by the recruitment of stromal cell activity including recruitment of immune cells and induction of angiogenesis. These cellular processes are regulated by a class of soluble molecules called cytokines. Based on function, cell target, and structure, cytokines are subdivided into several classes including: interleukins, chemokines, and lymphokines. While cytokines regulate normal physiological processes, chronic deregulation of cytokine expression and activity contributes to cancer in many ways. Gene polymorphisms of all types of cytokines are associated with risk of disease development. Deregulation RNA and protein expression of interleukins, chemokines, and lymphokines have been detected in many solid tumors and hematopoetic malignancies, correlating with poor patient prognosis. The current body of literature suggests that in some tumor types, interleukins and chemokines work against the human body by signaling to cancer cells and remodeling the local microenvironment to support the growth, survival, and invasion of primary tumors and enhance metastatic colonization. Some lymphokines are downregulated to suppress tumor progression by enhancing cytotoxic T cell activity and inhibiting tumor cell survival. In this review, we will describe the structure/function of several cytokine families and review our current understanding on the roles and mechanisms of cytokines in tumor progression. In addition, we will also discuss strategies for exploiting the expression and activity of cytokines in therapeutic intervention. PMID:27613135

  7. Compartmentalized Cytokine Responses in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Kersten, Brigit; Pistiki, Aikaterini; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Favorable treatment outcomes with TNF blockade led us to explore cytokine responses in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Methods Blood monocytes of 120 patients and 24 healthy volunteers were subtyped by flow cytometry. Isolated blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for cytokine production; this was repeated in 13 severe patients during treatment with etanercept. Cytokines in pus were measured. Results CD14brightCD16dim inflammatory monocytes and patrolling monocytes were increased in Hurley III patients. Cytokine production by stimulated PBMCs was low compared to controls but the cytokine gene copies did not differ, indicating post-translational inhibition. The low production of IL-17 was restored, when cells were incubated with adalimumab. In pus, high concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected. Based on the patterns, six different cytokine profiles were discerned, which are potentially relevant for the choice of treatment. Clinical improvement with etanercept was predicted by increased production of IL-1β and IL-17 by PBMCs at week 8. Conclusions Findings indicate compartmentalized cytokine expression in HS; high in pus but suppressed in PBMCs. This is modulated through blockade of TNF. PMID:26091259

  8. Interactions between Autophagy and Inhibitory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tian-tian; Li, Wei-Min; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Most early studies of autophagy focused on its involvement in age-associated degeneration and nutrient deprivation. However, the immunological functions of autophagy have become more widely studied in recent years. Autophagy has been shown to be an intrinsic cellular defense mechanism in the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines belong to a broad and loose category of proteins and are crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. Inhibitory cytokines have evolved to permit tolerance to self while also contributing to the eradication of invading pathogens. Interactions between inhibitory cytokines and autophagy have recently been reported, revealing a novel mechanism by which autophagy controls the immune response. In this review, we discuss interactions between autophagy and the regulatory cytokines IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and IL-27. We also mention possible interactions between two newly discovered cytokines, IL-35 and IL-37, and autophagy. PMID:27313501

  9. Cytokine Expression and Accelerated Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, C.C.; Khoo, E.; Tran, J.; Chartres, I.; Liu, Y.; Thant, L.M.; Khabensky, I.; Gart, L.P.; Cisneros, G.; Alikhani, M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that inhibiting the expression of certain cytokines decreases the rate of tooth movement. Here, we hypothesized that stimulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines, through small perforations of cortical bone, increases the rate of bone remodeling and tooth movement. Forty-eight rats were divided into 4 groups: 50-cN force applied to the maxillary first molar (O), force application plus soft tissue flap (OF), force application plus flap plus 3 small perforations of the cortical plate (OFP), and a control group (C). From the 92 cytokines studied, the expression of 37 cytokines increased significantly in all experimental groups, with 21 cytokines showing the highest levels in the OFP group. After 28 days, micro-computed tomography, light and fluorescent microscopy, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated higher numbers of osteoclasts and bone remodeling activity in the OFP group, accompanied by generalized osteoporosity and increased rate of tooth movement. PMID:20639508

  10. Soluble cytokine receptors in biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Crespo, Fabian A; Sun, Xichun

    2002-08-01

    Due to their fundamental involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases, cytokines constitute key targets for biotherapeutic approaches. The discovery that soluble forms of cytokine receptors are involved in the endogenous regulation of cytokine activity has prompted substantial interest in their potential application as immunotherapeutic agents. As such, soluble cytokine receptors have many advantages, including specificity, low immunogenicity and high affinity. Potential disadvantages, such as low avidity and short in vivo half-lifes, have been addressed by the use of genetically-designed receptors, hybrid proteins or chemical modifications. The ability of many soluble cytokine receptors to inhibit the binding and biological activity of their ligands makes them very specific cytokine antagonists. Several pharmaceutical companies have generated a number of therapeutic agents based on soluble cytokine receptors and many of them are undergoing clinical trials. The most advanced in terms of clinical development is etanercept (Enbrel, Immunex), a fusion protein between soluble TNF receptor Type II and the Fc region of human IgG1. This TNF-alpha; antagonist was the first soluble cytokine receptor to receive approval for use in humans. In general, most agents based on soluble cytokine receptors have been safe, well-tolerated and have shown only minor side effects in the majority of patients. Soluble cytokine receptors constitute a new generation of therapeutic agents with tremendous potential for applications in a wide variety of human diseases. Two current areas of research are the identification of their most promising applications and characterisation of their long-term effects. PMID:12171504

  11. Evidence of T-helper cell 2 cytokine regulation of chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Marina G; Birchall, John P; Pearson, Jeffrey P

    2005-10-01

    Cytokine and cellular patterns of effusions may reflect stages of middle ear inflammation. The local interplay between IL-2 and -4 is likely to play a crucial role in the switching of inflammation in the chronic stage. The T-helper cell 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4, -5 and -13 and the Th2/Th1 cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) regulate the cellular and molecular processes of chronic inflammation in the middle ear and therefore the chronic condition of otitis media with effusion (OME). Early identification of the cytokine and cellular patterns of effusions can be helpful in directing the clinical treatment of OME.We hypothesized that IL-2 and the group of Th2 cytokines regulate chronic inflammation in the middle ear and chronic OME. Effusions from children with persistent OME were analysed to determine the presence of cytokines (the Th1 cytokine IL-2, the Th2 cytokines IL-4, -5 and -13 and the Th1/Th2 cytokine GM-CSF), inflammatory cells (CD4+ T cells, eosinophils, macrophages and neutrophils) and mucin. Cytokines were evaluated by means of a quantitative "sandwich"-type ELISA, inflammatory cells by means of alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase immunocytostaining and mucin by means of a modified periodic acid-Schiff method based on a slot-blot technique. The cytokine pattern in effusions varied from patient to patient. GM-CSF correlated positively and IL-4 inversely with IL-2 and the increased level of IL-4 may have had an inhibitory effect on IL-2. IL-5 and -13 correlated with IL-4. Inflammatory cells correlated with cytokines as follows: CD4+ T cells with IL-2 and -4; macrophages and neutrophils with GM-CSF; and eosinophils with IL-5. Some cytokine-cellular correlations in effusions were reflected at the clinical level. The mucin content of effusions correlated with the concentrations of IL-4 (>10 pg/ml) and -13, suggesting involvement of IL-4 and -13 in upregulation of the middle ear mucin metabolism. PMID:16298784

  12. Resistin as an Intrahepatic Cytokine

    PubMed Central

    Bertolani, Cristiana; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Failli, Paola; Bataller, Ramon; Aleffi, Sara; DeFranco, Raffaella; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Romagnani, Paola; Milani, Stefano; Ginés, Pere; Colmenero, Jordi; Parola, Maurizio; Gelmini, Stefania; Tarquini, Roberto; Laffi, Giacomo; Pinzani, Massimo; Marra, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance accelerate the progression of fibrosis during chronic liver disease. Resistin antagonizes insulin action in rodents, but its role in humans is still controversial. The aims of this study were to investigate resistin expression in human liver and to evaluate whether resistin may affect the biology of activated human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), key modulators of hepatic fibrogenesis. Resistin gene expression was low in normal human liver but was increased in conditions of severe fibrosis. Up-regulation of resistin during chronic liver damage was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In a group of patients with alcoholic hepatitis, resistin expression correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, suggesting a possible action on HSCs. Exposure of cultured HSCs to recombinant resistin resulted in increased expression of the proinflammatory chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-8, through activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Resistin induced a rapid increase in intracellular calcium concentration, mainly through calcium release from intracellular inositol triphosphate-sensitive pools. The intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM blocked resistin-induced NF-κB activation and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression. In conclusion, this study shows a role for resistin as an intrahepatic cytokine exerting proinflammatory actions in HSCs, via a Ca2+/NF-κB-dependent pathway and suggests involvement of this adipokine in the pathophysiology of liver fibrosis. PMID:17148667

  13. Side effects of cytokines approved for therapy.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines, currently known to be more than 130 in number, are small MW (<30 kDa) key signaling proteins that modulate cellular activities in immunity, infection, inflammation and malignancy. Key to understanding their function is recognition of their pleiotropism and often overlapping and functional redundancies. Classified here into 9 main families, most of the 20 approved cytokine preparations (18 different cytokines; 3 pegylated), all in recombinant human (rh) form, are grouped in the hematopoietic growth factor, interferon, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) families. In the hematopoietin family, approved cytokines are aldesleukin (rhIL-2), oprelvekin (rhIL-11), filgrastim and tbo-filgrastim (rhG-CSF), sargramostim (rhGM-CSF), metreleptin (rh-leptin) and the rh-erythropoietins, epoetin and darbepoietin alfa. Anakinra, a recombinant receptor antagonist for IL-1, is in the IL-1 family; recombinant interferons alfa-1, alfa-2, beta-1 and gamma-1 make up the interferon family; palifermin (rhKGF) and becaplermin (rhPDGF) are in the PDGF family; and rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 represent the TGFβ family. The main physicochemical features, FDA-approved indications, modes of action and side effects of these approved cytokines are presented. Underlying each adverse events profile is their pleiotropism, potency and capacity to release other cytokines producing cytokine 'cocktails'. Side effects, some serious, occur despite cytokines being endogenous proteins, and this therefore demands caution in attempts to introduce individual members into the clinic. This caution is reflected in the relatively small number of cytokines currently approved by regulatory agencies and by the fact that 14 of the FDA-approved preparations carry warnings, with 10 being black box warnings. PMID:25270293

  14. Cytokine medicines in clinical practice: current issues.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Theresa; Moots, Robert J; Goodacre, John

    2005-10-21

    Cytokine medicines have been licensed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis since 2000. The rheumatology community has accrued a large amount of experience in the use of these medications. This experience has led to the development of guidelines for their use that include ongoing vigilance for long term adverse events and efficacy using the Biologics Register. Delivery of these expensive therapies has prompted extensive system developments within rheumatology. The cytokine medicines have provided important tools to probe the pathogenesis of rheumatoid and other inflammatory diseases. Further cytokine medicines, in various stages of development, are on the horizon and continue to stimulate excitement within this fast expanding field. PMID:16188452

  15. Blue light irradiation suppresses dendritic cells activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael R; Abel, Manuela; Lopez Kostka, Susanna; Rudolph, Berenice; Becker, Detlef; von Stebut, Esther

    2013-08-01

    Blue light is a UV-free irradiation suitable for treating chronic skin inflammation, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and hand- and foot eczema. However, a better understanding of the mode of action is still missing. For this reason, we investigated whether dendritic cells (DC) are directly affected by blue light irradiation in vitro. Here, we report that irradiation neither induced apoptosis nor maturation of monocyte-derived and myeloid DC. However, subsequent DC maturation upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation was impaired in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by maturation markers and cytokine release. Moreover, the potential of this DC to induce cytokine secretion from allogeneic CD4 T cells was reduced. In conclusion, unlike UV irradiation, blue light irradiation at high and low doses only resulted in impaired DC maturation upon activation and a reduced subsequent stimulatory capacity in allogeneic MLRs with strongest effects at higher doses. PMID:23879817

  16. Changes in proinflammatory cytokine activity after menopause.

    PubMed

    Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Köditz, Roland; Pfohl, Martin; Schatz, Helmut

    2002-02-01

    There is now a large body of evidence suggesting that the decline in ovarian function with menopause is associated with spontaneous increases in proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokines that have obtained the most attention are IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. The exact mechanisms by which estrogen interferes with cytokine activity are still incompletely known but may potentially include interactions of the ER with other transcription factors, modulation of nitric oxide activity, antioxidative effects, plasma membrane actions, and changes in immune cell function. Experimental and clinical studies strongly support a link between the increased state of proinflammatory cytokine activity and postmenopausal bone loss. Preliminary evidence suggests that these changes also might be relevant to vascular homeostasis and the development of atherosclerosis. Better knowledge of the mechanisms and the time course of these interactions may open new avenues for the prevention and treatment of some of the most prevalent and important disorders in postmenopausal women. PMID:11844745

  17. MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION SYNDROME AND CYTOKINE DIRECTED THERAPIES

    PubMed Central

    Grom, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is an episode of overwhelming inflammation that occurs most commonly in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is characterized by expansion and activation of T lymphocytes and hemophagocytic macrophages, and bears great similarity to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). This disorder has substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is frequently a delay in recognition and initiation of treatment. Here, we will review what is known about the pathogenesis of MAS and in particular its similarities to HLH. The development of MAS is characterized by a cytokine storm, with the elaboration of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. We will examine the evidence for various cytokines in the initiation and pathogenesis of MAS, and discuss how new biologic therapies may alter the risk of MAS. Finally we will review current treatment options for MAS, and examine how cytokine-directed therapy could serve as novel treatment modalities. PMID:24974063

  18. Cytokines in the perinatal period - Part I.

    PubMed

    Chau, A; Markley, J C; Juang, J; Tsen, L C

    2016-05-01

    Successful pregnancy requires a state of immune homeostasis. Maternal tolerance of the genetically distinct fetoplacental unit is in part mediated by maternal and fetal pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines; these cytokines have also been implicated in different pregnancy-related pathologic states. This two-part series seeks to provide anesthesiologists with an overview on selected perinatal cytokines in an effort to identify opportunities for research and improvements in clinical care. In part one, we review basic and pregnancy-related elements of the immune system, with an emphasis on the role of cytokines. From this foundation, we offer a perspective of a unique phenomenon witnessed within obstetric anesthesia - maternal temperature elevation associated with labor epidural analgesia. PMID:26970932

  19. Soypeptide lunasin in cytokine immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Chen; Lewis, David; Tung, Chun-Yu; Han, Ling; Henriquez, Sarah M P; Voiles, Larry; Lupov, Ivan P; Pelloso, David; Sinn, Anthony L; Pollok, Karen E; de Lumen, Ben O; Li, Fang; Blum, Janice S; Srivastava, Shivani; Robertson, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance anti-tumor immunity and are part of the therapeutic armamentarium for cancer treatment. We have previously reported that post-transplant lymphoma patients have an acquired deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4, which results in defective IFNγ production during clinical immunotherapy. With the goal of further improving cytokine-based immunotherapy, we examined the effects of a soybean peptide called lunasin that synergistically works with cytokines on natural killer (NK) cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors and post-transplant lymphoma patients were stimulated with or without lunasin in the presence of IL-12 or IL-2. NK activation was evaluated, and its tumoricidal activity was assessed using in vitro and in vivo tumor models. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was performed to evaluate the histone modification of gene loci that are regulated by lunasin and cytokine. Adding lunasin to IL-12- or IL-2-stimulated NK cells demonstrated synergistic effects in the induction of IFNG and GZMB involved in cytotoxicity. The combination of lunasin and cytokines (IL-12 plus IL-2) was capable of restoring IFNγ production by NK cells from post-transplant lymphoma patients. In addition, NK cells stimulated with lunasin plus cytokines displayed higher tumoricidal activity than those stimulated with cytokines alone using in vitro and in vivo tumor models. The underlying mechanism responsible for the effects of lunasin on NK cells is likely due to epigenetic modulation on target gene loci. Lunasin represents a different class of immune modulating agent that may augment the therapeutic responses mediated by cytokine-based immunotherapy. PMID:24363024

  20. Cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus, London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Anisur

    2003-01-01

    The meeting consisted of 11 talks that illustrated the complexity of the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying systemic lupus erythematosus and aimed to identify ways in which cytokine modulation might affect those mechanisms. The evidence relating to the involvement of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10 and BLyS in this disease was discussed in particular detail. A final discussion explored the possible ways in which cytokine modulation might lead to new methods of treating systemic lupus erythematosus in the future. PMID:12823845

  1. Anti cytokine therapy in chronic inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Charlotte; Davies, Ruth; Choy, Ernest

    2016-10-01

    This is a review looking at anti cytokine therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PSA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). The review explores the similarities and differences in the clinical features, as well as treatments and cytokines involved in the development and propagation of the disease. Particular attention is paid to TNFα inhibitors IL-1ra, IL-6 and JAK kinase Inhibitors, anti IL23 and IL-12 and the new developments with anti-IL-17. PMID:27497159

  2. A genetic contribution to circulating cytokines and obesity in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytokines are considered to be involved in obesity-related metabolic diseases. Study objectives are to determine the heritability of circulating cytokine levels, to investigate pleiotropy between cytokines and obesity traits, and to present genome scan results for cytokines in 1030 Hispanic children...

