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Sample records for cytomegalovirus infection implications

  1. Cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Climent, C; Vélez, R; Capriles, J A

    1992-01-01

    Post-transfusion CMV infection most frequently results in asymptomatic seroconversion. Among immunocompetent patients only seronegative pregnant women require such products because of the risk of fetal CMV infection. In selected groups of immunocompromised patients, significant disease can occur. It is desirable to provide blood and blood components with reduced CMV risk to the following patients: seronegative infants weighting less than 1200 g at birth, seronegative bone marrow transplant patients who receive marrow from seronegative donors and seronegative renal transplant patients receiving kidneys from seronegative donors. Heart and liver transplantation seronegative patients may receive seronegative blood if the donor is seronegative. CMV--seronegative HIV infected cases may also be transfused with CMV--seronegative blood. PMID:1323967

  2. Cytomegalovirus as nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Román González, J; Colón, M; Ramírez-Ronda, C H

    1991-08-01

    Nosocomial infections with cytomegalovirus are an area of great concern and controversy within the medical community. With the advent of organ transplantation there have been an increased number of susceptible individuals. In the past most cases were confined to newborn nurseries and the neonatal intensive care unit. It is of great interest that recent evidence suggests that health care providers are at no greater risk of acquiring CMV infection inside the hospital setting when compared to a representative control group within the same community. This paper will review some of the literature that deals with the nosocomial transmission of CMV. We will try to emphasize transmission, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of CMV infection. PMID:1667848

  3. Predictors of severity for postnatal cytomegalovirus infection in preterm infants and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Gunkel, Julia; Wolfs, Tom F W; de Vries, Linda S; Nijman, Joppe

    2014-11-01

    Postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is common in neonates and is mostly acquired through infected breast milk from seropositive mothers. In this review, risk factors of postnatal CMV transmission and predictors of severity, preventive measures and treatment of symptomatic postnatal CMV infection in preterm infants are discussed. Several viral, transmission route and host factors have been associated with a higher risk of postnatal CMV transmission from mother to child. Severity predictors of symptomatic postnatal CMV infection may include extreme prematurity (gestational age <26 weeks), timing of postnatal infection as well as comorbidities. Further research in postnatally infected preterm infants at risk for severe symptoms is essential with respect to preventive measures involving the infected breast milk and antiviral treatment. PMID:25277116

  4. Cytomegalovirus infection: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, A; Kashyap, B; Matlani, M

    2009-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) poses an important public health problem as it may cause serious morbidity and mortality in congenitally infected newborns and immunocompromised patients, most notably transplant recipients and HIV-infected persons. It is probably one of the most common infections known to humans and is characterized by a self-limiting infection in healthy individuals. CMV infection is the single most frequent cause of infectious complications in the early period following kidney transplantation Post-transfusion cytomegalovirus infection is of concern in the immunocompetent as well as in certain categories of immunocompromised individuals such as neonates, pregnant women, recipients of bone marrow and other organ transplants and individuals with immunodeficiency disorders. The emergence of AIDS in India has necessitated the establishment of reliable tests for diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection as a damaged immune system permits cytomegalovirus reactivation. The magnitude of this problem in India and the various diagnostic modalities used have not been adequately investigated and, hence, CMV infection is still a major health problem warranting strong preventive measures. The ultimate goal of the prevention program is to develop a vaccine that can be administered to seronegative women of childbearing age to prevent primary infection during pregnancy. PMID:19172051

  5. Cytomegalovirus Infection in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Jaythoon; O’Neill, Derek; Honari, Bahman; De Gascun, Cillian; Connell, Jeff; Keogan, Mary; Hickey, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections occur worldwide and primary infection usually occurs in early childhood and is often asymptomatic whereas primary infection in adults may result in symptomatic illness. CMV establishes a chronic latent infection with intermittent periods of reactivation. Primary infection or reactivation associate with increased mortality and morbidity in those who are immunocompromised. Transplacental transmission may result in significant birth defects or long-term sensorineural hearing loss. We performed a study to determine the CMV seroprevalence and the association between HLA Class I alleles and frequency of CMV infection in Ireland. The presence of CMV IgG, a marker of previous CMV infection, was determined for a cohort of 1849 HLA typed solid organ transplant donors between 1990 and 2013. The presence of CMV IgG was correlated with HLA type. The CMV seroprevalence in solid organ transplant donors was 33.4% (range 22–48% per annum) over the time period 1990 to 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that both age and HLA alleles were associated with CMV seropositivity. A significant and positive relationship between age and CMV seropositivity was observed (OR = 1.013, P < 0.001, CI [1.007, 1.019]). Chi-square analysis revealed that the female gender was independently associated with CMV seropositivity (P < 0.01). Seroprevalence in women of reproductive age (20–39 years) was significantly higher than men of the same age (37% vs 26%, P < 0.01). The frequencies of HLA-A1, HLA-A2, and HLA-A3 in our cohort were 40.8%, 48.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of HLA-A1 but not HLA-A2 or HLA-A3 was independently associated with CMV seronegativity (P < 0.01). Interestingly, individuals who co-expressed HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 alleles were significantly more likely to be CMV seropositive (P < 0.02). The frequencies of HLA-B5, HLA-B7, and HLA-B8 in our cohort

  6. Cytomegalovirus infection in transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Luiz Sergio; Pierrotti, Lígia Camera; Abdala, Edson; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo; Strabelli, Tânia Mara Varejão; Campos, Silvia Vidal; Ramos, Jéssica Fernandes; Latif, Acram Zahredine Abdul; Litvinov, Nadia; Maluf, Natalya Zaidan; Caiaffa Filho, Helio Hehl; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Lopes, Marta Heloisa; Santos, Vera Aparecida dos; Linardi, Camila da Cruz Gouveia; Yasuda, Maria Aparecida Shikanai; Marques, Heloisa Helena de Sousa

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus infection is a frequent complication after transplantation. This infection occurs due to transmission from the transplanted organ, due to reactivation of latent infection, or after a primary infection in seronegative patients and can be defined as follows: latent infection, active infection, viral syndrome or invasive disease. This condition occurs mainly between 30 and 90 days after transplantation. In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in particular, infection usually occurs within the first 30 days after transplantation and in the presence of graft-versus-host disease. The major risk factors are when the recipient is cytomegalovirus seronegative and the donor is seropositive as well as when lymphocyte-depleting antibodies are used. There are two methods for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection: the pp65 antigenemia assay and polymerase chain reaction. Serology has no value for the diagnosis of active disease, whereas histology of the affected tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage analysis are useful in the diagnosis of invasive disease. Cytomegalovirus disease can be prevented by prophylaxis (the administration of antiviral drugs to all or to a subgroup of patients who are at higher risk of viral replication) or by preemptive therapy (the early diagnosis of viral replication before development of the disease and prescription of antiviral treatment to prevent the appearance of clinical disease). The drug used is intravenous or oral ganciclovir; oral valganciclovir; or, less frequently, valacyclovir. Prophylaxis should continue for 90 to 180 days. Treatment is always indicated in cytomegalovirus disease, and the gold-standard drug is intravenous ganciclovir. Treatment should be given for 2 to 3 weeks and should be continued for an additional 7 days after the first negative result for viremia. PMID:26222822

  7. Cytomegalovirus infection in transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo*, Luiz Sergio; Pierrotti, Lígia Camera; Abdala, Edson; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo; Strabelli, Tânia Mara Varejão; Campos, Silvia Vidal; Ramos, Jéssica Fernandes; Latif, Acram Zahredine Abdul; Litvinov, Nadia; Maluf, Natalya Zaidan; Filho, Helio Hehl Caiaffa; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Lopes, Marta Heloisa; dos Santos, Vera Aparecida; da Cruz Gouveia Linardi, Camila; Yasuda, Maria Aparecida Shikanai; de Sousa Marques, Heloisa Helena

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infection is a frequent complication after transplantation. This infection occurs due to transmission from the transplanted organ, due to reactivation of latent infection, or after a primary infection in seronegative patients and can be defined as follows: latent infection, active infection, viral syndrome or invasive disease. This condition occurs mainly between 30 and 90 days after transplantation. In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in particular, infection usually occurs within the first 30 days after transplantation and in the presence of graft-versus-host disease. The major risk factors are when the recipient is cytomegalovirus seronegative and the donor is seropositive as well as when lymphocyte-depleting antibodies are used. There are two methods for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection: the pp65 antigenemia assay and polymerase chain reaction. Serology has no value for the diagnosis of active disease, whereas histology of the affected tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage analysis are useful in the diagnosis of invasive disease. Cytomegalovirus disease can be prevented by prophylaxis (the administration of antiviral drugs to all or to a subgroup of patients who are at higher risk of viral replication) or by preemptive therapy (the early diagnosis of viral replication before development of the disease and prescription of antiviral treatment to prevent the appearance of clinical disease). The drug used is intravenous or oral ganciclovir; oral valganciclovir; or, less frequently, valacyclovir. Prophylaxis should continue for 90 to 180 days. Treatment is always indicated in cytomegalovirus disease, and the gold-standard drug is intravenous ganciclovir. Treatment should be given for 2 to 3 weeks and should be continued for an additional 7 days after the first negative result for viremia. PMID:26222822

  8. Evolutive leukoencephalopathy in congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Krakar, Goran; Đaković, Ivana; Delin, Sanja; Bošnjak, Vlatka Mejaški

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is the most common infectious cause of congenital brain injury. Type and severity of congenital cytomegalovirus infection-related brain abnormalities depend on the developmental stage of the central nervous system at the time of fetal infection. The aim of this study was to follow the course of leukoencephalopathy in a patient with congenital cytomegalovirus infection. We describe brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a boy with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection performed at the age of 3 weeks, 13 months, and 4 and 7 years. Neonatal brain MRI showed most of characteristic findings in congenital cytomegalovirus infection with most prominent white matter abnormalities and cortical dysplasia. MRI follow-up images showed that cortical dysgenesis remained unchanged and static, whereas white matter abnormalities evolved over the years. We propose that leukoencephalopathy in congenital cytomegalovirus infection is not only nonprogressive or static but even evolutive and suggests both underlying disruption and delay of myelination. PMID:24453153

  9. Cytomegalovirus Infection in Ireland: Seroprevalence, HLA Class I Alleles, and Implications.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Jaythoon; O'Neill, Derek; Honari, Bahman; De Gascun, Cillian; Connell, Jeff; Keogan, Mary; Hickey, David

    2016-02-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections occur worldwide and primary infection usually occurs in early childhood and is often asymptomatic whereas primary infection in adults may result in symptomatic illness. CMV establishes a chronic latent infection with intermittent periods of reactivation. Primary infection or reactivation associate with increased mortality and morbidity in those who are immunocompromised. Transplacental transmission may result in significant birth defects or long-term sensorineural hearing loss.We performed a study to determine the CMV seroprevalence and the association between HLA Class I alleles and frequency of CMV infection in Ireland. The presence of CMV IgG, a marker of previous CMV infection, was determined for a cohort of 1849 HLA typed solid organ transplant donors between 1990 and 2013. The presence of CMV IgG was correlated with HLA type.The CMV seroprevalence in solid organ transplant donors was 33.4% (range 22-48% per annum) over the time period 1990 to 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that both age and HLA alleles were associated with CMV seropositivity. A significant and positive relationship between age and CMV seropositivity was observed (OR = 1.013, P < 0.001, CI [1.007, 1.019]). Chi-square analysis revealed that the female gender was independently associated with CMV seropositivity (P < 0.01). Seroprevalence in women of reproductive age (20-39 years) was significantly higher than men of the same age (37% vs 26%, P < 0.01). The frequencies of HLA-A1, HLA-A2, and HLA-A3 in our cohort were 40.8%, 48.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of HLA-A1 but not HLA-A2 or HLA-A3 was independently associated with CMV seronegativity (P < 0.01). Interestingly, individuals who co-expressed HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 alleles were significantly more likely to be CMV seropositive (P < 0.02). The frequencies of HLA-B5, HLA-B7, and HLA-B8 in our cohort were 6.1%, 31

  10. Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Blood transfusions Organ transplants Respiratory droplets Saliva Sexual contact Urine Most people come into contact with ... with another person. You should avoid kissing and sexual contact with an infected person. The virus may ...

  11. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Audiologic Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Karen B.

    2013-01-01

    The association between congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was first described almost 50 years ago. Studies over the intervening decades have further described the relationship between congenital CMV infection and SNHL in children. However, congenital CMV infection remains a leading cause of SNHL in children in the United States and the world today. As more CMV infections are identified, it is important to recognize that infants who are born to seroimmune mothers are not completely protected from SNHL, although their hearing loss is often milder than that seen in CMV-infected infants following primary maternal infections. Late-onset and progressive hearing losses occur following congenital CMV infection, and CMV-infected infants should be evaluated regularly to provide for early detection of hearing loss and appropriate intervention. Fluctuating hearing loss that is not explained by concurrent middle ear infections is another characteristic of CMV-related hearing loss in children. Challenges still remain in predicting which children with congenital CMV infection will develop hearing loss and, among those who do develop loss, whether or not the loss will continue to deteriorate. PMID:24257423

  12. Cerebral ultrasound images in prenatal cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Tomà, P; Magnano, G M; Mezzano, P; Lazzini, F; Bonacci, W; Serra, G

    1989-01-01

    A male newborn with prenatal cytomegalovirus infection was referred for cranial ultrasound. The cranial ultrasound demonstrated areas of increased echogenicity in the thalamic and gray nuclei resembling "a branched candlestick". Doppler technique located the "branched candlestick" along the thalamostriate arteries. This image is particularly interesting because to our knowledge it has never before been described in congenital cytomegalovirus infection, but only in congenital rubella. PMID:2550848

  13. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PARATHION POISONING FOLLOWING MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased Susceptibility to Parathion Poisoning Following Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection. Fifty to 100 percent mortality occurred in mice treated with ordinarily sublethal doses of parathion 2 to 5 days post infection with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). These mortalities appear...

  14. [Cytomegalovirus and BK polyomavirus infection after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    De Paolis, P; Gervasio, E; Tedesco, M; Favaro', A; Iappelli, M; Di Giulio, S

    2009-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and BK polyomavirus (BKV) infections have been described in a high percentage of renal transplant patients and are known to cause various complications in renal transplantation. They are closely related to immunosuppressive therapy and implicated in the progression of graft failure. This review focuses on the clinical aspects of CMV and BKV infection after renal transplantation, optimal monitoring, and recent preventive measures and interventions to improve graft function and recipient survival. PMID:19382094

  15. Subclinical Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection and Hearing Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahle, Arthur J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    When the hearing sensitivity of children with subclinical congenital cytomegalovirus infection was evaluated and compared with that of a group of matched control subjects, nine of the 18 infected subjects were found to have some hearing loss, ranging from slight high-frequency impairments to a severe-to-profound unilateral loss. (MYS)

  16. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: Clinical presentation, epidemiology, diagnosis and prevention

    PubMed Central

    van Zuylen, Wendy J; Hamilton, Stuart T; Naing, Zin; Hall, Beverly; Shand, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common congenital infection causing serious disease in infants. It is the leading infectious cause of sensorineural hearing loss and neurodevelopmental disability in developed countries. Despite the clinical importance of congenital cytomegalovirus, surveys show there is limited awareness and knowledge in the medical and general community about congenital cytomegalovirus infection. This article reviews the clinical features, global epidemiology, transmission and risk factors for cytomegalovirus infections. It also highlights several major advances made in recent years in the diagnosis and prevention of cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy. Although research is ongoing, no therapy is currently proven to prevent or treat maternal, fetal or neonatal cytomegalovirus infection. Education of women regarding hygiene measures can help prevent cytomegalovirus infection and are currently the best strategy to prevent congenital cytomegalovirus disease.

  17. Cytomegalovirus Cutaneous Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Faye T; Alhassan, Sulaiman; Adjapong, Opoku; Thirumala, Raghukumar

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is an opportunistic infection with a typically benign course in the healthy host but has a more ominous course in the immunocompromised population. CMV infection commonly affects the visceral organs, particularly the respiratory and the gastrointestinal tract. CMV cutaneous lesions are rare and can be easily missed. We present a case of a 76-year-old woman presenting with a diffuse non-pruritic macular lesion with scattered vesicles and bullae, which was initially treated as a varicella zoster virus infection and herpes simplex viral infection, but was later found on biopsy to be due to cytomegalovirus. She has a history of Sjögren's syndrome, interstitial lung disease, and being on chronic immunosuppression therapy. This case highlights the importance of considering CMV infection in the differential diagnosis of vesicular skin lesions in immunocompromised patients. Based on a PubMed search for “cutaneous cytomegalovirus”, “cutaneous CMV”, “cytomegalovirus skin”, and “skin CMV” in material published in the last 20 years (from 1996 to 2016) and reviewing any applicable referenced material outside of those dates, cases of cutaneous CMV are not well documented. PMID:27335710

  18. Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Shany; Eytan, Ori

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection has been reported many times in the literature since the mid 1980s – mainly in case reports and in small case series, but also in four controlled studies. Still, many physicians are unaware of this association although acute cytomegalovirus infection diagnosis in a thrombosis patient may warrant antiviral therapy and may affect anticoagulation therapy duration. Accordingly, the clinical characteristics of patients with thrombosis and acute cytomegalovirus infection are reviewed, and the current knowledge concerning this unique association is presented herein. We believe it is time to add acute cytomegalovirus infection to the list of thrombosis triggers. PMID:25624857

  19. Congenital cytomegalovirus: implications for maternal-child nursing.

    PubMed

    Alex, Marion Rita

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading infectious cause of neurodevelopmental disorders in children. Despite its prevalence and devastating consequences, there is limited public and professional awareness about it. This practice-focused article presents two stories describing the family experience of congenital CMV; a literature review describing incidence and epidemiology of congenital CMV; sequelae including infection; the extent of public awareness about congenital CMV; and risk reduction approaches. Implications for maternal-child nurses, whose work uniquely situates them with populations of childbearing women, are discussed. PMID:24201241

  20. Optimum treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Ville, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection affects 0.7% of live births and is the leading cause of congenital neurological handicaps of infectious origin. However, systematic screening of this infection has not been implemented in pregnancy or at birth in any country. This apparent paradox has been justified by the unavailability of an efficient vaccine and by the scarcity of data available on the treatment of congenital CMV. However, in the last decade interesting new data on the management of this congenital infection has emerged including new results on both neonatal and postnatal treatments. This review provides an update on the potential benefits of antiviral treatment and on passive immunisation both in the neonatal and the antenatal periods. These suggest a benefit to a proactive approach for neonatal and prenatal congenital infections. PMID:27043943

  1. Late cytomegalovirus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: case reports

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Sâmara Grapiuna; de Matos, Sócrates Bezerra; Botura, Mônica Borges; Meyer, Roberto; Lima, Fernanda Washington de Mendonça

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is related to high rates of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This report highlights the importance of adequate monitoring and management of this infection. We report on two cases of patients with late subclinical cytomegalovirus infection. These patients were monitored for antigenemia by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Active cytomegalovirus infection is most common in the first three months after transplantation however the cases reported herein show the importance of monitoring for active infection after Day +100 post-transplantation. Early detection of active infection enables quick preemptive therapy. In conclusion, we emphasize that patients with risk factors for developing severe or late cytomegalovirus disease should be monitored for more than 100 post-transplant days as late active infection is a reality. PMID:24478611

  2. Increased intestinal permeability during cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    de Maar, E F; Kleibeuker, J H; Boersma-van Ek, W; The, T H; van Son, W J

    1996-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in renal transplant recipients can affect the gastrointestinal tract, but significant clinical manifestations are seldom seen. We hypothesize that subclinical involvement of the gastrointestinal tract may be quite frequent during CMV infection. In order to study this, we measured intestinal permeability by calculating the urinary lactulose mannitol (LM) excretion ratio after oral administration of lactulose and mannitol (normal < 0.030) in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CMV infection. A total of 111 patients were enrolled in the study, 104 of whom were tested on postoperative day (POD) 10. Twenty-nine patients developed CMV infection, 12 of whom could be studied with the permeability test (median POD 40). Another nine patients without CMV infection were also studied at day 40 and served as controls. The LM ratio increased significantly during CMV infection compared to measurements before active infection (median 0.060 vs. 0.030, P < 0.01) and was significantly higher during the infection than in the control group (median 0.007, P < 0.01). No correlation could be found between the LM ratio and viral load, humoral response to the virus, or symptomatology of infection. We conclude that an increased intestinal permeability is found in a substantial number of patients with an active, albeit asymptomatic, CMV infection after renal transplantation. Pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical implications remain speculative but will be subject to further study. PMID:8914238

  3. An animal model of human cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Gao, L; Qian, S; Zeng, L; Wang, R; Wei, G; Fan, J; Zheng, S

    2007-12-01

    To develop a rat model that allowed in vivo progressive human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, allogeneic liver transplantation was performed across a rat combination of Dark Agouti (DA) to Brown Norway (BN). AD169, a well-characterized laboratory strain of HCMV, was used to establish a rat model of HCMV infection by injection of 0.4 mL (30.0 logTCID50) supernate into the rat peritoneum. Histological and blood specimens were obtained from animals sacrificed at predetermined timepoints. We performed immunohistochemical staining in liver, heart, kidney, spleen, and lung for HCMV immediate-early antigen (IE), lower matrix protein (pp65) detection in peripheral blood leukocytes, and HCMV early antigen (EA) and late antigen (LA). We compared survival rates. Our results showed positive HCMV IE and pp65 antigenemia detected in peripheral blood leukocytes in transplanted recipients from day 1 to day 30. Positive HCMV EA and LA staining cells were only detected in sections 10 days after liver transplantation, namely, in hepatocytes, mononuclear cells, bile duct epithelial cells, and endothelial cells. Successful HCMV replication was due to the combination of liver transplantation and cyclosporine (CsA) immunosuppression. Survival analysis showed no significant differences between the HCMV-infected group and HCMV-uninfected group. This new rat model of HCMV infection may be helpful to understand immune system modulation of HCMV infection. PMID:18089401

  4. Pathogenesis of Experimental Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lockridge, Kristen M.; Sequar, Getachew; Zhou, Shan Shan; Yue, Yujuan; Mandell, Carol P.; Barry, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes and maintains a lifelong persistence following infection in an immunocompetent host. The determinants of a stable virus-host relationship are poorly defined. A nonhuman primate model for HCMV was used to investigate virological and host parameters of infection in a healthy host. Juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were inoculated with rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV), either orally or intravenously (i.v.), and longitudinally necropsied. None of the animals displayed clinical signs of disease, although hematologic abnormalities were observed intermittently in i.v. inoculated animals. RhCMV DNA was detected transiently in the plasma of all animals at 1 to 2 weeks postinfection (wpi) and in multiple tissues beginning at 2 to 4 wpi. Splenic tissue was the only organ positive for RhCMV DNA in all animals. The location of splenic cells expressing RhCMV immediate-early protein 1 (IE1) in i.v. inoculated animals changed following inoculation. At 4 to 5 wpi, most IE1-positive cells were perifollicular, and at 25 wpi, the majority were located within the red pulp. All animals developed anti-RhCMV immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies within 1 to 2 wpi and IgG antibodies within 2 to 4 wpi against a limited number of viral proteins. Host reactivity to RhCMV proteins increased in titer (total and neutralizing) and avidity with time. These results demonstrate that while antiviral immune responses were able to protect from disease, they were insufficient to eliminate reservoirs of persistent viral gene expression. PMID:10516066

  5. Progressive Hearing Impairment in Children with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahle, Arthur J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Audiological assessment of 86 children (mean age 38 months at last evaluation time) with congenital cytomegalovirus infection revealed progressive hearing loss in four of 12 Ss with sensorineural hearing impairments. Case descriptions documented the progression of the hearing loss. (Author)

  6. Animal cytomegaloviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Staczek, J

    1990-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses are agents that infect a variety of animals. Human cytomegalovirus is associated with infections that may be inapparent or may result in severe body malformation. More recently, human cytomegalovirus infections have been recognized as causing severe complications in immunosuppressed individuals. In other animals, cytomegaloviruses are often associated with infections having relatively mild sequelae. Many of these sequelae parallel symptoms associated with human cytomegalovirus infections. Recent advances in biotechnology have permitted the study of many of the animal cytomegaloviruses in vitro. Consequently, animal cytomegaloviruses can be used as model systems for studying the pathogenesis, immunobiology, and molecular biology of cytomegalovirus-host and cytomegalovirus-cell interactions. PMID:2170830

  7. Acquisition of cytomegalovirus infection: an update.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, B A

    1989-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous deoxyribonucleic acid virus that commonly infects a majority of individuals at some time during their life. Although most of these CMV infections are asymptomatic, certain patient groups are at risk to develop serious illness. Understanding the epidemiology of this virus is a key element in the development of strategies for preventing CMV disease. However, a number of features of this virus complicate such understanding. Following infection, CMV can remain latent, with subsequent reactivation; the factors controlling latency and reactivation and those factors which determine whether a CMV infection will be symptomatic are unknown. CMV disease can be acquired by natural routes, including horizontal and vertical transmission. Due to the ubiquity of CMV, the delineation of CMV transmission by these natural routes is complicated by the myriad of possible sources. Moreover, concerns over the risk of CMV transmission to the seronegative pregnant female have been raised in relation to preventing CMV transmission. By using molecular biologic techniques, much knowledge has been gained regarding the transmission of CMV disease by natural routes; however, a number of questions remain unanswered. The transmission of CMV infection by natural routes is therefore reviewed and the issues are highlighted. Primary infection, reactivation, and reinfection are the types of active CMV infections that can occur in an immunocompromised patient. In addition to natural routes of infection, introduction of presumably latently infected organs and requirements for multiple blood transfusions increase potential exposure to CMV in the immunocompromised patient. Understanding the epidemiology of CMV infections in the immunocompromised patient is difficult and in some instances controversial due to the complexity and interdependency of a number of factors which lead to CMV infection. In an immunocompromised individual, a major risk factor in developing

  8. Peptide inhibition of human cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most prevalent congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe causing significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. HCMV is also an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- infected patients with AIDS, and solid organ and allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Current treatments for HCMV-associated diseases are insufficient due to the emergence of drug-induced resistance and cytotoxicity, necessitating novel approaches to limit HCMV infection. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic peptides targeting glycoprotein B (gB), a major glycoprotein of HCMV that is highly conserved across the Herpesviridae family, that specifically inhibit fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane preventing HCMV entry and infection. Results Using the Wimley-White Interfacial Hydrophobicity Scale (WWIHS), several regions within gB were identified that display a high potential to interact with lipid bilayers of cell membranes and hydrophobic surfaces within proteins. The ability of synthetic peptides analogous to WWIHS-positive sequences of HCMV gB to inhibit viral infectivity was evaluated. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF) were infected with the Towne-GFP strain of HCMV (0.5 MOI), preincubated with peptides at a range of concentrations (78 nm to 100 μM), and GFP-positive cells were visualized 48 hours post-infection by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by flow cytometry. Peptides that inhibited HCMV infection demonstrated different inhibitory concentration curves indicating that each peptide possesses distinct biophysical properties. Peptide 174-200 showed 80% inhibition of viral infection at a concentration of 100 μM, and 51% and 62% inhibition at concentrations of 5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Peptide 233-263 inhibited infection by 97% and 92% at concentrations of 100 μM and 50 μM, respectively

  9. Cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy: review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bonalumi, Silvia; Trapanese, Angelica; Santamaria, Angelo; D’Emidio, Laura; Mobili, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the principles of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in pregnancy. In particular, the aim of this review is to evaluate: Incidence and mother-to-child transmissionThe value of screening of pregnant womenDiagnosis of CMV maternal infectionDiagnosis of fetal infection (evaluate the value of ultrasound examination and amniocentesis and evaluate whether the amniotic viral load of mothers with primary cytomegalovirus infection correlate with fetal or neonatal outcomes)Diagnosis of infection in newbornsTherapy in pregnancy, postnatal therapy and prevention PMID:22439067

  10. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a target for cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for hematopoiesis, self-renewal and differentiation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Sergey V.; Harbacheuski, Ryhor; Lewis-Antes, Anita; Zhu Hua; Rameshwar, Pranela; Kotenko, Sergei V. . E-mail: kotenkse@umdnj.edu

    2007-03-30

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in bone marrow (BM) regulate the differentiation and proliferation of adjacent hematopoietic precursor cells and contribute to the regeneration of mesenchymal tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat and connective tissue. BM is an important site for the pathogenesis of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) where the virus establishes latency in hematopoietic progenitors and can transmit after reactivation to neighboring cells. Here we demonstrate that BM-MSCs are permissive to productive HCMV infection, and that HCMV alters the function of MSCs: (i) by changing the repertoire of cell surface molecules in BM-MSCs, HCMV modifies the pattern of interaction between BM-MSCs and hematopoietic cells; (ii) HCMV infection of BM-MSCs undergoing adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation impaired the process of differentiation. Our results suggest that by altering BM-MSC biology, HCMV may contribute to the development of various diseases.

  11. Brief Report: Autistic Disorder in Three Children with Cytomegalovirus Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeten, Thayne L.; Posey, David J.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has identified a relationship between autistic disorder (autism) and specific congenital infections. Three cases of congenital or perinatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurring in association with autism are described. Hypothetical mechanisms relating congenital infection, such as CMV, to the development of autism are…

  12. Prevention of Primary Cytomegalovirus Infection in Pregnancy☆

    PubMed Central

    Revello, Maria Grazia; Tibaldi, Cecilia; Masuelli, Giulia; Frisina, Valentina; Sacchi, Alessandra; Furione, Milena; Arossa, Alessia; Spinillo, Arsenio; Klersy, Catherine; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Gerna, Giuseppe; Todros, Tullia

    2015-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the leading infectious agent causing congenital sensorineural hearing loss and psychomotor retardation. CMV vaccine is currently unavailable and treatment options in pregnancy are limited. Susceptible pregnant women caring for children are at high risk for primary infection. CMV educational and hygienic measures have the potential to prevent primary maternal infection. Methods A mixed interventional and observational controlled study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of hygiene information among pregnant women at risk for primary CMV infection for personal/occupational reasons. In the intervention arm, CMV-seronegative women, identified at the time of maternal serum screening for fetal aneuploidy at 11–12 weeks of gestation, were given hygiene information and prospectively tested for CMV until delivery. The comparison arm consisted of women enrolled at delivery who were neither tested for nor informed about CMV during pregnancy, and who had a serum sample stored at the screening for fetal aneuploidy. By design, groups were homogeneous for age, parity, education, and exposure to at least one risk factor. The primary outcome was CMV seroconversion. Acceptance of hygiene recommendations was a secondary objective and was measured by a self-report. Findings Four out of 331 (1.2%) women seroconverted in the intervention group compared to 24/315 (7.6%) in the comparison group (delta = 6.4%; 95% CI 3.2–9.6; P < 0.001). There were 3 newborns with congenital infection in the intervention group and 8 in the comparison group (1 with cerebral ultrasound abnormalities at birth). Ninety-three percent of women felt hygiene recommendations were worth suggesting to all pregnant women at risk for infection. Interpretation This controlled study provides evidence that an intervention based on the identification and hygiene counseling of CMV-seronegative pregnant women significantly prevents maternal infection. While waiting for

  13. Ileal perforation caused by cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Van Schaeybroeck, S; Hiele, M; Miserez, M; Croes, R

    2002-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman developed a small bowel perforation due to cytomegalovirus infection. She did not taken any immunosuppressive medication and her cellular immunity was normal. Surgical resection and antiviral therapy with ganciclovir led to complete recovery. As far as we know, this paper reports the first case of small bowel perforation due to cytomegalovirus infection in a non-immunocompromised patient. Nevertheless the patient was known with diabetes mellitus. It should be emphasised that elderly patients have impaired immune defences and may be unsuspected hosts of opportunistic infections. PMID:12212357

  14. Autism in a Child with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Phillip I.

    1983-01-01

    A case study is described in which early infantile autism was diagnosed in a child with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMU) infection. It is suggested that congenital infection should be considered as an etiological agent in autism. The case's synergistic effect of CMU-induced brain damage, deafness, and maternal deprivation in noted. (CL)

  15. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients' neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  16. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients’ neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  17. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families After Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families after Stem Cell Transplant What is cytomegalovirus (CMV)? Cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ... weakened by medicines that you must take after stem cell transplant and by the transplant itself. Your body ...

  18. Infantile Spasms and Cytomegalovirus Infection: Antiviral and Antiepileptic Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunin-Wasowicz, Dorota; Kasprzyk-Obara, Jolanta; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Kapusta, Monika; Milewska-Bobula, Bogumila

    2007-01-01

    From 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2004, 22 patients (13 males, nine females; age range 2-12mo) with infantile spasms and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were treated with intravenous ganciclovir (GCV) and antiepileptic drugs. GCV was given for 3 to 12 weeks with a 1-month interval (one, two, or three courses). Epileptic spasms occurred before…

  19. Guillain-Barré syndrome and cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Julien; Germi, Raphaële; Jean, Dominique; Baccard-Longère, Monique; Casez, Olivier; Besson, Gérard; Rougé, Alain; Boutonnat, Jean; Schwebel, Carole; Hoffmann, Pascale; Morand, Patrice

    2016-06-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disorder which can be triggered by cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. GBS following CMV primary infection is a rare event during pregnancy, which raises the question of maternal and fetal management. We describe an unusual case of GBS after CMV primary infection in a pregnant woman. The mother was successfully treated with standard immunoglobulins but in utero fetal death caused by CMV congenital infection unfortunately occurred. Similar cases have rarely been reported in the literature. PMID:27105316

  20. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a cause of renal dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Chan, Maren; Hecht, Jonathan L; Boyd, Theonia; Rosen, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is one of the most frequently encountered viral infections of the fetus and induces a wide range of histologic and clinical manifestations. Congenital abnormalities are typically restricted to the central nervous system despite evidence of CMV inclusions occurring in most epithelial cells. Although tissue injury and even glomerulonephritis have been observed in congenital CMV infections, renal multicystic dysplasia has not been reported. Herein, we describe a case of unilateral renal dysplasia in a 19-week fetus with concurrent CMV infection. We believe the present case to be the first description of a virus apparently inducing renal multicystic dysplasia. PMID:17638423

  1. Cytomegalovirus Infection After Intestinal Transplantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Javier; Green, Michael; Kocoshis, Samuel; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ahu-Elmagd, Kareem; Yunis, Eduardo; Irish, William; Todo, Satoru; Reyes, Jorge; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen episodes of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease occurred in 10 of 41 children undergoing intestinal transplantation from 1990 to 1995. Stratification of CMV disease by donor (D)/recipient (R) serological status was as follows: 3 of 8, D+/R−; 3 of 9, D+/R+; 4 of 9, D−/R+; and 0 of 15, D−/R−. Treatment resulted in resolution of CMV disease in 93.3% of episodes. No deaths attributable to CMV disease occurred in this series. CMV in D+/R− children resulted in more extensive and persistent disease. However, patient and graft survival rates were similar in the different D/R subgroups and between children with and without CMV disease. Cumulative dose of steroid boluses (relative risk [RR]. 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]. 1.14–2.21) and history of steroid recycles (RR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.21–6.13) were associated with CMV disease. These results suggest that although CMV-associated morbidity in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients was substantial, it was not associated with an increased rate of mortality or graft loss, even among high-risk D+/R− patients. PMID:9402361

  2. [Ménétrieŕs disease associated with cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Fernández Caamaño, B; Ramos Boluda, E; Martínez-Ojinaga Nodal, E; Molina Arias, M; Sarría Osés, J; Prieto Bozano, G

    2015-01-01

    Menetrier's disease is a rare entity in children, characterized by a protein-losing gastroenteropathy with thickening of the gastric mucosa and generalized edema. The most common etiology is viral, and cytomegalovirus is the agent most frequently implicated. Unlike in the adult, it is a self-limited disorder with a good prognosis in children. Four patients (three boys and one girl) diagnosed with Ménétrier disease in the past five years were reviewed. The mean age at presentation was 28.7 months (range: 10-48 months). The most common clinical symptoms were fever, vomiting, and edema. Endoscopy showed thickened gastric folds and erosions in several stages. All patients had an associated gastric cytomegalovirus infection, and a favorable outcome, with resolution of the disorder,was observed within a few weeks. PMID:24666786

  3. Cutaneous involvement by cytomegalovirus in a renal transplant recipient as an indicator of severe systemic infection*

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Antonielle Borges Faria; Daxbacher, Egon Luiz Rodrigues; Chiaratti, Francielle Chiavelli; Jeunon, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is an opportunistic virus that commonly affects immunosuppressed patients. Cutaneous involvement by this virus is rare and occurs in significantly immunocompromised hosts, with a poor prognosis. Skin ulcers may represent the first sign of systemic infection by cytomegalovirus in these patients. Herein, a case of a systemic infection by Cytomegalovirus presenting as genital and oral ulcers in a kidney-transplant recipient is reported. PMID:26982783

  4. [Successful treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus infection with valganciclovir].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yu; Miyajima, Tasuku; Shimura, Masaru; Morichi, Shinichiro; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Ioi, Hiroaki; Oana, Shingo; Yamanaka, Gaku; Kawashima, Hisashi; Hoshika, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs frequently in neonates. However, there are no screening tests or definitive treatments for this infection in Japan. We report a case of a 21-day-old Japanese boy with congenital CMV infection. He was referred to our hospital for treatment of congenital bilateral deafness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed cortical dysplasia of the temporal poles, enlarged ventricles, and areas of abnormal intensity in the white matter. He was given a diagnosis of congenital CMV infection based on the detection of CMV DNA in his urine and the umbilical cord. After the administration of valganciclovir, no CMV DNA was detected in his serum, and brain MRI and electroencephalogram findings, motor development, and deafness improved. Further investigation is needed to establish a screening test and treatment for congenital CMV infection in Japan. PMID:22352032

  5. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Congenital CMV Infection: Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Good Hand Hygiene CDC Feature on Prenatal Infections Transmission Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... should consult their healthcare providers about breastfeeding. CMV Transmission during Pregnancy In the United States, approximately 30- ...

  6. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Cytomegalovirus Infections in Adolescent Females

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Laura Patricia; Bernstein, David I.; Callahan, S. Todd; Turley, Christine B.; Munoz, Flor M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Acharya, Mekhala; Simone, Gina A. Gorgone; Patel, Shital M.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Rosenthal, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading cause of disability, including sensorineural hearing loss, developmental delay, and mental retardation. Understanding risk factors for acquisition of CMV infection in adolescent females will help determine vaccine strategies. Methods Females (12–17 years) were recruited from primary care settings in Cincinnati, Galveston, Houston, and Nashville from June 2006 to July 2010 for a seroepidemiologic study, from which seronegative participants were recruited for a CMV vaccine trial. Participants (n = 1585) responded to questions regarding potential exposures. For those with young children in the home (n = 859), additional questions were asked about feeding and changing diapers, and for those > 14 years of age (n = 1162), questions regarding sexual activity were asked. Serum was evaluated for CMV antibody using a commercial immunoglobulin G assay. Results Cytomegalovirus antibody was detected in 49% of participants. In the univariate analyses, CMV seroprevalence was significantly higher among African Americans, those with children < 3 years of age in the home, and those with a history of oral, anal, or vaginal intercourse. Among those with young children in the home, feeding children and changing diapers further increased the association with CMV infection. However, in the final multivariate analysis, only African Americans and household contact with young children were associated with CMV infection. Conclusions By age 12, evidence of CMV infection was common. Multiple factors regarding race and personal behaviors likely contribute to seroconversion earlier in life. PMID:23687583

  7. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Upregulates the Mitochondrial Transcription and Translation Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, M. P.; Antrobus, R.; Rorbach, J.; van Haute, L.; Umrania, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Minczuk, M.; Lehner, P. J.; Sinclair, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) profoundly affects cellular metabolism. Like in tumor cells, HCMV infection increases glycolysis, and glucose carbon is shifted from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle to the biosynthesis of fatty acids. However, unlike in many tumor cells, where aerobic glycolysis is accompanied by suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, HCMV induces mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Here, we affinity purified mitochondria and used quantitative mass spectrometry to determine how the mitochondrial proteome changes upon HCMV infection. We found that the mitochondrial transcription and translation systems are induced early during the viral replication cycle. Specifically, proteins involved in biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome were highly upregulated by HCMV infection. Inhibition of mitochondrial translation with chloramphenicol or knockdown of HCMV-induced ribosome biogenesis factor MRM3 abolished the HCMV-mediated increase in mitochondrially encoded proteins and significantly impaired viral growth under bioenergetically restricting conditions. Our findings demonstrate how HCMV manipulates mitochondrial biogenesis to support its replication. PMID:27025248

  8. Intraperitoneal administration of cytomegalovirus hyperimmunoglobulin to the cytomegalovirus-infected fetus.

    PubMed

    Negishi, H; Yamada, H; Hirayama, E; Okuyama, K; Sagawa, T; Matsumoto, Y; Fujimoto, S

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-five percent of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected fetuses had sequelae and 8% of those in the recurrent-infected group had sequelae. There is no report yet on the fetal therapy for CMV infections. A Japanese pregnant woman with intrauterine fetal CMV infection diagnosed at 26 weeks of pregnancy is presented. CMV culture of amniotic fluid was positive. A CMV DNA assay using the polymerase chain reaction method of the cord blood and the amniotic fluid was positive during the pregnancy; however, testing for fetal serum CMV-specific IgM was negative. The CMV IgG titer of fetal serum at 27 weeks of pregnancy was a third of that of the maternal serum. CMV hyperimmunoglobulin was injected into the fetal abdominal cavity at 28 and 29 weeks of pregnancy. A second administration of CMV hyperimmunoglobulin increased the titer of CMV IgG in the fetal circulation. At birth, the urine culture was positive for CMV. However, CMV DNA of the ascites became negative. A brain CT scan performed 2 weeks after birth revealed some small calcifications beside the right ventricle. CMV hyperimmunoglobulin injection to the fetal abdominal cavity has been shown to increase the IgG in the fetal serum. This is the first report of fetal therapy of congenital CMV infection. PMID:9848763

  9. Acute Cytomegalovirus Infection as a Cause of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Francesca; Lissandrin, Raffaella; Mojoli, Francesco; Baldanti, Fausto; Brunetti, Enrico; Pascarella, Michela; Giordani, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Acute Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is an unusual cause of venous thromboembolism, a potentially life-threatening condition. Thrombus formation can occur at the onset of the disease or later during the recovery and may also occur in the absence of acute HCMV hepatitis. It is likely due to both vascular endothelium damage caused by HCMV and impairment of the clotting balance caused by the virus itself. Here we report on two immunocompetent women with splanchnic thrombosis that occurred during the course of acute HCMV infection. Although the prevalence of venous thrombosis in patients with acute HCMV infection is unknown, physicians should be aware of its occurrence, particularly in immunocompetent patients presenting with fever and unexplained abdominal pain. PMID:24959338

  10. Acute ulcerative proctocolitis associated with primary cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Diepersloot, R J; Kroes, A C; Visser, W; Jiwa, N M; Rothbarth, P H

    1990-08-01

    The case is reported of a 39-year-old pregnant woman who presented with fever, abdominal complaints, and diarrhea. Laboratory investigation revealed mononucleosis in the peripheral blood. All microbiological studies were negative, with the exception of finding cytomegalovirus (CMV). Seroconversion was documented; the virus was cultured from urine and subsequently was demonstrated to be present in the inflamed mucosa of the rectum and distal sigmoid, which was found at sigmoidoscopy. This woman was delivered of a neonate with congenital CMV infection but without apparent malformations. The patient experienced recurrences of the bowel disease, in the first of which CMV could still be cultured from a biopsy specimen. In the follow-up period, an otherwise aspecific chronic inflammatory bowel disease remained present. No immunological abnormalities were found, and antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus were negative. This case demonstrates that inflammatory bowel disease can develop as a result of primary infection with CMV. PMID:2166491

  11. Cutaneous Co-infected Cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus Perigenital Ulcers in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Jason; Cannon, Sarah; Cam, Kristin; Keller, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    There is uncertainty regarding the pathogenic nature of cytomegalovirus in cutaneous lesions co-infected with herpes simplex virus. It is widely believed that herpes simplex virus is the main pathogenic factor in such lesions and that cytomegalovirus plays little if any role. There are, however, isolated case reports that describe cytomegalovirus as an important driving pathogen in such lesions. The authors present two human immunodeficiency virus patients who have cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus co-infected perigenital ulcers, one of whom improved on valacyclovir, while the other, who was already on valacyclovir for chronic herpes simplex virus suppression, showed no improvement with a single dose of cidofovir. He only showed rapid improvement when treated with valganciclovir. The latter patient underscores the viewpoint that at least in some cases, cytomegalovirus may be an important driving force behind the formation of such lesions. The authors therefore recommend that clinicians be aware of the possible pathogenic role of cytomegalovirus in these ulcers, and, in nonhealing ulcers, use anti-cytomegalovirus agents to prevent the onset of systemic disease. These results warrant further study of the pathogenesis of cytomegalovirus in co-infected herpes simplex virus ulcers. PMID:24155993

  12. The Cell Biology of Cytomegalovirus: Implications for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, H; Fishman, J A

    2016-08-01

    Interpretation of clinical data regarding the impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection on allograft function is complicated by the diversity of viral strains and substantial variability of cellular receptors and viral gene expression in different tissues. Variation also exists in nonspecific (monocytes and dendritic cells) and specific (NK cells, antibodies) responses that augment T cell antiviral activities. Innate immune signaling pathways and expanded pools of memory NK cells and γδ T cells also serve to amplify host responses to infection. The clinical impact of specific memory T cell anti-CMV responses that cross-react with graft antigens and alloantigens is uncertain but appears to contribute to graft injury and to the abrogation of allograft tolerance. These responses are modified by diverse immunosuppressive regimens and by underlying host immune deficits. The impact of CMV infection on the transplant recipient reflects cellular changes and corresponding host responses, the convergence of which has been termed the "indirect effects" of CMV infection. Future studies will clarify interactions between CMV infection and allograft injury and will guide interventions that may enhance clinical outcomes in transplantation. PMID:26991039

  13. Intrauterine diagnosis of cytomegalovirus and rubella infections by amniocentesis.

    PubMed Central

    Skvorc-Ranko, R; Lavoie, H; St-Denis, P; Villeneuve, R; Gagnon, M; Chicoine, R; Boucher, M; Guimond, J; Dontigny, Y

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish a correlation between the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) or rubella virus in amniotic fluid obtained through amniocentesis and fetal infection. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: Five hospitals in the Montreal region. Virology testing was done at the Virology Research Centre, Institut Armand-Frappier, Laval, Que. PATIENTS: Thirteen pregnant women infected with CMV, 3 with rubella, their 15 babies and 2 fetuses. Twelve of the women with CMV infection were recruited from a prospective study of CMV infection in pregnancy. Infection in the other women was detected through routine laboratory diagnostic testing. INTERVENTION: Amniotic fluid samples were cultured for CMV and rubella virus. Congenital infection of the neonates was established through isolation of either virus from pharyngeal mucus and urine specimens collected during the first 3 days of life or from fetal tissue if the pregnancy was terminated. MAIN RESULTS: CMV was cultured from the amniotic fluid of three of the CMV-infected women and from the pharyngeal mucus and urine specimens of their infants. Of the three women with rubella the amniotic fluid of one (who had a twin pregnancy) was positive for rubella virus. After the in-utero death of one fetus she underwent a therapeutic abortion of both. Examination of fetal tissue indicated that both fetuses had been infected with rubella virus. Each of the two other women with rubella gave birth to an uninfected, healthy infant. CONCLUSIONS: We found a strong correlation between the isolation of CMV or rubella virus from the amniotic fluid and the presence of congenital infection. This suggests that amniocentesis used to detect the presence of a virus is a useful method for the diagnosis of fetal infection. PMID:1654193

  14. Cytomegalovirus infection following liver transplantation: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kanj, S S; Sharara, A I; Clavien, P A; Hamilton, J D

    1996-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains a major cause of problems following solid organ transplantation, accounting for a significant increase in morbidity and affiliated costs. Infection with CMV following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is commonly seen as a result of marked cell-mediated immunosuppression and is an independent risk factor for opportunistic and fungal infections. The role of CMV infection in acute cellular or chronic rejection remains unclear. Recent advances in diagnostic modalities, particularly the use of the antigenemia assay and the polymerase chain reaction, have provided ways to quantitate viral load during infection or disease, as well as providing a useful marker of response to therapy. Ganciclovir remains the best antiviral agent for the treatment of CMV disease, but the use of combination therapy with other antivirals or CMV immunoglobulin may improve outcome for patients with severe disease. The ideal prophylactic therapy for patients undergoing OLT remains to be identified, as tested regimens have shown variable efficacy when analyzed with regard to defined risk groups. The use of risk group-specific prophylaxis may prove to be most successful, however, in terms of efficacy and cost savings. Future advances in basic CMV virology and transplant immunology will be essential in defining rational approaches to control and prevention of CMV infection and disease following liver transplantation. PMID:8852975

  15. Human fetal inner ear involvement in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The mechanisms of pathogenesis of CMV-related SNHL are still unclear. The aim is to study congenital CMV-related damage in the fetal inner ear, in order to better understand the underlying pathophysiology behind CMV-SNHL. Results We studied inner ears and brains of 20 human fetuses, all at 21 week gestational age, with a high viral load in the amniotic fluid, with and without ultrasound (US) brain abnormalities. We evaluated histological brain damage, inner ear infection, local inflammatory response and tissue viral load. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CMV was positive in 14/20 brains (70%) and in the inner ears of 9/20 fetuses (45%). In the cases with inner ear infection, the marginal cell layer of the stria vascularis was always infected, followed by infection in the Reissner’s membrane. The highest tissue viral load was observed in the inner ear with infected Organ of Corti. Vestibular labyrinth showed CMV infection of sensory cells in the utricle and in the crista ampullaris. US cerebral anomalies were detected in 6 cases, and in all those cases, the inner ear was always involved. In the other 14 cases with normal brain scan, histological brain damage was present in 8 fetuses and 3 of them presented inner ear infection. Conclusions CMV-infection of the marginal cell layer of the stria vascularis may alter potassium and ion circulation, dissipating the endocochlear potential with consequent SNHL. Although abnormal cerebral US is highly predictive of brain and inner ear damage, normal US findings cannot exclude them either. PMID:24252374

  16. Bone marrow atrophy induced by murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, A E; Price, P; Shellam, G R

    1994-01-01

    Acute, sublethal infection of mice with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) resulted in up to 80% decreases in the number of cells recoverable from the bone marrow, and a decrease in peripheral blood leucocyte counts during the first week of infection. Depopulation of the leucopoietic areas of the marrow was evident from examination of histological sections. The severity of bone marrow atrophy in MCMV-infected mice of different strains correlated with previously described genetically determined sensitivity to MCMV disease. Although the phenomenon only occurred when mice were inoculated with infectious virus preparations, fewer than one in 10(5) marrow cells were productively infected, suggesting that atrophy was not due to lytic infection of large numbers of bone marrow cells. Interestingly, increases in serum colony-stimulating activity were observed and these were proportional to the severity of bone marrow atrophy. After MCMV infection, we observed increases in the proportions of cells expressing some B-cell and myeloid cell markers and a decrease in the proportion of cells expressing an erythroid cell marker. There was no change in the frequency of marrow cells expressing mature T-cell markers. The numbers of myeloid lineage-committed progenitor cells (GM-CFU) in the marrow decreased 10- to 20-fold in BALB/c nu/+ mice, while there was a threefold decrease in their numbers in BALB/c nu/nu mice. In addition, increases in serum colony-stimulating activity were greater in BALB/c nu/+ mice than in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Our results suggest that growth factors produced after MCMV infection may accelerate the maturation and migration of cells from the marrow to sites of virus replication and inflammation, thus accounting for the depletion in numbers of marrow cells observed soon after MCMV infection. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7959876

  17. Cytomegalovirus infection in immunosuppressed patients after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    LUSCALOV, SIMONA; LOGA, LUMINITA; DICAN, LUCIA; JUNIE, LIA MONICA

    2016-01-01

    The first kidney transplantation was performed in 1951 and ever since then living donor transplantation became a more and more important solution for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Renal transplantation is a life-saving procedure. Morbidity and mortality on waiting-lists are strongly correlated with the time of dialysis and end-stage renal disease is one of the most important causes of death; this is the reason why transplantation has to be performed as soon as possible in order to reduce the time of dialysis. Once the transplantation is performed, a number of complications may occur in post-transplant evolution, the most important of which is rejection. The rejection may appear through several mechanisms, but one of the most frequent causes of rejection is cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. It is very important to have a precocious and fast diagnosis of CMV infection in order to maintain the functionality and survival of the graft. PP65 CMV antigenemia has proven its effectiveness in detecting and monitoring the CMV infection in transplanted patients. In the laboratory of the Clinical Institute of Urology and Renal Transplantation (ICUTR) of Cluj Napoca the CMV infection is evidenced by two methods: PP65antigenemia and IgM antibody identification by chemiluminiscence. PMID:27547053

  18. Cytomegalovirus infection in the bone marrow transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Vivek; Joshi, Amit; Sarode, Rahul; Chavan, Preeti

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is an important contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Infection may lead to CMV disease involving multiple organs such as pneumonia, gastroenteritis, retinitis, central nervus system involvement and others. CMV seropositivity is an important risk factor and approximately half of BMT recipients will develop clinically significant infection most commonly in the first 100 d post-transplant. The commonly used tests to diagnose CMV infection in these patients include the pp65 antigenemia test and the CMV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Because of its greater sensitivity and lesser turnaround time, the CMV PCR is nowadays the preferred test and serves as a main guide for pre-emptive therapy. Methods of CMV prevention include use of blood products from seronegative donors or leukodepleted products. Prophylaxis or pre-emptive therapy strategies for CMV prevention may be used post-transplant with the latter becoming more common. The commonly used antivirals for pre-emptive therapy and CMV disease management include intravenous gancyclovir and foscarnet. The role of intravenous immunoglobulin, although used commonly in CMV pneumonia is not clear. PMID:26722656

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles and Cytomegalovirus Infection After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Futohi, Farzaneh; Saber, Azadeh; Nemati, Eglim; Einollahi, Behzad; Rostami, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have been conducted on the relationship between a number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and cytomegalovirus infection (CMV), in kidney transplant recipients, after transplantation. However, only a limited number of HLAs have been investigated, so far, and the results have been contradictory. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between 59 HLA alleles and the CMV infection, in transplant recipients, after kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted on 200 patients, receiving a kidney transplant, in Baqiyatallah Hospital, in Tehran, during 2013. Throughout a one-year follow-up of kidney transplant recipients, in case of detecting the CMV antigen in patients’ blood, at any time, they were placed in the group of patients with CMV infection, whereas, if no CMV-specific antigen was developed, over a year, patients were placed in the group of patients without CMV infection, after transplantation. This study investigated the relationship between CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients and 59 HLA alleles, including 14 HLA-A, 28 HLA-B, and 17 HLA-DRB1 cases. Results: Of all participants, 104 patients (52%) were diagnosed with CMV infection. There was no significant difference between the two groups, with and without CMV infection, in terms of patient’s characteristics. The CMV infection, in patients receiving a transplanted organ from deceased donor, was significantly more prevalent than in those receiving kidney transplant from living donor (63% vs. 39%, respectively, P = 0.001). Recipients with HLA-B44 were more infected with CMV compared with patients without this allele (80% vs. 50%, respectively, P = 0.024); on the contrary, kidney recipients with HLA-DRB1-1 were less infected with CMV than patients without this allele (31% vs. 55%, respectively, P = 0.020). There was no significant relationship between CMV infection and other HLA alleles. Results of

  20. Non-cytomegalovirus ocular opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Gangaputra, Sapna; Drye, Lea; Vaidya, Vijay; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Jabs, Douglas A; Lyon, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the incidence and clinical outcomes of non-cytomegalovirus (non-CMV) ocular opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Design Multicenter, prospective, observational study of patients with AIDS Methods Medical history, ophthalmologic examination, and laboratory tests were performed at enrollment and every 6 months subsequently. Once an ocular opportunistic infection was diagnosed, patients were seen every 3 months for outcomes. Results At enrollment, 37 non-CMV ocular opportunistic infections were diagnosed: 16 patients, herpetic retinitis; 11 patients, toxoplasmic retinitis; and 10 patients, choroiditis. During the follow-up period, the estimated incidences (and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of these were: herpetic retinitis, 0.007/100 person-years (PY) (95% CI 0.0004, 0.039); toxoplasmic retinitis, 0.007/100 PY (95% CI 0.004, 0.039); and choroiditis 0.014/100 PY (95% CI 0.0025, 0.050). The mortality rates appeared higher among those patients with newly diagnosed or incident herpetic retinitis and choroiditis (rates=21.7 deaths/100 PY [P=0.02] and 12.8 deaths/100 PY [P=0.04]) respectively, than that for patients with AIDS without an ocular opportunistic infection (4.1 deaths/100 PY); Toxoplasmic retinitis did not appear to be associated with greater mortality (6.4/100 PY, P=0.47). Eyes with newly-diagnosed herpetic retinitis appeared to have a poor visual prognosis with high rates of visual impairment (37.9/100 PY) and blindness (17.5/100 PY), whereas those outcomes in eyes with choroiditis appeared to be lower (2.3/100 PY and 0/100 PY, respectively). Conclusions Although uncommon, non-CMV ocular opportunistic infections may be associated with high rates of visual loss and/or mortality. PMID:23068916

  1. Bioactive Molecules Released From Cells Infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Luganini, Anna; Terlizzi, Maria E.; Gribaudo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Following primary infection in humans, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists in a latent state throughout the host’s lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive extracellular environment that

  2. Bioactive Molecules Released From Cells Infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Luganini, Anna; Terlizzi, Maria E; Gribaudo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Following primary infection in humans, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists in a latent state throughout the host's lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive extracellular environment that

  3. Mast cells: innate attractors recruiting protective CD8 T cells to sites of cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Podlech, Jürgen; Ebert, Stefan; Becker, Marc; Reddehase, Matthias J; Stassen, Michael; Lemmermann, Niels A W

    2015-06-01

    Reactivation of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the transient immunocompromised state after hematoablative treatment is a major concern in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as a therapy of hematopoietic malignancies. Timely reconstitution of antiviral CD8 T cells and their efficient recruitment to the lungs is crucial for preventing interstitial pneumonia, the most severe disease manifestation of CMV in HCT recipients. Here, we review recent work in a murine model, implicating mast cells (MC) in the control of pulmonary infection. Murine CMV (mCMV) productively infects MC in vivo and triggers their degranulation, resulting in the release of the CC chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) that attracts CD8 T cells to infiltrate infected tissues. Comparing infection of MC-sufficient C57BL/6 mice and congenic MC-deficient Kit (W-sh/W-sh) "sash" mutants revealed an inverse relation between the number of lung-infiltrating CD8 T cells and viral burden in the lungs. Specifically, reduced lung infiltration by CD8 T cells in "sash" mutants was associated with an impaired infection control. The causal, though indirect, involvement of MC in antiviral control was confirmed by reversion of the deficiency phenotype in "sash" mutants reconstituted with MC. These recent findings predict that efficient MC reconstitution facilitates the control of CMV infection also in immunocompromised HCT recipients. PMID:25648117

  4. Horizontal In Utero Acquisition of Cytomegalovirus Infection in a Twin Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Liliana; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Foschini, Maria Pia; Lanari, Marcello; Guerra, Brunella; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Landini, Maria Paola

    2003-01-01

    It is generally accepted that viral infections can be transmitted horizontally by direct or indirect contact with virus-excreting persons, and some viral infections can be transmitted vertically, either prenatally or perinatally, from mother to child. This report presents data strongly supporting a prenatal horizontal acquisition of human cytomegalovirus infection in a twin pregnancy. PMID:12624079

  5. Two strategies for prevention of cytomegalovirus infections after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Philipp; Sasse, Max; Laudi, Sven; Petroff, David; Bartels, Michael; Kaisers, Udo X; Bercker, Sven

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze differences in patients’ clinical course, we compared two regimes of either preemptive therapy or prophylaxis after liver transplantation. METHODS: This retrospective study was reviewed and approved by the institutional review board of the University of Leipzig. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis with valganciclovir hydrochloride for liver transplant recipients was replaced by a preemptive strategy in October 2009. We retrospectively compared liver transplant recipients 2 years before and after October 2009. During the first period, all patients received valganciclovir daily. During the second period all patients included in the analysis were treated following a preemptive strategy. Outcomes included one year survival and therapeutic intervention due to CMV viremia or infection. RESULTS: Between 2007 and 2010 n = 226 patients underwent liver transplantation in our center. n = 55 patients were D+/R- high risk recipients and were excluded from further analysis. A further 43 patients had to be excluded since CMV prophylaxis/preemptive strategy was not followed although there was no clinical reason for the deviation. Of the remaining 128 patients whose data were analyzed, 60 received prophylaxis and 68 were treated following a preemptive strategy. The difference in overall mortality was not significant, nor was it significant for one-year mortality where it was 10% (95%CI: 8%-28%, P = 0.31) higher for the preemptive group. No significant differences in blood count abnormalities or the incidence of sepsis and infections were observed other than CMV. In total, 19 patients (14.7%) received ganciclovir due to CMV viremia and/or infections. Patients who were treated according to the preemptive algorithm had a significantly higher rate risk of therapeutic intervention with ganciclovir [n = 16 (23.5%) vs n = 3 (4.9%), P = 0.003)]. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that CMV prophylaxis is superior to a preemptive strategy in patients undergoing liver

  6. Antiviral Drug- and Multidrug Resistance in Cytomegalovirus Infected SCT Patients

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Katharina; Hamprecht, Klaus; Jahn, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    In pediatric and adult patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT) disseminated infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause life threatening diseases. For treatment, the three antivirals ganciclovir (GCV), foscarnet (PFA) and cidofovir (CDV) are approved and most frequently used. Resistance to all of these antiviral drugs may induce a severe problem in this patient cohort. Responsible for resistance phenomena are mutations in the HCMV phosphotransferase-gene (UL97) and the polymerase-gene (UL54). Most frequently mutations in the UL97-gene are associated with resistance to GCV. Resistance against all three drugs is associated to mutations in the UL54-gene. Monitoring of drug resistance by genotyping is mostly done by PCR-based Sanger sequencing. For phenotyping with cell culture the isolation of HCMV is a prerequisite. The development of multidrug resistance with mutation in both genes is rare, but it is often associated with a fatal outcome. The manifestation of multidrug resistance is mostly associated with combined UL97/UL54-mutations. Normally, mutations in the UL97 gene occur initially followed by UL54 mutation after therapy switch. The appearance of UL54-mutation alone without any detection of UL97-mutation is rare. Interestingly, in a number of patients the UL97 mutation could be detected in specific compartments exclusively and not in blood. PMID:25750703

  7. Effect of acute cytomegalovirus infection on drug-induced SLE.

    PubMed Central

    Schattner, A.; Sthoeger, Z.; Geltner, D.

    1994-01-01

    A 58 year old woman developed systemic symptoms, interstitial lung disease, splenomegaly, leukopenia and anti-histone and anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), while treated with hydralazine for hypertension. Five months after presentation she was admitted with high fever, skin rash and atypical lymphocytosis due to acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Worsening leukopenia and increased ANA were found, and high titres of anti-DNA antibodies, anti-cardiolipin antibodies and rheumatoid factors appeared. Hydralazine was stopped and the patient gradually became asymptomatic. All autoantibodies spontaneously disappeared (over 16 weeks), and the white cell count and spleen size became normal. The patient was found to be a slow acetylator and to have both HLA-DR4 and selective IgA deficiency. Thus, a multifactorial genetic susceptibility to develop drug-induced lupus was brought out in stages first by hydralazine and then by CMV, yet all manifestations and autoantibodies resolved spontaneously, demonstrating the complex interplay of varied environmental factors with a genetic predisposition in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:7831173

  8. Cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplantation: clinical aspects, management and the perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Requião-Moura, Lúcio Roberto; de Matos, Ana Cristina Carvalho; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infection is one of most frequent infectious complications after renal transplantation, and can be classified as primo-infection, when the transmission occurs through the graft, or reactivation, when the recipient is cytomegalovirus seropositive. After transplantation, cytomegalovirus can appear as an infection, when the patient presents with evidence of viral replication without symptoms or disease, which has two clinical spectra: typical viral syndrome or invasive disease, which is a less common form. Their effects can be classified as direct, while the disease is developed, or indirect, with an increase of acute rejection and chronic allograft dysfunction risks. Diagnosis must be made based on viremia by one of the standardized methods: antigenemia or PCR, which is more sensitive. The risk factors related to infection after transplantation are the serologic matching (positive donor and negative recipient) and anti-lymphocyte antibody drugs. One of the strategies to reduce risk of disease should be chosen for patients at high risk: preemptive treatment or universal prophylaxis. Recent clinical research has described ganciclovir resistance as an emergent problem in management of cytomegalovirus infection. Two types of mutation that cause resistance were described: UL97 (most frequent) and UL54. Today, sophisticated methods of immunologic monitoring to detect specific T-cell clones against cytomegalovirus are used in clinical practice to improve the management of high-risk patients after renal transplantation. PMID:25993081

  9. Immunological response to cytomegalovirus in congenitally infected neonates

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, J; Dooley, S; Hall, W

    2007-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection worldwide and occurs as a result of transplacental transmission of the virus. The human neonate is highly susceptible to infection due to a combination of immaturity of the immune system and antigenic inexperience. This study uses the in vivo model of congenital CMV to examine both the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vertically infected neonates and their mothers. Ten pairs of matched neonates and their mothers were evaluated for specific IgM responses to three immunodominant CMV antigens: pp38 (pUL80a), pp52 (pUL44) and pp150 (pUL32). In contrast to conventional enzyme immunoassay (EIA) testing for CMV-specific IgM, which found five of the mothers and four of the neonates to be positive, Western immunoblotting showed all 10 adults and nine newborns to be positive. Eight mothers and nine newborns had serological evidence of primary infection. All neonates showed a response to pp38, an assembly protein, nine responded to the pp52 immediate early antigen but only four had reactivity to the pp150 tegument associated protein. Of the mothers, eight had pp38 reactivity, 10 showed a response to the pp52 antigen and seven to the pp150 antigen. T cell-mediated immunity was assessed by measuring cytokines using a multiplex microarray assay. Levels of interferon (IFN)-γ were high in both groups [mean ± standard error of the mean (s.e.m.): neonates = 657 ± 238 pg/ml, mothers = 1072 ± 677 pg/ml, pNS]; however, neonates had significantly higher levels of interleukin (IL)-8 (316 ± 136 pg/ml versus 48 ± 28 pg/ml, P < 0·005). Similar levels of IL-2, IL-7, IL-10 and IL-12 were measured in both groups, but levels of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were either absent or low. In response to CMV, neonates and adults mount a predominant T helper 1 (Th1) response, as evidenced by the presence of IL-2, IL-8, IL-12 and IFN-γ with concomitant lack of IL-4. These

  10. AABB Committee Report: reducing transfusion-transmitted cytomegalovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Heddle, Nancy M; Boeckh, Michael; Grossman, Brenda; Jacobson, Jessica; Kleinman, Steven; Tobian, Aaron A R; Webert, Kathryn; Wong, Edward C C; Roback, John D

    2016-06-01

    Transfusion-transmitted cytomegalovirus (TT-CMV) is often asymptomatic, but certain patient populations, such as very low birth weight neonates, fetuses requiring intrauterine transfusion, pregnant women, patients with primary immunodeficiencies, transplant recipients, and patients receiving chemotherapy or transplantation for malignant disease, may be at risk of life-threatening CMV infection. It is unclear whether leukoreduction of cellular blood components is sufficient to reduce TT-CMV or whether CMV serological testing adds additional benefit to leukoreduction. The AABB CMV Prevention Work Group commissioned a systematic review to address these issues and subsequently develop clinical practice guidelines. However, the data were of poor quality, and no studies of significant size have been performed for over a decade. Rather than creating guidelines of questionable utility, the Work Group (with approval of the AABB Board of Directors) voted to prepare this Committee Report. There is wide variation in practices of using leukoreduced components alone or combining CMV-serology and leukoreduction to prevent TT-CMV for at-risk patients. Other approaches may also be feasible to prevent TT-CMV, including plasma nucleic acid testing, pathogen inactivation, and patient blood management programs to reduce the frequency of inappropriate transfusions. It is unlikely that future large-scale clinical trials will be performed to determine whether leukoreduction, CMV-serology, or a combination of both is superior. Consequently, alternative strategies including pragmatic randomized controlled trials, registries, and collaborations for electronic data merging, nontraditional approaches to inform evidence, or development of a systematic approach to inform expert opinion may help to address the issue of CMV-safe blood components. PMID:26968400

  11. Co-infection of Plasmodium vivax Malaria and Cytomegalovirus in an Immunocompetent Neonate.

    PubMed

    Chandelia, Sudha; Jain, Sarika

    2014-12-01

    Co-infections when occur can pose substantial diagnostic and treatment challenges for clinicians. In this case report we describe a neonate with co infection of plasmodium vivax malaria with Cytomegalovirus and discuss whether it can be the result of reactivation of one by the other infection postnatally or if these infections can affect and facilitate the transplacental transmission of each other from the mother. PMID:25653999

  12. Cytomegalovirus infection associated with clonal proliferation of T-cell large granular lymphocytes: causal or casual?

    PubMed

    Wong, K F; Yip, S F; So, C C; Lau, G T C; Yeung, Y M

    2003-04-01

    Clonal proliferation of T-cell large granular lymphocytes (LGL) is an indolent disorder characterized by splenomegaly, lymphocytosis and frequent manifestations of immune disturbances. The LGL are CD3(+) CD4(-) CD8(+) CD56(-). The clonality of the tumor cell population is often only demonstrable by T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement study because chromosomal abnormality is distinctly rare. We describe a case of T-cell LGL leukemia that presented initially as cytomegalovirus infection. The leukemic LGL are shown to be clonal by both TCR gene rearrangement and chromosomal studies. They persist after subsidence of the cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:12660039

  13. Human Cytomegalovirus Up-Regulates Endothelin Receptor Type B: Implication for Vasculopathies?

    PubMed Central

    Yaiw, Koon-Chu; Mohammad, Abdul-Aleem; Costa, Helena; Taher, Chato; Badrnya, Sigrun; Assinger, Alice; Wilhelmi, Vanessa; Ananthaseshan, Sharan; Estekizadeh, Atosa; Davoudi, Belghis; Ovchinnikova, Olga; Shlyakhto, Eugene; Rafnsson, Arnar; Khan, Zahidul; Butler, Lynn; Rahbar, Afsar; Pernow, John; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Background. Both endothelin receptor type B ([ETBR], a G protein-coupled receptor that mediates the vascular effects of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1) and human cytomegalovirus ([HCMV], a ubiquitous herpesvirus) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The effects of HCMV infection on ETBR expression are unknown. We hypothesized that HCMV may contribute to the pathogenesis of CVD via ETBR modulation. Methods. Human CMV effects on ETBR were studied in vitro in endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and ex vivo in human carotid plaque tissue specimens. Expression of ETBR and viral immediate-early were quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Functional consequences after ETBR blockade in ECs were examined by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide proliferation, wound healing, tube formation, and flow adhesion assays. Results. Human CMV is capable of upregulating both ETBR mRNA and protein expression in ECs and SMCs. The ETBR was also abundantly expressed in ECs, foam cells, and SMCs, and, more importantly, in HCMV-positive cells in human carotid plaques. Endothelin receptor type B blockade led to decreased proliferation and reduced tumor necrosis factor α-mediated leukocyte recruitment in both uninfected and HCMV-infected ECs. Direct HCMV infection was antimigratory and antiangiogenic in ECs. Conclusions. Human CMV may contribute to CVD via ETBR induction. PMID:26719843

  14. Cytomegalovirus Infection in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Not Associated with Worsening of Intestinal Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo, Alexandre Medeiros; Santos, Fabiana Maria; Ortiz-Agostinho, Carmen Lucia; Nishitokukado, Iêda; Frota, Cintia S.; Gomes, Flavia Ubeda; de Arruda Leite, André Zonetti; Pannuti, Claudio Sérgio; Boas, Lucy Santos Vilas; Teixeira, Magaly Gemio; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus. Aim Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations. Methods Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient. Results Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine) Conclusion The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV

  15. COMPARISON OF THE PATHOGENESIS OF MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS IN LUNG AND LIVER FOLLOWING INTRAPERITONEAL OR INTRATRACHEAL INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compares the pathogenesis of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infections following intraperitoneal (I.P.) and intratracheal (I.T.) inoculation. No deaths were seen in mice given 1,000,000 pfu MCMV I.T., whereas 52% mortality occurred among animals given this dose I.P. Thi...

  16. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PENTOBARBITAL FOLLOWING MOUSE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION: ROLE OF VIRAL-INDUCED INTERFERON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative roles of viral induced interferon (IFN) and viral infection of the liver in mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-induced depression of cytochrome P-450 (cyt P-450) levels and enhancement of pentobarbital-induced sleeping time (PEN-S...