  3. Cytokine inhibition in the treatment of COPD.

    PubMed

    Caramori, Gaetano; Adcock, Ian M; Di Stefano, Antonino; Chung, Kian Fan

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines play an important part in many pathobiological processes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including the chronic inflammatory process, emphysema, and altered innate immune response. Proinflammatory cytokines of potential importance include tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, IL-32, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and growth factors such as transforming growth factor-β. The current objectives of COPD treatment are to reduce symptoms, and to prevent and reduce the number of exacerbations. While current treatments achieve these goals to a certain extent, preventing the decline in lung function is not currently achievable. In addition, reversal of corticosteroid insensitivity and control of the fibrotic process while reducing the emphysematous process could also be controlled by specific cytokines. The abnormal pathobiological process of COPD may contribute to these fundamental characteristics of COPD, and therefore targeting cytokines involved may be a fruitful endeavor. Although there has been much work that has implicated various cytokines as potentially playing an important role in COPD, there have been very few studies that have examined the effect of specific cytokine blockade in COPD. The two largest studies that have been reported in the literature involve the use of blocking antibody to TNFα and CXCL8 (IL-8), and neither has provided benefit. Blocking the actions of CXCL8 through its CXCR2 receptor blockade was not successful either. Studies of antibodies against IL-17, IL-18, IL-1β, and TSLP are currently either being undertaken or planned. There is a need to carefully phenotype COPD and discover good biomarkers of drug efficacy for each specific target. Specific groups of COPD patients should be targeted with specific anticytokine therapy if there is evidence of high expression of that cytokine and there are features of the clinical expression of COPD that will respond

  4. ANTIBODY-CYTOKINE FUSION PROTEINS FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER: ENGINEERING CYTOKINES FOR IMPROVED EFFICACY AND SAFETY

    PubMed Central

    Young, Patricia A.; Morrison, Sherie L.; Timmerman, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The true potential of cytokine therapies in cancer treatment is limited by the inability to deliver optimal concentrations into tumor sites due to dose-limiting systemic toxicities. To maximize the efficacy of cytokine therapy, recombinant antibody-cytokine fusion proteins have been constructed by a number of groups to harness the tumor-targeting ability of monoclonal antibodies. The aim is to guide cytokines specifically to tumor sites where they might stimulate more optimal anti-tumor immune responses while avoiding the systemic toxicities of free cytokine therapy. Antibody-cytokine fusion proteins containing IL-2, IL-12, IL-21, TNFα, and interferons α, β and γ have been constructed and have shown anti-tumor activity in pre-clinical and early phase clinical studies. Future priorities for development of this technology include optimization of tumor targeting, bioactivity of the fused cytokine, and choice of appropriate agents for combination therapies. This review is intended to serve as a framework for engineering an ideal antibody-cytokine fusion protein, focusing on previously developed constructs and their clinical trial results. PMID:25440607

  5. IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON THE PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SEWAGE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M-J.; Lee, J-K.; Yoo, D-H.; Ho, K.

    2004-10-05

    The radiation effects on the physical characteristic of the sewage sludge were studied in order to obtain information which will be used for study on the enhancement of the sludge's dewaterability. Water contents, capillary suction time, zeta potential, irradiation dose, sludge acidity, total solid concentration, sludge particle size and microbiology before and after irradiation were investigated. Irradiation gave an effect on physical characteristics sludge. Water content in sludge cake could be reduced by irradiation at the dose of 10kGy.

  6. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases. PMID:26549942

  7. Treatment of Cancer Pain by Targeting Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, I.; Macedo, D.; Alho, I.; Dionísio, M. R.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important causes of the majority of cancer symptoms, including pain, fatigue, cachexia, and anorexia. Cancer pain affects 17 million people worldwide and can be caused by different mediators which act in primary efferent neurons directly or indirectly. Cytokines can be aberrantly produced by cancer and immune system cells and are of particular relevance in pain. Currently, there are very few strategies to control the release of cytokines that seems to be related to cancer pain. Nevertheless, in some cases, targeted drugs are available and in use for other diseases. In this paper, we aim to review the importance of cytokines in cancer pain and targeted strategies that can have an impact on controlling this symptom. PMID:26538839

  8. [Plant-Producers Of Recombinant Cytokines (Review)].

    PubMed

    Burlakovskii, M S; Yemel'yanov, V V; Lutova, L A

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines are a family of signaling polypeptides involved in cell-cell interactions in the process of the immune response, as well as in the regulation of a number of normal physiological functions. Cytokines are used in medicine for the treatment of cancer, immune disorders, viral infections, and other socially significant diseases, but the extent of their use is limited by the high production cost of the active agent. The development of this area of pharmacology is associated with the success of genetic engineering, which allows the production of significant amounts of protein by transgenic organisms. The review discusses the latest advances in the production of various cytokines with the use of genetically modified plants. PMID:27266244

  9. The cytokine network in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Alfano, M; Poli, G

    2002-12-01

    Cytokines are major controller of HIV replication and represent, at the same time, a target for viral-induced immune dysregulation. This mutual relationship has profound implications for both active HIV replication and immune-mediated governance of latency; in addition, cytokines have therapeutic value in the perspective of immune reconstitution. In the current article we will review the most relevant aspects emerged in almost 20 years of research in this area with particular reference to the distinct, but interconnected contribution of the most simple (cell lines) to the most complex (animal) models of HIV infection. PMID:12462389

  10. Cytokines in the perinatal period - Part II.

    PubMed

    Chau, A; Markley, J C; Juang, J; Tsen, L C

    2016-05-01

    A contemporary, robust immunologic explanation for common obstetric conditions remains elusive; why some pregnant women are more susceptible to developing preeclampsia or preterm labor is not completely understood. We explore the immunology behind four important and commonly encountered pregnancy-related conditions: preeclampsia, recurrent miscarriage, preterm labor and gestational diabetes. For each condition, we summarize the current understanding of cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis, discuss the impact of anesthesia and analgesia on selected cytokine profiles, and suggest potential opportunities for clinical and research interventions. PMID:26971652

  11. [Food irradiation].

    PubMed

    Migdał, W

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by Codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19MeV, 1 kW) and an industrial unit Elektronika (10MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permission for irradiation for: spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. PMID:8619113

  12. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  13. Cytokine Reduction in the Treatment of Joint Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Martel-Pelletier, J.; Otterness, I. G.; Pelletier, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The destruction of joints caused by rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis is characterized by an imbalance of enzyme catalysed cartilage breakdown and regeneration. A complex cytokine network perpetuates joint conditions by direct regulation of metalloproteases, by indirect recruitment of cells that secrete degradative enzymes, and by inhibition of reparative processes. The destructive action of cytokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α can be modulated at multiple points associated either with cytokine production or with cytokine action. Potential agents for cytokine reduction include selective anti-cytokine antibodies, anticytokine receptor antibodies, cytokine receptor antagonist proteins, and soluble and chimeric cytokine receptor molecules. Pharmacologic regulation of IL-1 and TNFα remain primary targets for treatment of arthritis, and results of early clinical trials are promising. However, the results of long-term clinical trials will be required to support the value of anti-cytokine therapy in treatment of arthritis. PMID:18472950

  14. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Y. H.; Kim, W.; Park, K. U.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) according to different activation protocols. Methods Two manual preparation procedures (single-spin (SS) at 900 g for five minutes; double-spin (DS) at 900 g for five minutes and then 1500 g for 15 minutes) were performed for each of 14 healthy subjects. Both preparations were tested for platelet activation by one of three activation protocols: no activation, activation with calcium (Ca) only, or calcium with a low dose (50 IU per 1 ml PRP) of thrombin. Each preparation was divided into four aliquots and incubated for one hour, 24 hours, 72 hours, and seven days. The cytokine-release kinetics were evaluated by assessing PDGF, TGF, VEGF, FGF, IL-1, and MMP-9 concentrations with bead-based sandwich immunoassay. Results The concentration of cytokine released from PRP varied over time and was influenced by various activation protocols. Ca-only activation had a significant effect on the DS PRPs (where the VEGF, FGF, and IL-1 concentrations were sustained) while Ca/thrombin activation had effects on both SS and DS PRPs (where the PDGF and VEGF concentrations were sustained and the TGF and FGF concentrations were short). The IL-1 content showed a significant increase with Ca-only or Ca/thrombin activation while these activations did not increase the MMP-9 concentration. Conclusion The SS and DS methods differed in their effect on cytokine release, and this effect varied among the cytokines analysed. In addition, low dose of thrombin/calcium activation increased the overall cytokine release of the PRP preparations over seven days, relative to that with a calcium-only supplement or non-activation. Cite this article: Professor J. H. Oh. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:37–45. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000540 PMID:26862077

  15. Effect of acetazolamide on cytokines in rats exposed to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang; Wang, Rong; Xie, Hua; Sun, Yuhuan; Tao, Rui; Liu, Wenqing; Li, Wenbin; Lu, Hui; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-07-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a dangerous hypoxic illness that can affect humans who rapidly reach a high altitude above 2500m. In the study, we investigated the changes of cytokines induced by plateau, and the acetazolamide (ACZ) influenced the cytokines in rats exposed to high altitude. Wistar rats were divided into low altitude (Control), high altitude (HA), and high altitude+ACZ (22.33mg/kg, Bid) (HA+ACZ) group. The rats were acute exposed to high altitude at 4300m for 3days. The HA+ACZ group were given ACZ by intragastric administration. The placebo was equal volume saline. The results showed that hypoxia caused the heart, liver and lung damage, compared with the control group. Supplementation with ACZ significantly alleviated hypoxia-caused damage to the main organs. Compared with the HA group, the biochemical and blood gas indicators of the HA+ACZ group showed no difference, while some cytokines have significantly changed, such as activin A, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54), interleukin-1α,2 (IL-1α,2), l-selectin, monocyte chemotactic factor (MCP-1), CC chemokines (MIP-3α) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1). Then, the significant difference pro-inflammatory cytokines in protein array were chosen for further research. The protein and mRNA content of pro-inflammatory cytokines MCP-1, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in rat lung were detected. The results demonstrated that the high altitude affected the body's physiological and biochemical parameters, but, ACZ did not change those parameters of the hypoxia rats. This study found that ACZ could decrease the content of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as MCP-1, IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ in rat lungs, and, the lung injury in the HA+ACZ group reduced. The mechanism that ACZ protected hypoxia rats might be related to changes in cytokine content. The reducing of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in rat lung might be other

  16. Pro-inflammatory cytokines downregulate Hsp27 and cause apoptosis of human retinal capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nahomi, Rooban B.; Palmer, Allison; Roth, Katelyn E.; Fort, Patrice E.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of acellular capillaries in the retina, a hallmark feature of diabetic retinopathy, is caused by apoptosis of endothelial cells and pericytes. The biochemical mechanism of such apoptosis remains unclear. Small heat shock proteins play an important role in the regulation of apoptosis. In the diabetic retina, pro-inflammatory cytokines are upregulated. In this study, we investigated the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on small heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) in human retinal endothelial cells (HREC). In HREC cultured in the presence of cytokine mixtures (CM), a significant downregulation of Hsp27 at the protein and mRNA level occurred, with no effect on HSF-1, the transcription factor for Hsp27. The presence of high glucose (25 mM) amplified the effects of cytokines on Hsp27. CM activated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and enhanced the production of kynurenine and ROS. An inhibitor of IDO, 1-methyl tryptophan (MT), inhibited the effects of CM on Hsp27. CM also upregulated NOS2 and, consequently, nitric oxide (NO). A NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, and a ROS scavenger blocked the CM-mediated Hsp27 downregulation. While a NO donor in the culture medium did not decrease the Hsp27 content, a peroxynitrite donor and exogenous peroxynitrite did. The cytokines and high glucose-induced apoptosis of HREC were inhibited by MT and L-NAME. Downregulation of Hsp27 by a siRNA treatment promoted apoptosis in HREC. Together, these data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines induce the formation of ROS and NO, which, through the formation of peroxynitrite, reduce the Hsp27 content and bring about apoptosis of retinal capillary endothelial cells. PMID:24252613

  17. Cancer Therapeutic Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Are Associated with Oxidative Stress and Cytokine Induction.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Rina; Luo, Yi; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered to influence the inflammatory process; however, the precise mechanism and the significance in tumors are still not clear. In this study, when CT26 and LL2 mouse cancer cells were treated with 6-nm anatase titanium dioxide NPs (TDNPs) without ultraviolet irradiation, oxidative stress and induction of inflammatory cytokines were observed. Oxidative stress was further increased by disease-associated conditions such as high glucose concentrations and hypoxia. Inhaled or orally administered TDNPs generated granulomatous lesions in the lungs and colon of the rodent models tested, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also found in cancer cells treated with gold or carbon black NPs. Treatment of CT26 cells with 10- to 70-nm rutile TDNPs showed that smaller NPs produced more oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines than larger ones did. To avoid diffusion of TDNPs and to minimize toxicity, 10-nm TDNPs were suspended in a collagen gel inserted into a subcutaneous tumor in a CT26 mouse. A single TDNP treatment via this method inhibited tumor growth in a size- and dose-dependent manner, and resulted in lower levels of urinary 8-OHdG when compared to systemically administered TDNPs. These findings suggest that TDNPs might be useful for the local treatment of tumors. PMID:26485713

  18. Evaluation of reduced allergenicity of irradiated peanut extract using splenocytes from peanut-sensitized mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sejo; Jang, Da-In; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Soo-Young

    2009-07-01

    Peanut (PN) allergy is one of the most serious forms of IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity. Gamma irradiation has been widely used for the preservation of food. The results of our previous studies showed that the IgE-binding capacity to several antigens were profoundly reduced after gamma irradiation. In this study, we evaluated the changes of allergenecity and cytokine production profiles after exposure of irradiated PN extract in a PN-allergy mouse model. Mice were sensitized to PN extract by intragastric administration on days 0, 1, 2, and 7, and then challenged on day 21. Four weeks later, we evaluated the cytokine production patterns and proliferation responses of splenocytes that were stimulated with intact PN extract, compared to 10 and 50 kGy irradiated PN extract. When the cells were stimulated with 10 kGy of irradiated PN extract, a higher level of production of IFN-γ and IL-10 cytokines was observed. However, stimulation with 50 kGy of irradiated PN extract resulted in a higher level of production of only IFN-γ cytokines. In addition, the Th1/Th2 ratio increased in response to treatment with gamma-irradiated PNs. The results of this study show that the allergenicity of PN extracts could be reduced by gamma irradiation which caused downregulation of Th2 lymphocyte activity in the PN-sensitized mice.