  17. Interleukin-2 from Adaptive T Cells Enhances Natural Killer Cell Activity against Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeguang; Frascaroli, Giada; Bayer, Carina; Schmal, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) requires a continuous immune surveillance, thus HCMV is the most important viral pathogen in severely immunocompromised individuals. Both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the control of HCMV. Here, we report that peripheral blood natural killer cells (PBNKs) from HCMV-seropositive donors showed an enhanced activity toward HCMV-infected autologous macrophages. However, this enhanced response was abolished when purified NK cells were applied as effectors. We demonstrate that this enhanced PBNK activity was dependent on the interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion of CD4+ T cells when reexposed to the virus. Purified T cells enhanced the activity of purified NK cells in response to HCMV-infected macrophages. This effect could be suppressed by IL-2 blocking. Our findings not only extend the knowledge on the immune surveillance in HCMV—namely, that NK cell-mediated innate immunity can be enhanced by a preexisting T cell antiviral immunity—but also indicate a potential clinical implication for patients at risk for severe HCMV manifestations due to immunosuppressive drugs, which mainly suppress IL-2 production and T cell responsiveness. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is never cleared by the host after primary infection but instead establishes a lifelong latent infection with possible reactivations when the host′s immunity becomes suppressed. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity are important for the control of viral infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are main innate effectors providing a rapid response to virus-infected cells. Virus-specific T cells are the main adaptive effectors that are critical for the control of the latent infection and limitation of reinfection. In this study, we found that IL-2 secreted by adaptive CD4+ T cells after reexposure to HCMV enhances the activity of NK cells in response to HCMV-infected target cells. This is the first direct evidence that the adaptive T cells can

  18. Identification of Symptomatic Fetuses Infected with Cytomegalovirus Using Amniotic Fluid Peptide Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Ramirez-Torres, Adela; Lacroix, Chrystelle; Breuil, Benjamin; Froment, Carine; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P.; Ville, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection, and is a major cause of sensorineural hearing loss and neurological disabilities. Evaluating the risk for a CMV infected fetus to develop severe clinical symptoms after birth is crucial to provide appropriate guidance to pregnant women who might have to consider termination of pregnancy or experimental prenatal medical therapies. However, establishing the prognosis before birth remains a challenge. This evaluation is currently based upon fetal imaging and fetal biological parameters, but the positive and negative predictive values of these parameters are not optimal, leaving room for the development of new prognostic factors. Here, we compared the amniotic fluid peptidome between asymptomatic fetuses who were born as asymptomatic neonates and symptomatic fetuses who were either terminated in view of severe cerebral lesions or born as severely symptomatic neonates. This comparison allowed us to identify a 34-peptide classifier in a discovery cohort of 13 symptomatic and 13 asymptomatic neonates. This classifier further yielded 89% sensitivity, 75% specificity and an area under the curve of 0.90 to segregate 9 severely symptomatic from 12 asymptomatic neonates in a validation cohort, showing an overall better performance than that of classical fetal laboratory parameters. Pathway analysis of the 34 peptides underlined the role of viral entry in fetuses with severe brain disease as well as the potential importance of both beta-2-microglobulin and adiponectin to protect the injured fetal brain infected with CMV. The results also suggested the mechanistic implication of the T calcium channel alpha-1G (CACNA1G) protein in the development of seizures in severely CMV infected children. These results open a new field for potential therapeutic options. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that amniotic fluid peptidome analysis can effectively predict the severity of congenital CMV infection. This

  19. Cytomegalovirus implicated in a case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN).

    PubMed

    Sfeir, Maroun

    2015-08-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis, also known as PORN, has been described as a variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy, occurring particularly in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Although the etiologic organism has been reported to be Varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV) can be an etiologic agent. Our case illustrates the occurrence of two opportunistic infections: PORN associated with CMV and Mycobacterium avium intracellulare duodenitis in a patient with uncontrolled HIV infection. PMID:26209386

  20. A Supraglottic Pseudotumor in an Immunocompromised Patient with Nephrotic Syndrome, Herpes Zoster, and a Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Several viral infections may occasionally induce supraglottic mass lesions, resulting in an obstructive airway emergency. We herein report one such case in a 63-year-old male immunocompromised patient with nephrotic syndrome due to membranous nephropathy who also had ophthalmic herpes zoster with a laryngeal mass, which required urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient was initially treated with acyclovir; however, because a serological analysis revealed a concurrent cytomegalovirus infection, we discontinued the administration of acyclovir and gave priority to the simultaneous treatment of the cytomegalovirus and varicella-zoster virus infections with ganciclovir. The clinical course was favorable, and he was weaned from the ventilator 10 days later when a serial imaging analysis revealed no signs of the supraglottic mass, leading us to conclude that these two viral infections could have additively or synergistically contributed to the development of the local pseudotumor. The diagnostic and therapeutic concerns arising in the current case are also discussed. PMID:27547043

  1. [Severe thrombocytopenia associated with simultaneous cytomegalovirus and Epstein-barr virus infection in an immunocompetence patient].

    PubMed

    Bober, Grazyna; Krawczyk-Kuliś, Małgorzata; Kopera, Małgorzata; Hołowiecki, Jerzy

    2003-06-01

    A 22 year old woman, without preceeding immunological and hematological disorders was hospitalized because of severe thrombocytopenia. The results of extended workup revealed simultaneous cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection as the most probable causative factor. Both, thrombocytopenia and the symptoms of viral infections resolved after consequent treatment with acyclovir, corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulines. Based on this original case report authors suggest the need of virological tests in newly diagnosed idiopatic thrombocytopenia. PMID:14567095

  2. Colonic perforation in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus accompanied by cytomegalovirus infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tachikawa, Yuichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Fujisawa, Madoka; Takahashi, Katutoshi; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of the gastrointestinal tract is an uncommon illness, but can be observed in immunocompromised patients. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are generally at high risk of CMV infection. Here we report a subacute progressive case of colitis in SLE accompanied by cytomegalovirus infection. Presentation of case The patient, a 79-year-old woman, was hospitalized complaining of fever, polyarthritis, and skin ulcer that had lasted seven days. She additionally manifested vomiting, high fever, and right abdominal pain within two weeks thereafter, and was diagnosed with perforation of the intestine. Emergency operation was carried out for panperitonitis due to perforation of one of the multiple colon ulcers. Multidisciplinary postoperative treatment could not save her life. Pathological examination suggested that cytomegalovirus infection as well as cholesterin embolization contributed to the rapid progression of colitis. Discussion There have been only a limited number of case reports of CMV enteritis in SLE. Moreover, only two SLE patients on multiple medications have been reported to experience gastrointestinal perforation. Viral infections, including CMV, can induce clinical manifestations resembling SLE and for this reason we suspect that there are potentially many more patients misdiagnosed and/or unreported. Conclusion Our case underscores the importance of exploring the possibility of CMV infection as a differential diagnosis in SLE patients with obvious gastrointestinal symptoms who were treated by immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:27093690

  3. Molecular dissection of the human B cell response against cytomegalovirus infection by lambda display.

    PubMed

    Beghetto, Elisa; Paolis, Francesca De; Spadoni, Andrea; Del Porto, Paola; Buffolano, Wilma; Gargano, Nicola

    2008-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a ubiquitous herpesvirus, is the main cause of congenital abnormalities and mental retardation in newborns and is also responsible for severe life-threatening complications in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. The disorders generated by cytomegalovirus are closely associated with the competence of the host immune system and both humoral and cell-mediated mechanisms are involved in the response to viral infection. To identify viral proteins recognized by host antibody responses, a cytomegalovirus genome library was created and displayed on lambda bacteriophage. The challenge of such a library with sera from individuals with congenital or acquired infection allowed the identification of a wide panel of recombinant bacteriophages carrying cytomegalovirus B cell epitopes. Epitope-containing fragments within the families of tegument proteins (pUL25, pUL32), structural proteins (pUL48, pUL56) and glycoproteins (pUL55) were identified. Moreover, library screening permitted isolation of phage clones carrying an antigenic region of an uncharacterized HCMV protein encoded by the UL71 open reading frame (ORF), highlighting the potential of lambda display technology in antigen and epitope discovery. PMID:18499273

  4. EFFECTS OF IMMUNOSUPPRESSION WITH CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE ON ACUTE MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION AND VIRUS-AUGMENTED NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment on acute murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection were studied to explore the potential usefulness of MCMV as a means of detecting immune dysfunction and to identify host defense mechanisms important for protection against MCMV.

  5. Cytomegalovirus infection in a cohort of pregnant women.

    PubMed

    El Sanousi, S M; Osman, Z A; Mohmed, A B S; Al Awfi, M S H

    2016-04-01

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) in 300 pregnant women. Seventeen (5.7%) and 274 (91.3%) women were seropositive for IgM and IgG, respectively. There was significant increase in seroprevalence of CMV IgG and no significant increase in seroprevalence of CMV IgM among tested age groups. CMV IgM and IgG seroprevalence differed nonsignificantly by type of residence, the stage of pregnancy, and the level of education. PMID:26810886

  6. Characterization of Cytomegalovirus Lung Infection in Non-HIV Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo-Gualteros, Sonia M.; Jaramillo-Barberi, Lina E.; Gonzalez-Santos, Monica; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Perez, Geovanny F.; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Nino, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a prevalent pathogen in the immunocompromised host and invasive pneumonia is a feared complication of the virus in this population. In this pediatric case series we characterized CMV lung infection in 15 non-HIV infected children (median age 3 years; IQR 0.2–4.9 years), using current molecular and imaging diagnostic modalities, in combination with respiratory signs and symptoms. The most prominent clinical and laboratory findings included cough (100%), hypoxemia (100%), diffuse adventitious breath sounds (100%) and increased respiratory effort (93%). All patients had abnormal lung images characterized by ground glass opacity/consolidation in 80% of cases. CMV was detected in the lung either by CMV PCR in bronchoalveolar lavage (82% detection rate) or histology/immunohistochemistry in lung biopsy (100% detection rate). CMV caused respiratory failure in 47% of children infected and the overall mortality rate was 13.3%. Conclusion: CMV pneumonia is a potential lethal disease in non-HIV infected children that requires a high-index of suspicion. Common clinical and radiological patterns such as hypoxemia, diffuse adventitious lung sounds and ground-glass pulmonary opacities may allow early identification of CMV lung infection in the pediatric population, which may lead to prompt initiation of antiviral therapy and better clinical outcomes. PMID:24811320

  7. Cytomegalovirus infection in gastrointestinal tracts of patients infected with HIV-1 or AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, N D; Boylston, A W; Roberts, A H; Parkin, J M; Pinching, A J

    1989-01-01

    All gastrointestinal tract biopsy specimens from 190 patients positive for HIV-1 or with AIDS were reviewed to assess the prevalence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, morphology of infected cells, and the associated histopathological features. Eighteen patients (10 (7.7%) of 129 HIV antibody positive and eight (13.1%) of 61 with AIDS) had CMV identified in 35 biopsy specimens from the following sites: oesophagus (n = 3); stomach (n = 6); small intestine (n = 4); colorectum (n = 18) and perianal area (n = 4). Eleven patients had CMV alone as the potential cause of symptoms and in seven there were coexistent pathogens or Kaposi's sarcoma. The appearance and type of infected cells at different sites was highly variable. Immunocytochemical techniques and electron microscopic examination were performed to confirm the presence of CMV antigen and CMV virus particles and to exclude the possibility of an adenovirus producing similar cytopathic changes. It is important to recognise the different morphological forms of infected cells, and the use of immunocytochemical techniques is recommended in patients at risk for CMV or in whom CMV infection is suspected. Images PMID:2555397

  8. [Diagnosis of congenital cytomegalovirus infection in newborn dried blood spots on Guthrie cards. A promissory technique].

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Angélica L; González, Cecilia A; Pardón, Fabián; Sarubi, María A; Canero Velazco, Cristina

    2008-04-01

    Laboratories play a crucial role in the diagnosis of congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus infection, considering that other viral infections in newborn infants have similar clinical characteristics. The objectives of this work are to compare the results of the polymerase reaction in blood spots and urine as well as point out the relevance of the result in the Guthrie cards to differentiate congenital from perinatal infection. A total of 148 patients suspicious of CMVH infections were studied in the Congenital Perinatal Infections and Sexual Transmission Laboratory, at the National Institute "Carlos G. Malbrán". The dry blood samples (Guthrie cards) and urine of all patients were studied through the polymerase chain reaction. From the 148 patients, 3 presented other infections, 95 tested negative and 50 positive for cytomegalovirus: 35 had congenital infection and 15 perinatal. In the congenital cases, the polymerase reaction in dry blood was positive (sensitivity 100%, specificity 98.9%, VPP 98% and VPN 100%). Four of them with tardive symptoms were studied retrospectively. The urine specimens from the remaining 15 patients that were taken 15 days after birth were analyzed through the same methods, showing a sensitivity of 100%, the retrospective analysis of this dry blood group yielded negative results, so the infection was considered perinatal. Thus, the dry blood polymerase reaction of the newborn infants makes it a reliable assay for diagnosing congenital cytomegalovirus infection and could be used as an alternative method to urine polymerase reaction. In addition, this test is able to reveal whether the infection is congenital or perinatal in those cases of late symptom or other cases of controversial origin. PMID:18661038

  9. Acute Human Cytomegalovirus Infection with Bleeding in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pourhossein, Behzad; Yaghmaei, Farhad; Esmaeili, Saber; Banafshi, Omid; Afrasiabian, Shahla; Shirzadi, Mohammad Reza; Schleiss, Mark; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    In December 2011, a 42-year-old male farmer was admitted to a hospital in Sanandaj (Western Iran) with fever and anemia in order to check whether he suffered from some infectious diseases. During the first 3 days after admission, the patient gradually developed progressive oliguria, fever, abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant, leukocytosis with toxic granulation, petechiae and ecchymosis, oral bleeding, and vomiting. The sonographic findings revealed splenomegaly and an increase in the thickness of the gall bladder wall. In order to manage the patient and taking into consideration the most probable differential diagnoses, diagnostic tests were performed on two blood samples collected from him, and real-time polymerase chain reaction for human cytomegalovirus was positive. PMID:25562049

  10. Evasion of CD8+ T cells is critical for super-infection by cytomegalovirus$

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott G.; Powers, Colin J.; Richards, Rebecca; Ventura, Abigail B.; Ford, Julia C.; Siess, Don; Axthelm, Michael K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Jarvis, Michael A.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) can super-infect persistently infected hosts despite CMV-specific humoral and cellular immunity; however, how it does so remains undefined. Here, we demonstrate that super-infection of rhesus CMV-infected rhesus macaques (RM) requires evasion of CD8+ T cell immunity by virally-encoded inhibitors of MHC-I antigen presentation, particularly the homologues of human CMV US2, 3, 6 and 11. In contrast, MHC-I interference was dispensable for primary infection of RM, or for the establishment of a persistent secondary infection in CMV-infected RM transiently depleted of CD8+ lymphocytes. These findings demonstrate that US2-11 glycoproteins promote evasion of CD8+ T cells in vivo thus supporting viral replication and dissemination during super-infection, a process that complicates the development of preventative CMV vaccines, but that can be exploited for CMV-based vector development. PMID:20360110

  11. Management of cytomegalovirus infection in solid organ transplant recipients: SET/GESITRA-SEIMC/REIPI recommendations.

    PubMed

    Torre-Cisneros, J; Aguado, J M; Caston, J J; Almenar, L; Alonso, A; Cantisán, S; Carratalá, J; Cervera, C; Cordero, E; Fariñas, M C; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Fortún, J; Frauca, E; Gavaldá, J; Hernández, D; Herrero, I; Len, O; Lopez-Medrano, F; Manito, N; Marcos, M A; Martín-Dávila, P; Monforte, V; Montejo, M; Moreno, A; Muñoz, P; Navarro, D; Pérez-Romero, P; Rodriguez-Bernot, A; Rumbao, J; San Juan, R; Vaquero, J M; Vidal, E

    2016-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a major complication of solid organ transplantation. Because of management of CMV is variable among transplant centers, in 2011 the Spanish Transplantation Infection Study Group (GESITRA) of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) developed consensus guidelines for the prevention and treatment of CMV infection in solid organ transplant recipients. Since then, new publications have clarified or questioned the aspects covered in the previous document. For that reason, a panel of experts revised the evidence on CMV management, including immunological monitoring, diagnostics, prevention, vaccines, indirect effects, treatment, drug resistance, immunotherapy, investigational drugs, and pediatric issues. This document summarizes the recommendations. PMID:27132815

  12. Cytomegalovirus Infection of the Rat Developing Brain In Utero Prominently Targets Immune Cells and Promotes Early Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cloarec, Robin; Bauer, Sylvian; Luche, Hervé; Buhler, Emmanuelle; Pallesi-Pocachard, Emilie; Salmi, Manal; Courtens, Sandra; Massacrier, Annick; Grenot, Pierre; Teissier, Natacha; Watrin, Françoise; Schaller, Fabienne; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Gressens, Pierre; Malissen, Marie; Stamminger, Thomas; Streblow, Daniel N.; Bruneau, Nadine; Szepetowski, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus infections are a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disorders in human and represent a major health care and socio-economical burden. In contrast with this medical importance, the pathophysiological events remain poorly known. Murine models of brain cytomegalovirus infection, mostly neonatal, have brought recent insights into the possible pathogenesis, with convergent evidence for the alteration and possible involvement of brain immune cells. Objectives and Methods In order to confirm and expand those findings, particularly concerning the early developmental stages following infection of the fetal brain, we have created a model of in utero cytomegalovirus infection in the developing rat brain. Rat cytomegalovirus was injected intraventricularly at embryonic day 15 (E15) and the brains analyzed at various stages until the first postnatal day, using a combination of gene expression analysis, immunohistochemistry and multicolor flow cytometry experiments. Results Rat cytomegalovirus infection was increasingly seen in various brain areas including the choroid plexi and the ventricular and subventricular areas and was prominently detected in CD45low/int, CD11b+ microglial cells, in CD45high, CD11b+ cells of the myeloid lineage including macrophages, and in CD45+, CD11b– lymphocytes and non-B non-T cells. In parallel, rat cytomegalovirus infection of the developing rat brain rapidly triggered a cascade of pathophysiological events comprising: chemokines upregulation, including CCL2-4, 7 and 12; infiltration by peripheral cells including B-cells and monocytes at E17 and P1, and T-cells at P1; and microglia activation at E17 and P1. Conclusion In line with previous findings in neonatal murine models and in human specimen, our study further suggests that neuroimmune alterations might play critical roles in the early stages following cytomegalovirus infection of the brain in utero. Further studies are now needed to determine which

  13. Design of cocktail peptide vaccine against Cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tabaei, Samira; Mashkani, Baratali; Esmaili, Arezoo; Karimi, Reza; Jamehdar, Saeid Amel

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains a major morbidity and mortality cause in immuno suppressed patients. Therefore, significant effort has been made towards the development of a vaccine. In this study, the expression of the pp65 and gB fusion peptides and Fc domain of mouse IgG2a as a novel delivery system for selective uptake of antigens by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in Pichia pastoris yeast system were studied. Materials and Method: In this study, four immune dominant sequences in pp65 protein and 3 immuno dominant sequences in gB protein were selected according to literature review. Peptide linker -GGGGS- was used for construction of fusion peptide. This fusion peptide was cloned in the pPICZαA expression vector and transfected into P. pastoris host cells. Results: Dot blot and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) techniques showed that a high level of pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide was expressed. Conclusion: This CMV pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide could be a promising candidate for the development of a novel peptide vaccine. PMID:27279990

  14. A young patient with multisystem complications after cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Pulivarthi, Swaroopa; Gurram, Murali Krishna

    2014-01-01

    We are describing a case of an 18-year-old male patient with cytomegalovirus (CMV) associated guillain-barre syndrome (GBS) who presented with an acute onset of generalized weakness and numbness in the extremities, dysphagia, and facial diplegia, followed by respiratory failure, which led to mechanical ventilation. He had positive immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibodies against CMV, and CMV polymerase chain reaction was positive with <2000 copies of deoxyribonucleic acid. Human immunodeficiency virus test was negative. He received a course of ganciclovir, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasmapheresis. After improving from acute episode, patient was transferred to a rehabilitation facility for physical and occupational therapy. At the rehabilitation facility, he exhibited signs of acute abdomen with pain in the left upper quadrant secondary to peritonitis from dislodged gastrostomy tube and underwent exploratory laparotomy. During the hospital course he was found to have splenic infarct and colitis on the computed tomography of abdomen. This case showed an immunocompetent young patient with multisystem complications including guillain-barre syndrome (GBS), splenic infarct, hepatitis, and colitis due to CMV. PMID:24741254

  15. Pulmonary embolism and acute cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Del Borgo, Cosmo; Gianfreda, Romina; Belvisi, Valeria; Citton, Rita; Soscia, Fabrizio; Notarianni, Ermanno; Tieghi, Tiziana; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria

    2010-12-01

    A case of an immunocompetent man with acute CMV infection associated with a pulmonary embolism is described. Acute CMV infection could be a risk factor for developing thromboembolism. Pulmonary embolism should be included in differential diagnosis in patients with acute CMV infections and pulmonary opacities. PMID:21196823

  16. Impact of persistent cytomegalovirus infection on human neuroblastoma cell gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hoever, Gerold; Vogel, Jens-Uwe; Lukashenko, Polina; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Komor, Martina; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2005-01-14

    In a model of human neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines persistently infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) we previously showed that persistent HCMV infection is associated with an increased malignant phenotype, enhanced drug resistance, and invasive properties. To gain insights into the mechanisms of increased malignancy we analyzed the global changes in cellular gene expression induced by persistent HCMV infection of human neuroblastoma cells by use of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays (HG-U133A, Affymetrix) and RT-PCR. Comparing the gene expression of different NB cell lines with persistently infected cell sub-lines revealed 11 host cell genes regulated in a similar manner throughout all infected samples. Nine of these 11 genes may contribute to the previously observed changes in malignant phenotype of persistently HCMV infected NB cells by influencing invasive growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and proliferation. Thus, this work provides the basis for further functional studies. PMID:15582591

  17. Natural Killer Cell Evasion Is Essential for Infection by Rhesus Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sturgill, Elizabeth R; Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Seo, Seongkyung; Schneider, Christine L; Womack, Jennie L; Verweij, Marieke C; Ventura, Abigail B; Bhusari, Amruta; Jeffries, Krystal M; Legasse, Alfred W; Axthelm, Michael K; Hudson, Amy W; Sacha, Jonah B; Picker, Louis J; Früh, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The natural killer cell receptor NKG2D activates NK cells by engaging one of several ligands (NKG2DLs) belonging to either the MIC or ULBP families. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL16 and UL142 counteract this activation by retaining NKG2DLs and US18 and US20 act via lysomal degradation but the importance of NK cell evasion for infection is unknown. Since NKG2DLs are highly conserved in rhesus macaques, we characterized how NKG2DL interception by rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) impacts infection in vivo. Interestingly, RhCMV lacks homologs of UL16 and UL142 but instead employs Rh159, the homolog of UL148, to prevent NKG2DL surface expression. Rh159 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and retains several NKG2DLs whereas UL148 does not interfere with NKG2DL expression. Deletion of Rh159 releases human and rhesus MIC proteins, but not ULBPs, from retention while increasing NK cell stimulation by infected cells. Importantly, RhCMV lacking Rh159 cannot infect CMV-naïve animals unless CD8+ cells, including NK cells, are depleted. However, infection can be rescued by replacing Rh159 with HCMV UL16 suggesting that Rh159 and UL16 perform similar functions in vivo. We therefore conclude that cytomegaloviral interference with NK cell activation is essential to establish but not to maintain chronic infection. PMID:27580123

  18. An atypical case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    De Fino, Chiara; Nociti, Viviana; Modoni, Anna; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a young man admitted to our hospital for persistent headache associated with fever, retrorbitary pain and vomiting, who rapidly developed encephalopathy with drowsiness, paraplegia, hypoesthesia with a D6 sensory level and urinary retention. Brain and spinal cord MRI revealed findings compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and microbiological tests documented a cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. CMV infection is extraordinarily associated with ADEM, but must be included in microbiological tests, because early diagnosis and treatment ameliorate the neurological outcome. PMID:26856946

  19. Cutaneous cytomegalovirus infection on multi dermatomal herpes zoster scars: an isotopic immune response.

    PubMed

    Katibi, O S; Dlova, N C; Mosam, A

    2015-01-01

    As more patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are surviving, despite severe immune suppression, clinicians are faced with atypical manifestations of both common and uncommon dermatoses. A 30-year-old black South African woman presented with a 10-month history of multiple chronic ulcers appearing on a multidermatomal herpes zoster (HZ) scar. The woman was infected with HIV, and her CD4 count was 45 cells/μL. Histology and PCR revealed cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. This case highlights an unusual presentation of cutaneous CMV occurring as an isotopic immune response on a pre-existing multidermatomal HZ scar. PMID:25266481

  20. Cytomegalovirus Infection after CD34(+)-Selected Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Ting; Neofytos, Dionysios; Foldi, Julia; Kim, Seong Jin; Maloy, Molly; Chung, Dick; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Giralt, Sergio A; Papadopoulos, Esperanza; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Jakubowski, Ann A; Papanicolaou, Genovefa A

    2016-08-01

    The effectiveness of preemptive treatment (PET) for cytomegalovirus (CMV) in recipients of ex vivo T cell-depleted (TCD) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) by CD34(+) selection is not well defined. We analyzed 213 adults who received TCD-HCT at our institution from June 2010 through May 2014. Patients were monitored by a CMV quantitative PCR assay if recipient (R) or donor (D) were CMV seropositive. CMV viremia occurred early (median, 27 days after HCT) in 91 of 213 (42.7%) patients for a 180-day cumulative incidence of 84.5%, 61.8%, and 0 for R+/D+, R+/D-, and R-/D+ patients, respectively. CMV disease occurred in 5% of patients. In Cox regression analysis, R+/D+ status was associated with increased risk for CMV viremia compared with R+/D- (hazard ratio [HR], 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16 to 2.76, P = .01), whereas matched unrelated donor allograft was associated with decreased risk (HR, .62; 95% CI, .39 to .97, P = .04). Of 91 patients with CMV viremia, 52 (57%) had persistent viremia (>28 days duration). Time lag from detection of CMV viremia to PET was associated with incremental risk for persistent viremia (HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.18; P = .03). Overall, 166 of 213 (77.9%) patients were alive 1 year after HCT, with no difference between patients with and without CMV viremia or among the different CMV serostatus pairs (P = not significant). CMV viremia occurred in 70% of R + TCD-HCT. Delay in PET initiation was associated with persistent viremia. With PET, CMV R/D serostatus did not adversely impact survival in TCD-HCT on 1-year survival in the present cohort. PMID:27178374

  1. Invasive gastric mucormycosis and cytomegalovirus infection in an ABO incompatible renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Nandwani, A; Jha, P K; Duggal, R; Kher, V

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic infections are common in immunocompromised patients, such as solid organ transplant recipients. Both fungal and viral infections in posttransplant period increase morbidity and mortality. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains one of the most important pathogens. CMV disease may manifest as a nonspecific febrile syndrome or tissue-invasive infections. Zygomycosis is a rare infection, usually presents in rhino-cerebral, pulmonary and disseminated forms; gastrointestinal (GI) tract being a rare site of involvement. Newer techniques for early diagnosis and efficient therapies are essential for a better outcome of the disease; however, mortality rate remains high despite aggressive therapy. We report a renal transplant recipient, who developed gastric mucormycosis along with tissue invasive CMV disease, within 4 weeks of renal transplant and was diagnosed on the basis of upper GI endoscopy and gastric biopsy. The patient succumbed to the infection in spite of gastrectomy, antifungal and antiviral therapy. PMID:26664215

  2. Distribution of Cytomegalovirus Genotypes among Neonates Born to Infected Mothers in Islamabad, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mujtaba, Ghulam; Khurshid, Adnan; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Aamir, Uzma Bashir; Shaukat, Shahzad; Angez, Mehar; Rana, Muhammad Suleman; Umair, Massab; Shah, Aamer Ali; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection contributes to considerable long-term sequelae in neonates and children all over the world. The association between viral genotypes and severity of clinical cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is yet to be defined. The objective of this study was to find the impact of active CMV infection during pregnancy and the clinical significance of genotypes in neonates with congenital cytomegalovirus infections in Pakistan. Methods A total of 409 blood samples from pregnant women seeking health care services at the two antenatal hospitals of Islamabad during January to December 2012 were tested by ELISA and nested-PCR. Pregnant women with active infection (detected as IgM positive, PCR positive or positive on both assays) were followed until delivery, to detect the outcome of overt cCMV infection in neonates. Genetic characterization of CMV strains was performed by sequence analysis of envelope glycoproteins: gB, gN and gH to detect the contributing CMV genotypes. Results The seroprevalence of anti-CMV IgG and IgM was 97.5% (399 out of 409) and 12.7% (52 out of 409), respectively, while 20% (82/409) pregnant women were found positive for CMV DNA by PCR. Logistic regression analysis showed a significant association of active infection with parity [OR = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.82–2.62, p = 0.04], febrile illness [OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.76–3.65, p = 0.01] and jaundice [OR = 22.5, 95% CI = 4.53–85.02, p = 0.002]. We were able to isolate virus in 41 out of 70 neonates; 36.6% (15 out of 41) of them were symptomatic at birth while 63.4% (26 out of 41) were asymptomatic. The most prominent clinical feature observed in symptomatic neonates was hepatosplenomegaly (26.6%; 4 out of 15). All three genotypes gB, gN and gH were found with the highest frequency of gB1 genotype, found in 75% infants with hepatic damage. Phylogenetic analysis of Pakistani strains showed 96%-100% homology to their prototype strains. Conclusions Active CMV

  3. Hepatic decompensation in the absence of obvious precipitants: the potential role of cytomegalovirus infection/reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Rosi, Silvia; Poretto, Valentina; Cavallin, Marta; Angeli, Paolo; Amodio, Piero; Sattin, Andrea; Montagnese, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Details of two patients with alcohol-related and mixed aetiology cirrhosis who developed acute-on-chronic liver failure/hepatic decompensation with no obvious precipitants are reported. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection or reactivation was diagnosed in both, and required treatment with ganciclovir in one. Both returned to baseline hepatic function and remain well. Physicians should be alert to the possibility that CMV might cause or contribute to hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis, even if they are not severely immunocompromised, and especially if they are alcohol misusers. PMID:26629358

  4. [Cytomegalovirus and other herpes virus infections in systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Michaux, Christian; Morlat, Philippe; Bonnet, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    Reactivation of Herpesviridae is well known among transplant patients, but has not been sufficiently studied in patients who receive immunosuppressive treatment for systemic inflammatory diseases. CMV infection seems relatively rare; it is easily diagnosed by real-time PCR, a fast and reliable diagnostic tool. CMV disease is most often manifested in the form of lung disease, hepatitis, or colitis. The highest risks are associated with steroid or cyclophosphamide boluses and methotrexate. Prophylactic treatment cannot be recommended in clinical practice. The utility of monitoring viremia and of preemptive therapy must be evaluated. Herpes zoster is the most frequent viral infection in systemic diseases. Most immunosuppressive treatments, except methotrexate, promote its occurrence. Visceral involvement is quite rare, and outcome almost always favorable. Prophylactic treatment cannot be recommended. PMID:19446998

  5. Strategies to control human cytomegalovirus infection in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lilleri, Daniele; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents the major viral complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. HCMV infection may be controlled by the reconstituting immune system and remain subclinical or can lead to severe systemic and/or organ disease (mainly pneumonia and gastroenteritis) when immune reconstitution is delayed or impaired. In order to prevent the occurrence of HCMV disease, a prompt diagnosis of HCMV infection is mandatory. The adoption of pre-emptive therapy strategies guided by virological monitoring dramatically reduced the occurrence of HCMV disease. However, late-onset end-organ disease may occur in some patients with apparent immune reconstitution. In the near future, introduction of immunological monitoring and immunotherapies could markedly improve management of HCMV infection. PMID:27485084

  6. High susceptibility to cytomegalovirus infection of pregnant women in Flanders, Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Leuridan, E.; Ieven, M.; Hens, N.; Van Damme, P.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal antibodies against cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection offer, to some extent, protection against congenital CMV infection. This study describes the seroprevalence of CMV-specific IgG in 220 parturient women during pregnancy, at delivery, at 3 months after delivery and in their cord blood (Flanders, Belgium, 2006-2008). ELISA was used to measure IgG. Of this population, 30% had positive IgG titres. Active transplacental transport was confirmed with a ratio 1.15/1. Elevated maternal IgG titre and increased parity, but not age, were significantly associated with higher seroprevalence of CMV-specific IgG in the cord blood. These data indicate a high susceptibility to CMV among fertile women. Prenatal prevention and other strategies to prevent intra-uterine infection are of critical importance in a highly susceptible population. PMID:24753893

  7. Cytomegalovirus infection: its incidence and management in cytomegalovirus-seropositive living related liver transplant recipients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Manav; Gupta, Subash; Goyal, Neerav; Vasudevan, Karisangal R; Makki, Kausar; Dawar, Reetika; Sardana, Raman; Lal, Nand; Kumar, Ajay

    2012-12-01

    It is believed that antiviral prophylaxis decreases the incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and disease. There are few data regarding weekly assays for CMV DNA after transplantation and the subsequent management of CMV. Here we report a cohort of living related liver transplantation (LRLT) patients who were treated for invasive CMV disease or for CMV infections if they were receiving steroids for rejection. Patients who underwent liver transplantation at our center between September 2006 and August 2010 and were recipient-positive/donor-positive (R(+) /D(+) ) were prospectively included. Patients were tested for CMV DNA 3 weeks after transplantation. CMV DNA-positive patients underwent weekly DNA monitoring until there were 2 consecutive negative reports. Those who developed CMV disease or had rising DNA titers while they were on treatment for rejection were treated. A Cox regression analysis was performed for factors predicting survival. Two hundred sixty-six of the 306 R(+) /D(+) patients were CMV DNA-negative 3 weeks after transplantation, and 40 had detectable DNA. One of the DNA-negative patients developed CMV disease after treatment for rejection with methylprednisolone. Thirty patients had <500 copies/mL, and 10 had ≥500 copies/mL. Two of the 30 patients with DNA levels < 500 copies/mL developed CMV disease. Six of the 10 patients with DNA levels ≥500 copies/mL developed disease. CMV disease occurred in 9 of the 306 patients (2.9%). One patient received treatment for a rise in DNA titers while he was receiving steroids. There was a significant correlation between steroid administration for acute cellular rejection (ACR) and CMV reactivation (P = 0.003) and disease (P = 0.002). A multivariate analysis showed that CMV reactivation/disease did not predict survival. There was no difference in survival between CMV DNA-positive patients and CMV DNA-negative patients (P = 0.68). In conclusion, CMV reactivation is common after LRLT (13%), but the

  8. [Review and guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of post-natal cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Alarcón Allen, A; Baquero-Artigao, F

    2011-01-01

    Postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in the newborn can occur from exposure to maternal cervical secretions during birth, ingestion of breast milk, transfusion of blood products or transmission by body fluids of infected people. Breast milk is the main source of infection, given the high rate of CMV-positive mothers excreting CMV in milk. Freezing reduces the risk of CMV transmission by breastfeeding, although it does not eliminate it completely. Pasteurisation prevents such transmission, but it can alter the immunological properties of breast milk. Postnatal CMV infection is usually asymptomatic, as it normally results from viral reactivation in the mother, and the neonate is born with protective antibodies. However, in the very low birth weight premature infant the amount of transferred antibodies is smaller and a symptomatic infection can occur. Symptomatic post-natal CMV infection in the newborn typically causes hepatitis, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia or sepsis-like syndrome. Pneumonitis and enteritis are less common, but very characteristic. Diagnosis is based on urine virus detection at the time of onset of symptoms. Postnatal CMV infection in the newborn generally resolves spontaneously without antiviral treatment. Ganciclovir should be reserved for severe cases. Unlike congenital CMV disease, post-natal CMV infection in the preterm infant does not seem to be associated with hearing loss or abnormal neuro-development in long term follow-up. PMID:20630814

  9. The effect of cytomegalovirus infection on acute rejection in kidney transplanted patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzamani, Boshra; Hami, Maryam; Zolfaghari, Vajihe; Torkamani, Mahtab; Ghorban Sabagh, Mahin; Ahmadi Simab, Saiideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is known that cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a common problem among kidney transplant patients. This infection can be increased morbidity and decreased graft survival. This problem has been associated with acute rejection too. Patients and Methods: One hundred and thirty renal transplant patients were included in a prospective, case-control study. The renal transplant patients were divided into two groups; patients group with CMV infection and control group without CMV infection. Serum CMV-IgG in all patients was positive (donor and recipients). None of patients had received anti-thymocyte-globulin and thymoglobulin. CMV infection was diagnosed by quantitative CMV-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test (more than 500 copies/μg). Rejection episode was defined by kidney isotope scan or biopsy. Results: In the group of 66 CMV infection patients (41 male [62.1%] and 25 female [37.9%]) the incidence of graft rejection was 36%, however in the group of 64 control patients the incidence of graft rejection was 9.4 % (P < 0.005). Conclusion: CMV infection is important predisposing factor for acute allograft rejection after kidney transplantation. The results of this study suggests that the control of CMV infection could decrease episodes of acute kidney rejection. PMID:27471740

  10. Cytomegalovirus infection enhances smooth muscle cell proliferation and intimal thickening of rat aortic allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Lemström, K B; Bruning, J H; Bruggeman, C A; Lautenschlager, I T; Häyry, P J

    1993-01-01

    Inbred DA (AG-B4, RT1a) and WF (AG-B2, RT1v) rats were used as donors and recipients of aortic allografts. The recipient rats were inoculated i.p. either on day 1 (early infection) or on day 60 (late infection) with 10(5) plaque-forming units of rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV). The control rats were left noninfected. The presence of viral infection was demonstrated by plaque assays from biopsies of the salivary glands, liver, and spleen at sacrifice. The rats received 300 microCi[3H]thymidine by i.v. injection 3 h before sacrifice, and the grafts were removed at various time points for histology, immunohistochemistry, and autoradiography. RCMV infection significantly enhanced the generation of allograft arteriosclerosis. Infection at the time of transplantation had two important effects. First, the infection was associated with an early, prominent inflammatory episode and proliferation of inflammatory cells in the allograft adventitia. Second, the viral infection doubled the proliferation rate of smooth muscle cells and the arteriosclerotic alterations in the intima. In late infection the impact of RCMV infection on the allograft histology was nearly nonexistent. RCMV infection showed no effect in syngeneic grafts. These results suggest that early infection is more important to the generation of accelerated allograft arteriosclerosis than late infection, and that an acute alloimmune response must be associated with virus infection, to induce accelerated allograft arteriosclerosis. RCMV-infected aortic allografts, as described here, provide the first experimental model to investigate the interaction between the virus and the vascular wall of the transplant. Images PMID:8394384

  11. Diagnosis and management of human cytomegalovirus infection in the mother, fetus, and newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Revello, Maria Grazia; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2002-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the leading cause of congenital viral infection and mental retardation. HCMV infection, while causing asymptomatic infections in most immunocompetent subjects, can be transmitted during pregnancy from the mother with primary (and also recurrent) infection to the fetus. Hence, careful diagnosis of primary infection is required in the pregnant woman based on the most sensitive serologic assays (immunoglobulin M [IgM] and IgG avidity assays) and conventional virologic and molecular procedures for virus detection in blood. Maternal prognostic markers of fetal infection are still under investigation. If primary infection is diagnosed in a timely manner, prenatal diagnosis can be offered, including the search for virus and virus components in fetal blood and amniotic fluid, with fetal prognostic markers of HCMV disease still to be defined. However, the final step for definite diagnosis of congenital HCMV infection is detection of virus in the blood or urine in the first 1 to 2 weeks of life. To date, treatment of congenital infection with antiviral drugs is only palliative both prior to and after birth, whereas the only efficacious preventive measure seems to be the development of a safe and immunogenic vaccine, including recombinant, subunit, DNA, and peptide-based vaccines now under investigation. The following controversial issues are discussed in the light of the most recent advances in the field: the actual perception of the problem; universal serologic screening before pregnancy; the impact of correct counseling on decision making by the couple involved; the role of prenatal diagnosis in ascertaining transmission of virus to the fetus; the impact of preconceptional and periconceptional infections on the prevalence of congenital infection; and the prevalence of congenitally infected babies born to mothers who were immune prior to pregnancy compared to the number born to mothers undergoing primary infection during pregnancy. PMID

  12. Immune-based guidance of foscarnet treatment duration in a transplant recipient with ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Mihm, Janine; Leyking, Sarah; Dirks, Jan; Smola, Sigrun; Fliser, Danilo; Sester, Urban; Sester, Martina; Wilkens, Heinrike; Rissland, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    A lung and kidney transplant recipient underwent cytomegalovirus (CMV) primary infection with a UL97 mutation. Combined monitoring of viral load and CMV-specific CD4 T-cells allowed reduction of treatment duration with foscarnet, and illustrates how knowledge on the individual immunocompetence towards CMV may be used to individualize duration of antiviral treatment. PMID:27389910

  13. The life cycle and pathogenesis of human cytomegalovirus infection: lessons from proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Pierre M. Jean; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses have co-evolved with their hosts, acquiring strategies to subvert host cellular pathways for effective viral replication and spread. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a widely-spread β-herpesvirus, is a major cause of birth defects and opportunistic infections in HIV-1/AIDS patients. HCMV displays an intricate system-wide modulation of the human cell proteome. An impressive array of virus–host protein interactions occurs throughout the infection. To investigate the virus life cycle, proteomics has recently become a significant component of virology studies. Here, we review the mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches used in HCMV studies, as well as their contribution to understanding the HCMV life cycle and the virus-induced changes to host cells. The importance of the biological insights gained from these studies clearly demonstrate the impact that proteomics has had and can continue to have on understanding HCMV biology and identifying new therapeutic targets. PMID:25327590

  14. [Ulcerous colitis and infection with cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus and clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    Arnold, C; von Sanden, S; Theilacker, C; Blum, H E

    2008-08-01

    The treatment of severe flares of ulcerative colitis is based on systemic corticosteroids, immunomodulators such as cyclosporine and azathioprine and in some cases TNF-alpha-antagonists, respectively. These immunosuppressed patients are susceptible for infectious pathogens. Here we report the case of a patient with a severe flare of ulcerative colitis that was first treated with systemic corticosteroids combined with immunomodulators and subsequent with infliximab. The patient then experienced an infection with Clostridium difficile and cytomegalovirus of the colon and a Herpes simplex esophagitis, respectively. After specific treatment the patient responded well to the immunosuppressive therapy. This case illustrates that infections have to be considered before systemic treatment of an acute flare of ulcerative colitis is instituted especially in the case of disease activation during immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:18759202

  15. Cytomegalovirus Infection Drives Adaptive Epigenetic Diversification of NK Cells with Altered Signaling and Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Tesi, Bianca; Theorell, Jakob; Beziat, Vivien; Holmes, Tim D.; Han, Hongya; Chiang, Samuel C.C.; Foley, Bree; Mattsson, Kristin; Larsson, Stella; Schaffer, Marie; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Bryceson, Yenan T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanisms underlying human natural killer (NK) cell phenotypic and functional heterogeneity are unknown. Here, we describe the emergence of diverse subsets of human NK cells selectively lacking expression of signaling proteins after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The absence of B and myeloid cell-related signaling protein expression in these NK cell subsets correlated with promoter DNA hyperme-thylation. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were strikingly similar between HCMV-associated adaptive NK cells and cytotoxic effector T cells but differed from those of canonical NK cells. Functional interrogation demonstrated altered cytokine responsiveness in adaptive NK cells that was linked to reduced expression of the transcription factor PLZF. Furthermore, subsets of adaptive NK cells demonstrated significantly reduced functional responses to activated autologous T cells. The present results uncover a spectrum of epigenetically unique adaptive NK cell subsets that diversify in response to viral infection and have distinct functional capabilities compared to canonical NK cell subsets. PMID:25786176

  16. Clinical Findings and Autopsy of a Preterm Infant with Breast Milk-Acquired Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Anne-Aurélie, Lopes; Souad, Belhabri; Leila, Karaoui

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonpasteurized, nonfrozen, fresh breast milk from mothers with positive cytomegalovirus (CMV) serology was initially contraindicated to very low-birth-weight infants because of the risk of milk-acquired CMV infection. Recently, the severity of this infection was increasingly discussed and the international guidelines now differ. Since 2012, the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended nutrition through raw breast milk for all preterm infants. Case We report the case of an infant born prematurely at 27 weeks and 4 days and fed with raw breastmilk from day 12 of life (D12). He presented with a late-onset of CMV infection from D39. The CMV polymerase chain reaction (PCR), negative on D3, was strongly positive on D49, as well as the PCR on breast milk. He had CMV-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M while his mother had only CMV-specific IgG. On D52, he deteriorated further with septic shock, and a fatal cardiac arrest on D54. His twin presented an asymptomatic CMV infection. The autopsy and histological examination showed evidence of numerous organ damage caused by CMV (with differences compared with congenital infection) but no evidence of bacterial infection. Conclusion Although rare, postnatal CMV infections transmitted by raw breast milk given to very low-birthweight infants can have dramatic consequences. PMID:27257513

  17. THY-1 Cell Surface Antigen (CD90) Has an Important Role in the Initial Stage of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingxue; Wilkie, Adrian R; Weller, Melodie; Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2015-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects about 50% of the US population, is the leading infectious cause of birth defects, and is considered the most important infectious agent in transplant recipients. The virus infects many cell types in vivo and in vitro. While previous studies have identified several cellular proteins that may function at early steps of infection in a cell type dependent manner, the mechanism of virus entry is still poorly understood. Using a computational biology approach, correlating gene expression with virus infectivity in 54 cell lines, we identified THY-1 as a putative host determinant for HCMV infection in these cells. With a series of loss-of-function, gain-of-function and protein-protein interaction analyses, we found that THY-1 mediates HCMV infection at the entry step and is important for infection that occurs at a low m.o.i. THY-1 antibody that bound to the cell surface blocked HCMV during the initial 60 minutes of infection in a dose-dependent manner. Down-regulation of THY-1 with siRNA impaired infectivity occurred during the initial 60 minutes of inoculation. Both THY-1 antibody and siRNA inhibited HCMV-induced activation of the PI3-K/Akt pathway required for entry. Soluble THY-1 protein blocked HCMV infection during, but not after, virus internalization. Expression of exogenous THY-1 enhanced entry in cells expressing low levels of the protein. THY-1 interacted with HCMV gB and gH and may form a complex important for entry. However, since gB and gH have previously been shown to interact, it is uncertain if THY-1 directly binds to both of these proteins. Prior observations that THY-1 (a) interacts with αVβ3 integrin and recruits paxillin (implicated in HCMV entry), (b) regulates leukocyte extravasation (critical for HCMV viremia), and (c) is expressed on many cells targeted for HCMV infection including epithelial and endothelial cells, fibroblast, and CD34+/CD38- stem cells, all support a role for THY-1 as an HCMV entry mediator in

  18. THY-1 Cell Surface Antigen (CD90) Has an Important Role in the Initial Stage of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingxue; Wilkie, Adrian R.; Weller, Melodie; Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects about 50% of the US population, is the leading infectious cause of birth defects, and is considered the most important infectious agent in transplant recipients. The virus infects many cell types in vivo and in vitro. While previous studies have identified several cellular proteins that may function at early steps of infection in a cell type dependent manner, the mechanism of virus entry is still poorly understood. Using a computational biology approach, correlating gene expression with virus infectivity in 54 cell lines, we identified THY-1 as a putative host determinant for HCMV infection in these cells. With a series of loss-of-function, gain-of-function and protein-protein interaction analyses, we found that THY-1 mediates HCMV infection at the entry step and is important for infection that occurs at a low m.o.i. THY-1 antibody that bound to the cell surface blocked HCMV during the initial 60 minutes of infection in a dose-dependent manner. Down-regulation of THY-1 with siRNA impaired infectivity occurred during the initial 60 minutes of inoculation. Both THY-1 antibody and siRNA inhibited HCMV-induced activation of the PI3-K/Akt pathway required for entry. Soluble THY-1 protein blocked HCMV infection during, but not after, virus internalization. Expression of exogenous THY-1 enhanced entry in cells expressing low levels of the protein. THY-1 interacted with HCMV gB and gH and may form a complex important for entry. However, since gB and gH have previously been shown to interact, it is uncertain if THY-1 directly binds to both of these proteins. Prior observations that THY-1 (a) interacts with αVβ3 integrin and recruits paxillin (implicated in HCMV entry), (b) regulates leukocyte extravasation (critical for HCMV viremia), and (c) is expressed on many cells targeted for HCMV infection including epithelial and endothelial cells, fibroblast, and CD34+/CD38- stem cells, all support a role for THY-1 as an HCMV entry mediator in

  19. Does cytomegalovirus infection contribute to socioeconomic disparities in all-cause mortality?

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Lydia; Douglas, Christian E; Stebbins, Rebecca C; Pawelec, Graham; Simanek, Amanda M; Aiello, Allison E

    2016-09-01

    The social patterning of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and its implication in aging suggest that the virus may partially contribute to socioeconomic disparities in mortality. We used Cox regression and inverse odds ratio weighting to quantify the proportion of the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and all-cause mortality that was attributable to mediation by CMV seropositivity. Data were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III (1988-1994), with mortality follow-up through December 2011. SES was assessed as household income (income-to-poverty ratio ≤1.30;>1.30 to≤1.85;>1.85 to≤3.50;>3.50) and education (high school). We found strong associations between low SES and increased mortality: hazard ratio (HR) 1.80; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57, 2.06 comparing the lowest versus highest income groups and HR 1.29; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.48 comparing high school education. 65% of individuals were CMV seropositive, accounting for 6-15% of the SES-mortality associations. Age modified the associations between SES, CMV, and mortality, with CMV more strongly associated with mortality in older individuals. Our findings suggest that cytomegalovirus may partially contribute to persistent socioeconomic disparities in mortality, particularly among older individuals. PMID:27268074

  20. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  1. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  2. Human cytomegalovirus pUL97 kinase induces global changes in the infected cell phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Oberstein, Adam; Perlman, David H.; Shenk, Thomas; Terry, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Replication of human cytomegalovirus is regulated in part by cellular kinases and the single viral Ser/Thr kinase, pUL97. The virus-coded kinase augments the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) by enabling nuclear egress and altering cell cycle progression. These roles are accomplished through direct phosphorylation of nuclear lamins and the retinoblastoma protein, respectively. In an effort to identify additional pUL97 substrates, we analyzed the phosphoproteome of SILAC-labeled human fibroblasts during infection with either wild-type HCMV or a pUL97 kinase-dead mutant virus. Phosphopeptides were enriched over a titanium dioxide matrix and analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometry. We identified 157 unambiguous phosphosites from 106 cellular and 17 viral proteins whose phosphorylation required UL97. Analysis of peptides containing these sites allowed the identification of several candidate pUL97 phosphorylation motifs, including a completely novel phosphorylation motif, LxSP. Substrates harboring the LxSP motif were enriched in nucleocytoplasmic transport functions, including a number of components of the nuclear pore complex. These results extend the known functions of pUL97 and suggest that modulation of nuclear pore function may be important during HCMV replication. PMID:25867546

  3. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Osnat; Cohen, Yifat; Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus. PMID:26599541

  4. Comparison of Presentation, Course, and Outcome of Congenital and Acquired Cytomegalovirus Infection in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Samedi, Veronica Mugarab; Skappak, Christopher; Jantzie, Lindsay; Trevenen, Cynthia; Kamaluddeen, Majeeda; Ekwalanga, Pauline; Al Awad, Essa Hamdan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the most common causes of serious viral intrauterine infections. It is universally distributed among the human population with an average incidence of 0.15 to 2%. Indeed, at least half of the women in the reproductive age have evidence of prior CMV infection. Epidemiology and Pathogenicity However, it is not a usual practice to screen asymptomatic pregnant woman or neonates for CMV. Even if a mother developed a primary CMV infection during pregnancy, up to 90% of the newborns with congenital CMV will be asymptomatic at the time of birth. Only 5 to 7% of the infected babies will be acutely symptomatic, and the typical clinical presentation includes intrauterine growth restriction, microcephaly, various cutaneous manifestations (including petechiae and purpura), hematological abnormalities (particularly resistant thrombocytopenia), hepatosplenomegaly, chorioretinitis, hepatitis, etc. In contrast, acquired CMV infection is extremely unlikely to cause any serious sequelae for the infant. Cases  We present a case of congenital and acquired CMV infection in twins with a focus of dissimilarity in presentation, clinical course, and outcome. PMID:26929859

  5. Cytomegalovirus infection impairs immunosuppressive and antimicrobial effector functions of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Roland; Heseler, Kathrin; Nau, Julia; Schmidt, Silvia Kathrin; Leineweber, Margret; Pudelko, Sabine; Wenning, Johannes; Zimmermann, Albert; Hengel, Hartmut; Sinzger, Christian; Degistirici, Özer; Sorg, Rüdiger Volker; Däubener, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) possess immunosuppressive and antimicrobial effects that are partly mediated by the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Therefore MSC represent a promising novel cellular immunosuppressant which has the potential to control steroid-refractory acute graft versus host disease (GvHD). In addition, MSC are capable of reducing the risk of infection in patients after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HST). Recent data indicate that signals from the microenvironment including those from microbes may modulate MSC effector functions. As Cytomegalovirus (CMV) represents a prominent pathogen in immunocompromised hosts, especially in patients following HST, we investigated the impact of CMV infection on MSC-mediated effects on the immune system. We demonstrate that CMV-infected MSC lose their cytokine-induced immunosuppressive capacity and are no longer able to restrict microbial growth. IDO expression is substantially impaired following CMV infection of MSC and this interaction critically depends on intact virus and the number of MSC as well as the viral load. Since overt CMV infection may undermine the clinical efficacy of MSC in the treatment of GvHD in transplant patients, we recommend that patients scheduled for MSC therapy should undergo thorough evaluation for an active CMV infection and receive CMV-directed antiviral therapy prior to the administration of MSC. PMID:24782599

  6. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus. PMID:26599541

  7. PPARγ Is Activated during Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection and Inhibits Neuronogenesis from Human Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Maude; Li, Xiaojun; Perez-Berezo, Teresa; Rauwel, Benjamin; Benchoua, Alexandra; Bessières, Bettina; Aziza, Jacqueline; Cenac, Nicolas; Luo, Minhua; Casper, Charlotte; Peschanski, Marc; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Davrinche, Christian; Chavanas, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Congenital infection by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a leading cause of permanent sequelae of the central nervous system, including sensorineural deafness, cerebral palsies or devastating neurodevelopmental abnormalities (0.1% of all births). To gain insight on the impact of HCMV on neuronal development, we used both neural stem cells from human embryonic stem cells (NSC) and brain sections from infected fetuses and investigated the outcomes of infection on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ), a transcription factor critical in the developing brain. We observed that HCMV infection dramatically impaired the rate of neuronogenesis and strongly increased PPARγ levels and activity. Consistent with these findings, levels of 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), a known PPARγ agonist, were significantly increased in infected NSCs. Likewise, exposure of uninfected NSCs to 9-HODE recapitulated the effect of infection on PPARγ activity. It also increased the rate of cells expressing the IE antigen in HCMV-infected NSCs. Further, we demonstrated that (1) pharmacological activation of ectopically expressed PPARγ was sufficient to induce impaired neuronogenesis of uninfected NSCs, (2) treatment of uninfected NSCs with 9-HODE impaired NSC differentiation and (3) treatment of HCMV-infected NSCs with the PPARγ inhibitor T0070907 restored a normal rate of differentiation. The role of PPARγ in the disease phenotype was strongly supported by the immunodetection of nuclear PPARγ in brain germinative zones of congenitally infected fetuses (N = 20), but not in control samples. Altogether, our findings reveal a key role for PPARγ in neurogenesis and in the pathophysiology of HCMV congenital infection. They also pave the way to the identification of PPARγ gene targets in the infected brain. PMID:27078877

  8. Pathological changes of cochlear in deaf mice at different time after mouse cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yongyuan; Liu, Xinguo; Liu, Hongjian; Xing, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to observe the pathological changes of inner ear in deaf mice at different time after mouse cytomegalovirus infection. Methods: A total of 60 BALB/C mice were divided into 2 groups randomly: model group (A) and control group (B). In model group, 10 μl of MCMV was injected into the brain of each mouse while 10 μl of physiological saline was injected in control group. 10 cochlear samples were taken from 5 mice selected from each group randomly after infection for 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 days respectively. They were detected with PCR and HE staining methods. Auditory brain stem response was determined. The apoptosis of spiral ganglion (SGN) cells was detected by apoptosis assay kit. The levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were detected by RT-PCR and western blotting methods. Results: In group A, PCR results were negative after infection for 1 day, they were positive after infection for 3 days to 21 days. In group B, PCR results were negative in the experimental period. Compared with group B, ABR I wave latency and threshold increased while ABR I wave decreased in group A. There were no obvious hyperemia and inflammatory cells infiltration in group B, In group A, hemorrhage of scala tympani and scala vestibule appeared and reached highest peak after infection for 3 days accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration; the vestibular membrane thickened after infection for 5 days; cell gap of SGN cells widened, arranged more sparsely with cell edema after infection for 7 days accompanied by infiltration of plasma cells; fibroblast proliferation and fibrosis appeared after infection for 14 days. Conclusions: MCMV infection occurred in cochlear after MCMV infection for 3 days and could sustain, the continues pathological changes of inner will bring difficulties to the treatment of CMV deafness, further studies on the specific mechanism of SGN changes caused by CMV infection will provide an important target for the treatment of CMV deafness. PMID:26221258

  9. Antagonistic Determinants Controlling Replicative and Latent States of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Umashankar, Mahadevaiah; Rak, Michael; Bughio, Farah; Zagallo, Patricia; Caviness, Katie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms by which viruses persist and particularly those by which viruses actively contribute to their own latency have been elusive. Here we report the existence of opposing functions encoded by genes within a polycistronic locus of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome that regulate cell type-dependent viral fates: replication and latency. The locus, referred to as the UL133-UL138 (UL133/8) locus, encodes four proteins, pUL133, pUL135, pUL136, and pUL138. As part of the ULb′ region of the genome, the UL133/8 locus is lost upon serial passage of clinical strains of HCMV in cultured fibroblasts and is therefore considered dispensable for replication in this context. Strikingly, we could not reconstitute infection in permissive fibroblasts from bacterial artificial chromosome clones of the HCMV genome where UL135 alone was disrupted. The loss of UL135 resulted in complex phenotypes and could ultimately be overcome by infection at high multiplicities. The requirement for UL135 but not the entire locus led us to hypothesize that another gene in this locus suppressed virus replication in the absence of UL135. The defect associated with the loss of UL135 was largely rescued by the additional disruption of the UL138 latency determinant, indicating a requirement for UL135 for virus replication when UL138 is expressed. In the CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor model of latency, viruses lacking only UL135 were defective for viral genome amplification and reactivation. Taken together, these data indicate that UL135 and UL138 comprise a molecular switch whereby UL135 is required to overcome UL138-mediated suppression of virus replication to balance states of latency and reactivation. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms by which viruses persist in their host remain one of the most poorly understood phenomena in virology. Herpesviruses, including HCMV, persist in an incurable, latent state that has profound implications for immunocompromised individuals, including transplant

  10. Human cytomegalovirus gene expression in long-term infected glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fiallos, Estefania; Judkins, Jonathon; Matlaf, Lisa; Prichard, Mark; Dittmer, Dirk; Cobbs, Charles; Soroceanu, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    The most common adult primary brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM), is characterized by fifteen months median patient survival and has no clear etiology. We and others have identified the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene products endogenously expressed in GBM tissue and primary cells, with a subset of viral genes being consistently expressed in most samples. Among these viral genes, several have important oncomodulatory properties, regulating tumor stemness, proliferation, immune evasion, invasion and angiogenesis. These findings lead us to hypothesize that a specific HCMV gene signature may be associated with GBM pathogenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we used glioma cell lines and primary glioma stem-like cells (GSC) infected with clinical and laboratory HCMV strains and measured relative viral gene expression levels along several time points up to 15 weeks post-infection. While HCMV gene expression was detected in several infected glioma lines through week 5 post-infection, only HCMV-infected GSC expressed viral gene products 15 weeks post-infection. Efficiency of infection across time was higher in GSC compared to cell lines. Importantly, HCMV-infected GSC outlived their uninfected counterparts, and this extended survival was paralleled by increased tumorsphere frequency and upregulation of stemness regulators, such as SOX2, p-STAT3, and BMX (a novel HCMV target identified in this study). Interleukin 6 (IL-6) treatment significantly upregulated HCMV gene expression in long-term infected glioma cultures, suggesting that pro-inflammatory signaling in the tumor milieu may further augment HCMV gene expression and subsequent tumor progression driven by viral-induced cellular signaling. Together, our data support a critical role for long-term, low-level HCMV infection in promoting survival, stemness, and proliferation of GSC that could significantly contribute to GBM pathogenesis. PMID:25549333

  11. Role of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG Avidity Testing in Diagnosing Primary CMV Infection during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lapé-Nixon, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The risk of intrauterine transmission of cytomegalovirus (CMV) during pregnancy is much greater for women who contract primary CMV infection after conception than for women with evidence of infection (circulating CMV antibodies) before conception. Thus, laboratory tests that aid in the identification of recent primary CMV infection are important tools for managing the care of pregnant women suspected of having been exposed to CMV. CMV IgM detection is a sensitive marker of primary CMV infection, but its specificity is poor because CMV IgM is also produced during viral reactivation and persists following primary infection in some individuals. Studies conducted over the last 20 years convincingly demonstrate that measurement of CMV IgG avidity is both a sensitive and a specific method for identifying pregnant women with recent primary CMV infection and thus at increased risk for vertical CMV transmission. IgG avidity is defined as the strength with which IgG binds to antigenic epitopes expressed by a given protein; it matures gradually during the 6 months following primary infection. Low CMV IgG avidity is an accurate indicator of primary infection within the preceding 3 to 4 months, whereas high avidity excludes primary infection within the preceding 3 months. In this minireview, we summarize published data demonstrating the clinical utility of CMV IgG avidity results for estimating time since primary infection in pregnant women, describe commercially available CMV IgG avidity assays, and discuss some of the issues and controversies surrounding CMV IgG avidity testing during pregnancy. PMID:25165026

  12. Knowledge and practices of obstetricians and gynecologists regarding cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy--United States, 2007.

    PubMed

    2008-01-25

    In the United States, congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs in approximately 1 in 150 live births, leading to permanent disabilities (e.g., hearing loss, vision loss, and cognitive impairment) in approximately 1 in 750 live-born children. A common mode of CMV transmission to a pregnant woman is through close contact with infected bodily fluids such as urine or saliva, especially from young children. Because no vaccine is available and treatment options are limited, renewed attention has been given to prevention of CMV infections among pregnant women through traditional infection-control practices, such as good hand hygiene. These practices have been encouraged by organizations such as CDC and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), which recommend that obstetricians and gynecologists (OB/GYNs) counsel women on careful handling of potentially CMV-infected articles, such as diapers, and thorough hand washing after close contact with young children. Despite this increased emphasis on avoiding infection during pregnancy, few women are aware of CMV infection and how it can be prevented. During March-May 2007, ACOG surveyed a national sample of OB/GYNs to assess their knowledge and practices regarding CMV infection prevention. This report describes the results of that survey, which indicated that fewer than half (44%) of OB/GYNs surveyed reported counseling their patients about preventing CMV infection. These results emphasize the need for additional training of OB/GYNs regarding CMV infection prevention and for a better understanding of the reasons that physician knowledge regarding CMV transmission might not result in patient counseling. PMID:18219267

  13. Detection of CMV DNA in the perilymph of a 6-year-old boy with congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Foulon, Ina; Soetens, Oriane; Vleurinck, Leen; Gordts, Frans; Leus, Astrid; Naessens, Anne

    2016-06-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who received a cochlear implant for profound sensorineural hearing loss after being born with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Even after 6 years, CMV DNA was still found in the perilymph of the cochlea. Our case shows that CMV DNA can be present in the cochlea years after congenital CMV infection, and it can explain why progressive and/or late-onset hearing loss occurs in these children. PMID:27304443

  14. Cytomegalovirus Infection among Infants in California Neonatal Intensive Care Units, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Lanzieri, Tatiana M.; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Bennett, Mihoko V.; Gould, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Assess the burden of congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease among infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods CMV infection was defined as a report of positive CMV viral culture or PCR at any time since birth in an infant hospitalized in a NICU reporting to California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative during 2005–2010. Results 156 (1.7 per 1000) infants were reported with CMV infection, representing an estimated 5% of the expected number of live births with symptomatic CMV disease. Prevalence was higher among infants with younger gestational ages and lower birth weights. Infants with CMV infection had significantly longer hospital stays; 14 (9%) died. Conclusions Reported prevalence of CMV infection in NICUs represents a fraction of total expected disease burden from CMV in the newborn period, likely resulting from underdiagnosis and milder symptomatic cases that do not require NICU care. More complete ascertainment of infants with congenital CMV infection that would benefit from antiviral treatment may reduce the burden of CMV disease in this population. PMID:24334425

  15. Dynamics of the NK-cell subset redistribution induced by cytomegalovirus infection in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Daniel E; Alarcón, Ana; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Muntasell, Aura; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; García, Jordi; Mur, Antonio; Fortuny, Claudia; López-Botet, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection promotes an expansion of NK-cells expressing the CD94/NKG2C receptor. We prospectively monitored the effects of HCMV on the NK-cell receptor (NKG2C, NKG2A, KIR, LILRB1) distribution in preterm infants. As compared to non-infected moderately preterm newborns (n=19, gestational age: 32-37 weeks), very preterm infants (n=5, gestational age: <32 weeks) suffering symptomatic postnatal HCMV infection displayed increased numbers of NKG2C+, KIR+ NK-cells, encompassed by a reduction of NKG2A+ NK-cells. A similar profile was observed in HCMV-negative newborns (n=4) with asymptomatic infection, during follow-up at ~4 and 10 months of age. Of note, viremia remained detectable in three symptomatic cases at ~10 months despite the persistent expansion of NKG2C+ NK-cells. Our study provides original insights on the dynamics of the imprint exerted by primary HCMV infection on the NK-cell compartment, revealing that the expansion of NKG2C+ NK-cells may be insufficient to control viral replication in very preterm infants. PMID:25636568

  16. Vascular dysfunction in young, mid-aged and aged mice with latent cytomegalovirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Gombos, R. B.; Brown, J. C.; Teefy, J.; Gibeault, R. L.; Conn, K. L.; Schang, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is associated with vascular diseases in both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent individuals. CMV infections cycle between active and latent phases throughout life. We and others have shown vascular dysfunction during active mouse CMV (mCMV) infections. Few studies have examined changes in physiology during latent CMV infections, particularly vascular responses or whether the negative effects of aging on vascular function and fertility will be exacerbated under these conditions. We measured vascular responses in intact mesenteric and uterine arteries dissected from young, mid-aged, and aged latently mCMV-infected (mCMV genomes are present but infectious virus is undetectable) and age-matched uninfected mice using a pressure myograph. We tested responses to the α1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine, the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, and the endothelium-dependent vasodilator methacholine. In young latently mCMV-infected mice, vasoconstriction was increased and vasodilation was decreased in mesenteric arteries, whereas both vasoconstriction and vasodilation were increased in uterine arteries compared with those in age-matched uninfected mice. In reproductively active mid-aged latently infected mice, mesenteric arteries showed little change, whereas uterine arteries showed greatly increased vasoconstriction. These vascular effects may have contributed to the decreased reproductive success observed in mid-aged latently mCMV-infected compared with age-matched uninfected mice (16.7 vs. 46.7%, respectively). In aged latently infected mice, vasodilation is increased in mesenteric and uterine arteries likely to compensate for increased vasoconstriction to mediators other than phenylephrine. The novel results of this study show that even when active mCMV infections become undetectable, vascular dysfunction continues and differs with age and artery origin. PMID:23125213

  17. Immunobiology of herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus infections of the fetus and newborn

    PubMed Central

    Muller, William J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Koelle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Immunologic “immaturity” is often blamed for the increased susceptibility of newborn humans to infection, but the precise mechanisms and details of immunologic development remain somewhat obscure. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are two of the more common severe infectious agents of the fetal and newborn periods. HSV infection in the newborn most commonly occurs after exposure to the virus during delivery, and can lead to a spectrum of clinical disease ranging from isolated skin-eye-mucous membrane infection to severe disseminated multiorgan disease, often including encephalitis. In contrast to HSV, clinically severe CMV infections early in life are usually acquired during the intrauterine period. These infections can result in a range of clinical disease, including hearing loss and neurodevelopmental delay. However, term newborns infected with CMV after delivery are generally asymptomatic, and older children and adults often acquire infection with HSV or CMV with either no or mild clinical symptoms. The reasons for these widely variable clinical presentations are not completely understood, but likely relate to developmental differences in immune responses. This review summarizes recent human and animal studies of the immunologic response of the fetus and newborn to these two infections, in comparison to the responses of older children and adults. The immunologic defense of the newborn against each virus is considered under the broader categories of (i) the placental barrier to infection, (ii) skin and mucosal barriers (including antimicrobial peptides), (iii) innate responses, (iv) humoral responses, and (v) cellular responses. A specific focus is made on recent studies of innate and cellular immunity to HSV and CMV. PMID:20467462

  18. Genetic mechanism associated with congenital cytomegalovirus infection and analysis of effects of the infection on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Li, J M; Zhang, H F; Zhang, X Q; Huang, G L; Huang, H Z; Yu, W W

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to compare the diagnostic value of various detection methods for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, to investigate the genetic mechanism associated with CMV infection in pregnant women, and to analyze the risk of sequelae development in fetuses with CMV infection. A total of 300 participants who had the same immunosuppressive regimen and received preemptive therapy for CMV infection were prospectively enrolled in this study; they included 289 vaccine trial participants. The gB-absorbed CMV IgG assay was performed for each vaccine trial participant. The healthy women were divided into 2 groups, and amniotic fluids were collected from them at 15-18 weeks of gestation to test for CMV seropositivity before conception by using IgM specific antibodies, CMV-DNA, and IgG analysis. In 104 cases, cord blood sera and urine specimens were also collected from the infants and examined. The sensitivity and specificity of immediate-early messenger RNA and pp67 (late) messenger RNA detection by the nucleic acid sequence-based amplification technique was comparable to those of virus isolation and PCR. Furthermore, an association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the TLR-2 gene and congenital CMV infection was observed and confirmed. Moreover, CMV infection during early pregnancy has been shown to have a much more severe effect on the pregnancy outcome compared to infection during later stages of pregnancy. PMID:26535638

  19. Macrophage activation associated with chronic murine cytomegalovirus infection results in more severe experimental choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Scott W; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G; Miller, Daniel M; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication. PMID:22570607

  20. Macrophage Activation Associated with Chronic Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection Results in More Severe Experimental Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Scott W.; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G.; Miller, Daniel M.; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P.; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication. PMID:22570607

  1. Human Cytomegalovirus-Induces Cytokine Changes in the Placenta with Implications for Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Stuart T.; Scott, Gillian; Naing, Zin; Iwasenko, Jenna; Hall, Beverley; Graf, Nicole; Arbuckle, Susan; Craig, Maria E.; Rawlinson, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of the developing fetus can result in adverse pregnancy outcomes including death in utero. Fetal injury results from direct viral cytopathic damage to the CMV-infected fetus, although evidence suggests CMV placental infection may indirectly cause injury to the fetus, possibly via immune dysregulation with placental dysfunction. This study investigated the effects of CMV infection on expression of the chemokine MCP-1 (CCL2) and cytokine TNF-α in placentae from naturally infected stillborn babies, and compared these changes with those found in placental villous explant histocultures acutely infected with CMV ex vivo. Tissue cytokine protein levels were assessed using quantitative immunohistochemistry. CMV-infected placentae from stillborn babies had significantly elevated MCP-1 and TNF-α levels compared with uninfected placentae (p = 0.001 and p = 0.007), which was not observed in placentae infected with other microorganisms (p = 0.62 and p = 0.71) (n = 7 per group). Modelling acute clinical infection using ex vivo placental explant histocultures showed infection with CMV laboratory strain AD169 (0.2 pfu/ml) caused significantly elevated expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α compared with uninfected explants (p = 0.0003 and p<0.0001) (n = 25 per group). Explant infection with wild-type Merlin at a tenfold lower multiplicity of infection (0.02 pfu/ml), caused a significant positive correlation between increased explant infection and upregulation of MCP-1 and TNF-α expression (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.017). Cytokine dysregulation has been associated with adverse outcomes of pregnancy, and can negatively affect placental development and function. These novel findings demonstrate CMV infection modulates the placental immune environment in vivo and in a multicellular ex vivo model, suggesting CMV-induced cytokine modulation as a potential initiator and/or exacerbator of placental and fetal injury. PMID

  2. Ganciclovir-Resistant Cytomegalovirus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated with Foscarnet and Everolimus.

    PubMed

    Menghi, Viola; Comai, Giorgia; Baraldi, Olga; Liviano D'Arcangelo, Giovanni; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; La Manna, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a major cause of morbidity, graft failure, and death in kidney transplant recipients. We describe a case of a 53-year-old CMV-seronegative man who underwent renal transplant from a CMV-positive donor and who developed ganciclovir- (GCV-) resistant CMV infection. Foscarnet was started while immunosuppressive therapy was modified with the introduction of everolimus minimizing tacrolimus dosage. Only two weeks after the start of this treatment regimen was the patient's viral load negative. At two-year follow-up the patient has no clinical or laboratory signs of CMV infection and a good and stable renal function or graft survival. In our case, administration of an mTOR inhibitor combined with foscarnet led to rapid and persistent viral clearance without compromising short- and medium-term graft function. This combination therapy supports the need for the kidney transplant community to individualize a target therapy for each type of GCV-resistant CMV infection. PMID:26942027

  3. Ganciclovir-Resistant Cytomegalovirus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated with Foscarnet and Everolimus

    PubMed Central

    Menghi, Viola; Comai, Giorgia; Baraldi, Olga; Liviano D'Arcangelo, Giovanni; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; La Manna, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a major cause of morbidity, graft failure, and death in kidney transplant recipients. We describe a case of a 53-year-old CMV-seronegative man who underwent renal transplant from a CMV-positive donor and who developed ganciclovir- (GCV-) resistant CMV infection. Foscarnet was started while immunosuppressive therapy was modified with the introduction of everolimus minimizing tacrolimus dosage. Only two weeks after the start of this treatment regimen was the patient's viral load negative. At two-year follow-up the patient has no clinical or laboratory signs of CMV infection and a good and stable renal function or graft survival. In our case, administration of an mTOR inhibitor combined with foscarnet led to rapid and persistent viral clearance without compromising short- and medium-term graft function. This combination therapy supports the need for the kidney transplant community to individualize a target therapy for each type of GCV-resistant CMV infection. PMID:26942027

  4. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-04-01

    Indium-111-labelled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labelling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111 leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients.

  5. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-04-01

    Indium-111-labeled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labeling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111-leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients.

  6. Enhanced capacity of DNA repair in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Rapp, F.

    1981-04-01

    Plaque formation in Vero cells by UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus was enhanced by infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), UV irradiation, or treatment with methylmethanesulfonate. Preinfection of Vero cells with HCMV enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus more significantly than did treatment with UV or methylmethanesulfonate alone. A similar enhancement by HCMV was observed in human embryonic fibroblasts, but not in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP12BE) cells. It was also found that HCMV infection enhanced hydroxyurea-resistant DNA synthesis induced by UV light or methylmethanesulfonate. Alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis revealed an enhanced rate of synthesis of all size classes of DNA in UV-irradiated HCMV-infected Vero cells. However, HCMV infection did not induce repairable lesions in cellular DNA and did not significantly inhibit host cell DNA synthesis, unlike UV or methylmethanesulfonate. These results indicate that HCMV enhanced DNA repair capacity in the host cells without producing detectable lesions in cellular DNA and without inhibiting DNA synthesis. This repair appeared to be error proof for UV-damaged herpes simplex virus DNA when tested with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase-negative mutants.