  19. Cytokine therapeutics: lessons from interferon alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Gutterman, J U

    1994-01-01

    Cytokines are soluble proteins that allow for communication between cells and the external environment. Interferon (IFN) alpha, the first cytokine to be produced by recombinant DNA technology, has emerged as an important regulator of growth and differentiation, affecting cellular communication and signal transduction pathways as well as immunological control. This review focuses on the biological and clinical activities of the cytokine. Originally discovered as an antiviral substance, the efficacy of IFN-alpha in malignant, viral, immunological, angiogenic, inflammatory, and fibrotic diseases suggests a spectrum of interrelated pathophysiologies. The principles learned from in vivo studies will be discussed, particularly hairy cell leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, certain angiogenic diseases, and hepatitis. After the surprising discovery of activity in a rare B-cell neoplasm, IFN-alpha emerged as a prototypic tumor suppressor protein that represses the clinical tumorigenic phenotype in some malignancies capable of differentiation. Regulatory agencies throughout the world have approved IFN-alpha for treatment of 13 malignant and viral disorders. The principles established with this cytokine serve as a paradigm for future development of natural proteins for human disease. PMID:8108387

  20. Cytokines as biomarkers of nanoparticle immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale objects, whether of biologic origin or synthetically created, are being developed into devices for a variety of bionanotechnology diagnostic and pharmaceutical applications. However, the potential immunotoxicity of these nanomaterials and mechanisms by which they may induce adverse reactions have not received sufficient attention. Nanomaterials, depending on their characteristics and compositions, can interact with the immune system in several ways and either enhance or suppress immune system function. Cytokines perform pleiotropic functions to mediate and regulate the immune response and are generally recognized as biomarkers of immunotoxicity. While the specificity and validity of certain cytokines as markers of adverse immune response has been established for chemicals, small and macromolecular drugs, research on their applicability for predicting and monitoring the immunotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials is still ongoing. The goal of this review is to provide guidelines as to important cytokines that can be utilized for evaluating the immunotoxicity of nanomaterials and to highlight the role of those cytokines in mediating adverse reactions, which is of particular importance for the clinical development of nanopharmaceuticals and other nanotechnology-based products. Importantly, the rational design of nanomaterials of low immunotoxicity will be discussed, focusing on synthetic nanodevices, with emphasis on both the nanoparticle-forming materials and the embedded cargoes. PMID:23549679

  1. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to explore further the effects of space flight on cyotokines and cytokine-directed immunological function. Among the tests carried out are interferon-alpha production, interferon-gamma production, interleukin-1 and -2 production, signal transduction in neutrophils, signal transduction in monocytes, and monocyte phagocytic activity. The experiments will be performed using peripheral blood obtained from human subjects. It is our intent to eventually carry out these experiments using astronauts as subjects to determine the effects of space flight on cytokine production and activity. However, these subjects are not currently available. Until they become available, we will carry out these experiments using subjects maintained in the bed-rest model for microgravity.

  2. [Cytokines in the treatment of blood diseases].

    PubMed

    Robak, T

    1995-01-01

    Cytokines are a class of signal peptides which represent a major communication network in living organism. Over the last decade, the discovery, cloning and purification of hematopoietic cytokines (interleukins, hematopoietic growth factors) has increased our understanding of the regulation, proliferation, differentiation and function of hematopoietic cells. More recently, the large scale production of the recombinant forms of these molecules has enabled to treat the patients with pharmacologic doses of cytokines. The therapeutic activity of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) has been demonstrated in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia and other chronic myeloproliferative syndromes. IFN-gamma is useful in the prevention of infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease. Erythropoietin (EPO) was the first hematopoietic growth factor available for clinical use, initially to treat anaemia in renal failure patients. The next cytokines introduced into the clinic were granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF). They are used successfully in haematological malignant disorders to stimulate granulopoiesis after chemotherapy or bone marrow transplantation and to help mobilise marrow stem cells for peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Interleukin (IL)-1, -2, -3, -4, -6 and -11 have been tested in clinical trials. However, the value of these agents remains to be established. PMID:7544526

  3. CYTOKINE PROFILING FOR CHEMICAL RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CYTOKINE PROFILING FOR CHEMICAL RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS. LM Plitnick1, SE Loveless2, GS Ladics2, MP Holsapple3, MJ Selgrade4, DM Sailstad4 & RJ Smialowicz4. 1UNC, Chapel Hill, NC; 2DuPont Co., Haskell Laboratory, Newark, DE; 3Dow Chemical, Midland, MI & 4USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC.

  4. Cytokine levels as biomarkers for leptospirosis patients.

    PubMed

    Chirathaworn, C; Supputtamongkol, Y; Lertmaharit, S; Poovorawan, Y

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory mediators were suggested to be biomarkers for prediction of disease severity. In this study, we investigated the levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α in leptospirosis patients with mild or severe illnesses. Sera samples were divided into two groups. The OI group and NOI groups included sera from patients with and without organ involvement, respectively. Each group consisted of 20 pairs of sera. Twenty-five sera from healthy individuals were included as controls. Cytokine levels were compared. Although IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels in acute sera from the OI group were significantly higher than NOI group, only IL-8 level was significantly higher in the OI group when cytokine levels in convalescent sera were compared. TNF-α, an inflammatory cytokine widely studied in leptospirosis was not significantly different between two groups of patients. Our data suggested that IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 were involved in disease severity. However, time of specimen collection could affect the significant levels of cytokines especially as biomarkers for monitoring disease severity. PMID:27295614

  5. Workers’ cytokines profiling upon exposure to MWCNT aerosol in occupational settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatkhutdinova, L. M.; Khaliullin, T. O.; Zalyalov, R. R.; Vasilyeva, O. L.; Valeeva, I. Kh; Mustafin, I. G.

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have found that upon pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) animals develop primarily fibrosis and granulomas in lungs. In vitro and in vivo studies also give reason to assume that local exposure could be related to remote effects, including immune system and the endothelium. To investigate the remote effect hypothesis, we have analyzed blood, nasal lavage and induced sputum samples taken from workers in the frame of the Russian epidemiological study on Carbon Nanotubes Exposure and Risk Assessment (CNT-ERA). In serum and nasal lavage no significant differences between exposure and control groups were observed with a high variability to the cytokines content. In the samples of induced sputum from exposed workers the content of IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a, IL-4, IL-5, IFN-g exceeded the control group values, but after the regression models construction and bootstrap analysis, significant differences were found only for IL-1b. This study could not provide evidences of blood cytokines changes following local cytokine production in airways in workers exposed to MWCNTs. Cytokines variability in serum and nasal lavage may indicate the absence of severe systemic inflammatory response upon the existing occupational exposure to MWCNTs. Other systemic responses (including allergy-like or autoimmune reactions) should be regarded as well.

  6. Irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  7. Irradiance gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.J. Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne ); Heckbert, P.S. . School of Computer Science Technische Hogeschool Delft . Dept. of Technical Mathematics and Informatics)

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques.

  8. Temporal Onset of Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress After Pulmonary Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fleckenstein, Katharina; Zgonjanin, Larisa; Chen Liguang; Rabbani, Zahid; Jackson, Isabel L.; Thrasher, Bradley; Kirkpatrick, John; Foster, W. Michael; Vujaskovic, Zeljko . E-mail: vujas@radonc.duke.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the temporal onset of hypoxia following irradiation, and to show how it relates to pulmonary vascular damage, macrophage accumulation, and the production of reactive oxygen species and cytokines. Our previous studies showed that tissue hypoxia in the lung after irradiation contributed to radiation-induced injury. Methods and Materials: Female Fisher 344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax with a single dose of 28 Gy. Serial studies were performed up to 20 weeks following irradiation. Radionuclide lung-perfusion studies were performed to detect changes in pulmonary vasculature. Immunohistochemical studies were conducted to study macrophages, tissue hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase-9 marker), oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and the expression of profibrogenic (transforming growth factor-{beta} [TGF-{beta}]) and proangiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) cytokines. Results: Significant changes in lung perfusion along with tissue hypoxia were observed 3 days after irradiation. Significant oxidative stress was detected 1 week after radiation, whereas macrophages started to accumulate at 4 weeks. A significant increase in TGF-{beta} expression was seen within 1 day after radiation, and for VEGF at 2 weeks after radiation. Levels of hypoxia, oxidative stress, and both cytokines continued to rise with time after irradiation. The steepest increase correlated with vast macrophage accumulation. Conclusions: Early changes in lung perfusion, among other factors initiate, the development of hypoxia and chronic oxidative stress after irradiation. Tissue hypoxia is associated with a significant increase in the activation of macrophages and their continuous production of reactive oxygen species, stimulating the production of fibrogenic and angiogenic cytokines, and maintaining the development of chronic radiation-induced lung injury.

  9. In vitro modulation of inflammatory cytokine and IgG levels by extracts of Perna canaliculus

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Sachin; Lawson, John W

    2006-01-01

    Background Inflammation is a predominant characteristic of autoimmune diseases which is characterized by the increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Soon to be published work from our laboratory has shown that ingestion of Perna canaliculus prevents the development of autoimmune diseases such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis in laboratory animals. The current paper attempts to illustrate how Perna can alleviate inflammation by modulating inflammatory cytokines, cyclooxygenase enzymes and Immunoglobulin-G (IgG) levels. Methods In the present study, hydrochloric acid [HCl] and Tween-20 were used to develop extracts of Perna. These extracts were assayed for protein content. Increasing concentrations of these extracts were then tested in cell culture for modulation of inflammatory cytokine, cyclooxygenase enzymes and IgG levels. Parallel tests were run using an available glycogen extract of Perna as a comparison to our in-house laboratory preparations. Results Tween-20 Perna extracts were found to be more stable and less toxic in cell culture than HCl digest of Perna. They also assayed higher in protein content that HCl extracts. Although both extracts inhibited IgG production in V2E9 hybridomas, Tween-20 extracts were more consistent in IgG suppression than HCl extracts. Overall Tween-20 extracts effectively decreased levels of TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2 and IL-6 as observed using cytokine bioassays. Twenty micrograms of Tween-20 Perna extracts induced such significant decreases in inflammatory cytokine production that when tested on sensitive cell lines, they very nearly abolished the decrease in viability induced by these cytokines. Tween-20 extracts effectively inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2 cyclooxygenase activity. As a comparison, the glycogen extract also demonstrated a similar though weaker effect on COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. The active components of both extracts (Tween-20 and glycogen) were observed to possess molecular weights

  10. Alteration of somatotropic function by proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Frost, R A; Lang, C H

    2004-01-01

    Infections direct amino acids away from growth and skeletal muscle accretion toward the hepatic synthesis of acute-phase proteins. The loss of skeletal muscle protein stores results in both a decrease in muscle function and an increase in mortality. In general, muscle protein synthesis is decreased in rodent models of sepsis, as well as after the injection of components of the bacterial cell wall, such as lipopolysaccharide. Although the overexpression of proinflammatory cytokines is known to hasten the loss of skeletal muscle protein, it is not known whether this represents a direct effect of cytokines or results from secondary changes in the IGF system. Plasma concentrations of IGF-I are dramatically lowered by infection in rats, mice, pigs, and steers. The drop in IGF-I often occurs despite an increase in the plasma concentration of somatotropin. Animals are therefore considered to be GH resistant. The IGF bioactivity is determined not only by the plasma concentration of the ligand, but also by IGFBP; IGFBP-3 is the most abundant of these binding proteins and undergoes proteolysis during some catabolic states. In contrast to IGFBP-3, the plasma concentration of inhibitory IGFBP, such as IGFBP-1, is increased during infection. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 accumulates in skeletal muscle, where it can potentially inhibit IGF-dependent protein synthesis. Insulin-like growth factor-I and IGFBP-1 are regulated at the level of gene transcription by proinflammatory cytokines. Recent studies demonstrate that bacterial components that activate immune cells also activate the innate immune response in skeletal muscle. Lipopolysaccharide increases proinflammatory cytokine messenger RNA expression in muscle from control mice, but not from mice with a mutation in the lipopolysaccharide receptor. Lipopolysaccharide also increases cytokine expression in human and mouse myoblasts. Local expression of cytokines in skeletal muscle may negatively regulate the

  11. Cytokine Correlations in Youth with Tic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parker-Athill, E. Carla; Ehrhart, Jared; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Studies have noted immunological disruptions in patients with tic disorders, including increased serum cytokine levels. This study aimed to determine whether or not cytokine levels could be correlated with tic symptom severity in patients with a diagnosed tic disorder. Methods: Twenty-one patients, ages 4–17 years (average 10.63±2.34 years, 13 males), with a clinical diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome (TS) or chronic tic disorder (CTD), were selected based on having clinic visits that coincided with a tic symptom exacerbation and a remission. Ratings of tic severity were assessed using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) and serum cytokine levels (interleukin [IL]-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, interferon [IFN]-γ, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) were measured using Luminex xMAP technology. Results: During tic symptom exacerbation, patients had higher median serum TNF-α levels (z=−1.962, p=0.05), particularly those on antipsychotics (U=9.00, p=0.033). Increased IL-13 was also associated with antipsychotic use during exacerbation (U=4.00, p=0.043) despite being negatively correlated to tic severity scores (ρ=−0.599, p=018), whereas increased IL-5 was associated with antibiotic use (U=6.5, p=0.035). During tic symptom remission, increased serum IL-4 levels were associated with antipsychotic (U=6.00, p=0.047) and antibiotic (U=1.00, p=0.016) use, whereas increased IL-12p70 (U=4.00, p=0.037) was associated with antibiotic use. Conclusions: These findings suggest a role for cytokine dysregulation in the pathogenesis of tic disorders. It also points toward the mechanistic involvement and potential diagnostic utility of cytokine monitoring, particularly TNF-α levels. Larger, systematic studies are necessary to further delineate the role of cytokines and medication influences on immunological profiling in tic disorders. PMID:25658821

  12. Irradiated foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... it reduces the risk of food poisoning . Food irradiation is used in many countries. It was first approved in the U.S. to prevent sprouts on white potatoes, and to control insects on wheat and in certain spices and seasonings.