  7. Is there any association of extra hepatic biliary atresia with cytomegalovirus or other infections?

    PubMed

    Soomro, Ghous Bukhsh; Abbas, Zaigham; Hassan, Mujahid; Luck, Nasir; Memon, Yousuf; Khan, Abdaal Wasim

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to find any association of extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA) with a possible infectious etiology. Infants diagnosed to have EHBA were tested by blood PCR for cytomegalovirus (CMV), Ebstein-Barr virus, HBsAg, anti-HCV and IgM antibodies for CMV, toxoplasma, rubella, and herpes infections. Thirty-three infants of EHBA were included in the study, male 22, median age when diagnosed 2.5 months (range 1.0-5.0 months). On examination pallor, oedema and hepatosplenomegaly were seen in all and ascites and microcephaly in 19 (57.6%). Centile height and weight were 50th in 23 and 25th in 10. Persistent CMV infection documented by PCR was present in 14 (42%) patients. Eleven of these also had positive CMV IgM antibodies. No other above mentioned infections could be detected in our patients of EHBA. Our data suggests that CMV infection may play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of EHBA. PMID:21465946

  8. The Association of Human Cytomegalovirus with Biomarkers of Inflammation and Immune Activation in HIV-1-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Lurain, Nell S; Hanson, Barbara A; Hotton, Anna L; Weber, Kathleen M; Cohen, Mardge H; Landay, Alan L

    2016-02-01

    Three groups of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive women (total n = 164) were selected from the Chicago Women's Interagency HIV-1 Study to investigate the association between CMV coinfection and immune activation: (1) HIV-1 viremic, (2) HIV-1 aviremic, and (3) HIV-1 uninfected. Quantitative measures of CMV serum IgG, CMV DNA, and serum biomarkers interleukin (IL)-6, soluble CD163 (sCD163), soluble CD14 (sCD14), and interferon gamma-induced protein (IP10) were obtained. Levels of CMV IgG and the serum biomarkers were significantly higher in the HIV-1 viremic group compared to the aviremic and uninfected groups (p < 0.001). No significant associations with CMV IgG levels were found for HIV-uninfected women. When each of the HIV-infected groups was analyzed, sCD14 levels in the viremic women were significantly associated with CMV IgG levels with p < 0.02 when adjusted for age, CD4 count, and HIV viral load. There was also a modest association (p = 0.036) with IL-6 from plasma and cervical vaginal lavage specimens both unadjusted and adjusted for CD4 count and HIV viral load. The association of CMV IgG level with sCD14 implicates the monocyte as a potential site for interaction of the two viruses, which eventually may lead to non-AIDS-defining pathological conditions. PMID:26422187

  9. A High-Affinity Native Human Antibody Neutralizes Human Cytomegalovirus Infection of Diverse Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Keyi; Park, Minha; DeChene, Neal; Stephenson, Robert; Tenorio, Edgar; Ellsworth, Stote L.; Tabata, Takako; Petitt, Matthew; Tsuge, Mitsuru; Fang-Hoover, June; Adler, Stuart P.; Cui, Xiaohong; McVoy, Michael A.; Pereira, Lenore

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common infection causing poor outcomes among transplant recipients. Maternal infection and transplacental transmission are major causes of permanent birth defects. Although no active vaccines to prevent HCMV infection have been approved, passive immunization with HCMV-specific immunoglobulin has shown promise in the treatment of both transplant and congenital indications. Antibodies targeting the viral glycoprotein B (gB) surface protein are known to neutralize HCMV infectivity, with high-affinity binding being a desirable trait, both to compete with low-affinity antibodies that promote the transmission of virus across the placenta and to displace nonneutralizing antibodies binding nearby epitopes. Using a miniaturized screening technology to characterize secreted IgG from single human B lymphocytes, 30 antibodies directed against gB were previously cloned. The most potent clone, TRL345, is described here. Its measured affinity was 1 pM for the highly conserved site I of the AD-2 epitope of gB. Strain-independent neutralization was confirmed for 15 primary HCMV clinical isolates. TRL345 prevented HCMV infection of placental fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and epithelial cells, and it inhibited postinfection HCMV spread in epithelial cells. The potential utility for preventing congenital transmission is supported by the blockage of HCMV infection of placental cell types central to virus transmission to the fetus, including differentiating cytotrophoblasts, trophoblast progenitor cells, and placental fibroblasts. Further, TRL345 was effective at controlling an ex vivo infection of human placental anchoring villi. TRL345 has been utilized on a commercial scale and is a candidate for clinical evaluation. PMID:25534746

  10. [Optimisation of retrospective diagnosis of cytomegalovirus congenital infection from dried blood spots].

    PubMed

    Vauloup-Fellous, C; Dubreuil, P; Grangeot-Keros, L

    2006-12-01

    Out of the 90% of cytomegalovirus (CMV) congenitally infected children that are asymptomatic at birth, 5 to 15% will later develop complications, mainly neurodevelopmental defects and/or deafness. Unfortunately, after the first 2 weeks of life, usual diagnostic techniques for CMV detection (viral culture and serology) are useless to differentiate congenital infection from post-natal acquired infection, whereas detection of viral DNA from dried blood spots (DBS; Guthrie cards), systematically collected from all newborns in the first days of life, has been described for late diagnosis of CMV congenital infection. The aim of our study was to choose and optimise a viral DNA extraction method from DBS and to study if CMV DNA detection is reliable when DBS are stored for 1 year at room temperature or 2 months at 37 degrees C. 10 reference cards (blood collected from CMV seronegative newborns (IgG/IgM negative) were "infected" with serial dilutions of virus and spotted on Guthrie cards) were tested. 3 extraction methods were evaluated, products of PCR were analyzes by agarose gel electrophoresis and quantification of CMV from DBS was also performed. Analysis of the results obtained from reference cards showed higher sensitivity of phenol/chloroform extraction following treatment with proteinase K, compared to heat extraction in cell culture medium or extraction with a commercial kit. We did not observe quantitative loss of viral DNA after 1 year storage at room temperature. CMV DNA detection from Guthrie cards could become a very useful tool for retrospective diagnosis of congenital CMV infection when sequelae are diagnosed in the first years of life. We are pursuing this study with DBS from congenitally infected children. PMID:17027198

  11. Systematic review of the birth prevalence of congenital cytomegalovirus infection in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Lanzieri, Tatiana M.; Dollard, Sheila C.; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Grosse, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading infectious cause of congenital hearing loss and neurodevelopmental disability in developed countries. Information on congenital CMV infection in developing countries appears to be lacking. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review to identify studies from developing countries with population-based samples of at least 300 infants that used laboratory methods established as reliable for the diagnosis of congenital CMV infection. Results Most studies were excluded due to biased samples or inadequate diagnostic methods; consequently the search identified just 11 studies that were from Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The number of newborns tested ranged from 317 to 12 195. Maternal CMV seroprevalence ranged from 84% to 100%. CMV birth prevalence varied from 0.6% to 6.1%. CMV-associated impairments were not documented in most studies. Conclusions Birth prevalence ranges were higher than for Europe and North America, as expected based on the higher maternal CMV seroprevalence. With very limited data available on sequelae, the disease burden of congenital CMV in developing countries remains largely unknown at this time. PMID:24631522

  12. Virological and Immunological Characteristics of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Associated With Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lurain, Nell S.; Hanson, Barbara A.; Martinson, Jeffrey; Leurgans, Sue E.; Landay, Alan L.; Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and cryopreserved lymphocytes from subjects in the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center Religious Orders Study were analyzed for associations between cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and clinical and pathological markers of Alzheimer disease. CMV antibody levels were associated with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). CSF interferon γ was only detected in seropositive subjects and was significantly associated with NFTs. The percentage of senescent T cells (CD4+ or CD8+CD28−CD57+) was significantly higher for CMV-seropositive as compared to CMV-seronegative subjects and was marginally associated with the pathologic diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (CD4+) or amyloid-β (CD8+). Immunocytochemical analysis showed induction of amyloid-β in human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) infected with each of 3 clinical CMV strains. In the same subjects, there was no association of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) antibody levels with CMV antibody levels or clinical or pathological markers of Alzheimer disease. HSV-1 infection of HFFs did not induce amyloid-β. These data support an association between CMV and the development of Alzheimer disease. PMID:23661800

  13. Awareness of Cytomegalovirus Infection among Pregnant Women in Geneva, Switzerland: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Willame, Alexia; Blanchard-Rohner, Geraldine; Combescure, Christophe; Irion, Olivier; Posfay-Barbe, Klara; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most frequent cause of congenital infection and commonly associated with sensorineural deficit. At present, there is neither prophylaxis nor treatment during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the level of awareness regarding CMV infection and its consequences in women delivering at the University of Geneva Hospitals (Geneva, Switzerland). Methods: The study consisted of a validated questionnaire completed by women in the immediate postpartum period. Results: The questionnaire was completed by 59% (314/528) of delivering women. Only 39% (123/314) knew about CMV and 19.7% (62/314) had received information about preventive measures. Women were more aware about other congenital diseases, such as toxoplasmosis (87%); human immunodeficiency virus (99%); syphilis (85.5%); rubella (92.3%); and group B Streptococcus (63%). Factors associated with CMV awareness were Swiss nationality, high education level, employment in health care or with children, and being followed by an obstetrician. Regarding quality of information, few were aware of the main CMV complications (deafness, 25.2%; mental retardation, 34.5%). Among those informed about CMV, most (74.6%) knew about preventive measures. Among these, 82.5% thought that these were easily applicable. Conclusions: Most women are unaware of CMV infection and its potential risks during pregnancy. It is crucial to improve CMV information given to pregnant women to prevent the risks for the fetus/newborn. PMID:26633451

  14. Impact of Persistent Cytomegalovirus Infection on Dynamic Changes in Human Immune System Profile

    PubMed Central

    Vescovini, Rosanna; Telera, Anna Rita; Pedrazzoni, Mario; Abbate, Barbara; Rossetti, Pietro; Verzicco, Ignazio; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Calderaro, Adriana; Volpi, Riccardo; Sansoni, Paolo; Fagnoni, Francesco Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) imprints the immune system after primary infection, however its effect during chronic infection still needs to be deciphered. In this study we report the variation of blood cell count along with anti-HCMV IgG and T cell responses to pp-65 and IE-1 antigens, that occurred after an interval of five years in a cohort of 25 seropositive healthy adults. We found increased anti-viral IgG antibody responses and intracellular interferon-gamma secreting CD8+ T cell responses to pp-65: a result consistent with memory inflation. With the only exception of shortage in naive CD8+ T cells most memory T cell subsets as well as total CD8+ T cells, T cells, lymphocytes, monocytes and leukocytes had increased. By contrast, none of the cell types tested were found to have increased in 14 subjects stably seronegative. Rather, in addition to a shortage in naive CD8+ T cells, also memory T cell subsets and most other cell types decreased, either in a statistically significant or non-significant manner. The trend of T cell pool representation with regard to CD4/CD8 ratio was in the opposing directions depending on HCMV serology. Globally, this study demonstrates different dynamic changes of most blood cell types depending on presence or absence of HCMV infection. Therefore, HCMV plays a continual role in modulating homeostasis of blood T cells and a broader expanding effect on other cell populations of lymphoid and myeloid origin. PMID:26990192

  15. Intrinsic Contribution of Perforin to NK-Cell Homeostasis during Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Arapović, Maja; Brizić, Ilija; Popović, Branka; Jurković, Slaven; Jordan, Stefan; Krmpotić, Astrid; Arapović, Jurica; Jonjić, Stipan

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their role as effector cells in virus control, natural killer (NK) cells have an immunoregulatory function in shaping the antiviral T-cell response. This function is further pronounced in perforin-deficient mice that show the enhanced NK-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion upon mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Here, we confirmed that stronger activation and maturation of NK cells in perforin-deficient mice correlates with higher MCMV load. To further characterize the immunoregulatory potential of perforin, we compared the response of NK cells that express or do not express perforin using bone-marrow chimeras. Our results demonstrated that the enhanced proliferation and maturation of NK cells in MCMV-infected bone-marrow chimeras is an intrinsic property of perforin-deficient NK cells. Thus, in addition to confirming that NK-cell proliferation is virus load dependent, our data extend this notion demonstrating that perforin plays an intrinsic role as a feedback mechanism in the regulation of NK-cell proliferation during viral infections. PMID:27092144

  16. Intrinsic Contribution of Perforin to NK-Cell Homeostasis during Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arapović, Maja; Brizić, Ilija; Popović, Branka; Jurković, Slaven; Jordan, Stefan; Krmpotić, Astrid; Arapović, Jurica; Jonjić, Stipan

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their role as effector cells in virus control, natural killer (NK) cells have an immunoregulatory function in shaping the antiviral T-cell response. This function is further pronounced in perforin-deficient mice that show the enhanced NK-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion upon mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Here, we confirmed that stronger activation and maturation of NK cells in perforin-deficient mice correlates with higher MCMV load. To further characterize the immunoregulatory potential of perforin, we compared the response of NK cells that express or do not express perforin using bone-marrow chimeras. Our results demonstrated that the enhanced proliferation and maturation of NK cells in MCMV-infected bone-marrow chimeras is an intrinsic property of perforin-deficient NK cells. Thus, in addition to confirming that NK-cell proliferation is virus load dependent, our data extend this notion demonstrating that perforin plays an intrinsic role as a feedback mechanism in the regulation of NK-cell proliferation during viral infections. PMID:27092144

  17. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection in fraternal twins: a longitudinal case study examining neurocognitive and neurobehavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Antolin M; Castillo, Christine L

    2012-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most ubiquitous member of the herpes virus family and is the leading cause of congenital (vertical) infection in newborns (Fowler, Stagno, & Pass, 2003; Llorente, Steigmeyer, Cooper, Rivers, & Gazley, 2011; Noyola et al., 2000; Steigmeyer & Llorente, 2010). CMV is related to the group of viruses capable of causing more pernicious infectious diseases, such as chicken pox (Santos de Barona, 1998). Although the virus generally remains dormant, individuals whose symptoms are clinically apparent often are dramatically affected. Common symptomatic characteristics of the virus include microcephaly, jaundice, liver-spleen infections, pneumonia, cardiac anomalies, chorioretinitis, vision loss, sensory-neural hearing loss, mental retardation, and mononucleosis (Demmler, 1991; Kashden, Frison, Fowler, Pass, & Boll, 1998; Noyola et al., 2000; Pass, 2005; Santos de Barona). The prognosis of individuals with CMV is highly variable, and the prognosis of individuals with congenital CMV can usually be determined based on the extent of infection at birth. The purpose of this investigation is to present longitudinal results of neuropsychological evaluation of two dizygotic twin sets (one twin of each set is asymptomatic CMV-positive and the other is uninfected) who were reared in the same environment. In addition, the present findings are discussed within the context of emerging murine and other animal analogues of CMV as well as within the extant CMV literature. PMID:23428280

  18. RAT CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION DEPLETES MHC II IN BONE MARROW DERIVED DENDRITIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Baca Jones, Carmen C.; Kreklywich, Craig N.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Vomaske, Jennifer; McCartney, Erin; Orloff, Susan L.; Nelson, Jay A.; Streblow, Daniel N.

    2009-01-01

    While cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects and replicates in a multitude of cell types, the ability of the virus to replicate in antigen presenting cells (APCs) is believed to play a critical role in the viral dissemination and latency. CMV infection of APCs and manipulation of their function is an important area of investigation. CMV down regulation of MHC II is reportedly mediated by the HCMV proteins US2, US3, UL83, UL111a (vIL10) or through the induction of cellular IL10. In this study, we demonstrate that rat CMV (RCMV) significantly reduces MHC II expression by mechanisms that do not involve orthologues of the known HCMV genes nor by an increase in cellular IL10. Rat bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) were highly susceptible to infection with RCMV and a recombinant RCMV expressing eGFP. RCMV infection of BMDCs depleted both surface and intracellular MHC II to nearly undetectable levels as well as reduced surface expression of MHC I. The effect on MHC II only occurred in the infected GFP positive cells and is mediated by an immediate early or early viral gene product. Furthermore, treatment of uninfected immature DCs with virus-free conditioned supernatants from infected cells failed to down regulate MHC II. RCMV depletion of MHC II was sensitve to treatment with lysosomal inhibitors but not proteasomal inhibitors suggesting that the mechanism of RCMV mediated down-regulation of MHC II occurs through endocytic degradation. Since RCMV does not encode homologues of US2, US3, UL83 or UL111a, these data indicate a novel mechanism for RCMV depletion of MHC II. PMID:19349057

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of the Safety and Efficacy of Standard Intravenous Immunoglobulins in Pregnant Women with Primary Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Polilli, Ennio; D'Arcangelo, Francesca; Tracanna, Elisa; Clerico, Luigi; Savini, Vincenzo; D'Antonio, Francesco; Rosati, Maurizio; Manzoli, Lamberto; D'Antonio, Domenico; Nigro, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hyperimmune globulins were reported to prevent and treat fetal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection during pregnancy. Here, we report that infusions of standard human intravenous immunoglobulin significantly increase CMV IgG titers and avidity indexes in pregnant women, paving the way to their use for passive transfer of maternal CMV humoral immunity to fetuses. Preliminary data on perinatal outcomes of the first 67 newborns are encouraging. PMID:23100477

  20. Genital Cytomegalovirus Replication Predicts Syphilis Acquisition among HIV-1 Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Gianella, Sara; Smith, Davey M.; Daar, Eric S.; Dube, Michael P.; Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid; Haubrich, Richard H.; Morris, Sheldon R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are common among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). While behavioral factors are important in STI acquisition, other biological factors such as immune modulation due to chronic viral infection may further predispose to STI acquisition. Design Post Hoc analysis including data collected over 12 months of follow-up from 131 HIV-infected MSM receiving antiretroviral therapy and screened for incident bacterial STI every 3 months. Methods Genital secretions collected at baseline were used to measure herpesvirus replication and inflammatory cytokines. Baseline predictors of STI were determined using survival analysis of time to incident STI. Results All participants were seropositive for cytomegalovirus (CMV), and 52% had detectable genital CMV at baseline. Thirty-five individuals acquired STI during follow-up, sometimes with multiple pathogen (17 syphilis, 21 gonorrhea, 14 chlamydia). Syphilis acquisition was associated with genital CMV replication at baseline (19.1% CMV-shedders versus 4.8% non-shedders, p=0.03) and younger age (p=0.02). Lower seminal MCP-1 was associated with higher seminal CMV levels and with syphilis acquisition (p<0.01). For syphilis acquisition, in multivariable Cox-Proportional Hazard model adjusted hazard rates were 3.56 (95%CI:1.00–12.73) for baseline CMV replication and 2.50 (0.92–6.77) for younger age. Conclusions This post hoc analysis suggest that CMV-associated decrease in seminal MCP-1 levels might predispose HIV-infected MSM to syphilis acquisition, but not other STI. Future studies should determine underlying mechanisms and if a causal association exists. PMID:26061824

  1. Chromatin structure regulates human cytomegalovirus gene expression during latency, reactivation and lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, John

    2010-01-01

    Infection of cells with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has two potential outcomes. For instance, infection of fibroblasts results in extensive viral gene expression, viral DNA replication and release of progeny virus. In contrast, in undifferentiated myeloid cells, the lytic transcription programme of HCMV is effectively suppressed and cells undergo latent infection. It is now accepted that the suppression of viral lytic gene expression observed during latency in myeloid cells is a result of the inability of undifferentiated cell types to support robust viral immediate early (IE) gene expression--crucial genes responsible for driving the lytic cycle. The repression of IE gene expression in undifferentiated myeloid cells, at least in part, results from specific post-translational modifications of histones associated with the viral major immediate early promoter (MIEP). In cells of the early myeloid lineage, the histone modifications present on the MIEP impart on it a repressive chromatin structure preventing transcriptional activity. Reactivation of HCMV lytic infection is correlated to changes in histone modifications around the MIEP resulting in a chromatin structure conducive to transcriptional activity. These changes are intimately linked with the differentiation of myeloid cells - a phenomenon known to reactivate latent virus in vivo. Chromatin structure of the viral MIEP, therefore, plays a crucial role in latency and reactivation of this persistent human herpesvirus. Whether chromatin-mediated regulation of viral lytic gene expression also occurs, is only beginning to be addressed. However, recent work suggests that all classes of lytic HCMV promoters are subjected to regulation by post-translational modification of their associated histones throughout the time course of infection. Incoming viral genomes appear to be the targets of intrinsic cellular defence mechanisms which attempt to silence viral gene expression through chromatinisation. Viral functions

  2. Polyradiculopathy and Gastroparesis due to Cytomegalovirus Infection in AIDS: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thongpooswan, Supat; Chyn, Eric; Alfishawy, Mostafa; Restrepo, Erfidia; Berman, Charles; Ahmed, Kawser; Muralidharan, Sethu

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 46 Final Diagnosis: CMV gastroparesis and radiculopathy Symptoms: Nausea • paraplegia • urinary retention • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lumbar puncture Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been well described as an opportunistic infection of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with AIDS and lumbosacral polyradiculopathy, associated with gastroparesis resulting from CMV infection. Case Report: A 46-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of HIV for 10 years was admitted to our hospital for nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and generalized weakness. Bilateral lower extremity examination revealed flaccid paraplegia, decreased sensations from the groin downwards, bilateral lower extremity areflexia, and absent plantar reflexes, with enlarged urinary bladder. CMV was detected in CSF by PCR, and cervical and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed intense nodular leptomeningeal enhancement from the lower thoracic cord and extending along the conus medullaris/filum terminalis and nerve roots. Gastric emptying scintigraphy revealed severe delayed gastric emptying time. Ganciclovir was initiated and her neurological symptoms and gastrological symptoms gradually improved. Over 8 weeks, nausea and vomiting resolved and the patient was able to walk before being discharged from the hospital. Conclusions: Polyradiculopathy and gastroparesis can result from CMV infection in AIDS patients. Whether the mechanism is secondary to viral infection or immune systems remains unclear. It is important for physicians to be aware of this uncommon presentation in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. CMV treatment should be initiated immediately once diagnosis is confirmed. PMID:26552851

  3. Broncholaveolar lavage to detect cytomegalovirus infection, latency, and reactivation in immune competent hosts.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Sara; Dwivedi, Varun; Byrd, Sara; Trgovcich, Joanne; Griessl, Marion; Gutknecht, Michael; Cook, Charles H

    2016-08-01

    Roughly 1/3rd of immune competent patients will reactivate latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) during critical illness. There are no standard methods to detect reactivation, and some investigators have postulated that presence of DNA in BAL fluid is indicative of viral replication. To test this hypothesis, we used a murine model that allows inclusion of matched healthy controls which is not possible in human studies. BALB/c mice infected with Smith-murine CMV or PBS (mock) had BAL evaluated 7, 14, or 21 days after acute infections, during latency, or during bacterial sepsis. Plaque assay, PCR, and rtPCR were performed on BALs and concomitantly obtained lung tissue. BAL cellular compositions, including tetramer evaluation of CMV-specific T cells were evaluated by flow cytometry. CMV DNA were detected in BAL at all time-points during acute infection, becoming undetectable in all mice during latency, then were detected again during bacterial sepsis, peaking 3 weeks after onset. mCMV specific T-cells were most numerous in BAL after acute viral infections, decreasing to low levels during latency, then fluctuating during bacterial sepsis. Specifically, mCMV-specific T-cells contracted at sepsis onset, expanding 2-4 weeks post-sepsis, presumably in response to increased viral loads at that time point. Altogether, our results support the use of BAL PCR for the diagnosis of CMV replication in immune competent hosts. Additionally, we demonstrate dynamic changes in CMV-specific T cells that occur in BAL during CMV infection and during sepsis induced viral reactivation. J. Med. Virol. 88:1408-1416, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26762116

  4. Cytomegalovirus Infection following Kidney Transplantation: a Multicenter Study of 3065 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Einollahi, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a common complication following kidney transplantation. Objective: To assess the incidence and risk factors of CMV infection among renal transplant recipients. Methods: In a retrospective multicenter study, 3065 renal transplant recipients from 17 transplant centers of Iran were studied between April 2008 and January 2011. Kidney transplant patients were routinely monitored by sequential blood samples drawn for use in the CMV-pp65 antigenemia assay, and for hematological and biochemistry tests. Results: 63% of studied patients were males; the mean±SD age of participants was 38±15 years. The majority of cases (81%) received a kidney from a living unrelated donor (LURD), 9% from living related donor (LRD), and 10% from deceased donors. 671 patients experienced CMV viremia. The incidence of CMV infection was 21.9% (95% CI: 20.4%–23.4%). The rate was higher in the first 6 months after transplantation (p<0.001); in recipients with higher level of cyclosporine (p<0.001); in those with lower hemoglobin concentration (p=0.02); patients with elevated ALT (p<0.001); those with increased fasting blood sugar (p=0.005); recipients with dyslipidemia (p<0.05); deceased kidney recipients (p=0.006); and patients with kidney graft impairment (p=0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, time since kidney transplantation (p<0.001) and renal allograft failure (p<0.001) were the only risk factors associated with CMV infection. Conclusions: CMV infection was a common complication in the first 6 months of kidney transplantation, particularly among patients with kidney graft impairment. PMID:25013626

  5. Use of leflunomide in an allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipient with refractory cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Avery, R K; Bolwell, B J; Yen-Lieberman, B; Lurain, N; Waldman, W J; Longworth, D L; Taege, A J; Mossad, S B; Kohn, D; Long, J R; Curtis, J; Kalaycio, M; Pohlman, B; Williams, J W

    2004-12-01

    Ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is an emerging problem in transplant recipients. Foscarnet resistance and cidofovir resistance have also been described, but no previous reports have suggested treatment regimens for patients with CMV refractory to all three of these drugs. Leflunomide, an immunosuppressive drug used in rheumatoid arthritis and in rejection in solid-organ transplantation, has been reported to have novel anti-CMV activity. However, its clinical utility in CMV treatment has not been described previously. We report an allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipient who developed CMV infection refractory to sequential therapy with ganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir. The patient was ultimately treated with a combination of leflunomide and foscarnet. Both phenotypic and genotypic virologic analysis was performed on sequential CMV isolates. The patient's high CMV-DNA viral load became undetectable on leflunomide and foscarnet, but the patient, who had severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) of the liver, expired with progressive liver failure and other complications. We concluded that leflunomide is a new immunosuppressive agent with anti-CMV activity, which may be useful in the treatment of multiresistant CMV. However, the toxicity profile of leflunomide in patients with underlying GVHD remains to be defined. PMID:15489872

  6. Assessing the economic merits of managing cytomegalovirus infection in organ and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wait, Suzanne; Musingarimi, Primrose; Briggs, Andrew; Tillotson, Glenn

    2009-03-01

    Two preventative approaches exist to manage cytomegalovirus (CMV), a common infection in recipients of organ and stem cell transplants: prophylaxis--the prevention of viraemia--and pre-emptive therapy--the prevention of manifestation of disease in patients who have viraemia. Economic evaluation may provide a helpful framework to inform the choice between these two approaches. However, several issues arise. Direct comparisons of prophylaxis and pre-emptive therapy are rare and there are few epidemiological data that depict the full natural history of CMV infection and disease. There is a need for large, prospective randomised trials that directly compare these two strategies and are of sufficient duration to assess their overall impact on direct and indirect effects of CMV as well as patient quality of life. These methodological issues are relevant to the economic evaluation of preventative measures in other clinical settings and highlight the need for a rigorous evaluative framework to best inform decision making about the optimal strategy for patients. PMID:19450067

  7. Latent cytomegalovirus infection exacerbates experimental pulmonary fibrosis by activating TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghuai; Gao, Jian; Wang, Guoliang; Fei, Guanghe

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the hypotheses that cytomegalovirus (CMV) may trigger idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in a susceptible host and/or that the presence of CMV may alter IPF in response to a well-defined trigger of pulmonary fibrosis. A mouse model of murine CMV (MCMV) infection was established, and the mice were divided into a control group, bleomycin group and an MCMV+bleomycin group. Changes in the weights of the mice were determined in the three groups. Pulmonary fibrosis was detected using a histopathological method. The activity of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1 was measured, and the levels of E‑cadherin, Vimentin and phosphorylated (phospho)‑small mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD)2 were determined using western blot analysis. MCMV was found to invade the lungs, however, it did not cause pulmonary fibrosis. The progression of fibrosis in the mice treated with MCMV+bleomycin was more rapid, compared with that in the control mice. The protein levels of Vimentin and phospho-SMAD2 were upregulated, whereas the level of E‑cadherin was downregulated in the MCMV+bleomycin group,. The results suggested that latent MCMV infection aggravated pulmonary fibrosis in the mouse model, possibly through the activation of TGF-β1. PMID:27279470

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection is Associated with Essential Hypertension in Kazakh and Han Chinese Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Na; Li, Jia-wei; Liu, Yong-min; Zhong, Hua; Wang, La-mei; Deng, Feng-mei; Qu, Yuan-yuan; Hui, Jing; Cheng, Jiang; Tang, Bin; Huang, Gang; Guo, Shu-xia; Li, Xin-zhi; Wei, Li-li; He, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to study the association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and hypertension in Kazakh and Han populations from Xinjiang Province, China. Material/Methods We analyzed data on 800 Kazakhs (467 hypertension patients and 333 healthy control participants) and 800 Hans (482 hypertension patients and 318 healthy control participants) aged 18–84 years old. ELISA and real-time quantitative PCR coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were applied for determining CMV infection and glycoprotein B (gB) genotypes, respectively. Results Serologic evidence of CMV infection was obtained for 95.4% and 90.1% of the Kazakhs and Hans, respectively. The CMV seroprevalence rates among the Kazakh and Han participants with hypertension were 96.8% and 89.8%, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed statistically significant independent associations between CMV seropositivity and hypertension in Kazakh males and between CMV antibody titers and hypertension in Hans; significant relationships also existed between CMV antibody titers and blood pressure in Hans. In Kazakhs, 3 CMV gB genotypes were identified: gB2 and genotype mixtures gB1+gB2 and gB2+gB3. In Hans, 4 CMV gB genotypes were identified: gB1, gB2, gB1+gB2, and gB2+gB3. Of the 4 studied genotypes, gB2+gB3 showed a significant independent association with hypertension in Kazakh females. Conclusions CMV infection is associated with essential hypertension in Kazakh males and Hans in Xinjiang. CMV seropositivity is associated with hypertension in Kazakh males, and CMV antibody titers are associated with blood pressure and hypertension in Han males and females. Moreover, the CMV gB2+gB3 genotype mixture is associated independently with essential hypertension in Kazakh females. PMID:25448630

  9. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infections in Adolescent Males

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Laura Patricia; Bernstein, David I; Callahan, S. Todd; Ferreira, Jennifer; Gorgone Simone, Gina A.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Rosenthal, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading cause of disability, including sensorineural hearing loss, developmental delay, and mental retardation. Although the seroprevalence of CMV and associated exposure and behavioral risk factors have been reported in adolescent females, limited data exists in males. Method Serum was obtained from males (aged 12–17 years) from 6/2006 – 7/2007 in Cincinnati, OH, Galveston, TX, and Nashville, TN and tested for CMV IgG antibody using a commercial assay. Participants completed a computer assisted screening interview to assess seven risk categories. Results A total of 397 adolescent males were screened and 165 (47%) were seropositive. African American race, older age, and exposure to children ≤3 years of age in the home were significant predictors of CMV infection in the univariate analysis. Hispanic ethnicity, group living situations, saliva sharing behaviors, and intimate sexual contact were not associated with CMV infection. However, among those with a history of sexual contact, the number of life time partners was associated with CMV. In the final multivariate model, CMV seroprevalence was significantly higher in African American subjects (OR 1.99 (95% CI [1.27, 2.95]) and subjects >14 years of age (OR 1.1 (95%CI [1.00, 1.28]. With each additional risk factor, males had a 1.6x increased risk of CMV. Conclusions This study indicates that CMV infections are common in adolescent males, increase with age, and are associated with African American race. Further study is needed to understand these risk factors in preparation for a CMV vaccine targeted at both adolescent males and females. Summary This study indicates CMV infections are common in adolescent males, increase with age, and are associated with African Americans. Further study is needed to understand these risk factors in preparation for a CMV vaccine targeted at adolescent males and females. PMID:20936976

  10. Cytomegalovirus-associated splenic infarcts in an adult immune-competent man: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cytomegalovirus-associated thrombosis has been extensively reported in the medical literature, mainly in immune-compromised patients. However, the association with splenic infarcts has been rarely mentioned. Case presentation We report the case of a 38-year-old Caucasian man of Hellenic origin with acute cytomegalovirus infection presenting with spontaneous splenic infarcts. Echocardiography did not show any vegetations or mural thrombi. Anticoagulation treatment was not considered due to implication of minor vessels and since cytomegalovirus was the probable trigger for thrombosis in this patient. Conclusions This case report serves as additional evidence for the role of cytomegalovirus in thrombosis. PMID:24594283

  11. Successful low-dose leflunomide treatment for ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus infection with high-level antigenemia in a kidney transplant: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shinya; Shinoda, Kazunobu; Tamaki, Satoshi; Kono, Hidaka; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Ken; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-09-01

    Ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus infection is sometimes life-threatening for organ transplant recipients. Foscarnet is an alternative, although it may potentially worsen the preexistent impaired renal function. Here we report the case of a successful low-dose leflunomide treatment in a kidney transplant recipient with very high viral replication, who underwent kidney transplantation 10 years before. Administering 10mg leflunomide daily for 5 months without a loading dose completely cleared the ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus strains. PMID:27494108

  12. Cytomegalovirus infection in autologous stem cell transplant recipients in the era of rituximab.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tania; John, Jisha; Kotecha, Aditya; Deol, Abhinav; Saliminia, Tanaz; Revankar, Sanjay; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation/disease after autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is much lower than that after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. With the recent use of rituximab during cancer chemotherapy or conditioning regimens prior to transplantation, there has been an increasing concern of opportunistic infections including CMV. In the present study, we reviewed the patients undergoing ASCT from December 2007 to December 2013 to identify those developing CMV reactivation/disease. Out of the 978 patients who underwent ASCT at the Karmanos Cancer Institute, 239 patients were tested for symptomatic CMV reactivation based on clinical suspicion. Of the tested patients, 7/239 (2.9 %) were documented to have CMV reactivation within 90 days of ASCT. The median time to develop CMV viremia was 32 days from transplantation. Of the 239 patients tested, CMV viremia was detected in 3 out of 72 patients who received rituximab as compared to 4 out of 167 patients who did not. Three of these seven viremic patients were treated with anti-viral drugs; viremia resolved in all patients at a median of 24 days. Three patients were found to develop other bacterial and/or fungal infections following CMV viremia. Two of the seven patients died during 1-year follow-up, due to primary disease progression or Candida sepsis. None of the patients developed proven tissue-invasive CMV disease. The study did not evaluate the incidence of asymptomatic CMV infection/reactivation. Despite prior publications based on limited data, rituximab does not appear to contribute to an increased frequency of symptomatic CMV reactivation following ASCT. PMID:27225264

  13. Subacute autonomic and sensory neuropathy closely related to cytomegalovirus infection preceded by frequent syncopal attacks.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Koichi; Namekawa, Michito; Kondo, Soichi; Ono, Sayaka; Nakano, Imaharu

    2016-08-31

    A 73-year-old woman who had hypertension developed a slight fever and general malaise with laboratory-proven hepatic dysfunction as well as frequent syncopal attacks 3 months before admission to our hospital. One month later, she developed urinary retention and distal limb numbness. Upon admission, her neurological examination showed reduced limb tendon reflexes, glove and stocking-type numbness, and diminished senses of touch, temperature, pain, and distal leg vibration and position. Serum cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgM antibody and CMV IgG antibody were elevated on admission, and both decreased thereafter, confirming CMV infection. No serum anti-ganglioside antibody was detected. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed a mild pleocytosis and elevated proteins. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes of the tibial and peroneal nerve were slightly reduced. Sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitudes of the median and ulnar nerves were reduced, and sural SNAP was not evoked. Systolic blood pressure dropped 48 mmHg when the patient assumed a standing position from a supine one, demonstrating orthostatic hypotension, and a cold pressor test was abnormal, both indicating an obvious hypofunction of the sympathetic nerve. The postganglionic autonomic nerve appeared to be damaged because the accumulation of [(123)I] meta-iodobenzylguanidine was reduced on myocardial scintigraphy. These findings combined together led us to make a diagnosis of subacute autonomic and sensory neuropathy associated with CMV infection in this case. Following an eventless administration of oral fludrocortisones, intravenous immuno-globulin (IVIg) was given after one month of the hospitalization with a remarkable reduction of the syncope. This case is instructive in two points. One is that there may be a couple of months with syncope alone before the sensory disturbance appearance, and the other is that IVIg may be considerably effective for the patient-annoying syncopes. To our knowledge, this

  14. Hearing Loss and Cytomegalovirus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Melvin

    1997-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common cause of congenital virally induced hearing loss. Maternal infection is most often asymptomatic as is the infection in the newborn. Hearing loss occurs in both clinically apparent infection and in the asymptomatic infection. Current methods of detection, treatment, and prevention and research efforts are…

  15. Murine Cytomegalovirus Capsid Assembly Is Dependent on US22 Family Gene M140 in Infected Macrophages▿

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Laura K.; Slater, Jacquelyn S.; Cavanaugh, Victoria J.; Newcomb, William W.; Bolin, Lisa L.; Nelson, Christine N.; Fetters, Lisa D.; Tang, Qiyi; Brown, Jay C.; Maul, Gerd G.; Campbell, Ann E.

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages are an important target cell for infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV). A number of viral genes that either are expressed specifically in this cell type or function to optimize CMV replication in this host cell have now been identified. Among these is the murine CMV (MCMV) US22 gene family member M140, a nonessential early gene whose deletion (RVΔ140) leads to significant impairment in virus replication in differentiated macrophages. We have now determined that the defect in replication is at the stage of viral DNA encapsidation. Although the rate of RVΔ140 genome replication and extent of DNA cleavage were comparable to those for revertant virus, deletion of M140 resulted in a significant reduction in the number of viral capsids in the nucleus, and the viral DNA remained sensitive to DNase treatment. These data are indicative of incomplete virion assembly. Steady-state levels of both the major capsid protein (M86) and tegument protein M25 were reduced in the absence of the M140 protein (pM140). This effect may be related to the localization of pM140 to an aggresome-like, microtubule organizing center-associated structure that is known to target misfolded and overexpressed proteins for degradation. It appears, therefore, that pM140 indirectly influences MCMV capsid formation in differentiated macrophages by regulating the stability of viral structural proteins. PMID:19458005

  16. Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Cytomegalovirus Infection: A Call for a Change in the Current Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shimanovsky, Alexei; Patel, Devbala; Wasser, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a decreased platelet count caused by excess destruction of platelets and inadequate platelet production. In many cases, the etiology is not known, but the viral illness is thought to play a role in the development of some cases of ITP. The current (2011) American Society of Hematology ITP guidelines recommend initial diagnostic studies to include testing for HIV and Hepatitis C. The guidelines suggest that initial treatment consist of observation, therapy with corticosteroids, IVIG or anti D. Most cases respond to the standard therapy such that the steroids may be tapered and the platelet counts remain at a hemostatically safe level. Some patients with ITP are dependent on long-term steroid maintenance, and the thrombocytopenia persists with the tapering of the steroids. Recent case reports demonstrate that ITP related to cytomegalovirus (CMV) can persist in spite of standard therapy and that antiviral therapy may be indicated. Herein we report a case of a 26-year-old female with persistent ITP that resolved after the delivery of a CMV-infected infant and placenta. Furthermore, we review the current literature on CMV-associated ITP and propose that the current ITP guidelines be amended to include assessment for CMV, even in the absence of signs and symptoms, as part of the work-up for severe and refractory ITP, especially prior to undergoing an invasive procedure such as splenectomy. PMID:26740871

  17. Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Cytomegalovirus Infection: A Call for a Change in the Current Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Shimanovsky, Alexei; Patel, Devbala; Wasser, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a decreased platelet count caused by excess destruction of platelets and inadequate platelet production. In many cases, the etiology is not known, but the viral illness is thought to play a role in the development of some cases of ITP. The current (2011) American Society of Hematology ITP guidelines recommend initial diagnostic studies to include testing for HIV and Hepatitis C. The guidelines suggest that initial treatment consist of observation, therapy with corticosteroids, IVIG or anti D. Most cases respond to the standard therapy such that the steroids may be tapered and the platelet counts remain at a hemostatically safe level. Some patients with ITP are dependent on long-term steroid maintenance, and the thrombocytopenia persists with the tapering of the steroids. Recent case reports demonstrate that ITP related to cytomegalovirus (CMV) can persist in spite of standard therapy and that antiviral therapy may be indicated. Herein we report a case of a 26-year-old female with persistent ITP that resolved after the delivery of a CMV-infected infant and placenta. Furthermore, we review the current literature on CMV-associated ITP and propose that the current ITP guidelines be amended to include assessment for CMV, even in the absence of signs and symptoms, as part of the work-up for severe and refractory ITP, especially prior to undergoing an invasive procedure such as splenectomy. PMID:26740871

  18. Identification and Analysis of the Porcine MicroRNA in Porcine Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages Using Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Liao, Shan; Xu, Zhiwen; Zhu, Ling; Yang, Fan; Guo, Wanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV; genus Cytomegalovirus, subfamily Betaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae) is an immunosuppressive virus that mainly inhibits the immune function of T lymphocytes and macrophages, which has caused substantial damage in the farming industry. In this study, we obtained the miRNA expression profiles of PCMV-infected porcine macrophages via high-throughput sequencing. The comprehensive analysis of miRNA profiles showed that 239 miRNA database-annotated and 355 novel pig-encoded miRNAs were detected. Of these, 130 miRNAs showed significant differential expression between the PCMV-infected and uninfected porcine macrophages. The 10 differentially expressed pig-encoded miRNAs were further determined by stem-loop reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the results were consistent with the high-throughput sequencing. Gene Ontology analysis of the target genes of miRNAs in PCMV-infected porcine macrophages showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs are mainly involved in immune and metabolic processes. This is the first report of the miRNA transcriptome in porcine macrophages and an analysis of the miRNA regulatory mechanisms during PCMV infection. Further research into the regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs during immunosuppressive viral infections should contribute to the treatment and prevention of immunosuppressive viruses. PMID:26943793

  19. [A steroid-responsive case of severe rhabdomyolysis associated with cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Sato, Keishiro; Yoneda, Makoto; Hayashi, Koji; Nakagawa, Hiroto; Higuchi, Itsuro; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2006-05-01

    A 31-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, complaining of muscular weakness and pain in the legs one month after a common cold. On admission, neurological examinations demonstrated moderate weakness in the arms and mild weakness in the legs with decreased or diminished deep tendon reflexes, and mild dysphagia. Weakness was gradually extended to the arm, throat and respiratory muscles, requiring artificial ventilation. Laboratory examinations demonstrated increased levels of CK (upto 24,380 IU/L) and positive anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) -IgM antibodies in the serum, and myogloburinuria. CMV was not detected in either the blood cells or muscles by PCR. There were no antibodies against viruses including Ebstein-Barr virus and HIV, in the serum. There were no autoantibodies related to collagen diseases in the serum. Systemic PET scan did not show any evidence of malignancy. Bone marrow biopsy did not show any atypical cells. Muscle MRI demonstrated mild atrophy with high intensity signals in part. Muscle biopsy demonstrated scattered necrotic and regenerated muscle fibers without inflammatory cell infiltration. The patient was therefore diagnosed as having rhabdomyolysis associated with CMV infection. After three courses of intravenously administered high dose methylprednislone over three days, muscle weakness improved gradually, and the serum CK level was normalized in two months. The patient recovered and was removed from artificial ventilation three months after the therapy. There were no sign of renal failure. Steroid therapy should be considered for the treatment of rhabdomyolysis or myopathy associated with CMV infection in order to prevent renal failure or fatal progression of the disease. PMID:16886796

  20. Quantitative measurement of cytomegalovirus-specific IgG and IgM antibodies in relation to cytomegalovirus antigenaemia and disease activity in kidney recipients with an active cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Giessen, M; van den Berg, A P; van der Bij, W; Postma, S; van Son, W J; The, T H

    1990-01-01

    In a longitudinal investigation 103 kidney recipients were studied with respect to the development of cytomegalovirus (CMV) specific antibodies of the IgG and IgM class, in relation to the detection of CMV antigenaemia (immediate early antigen, IEA), in weekly obtained blood samples during the first 3 months after transplantation. In 15 out of 49 (31%) seronegative patients a primary infection occurred, which was characterized by a quick rise in IgM antibody followed by a slower production of IgG antibody, high maximum numbers of IEA+ cells, and a CMV syndrome in 11 patients. In 35 out of 54 (65%) seropositive patients a secondary infection occurred. After a post-operative fall in the IgG antibody, which was also found in patients without an active infection and which was accompanied by a similar drop in serum albumin and IgG, a second dip in IgG antibody was found 6 days before the first IEA+ leucocyte appeared in the blood. This was followed by a significant increase, indicative of an active immune response in consequence of the infection, 18 days later. In 31 of these 35 patients an IgM response was found. This could be ascribed to the presence of rheumatoid factor activity in 20 of them. Eight patients who showed a transient rise in IgG antibody between the two dips could be distinguished from the remaining ones by a lower maximum number of IEA+ cells and less severe disease symptoms. The described results suggest that (i) an adequate humoral immune system may prevent symptomatic CMV disease in secondary infections; and (ii) CMV-specific antibodies may be removed from the circulation by antigens present in infected tissues before CMV antigenaemia becomes detectable. PMID:2157567

  1. Metabolism of Cyclopropavir and Ganciclovir in Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drach, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen that can cause severe disease in immunologically immature and immunocompromised patients. The current standard of therapy for the treatment of HCMV infections is ganciclovir (GCV). However, high incidence rates of adverse effects are prevalent and limit the use of this drug. Cyclopropavir (CPV) is 10-fold more effective against HCMV in vitro than GCV (50% effective concentrations [EC50s] = 0.46 and 4.1 μM, respectively) without any observed increase in cytotoxicity (S. Zhou, J. M. Breitenbach, K. Z. Borysko, J. C. Drach, E. R. Kern, E. Gullen, Y. C. Cheng, and J. Zemlicka, J. Med. Chem. 47:566–575, 2004, doi:10.1021/jm030316s). We have previously determined that the viral protein kinase pUL97 and endogenous cellular kinases are responsible for the conversion of CPV to a triphosphate (TP), the active compound responsible for inhibiting viral DNA synthesis and viral replication. However, this conversion has not been observed in HCMV-infected cells. To that end, we subjected HCMV-infected cells to equivalently effective concentrations (∼5 times the EC50) of either CPV or GCV and observed a time-dependent increase in triphosphate levels for both compounds (CPV-TP = 121 ± 11 pmol/106 cells; GCV-TP = 43.7 ± 0.4 pmol/106 cells). A longer half-life was observed for GCV-TP (48.2 ± 5.7 h) than for CPV-TP (23.8 ± 5.1 h). The area under the curve for CPV-TP produced from incubation with 2.5 μM CPV was 8,680 ± 930 pmol · h/106 cells, approximately 2-fold greater than the area under the curve for GCV-TP of 4,520 ± 420 pmol · h/106 cells produced from incubation with 25 μM GCV. We therefore conclude that the exposure of HCMV-infected cells to CPV-TP is greater than that of GCV-TP under these experimental conditions. PMID:24514084

  2. Glucocorticosteroids trigger reactivation of human cytomegalovirus from latently infected myeloid cells and increase the risk for HCMV infection in D+R+ liver transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Ellen; Sauviller, Sarah; Lau, Betty; Kesteleyn, Bart; Griffiths, Paul; Burroughs, Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Graft rejection in transplant patients is managed clinically by suppressing T-cell function with immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisolone and methylprednisolone. In such immunocompromised hosts, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen and can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Currently, the effect of glucocorticosteroids (GCSs) on the HCMV life cycle remains unclear. Previous reports showed enhanced lytic replication of HCMV in vitro in the presence of GCSs. In the present study, we explored the implications of steroid exposure on latency and reactivation. We observed a direct effect of several GCSs used in the clinic on the activation of a quiescent viral major immediate-early promoter in stably transfected THP-1 monocytic cells. This activation was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist Ru486 and by shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GR. Consistent with this observation, prednisolone treatment of latently infected primary monocytes resulted in HCMV reactivation. Analysis of the phenotype of these cells showed that treatment with GCSs was correlated with differentiation to an anti-inflammatory macrophage-like cell type. On the basis that these observations may be pertinent to HCMV reactivation in post-transplant settings, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence, viral kinetics and viral load of HCMV in liver transplant patients in the presence or absence of GCS treatment. We observed that combination therapy of baseline prednisolone and augmented methylprednisolone, upon organ rejection, significantly increased the incidence of HCMV infection in the intermediate risk group where donor and recipient are both HCMV seropositive (D+R+) to levels comparable with the high risk D+R− group. PMID:25312585

  3. Glucocorticosteroids trigger reactivation of human cytomegalovirus from latently infected myeloid cells and increase the risk for HCMV infection in D+R+ liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Ellen; Sauviller, Sarah; Lau, Betty; Kesteleyn, Bart; Griffiths, Paul; Burroughs, Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Sinclair, John; Van Loock, Marnix

    2015-01-01

    Graft rejection in transplant patients is managed clinically by suppressing T-cell function with immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisolone and methylprednisolone. In such immunocompromised hosts, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen and can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Currently, the effect of glucocorticosteroids (GCSs) on the HCMV life cycle remains unclear. Previous reports showed enhanced lytic replication of HCMV in vitro in the presence of GCSs. In the present study, we explored the implications of steroid exposure on latency and reactivation. We observed a direct effect of several GCSs used in the clinic on the activation of a quiescent viral major immediate-early promoter in stably transfected THP-1 monocytic cells. This activation was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist Ru486 and by shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GR. Consistent with this observation, prednisolone treatment of latently infected primary monocytes resulted in HCMV reactivation. Analysis of the phenotype of these cells showed that treatment with GCSs was correlated with differentiation to an anti-inflammatory macrophage-like cell type. On the basis that these observations may be pertinent to HCMV reactivation in post-transplant settings, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence, viral kinetics and viral load of HCMV in liver transplant patients in the presence or absence of GCS treatment. We observed that combination therapy of baseline prednisolone and augmented methylprednisolone, upon organ rejection, significantly increased the incidence of HCMV infection in the intermediate risk group where donor and recipient are both HCMV seropositive (D+R+) to levels comparable with the high risk D+R- group. PMID:25312585

  4. Cytomegalovirus retinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent its return. Alternative Names Cytomegalovirus retinitis Images Eye CMV retinitis CMV (cytomegalovirus) References Crumpacker CS. ... 5. Read More Antibody HIV/AIDS Immune response Retinal detachment Systemic WBC count Update Date 12/10/ ...

  5. Detection of human cytomegalovirus antigenaemia: a rapid diagnostic technique for predicting cytomegalovirus infection/pneumonitis in lung and heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Egan, J. J.; Barber, L.; Lomax, J.; Fox, A.; Yonan, N.; Rahman, A. N.; Campbell, C. S.; Deiraniya, A. K.; Carroll, K. B.; Craske, J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--New rapid diagnostic techniques offer the opportunity of early diagnosis of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunocompromised patients at risk of developing CMV disease. The use of human CMV antigenaemia as a predictor of clinical CMV infection and disease in lung and heart transplant recipients was studied prospectively. METHODS--Twenty three heart and nine lung transplant recipients who survived 40 days were observed by standard CMV surveillance with serological testing, culture, and by sequential testing for CMV antigenaemia. CMV antigenaemia testing is a rapid and quantifiable technique in which a viral lower matrix protein is detected in cytospin preparations of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) by immunofluorescent staining. RESULTS--Eleven patients developed CMV infection and five developed CMV disease (four pneumonitis, one duodenitis). These clinical events occurred at a median of 65 days following transplantation. CMV antigenaemia occurred in 17 patients at a median of 35 days following transplantation. Detection of CMV antigenaemia had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 93.7%, and a positive predictive value of 94.1% for CMV related illness. CMV antigenaemia was positive at a significant interval before the clinical event. High levels of CMV antigenaemia (> 50 CMV antigen positive cells/2 x 10(5) PMNLs) occurred in 11 patients and five of these developed disease. CMV antigenaemia of > 50 CMV antigen positive cells/2 x 10(5) PMNLs had a positive predictive value of 45.5% for disease but a negative predictive value of 100%. Patients with disease had higher levels of antigenaemia than those without disease. CONCLUSIONS--CMV antigenaemia is a rapid diagnostic technique which can identify patients likely to develop CMV disease, potentially allowing early treatment. Images PMID:7886659

  6. Cytomegalovirus Infection and Atherosclerosis in Candidate of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    Heybar, Habib; Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Farashahi Nejad, Mehdi; Latifi, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although there is enough evidence that infectious agents such as Chlamydia pneumonia and Helicobacter pylori may play a pathogenic role in atherosclerosis, this role for cytomegalovirus (CMV) is yet controversial. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to detect CMV-DNA in atherosclerotic plaques in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Patients and Methods: In this case-control study, candidates for CABG (cases) and patients with valvular or congenital malformation but without atherosclerotic plaques (controls) were studied from 2012 to 2013 at Golestan hospital, Ahvaz, IR Iran. Demographic and laboratory data were collected. Atherosclerotic and histological samples were obtained from visible plaques and from aorta by the surgeon. All the samples were examined for the presence of CMV-DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using a commercial kit (SinaClon, Tehran, IR Iran). Results: The mean ages in case and control groups were 60.8 ± 6.8 and 57.5 ± 11.5 years, respectively, with no significant difference (P = 0.09). Thirty patients (54.5%) in case and 32 (58.2%) in control groups were male with no significant difference (P = 0.7). CMV-DNA was present in 8 (14.5%) of the cases and 2 (4%) of the controls. CMV-DNA was associated with higher risk of atherosclerosis (OR: 7.7, 95% CI = 1.1-51.4, P = 0.03). Of the total normal aortic samples (55 in cases and 55 in controls), there was no individual with simultaneous positive CMV-DNA among aortic atherosclerotic and normal tissue samples. Conclusions: The presence of CMV-DNA in aortic plaques is associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis. CMV infection may be considered as an independent risk factor for this event. PMID:25834719

  7. Pneumonia associated with infection with pneumocystis, respiratory syncytial virus, chlamydia, mycoplasma, and cytomegalovirus in children in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Shann, F; Walters, S; Pifer, L L; Graham, D M; Jack, I; Uren, E; Birch, D; Stallman, N D

    1986-01-01

    Paired serum samples were collected from 94 children with pneumonia admitted to Goroka Hospital, Papua New Guinea. All but three of the children were aged 1-24 months. Only nine children were malnourished, with weight for age less than 70% of the Harvard median (three had weight for age less than 60% of the Harvard median). Pneumocystis carinii antigen was detected in the serum of 23 children. Twenty two children had serological evidence of recent infection with respiratory syncytial virus. Five children were probably infected with Chlamydia trachomatis at the time of the study, and there was less convincing serological evidence of current infection in a further 11 children. Five children showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Although only one child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to cytomegalovirus, 86 children had this antibody. No child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Ureaplasma urealyticum or Legionella pneumophila. P carinii, respiratory syncytial virus, C trachomatis, M pneumoniae, and cytomegalovirus may be important causes of pneumonia in children in developing countries. PMID:3002538

  8. The prevalence and risk factors of cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease in Wuhan, Central China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not clear and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is often associated with IBD patients. The etiologic link between IBD and CMV infection needs to be studied. The objective of the present study is to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CMV in a cohort of IBD patients from Central China. Methods Two hundred and twenty six IBD patients (189 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 37 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD)), and 290 age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited. CMV DNA was detected by nested PCR, while serum anti-CMV IgG and anti-CMV IgM was determined by ELISAs. Colonoscopy/enteroscopy with biopsy of diseased tissues and subsequent H&E stain were then conducted in IBD patients with positive anti-CMV IgM. Finally, we analyzed the prevalence and clinical risk factors of CMV infection in IBD patients. Results The prevalence of CMV DNA and anti-CMV IgG positive rate in IBD patients were 84.07% and 76.11%, respectively, higher than those in healthy controls (59.66% and 50.69%, respectively, P < 0.05), However, anti-CMV IgM positive rate was no different with healthy controls (1.77% vs 0.34%, P = 0.235). In univariate analysis of risk factors, the recent use of corticosteroid was associated with increase of CMV DNA and IgM positive rate in UC (P = 0.035 and P = 0.015, respectively), aminosalicylic acid drug therapy was correlated with positivity of CMV DNA and IgG in UC and CMV DNA in CD (P = 0.041, P < 0.001 and P = 0.014, respectively), the treatment of immunosuppresent was correlated with CMV IgM (P < 0.001). Furthermore, patients with severe UC were significantly associated with CMV DNA and IgM (P = 0.048 and P = 0.031, respectively). Malnutrition (albumin < 35 G/L) was also found to be related with CMV recent infection (P = 0.031). In multivariate analysis of risk factors in UC, pancolitis was significantly associated with CMV DNA positivity

  9. Cytomegalovirus infection in children with Down syndrome in a day-care center in Brazil.

    PubMed

    do Canto, C L; Granato, C F; Garcez, E; Villas Boas, L S; Fink, M C; Estevam, M P; Pannuti, C S

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluates the transmission of CMV infection in 120 children aged 1 to 15 years with Down syndrome who attended a day-care center for handicapped children in São Paulo, Brazil. A blood sample was obtained from each children at the beginning of the study for detection of IgG and IgM cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibodies by an immunofluorescence assay. Samples of saliva and urine were obtained every 3 months from the children with CMV antibodies to detect shedding of the virus by culture in human foreskin fibroblasts, by detection of pp65 CMV-antigen and by a nested PCR assay. The prevalence of anti CMV-IgG antibodies was 76.6% (92/120), and IgM anti-CMV antibodies were detected in 13% (12/92) of the seropositive children. During the first viral evaluation, CMV was detected in the urine and/or saliva in 39/90 (43.3%) of the seropositive children. In the second and third evaluations, CMV was detected in 41/89 (46%) and in 35/89 (39.3%) children, respectively. Detection of CMV was shown both in urine and saliva in 28/39 (71.8%), 19/41(46.3%) and 20/35 (57.1%) of the children excreting the virus, respectively. Additionally, in 3(3/4)9 (67.4%) of the excreters CMV could be demonstrated in urine or saliva in at least two out of the three virological evaluations carried out sequentially in a six month period. Of the 28 initially seronegative children, 26 were re-examined for anti-CMV IgG antibodies about 18 months after the negative sample; seroconversion was found in 10/26 (38.5%). Taking all 536 samples of urine or saliva examined by virus culture and pp65 antigen detection during the study into account, 159 (29.6%) were positive by virus culture and 59 (11%) gave a positive result with the pp65 assay. These data demonstrate the high prevalence of CMV shedding and the high risk of CMV infection in children with Down syndrome attending a day-care center for mentally handicapped patients. The virus culture was more sensitive than the pp65 CMV antigen assay for CMV

  10. A novel flow cytometry-based tool for determining the efficiency of human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifen; Mao, Genxiang; Carlson, Joshua; Leng, Sean X

    2015-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that causes congenital infection and severe infections in immunocompromised patients. Chronic hCMV infection may also play an important role in immunosenescence and adverse health outcomes in older adults. THP-1, a human monocytic cell line and its derived macrophages serve as a useful cell culture model for mechanistic studies of hCMV infection and its underlying biology. A major methodological challenge is the lack of a quick and reliable tool to accurately determine the efficiency of hCMV infection in THP-1 derived macrophages. In this study, we developed a flow cytometry based method using commercially available monoclonal antibody (MAb) against hCMV immediate early (IE) antigen that can accurately determine infection efficiency. We used 0.5% formaldehyde for fixation, 90% methanol for permeabilization, and incubation with FITC conjugated MAb at 37°C. The method was tested by hCMV infection with laboratory Towne strain in the presence or absence of hydrocortisone. It was also compared with the routine flow cytometry protocol using Cytofix/Cytoperm solution and with immunofluorescence. The results indicate that this new method is reliable and time saving for accurate determination of infection efficiency. It may facilitate further investigations into the underlying biological mechanisms of hCMV infection. PMID:25958130

  11. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate-early enhancer/promoter specificity during embryogenesis defines target tissues of congenital HCMV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Koedood, M; Fichtel, A; Meier, P; Mitchell, P J

    1995-01-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a common cause of deafness and neurological disabilities. Many aspects of this prenatal infection, including which cell types are infected and how infection proceeds, are poorly understood. Transcription of HCMV immediate-early (IE) genes is required for expression of all other HCMV genes and is dependent on host cell transcription factors. Cell type-specific differences in levels of IE transcription are believed to underlie differences in infection permissivity. However, DNA transfection experiments have paradoxically suggested that the HCMV major IE enhancer/promoter is a broadly active transcriptional element with little cell type specificity. In contrast, we show here that expression of a lacZ gene driven by the HCMV major IE enhancer/promoter -524 to +13 segment is restricted in transgenic mouse embryos to sites that correlate with known sites of congenital HCMV infection in human fetuses. This finding suggests that the IE enhancer/promoter is a major determinant of HCMV infection sites in humans and that transcription factors responsible for its regulation are cell type-specifically conserved between humans and mice. The lacZ expression patterns of these transgenic embryos yield insight into congenital HCMV pathogenesis by providing a spatiotemporal map of the sets of vascular, neural, and epithelial cells that are likely targets of infection. These transgenic mice may constitute a useful model system for investigating IE enhancer/promoter regulation in vivo and for identifying factors that modulate active and latent HCMV infections in humans. PMID:7884867

  12. Cytomegalovirus Infection in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Risk Factors for Primary Infection and Cases of Recurrent and Late Infection at a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Rowe, R Grant; Guo, Dongjing; Lee, Michelle; Margossian, Steven; London, Wendy B; Lehmann, Leslie

    2016-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). We identified a cohort of 91 pediatric SCT patients at risk (defined as either donor and/or recipient seropositivity) for CMV infection at our institution. We retrospectively categorized at-risk SCT recipients as those who (1) were at risk of CMV infection in the post-SCT period, (2) had documented CMV infection before SCT, (3) experienced recurrence of post-SCT CMV viremia, or (4) experienced late post-SCT CMV viremia; categories were not mutually exclusive. We analyzed the impact of SCT-related factors on incidence of CMV infection and outcome, and we described the outcome of each of these cohorts. In univariate analysis, recipient CMV seropositivity, use of umbilical cord blood graft, and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) predicted post-SCT CMV viremia, and the effects of acute GVHD (odds ratio, 4.018; 95% confidence interval, 1.032 to 15.643) and CMV seropositivity (odds ratio, 16.525; 95% confidence interval, 2.041 to 133.803) were confirmed in multivariate analysis. Patients with recurrence of post-SCT CMV viremia had a 50% all-cause mortality rate, compared with 12% in all 91 patients. Patients with pre-SCT CMV infection had a high incidence of post-SCT CMV infection but could successfully undergo SCT with antiviral prophylaxis and pre-emptive CMV treatment. All patients with late CMV infection had prior GVHD. Theses findings identify risk factors for post-SCT CMV infection and provide novel descriptions of childhood SCT recipients with pre-SCT, recurrent, and late CMV infection, which may contribute to risk stratification strategies for CMV at-risk patients in pediatric allogeneic SCT. PMID:27090959

  13. HUMORAL ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO INDIVIDUAL VIRAL PROTEINS AFTER MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to identify viral proteins that played an important role in the humoral immune response to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Viral proteins were separated from a purified virus preparation on polyacrylamide gels, were blotted onto nitrocellulose strips,...

  14. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: A Significant Cause of Deafness and Mental Deficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichhorn, Sarah K.

    1982-01-01

    Research on cytomegalovirus (CMV), a herpes virus causing neurological damage (hearing problems and/or mental retardation) in 10 percent of infants born with the condition, is reviewed. Incidence of hearing and retardation in CMV cases is reported and current treatment described. (CL)

  15. Late-onset cytomegalovirus infection complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome in a kidney transplant recipient: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shaban, E; Gohh, R; Knoll, B M

    2016-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a common infection after solid-organ transplantation. In the general population CMV disease is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an autoimmune disease leading to an acute peripheral neuropathy, in 1 of 1000 cases. Interestingly, GBS is a rarely observed complication in solid-organ transplant recipients, possibly related to maintenance immunosuppression. We describe a case of CMV infection complicated by GBS in a kidney transplant recipient and review the literature. PMID:26141820

  16. Complete resolution of non-necrotizing lung granuloma and pyoderma gangrenosum after restorative proctocolectomy in a woman with severe ulcerative colitis and cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Alessandro; Bianchini, Marcello; Schepis, Filippo; Marzi, Luca; De Maria, Nicola; Villa, Erica

    2016-02-01

    Here, we report the unusual case of an ulcerative colitis female patient presenting together with cytomegalovirus infection, pyoderma gangrenosum and a noncaseating lung granuloma, both resistant to immunomodulatory drugs which dramatically obtained a clinical stable remission after restorative proctocolectomy. PMID:26862424

  17. T cell responses to cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Klenerman, Paul; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a latent infection that generally remains asymptomatic in immune-competent hosts for decades but can cause serious illness in immune-compromised individuals. The long-term control of CMV requires considerable effort from the host immune system and has a lasting impact on the profile of the immune system. One hallmark of CMV infection is the maintenance of large populations of CMV-specific memory CD8(+) T cells - a phenomenon termed memory inflation - and emerging data suggest that memory inflation is associated with impaired immunity in the elderly. In this Review, we discuss the molecular triggers that promote memory inflation, the idea that memory inflation could be considered a natural pathway of T cell maturation that could be harnessed in vaccination, and the broader implications of CMV infection and the T cell responses it elicits. PMID:27108521

  18. Perforation of the bowel due to cytomegalovirus infection in a man with AIDS: surgery is not always necessary!

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, Katie Tharshana; Morgan, Andrew Roger; Yoganathan, Kathir G

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common viral opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients and is a rare cause of bowel perforation. It invariably requires surgical intervention and is often fatal. We report a 50-year-old Caucasian man with AIDS, presented 3 weeks after developing abdominal pain and distension. He was treated for CMV retinitis in the past. His adherence to antiretroviral therapy was poor. Examination revealed a recurrence of active CMV retinitis. His abdomen was tender and distended. The plain X-ray of the abdomen revealed a double wall sign (Rigler's sign), indicating pneumoperitoneum due to the bowel perforation. The upper endoscopy was normal. His CD4 count was 30 cells/mm(3) He was treated with cidofovir infusion. He made a full recovery, without requiring any form of surgery. However, he died of adult respiratory distress syndrome 14 months later, due to iatrogenic acute pancreatitis. PMID:27440845

  19. Atypical presentation of exophytic herpes simplex virus type 2 with concurrent cytomegalovirus infection: a significant pitfall in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Garib, George; Hughey, Lauren C; Elmets, Craig A; Cafardi, Jennifer A; Andea, Aleodor A

    2013-05-01

    We report 3 unusual cases of atypical exophytic cutaneous herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 with concurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunosuppressed patients and raise awareness to the significant clinical and pathologic challenges in establishing the correct diagnosis. In all the 3 cases, the lesions presented as fungating plaques and nodules with areas of superficial erosion. Initial clinical differential included genital warts, syphilis, versus cutaneous malignancy. All the 3 patients were referred to the dermatology clinic where a combination of cutaneous biopsies, viral cultures of the lesions, polymerase chain reaction, CMV antigenemia, and immunoperoxidase stains for CMV and HSV confirmed the diagnosis of HSV type 2 with concurrent CMV infection. All the 3 patients were treated with oral valganciclovir with significant improvement noted at the follow-up visit. In addition, we review the previously reported HSV/CMV cutaneous coinfection cases. PMID:22534637

  20. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells.

    PubMed

    Krishna, B A; Lau, B; Jackson, S E; Wills, M R; Sinclair, J H; Poole, E

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  1. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, B. A.; Lau, B.; Jackson, S. E.; Wills, M. R.; Sinclair, J. H.; Poole, E.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  2. Distinct MHC class I–dependent NK cell–activating receptors control cytomegalovirus infection in different mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Pyzik, Michał; Charbonneau, Benoit; Gendron-Pontbriand, Eve-Marie; Babić, Marina; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV)–infected cells by activating NK cell receptors was first described in the context of Ly49H, which confers resistance to C57BL/6 mice. We investigated the ability of other activating Ly49 receptors to recognize MCMV-infected cells in mice from various H-2 backgrounds. We observed that Ly49P1 from NOD/Ltj mice, Ly49L from BALB mice, and Ly49D2 from PWK/Pas mice respond to MCMV-infected cells in the context of H-2Dk and the viral protein m04/gp34. Recognition was also seen in the H-2d and/or H-2f contexts, depending on the Ly49 receptor examined, but never in H-2b. Furthermore, BALB.K (H-2k) mice showed reduced viral loads compared with their H-2d or H-2b congenic partners, a reduction which was dependent on interferon γ secretion by Ly49L+ NK cells early after infection. Adoptive transfer of Ly49L+, but not Ly49L−, NK cells significantly increased resistance against MCMV infection in neonate BALB.K mice. These results suggest that multiple activating Ly49 receptors participate in H-2–dependent recognition of MCMV infection, providing a common mechanism of NK cell–mediated resistance against viral infection. PMID:21518798

  3. Regulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) α in human-cytomegalovirus-infected fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junsub; Kim, Sunyoung

    2016-05-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) α, a member of the C/EBP family of transcription factors, is known to be involved in gene expression and DNA replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This study aimed to understand the regulation of endogenous C/EBPα during HCMV infection using an in vitro infection model. The expression and localization of C/EBPα were investigated in fibroblasts infected with HCMV. The overexpression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), the endogenous inhibitor of C/EBP, was also employed to test the involvement of C/EBPα during HCMV infection. Our data showed that HCMV infection increases the expression of the full-length C/EBPα isoform (p42) especially during the late stage of infection at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. The increased p42 accumulated in the viral DNA replication compartment. p42 expression was not induced in cells treated with UV-irradiated virus or in cells infected with normal virus in the presence of ganciclovir. CHOP-mediated inhibition of C/EBP activity suppressed viral gene expression and DNA replication, which lowered the level of viral production. Together, our data suggest that HCMV-mediated C/EBPα regulation might play a beneficial role in the lytic cycle of HCMV. PMID:26831934

  4. A Homolog Pentameric Complex Dictates Viral Epithelial Tropism, Pathogenicity and Congenital Infection Rate in Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Stewart; Choi, K Yeon; Root, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair

    2016-07-01

    In human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), tropism to epithelial and endothelial cells is dependent upon a pentameric complex (PC). Given the structure of the placenta, the PC is potentially an important neutralizing antibody target antigen against congenital infection. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV. Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) potentially encodes a UL128-131 HCMV PC homolog locus (GP128-GP133). In transient expression studies, GPCMV gH and gL glycoproteins interacted with UL128, UL130 and UL131 homolog proteins (designated GP129 and GP131 and GP133 respectively) to form PC or subcomplexes which were determined by immunoprecipitation reactions directed to gH or gL. A natural GP129 C-terminal deletion mutant (aa 107-179) and a chimeric HCMV UL128 C-terminal domain swap GP129 mutant failed to form PC with other components. GPCMV infection of a newly established guinea pig epithelial cell line required a complete PC and a GP129 mutant virus lacked epithelial tropism and was attenuated in the guinea pig for pathogenicity and had a low congenital transmission rate. Individual knockout of GP131 or 133 genes resulted in loss of viral epithelial tropism. A GP128 mutant virus retained epithelial tropism and GP128 was determined not to be a PC component. A series of GPCMV mutants demonstrated that gO was not strictly essential for epithelial infection whereas gB and the PC were essential. Ectopic expression of a GP129 cDNA in a GP129 mutant virus restored epithelial tropism, pathogenicity and congenital infection. Overall, GPCMV forms a PC similar to HCMV which enables evaluation of PC based vaccine strategies in the guinea pig model. PMID:27387220

  5. A Homolog Pentameric Complex Dictates Viral Epithelial Tropism, Pathogenicity and Congenital Infection Rate in Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    In human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), tropism to epithelial and endothelial cells is dependent upon a pentameric complex (PC). Given the structure of the placenta, the PC is potentially an important neutralizing antibody target antigen against congenital infection. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV. Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) potentially encodes a UL128-131 HCMV PC homolog locus (GP128-GP133). In transient expression studies, GPCMV gH and gL glycoproteins interacted with UL128, UL130 and UL131 homolog proteins (designated GP129 and GP131 and GP133 respectively) to form PC or subcomplexes which were determined by immunoprecipitation reactions directed to gH or gL. A natural GP129 C-terminal deletion mutant (aa 107–179) and a chimeric HCMV UL128 C-terminal domain swap GP129 mutant failed to form PC with other components. GPCMV infection of a newly established guinea pig epithelial cell line required a complete PC and a GP129 mutant virus lacked epithelial tropism and was attenuated in the guinea pig for pathogenicity and had a low congenital transmission rate. Individual knockout of GP131 or 133 genes resulted in loss of viral epithelial tropism. A GP128 mutant virus retained epithelial tropism and GP128 was determined not to be a PC component. A series of GPCMV mutants demonstrated that gO was not strictly essential for epithelial infection whereas gB and the PC were essential. Ectopic expression of a GP129 cDNA in a GP129 mutant virus restored epithelial tropism, pathogenicity and congenital infection. Overall, GPCMV forms a PC similar to HCMV which enables evaluation of PC based vaccine strategies in the guinea pig model. PMID:27387220

  6. Schizophrenia Susceptibility Genes Directly Implicated in the Life Cycles of Pathogens: Cytomegalovirus, Influenza, Herpes simplex, Rubella, and Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Many genes implicated in schizophrenia can be related to glutamatergic transmission and neuroplasticity, oligodendrocyte function, and other families clearly related to neurobiology and schizophrenia phenotypes. Others appear rather to be involved in the life cycles of the pathogens implicated in the disease. For example, aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), PLA2, SIAT8B, GALNT7, or B3GAT1 metabolize chemical ligands to which the influenza virus, herpes simplex, cytomegalovirus (CMV), rubella, or Toxoplasma gondii bind. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGR/EGFR) is used by the CMV to gain entry to cells, and a CMV gene codes for an interleukin (IL-10) mimic that binds the host cognate receptor, IL10R. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1) is used by herpes simplex. KPNA3 and RANBP5 control the nuclear import of the influenza virus. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) controls the microtubule network that is used by viruses as a route to the nucleus, while DTNBP1, MUTED, and BLOC1S3 regulate endosomal to lysosomal routing that is also important in viral traffic. Neuregulin 1 activates ERBB receptors releasing a factor, EBP1, known to inhibit the influenza virus transcriptase. Other viral or bacterial components bind to genes or proteins encoded by CALR, FEZ1, FYN, HSPA1B, IL2, HTR2A, KPNA3, MED12, MED15, MICB, NQO2, PAX6, PIK3C3, RANBP5, or TP53, while the cerebral infectivity of the herpes simplex virus is modified by Apolipoprotein E (APOE). Genes encoding for proteins related to the innate immune response, including cytokine related (CCR5, CSF2RA, CSF2RB, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL3, IL3RA, IL4, IL10, IL10RA, IL18RAP, lymphotoxin-alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF]), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antigens (HLA-A10, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1), and genes involved in antigen processing (angiotensin-converting enzyme and tripeptidyl peptidase 2) are all concerned with defense against invading pathogens. Human microRNAs (Hsa-mir-198 and Hsa-mir-206) are predicted to bind

  7. Comparison of guinea pig cytomegalovirus and guinea pig herpes-like virus: pathogenesis and persistence in experimentally infected animals.