  13. Suppression of Cytokine Signaling: the SOCS perspective

    PubMed Central

    Linossi, Edmond M.; Babon, Jeffrey J.; Hilton, Douglas J.; Nicholson, Sandra E.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the Suppressor Of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) family of proteins has resulted in a significant body of research dedicated to dissecting their biological functions and the molecular mechanisms by which they achieve potent and specific inhibition of cytokine and growth factor signaling. The Australian contribution to this field has been substantial, with the initial discovery of SOCS1 by Hilton, Starr and colleagues (discovered concurrently by two other groups) and the following work, providing a new perspective on the regulation of JAK/STAT signaling. In this review, we reflect on the critical discoveries that have lead to our current understanding of how SOCS proteins function and discuss what we see as important questions for future research. PMID:23545160

  14. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Role of Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G.; Maor, Yaakov; Nanau, Radu M.; Melzer, Ehud; Mell, Haim; Opris, Mihai; Cohen, Lawrence; Malnick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The present review spans a broad spectrum of topics dealing with alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including clinical and translational research. It focuses on the role of the immune system and the signaling pathways of cytokines in the pathogenesis of ALD. An additional factor that contributes to the pathogenesis of ALD is lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which plays a central role in the induction of steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the liver. LPS derived from the intestinal microbiota enters the portal circulation, and is recognized by macrophages (Kupffer cells) and hepatocytes. In individuals with ALD, excessive levels of LPS in the liver affect immune, parenchymal, and non-immune cells, which in turn release various inflammatory cytokines and recruit neutrophils and other inflammatory cells. In this review, we elucidate the mechanisms by which alcohol contributes to the activation of Kupffer cells and the inflammatory cascade. The role of the stellate cells in fibrogenesis is also discussed. PMID:26343741

  15. Alteration of cytokine profile following hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sumin; Aguilar, Alex; Subramani, Kumar; Poulose, Ninu; Ayub, Ahmar; Raju, Raghavan

    2016-05-01

    Hemorrhage is one of the leading causes of death in patients with trauma. We recently demonstrated that resveratrol can improve cardiac function and prolong life following severe hemorrhagic injury (HI) in a rat model. The present work is focused on determining changes in NF-κB dependent gene expression in the heart and the systemic cytokine milieu following HI and the effect of resveratrol treatment. The results indicate an increase in phosphorylated NF-κB in the heart with a concomitant increase in the expression of NF-κB dependent genes following HI. There was also a significant increase of systemic cytokine levels, both pro and anti-inflammatory, following HI and resolution when treated with resveratrol. This study demonstrates the potential role NF-κB has in the physiological response to HI and the effectiveness of resveratrol in reducing immune activation. PMID:26851979

  16. Cytokines in Schizophrenia: Hope or Hype?

    PubMed Central

    Koola, Maju Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Although there is a cumulative evidence for the inflammation pathophysiology in schizophrenia, it has not been conclusively proven yet. One reason for this is the lack of studies that have controlled for major confounding factors such as obesity, smoking, antipsychotic use, and stress. The studies in which the major confounding factors were controlled were done in subjects in acute relapse and in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. To date, no studies have been done in stable outpatients with schizophrenia controlling for major confounding factors. Data on cerebrospinal fluid cytokines in large sample independent of confounding factors are also lacking. The efficacy signal from anti-inflammatory medications in schizophrenia has been modest. In this study, the inconsistent and nonvalidated cytokine findings independent of the confounding factors are discussed. PMID:27114618

  17. Inflammatory cytokines in atherosclerosis: current therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Economou, Evangelos K; Crea, Filippo; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The notion of atherosclerosis as a chronic inflammatory disease has intensified research on the role of cytokines and the way these molecules act and interact to initiate and sustain inflammation in the microenvironment of an atherosclerotic plaque. Cytokines are expressed by all types of cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, act on a variety of targets exerting multiple effects, and are largely responsible for the crosstalk among endothelial, smooth muscle cells, leucocytes, and other vascular residing cells. It is now understood that widely used drugs such as statins, aspirin, methotrexate, and colchicine act in an immunomodulatory way that may beneficially affect atherogenesis and/or cardiovascular disease progression. Moreover, advancement in pharmaceutical design has enabled the production of highly specific antibodies against key molecules involved in the perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade, raising hope for advances in the treatment of atherosclerosis. This review describes the actions and effects of these agents, their potential clinical significance, and future prospects. PMID:26843277

  18. Cytokines and Other Mediators in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriou, Stamatis; Papafragkaki, Dafni; Kontochristopoulos, George; Rallis, Eustathios; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia areata, a disease of the hair follicles with multifactorial etiology and a strong component of autoimmune origin, has been extensively studied as far as the role of several cytokines is concerned. So far, IFN-γ, interleukins, TNF-α, are cytokines that are well known to play a major role in the pathogenesis of the disease, while several studies have shown that many more pathways exist. Among them, MIG, IP-10, BAFF, HLA antigens, MIG, as well as stress hormones are implicated in disease onset and activity. Within the scope of this paper, the authors attempt to shed light upon the complexity of alopecia areata underlying mechanisms and indicate pathways that may suggest future treatments. PMID:20300578

  19. Cytokine profile of conditioned medium from human tumor cell lines after acute and fractionated doses of gamma radiation and its effect on survival of bystander tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Laskar, S; Pandey, B N

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play pivotal roles in cancer initiation, progression and pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences suggest differences in basal and stress-induced cytokine profiles of cancers with diverse origin. However, a comprehensive investigation characterising the cytokine profile of various tumor types after acute and fractionated doses of gamma-irradiation, and its effect on survival of bystander cells is not well known in literature. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytokine secretion profile of human tumor cell lines (HT1080, U373MG, HT29, A549 and MCF-7) either before (basal) or after acute (2, 6 Gy) and fractionated doses (3×2 Gy) of gamma-irradiation in culture medium obtained from these cells by multiplex bead array/ELISA. Moreover, clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on the survival and growth of respective cells. Based on the screening of 28 analytes, our results showed that the basal profiles of these cell lines varied considerably in terms of the number and magnitude of secreted factors, which was minimum in MCF-7. Interestingly, TNF-α, IL-1β, PDGF-AA, TGF-β1, fractalkine, IL-8, VEGF and GCSF were found in CM of all the cell lines. However, secretion of certain cytokines was cell line-specific. Moreover, CM caused increase in clonogenic survival of respective tumor cells (in the order HT1080>U373MG>HT29>A549>MCF-7), which was correlated with the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF and VEGF in their CM. After irradiation, the levels of most of the cytokines increased markedly in a dose dependent manner. The fold change in cytokine levels was lower in irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) of tumor cells collected after fractionated than respective acute dose, except in MCF-7. Interestingly, amongst these cell lines, the radiation-induced fold increase in cytokine levels was maximum in ICM of A549 cells. Moreover, bystander A549 cells treated with respective ICM showed dose dependent

  20. The association between cytokines and intestinal mucosal immunity among broilers fed on diets supplemented with fluorine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qin; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Liu, Juan; Wu, Bangyuan; Deng, Yubing

    2013-05-01

    Fluorine (F) bioaccumulation has been reported in the organs and tissues of organisms, including intestine. The intestinal mucosa is very important to the immune development. Meanwhile, cytokines are present in the normal intestinal mucosal and play an important role in the immune function. Thus, changes of the cytokine contents are related to the state of intestinal mucosal immunity. In this study, we investigated the changes in contents of cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) induced by dietary high F in the mucosa of different parts of intestines (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A total of 280 one-day-old healthy avian broilers were randomly divided into four groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet (F 22.6 mg/kg) or the same basal diet supplemented with 400, 800, and 1,200 mg F/kg (high F groups I, II, and III) in the form of sodium fluoride for 42 days. The experimental data showed that the contents of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IFN-γ, and TNF-α in the intestinal mucosa were significantly decreased in the high F groups II and III when compared with those of the control group from 14 to 42 days of age. It was concluded that dietary F in the range of 800-1,200 mg/kg significantly reduced the contents of aforementioned cytokines in the intestinal mucosa of broilers, which could impact the function of intestinal mucosal immunity through the pathways that decreased the lymphocyte population and/or lymphocyte activation. PMID:23354543

  1. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mager, Lukas F; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27148488

  2. Cytokines as Biomarkers in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Burska, Agata; Boissinot, Marjorie; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    RA is a complex disease that develops as a series of events often referred to as disease continuum. RA would benefit from novel biomarker development for diagnosis where new biomarkers are still needed (even if progresses have been made with the inclusion of ACPA into the ACR/EULAR 2010 diagnostic criteria) and for prognostic notably in at risk of evolution patients with autoantibody-positive arthralgia. Risk biomarkers for rapid evolution or cardiovascular complications are also highly desirable. Monitoring biomarkers would be useful in predicting relapse. Finally, predictive biomarkers for therapy outcome would allow tailoring therapy to the individual. Increasing numbers of cytokines have been involved in RA pathology. Many have the potential as biomarkers in RA especially as their clinical utility is already established in other diseases and could be easily transferable to rheumatology. We will review the current knowledge's relation to cytokine used as biomarker in RA. However, given the complexity and heterogeneous nature of RA, it is unlikely that a single cytokine may provide sufficient discrimination; therefore multiple biomarker signatures may represent more realistic approach for the future of personalised medicine in RA. PMID:24733962

  3. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T.; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27148488

  4. Interleukin-10 and related cytokines and receptors.

    PubMed

    Pestka, Sidney; Krause, Christopher D; Sarkar, Devanand; Walter, Mark R; Shi, Yufang; Fisher, Paul B

    2004-01-01

    The Class 2 alpha-helical cytokines consist of interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24 (Mda-7), and IL-26, interferons (IFN-alpha, -beta, -epsilon, -kappa, -omega, -delta, -tau, and -gamma) and interferon-like molecules (limitin, IL-28A, IL-28B, and IL-29). The interaction of these cytokines with their specific receptor molecules initiates a broad and varied array of signals that induce cellular antiviral states, modulate inflammatory responses, inhibit or stimulate cell growth, produce or inhibit apoptosis, and affect many immune mechanisms. The information derived from crystal structures and molecular evolution has led to progress in the analysis of the molecular mechanisms initiating their biological activities. These cytokines have significant roles in a variety of pathophysiological processes as well as in regulation of the immune system. Further investigation of these critical intercellular signaling molecules will provide important information to enable these proteins to be used more extensively in therapy for a variety of diseases. PMID:15032600

  5. Cytokine disbalance in common human cancers.

    PubMed

    Culig, Zoran

    2011-02-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6, -4, and -8 levels have been elevated in most patients suffering from prostate, breast, or colon cancer. There is a large body of evidence suggesting that chronic inflammation is one of the etiologic factors in these tumors. IL-6 is a multifunctional cytokine which is known to influence proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis in cancer. Its transcription factor STAT3 is known as an oncogene that is constitutively phosphorylated in these malignancies. However, IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation may result in growth arrest. IL-6 activation of androgen receptor in prostate cancer may yield either tumor cell proliferation or differentiation. Prolonged treatment with IL-6 results in generation of sublines which express a more malignant phenotype. Therapy options against IL-6 have been established and the antibody siltuximab has been applied in preclinical and clinical studies. Recently, investigations of the role of suppressors of cytokine signaling have been carried out. IL-4 and -8 are implicated in regulation of apoptosis, migration, and angiogenesis in cancers associated with chronic inflammation. All cytokines mentioned above regulate cellular events in stem cells. These cells could not be targeted by most conventional cancer therapies. PMID:21167870

  6. Metoprolol Reduces Proinflammatory Cytokines and Atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ulleryd, Marcus A.; Bernberg, Evelina; Yang, Li Jin; Bergström, Göran M. L.; Johansson, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    A few studies in animals and humans suggest that metoprolol (β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist) may have a direct antiatherosclerotic effect. However, the mechanism behind this protective effect has not been established. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of metoprolol on development of atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice and investigate its effect on the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Male ApoE−/− mice were treated with metoprolol (2.5 mg/kg/h) or saline for 11 weeks via osmotic minipumps. Atherosclerosis was assessed in thoracic aorta and aortic root. Total cholesterol levels and Th1/Th2 cytokines were analyzed in serum and macrophage content in lesions by immunohistochemistry. Metoprolol significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque area in thoracic aorta (P < 0.05 versus Control). Further, metoprolol reduced serum TNFα and the chemokine CXCL1 (P < 0.01 versus Control for both) as well as decreasing the macrophage content in the plaques (P < 0.01 versus Control). Total cholesterol levels were not affected. In this study we found that a moderate dose of metoprolol significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque area in thoracic aorta of ApoE−/− mice. Metoprolol also decreased serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα and CXCL1 and macrophage content in the plaques, showing that metoprolol has an anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:25105129

  7. Cytokine Activation by Antibody Fragments Targeted to Cytokine-Receptor Signaling Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kuruganti, Srilalitha; Miersch, Shane; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Speir, Jeffrey A; Harris, Bethany D; Schriewer, Jill M; Buller, R Mark L; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Walter, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous cytokine therapy can induce systemic toxicity, which might be prevented by activating endogenously produced cytokines in local cell niches. Here we developed antibody-based activators of cytokine signaling (AcCS), which recognize cytokines only when they are bound to their cell surface receptors. AcCS were developed for type I interferons (IFNs), which induce cellular activities by binding to cell surface receptors IFNAR1 and IFNAR2. As a potential alternative to exogenous IFN therapy, AcCS were shown to potentiate the biological activities of natural IFNs by ∼100-fold. Biochemical and structural characterization demonstrates that the AcCS stabilize the IFN-IFNAR2 binary complex by recognizing an IFN-induced conformational change in IFNAR2. Using IFN mutants that disrupt IFNAR1 binding, AcCS were able to enhance IFN antiviral potency without activating antiproliferative responses. This suggests AcCS can be used to manipulate cytokine signaling for basic science and possibly for therapeutic applications. PMID:26546677

  8. A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Alpha- (α-) particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF) was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific. PMID:22619631

  9. Regulation of cytokines by small RNAs during skin inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Intercellular signaling by cytokines is a vital feature of the innate immune system. In skin, an inflammatory response is mediated by cytokines and an entwined network of cellular communication between T-cells and epidermal keratinocytes. Dysregulated cytokine production, orchestrated by activated T-cells homing to the skin, is believed to be the main cause of psoriasis, a common inflammatory skin disorder. Cytokines are heavily regulated at the transcriptional level, but emerging evidence suggests that regulatory mechanisms that operate after transcription play a key role in balancing the production of cytokines. Herein, we review the nature of cytokine signaling in psoriasis with particular emphasis on regulation by mRNA destabilizing elements and the potential targeting of cytokine-encoding mRNAs by miRNAs. The proposed linkage between mRNA decay mediated by AU-rich elements and miRNA association is described and discussed as a possible general feature of cytokine regulation in skin. Moreover, we describe the latest attempts to therapeutically target cytokines at the RNA level in psoriasis by exploiting the cellular RNA interference machinery. The applicability of cytokine-encoding mRNAs as future clinical drug targets is evaluated, and advances and obstacles related to topical administration of RNA-based drugs targeting the cytokine circuit in psoriasis are described. PMID:20594301

  10. Multiple Circulating Cytokines Are Coelevated in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Senthooran; Todd, Ian; Tighe, Patrick J; John, Michelle; Bolton, Charlotte E; Harrison, Timothy; Fairclough, Lucy C

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers, including cytokines, are associated with COPD, but the association of particular circulating cytokines with systemic pathology remains equivocal. To investigate this, we developed a protein microarray system to detect multiple cytokines in small volumes of serum. Fourteen cytokines were measured in serum from never-smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers, and COPD patients (GOLD stages 1-3). Certain individual circulating cytokines (particularly TNFα and IL-1β) were significantly elevated in concentration in the serum of particular COPD patients (and some current/ex-smokers without COPD) and may serve as markers of particularly significant systemic inflammation. However, numerous circulating cytokines were raised such that their combined, but not individual, elevation was significantly associated with severity of disease, and these may be further indicators of, and contributors to, the systemic inflammatory manifestations of COPD. The coelevation of numerous circulating cytokines in COPD is consistent with the insidious development, chronic nature, and systemic comorbidities of the disease. PMID:27524865

  11. Multiple Circulating Cytokines Are Coelevated in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ian; John, Michelle; Bolton, Charlotte E.; Harrison, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers, including cytokines, are associated with COPD, but the association of particular circulating cytokines with systemic pathology remains equivocal. To investigate this, we developed a protein microarray system to detect multiple cytokines in small volumes of serum. Fourteen cytokines were measured in serum from never-smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers, and COPD patients (GOLD stages 1–3). Certain individual circulating cytokines (particularly TNFα and IL-1β) were significantly elevated in concentration in the serum of particular COPD patients (and some current/ex-smokers without COPD) and may serve as markers of particularly significant systemic inflammation. However, numerous circulating cytokines were raised such that their combined, but not individual, elevation was significantly associated with severity of disease, and these may be further indicators of, and contributors to, the systemic inflammatory manifestations of COPD. The coelevation of numerous circulating cytokines in COPD is consistent with the insidious development, chronic nature, and systemic comorbidities of the disease. PMID:27524865

  12. How does Chinese medicine target cytokine imbalance in rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Sun, Yue

    2013-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) manifests as an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Cytokine imbalance is suggested to play critical roles in the development of RA. Currently, various treatments for RA, including biological agents such as antibodies against inflammation mediators, or Chinese herbal medicines, intervene the disease by restoring the balance of cytokines. Chinese medicine (CM) can not only suppress the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but also induce the expression of cytokines with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Thus, Chinese medicine can effectively reduce inflammatory cell infiltration into synovial tissue, pannus formation, and degradation of the extracellular matrix surrounding cartilage cells, thereby reducing subchondral bone damage. This paper reviews the changes of cytokine profiling during development of RA and discuss the mechanisms by which Chinese medicine restores the cytokine balance. PMID:24170633

  13. Bystander Effects Induced by Medium From Irradiated Cells: Similar Transcriptome Responses in Irradiated and Bystander K562 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Herok, Robert; Konopacka, Maria; Polanska, Joanna; Swierniak, Andrzej; Rogolinski, Jacek; Jaksik, Roman; Hancock, Ronald; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Cells exposed to ionizing radiation release factors that induce deoxyribonucleic acid damage, chromosomal instability, apoptosis, and changes in the proliferation rate of neighboring unexposed cells, phenomena known as bystander effects. This work analyzes and compares changes in global transcript levels induced by direct irradiation and by bystander effects in K562 (human erythroleukemia) cells. Methods and Materials: Cells were X-irradiated with 4 Gy or transferred into culture medium collected from cells 1 h after irradiation (irradiation-conditioned medium). Global transcript profiles were assessed after 36 h of growth by use of Affymetrix microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) and the kinetics of change of selected transcripts by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The level of the majority (72%) of transcripts changed similarly (increase, decrease, or no change) in cells grown in irradiation-conditioned medium or irradiated, whereas only 0.6% showed an opposite response. Transcript level changes in bystander and irradiated cells were significantly different from those in untreated cells grown for the same amount of time and were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for selected genes. Signaling pathways in which the highest number of transcripts changed in both conditions were found in the following groups: neuroactive ligand-receptor, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, Janus Kinase-Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (JAK-STAT) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) In control cells more transcripts were downregulated than in irradiated and bystander cells with transcription factors YBX1 and STAT5B, heat shock protein HSPA1A, and ribonucleic acid helicase DDX3X as examples. Conclusions: The transcriptomes of cells grown in medium from X-irradiated cells or directly irradiated show very similar changes. Signals released by irradiated cells may cause

  14. Ultraviolet Irradiation Induces the Accumulation of Chondroitin Sulfate, but Not Other Glycosaminoglycans, in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Werth, Benjamin Boegel; Bashir, Muhammad; Chang, Laura; Werth, Victoria P.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light alters cutaneous structure and function. Prior work has shown loss of dermal hyaluronan after UV-irradiation of human skin, yet UV exposure increases total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in mouse models. To more fully describe UV-induced alterations to cutaneous GAG content, we subjected human volunteers to intermediate-term (5 doses/week for 4 weeks) or single-dose UV exposure. Total dermal uronyl-containing GAGs increased substantially with each of these regimens. We found that UV exposure substantially increased dermal content of chondroitin sulfate (CS), but not hyaluronan, heparan sulfate, or dermatan sulfate. UV induced the accumulation of both the 4-sulfated (C4S) and 6-sulfated (C6S) isoforms of CS, but in distinct distributions. Next, we examined several CS proteoglycan core proteins and found a significant accumulation of dermal and endothelial serglycin, but not of decorin or versican, after UV exposure. To examine regulation in vitro, we found that UVB in combination with IL-1α, a cytokine upregulated by UV radiation, induced serglycin mRNA in cultured dermal fibroblasts, but did not induce the chondroitin sulfate synthases. Overall, our data indicate that intermediate-term and single-dose UVB exposure induces specific GAGs and proteoglycan core proteins in human skin in vivo. These molecules have important biologic functions and contribute to the cutaneous response to UV. PMID:21829593

  15. Revealing cytokine-induced changes in the extracellular matrix with secondary ion mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Adam J; Ratner, Buddy D; Buttery, Lee DK; Alexander, Morgan R

    2015-01-01

    Cell-secreted matrices (CSMs), where extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by monolayer cell cultures are decellularized, have been increasingly used to produce surfaces that may be reseeded with cells. Such surfaces are useful to help us understand cell-ECM interactions in a microenvironment closer to the in vivo situation than synthetic substrates with adsorbed proteins. We describe the production of CSMs from mouse primary osteoblasts (mPObs) exposed to cytokine challenge during matrix secretion, mimicking in vivo inflammatory environments. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) data revealed that CSMs with cytokine challenge at day 7 or day 12 of culture can be chemically distinguished from one another and from untreated CSM using multivariate analysis. Comparison of the differences with reference spectra from adsorbed protein mixtures points towards cytokine challenge resulting in a decrease in collagen content. This is supported by immunocytochemical and histological staining, demonstrating a 44% loss of collagen mass and a 32% loss in collagen I coverage. CSM surfaces demonstrate greater cell adhesion than adsorbed ECM proteins. When mPObs were reseeded onto cytokine-challenged CSMs they exhibited reduced adhesion and elongated morphology compared to untreated CSMs. Such changes may direct subsequent cell fate and function and provide insights into pathological responses at sites of inflammation. PMID:25523877

  16. [Effects of cytokines on somatostatin in nude mice bearing human renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Li, G; Cao, G; Huo, J

    1997-06-01

    We studied the relationship between the production of SS and treatment with cytokines and a new method for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. 4.4 x 10(6)RCC94616 cells were injected subcutaneously into the back of nude mice. Five groups with TNF, IL-2, rIFN, TNF + IL-2, TNF + rIFN and controls were randomly divided according to the mean diameter of experimental tumor. After the last injection of cytokines, 0.5-0.8 ml blood, 1g tumor tissue, para-tissue and normal tissue were havested respectively. Contents of SS were tested by radioimmunoassay. In the treatment groups with cytokines, the concentration of SS was changed, siginificantly increased in the TNF + IL-2 group (P < 0.01). The effect on distribution of SS by cytokines may also be mediated by the regulation of human immunity and antitumor activity. It may be suggested that the method of TNF + IL-2 + SS is best to treat renal cell carcinoma. PMID:10374465

  17. Rapid differentiation between gamma-irradiated and non irradiated potato tubers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jona, Roberto; Fronda, Anna

    The use of gamma irradiation as commercial method for the preservation of fruits and vegetables calls for methods of differentiation between irradiated and non-irradiated foodstuffs. In a previous research, the polysaccharidic content of cell walls of irradiated tissue has been investigated, but it required rather long time to reach the result. A method devised to ascertain the vitality of cells has been applied to distinguish irradiated from non-irradiated potato tubers. 500 mg of tissue excised from tubers have been infiltrated with tetrazolium chloride 0.6% in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. After 15 hrs of incubation at 30°C the treated tissues have been extracted with 95% ethanol whose O.D. has been measured at 530 mμ wavelength. The colour intensity of the alcohol allowed a very clearcut recognition of the irradiated tubers.

  18. Effect of gamma irradiation on quality of kiwifruit ( Actinidia deliciosa var. deliciosa cv. Hayward)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kim, Kyoung-Hee; Yook, Hong-Sun

    2009-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is able to inactivate the three pathogens of Botrytis cinerea, Diaporthe actinidiae, and Botryosphaeria dothidea in kiwifruit. Irradiated kiwifruits appeared softer compared to non-irradiated kiwifruits. The color and organic acid content of kiwifruits were minimally affected by the irradiation. Irradiated fruits showed a decrease in the total soluble solids content with increasing irradiation dose. Irradiation of kiwifruit up to 3 kGy had negative effects on vitamin C content and antioxidant activity, but it contributed to improving sensory quality.

  19. Cytokines in therapy of radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, R.; Oppenheim, J.J.

    1988-09-01

    Repeated injections or infusion of hematopoietic growth factors, such as interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), accelerate restoration of hematopoiesis in animals compromised by sublethal doses of cytotoxic drugs or irradiation. Previous work by the investigators has shown that IL-1 induced circulating CSF in normal mice and, when used after sublethal irradiation, accelerated the recovery of endogenous splenic colonies. Therefore, IL-1, as well as IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), G-CSF, and GM-CSF, were evaluated as potential therapeutic agents in irradiated C3H-HeN mice. A single intraperitoneal injection, administered within three hours after a lethal dose (LD)95/30 of irradiation that would kill 95% of mice within 30 days, protected in a dose-dependent manner up to 100% of mice from radiation-induced death due to hematopoietic syndrome. Significant therapeutic effects were also achieved with a single dose of IFN-gamma or of TNF. In contrast, GM-CSF and G-CSF, administered shortly after irradiation, had no effect in the doses used on mice survival.

  20. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L.; Johnson, K.W.

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  1. Harmonization of the intracellular cytokine staining assay.

    PubMed

    Welters, Marij J P; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H; Letsch, Anne; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Britten, Cedrik M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2012-07-01

    Active immunotherapy for cancer is an accepted treatment modality aiming to reinforce the T-cell response to cancer. T-cell reactivity is measured by various assays and used to guide the clinical development of immunotherapeutics. However, data obtained across different institutions may vary substantially making comparative conclusions difficult. The Cancer Immunotherapy Immunoguiding Program organizes proficiency panels to identify key parameters influencing the outcome of commonly used T-cell assays followed by harmonization. Our successes with IFNγ-ELISPOT and peptide HLA multimer analysis have led to the current study on intracellular cytokine staining (ICS). We report the results of three successive panels evaluating this assay. At the beginning, 3 out of 9 participants (33 %) were able to detect >6 out of 8 known virus-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. This increased to 50 % of the laboratories in the second phase. The reported percentages of cytokine-producing T cells by the different laboratories were highly variable with coefficients of variation well over 60 %. Variability could partially be explained by protocol-related differences in background cytokine production leading to sub-optimal signal-to-noise ratios. The large number of protocol variables prohibited identification of prime guidelines to harmonize the assays. In addition, the gating strategy used to identify reactive T cells had a major impact on assay outcome. Subsequent harmonization of the gating strategy considerably reduced the variability within the group of participants. In conclusion, we propose that first basic guidelines should be applied for gating in ICS experiments before harmonizing assay protocol variables. PMID:22714399

  2. Cytokine profile in Nigerians with tubal infertility

    PubMed Central

    Charles-Davies, Mabel A.; Bello, Folashade A.; Taiwo, Victor O.; Bin, Li; Oni, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immune response to genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection is involved in both immunity and pathology. The cytokine profile during infection has been implicated in the disease outcome, either resolution or severe sequelae. Serum cytokines of Chlamydia positive Nigerian women with tubal infertility were assessed to determine their possible relationship with tubal occlusion. Material and methods One hundred and fifty age-matched consenting women (100 fertile and 50 with tubal infertility) were recruited based on C. trachomatis antibody positivity and grouped into infertile Chlamydia positive (CTpos) women (n = 50), fertile Chlamydia positive women (n = 50) and fertile Chlamydia negative (CTneg) women as controls (n = 50). High vaginal swabs and endo-cervical swabs were collected for microscopy, culture and gram staining. Cytokines [transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), interferon γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17A] were estimated by ELISA in sera. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, χ 2 and Spearman's correlation at p = 0.05. Results Lower IFN-γ levels were observed in infertile women compared to fertile women. Fertile CTneg women had significantly higher TNF-α, and TGF-β1 compared to fertile and infertile CTpos women, respectively. Lower IL-10 levels were seen in fertile CTpos women compared to the infertile CTpos group. Vaginal discharge was negatively correlated with TNF-α and IFN-γ and positively with IL-4 in Chlamydia positive women. Conclusions Chlamydia positive women with tubal infertility have higher IL-10 and lower IFN-γ levels than controls, which may contribute to their development of tubal pathology. PMID:27095929

  3. Cytokine Analysis by Immunoaffinity Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Mark; Kalish, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Immunoaffinity capillary electrophoresis (ICE) is a powerful tool used to detect and quantify target proteins of interest in complex biological fluids. The target analyte is captured and bound to antibodies immobilized onto the wall of a capillary, labeled in situ with a fluorescent dye, eluted and detected online using laser-induced fluorescence following electrophoretic separation. Here, we illustrate how to construct an immunoaffinity capillary and utilize it to run ICE in order to capture and quantify target cytokines and chemokines from a clinical sample. PMID:22976107

  4. Cytokine production capacity in depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Vogelzangs, N; de Jonge, P; Smit, J H; Bahn, S; Penninx, B W

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that immune function may be dysregulated in persons with depressive and anxiety disorders. Few studies examined the expression of cytokines in response to ex vivo stimulation of blood by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to study the innate production capacity of cytokines in depression and anxiety. To investigate this, baseline data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used, including persons (18-65 years; 66% women) with current (that is, past month; N=591) or remitted (N=354) DSM-IV depressive or anxiety disorders and healthy controls (N=297). Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured by means of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Using Multi-Analyte Profiling technology, plasma levels of 13 cytokines were assayed after whole blood stimulation by addition of LPS. Basal plasma levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were also available. A basal and a LPS summary index were created. Results show that LPS-stimulated inflammation was associated with increased odds of current depressive/anxiety disorders (odds ratio (OR)=1.28, P=0.009), as was the case for basal inflammation (OR=1.28, P=0.001). These associations were no longer significant after adjustment for lifestyle and health (OR=1.13, P=0.21; OR=1.07, P=0.45, respectively). After adjustment for lifestyle and health, interleukin-8 was associated with both remitted (OR=1.25, P=0.02) and current (OR=1.28, P=0.005) disorders. In addition, LPS-stimulated inflammation was associated with more severe depressive (β=0.129, P<0.001) and anxiety (β=0.165, P<0.001) symptoms, as was basal inflammation. Unlike basal inflammation, LPS-stimulated inflammation was still associated with (anxiety) symptom severity after adjustment for lifestyle and health (IDS: interleukin (IL)-8, MCP-1, MMP2; BAI: LPS index, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, MCP-1, MMP2, TNF-β). To conclude, lifestyle and health

  5. Forecasting Cytokine Storms with New Predictive Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Rouce, Rayne H; Heslop, Helen E

    2016-06-01

    T cells genetically modified with CD19 chimeric antigen receptors have produced impressive clinical responses in patients with refractory B-cell malignancies, but therapeutic responses are often accompanied by cytokine release syndrome (CRS), which can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Teachey and colleagues have identified predictive biomarkers for this complication that may allow testing of earlier intervention with agents such as the IL6 receptor blocker tocilizumab to evaluate whether CRS can be ameliorated without jeopardizing clinical responses. Cancer Discov; 6(6); 579-80. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Teachey et al., p. 664. PMID:27261481

  6. [Changes in the content of the thiol form of the acetylation coenzyme in the liver during administration of vitamin B3-active compounds to intact and locally irradiated animals].

    PubMed

    Rozanov, V A

    1984-01-01

    A local exposure of mouse head to gamma-rays caused phase changes in CoASH content of the liver. The administration of D-pantothenate-Ca and D-pantethine increased the level of CoASH in the liver of exposed animals; calcium D-homopantothenate did not influence the co-enzyme content. It is suggested that pantothenate and pantethine act like vitamins while the influence of homopantothenate is associated with the effects of calcium ions. PMID:6739738

  7. Inflammatory Cytokines in Depression: Neurobiological Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Felger, Jennifer C.; Lotrich, Francis E.