    PubMed Central

    Tenser, R B; Hsiung, G D

    1976-01-01

    The pathogenesis of guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) and guinea pig herpes-like virus (GPHLV) in guinea pigs was compared. Animals were inoculated with the two viruses by different routes and sacrificed after varying periods of time. GPCMV was consistently isolated from salivary gland 2 weeks postinoculation and thereafter following intraperitoneal or subcutaneous incoulaton. Virus was less frequently found in other tissues including blood, spleen, and kidney. Intranuclear inclusions were seen in tissue sections of salivary gland after inoculation with GPCMV- infected tissue suspension, but were only rarely found after inoculation with tissue culture virus. In GPHLV-infected guinea pigs, consistent latent infection of leukocytes and other tissues was detected by cocultivation techniques. Intranuclear inclusions were not found in the spleen, salivary gland, or other infected tissues after GPHLV infection with either tissue culture virus or infected tissue suspension. Guinea pigs inoculated with GPCMV produced high titers of specific neutralizing antibody to the homologous virus; those inoculated with GPHLV developed long-term viremia accompanied by minimal neutralizing antibody levels to the virus. Images PMID:178599

  8. Cytomegalovirus Infection May Contribute to the Reduced Immune Function, Growth, Development, and Health of HIV-Exposed, Uninfected African Children

    PubMed Central

    Filteau, Suzanne; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    With increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Africa, most children born to HIV-infected mothers are not themselves HIV-infected. These HIV-exposed, uninfected (HEU) children are at increased risk of mortality and have immune, growth, development, and health deficits compared to HIV-unexposed children. HEU children are known to be at higher risk than HIV-unexposed children of acquiring cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in early life. This risk is largely unaffected by ART and is increased by breastfeeding, which itself is critically important for child health and survival. Early CMV infection, namely in utero or during early infancy, may contribute to reduced growth, altered or impaired immune functions, and sensory and cognitive deficits. We review the evidence that CMV may be responsible for the health impairments of HEU children. There are currently no ideal safe and effective interventions to reduce postnatal CMV infection. If a clinical trial showed proof of the principle that decreasing early CMV infection improved health and development of HEU children, this could provide the impetus needed for the development of better interventions to improve the health of this vulnerable population. PMID:27446087

  9. The Influence of Primary Cytomegalovirus or Epstein-Barr Virus Infection on the Course of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Smalisz-Skrzypczyk, Katarzyna; Romiszewski, Michał; Matysiak, Michał; Demkow, Urszula; Pawelec, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in children is usually triggered by a viral infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of CMV and EBV infections in children with first relapse of ITP, and the influence of these infections on the course and response to treatment of ITP. Sixty patients (30 boys and 30 girls) with ITP were enrolled into the study. We found that the age at the onset of ITP was from 1 month to 17 years (mean 7.0 ± 5.7 years), the platelet number was from 1 to 79 x 10(9)/L (mean 18.1 ± 19.0 x 10(9)/L) at the time of diagnosis and it increased from 17 to 395 x 10(9)/L (mean 134.4 ± 81.2 x 10(9)/L)(p < 0.05) after the first course of therapy. Forty seven patients required pharmacological treatment, the duration of the treatment was from 2 to 25 days (mean 6.1 ± 4.1 days). Relapses were observed in 27 (45%) of the patients. Active CMV infection was found in 19 patients (31.7%), EBV infection in 5 patients (8.3%), and both infections concomitantly in 1 patient (1.7%). The group of patients with CMV or EBV infection(n = 25) did not differ from the patients free of infection (n = 35) in regard to the age, number of platelets at onset, duration of treatment, number of platelets after treatment, number of relapses, and the interval between the onset and first relapse. In conclusion, active CMV or EBV infection is common in children with ITP. These infections do not seem to have an appreciable bearing on the clinical course and the response to treatment on children with ITP. PMID:26269027

  10. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Interferes with the Maintenance and Differentiation of Trophoblast Progenitor Cells of the Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Takako; Petitt, Matthew; Zydek, Martin; Fang-Hoover, June; Larocque, Nicholas; Tsuge, Mitsuru; Gormley, Matthew; Kauvar, Lawrence M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of birth defects that include severe neurological deficits, hearing and vision loss, and intrauterine growth restriction. Viral infection of the placenta leads to development of avascular villi, edema, and hypoxia associated with symptomatic congenital infection. Studies of primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) revealed that HCMV infection impedes terminal stages of differentiation and invasion by various molecular mechanisms. We recently discovered that HCMV arrests earlier stages involving development of human trophoblast progenitor cells (TBPCs), which give rise to the mature cell types of chorionic villi—syncytiotrophoblasts on the surfaces of floating villi and invasive CTBs that remodel the uterine vasculature. Here, we show that viral proteins are present in TBPCs of the chorion in cases of symptomatic congenital infection. In vitro studies revealed that HCMV replicates in continuously self-renewing TBPC lines derived from the chorion and alters expression and subcellular localization of proteins required for cell cycle progression, pluripotency, and early differentiation. In addition, treatment with a human monoclonal antibody to HCMV glycoprotein B rescues differentiation capacity, and thus, TBPCs have potential utility for evaluation of the efficacies of novel antiviral antibodies in protecting and restoring placental development. Our results suggest that HCMV replicates in TBPCs in the chorion in vivo, interfering with the earliest steps in the growth of new villi, contributing to virus transmission and impairing compensatory development. In cases of congenital infection, reduced responsiveness of the placenta to hypoxia limits the transport of substances from maternal blood and contributes to fetal growth restriction. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a leading cause of birth defects in the United States. Congenital infection can result in permanent neurological defects, mental retardation

  11. Risk of congenital cytomegalovirus infection among HIV-exposed uninfected infants is not decreased by maternal nelfinavir use during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Leister, Erin; Jacobson, Denise L.; Boucoiran, Isabelle; Huang, Meei-Li; Jerome, Keith R.; Jourdain, Gonzague; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Burchett, Sandra; Frenkel, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is common among infants born to HIV-infected women. Nelfinavir (NFV), an antiretroviral drug that is safe during pregnancy, inhibits CMV replication in vitro at concentrations that standard doses achieve in plasma. We hypothesized that infants born to women receiving NFV for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) would have a reduced prevalence of cCMV infection. Methods The prevalence of cCMV infection was compared among HIV-uninfected infants whose HIV-infected mothers either received NFV for ≥4 weeks during pregnancy (NFV-exposed) or did not receive any NFV in pregnancy (NFV-unexposed). CMV PCR was performed on infant blood samples collected at <3 weeks from birth. Results Of the 1,255 women included, 314 received NFV for ≥4 weeks during pregnancy and 941 did not receive any NFV during pregnancy. The overall prevalence of cCMV infection in the infants was 2.2%, which did not differ by maternal NFV use. Maternal CD4 T cell counts were inversely correlated with risk of cCMV infection, independent of the time NFV was initiated during gestation. Infants with cCMV infection were born 0.7 weeks earlier (p=0.010) and weighed 170 grams less (p=0.009) than uninfected infants. Conclusion Among HIV-exposed uninfected infants, cCMV infection was associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. NFV use in pregnancy was not associated with protection against cCMV. Safe and effective strategies to prevent cCMV infection are needed. PMID:26519647

  12. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously

  13. Murine Cytomegalovirus Virion-Associated Protein M45 Mediates Rapid NF-κB Activation after Infection

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Eva; de Graaf, Miranda; Fliss, Patricia M.; Dölken, Lars

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) rapidly induces activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) upon infection of host cells. After a transient phase of activation, the MCMV M45 protein blocks all canonical NF-κB-activating pathways by inducing the degradation of the gamma subunit of the inhibitor of κB kinase complex (IKKγ; commonly referred to as the NF-κB essential modulator [NEMO]). Here we show that the viral M45 protein also mediates rapid NF-κB activation immediately after infection. MCMV mutants lacking M45 or expressing C-terminally truncated M45 proteins induced neither NF-κB activation nor transcription of NF-κB-dependent genes within the first 3 h of infection. Rapid NF-κB activation was absent in MCMV-infected NEMO-deficient fibroblasts, indicating that activation occurs at or upstream of the IKK complex. NF-κB activation was strongly reduced in murine fibroblasts lacking receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1), a known M45-interacting protein, but was restored upon complementation with murine RIP1. However, the ability of M45 to interact with RIP1 and NEMO was not sufficient to induce NF-κB activation upon infection. In addition, incorporation of the M45 protein into virions was required. This was dependent on a C-terminal region of M45, which is not required for interaction with RIP1 and NEMO. We propose a model in which M45 delivered by viral particles activates NF-κB, presumably involving an interaction with RIP1 and NEMO. Later in infection, expression of M45 induces the degradation of NEMO and the shutdown of canonical NF-κB activation. IMPORTANCE Transcription factor NF-κB is an important regulator of innate and adaptive immunity. Its activation can be beneficial or detrimental for viral pathogens. Therefore, many viruses interfere with NF-κB signaling by stimulating or inhibiting the activation of this transcription factor. Cytomegaloviruses, opportunistic pathogens that cause lifelong infections in their hosts, activate NF

  14. Cytomegalovirus IgG Level and Avidity in Breastfeeding Infants of HIV-Infected Mothers in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Jeffrey; Chang, Tiffany S.; Dollard, Sheila C.; Amin, Minal M.; Ellington, Sascha; Kayira, Dumbani; van der Horst, Charles; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is common among infants of HIV-infected mothers in resource-limited settings. We examined the prevalence and timing of infant CMV infection during the first year of life using IgG antibody and avidity among HIV-exposed infants in Malawi and correlated the results with the presence of detectable CMV DNA in the blood. The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition (BAN) study randomized 2,369 mothers and their infants to maternal antiretrovirals, infant nevirapine, or neither for 28 weeks of breastfeeding, followed by weaning. Stored plasma specimens were tested for CMV IgG and antibody avidity from a random subset of infants who had been previously tested with blood CMV PCR and had available specimens at birth and at 24 and 48 weeks of age. Ninety-four of 127 infants (74.0%) tested at 24 weeks of age had CMV IgG of low or intermediate avidity, signifying primary CMV infections. An additional 22 infants (17.3%) had IgG of high avidity; 19 of them had CMV DNA detected in their blood, indicating infant infections. Taken together, these results show that the estimated prevalence of CMV infection at 24 weeks was 88.9%. By 48 weeks of age, 81.3% of infants had anti-CMV IgG; most of them (70.9%) had IgG of high avidity. The CMV serology and avidity testing, combined with the PCR results, confirmed a high rate of primary CMV infection by 6 months of life among breastfeeding infants of HIV-infected mothers. The CMV PCR in blood detected most, but not all, infant CMV infections. PMID:26424831

  15. Viral infections in transfusion-dependent patients with beta-thalassemia major: the predominant role of cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Nigro, G; Lionetti, P; Digilio, G; Multari, G; Vania, A; Midulla, M

    1990-01-01

    For 9 months, 38 transfusion-dependent patients with beta-thalassemia, ranging in age from 3.4 to 19.1 years, were observed for serologic evidence of viral infections, by the collection of serial serum samples. Seventy-six age-matched healthy subjects, two for each patient, were followed as controls. Samples taken at the beginning, middle, and end of the study were tested against 18 viral antigens by complement fixation (CF). In addition, tests for antibodies to HIV, Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis A virus, and markers for hepatitis B virus were performed. When changes in the antibody titer on CF tests (greater than or equal to 2-fold increase or decrease) or persistently high titers (greater than or equal to 64) were revealed, specific enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) for IgM and IgA antibodies were performed concomitant with CF tests in all sera. When symptomatic infections occurred, viral cultures and/or direct detection of antigens were carried out by immunofluorescence methods, EIA, or latex agglutination tests. Thalassemic patients and controls had similar (p greater than 0.05) overall rates of serologically confirmed viral infections (53 versus 132), but the former group had a higher (p less than 0.01) incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections (9 versus 4). CMV infections were associated in the thalassemic patients with hepatitis (2 cases), lymphadenitis (2 cases), and upper respiratory tract infection (1 case), while the remaining cases of CMV had a subclinical course. Moreover, the thalassemic patients had a lower (p less than 0.01) incidence of symptomatic infections (27 versus 110) than controls. Therefore, this study showed that both symptomatic and subclinical CMV infections may occur often in thalassemic patients, who otherwise have subclinical viral infections at an overall rate similar to that in healthy subjects. PMID:2173179

  16. Autoimmune response to U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) associated with cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, M M; van Venrooij, W J; Marshall, G S

    2001-01-01

    The induction of autoantibodies to U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) complexes is not well understood. We present evidence that healthy individuals with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection have an increased frequency and quantity of antibodies to ribonucleoprotein, directed primarily against the U1-70k protein. A significant association between the presence of antibodies to CMV and antibodies to the total RNP targeted by the immune response to the spliceosome (to both the Sm and RNP; Sm/RNP) was found for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but not those with mixed connective-tissue disease. CMV thus may play a role in inducing autoimmune responses in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:11438044

  17. Data correlations between gender, cytomegalovirus infection and T cells, NK cells, and soluble immune mediators in elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Ahmad; Presnell, Steven R; Peterson, Charlotte A; Thomas, D Travis; Lutz, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    We describe a cohort of 50 elderly subjects, age at least 70 years. We present gender-specific findings in T lymphocyte markers and soluble immune mediators. We show the correlation between cytomegalovirus infection status with CD56(dim) NK cell responses to a variety of stimuli and with CD56(bright)/CD56(dim) NK cell ratio. We also present the correlation of retinol binding protein (RBP)-4 plasma levels with NK cell responses and we explore the relationship between gender and adiponectin, 25(OH)D (vitamin D), and RBP4 in affecting CD56(dim) NK cell responses. These data are discussed in Al-Attar et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27508213

  18. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  19. [Consensus document from the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) on the diagnosis and treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Artigao, F

    2009-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the leading cause of congenital infection in developed countries, affecting 0.3 to 0.6% of all live births in Europe. Primary CMV infection occurs in 1 to 4% of seronegative women during pregnancy and may be transmitted to the fetus in 40% of cases. Up to 10% of intrauterine CMV infections result in symptomatic congenital disease at birth. Half of these children and 13% of those born with asymptomatic infection will develop long-term sequelae, especially neurosensory hearing loss and mental retardation. Accurate diagnosis of primary maternal and fetal infection is now possible using the avidity index of anti-CMV IgG and virological testing to detect the virus in amniotic fluid. Symptomatic congenital infection may be preventable using CMV hyperimmune globulin during pregnancy. The gold standard for diagnosis of congenital CMV infection is the detection of the virus in urine within the first 2 weeks of life by rapid cell culture techniques (shell vial) or nucleic acid amplification of viral DNA (PCR). Retrospective diagnosis can be achieved by detection of viral DNA by PCR in dried blood spots (Guthrie card) collected on filter paper in the first days of life. Currently available drugs for the treatment of congenital CMV include ganciclovir and its oral prodrug valganciclovir. Treatment with intravenous ganciclovir for six weeks may prevent hearing deterioration in children with symptomatic congenital CMV infection and central nervous system involvement. Valganciclovir may be an excellent alternative because of its good bio-availability, providing plasma concentrations similar to those achieved with intravenous ganciclovir. PMID:19815469

  20. Active human cytomegalovirus infection and glycoprotein b genotypes in brazilian pediatric renal or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    de Campos Dieamant, Débora; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves; Prates, Liliane Cury; Belangelo, Vera Maria Santoro; Pontes, Erika R; Costa, Sandra Cecília Botelho

    2010-01-01

    A prospective analysis of active Human Cytomegalovirus infection (HCMV) was conducted on 33 pediatric renal or hematopoietic stem cell post-transplant patients. The HCMV-DNA positive samples were evaluated for the prevalence of different gB subtypes and their subsequent correlation with clinical signs. The surveillance of HCMV active infection was based on the monitoring of antigenemia (AGM) and on a nested polymerase chain reaction (N-PCR) for the detection of HCMV in the patients studied. Using restriction analysis of the gB gene sequence by PCR-RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism), different HCMV strains could be detected and classified in at least four HCMV genotypes. Thirty-three pediatric recipients of renal or bone marrow transplantation were monitored. Twenty out of thirty-three (60.6%) patients demonstrated active HCMV infection. gB1 and gB2 genotypes were more frequent in this population. In this study, we observed that gB2 had correlation with reactivation of HCMV infection and that patients with mixture of genotypes did not show any symptoms of HCMV disease. Future studies has been made to confirm this. PMID:24031463

  1. Self-Injurious Behavior Secondary to Cytomegalovirus-Induced Neuropathy in an SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Clemmons, Elizabeth A; Gumber, Sanjeev; Strobert, Elizabeth; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Jean, Sherrie M

    2015-01-01

    A 3.5-y-old, female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) inoculated with SIVmac239 presented 8 mo later for inappetence and facial bruising. Physical examination revealed a superficial skin abrasion below the left eye, bruising below the left brow, and epistaxis of the left nostril. There were no significant findings on CBC, serum chemistry, urinalysis, or radiographs. Differential diagnoses included infectious etiologies, self-injurious behavior, immune-mediated dermatitis, and neoplasia. Lack of response to antibiotic and analgesic therapy and observations of the macaque made it apparent that the skin lesions were self-inflicted. The excoriations rapidly progressed to extend over the nose, and the left palpebrae became edematous. Euthanasia was elected because the macaque appeared to be experiencing continued discomfort despite analgesic therapy. Histopathologic examination revealed systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection involving the facial nerves, periocular nerves, meninges, and perimesenteric lymph nodes. CMV is a common infection in macaques, with adult seroprevalence close to 100% in most colonies. Infection in immunocompetent animals is usually asymptomatic but can cause significant clinical disease in immunodeficient hosts. CMV is associated with a painful peripheral neuropathy in human AIDS patients, and analgesic treatment is often unsatisfactory. Peripheral neuropathy secondary to CMV should be considered as an underlying cause of self-injurious behavior in SIV-infected macaques. Macaques affected by other diseases and disorders may also be at risk for development of painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26141451

  2. Cytomegalovirus generates long-lived antigen-specific NK cells with diminished bystander activation to heterologous infection

    PubMed Central

    Min-Oo, Gundula

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in the host response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and can mediate an enhanced response to secondary challenge with CMV. We assessed the ability of mouse CMV (MCMV)–induced memory Ly49H+ NK cells to respond to challenges with influenza, an acute viral infection localized to the lung, and Listeria monocytogenes, a systemic bacterial infection. MCMV-memory NK cells did not display enhanced activation or proliferation after infection with influenza or Listeria, as compared with naive Ly49H+ or Ly49H− NK cells. Memory NK cells also showed impaired activation compared with naive cells when challenged with a mutant MCMV lacking m157, highlighting their antigen-specific response. Ex vivo, MCMV-memory NK cells displayed reduced phosphorylation of STAT4 and STAT1 in response to stimulation by IL-12 and type I interferon (IFN), respectively, and IFN-γ production was reduced in response to IL-12 + IL-18 compared with naive NK cells. However, costimulation of MCMV-memory NK cells with IL-12 and m157 antigen rescues their impaired response compared with cytokines alone. These findings reveal that MCMV-primed memory NK cells are diminished in their response to cytokine-driven bystander responses to heterologous infections as they become specialized and antigen-specific for the control of MCMV upon rechallenge. PMID:25422494

  3. Morphologic Analysis of Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells in Bronchial Washing Cytology: Comparison of Liquid-Based Preparation and Conventional Smear

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Jae Yeon; An, Jungsuk; Ha, Seung Yeon; Chung, Dong Hae; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Hyunchul

    2016-01-01

    Background: The cytopathic effects of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection have been well described since the virus was first reported; however, the morphology of CMV infection has not been clearly studied. We examined the difference in detailed cytologic findings in bronchial washing cytology between liquid-based and conventionally prepared smears. Methods: Bronchial washing cytology was processed using either the conventional preparation (CP) or liquid-based preparation (LBP). Sixty-nine cells with typical cytopathic effects of CMV infection were detected on CP slides and 18 cells on LBP slides. Using the image analyzer, area, circumference, major axis, and minor axis of the cytoplasm, nucleus, and intranuclear inclusion were measured in singly scattered CMV-infected cells, and histiocytes were used as a control. Results: The mean cytoplasmic area of CMV-infected cells was 1.47 times larger than that of histiocytes in CP and 2.92 times larger in LBP (p<.05). The mean nuclear area of CMV-infected cells was 2.61 times larger than that of histiocytes in CP and 4.25 times larger in LBP (p<.05). The nucleus to cytoplasm ratio and intranuclear inclusion to cytoplasm ratio of the mean area, circumference, major axis, and minor axis in CP were larger than those in LBP (p<.05). Conclusions: The sizes of cytoplasm, nucleus, and intranuclear inclusion were larger in LBP than in CP, indicating that CMV-infected cells are easily detectable in LBP. However, the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio was larger in CP, suggesting that differentiation from malignancy or regenerative atypia requires caution in CP. PMID:26875760

  4. Specific serum immunoglobulin D, detected by antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, J; Nielsen, S L; Sørensen, I; Andersen, H K

    1989-01-01

    An antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection of immunoglobulin D (IgD) antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV) in sera from blood donors and various groups of patients infected with CMV. This method has previously been found especially valuable in detecting specific antibodies of the IgM, IgE, IgA and IgG class in patients with CMV infection. Specific CMV IgD antibodies were found in 37% of CMV seropositive blood donors and in 47 (88%) of the 53 patients investigated, including bone marrow transplant and renal allograft transplant patients, patients with CMV mononucleosis, neonates with CMV infection and AIDS patients with CMV infection. The highest IgD reactivity was found in patients having either a primary post-transplant CMV infection or CMV mononucleosis. The IgD reactivity in patients with AIDS and in neonates was low. It was also found that in the acute phase of CMV infection the development of CMV antibodies of the IgD class was similar to the development of antibodies of the other classes. The maintenance of IgD activity in some patients together with the presence of CMV IgD antibodies in a great proportion of the blood donors indicates that the development of CMV IgD antibodies resembles that of the IgG class. Determination of specific IgD antibodies offered no advantage over determination of specific antibodies of the IgM, IgE and IgA classes in the diagnosis of CMV infection. PMID:2539278

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus Promotes Survival of Infected Monocytes via a Distinct Temporal Regulation of Cellular Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Collins-McMillen, Donna; Kim, Jung Heon; Nogalski, Maciej T.; Stevenson, Emily V.; Caskey, Joshua R.; Cieply, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytes play a key role in the hematogenous dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to target organ systems. To infect monocytes and reprogram them to deliver infectious virus, HCMV must overcome biological obstacles, including the short life span of monocytes and their antiviral proapoptotic response to infection. We have shown that virally induced upregulation of cellular Mcl-1 promotes early survival of HCMV-infected monocytes, allowing cells to overcome an early apoptotic checkpoint at around 48 h postinfection (hpi). Here, we demonstrate an HCMV-dependent shift from Mcl-1 as the primary antiapoptotic player to the related protein, Bcl-2, later during infection. Bcl-2 was upregulated in HCMV-infected monocytes beginning at 48 hpi. Treatment with the Bcl-2 antagonist ABT-199 only reduced the prosurvival effects of HCMV in target monocytes beginning at 48 hpi, suggesting that Mcl-1 controls survival prior to 48 hpi, while Bcl-2 promotes survival after 48 hpi. Although Bcl-2 was upregulated following viral binding/signaling through cellular integrins (compared to Mcl-1, which is upregulated through binding/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]), it functioned similarly to Mcl-1, adopting the early role of Mcl-1 in preventing caspase-3 cleavage/activation. This distinct, HCMV-induced shift from Mcl-1 to Bcl-2 occurs in response to a cellular upregulation of proapoptotic Bax, as small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Bax reduced the upregulation of Bcl-2 in infected monocytes and rescued the cells from the apoptotic effects of Bcl-2 inhibition. Our data demonstrate a distinct survival strategy whereby HCMV induces a biphasic regulation of cellular Bcl-2 proteins to promote host cell survival, leading to viral dissemination and the establishment of persistent HCMV infection. IMPORTANCE Hematogenous dissemination of HCMV via infected monocytes is a crucial component of the viral survival strategy and is required for the

  6. Poly(A) binding protein abundance regulates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F assembly in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Caleb; Perez, Cesar; Mohr, Ian

    2012-04-10

    By commandeering cellular translation initiation factors, or destroying those dispensable for viral mRNA translation, viruses often suppress host protein synthesis. In contrast, cellular protein synthesis proceeds in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected cells, forcing viral and cellular mRNAs to compete for limiting translation initiation factors. Curiously, inactivating the host translational repressor 4E-BP1 in HCMV-infected cells stimulates synthesis of the cellular poly(A) binding protein (PABP), significantly increasing PABP abundance. Here, we establish that new PABP synthesis is translationally controlled by the HCMV-encoded UL38 mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1-activator. The 5' UTR within the mRNA encoding PABP contains a terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) element found in mRNAs, the translation of which is stimulated in response to mitogenic, growth, and nutritional stimuli, and proteins encoded by TOP-containing mRNAs accumulated in HCMV-infected cells. Furthermore, UL38 expression was necessary and sufficient to regulate expression of a PABP TOP-containing reporter. Remarkably, preventing the rise in PABP abundance by RNAi impaired eIF4E binding to eIF4G, thereby reducing assembly of the multisubunit initiation factor eIF4F, viral protein production, and replication. This finding demonstrates that viruses can increase host translation initiation factor concentration to foster their replication and defines a unique mechanism whereby control of PABP abundance regulates eIF4F assembly. PMID:22431630

  7. Spatial relationships between markers for secretory and endosomal machinery in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells versus those in uninfected cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhendu; Pellett, Philip E

    2011-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) induces extensive remodeling of the secretory apparatus to form the cytoplasmic virion assembly compartment (cVAC), where virion tegumentation and envelopment take place. We studied the structure of the cVAC by confocal microscopy to assess the three-dimensional distribution of proteins specifically associated with individual secretory organelles. In infected cells, early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1)-positive vesicles are concentrated at the center of the cVAC and, as previously seen, are distinct from structures visualized by markers for the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and trans-Golgi network (TGN). EEA1-positive vesicles can be strongly associated with markers for recycling endosomes, to a lesser extent with markers associated with components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT III) machinery, and then with markers of late endosomes. In comparisons of uninfected and infected cells, we found significant changes in the structural associations and colocalization of organelle markers, as well as in net organelle volumes. These results provide new evidence that the HCMV-induced remodeling of the membrane transport apparatus involves much more than simple relocation and expansion of preexisting structures and are consistent with the hypothesis that the shift in identity of secretory organelles in HCMV-infected cells results in new functional profiles. PMID:21471245

  8. Prevalence and predictors of cytomegalovirus retinitis in HIV-infected patients with low CD4 lymphocyte counts in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Colby, Donn J; Vo, Diem Qh; Teoh, Stephen C; Tam, Nguyen T; Liem, Nguyen T; Lu, Doanh; Nguyen, Thi T; Cosimi, Lisa; Pollack, Todd; Libman, Howard

    2014-06-01

    We describe the results of a study to determine the prevalence and characteristics of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis among HIV-infected patients in Vietnam. We conducted a cross-sectional prospective study of patients with CD4 lymphocyte count ≤100 cells/mm(3)recruited from public HIV clinics. The diagnosis was made by a trained ophthalmologist using slit lamp biomicroscopy and corroborated on fundus photography. A total of 201 patients were screened. The median age was 32 years, 77% were men, median CD4 count was 47 cells/mm(3), and 62% were on antiretroviral treatment. Prevalence of CMV retinitis was 7% (14/201, 95% CI 4-11%). CMV retinitis was not associated with age, gender, injection drug use, CD4 count, WHO clinical stage, or antiretroviral treatment status. Blurring of vision and reduced visual acuity <20/40 were associated with CMV retinitis, but only 29% of patients with the diagnosis reported blurry vision and only 64% had abnormal vision. On multivariate analysis, the sole predictor for CMV retinitis was decreased visual acuity (OR 22.8,p < 0.001). In Ho Chi Minh City, CMV retinitis was found in 7% of HIV-infected patients with low CD4. HIV-infected patients with a CD4 count <100/mm(3)or who develop blurring of vision in Vietnam should be screened for CMV retinitis. PMID:24327723

  9. Outcome of Preterm Infants With Postnatal Cytomegalovirus Infection via Breast Milk: A Two-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Jim, Wai-Tim; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Ho, Che-Sheng; Shu, Chyong-Hsin; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Hung, Han-Yang; Kao, Hsin-An; Chang, Hung-Yang; Peng, Chun-Chih; Yui, Bey-Hwa; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-10-01

    Approximately 15% of preterm infants may develop postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection from seropositive mothers via breast milk and are at risk for neurological sequelae in childhood. The aims of this study were to assess the effects and outcomes on growth, neurodevelopmental status, and hearing in very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants with postnatal CMV infection via breast milk at the corrected age of 12 and 24 months.The prospective follow-up study population comprised all living preterm children (n = 55) with a birth weight ≤1500 g and gestational age of ≤35 weeks, who had been participated in our "postnatal CMV infection via breast milk" studies in 2000 and 2009, respectively. The cohort of children was assessed at 12 and 24 months. Clinical outcomes were documented during hospitalization and after discharge. Long-term outcomes included anthropometry, audiologic tests, gross motor quotient, Infant International Battery, and neurodevelopmental outcomes; all were assessed at postcorrected age in 12 and 24 months during follow-up visits.Of the 55 infants enrolled in the study (4 noninfected infants were excluded because their parents did not join this follow-up program later), 14 infants postnatally acquired CMV infection through breast-feeding (infected group) and were compared with 41 infants without CMV infection (control group). No significant differences were observed between the groups with regard to baseline characteristics, clinical outcomes, anthropometry, or psychomotor and mental development on the Bayley scale of infant development. None of the infants had CMV-related death or permanent sensorineural hearing loss.Transmission of CMV from seropositive mother via breast milk to preterm infants does not appear at this time to have major adverse effects on clinical outcomes, growth, neurodevelopmental status, and hearing function at 12 and 24 months corrected age. PMID:26512588

  10. Cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein protects nonhuman primates from Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Andrea; Murphy, Aisling A.; Feldmann, Friederike; Parkins, Christopher J.; Haddock, Elaine; Hanley, Patrick W.; Emery, Matthew J.; Engelmann, Flora; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Feldmann, Heinz; Jarvis, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Ebolaviruses pose significant public health problems due to their high lethality, unpredictable emergence, and localization to the poorest areas of the world. In addition to implementation of standard public health control procedures, a number of experimental human vaccines are being explored as a further means for outbreak control. Recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vectors are a novel vaccine platform that have been shown to induce substantial levels of durable, but primarily T-cell-biased responses against the encoded heterologous target antigen. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of rhesus CMV (RhCMV) expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) to provide protective immunity to rhesus macaques against lethal EBOV challenge. Surprisingly, vaccination was associated with high levels of GP-specific antibodies, but with no detectable GP-directed cellular immunity. PMID:26876974

  11. Cytomegalovirus: the stealth virus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sharon

    2016-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an infection, part of the herpes family of viruses which, if contracted during pregnancy, cancause devastating effects on the newborn baby. This article is written by the trustee of a volunteer-based charity, mostly run by mothers of CMV children, who are striving to raise awareness of this infection, which is more common than Down's syndrome, listeria and toxoplasmosis, and is theprimary preventable cause of childhood hearing loss. PMID:27295757

  12. The presence of precursors of benign pre-B lymphoblasts (hematogones) in the bone marrow of a paediatric patient with cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Madrid, F; Uberos, J; Díaz-Molina, M; Ramírez-Arredondo, A; Jiménez-Gámiz, P; Molina-Carballo, A

    2008-01-01

    Hematogones are normal B-lymphoid precursors that multiply in the bone marrow of small children and of adults with ferropenic anaemia, neuroblastoma or idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. They are not normally found in peripheral blood, and the immunophenotype is virtually indistinguishable from that of B lymphoblasts. We discuss the case of a 3-month infant with an active cytomegalovirus infection, with hepatitis and pancytopenia associated with 13% hematogones in the bone marrow. PMID:21892313

  13. Clinical relevance of the plasma load of cytomegalovirus in patients infected with HIV--a survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Aramă, Victoria; Mihăilescu, Raluca; Rădulescu, Mihaela; Aramă, Sorin Ştefan; Streinu-Cercel, Adrian; Youle, Mike

    2014-11-01

    To investigate whether asymptomatic cytomegalovirus (CMV) viraemia impact the course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, this study evaluated the effect of CMV replication on progression of newly-diagnosed HIV infected individuals towards AIDS events and death. In a 3-year prospective study on co-infected patients, clinical, immunological, and virological tests were performed in a national reference hospital quarterly. CMV viraemia was quantified by RoboGene® HCMV DNA Quantification Kit (Analytik Jena, Germany), on ABI Prism® 7000 Sequence Detection System (Applied Biosystems, USA). One hundred and five patients were enrolled with a balanced sex distribution and a median age of 30.7 years. Median CD4(+) cell count at enrollment was 164/mm(3) and median HIV RNA 4.6 log10 copies/ml. Detectable CMV viraemia was found in 25.7% of the patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed progression of HIV infection to be significantly increased in those with active CMV replication and/or low CD4(+) cell count. Cox regression indicated the risk of developing new AIDS events was 2.6 times greater in patients with detectable CMV viraemia versus those without (CI95% 1-6.6; P = 0.04). Also in multivariate analysis, the overall risk of progression to AIDS events or death was 3-fold higher in those with detectable CMV viraemia (CI95% 1.3-6.7; P = 0.008) and 2.3-fold higher if CD4(+) cell count was below 100/mm(3) (CI95% 1-5.1; P = 0.04). In these young Romanian HIV-seropositives, active CMV replication increased morbidity, even when treated with combination antiretroviral therapy. Further studies are needed to evaluate if serial quantitative CMV-DNA levels might correlate with non-infectious inflammation-related risks in patients with HIV and active CMV infection. PMID:25087866

  14. Cytomegalovirus infection induces a stem cell phenotype in human primary glioblastoma cells: prognostic significance and biological impact.