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that inflammatory cytokines contribute to the development of depression in both medically ill and medically healthy individuals. Cytokines are important for development and normal brain function, and have the ability to influence neurocircuitry and neurotransmitter systems to produce behavioral alterations. Acutely, inflammatory cytokine administration or activation of the innate immune system produces adaptive behavioral responses that promote conservation of energy to combat infection or recovery from injury. However, chronic exposure to elevated inflammatory cytokines and persistent alterations in neurotransmitter systems can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders and depression. Mechanisms of cytokine behavioral effects involve activation of inflammatory signaling pathways in the brain that results in changes in monoamine, glutamate, and neuropeptide systems, and decreases in growth factors, e.g. brain derived neurotrophic factor. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines may serve as mediators of both environmental (e.g. childhood trauma, obesity, stress, and poor sleep) and genetic (functional gene polymorphisms) factors that contribute to depression’s development. This review explores the idea that specific gene polymorphisms and neurotransmitter systems can confer protection from or vulnerability to specific symptom dimensions of cytokine-related depression. Additionally, potential therapeutic strategies that target inflammatory cytokine signaling or the consequences of cytokines on neurotransmitter systems in the brain to prevent or reverse cytokine effects on behavior are discussed. PMID:23644052

  8. Inflammatory cytokines in depression: neurobiological mechanisms and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Felger, J C; Lotrich, F E

    2013-08-29

    Mounting evidence indicates that inflammatory cytokines contribute to the development of depression in both medically ill and medically healthy individuals. Cytokines are important for development and normal brain function, and have the ability to influence neurocircuitry and neurotransmitter systems to produce behavioral alterations. Acutely, inflammatory cytokine administration or activation of the innate immune system produces adaptive behavioral responses that promote conservation of energy to combat infection or recovery from injury. However, chronic exposure to elevated inflammatory cytokines and persistent alterations in neurotransmitter systems can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders and depression. Mechanisms of cytokine behavioral effects involve activation of inflammatory signaling pathways in the brain that results in changes in monoamine, glutamate, and neuropeptide systems, and decreases in growth factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines may serve as mediators of both environmental (e.g. childhood trauma, obesity, stress, and poor sleep) and genetic (functional gene polymorphisms) factors that contribute to depression's development. This review explores the idea that specific gene polymorphisms and neurotransmitter systems can confer protection from or vulnerability to specific symptom dimensions of cytokine-related depression. Additionally, potential therapeutic strategies that target inflammatory cytokine signaling or the consequences of cytokines on neurotransmitter systems in the brain to prevent or reverse cytokine effects on behavior are discussed. PMID:23644052

  9. Local brain heavy ion irradiation induced Immunosuppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Runhong; Deng, Yulin; Huiyang Zhu, Bitlife.; Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Yingqi; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Qing, Hong

    Purpose: To investigate the long term effect of acute local brain heavy ion irradiation on the peripheral immune system in rat model. Methodology: Only the brain of adult male Wistar rats were radiated by heavy ions at the dose of 15 Gy. One, two and three months after irradiation, thymus and spleen were analyzed by four ways. Tunel assay was performed to evaluate the percentage of apoptotic cells in thymus and spleen, level of Inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, SSAO, and TNF-α) was detected by ELISA assay, the differentiation of thymus T lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry and the relative expression levels of genes related to thymus immune cell development were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Thymus and spleen showed significant atrophy from one month to three months after irradiation. A high level of apoptosis in thymus and spleen were obtained and the latter was more vulnerable, also, high level of inflammatory cytokines were found. Genes (c-kit, Rag1, Rag2 and Sca1) related to thymus lymphocytes’ development were down-regulated. Conclusion: Local area radiation in the rat brain would cause the immunosuppression, especially, the losing of cell-mediated immune functions. In this model, radiation caused inflammation and then induced apoptosis of cells in the immune organs, which contributed to immunosuppression.

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces the Production and Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Canine Synovial Explant Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Straubinger, Alix F.; Summers, Brian A.; Erb, Hollis N.; Härter, Luc; Appel, Max J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Canine synovial membrane explants were exposed to high- or low-passage Borrelia burgdorferi for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Spirochetes received no treatment, were UV light irradiated for 16 h, or were sonicated prior to addition to synovial explant cultures. In explant tissues, mRNA levels for the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, and IL-8 were surveyed semiquantitatively by reverse transcription-PCR. Culture supernatants were examined for numbers of total and motile (i.e., viable) spirochetes, TNF-like and IL-1-like activities, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis-inducing activities, and IL-8. During exposure to synovial explant tissues, the total number of spirochetes in the supernatants decreased gradually by ∼30%, and the viability also declined. mRNAs for TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 were up-regulated in synovial explant tissues within 3 h after infection with untreated or UV light-irradiated B. burgdorferi, and mRNA levels corresponded to the results obtained with bioassays. During 24 h of coincubation, cultures challenged with untreated or UV light-irradiated spirochetes produced similar levels of TNF-like and IL-1-like activities. In contrast, explant tissues exposed to untreated B. burgdorferi generated significantly higher levels of chemotactic factors after 24 h of incubation than did explant tissues exposed to UV light-treated spirochetes. In identical samples, a specific signal for IL-8 was identified by Western blot analysis. High- and low-passage borreliae did not differ in their abilities to induce proinflammatory cytokines. No difference in cytokine induction between untreated and sonicated high-passage spirochetes was observed, suggesting that fractions of the organism can trigger the production and release of inflammatory mediators. The titration of spirochetes revealed a dose-independent cytokine response, where 103 to 107 B. burgdorferi organisms induced similar TNF

  11. Cytokine and anti-cytokine therapies in prevention or treatment of fibrosis in IBD

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Noam; Targan, Stephan R

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of fibrosing Crohn’s disease (CD) is significant, with approximately 40% of CD patients with ileal disease developing clinically apparent strictures throughout their lifetime. Although strictures may be subdivided into fibrotic, inflammatory, or mixed forms, despite immunosuppressive therapy in CD patients in the form of steroids or immunomodulators, the frequency of fibrostenosing complications has still remained significant. A vast number of genetic and epigenetic variables are thought to contribute to fibrostenosing disease, including those that affect cytokine biology, and therefore highlight the complexity of disease, but also shed light on targetable pathways. Exclusively targeting fibrosis may be difficult, however, because of the relatively slow evolution of fibrosis in CD, and the potential adverse effects of inhibiting pathways involved in tissue repair and mucosal healing. Acknowledging these caveats, cytokine-targeted therapy has become the mainstay of treatment for many inflammatory conditions and is being evaluated for fibrotic disorders. The question of whether anti-cytokine therapy will prove useful for intestinal fibrosis is, therefore, acutely relevant. This review will highlight some of the current therapeutics targeting cytokines involved in fibrosis.

  12. Cytokine and anti-cytokine therapies in prevention or treatment of fibrosis in IBD.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Noam; Targan, Stephan R; Shih, David Q

    2016-08-01

    The frequency of fibrosing Crohn's disease (CD) is significant, with approximately 40% of CD patients with ileal disease developing clinically apparent strictures throughout their lifetime. Although strictures may be subdivided into fibrotic, inflammatory, or mixed forms, despite immunosuppressive therapy in CD patients in the form of steroids or immunomodulators, the frequency of fibrostenosing complications has still remained significant. A vast number of genetic and epigenetic variables are thought to contribute to fibrostenosing disease, including those that affect cytokine biology, and therefore highlight the complexity of disease, but also shed light on targetable pathways. Exclusively targeting fibrosis may be difficult, however, because of the relatively slow evolution of fibrosis in CD, and the potential adverse effects of inhibiting pathways involved in tissue repair and mucosal healing. Acknowledging these caveats, cytokine-targeted therapy has become the mainstay of treatment for many inflammatory conditions and is being evaluated for fibrotic disorders. The question of whether anti-cytokine therapy will prove useful for intestinal fibrosis is, therefore, acutely relevant. This review will highlight some of the current therapeutics targeting cytokines involved in fibrosis. PMID:27536363

  13. Cytokine profile in elderly patients with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil T.; Sudhir, U.; Punith, K.; Kumar, Rahul; Ravi Kumar, V. N.; Rao, Medha Y.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Sepsis is a serious health problem in the elderly with a high degree of mortality. There is very limited data available in elderly subjects regarding the markers for sepsis. Development of good markers will help in overall management and prediction of sepsis. Objectives: Serial estimation of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha (TNF-α) and their correlation with mortality in sepsis in elderly patients and to determine the influence of gender on cytokine production and mortality in elderly patients with sepsis. Settings and Design: The prospective study was conducted at our tertiary care center from April 2007 to September 2008. Elderly Patients satisfying the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria were included. Methods and Material: TNF-α and IL-6 were estimated in 30 elderly patients admitted to our intensive care unit with SIRS and sepsis. The estimations were done on day 1, 3 and 7 of admission. Statistical Analysis Used: Student and paired ‘t’ tests, and ANOVA, which were further followed up by post-hoc ‘t’ tests with Bonferroni correction using SPSS. Results: Reducing levels of IL-6 levels from day 1 to 7 was found in the survivor group. TNF-α level was significantly low on day 1 in the nonsurvivor female group. Conclusions: Serial estimation of cytokines in elderly patients with sepsis will help in prediction of mortality. Female gender was an independent predictor of increased morality in critically ill patients with sepsis. PMID:19881187

  14. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm(2) fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C-C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. PMID:26047701

  15. Triggering Dectin-1-Pathway Alone Is Not Sufficient to Induce Cytokine Production by Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Walachowski, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    β-glucans (BG) are abundant polysaccharides of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall (Sc CW), an industry byproduct. They have immuno-stimulatory properties upon engagement of dectin-1 (Clec7a), their main receptor on particular immune cells, and they actually become of great interest because of their preventive or therapeutic potentials. Zymosan, a crude extract of Sc CW was studied as a prototypic BG, despite its miscellaneous PAMPs content. Here, we examined the response of murine wild type or Clec7a-/- bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to products with increasing BG content (15, 65 or 75%) and compared their effects with those of other dectin-1 ligands. The enrichment process removed TLR ligands while preserving dectin-1 activity. The most enriched extracts have very low NFκB activity and triggered low amounts of cytokine production in contrast with crude products like zymosan and BG15. Furthermore, MyD88-/- BMDM did not produce TNFα in response to crude Sc CW extracts, whereas their response to BG-enriched extracts was unaffected, suggesting that BG alone are not able to initiate cytokine secretion. Although Sc CW-derived BG stimulated the late and strong expression of Csf2 in a dectin-1-dependent manner, they remain poor inducers of chemokine and cytokine production in murine macrophages. PMID:26840954

  16. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  17. A primer on cytokines: sources, receptors, effects, and inducers.

    PubMed Central

    Curfs, J H; Meis, J F; Hoogkamp-Korstanje, J A

    1997-01-01

    Protection against pathogens is a prerequisite for survival of most organisms. To cope with this continuous challenge, complex defense mechanisms have evolved. The construction, adaptation, and maintenance of these mechanisms are under control of an extensive network of regulatory proteins called cytokines. A great number of cytokines have been described over the last 2 decades. This review consists of an overview of cytokines that are involved in immune responses and describes some historical and general aspects as well as prospective clinical applications. Major biological effects together with information on cytokine receptors, producers, inducers, and biochemical and molecular characteristics are listed in tables. In addition, some basic information is given on cytokine receptor signal transduction. Finally, the recent discoveries of cytokine receptors functioning as coreceptors in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus are summarized. PMID:9336671

  18. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  19. Three-Dimensional Gradients of Cytokine Signaling between T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thurley, Kevin; Gerecht, Daniel; Friedmann, Elfriede; Höfer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune responses are regulated by diffusible mediators, the cytokines, which act at sub-nanomolar concentrations. The spatial range of cytokine communication is a crucial, yet poorly understood, functional property. Both containment of cytokine action in narrow junctions between immune cells (immunological synapses) and global signaling throughout entire lymph nodes have been proposed, but the conditions under which they might occur are not clear. Here we analyze spatially three-dimensional reaction-diffusion models for the dynamics of cytokine signaling at two successive scales: in immunological synapses and in dense multicellular environments. For realistic parameter values, we observe local spatial gradients, with the cytokine concentration around secreting cells decaying sharply across only a few cell diameters. Focusing on the well-characterized T-cell cytokine interleukin-2, we show how cytokine secretion and competitive uptake determine this signaling range. Uptake is shaped locally by the geometry of the immunological synapse. However, even for narrow synapses, which favor intrasynaptic cytokine consumption, escape fluxes into the extrasynaptic space are expected to be substantial (≥20% of secretion). Hence paracrine signaling will generally extend beyond the synapse but can be limited to cellular microenvironments through uptake by target cells or strong competitors, such as regulatory T cells. By contrast, long-range cytokine signaling requires a high density of cytokine producers or weak consumption (e.g., by sparsely distributed target cells). Thus in a physiological setting, cytokine gradients between cells, and not bulk-phase concentrations, are crucial for cell-to-cell communication, emphasizing the need for spatially resolved data on cytokine signaling. PMID:25923703

  20. Original inhibition method of excessive synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokine of tumour necrosis factor α

    PubMed Central

    Zinchuk, AleXander; Holubovska, Olga; Shkurba, Andrij; Hrytsko, Roman; Vorozhbyt, Olga; Richniak, Mykhailo

    2015-01-01

    Influence on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines of an ill person is an urgent aspect of treatment of many diseases. For inhibition of synthesis of a high level of pro-inflammatory cytokines, medications which are recombinant monoclonal antibodies, especially to tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), are used. However, these methods of treatment require further improvement by elaborating new approaches with a wider spectrum of influence on the immune system. A completely new method of reduction in high activity of TN F-α with the method of intradermal autoleukocyte immunization is presented in the article. Investigation was performed in a group of patients with psoriasis (24) with a high level of TNF-α in the blood (over 30 pg/ml). Simultaneously such investigation was performed on patients with psoriasis (9) without TNF-α detected (0 pg/ml). As a result of immunization, a significant reduction in TNF-α occurred in all patients with its high level, in 16 (66.7%) from 24 patients – to 0-5 pg/ml. The level of reduction and duration of the achieved effect was of an individual character and requires further investigation. However, the achieved results prove the expediency of administration of this immunization method for patients requiring reduction of TNF-α synthesis. However, the content of TNF-α in blood serum could not be detected in most patients with a low level of cytokine (in 6 from 9) after immunization (as well as before immunization), but an increase in its level from 0 to 5-8 pg/ml was observed in 3 patients. On the basis of the conducted research, the authors suggest that the influence of immunization on cytokine synthesis depends on the condition of immune cells and correlation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in a patient's skin. PMID:26648779

  1. Disinfestation of different cereal products by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, E.; Kiss, I.; Boros, A.; Horváth, Ny.; Tóth, J.; Gyulai, P.; Szalma, Á.

    The sensitivity of overlineTribolium confusum - small flour beetle - to radiation was studied in a dose range of 0-0.8 kGy. We found that the insect egg was the most sensitive to radiation, then larvae and pupae followed it. 0.2 kGy dose of irradiation kills these forms or their further development is inhibited. Imagoes do not immediately die after 0.8 kGy dose of irradiation; the young imagoes are more sensitive to radiation than the aged ones. 0.4 kGy average dose of irradiation is a suitable protection against overlineTribolium confusum. Disinfestation experiments were performed with wheat-germ and wheat-bran and parallelly the most important ingredients of the two products were analysed. The vitamin E content and the rate of lipid-oxidation of wheat germ were determined. The vitamin E content decreased after radiation treatment, however, during storage of at least 6 months, it remained at a level specified by food quality standards (higher than 10 mg%). Carbohydrate content of wheat-bran (water soluble carbohydrate content, crude-fibre and dietary fibre content) did not change at all. Storability of radiation disinfested wheat-germ was 8 months, wheat-bran 3-4 months. On the base of the results 2-2 tons of wheat-germ and wheat-bran were irradiated and trial marked in 1985. In 1986 the irradiation of 10 tons of wheat-germ is planned.

  2. Gamma irradiation reduces the immunological toxicity of doxorubicin, anticancer drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Sung, Nak-Yun; Raghavendran, H. Balaji; Yoon, Yohan; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Yoo, Young-Choon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Hwang, Young-Jeong; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anticancer agent, but exhibits some immunological toxicity to patients during chemotherapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the immunological response and the inhibition activity on in vivo tumor mass of DOX. The results showed that DOX irradiated at 10 and 20 kGy reduce the inhibition of mouse peritoneal macrophage proliferation and induce the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) when compared with non-irradiated DOX. The cytotoxicity against human breast (MCF-7), murine colon adenocarcinoma (Colon 26) and human monocytic (THP-1) tumor cell were not significantly different between non-irradiated and irradiated DOX ( P<0.05). In vivo study on the tumor mass inhibition, gamma-irradiated DOX showed a considerable inhibition of tumor mass and this effect was statistically non-significant as compared with non-irradiated DOX. In conclusion, gamma irradiation could be regarded as a potential method for reducing the immunological toxicity of DOX. Further researches is needed to reveal the formation and activity of radiolysis products by gamma irradiation.

  3. Leptin–cytokine crosstalk in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Gale; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben Rene

    2013-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence suggesting a positive correlation between leptin levels, obesity, post-menopause and breast cancer incidence, our current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in these relationships is still incomplete. Since the cloning of leptin in 1994 and its receptor (OB-R) 1 year later by Friedman’s laboratory (Zhang et al., 1994) and Tartaglia et al. (Tartaglia et al., 1995), respectively, more than 22,000 papers related to leptin functions in several biological systems have been published (Pubmed, 2012). The ob gene product, leptin, is an important circulating signal for the regulation of body weight. Additionally, leptin plays critical roles in the regulation of glucose homeostasis, reproduction, growth and the immune response. Supporting evidence for leptin roles in cancer has been shown in more than 1000 published papers, with almost 300 papers related to breast cancer (Pubmed, 2012). Specific leptin-induced signaling pathways are involved in the increased levels of inflammatory, mitogenic and pro-angiogenic factors in breast cancer. In obesity, a mild inflammatory condition, deregulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and adipokines such as IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and leptin from adipose tissue, inflammatory and cancer cells could contribute to the onset and progression of cancer. We used an in silico software program, Pathway Studio 9, and found 4587 references citing these various interactions. Functional crosstalk between leptin, IL-1 and Notch signaling (NILCO) found in breast cancer cells could represent the integration of developmental, proinflammatory and pro-angiogenic signals critical for leptin-induced breast cancer cell proliferation/migration, tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). Remarkably, the inhibition of leptin signaling via leptin peptide receptor antagonists (LPrAs) significantly reduced the establishment and growth of syngeneic, xenograft and carcinogen-induced breast cancer and, simultaneously

  4. RERTR-8 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-12-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-8, was designed to test monolithic mini-fuel plates fabricated via hot isostatic pressing (HIP), the effect of molybdenum (Mo) content on the monolithic fuel behavior, and the efficiency of ternary additions to dispersion fuel particles on the interaction layer behavior at higher burnup. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-8 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis, thermal analysis and hydraulic testing results.

  5. [Gene therapy with cytokines against cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy is an excellent alternative for treatment of many diseases. Capacity to manipulate the DNA has allowed direct the gene therapy to correct the function of an altered gene, to increase the expression of a gene and to favour the activation of the immune response. This way, it can intend the use of the DNA like medication able to control, to correct or to cure many diseases. Gene therapy against cancer has an enormous potential, and actually the use of the DNA has increased to control diverse cancer in animal models, with very encouraging results that have allowed its applications in experimental protocols in human. This work concentrates a review of the foundations of the gene therapy and its application on cervical cancer, from the point of view of the alterations of the immune system focused on the tumour micro-environment, and the use of the cytokines as immunomodulators. PMID:16983992

  6. Cytokines and Angiogenesis in the Corpus Luteum

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, António M.; Ferreira-Dias, Graça; Skarzynski, Dariusz J.

    2013-01-01

    In adults, physiological angiogenesis is a rare event, with few exceptions as the vasculogenesis needed for tissue growth and function in female reproductive organs. Particularly in the corpus luteum (CL), regulation of angiogenic process seems to be tightly controlled by opposite actions resultant from the balance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors. It is the extremely rapid sequence of events that determines the dramatic changes on vascular and nonvascular structures, qualifying the CL as a great model for angiogenesis studies. Using the mare CL as a model, reports on locally produced cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF), interferon gamma (IFNG), or Fas ligand (FASL), pointed out their role on angiogenic activity modulation throughout the luteal phase. Thus, the main purpose of this review is to highlight the interaction between immune, endothelial, and luteal steroidogenic cells, regarding vascular dynamics/changes during establishment and regression of the equine CL. PMID:23840095

  7. Interleukin 33: A Switch-Hitting Cytokine

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    For many years IL-33 has been widely studied in the context of T helper type 2 (TH2)-driven inflammatory disorders. Interestingly, IL-33 has now emerged as a cytokine with a plethora of pleiotropic properties. Depending on the immune cells targeted by IL-33, it is reported to not only promote TH2 immunity, but also to induce T helper type 1 (TH1) immunity. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that IL-33 can activate CD8+ T cells. These new studies provide evidence for its beneficial role in antiviral and antitumor immunity. Here we review the evidence of IL-33 to drive protective T cell immunity plus its potential use as an adjuvant in vaccination and tumor therapy. PMID:24762410

  8. Curcumin protects against radiation-induced acute and chronic cutaneous toxicity in mice and decreases mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Okunieff, Paul . E-mail: paul_okunieff@urmc.rochester.edu; Xu Jianhua; Hu Dongping; Liu Weimin; Zhang Lurong; Morrow, Gary; Pentland, Alice; Ryan, Julie L.; Ding, Ivan M.D.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether curcumin ameliorates acute and chronic radiation skin toxicity and to examine the expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-18, IL-1Ra, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-{alpha}, and lymphotoxin-{beta}) or fibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF]-{beta}) during the same acute and chronic phases. Methods and Materials: Curcumin was given intragastrically or intraperitoneally to C3H/HeN mice either: 5 days before radiation; 5 days after radiation; or both 5 days before and 5 days after radiation. The cutaneous damage was assessed at 15-21 days (acute) and 90 days (chronic) after a single 50 Gy radiation dose was given to the hind leg. Skin and muscle tissues were collected for measurement of cytokine mRNA. Results: Curcumin, administered before or after radiation, markedly reduced acute and chronic skin toxicity in mice (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin significantly decreased mRNA expression of early responding cytokines (IL-1 IL-6, IL-18, TNF-{alpha}, and lymphotoxin-{beta}) and the fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-{beta}, in cutaneous tissues at 21 days postradiation. Conclusion: Curcumin has a protective effect on radiation-induced cutaneous damage in mice, which is characterized by a downregulation of both inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines in irradiated skin and muscle, particularly in the early phase after radiation. These results may provide the molecular basis for the application of curcumin in clinical radiation therapy.

  9. Inflammatory Cytokines in Vascular Dysfunction and Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Alexander H.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2009-01-01

    The vascular inflammatory response involves complex interaction between inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages), endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and extracellular matrix (ECM). Vascular injury is associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules by ECs and recruitment of inflammatory cells, growth factors, and cytokines, with consequent effects on ECs, VSMCs and ECM. Cytokines include tumor necrosis factors, interleukins, lymphokines, monokines, interferons, colony stimulating factors, and transforming growth factors. Cytokines are produced by macrophages, T cells and monocytes, as well as platelets, ECs and VSMCs. Circulating cytokines interact with specific receptors on various cell types and activate JAK-STAT, NF-κB, and Smad signaling pathways leading to an inflammatory response involving cell adhesion, permeability and apoptosis. Cytokines also interact with mitochondria to increasie the production of reactive oxygen species. Cytokine-induced activation of these pathways in ECs modifies the production/activity of vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and bradykinin, as well as vasoconstrictive mediators such as endothelin and angiotensin II. Cytokines interact with VSMCs to activate Ca2+, protein kinase C, Rho-Kinase, and MAPK pathways, which promote cell growth and migration, and VSM reactivity. Cytokines also interact with integrins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and modify ECM composition. Persistent increases in cytokines are associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm, varicose veins and hypertension. Genetic and pharmacological tools to decrease the production of cytokines or to diminish their effects using cytokine antagonists could provide new approaches in the management of inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:19413999

  10. Microbiological decontamination of natural honey by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migdał, W.; Owczarczyk, H. B.; K ȩdzia, B.; Hołderna-K ȩdzia, E.; Madajczyk, D.

    2000-03-01

    Degree of microbiological decontamination, organoleptic and physico-chemical properties of natural honeys were investigated after radiation treatment. Seven kinds of honeys were irradiated with the beams of 10 MeV electrons from a 10 kW linear accelerator "Elektronika 10-10" at the dose 10 kGy. It was shown, that after irradiation, the total count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and moulds decrease by 99%. The antibiotic value in investigated honeys increased in turn from 1.67 to 2.67 after irradiation. Such factors and parameters of investigated honeys as their consistency, content of water and saccharose, acidity, the diastase and 5-HMF values were not changed significantly after irradiation. Decontamination by irradiation is a process which allows us to obtain high microbiological purity of honeys. It is especially needed, when honeys are used in surgical treatment of injuries and in nutrition of babies with food deficiency.

  11. Reduction of allergenicity of irradiated ovalbumin in ovalbumin-allergic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Lee, Soo-Young; Kang, Il-Jun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2007-11-01

    Egg allergy is one of the most serious of the immediate hypersensitivity reactions to foods. Such an allergic disorder is mediated by IgE antibodies stimulated by T-helper type 2 (Th2) lymphocytes. This study was undertaken to evaluate changes of allergenicity and cytokine profiles by exposure of irradiated ovalbumin (OVA), a major allergen of egg white, in the OVA-allergic mice model. OVA solutions (2 mg/ml in 0.01 M phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were gamma-irradiated to 50 and 100 kGy. The allergenicity in the OVA-allergy-induced mice model was remarkably reduced when challenged with irradiated OVA. Cultures of spleen cells harvested from OVA-sensitized mice showed a significant decrease in Th2 cytokine levels of ILs-4 and -5 with a concomitant increase in Th1 cytokine levels of IL-12 when co-cultured with irradiated OVA. However, IFN- γ level decreased dependant on the radiation dose of co-cultured OVA. The levels of IgEs and Th2-cytokine were reduced dependant on the radiation dose. These data show that the irradiated OVA could downregulate the activity of Th2 lymphocytes in OVA-sensitized mice.

  12. Platelet-rich plasma preparation for regenerative medicine: optimization and quantification of cytokines and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is nowadays widely applied in different clinical scenarios, such as orthopedics, ophthalmology and healing therapies, as a growth factor pool for improving tissue regeneration. Studies into its clinical efficiency are not conclusive and one of the main reasons for this is that different PRP preparations are used, eliciting different responses that cannot be compared. Platelet quantification and the growth factor content definition must be defined in order to understand molecular mechanisms behind PRP regenerative strength. Standardization of PRP preparations is thus urgently needed. Methods PRP was prepared by centrifugation varying the relative centrifugal force, temperature, and time. Having quantified platelet recovery and yield, the two-step procedure that rendered the highest output was chosen and further analyzed. Cytokine content was determined in different fractions obtained throughout the whole centrifugation procedure. Results Our method showed reproducibility when applied to different blood donors. We recovered 46.9 to 69.5% of total initial platelets and the procedure resulted in a 5.4-fold to 7.3-fold increase in platelet concentration (1.4 × 106 to 1.9 × 106 platelets/μl). Platelets were highly purified, because only <0.3% from the initial red blood cells and leukocytes was present in the final PRP preparation. We also quantified growth factors, cytokines and chemokines secreted by the concentrated platelets after activation with calcium and calcium/thrombin. High concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor, endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF) were secreted, together with the anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-13, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-α. No cytokines were secreted before platelet activation. TGF-β3 and IFNγ were not detected in any studied fraction. Clots obtained after platelet coagulation

  13. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 inhibits head kidney macrophage activation and cytokine expression in Scophthalmus maximus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xiao, Zhi-zhong; Sun, Li

    2011-02-01

    Proteins of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family function as inducible feedback inhibitors of cytokine signaling via the JAK/STAT pathway. Although several SOCS isoforms have been identified in teleosts, their immunological functions remain largely unknown. In this study, we identified in turbot Scophthalmus maximus a SOCS homologue (named SmSOCS3) of the mammalian SOCS3 type. The deduced amino acid sequence of SmSOCS3 contains 205 residues and shares extensive overall identities (60-82%) with those of known fish SOCS3. In silico analyses revealed that, like typical SOCS3, SmSOCS3 possesses a kinase inhibitor region (KIR), a Src homology 2 (SH2) domain, and a SOCS box domain. Under physiological conditions SmSOCS3 expression was detected, in increasing order, in blood, brain, heart, kidney, liver, spleen, muscle, and gill. Experimental infection of turbot with a bacterial pathogen induced significant SmSOCS3 expression in kidney, spleen, liver, and gill in time-dependent manners. Examination of SmSOCS3 expression in head kidney (HK) macrophages showed that SmSOCS3 transcription was significantly upregulated in the presence of purified recombinant TNF-α. On the other hand, SmSOCS3 overexpression in HK macrophages inhibited the transcription of TNF-α as well as IL-1β and CC-chemokine. In addition, SmSOCS3 overexpression significantly reduced macrophage respiratory burst activity, nitric oxide production, and bactericidal activity. Taken together, these results suggest that SmSOCS3 is a cytokine-inducible suppressor of pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling in HK macrophages and that regulated expression of SmSOCS3 is required for optimal innate immune response against bacterial infection. PMID:20869394

  14. Novel cytokines and cytokine-producing T cells in allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Julia A; Borish, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Allergic diseases reflect various pathways of T lymphocyte inflammation and largely comprise T helper (Th) 2-associated processes. Recent investigations have identified pathways involved in promoting Th2 responses. Additionally, novel T-cell subtypes, each with its own distinct cytokine profile, contribute to the heterogeneous presentations of allergic diseases. This article focuses on recent developments including novel effector (nuocytes, Th9, and Th22) and regulatory T-cell (Treg) families of lymphocytes as well as cytokines that are central in driving Th2 differentiation (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-9, IL-25, thymic stromal lymphopoietin [TSLP], and IL-33). Recent literature and investigations were reviewed. Unregulated IL-25, TSLP, and IL-33 activity results in activation of Th2 cells, mast cells, dendritic cells, eosinophils, and basophils, leading to inflammatory processes that define allergic disease. As such, these cytokines are central mediators capable of instigating the inflammatory processes responsible for allergen-mediated diseases. The previous paradigm of Th1/Th2 imbalance driving allergic disease is expanded by identification of novel T helper families (nuocytes, Th9, Th17, and Th22) with their signature cytokines, which provide alterative avenues for investigation of neutrophil-predominant asthma and other heterogeneous presentations of allergic diseases. IL-25, TSLP, and IL-33 are attractive targets for therapeutics designed to ameliorate Th2-mediated diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Moreover, the ability to delineate novel regulatory and effector T-cell lineages among CD4(+) T cells challenges the Th1/Th2 paradigm of allergic disease and invites further avenues of investigation into the role of these cells in allergic disease. PMID:21439160

  15. Influence of gamma ray irradiation on metakaolin based sodium geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambertin, D.; Boher, C.; Dannoux-Papin, A.; Galliez, K.; Rooses, A.; Frizon, F.

    2013-11-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation on metakaolin based Na-geopolymer have been investigated by external irradiation. The experiments were carried out in a gamma irradiator with 60Co sources up to 1000 kGy. Various Na-geopolymer with three H2O/Na2O ratios have been studied in terms of hydrogen radiolytic yield. The results show that hydrogen production increases linearly with water content. Gamma irradiation effects on Na-geopolymer microstructure have been investigated with porosity measurements and X-ray pair distribution function analysis. A change of pore size distribution and a structural relaxation have been found after gamma ray irradiation.