    PubMed

    Fornara, O; Bartek, J; Rahbar, A; Odeberg, J; Khan, Z; Peredo, I; Hamerlik, P; Bartek, J; Stragliotto, G; Landázuri, N; Söderberg-Nauclér, C

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Unfortunately, this standard therapy does not target glioma cancer stem cells (GCSCs), a subpopulation of GBM cells that can give rise to recurrent tumors. GBMs express human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) proteins, and previously we found that the level of expression of HCMV immediate-early (IE) protein in GBMs is a prognostic factor for poor patient survival. In this study, we investigated the relation between HCMV infection of GBM cells and the presence of GCSCs. Primary GBMs were characterized by their expression of HCMV-IE and GCSCs marker CD133 and by patient survival. The extent to which HCMV infection of primary GBM cells induced a GCSC phenotype was evaluated in vitro. In primary GBMs, a large fraction of CD133-positive cells expressed HCMV-IE, and higher co-expression of these two proteins predicted poor patient survival. Infection of GBM cells with HCMV led to upregulation of CD133 and other GSCS markers (Notch1, Sox2, Oct4, Nestin). HCMV infection also promoted the growth of GBM cells as neurospheres, a behavior typically displayed by GCSCs, and this phenotype was prevented by either chemical inhibition of the Notch1 pathway or by treatment with the anti-viral drug ganciclovir. GBM cells that maintained expression of HCMV-IE failed to differentiate into neuronal or astrocytic phenotypes. Our findings imply that HCMV infection induces phenotypic plasticity of GBM cells to promote GCSC features and may thereby increase the aggressiveness of this tumor. PMID:26138445

  15. TLR9 -1486T/C and 2848C/T SNPs Are Associated with Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Paradowska, Edyta; Jabłońska, Agnieszka; Studzińska, Mirosława; Skowrońska, Katarzyna; Suski, Patrycja; Wiśniewska-Ligier, Małgorzata; Woźniakowska-Gęsicka, Teresa; Nowakowska, Dorota; Gaj, Zuzanna; Wilczyński, Jan; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes non-methylated viral CpG-containing DNA and serves as a pattern recognition receptor that signals the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Here, we present the genotype distribution of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TLR9 gene in infants and the relationship between TLR9 polymorphisms and HCMV infection. Four polymorphisms (-1237T/C, rs5743836; -1486T/C, rs187084; 1174G/A, rs352139; and 2848C/T, rs352140) in the TLR9 gene were genotyped in 72 infants with symptomatic HCMV infection and 70 healthy individuals. SNP genotyping was performed by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Digested fragments were separated and identified by capillary electrophoresis. The HCMV DNA copy number was measured by a quantitative real-time PCR assay. We found an increased frequency of heterozygous genotypes TLR9 -1486T/C and 2848C/T in infants with HCMV infection compared with uninfected cases. Heterozygous variants of these two SNPs increased the risk of HCMV disease in children (P = 0.044 and P = 0.029, respectively). In infants with a mutation present in at least one allele of -1486T/C and 2848C/T SNPs, a trend towards increased risk of cytomegaly was confirmed after Bonferroni’s correction for multiple testing (Pc = 0.063). The rs352139 GG genotype showed a significantly reduced relative risk for HCMV infection (Pc = 0.006). In contrast, the -1237T/C SNP was not related to viral infection. We found no evidence for linkage disequilibrium with the four examined TLR9 SNPs. The findings suggest that the TLR9 -1486T/C and 2848C/T polymorphisms could be a genetic risk factor for the development of HCMV disease. PMID:27105145

  16. Effect of cytomegalovirus infection on breastfeeding transmission of HIV and on the health of infants born to HIV-infected mothers

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tiffany S.; Wiener, Jeffrey; Dollard, Sheila C.; Amin, Minal M.; Ellington, Sascha; Chasela, Charles; Kayira, Dumbani; Tegha, Gerald; Kamwendo, Deborah; Jamieson, Denise J.; van der Horst, Charlie; Kourtis, Athena P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection can be acquired in utero or postnatally through horizontal transmission and breastfeeding. The effect of postnatal CMV infection on postnatal HIV transmission is unknown. Methods The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition study, conducted in Malawi, randomized 2369 mothers and their infants to three antiretroviral prophylaxis arms –mother (triple regimen), infant (nevirapine), or neither – for 28 weeks of breastfeeding, followed by weaning. Stored plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell specimens were available for 492 infants at 24 weeks and were tested with CMV PCR. Available samples from infants who were CMV PCR-positive at 24 weeks were also tested at birth (N = 242), and from infants PCR-negative at 24 weeks were tested at 48 weeks (N = 96). Cox proportional-hazards models were used to determine if CMV infection was associated with infant morbidity, mortality, or postnatal HIV acquisition. Results At 24 weeks of age, CMV DNA was detected in 345/492 infants (70.1%); the estimated congenital CMV infection rate was 2.3%, and the estimated rate of CMV infection at 48 weeks was 78.5%. CMV infection at 24 weeks was associated with subsequent HIV acquisition through breastfeeding or infant death between 24 and 48 weeks of age (hazard ratio 4.27, P = 0.05). Conclusion Most breastfed infants of HIV-infected mothers in this resource-limited setting are infected with CMV by 24 weeks of age. Early CMV infection may be a risk factor for subsequent infant HIV infection through breastfeeding, pointing to the need for comprehensive approaches in order to achieve elimination of breastfeeding transmission of HIV. PMID:25985405

  17. Excess apoptosis of mononuclear cells contributes to the depressed cytomegalovirus-specific immunity in HIV-infected patients on HAART

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Adriana . E-mail: Adriana.Weinberg@uchsc.edu; Jesser, Renee D.; Edelstein, Charles L.; Bill, Jerome R.; Wohl, David A.

    2004-12-05

    HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have persistently decreased cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific proliferative responses [lymphocyte proliferation assay (LPA)] in spite of increases in CD4+ T cell counts. Here we demonstrate an association between apoptosis of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (uPBMC) and decreased CMV-LPA. HAART recipients had more apoptosis of uPBMC than controls when measured by caspases 3, 8, and 9 activities and by annexin V binding. Patients with undetectable HIV replication maintained significantly higher apoptosis of CD4+ and CD14+ cells compared to controls. CMV-LPA decreased with higher apoptosis of uPBMC in patients only. This association was independent of CD4+ cell counts or HIV replication. Furthermore, rescuing PBMC from apoptosis with crmA, but not with TRAIL- or Fas-pathway blocking agents or with other caspase inhibitors, increased CMV-LPA in HAART recipients. This effect was not observed in uninfected controls, further indicating that the down regulatory effect of apoptosis on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was specifically associated with the HIV-infected status.

  18. Rat Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Prevents Accelerated Chronic Rejection in CMV-Naïve Recipients of Infected Donor Allograft Hearts.

    PubMed

    Streblow, D N; Hwee, Y K; Kreklywich, C N; Andoh, T; Denton, M; Smith, P; Hart, E; Broekel, R; Pallett, C; Rogers, K; Streblow, A D; Chuop, M; Perry, A; Slifka, M; Messaoudi, I; Orloff, S L

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus accelerates transplant vascular sclerosis (TVS) and chronic rejection (CR) in solid organ transplants; however, the mechanisms involved are unclear. We determined the efficacy of a CMV vaccine in preventing CMV-accelerated rat cardiac allograft rejection in naïve recipients of CMV+ donor hearts. F344 donor rats were infected with RCMV 5 days prior to heterotopic cardiac transplantation into CMV-naïve or H2 O2 -inactivated RCMV-vaccinated Lewis recipients. Recipients of RCMV-infected donor hearts rejected at POD59, whereas vaccinated recipients exhibited a significantly prolonged time to rejection-POD97, similar to recipients of uninfected donor hearts (POD108). Although all of the donor hearts were preinfected, the vaccinated recipients had lower graft and PBMC viral loads at POD 7 compared to unvaccinated controls. Adoptive T cell and passive antibody transfers from vaccinated Lewis rats into naïve recipients demonstrate that both T-cell and B-cell arms of the adaptive immune response provide protection against CMV-accelerated rejection. Similar findings were obtained when testing three different adjuvants in passive transfer experiments. We have determined that the timing of the vaccine prior to transplantation and the specific adjuvant play critical roles in mediating anti-viral responses and promoting graft survival. CMV vaccination prior to transplantation may effectively increase graft survival. PMID:25766876

  19. Clinical profile of hearing loss in children with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection: CMV DNA diagnosis using preserved umbilical cord

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major cause of bilateral and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in children, accounting for 9.0% of SNHL cases. The diagnostic rate using combined genetic deafness test and CMV DNA detection test was determined to be 46.4% in bilateral profound SNHL. Objectives. The present study investigated the prevalence of congenital CMV infection diagnosed retrospectively by detection of CMV DNA in dried umbilical cord specimens from children with unilateral or bilateral SNHL up to the age of 12 years. Methods: Preserved dried umbilical cords were collected from 134 children with bilateral (46 children) or unilateral (88 children) SNHL. DNA was extracted from the dried umbilical cords and CMV DNA was detected by quantitative PCR. Genetic deafness tests based on the invader assay were performed in children with bilateral SNHL. Results: CMV DNA from the dried umbilical cords was detected in 8.7% of the bilateral SNHL and 9.1% of unilateral SNHL. Deafness gene mutations were identified in 21.7% (10/46) of children with bilateral SNHL. PMID:21612560

  20. Vaccine-Derived Neutralizing Antibodies to the Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Pentamer Potently Block Primary Cytotrophoblast Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Johnson, Erica; Bian, Chao; Zhuo, Meng; Rajakumar, Augustine; Barry, Peter A.; Britt, William J.; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) elicits neutralizing antibodies (NAb) of various potencies and cell type specificities to prevent HCMV entry into fibroblasts (FB) and epithelial/endothelial cells (EpC/EnC). NAb targeting the major essential envelope glycoprotein complexes gB and gH/gL inhibit both FB and EpC/EnC entry. In contrast to FB infection, HCMV entry into EpC/EnC is additionally blocked by extremely potent NAb to conformational epitopes of the gH/gL/UL128/130/131A pentamer complex (PC). We recently developed a vaccine concept based on coexpression of all five PC subunits by a single modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector, termed MVA-PC. Vaccination of mice and rhesus macaques with MVA-PC resulted in a high titer and sustained NAb that blocked EpC/EnC infection and lower-titer NAb that inhibited FB entry. However, antibody function responsible for the neutralizing activity induced by the MVA-PC vaccine is uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that MVA-PC elicits NAb with cell type-specific neutralization potency and antigen recognition pattern similar to human NAb targeting conformational and linear epitopes of the UL128/130/131A subunits or gH. In addition, we show that the vaccine-derived PC-specific NAb are significantly more potent than the anti-gH NAb to prevent HCMV spread in EpC and infection of human placental cytotrophoblasts, cell types thought to be of critical importance for HCMV transmission to the fetus. These findings further validate MVA-PC as a clinical vaccine candidate to elicit NAb that resembles those induced during HCMV infection and provide valuable insights into the potency of PC-specific NAb to interfere with HCMV cell-associated spread and infection of key placental cells. IMPORTANCE As a consequence of the leading role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in causing permanent birth defects, developing a vaccine against HCMV has been assigned a major public health priority. We have recently introduced a vaccine strategy based

  1. Seroconversion for cytomegalovirus infection in a cohort of pregnant women in Québec, 2010-2013.

    PubMed

    Lamarre, V; Gilbert, N L; Rousseau, C; Gyorkos, T W; Fraser, W D

    2016-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the leading cause of congenital infection and non-genetic sensorineural hearing loss in children. There are no recent data on the incidence of CMV infection during pregnancy in Canada. This present study was undertaken to determine the seroprevalence of CMV IgG antibodies and the rate of seroconversion in a cohort of pregnant women in the province of Québec, Canada. We used serum samples and questionnaire data collected as part of the 3D Pregnancy and Birth Cohort Study (2010-2013) conducted in Québec, Canada. CMV IgG antibodies were determined in serum samples collected at the first and third trimesters. Associations between independent variables and seroprevalence were assessed using logistic regression, and associations with seroconversions, by Poisson regression. Of 1938 pregnant women tested, 40·4% were seropositive for CMV at baseline. Previous CMV infection was associated with: working as a daycare educator, lower education, lower income, having had children, first language other than French or English, and being born outside Canada or the United States. Of the 1122 initially seronegative women, 24 (2·1%) seroconverted between their first and third trimesters. The seroconversion rate was 1·4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·9-2·1]/10 000 person-days at risk or 3·9 (95% CI 2·5-5·9)/100 pregnancies (assuming a 280-day gestation). The high proportion of pregnant women susceptible to CMV infection (nearly 60%) and the subsequent rate of seroconversion are of concern. PMID:26686548

  2. Cytomegalovirus infection does not impact on survival or time to first treatment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parry, Helen Marie; Damery, Sarah; Hudson, Christopher; Maurer, Matthew J; Cerhan, James R; Pachnio, Annette; Begum, Jusnara; Slager, Susan L; Fegan, Christopher; Man, Stephen; Pepper, Christopher; Shanafelt, Tait D; Pratt, Guy; Moss, Paul A H

    2016-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widely prevalent herpes virus which establishes a state of chronic infection. The establishment of CMV-specific immunity controls viral reactivation and leads to the accumulation of very large numbers of virus-specific T cells which come to dominate the immune repertoire. There is concern that this may reduce the immune response to heterologous infections and HCMV infection has been associated with reduced survival in elderly people. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) suffer from a state of immune suppression but have a paradoxical increase in the magnitude of the CMV-specific T cell and humoral immune response. As such, there is now considerable interest in how CMV infection impacts on the clinical outcome of patients with B-CLL. Utilizing a large prospective cohort of patients with B-CLL (n = 347) we evaluated the relationship between HCMV seropositivity and patient outcome. HCMV seropositive patients had significantly worse overall survival than HCMV negative patients in univariate analysis (HR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.34-3.88; P = 0.002). However, CMV seropositive patients were 4 years older than seronegative donors and this survival difference was lost in multivariate modeling adjusted for age and other validated prognostic markers (P = 0.34). No significant difference was found in multivariate modeling between HCMV positive and negative patients in relation to the time to first treatment (HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 0.68-1.84; P = 0.65). These findings in a second independent cohort of 236 B-CLL patients were validated. In conclusion no evidence that HCMV impacts on the clinical outcome of patients with B-CLL was found. Am. J. Hematol. 91:776-781, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27124884

  3. Latent cytomegalovirus infection enhances anti-tumour cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C+ NK cells in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bigley, A B; Rezvani, K; Shah, N; Sekine, T; Balneger, N; Pistillo, M; Agha, N; Kunz, H; O'Connor, D P; Bollard, C M; Simpson, R J

    2016-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection markedly expands NKG2C+/NKG2A- NK cells, which are potent killers of infected cells expressing human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E. As HLA-E is also over-expressed in several haematological malignancies and CMV has been linked to a reduced risk of leukaemic relapse, we determined the impact of latent CMV infection on NK cell cytotoxicity against four tumour target cell lines with varying levels of HLA-E expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 (leukaemia origin) and U266 (multiple myeloma origin) target cells was strikingly greater in healthy CMV-seropositive donors than seronegative donors and was associated strongly with target cell HLA-E and NK cell NKG2C expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E transfected lymphoma target cells (221.AEH) was ∼threefold higher with CMV, while NK cell cytotoxicity against non-transfected 721.221 cells was identical between the CMV groups. NK cell degranulation (CD107a(+) ) and interferon (IFN)-γ production to 221.AEH cells was localized almost exclusively to the NKG2C subset, and antibody blocking of NKG2C completely eliminated the effect of CMV on NK cell cytotoxicity against 221.AEH cells. Moreover, 221.AEH feeder cells and interleukin (IL)-15 were found to expand NKG2C(+) /NKG2A(-) NK cells preferentially from CMV-seronegative donors and increase NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E(+) tumour cell lines. We conclude that latent CMV infection enhances NK cell cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C(+) NK cells, which may be beneficial in preventing the initiation and progression of haematological malignancies characterized by high HLA-E expression. PMID:26940026

  4. Management of Developmentally Disabled Children with Chronic Infections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    The nature of chronic infections in developmentally disabled children is reviewed, along with appropriate management strategies for care providers and implications for other children. Discussed are herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. (Author/JDD)

  5. The Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus MicroRNA MiR-UL148D during Latent Infection in Primary Myeloid Cells Inhibits Activin A-triggered Secretion of IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Betty; Poole, Emma; Krishna, Benjamin; Sellart, Immaculada; Wills, Mark R.; Murphy, Eain; Sinclair, John

    2016-01-01

    The successful establishment and maintenance of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is dependent on the expression of a subset of viral genes. Whilst the exact spectrum and functions of these genes are far from clear, inroads have been made for protein-coding genes. In contrast, little is known about the expression of non-coding RNAs. Here we show that HCMV encoded miRNAs are expressed de novo during latent infection of primary myeloid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-UL148D, one of the most highly expressed viral miRNAs during latent infection, directly targets the cellular receptor ACVR1B of the activin signalling axis. Consistent with this, we observed upregulation of ACVR1B expression during latent infection with a miR-UL148D deletion virus (ΔmiR-UL148D). Importantly, we observed that monocytes latently infected with ΔmiR-UL148D are more responsive to activin A stimulation, as demonstrated by their increased secretion of IL-6. Collectively, our data indicates miR-UL148D inhibits ACVR1B expression in latently infected cells to limit proinflammatory cytokine secretion, perhaps as an immune evasion strategy or to postpone cytokine-induced reactivation until conditions are more favourable. This is the first demonstration of an HCMV miRNA function during latency in primary myeloid cells, implicating that small RNA species may contribute significantly to latent infection. PMID:27491954

  6. Maintenance of Large Numbers of Virus Genomes in Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected T98G Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Ying-Liang; Ye, Han-Qing; Zavala, Anamaria G.; Yang, Cui-Qing; Miao, Ling-Feng; Fu, Bi-Shi; Seo, Keun Seok; Davrinche, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT After infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists for life. Primary infections and reactivation of latent virus can both result in congenital infection, a leading cause of central nervous system birth defects. We previously reported long-term HCMV infection in the T98G glioblastoma cell line (1). HCMV infection has been further characterized in T98Gs, emphasizing the presence of HCMV DNA over an extended time frame. T98Gs were infected with either HCMV Towne or AD169-IE2-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) strains. Towne infections yielded mixed IE1 antigen-positive and -negative (Ag+/Ag−) populations. AD169-IE2-eGFP infections also yielded mixed populations, which were sorted to obtain an IE2− (Ag−) population. Viral gene expression over the course of infection was determined by immunofluorescent analysis (IFA) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The presence of HCMV genomes was determined by PCR, nested PCR (n-PCR), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Compared to the HCMV latency model, THP-1, Towne-infected T98Gs expressed IE1 and latency-associated transcripts for longer periods, contained many more HCMV genomes during early passages, and carried genomes for a greatly extended period of passaging. Large numbers of HCMV genomes were also found in purified Ag− AD169-infected cells for the first several passages. Interestingly, latency transcripts were observed from very early times in the Towne-infected cells, even when IE1 was expressed at low levels. Although AD169-infected Ag− cells expressed no detectable levels of either IE1 or latency transcripts, they also maintained large numbers of genomes within the cell nuclei for several passages. These results identify HCMV-infected T98Gs as an attractive new model in the study of the long-term maintenance of virus genomes in the context of neural cell types. IMPORTANCE Our previous work showed that T98G glioblastoma cells were semipermissive to HCMV infection; virus

  7. Monocyte Phenotype and Polyfunctionality Are Associated With Elevated Soluble Inflammatory Markers, Cytomegalovirus Infection, and Functional and Cognitive Decline in Elderly Adults.

    PubMed

    de Pablo-Bernal, Rebeca Sara; Cañizares, Julio; Rosado, Isaac; Galvá, María Isabel; Alvarez-Ríos, Ana Isabel; Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Rafii-El-Idrissi Benhnia, Mohammed; Pacheco, Yolanda María; Ramos, Raquel; Leal, Manuel; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel

    2016-05-01

    Monocytes are mediators of the inflammatory response and include three subsets: classical, intermediate, and nonclassical. Little is known about the phenotypical and functional age-related changes in monocytes and their association with soluble inflammatory biomarkers, cytomegalovirus infection, and functional and mental decline. We assayed the activation ex vivo and the responsiveness to TLR2 and TLR4 agonists in vitro in the three subsets and assessed the intracellular production of IL1-alpha (α), IL1-beta (β), IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 of elderly adults (median 83 [67-90] years old;n= 20) compared with young controls (median 35 [27-40] years old;n= 20). Ex vivo, the elderly adults showed a higher percentage of classical monocytes that expressed intracellular IL1-α (p= .001), IL1-β (p= .001), IL-6 (p= .002), and IL-8 (p= .007). Similar results were obtained both for the intermediate and nonclassical subsets and in vitro. Polyfunctionality was higher in the elderly adults. The functionality ex vivo was strongly associated with soluble inflammatory markers. The activation phenotype was independently associated with the anti-cytomegalovirus IgG levels and with functional and cognitive decline. These data demonstrate that monocytes are key cell candidates for the source of the high soluble inflammatory levels. Our findings suggest that cytomegalovirus infection might be a driving force in the activation of monocytes and is associated with the functional and cognitive decline. PMID:26286603

  8. Successful treatment with foscarnet for ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus infection in a kidney transplant recipient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Daiki; Ogawa, Yayoi; Fujita, Hiromi; Morita, Ken; Sasaki, Hajime; Oishi, Yuichiro; Higuchi, Haruka; Hatanaka, Kanako; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2016-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common infectious complication following solid organ transplantation. Ganciclovir (GCV)-resistant CMV infection may be fatal, and is difficult to treat while avoiding allograft rejection. A 31-year-old woman received a second ABO-incompatible kidney transplant, from her father. Induction therapy consisted of basiliximab and rituximab followed by maintenance immunosuppression with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and methylprednisolone. Her CMV serostatus was D(+) /R(-) at second transplant and she received prophylactic low-dose valganciclovir (VGCV). BK polyoma virus nephropathy (BKVN) developed 7 months after transplant concurrent with CMV hepatitis and retinitis. VGCV was increased to a therapeutic dose combined with reduced immunosuppression with minimal methylprednisolone (2 mg/day) and everolimus (0.5 mg/day). However, pp65 antigenaemia continued to increase for 6 weeks. Her CMV was defined as ganciclovir (GCV)-resistant. Foscarnet was therefore administered and her CMV disease resolved within 2 weeks. Kidney allograft dysfunction developed 9 months after transplant, and graft biopsy showed tubulointerstitial injury with crystal deposition suggesting foscarnet nephrotoxicity, with no findings of BKVN or rejection. Kidney function recovered after cessation of foscarnet and the patient had good graft function 18 months after transplant. This case demonstrates the successful use of foscarnet to treat GCV-resistant CMV infection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplant complicated with BKVN, without acute allograft rejection. This case further highlights the need to establish appropriate management for CMV D(+) /R(-) patients to avoid the acquisition of GCV-resistant gene mutations. PMID:26970406

  9. Murine cytomegalovirus perturbs endosomal trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in the early phase of infection.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Maja Ilić; Kucić, Natalia; Mahmutefendić, Hana; Blagojević, Gordana; Lucin, Pero

    2010-11-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) functions interfere with protein trafficking in the secretory pathway. In this report we used Δm138-MCMV, a recombinant virus with a deleted viral Fc receptor, to demonstrate that MCMV also perturbs endosomal trafficking in the early phase of infection. This perturbation had a striking impact on cell surface-resident major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules due to the complementary effect of MCMV immunoevasins, which block their egress from the secretory pathway. In infected cells, constitutively endocytosed cell surface-resident MHC-I molecules were arrested and retained in early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1)-positive and lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA)-negative perinuclear endosomes together with clathrin-dependent cargo (transferrin receptor, Lamp1, and epidermal growth factor receptor). Their progression from these endosomes into recycling and degradative routes was inhibited. This arrest was associated with a reduction of the intracellular content of Rab7 and Rab11, small GTPases that are essential for the maturation of recycling and endolysosomal domains of early endosomes. The reduced recycling of MHC-I in Δm138-MCMV-infected cells was accompanied by their accelerated loss from the cell surface. The MCMV function that affects cell surface-resident MHC-I was activated in later stages of the early phase of viral replication, after the expression of known immunoevasins. MCMV without the three immunoevasins (the m04, m06, and m152 proteins) encoded a function that affects endosomal trafficking. This function, however, was not sufficient to reduce the cell surface expression of MHC-I in the absence of the transport block in the secretory pathway. PMID:20719942

  10. Pp65 antigenemia, plasma real-time PCR and DBS test in symptomatic and asymptomatic cytomegalovirus congenitally infected newborns

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many congenitally cytomegalovirus-infected (cCMV) neonates are at risk for severe consequences, even if they are asymptomatic at birth. The assessment of the viral load in neonatal blood could help in identifying the babies at risk of sequelae. Methods In the present study, we elaborated the results obtained on blood samples collected in the first two weeks of life from 22 symptomatic and 48 asymptomatic newborns with cCMV diagnosed through urine testing. We evaluated the performances of two quantitative methods (pp65 antigenemia test and plasma Real-time PCR) and the semi-quantitative results of dried blood sample (DBS) test in the aim of identifying a valid method for measuring viral load. Results Plasma qPCR and DBS tests were positive in 100% of cases, antigenemia in 81%. Only the latter test gave quantitatively different results in symptomatic versus asymptomatic children. qPCR values of 103 copies/ml were found in 52% of newborn. "Strong" DBS test positivity cases had higher median values of both pp65 positive PBL and DNA copies/ml than cases with a "weak" positivity. Conclusions As expected antigenemia test was less sensitive than molecular tests and DBS test performed better on samples with higher rates of pp65 positive PBL and higher numbers of DNA copies/ml. The prognostic significance of the results of these tests will be evaluated on completion of the ongoing collection of follow-up data of these children. PMID:20149232

  11. Disease burden of congenital cytomegalovirus infection at school entry age: study design, participation rate and birth prevalence.

    PubMed

    Korndewal, M J; Vossen, A C T M; Cremer, J; VAN Binnendijk, R S; Kroes, A C M; VAN DER Sande, M A B; Oudesluys-Murphy, A M; DE Melker, H E

    2016-05-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection (cCMV) may lead to symptoms at birth and long-term consequences. We present a nationwide, retrospective cohort study on the outcome of cCMV up to age 6 years. For this study we identified cCMV, using polymerase chain reaction, by analysing dried blood spots, which are taken shortly after birth for neonatal screening. The group of children with cCMV were compared to a group of children who were cCMV negative at birth. Data were collected about their health and development up to age 6 years. Parents of 73 693 children were invited to participate, and 32 486 (44·1%) gave informed consent for testing of their child's dried blood spot for CMV. Of the 31 484 dried blood spots tested, 156 (0·5%) were positive for cCMV. Of these, four (2·6%) children had been diagnosed with cCMV prior to this study. This unique retrospective nationwide study permits the estimation of long-term sequelae of cCMV up to the age of 6 years. The birth prevalence of cCMV in this study was 0·5%, which is in line with prior estimates. Most (97·4%) children with cCMV had not been diagnosed earlier, indicating under-diagnosis of cCMV. PMID:26554756

  12. Application of PCR to multiple specimen types for diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection: comparison with cell culture and shell vial assay.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Bovey, S; Pado, K; Bruckner, D A; Wagar, E A

    1994-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a herpesvirus that is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in congenitally infected infants and immunocompromised patients. Antiviral therapies are available, thus making timely diagnosis of significant importance to at-risk patients. A PCR system was devised. The newly devised system, unlike previously described systems, can be applied to a wide variety of specimen types in a clinical microbiology laboratory setting. Specimens from all sites routinely accepted for CMV culture were shown to be acceptable for CMV PCR. Sensitivity and specificity were established in comparison with those of both monolayer culture and shell vial assay (SVA). The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for detection of CMV in specimens exclusive of urine and blood were 97.5 (77 of 79 specimens) and 87.2% (41 of 47 specimens), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for urine and blood specimens were 100 (10 of 10) and 95.7% (45 of 47) and 66.7 (4 of 6) and 78.8% (41 of 52), respectively. Discrepancies of positive PCR results with negative culture or SVA results occurred for specimens flanked chronologically by other culture- or SVA-positive specimens and were likely culture failures, increasing the specificity (100%) of PCR. Discrepancies of negative PCR results with positive culture or SVA results occurred in specimens with few cells or infectious foci by SVA or culture and may represent sampling variability associated with low virus titers. PMID:8126204

  13. Diagnosis of children’s attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its association with cytomegalovirus infection with ADHD: a historical review

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Xia, Qun; Shen, Huaiyun; Yang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yongli; Xu, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    As the most common mental disorder identified in children and teenagers, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects millions of children and their families, making it a critical health issue worldwide. This article reviewed the historical opinions about the diagnosis of ADHD and defined different subtypes of this disorder. It also summarized the current diagnostic criteria and available medications. After re-visiting the etiology of ADHD in the sense of both genetic and environment factors, it was further hypothesized that viral infection might be involved in ADHD pathogenesis. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection may be associated with ADHD, although both clinical observations and animal studies need to be performed for validation. PMID:26550354

  14. Immunosuppressive effect of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Loh, L; Hudson, J B

    1980-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus suppressed the ability of spleen cells to respond to mitogens in vitro. The degree of suppression was proportional to the multiplicity of infection. This effect could not be explained by cytolysis of lymphocytes, an alteration in the kinetics of the response to mitogen, or a direct competition between virions and mitogen molecules for cell-surface receptors. Nor was it due to simple contact between cell and virus, since ultraviolet-inactivated murine cytomegalovirus failed to suppress the response to mitogens. Reconstitution experiments were performed which involved mixing various combinations of infected and uninfected macrophages and lymphocytes. Under these conditions, it was found that the infected macrophages and lymphocytes. Under these conditions, it was found that the infected macrophages had an impaired capacity to mediate the response ot T lymphocytes to concanavalin A. This suggests that murine cytomegalovirus may cause immunosuppression indirectly by interfering with macrophage function. PMID:6244228

  15. Triple drug immunosuppression significantly reduces immune activation and allograft arteriosclerosis in cytomegalovirus-infected rat aortic allografts and induces early latency of viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lemström, K. B.; Bruning, J. H.; Bruggeman, C. A.; Lautenschlager, I. T.; Häyry, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of triple drug immunosuppression (cyclosporine A 10 mg/kg/day+methylprednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day+azathioprine 2 mg/kg/day) on rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV)-enhanced allograft arteriosclerosis was investigated applying WF (AG-B2, RT1v) recipients of DA (AG-B4, RT1a) aortic allografts. The recipients were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(5) plaque-forming units of RCMV 1 day after transplantation or left noninfected. The grafts were removed on 7 and 14 days, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. The presence of viral infection was demonstrated by plaque assays, cell proliferation by [3H]thymidine autoradiography, and vascular wall alterations by quantitative histology and immunohistochemistry. Triple drug immunosuppression reduced the presence of infectious virus in plaque assays and induced early latency of viral infection. It significantly reduced the peak adventitial inflammatory response (P < 0.05) and reduced and delayed intimal nuclear intensity and intimal thickening (P < 0.05) in RCMV-infected allografts. The proliferative response of smooth muscle cells was reduced by triple drug immunosuppression to 50% of that observed in nonimmunosuppressed RCMV-infected allografts, but still the proliferative peak response was seen at 1 month. Only low level immune activation, ie, the expression of interleukin-2 receptor (P < 0.05) and MHC class II, was observed under triple drug immunosuppression in the adventitia of RCMV-infected allografts, whereas there was no substantial change in the phenotypic distribution of inflammatory cells. In conclusion, although RCMV infection significantly enhances allograft arteriosclerosis also in immunosuppressed allografts, triple drug immunosuppression has no additional detrimental effect but rather a protective one on vascular wall histology. These results further suggest that RCMV-enhanced allograft arteriosclerosis may be an immunopathological condition linked to the host immune response toward the graft and

  16. Long-term results of oral valganciclovir for treatment of anterior segment inflammation secondary to cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victoria WY; Chan, Carmen KM; Leung, Dexter YL; Lai, Timothy YY

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of oral valganciclovir in the treatment of anterior segment inflammation caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Methods Consecutive patients with anterior segment inflammation due to CMV causing anterior uveitis or corneal endotheliitis treated with oral valganciclovir were reviewed. Diagnosis of CMV infection was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous aspirate prior to commencement of oral valganciclovir. All patients were treated with an oral loading dose of 900 mg valganciclovir twice daily for at least 2 weeks, followed by an additional 450 mg valganciclovir twice-daily maintenance therapy. Changes in visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), use of antiglaucomatous eye drops, and recurrence were analyzed. Results Thirteen eyes of 11 patients were followed for a mean of 17.2 months. Two patients had bilateral corneal endotheliitis. All eyes had absence of anterior segment inflammation within 3 weeks after treatment. Following treatment, the mean logMAR visual acuity improved significantly from 0.58 at baseline to 0.37 at the last follow-up (P = 0.048). The mean IOP and number of antiglaucomatous eye drops also decreased significantly (P = 0.021 and P = 0.004, respectively). Five (38.5%) eyes had recurrence of anterior uveitis after valganciclovir was stopped and required retreatment with oral valganciclovir. Conclusion Oral valganciclovir appeared to be effective in controlling CMV anterior uveitis, resulting in visual improvement and IOP reduction following control of inflammation. However, despite the initial clinical response in all cases, recurrence after cessation of oral valganciclovir could occur. PMID:22553419

  17. Opportunistic infections (non-cytomegalovirus) in live related renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, P. B.; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of review was increasing number of opportunistic infections with use of newer immunosuppression and difficulty in diagnosis and management of such patients. For this review, MEDLINE database was searched from 2000 to 2006 with the keywords of opportunistic infections in renal transplantation. Opportunistic infection is a serious clinical complication in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy after kidney transplantation. The two major factors for successful renal transplantation are better control of rejection and better prevention and treatment of infection. In renal allograft recipient, immunosuppressive drug therapy is the major cause of immunocompromised status and occurrence of infections, which arise most commonly as a result of invasion by endogenous opportunists. The opportunistic infections with varicella zoster viruses, parvovirus B-19, polyomavirus, nocardia and mucormycosis in immunosuppressed patients were present with severe complications that are reviewed in this article. As a result of use of strong immunosuppressive drugs like tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetyl and antirejection therapy with antithymocyte globulins, these infections are now seen frequently, so they should always be included in differential diagnostic consideration. New diagnostic procedures and new treatment strategies are required to allow early detection and successful treatment of opportunistic infections in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:19672339

  18. Trehalose, an mTOR-Independent Inducer of Autophagy, Inhibits Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in Multiple Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Belzile, Jean-Philippe; Sabalza, Maite; Craig, Megan; Clark, Elizabeth; Morello, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the major viral cause of birth defects and a serious problem in immunocompromised individuals and has been associated with atherosclerosis. Previous studies have shown that the induction of autophagy can inhibit the replication of several different types of DNA and RNA viruses. The goal of the work presented here was to determine whether constitutive activation of autophagy would also block replication of HCMV. Most prior studies have used agents that induce autophagy via inhibition of the mTOR pathway. However, since HCMV infection alters the sensitivity of mTOR kinase-containing complexes to inhibitors, we sought an alternative method of inducing autophagy. We chose to use trehalose, a nontoxic naturally occurring disaccharide that is found in plants, insects, microorganisms, and invertebrates but not in mammals and that induces autophagy by an mTOR-independent mechanism. Given the many different cell targets of HCMV, we proceeded to determine whether trehalose would inhibit HCMV infection in human fibroblasts, aortic artery endothelial cells, and neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. We found that in all of these cell types, trehalose induces autophagy and inhibits HCMV gene expression and production of cell-free virus. Treatment of HCMV-infected neural cells with trehalose also inhibited production of cell-associated virus and partially blocked the reduction in neurite growth and cytomegaly. These results suggest that activation of autophagy by the natural sugar trehalose or other safe mTOR-independent agents might provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating HCMV disease. IMPORTANCE HCMV infects multiple cell types in vivo, establishes lifelong persistence in the host, and can cause serious health problems for fetuses and immunocompromised individuals. HCMV, like all other persistent pathogens, has to finely tune its interplay with the host cellular machinery to replicate efficiently and evade

  19. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Congenital CMV Infection: People with Weakened Immune Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Feature on Prenatal Infections People with Weakened Immune Systems Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... disease in immunocompromised persons (meaning people with weakened immune systems), such as organ and bone marrow transplant recipients, ...

  20. Carotid atherosclerosis, cytomegalovirus infection, and cognitive decline in the very old: a community-based prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Midori; Arai, Yasumichi; Takayama, Michiyo; Hirata, Takumi; Takayama, Midori; Abe, Yukiko; Niimura, Hidehito; Mimura, Masaru; Takebayashi, Toru; Hirose, Nobuyoshi

    2016-04-01

    To investigate various risk factors of cognitive decline in the very old, we studied 494 subjects over 85 years old without diagnosis of dementia at baseline from the Tokyo Oldest Old Survey on Total Health, an ongoing, community-based cohort in Japan. Cognitive function was assessed at baseline and at 3-year follow-up using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Plasma samples were assayed for levels of cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and blood chemistry. Carotid artery plaques were measured using an ultrasonography. In the cross-sectional analyses using Tobit regression, individuals with high carotid artery plaque score (≥5.0) had MMSE scores that were 1.08 points lower compared to those with no plaque (95 % confidence interval (CI) -1.95 to -0.20; p = 0.016), adjusted for age, sex, and education. Individuals with CMV IgG titers in the highest quartile had MMSE scores that were 1.47 points lower compared to individuals in the lowest quartile (95 % CI -2.44 to -0.50; p = 0.003). CMV and carotid atherosclerosis showed evidence of an interaction, where the association between CMV and MMSE was present only in subjects with carotid artery plaque. In the longitudinal analyses using linear regression, carotid atherosclerosis, smoking, low grip strength, and poor activities of daily living (ADL) status were associated with faster cognitive decline, adjusted for age, sex, education, and baseline cognitive function. Our findings suggest that carotid atherosclerosis is consistently associated with low cognitive function in the very old and modifies the association between latent CMV infection and cognition. PMID:26886582

  1. Bicaudal D1-Dependent Trafficking of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Protein pp150 in Virus-Infected Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Indran, Sabarish V.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Britt, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) virion assembly takes place in the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected cells. The HCMV virion tegument protein pp150 (ppUL32) is an essential protein of HCMV and has been suggested to play a role in the cytoplasmic phase of HCMV assembly. To further define its role in viral assembly and to identify host cell proteins that interact with pp150 during viral assembly, we utilized yeast two-hybrid analyses to detect an interaction between pp150 and Bicaudal D1 (BicD1), a protein thought to play a role in trafficking within the secretory pathway. BicD1 is known to interact with the dynein motor complex and the Rab6 GTPase. The interaction between pp150 and BicD1 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Depletion of BicD1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) caused decreased virus yield and a defect in trafficking of pp150 to the cytoplasmic viral assembly compartment (AC), without altering trafficking to the AC of another essential tegument protein, pp28, or the viral glycoprotein complex gM/gN. The C terminus of BicD1 has been previously shown to interact with the GTPase Rab6, suggesting a potential role for Rab6-mediated vesicular trafficking in HCMV assembly. Finally, overexpression of the N terminus of truncated BicD1 acts in a dominant-negative manner and leads to disruption of the AC and a decrease in the assembly of infectious virus. This phenotype was similar to that observed following overexpression of dynamitin (p50) and provided additional evidence that morphogenesis of the AC and virus assembly were dynein dependent. PMID:20089649

  2. Cytomegalovirus infection in patients with sepsis due to bloodstream infections: lower risk and better outcomes in new versus already hospitalised intensive care unit admissions.

    PubMed

    R, Osawa; M, Wagener; Ns, Singh

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have examined cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation exclusively in immunocompetent patients with sepsis due to bloodstream infections. In a cohort of CMV-seropositive critically ill otherwise