  16. Vitamin D and Inflammatory Cytokines in Healthy and Preeclamptic Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Barrera, David; Díaz, Lorenza; Noyola-Martínez, Nancy; Halhali, Ali

    2015-08-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disease characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. Among several disorders, the imbalance of inflammatory cytokines and the alteration of vitamin D metabolism have been reported in preeclampsia. The effects of calcitriol upon inflammatory cytokines has been demonstrated. In healthy pregnant women there is a shift toward a Th2 cytokine profile, which is necessary for an adequate pregnancy outcome. As compared with normal pregnancy, high pro-inflammatory and low anti-inflammatory cytokine levels have been observed in preeclamptic women. Preeclampsia has been associated with low calcitriol levels and vitamin D deficiency is correlated with a higher risk of the development of this disease. It has been demonstrated that placenta is a source as well as the target of calcitriol and cytokines and placental dysfunction has been associated with preeclampsia. Therefore, the present manuscript includes a review about serum calcitriol levels in non-pregnant, pregnant, and preeclamptic women as well as a review on the fetoplacental vitamin D metabolism in healthy and preeclamptic pregnancies. In addition, circulating and fetoplacental inflammatory cytokines in healthy and preeclamptic pregnancies are reviewed. Finally, the effects of calcitriol upon placental pro-inflammatory cytokines are also explored. In conclusion, maternal and placental calcitriol levels are low in preeclampsia which may explain, at least in part, high pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in this disease. PMID:26247971

  17. Vitamin D and Inflammatory Cytokines in Healthy and Preeclamptic Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, David; Díaz, Lorenza; Noyola-Martínez, Nancy; Halhali, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disease characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. Among several disorders, the imbalance of inflammatory cytokines and the alteration of vitamin D metabolism have been reported in preeclampsia. The effects of calcitriol upon inflammatory cytokines has been demonstrated. In healthy pregnant women there is a shift toward a Th2 cytokine profile, which is necessary for an adequate pregnancy outcome. As compared with normal pregnancy, high pro-inflammatory and low anti-inflammatory cytokine levels have been observed in preeclamptic women. Preeclampsia has been associated with low calcitriol levels and vitamin D deficiency is correlated with a higher risk of the development of this disease. It has been demonstrated that placenta is a source as well as the target of calcitriol and cytokines and placental dysfunction has been associated with preeclampsia. Therefore, the present manuscript includes a review about serum calcitriol levels in non-pregnant, pregnant, and preeclamptic women as well as a review on the fetoplacental vitamin D metabolism in healthy and preeclamptic pregnancies. In addition, circulating and fetoplacental inflammatory cytokines in healthy and preeclamptic pregnancies are reviewed. Finally, the effects of calcitriol upon placental pro-inflammatory cytokines are also explored. In conclusion, maternal and placental calcitriol levels are low in preeclampsia which may explain, at least in part, high pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in this disease. PMID:26247971

  18. Local and Systemic Cytokine Expression in Patients with Postherpetic Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Valet, Michael; Kafke, Waldemar; Tölle, Thomas R.; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the painful complication of a varicella zoster virus reactivation. We investigated the systemic and local gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression in patients with PHN. Methods Thirteen patients with PHN at the torso (Th4-S1) were recruited. Skin punch biopsies were obtained from the painful and the contralateral painless body area for intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) and cytokine profiling. Additionally, blood was withdrawn for systemic cytokine expression and compared to blood values of healthy controls. We analyzed the gene expression of selected pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF] and interleukins [IL]-1β, IL-2, and IL-8). Results IENFD was lower in affected skin compared to unaffected skin (p<0.05), while local gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines did not differ except for two patients who had 7fold higher IL-6 and 10fold higher IL-10 gene expression in the affected skin compared to the contralateral unaffected skin sample. Also, the systemic expression of cytokines in patients with PHN and in healthy controls was similar. Conclusion While the systemic and local expression of the investigated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines was not different from controls, this may have been influenced by study limitations like the low number of patients and different disease durations. Furthermore, other cytokines or pain mediators need to be considered. PMID:25127283

  19. Cytokine Signaling Modulates Blood-Brain Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihong; Stone, Kirsten P.; Hsuchou, Hung; Manda, Vamshi K.; Zhang, Yan; Kastin, Abba J.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) provides a vast interface for cytokines to affect CNS function. The BBB is a target for therapeutic intervention. It is essential, therefore, to understand how cytokines interact with each other at the level of the BBB and how secondary signals modulate CNS functions beyond the BBB. The interactions between cytokines and lipids, however, have not been fully addressed at the level of the BBB. Here, we summarize current understanding of the localization of cytokine receptors and transporters in specific membrane microdomains, particularly lipid rafts, on the luminal (apical) surface of the microvascular endothelial cells composing the BBB. We then illustrate the clinical context of cytokine effects on the BBB by neuroendocrine regulation and amplification of inflammatory signals. Two unusual aspects discussed are signaling crosstalk by different classes of cytokines and genetic regulation of drug efflux transporters. We also introduce a novel area of focus on how cytokines may act through nuclear hormone receptors to modulate efflux transporters and other targets. A specific example discussed is the ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA-1) that regulates lipid metabolism. Overall, cytokine signaling at the level of the BBB is a crucial feature of the dynamic regulation that can rapidly change BBB function and affect brain health and disease. PMID:21834767

  20. Cytokines, Graves' Disease, and Thyroid-Associated Ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khadavi, Nicole; Smith, Terry J.

    2008-01-01

    Graves' disease, an autoimmune process associated with thyroid dysfunction, can also manifest as remodeling of orbital connective tissue. Affected tissues exhibit immune responses that appear to be orchestrated by resident cells and those recruited from the bone marrow through their expression and release of cytokines and surface display of cytokine receptors. Cytokines are small molecules produced by many types of cells, including those of the “professional” immune system. Aberrant cytokine expression appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including thyroid autoimmunity. The skewed pattern of cytokine expression in the thyroid, including the T helper cell bias, may condition the response to apoptotic signals and determine the characteristics of an autoimmune reaction. Furthermore, chemoattractant cytokines, including IL16, RANTES, and CXCL10, elaborated by resident cells in the thyroid and orbit may provoke mononuclear cell infiltration. Other cytokines may drive cell activation and tissue remodeling. Thus cytokines and the signaling pathways they activate represent attractive therapeutic targets. Interruption of these might alter the natural course of Graves' disease and its orbital manifestations. PMID:18713026

  1. Cytokines, Graves' disease, and thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Gianoukakis, Andrew G; Khadavi, Nicole; Smith, Terry J

    2008-09-01

    Graves' disease, an autoimmune process associated with thyroid dysfunction, can also manifest as remodeling of orbital connective tissue. Affected tissues exhibit immune responses that appear to be orchestrated by resident cells and those recruited from the bone marrow through their expression and release of cytokines and surface display of cytokine receptors. Cytokines are small molecules produced by many types of cells, including those of the "professional" immune system. Aberrant cytokine expression appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including thyroid autoimmunity. The skewed pattern of cytokine expression in the thyroid, including the T helper cell bias, may condition the response to apoptotic signals and determine the characteristics of an autoimmune reaction. Furthermore, chemoattractant cytokines, including IL16, RANTES, and CXCL10, elaborated by resident cells in the thyroid and orbit may provoke mononuclear cell infiltration. Other cytokines may drive cell activation and tissue remodeling. Thus cytokines and the signaling pathways they activate represent attractive therapeutic targets. Interruption of these might alter the natural course of Graves' disease and its orbital manifestations. PMID:18713026

  2. The role of cytokines in immune changes induced by spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Miller, E. S.

    1993-01-01

    It has become apparent that spaceflight alters many immune responses. Among the regulatory components of the immune response that have been shown to be affected by spaceflight is the cytokine network. Spaceflight, as well as model systems of spaceflight, have been shown to affect the production and action of various cytokines including interferons, interleukins, colony stimulating factors, and tumor necrosis factors. These changes have been shown not to involve a general shutdown of the cytokine network but, rather, to involve selective alterations of specific cytokine functions by spaceflight. The full breadth of changes in cytokines induced by spaceflight, as well as mechanisms, duration, adaptation, reversibility, and significance to resistance to infection and neoplastic diseases, remains to be established.

  3. [Role of cytokines in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Benavides, J; Toulmond, S

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines were first characterized as high-molecular weight modulators of the immune response. However they also play an important role in the CNS. Thus, some cytokines could influence the synaptic transmission or modulate the neuronal and glial growth during brain development or after brain injury. Activated glial cells appear to be the major cytokines producing cells. Some of these cytokines are glial cells mitogens, whilst others have a direct neurotrophic activity. These effects seem to be mediated by receptors similar to those of neurotrophic factors. Cytokines might be crucial factors in the evolution of different acute or chronic neuropathological processes such as ischemia, brain trauma, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Control of their effect on brain cells could allow prevention of brain damage observed in such pathologies. PMID:8091343

  4. Role of IL-38 and Its Related Cytokines in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xianli; Peng, Xiao; Li, Yan; Li, Mingcai

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin- (IL-) 38 is a recently discovered cytokine and is the tenth member of the IL-1 cytokine family. IL-38 shares structural features with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-36Ra. IL-36R is the specific receptor of IL-38, a partial receptor antagonist of IL-36. IL-38 inhibits the production of T-cell cytokines IL-17 and IL-22. IL-38 also inhibits the production of IL-8 induced by IL-36γ, thus inhibiting inflammatory responses. IL-38-related cytokines, including IL-1Ra and IL-36Ra, are involved in the regulation of inflammation and immune responses. The study of IL-38 and IL-38-related cytokines might provide new insights for developing anti-inflammatory treatments in the near future. PMID:25873772

  5. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a cytokine/chemokine-mediated disorder?

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Lara; Struyf, Sofie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Sozzani, Silvano; Van Damme, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2011-09-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation and/or proliferation of cells with a Langerhans cell phenotype. Although no clear cause of LCH has been identified, it has been postulated that LCH might be the consequence of an immune dysregulation, causing Langerhans cells to migrate to and accumulate at various sites. Production of cytokines and chemokines is a central feature of immune regulation. Cytokines are abundantly present within LCH lesions. We review here the potential role of cytokines and chemokines in the pathogenesis of LCH. The type, distribution, and number of different cytokines released within lesions can provide clues to the possible aetiology of LCH and, ultimately, might offer therapeutic possibilities using recombinant cytokines or antagonists for this disorder. PMID:22001902

  6. Free-radical concentrations and other properties of pile-irradiated coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, R.A.; Breger, I.A.

    1959-01-01

    Five coals reacted quite differently when they were exposed to pile-irradiation. Little or no change was found in free-radical content for the three coals of lowest carbon content, whereas the two coals of highest carbon content were found to have a considerable increase in free-radical content. The infrared spectra and the apparent hardness of the irradiated coals of higher carbon content indicate that polymerization occurred. Radiation of these coals in chemical reagents may promote reactivity.

  7. Autoantibodies induced by chimeric cytokine - HIV envelope glycoprotein immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Chung, Nancy P.Y.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are often used as adjuvants to increase the immunogenicity of vaccines as they can improve the immune response and/or direct it into a desired direction. As an alternative to co-delivering antigens and cytokines separately they can be fused into a composite protein, with the advantage that both moieties act on the same immune cells. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike, located on the outside of virus particles and the only relevant protein for the induction of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), is poorly immunogenic. The induction of anti-Env Abs can be improved by coupling Env proteins to co-stimulatory molecules such as a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL). Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of chimeric molecules containing uncleaved Env gp140 fused to the species-matched cytokines IL-21 or GM-CSF in rabbits and mice. Each cytokine was either fused to the C-terminus of Env or embedded within Env at the position of the variable loops 1 and 2 (V1V2). The cytokine components of the chimeric Env-GM-CSF and Env-IL-21 molecules were functional in vitro, but none of the Env-cytokine fusion proteins resulted in improved Ab responses in vivo. Both the Env-GM-CSF and the Env-IL-21 molecules induced strong anti-cytokine Ab responses, in both test species. These autoimmune responses were independent of the location of the cytokine in the chimeric Env molecules; in that they were induced by cytokines inserted within the V1V2 of Env or fused to its Ct. The induction of undesired autoimmune responses should be considered when using cytokines as co-stimulatory molecules in fusion proteins. PMID:24729614

  8. Effects of Lipopolysaccharide on the response of C57BL/6J mice to whole thorax irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Asif; Jelveh, Salomeh; Mahmood, Javed; Hill, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Inflammatory and fibrogenic processes play a crucial role in the radiation-induced injury in the lung. The aim of the present study was to examine whether additive LPS exposure in the lung (to simulate respiratory infection) would affect pneumonitis or fibrosis associated with lung irradiation. Material and Methods Wildtype C57Bl/6J (WT-C57) and TNFα, TNFR1 and TNFR2 knockout (−/−) mice, in C57Bl/6J background, were given whole thorax irradiation (10Gy) with or without post-irradiation intratracheal administration of LPS (50μg/mice). Functional deficit was examined by measuring breathing rate at various times after treatment. Real-time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to analyse the protein expression and m-RNA of Interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α), Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFβ) in the lung at various times after treatment. Inflammatory cells were detected by Mac-3 (macrophages) and Toluidine Blue (mast cells) staining. Collagen content was estimated by hydroxyproline (total collagen) and Sircol assay (soluble collagen). Levels of oxidative damage were assessed by 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) staining. Results LPS exposure significantly attenuated the breathing rate increases following irradiation of WT-C57, TNFR1−/− and TNFR2−/− mice and to a lesser extent in TNFα−/− mice. Collagen content was significantly reduced after LPS treatment in WT-C57, TNFR1−/− and TNFα−/− mice and there was a trend in TNFR2−/− mice. Similarly there were lower levels of inflammatory cells and cytokines in the LPS treated mice. Conclusions This study reveals a mitigating effect of early exposure to LPS on injury caused by irradiation on lungs of C57Bl mice. The results suggest that immediate infection post irradiation may not impact lung response negatively in radiation

  9. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  10. Waste management - cytokines, growth factors and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amarjit; Al-Shanti, Nasser; Nasser, Al-Shanti; Stewart, Claire E H

    2006-12-01

    Muscle damage with a lack of regeneration, manifests itself in several life-threatening diseases, including cancer cachexia, congestive heart failure, AIDS and sepsis. Often misdiagnosed as a condition simply of weight loss, cachexia is actually a highly complex metabolic disorder involving features of anorexia, anaemia, lipolysis and insulin resistance. A significant loss of lean body mass arises from such conditions, resulting in wasting of skeletal muscle. Unlike starvation, the weight loss seen in chronic illnesses arises equally from loss of muscle and of fat. The cachectic state is particularly problematic in cancer, typifying poor prognosis and often lowering responses to chemotherapy and radiation treatment. More than half of cancer patients suffer from cachexia, and strikingly, nearly one-third of cancer deaths are related to cachexia rather than the tumour burden. In considering this disorder, we are faced with a conundrum; how is it possible for uncontrolled growth to prevail in the tumour, in the face of unrestrained tissue loss in our muscles? Consistently, the catabolic state has been associated with a shift in the homeostatic balance between muscle synthesis and degradation mediated by the actions of growth factors and cytokines. Indeed, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels are raised in several animal models of cachectic muscle wasting, whereas the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system acts potently to regulate muscle development, hypertrophy and maintenance. This concept of skeletal muscle homeostasis, often viewed as the net balance between two separate processes of protein synthesis and degradation has however changed. More recently, the view is that these two biochemical processes are not occurring independently of each other but in fact are finely co-ordinated by a web of intricate signalling networks. This review, therefore, aims to discuss data currently available regarding the mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration with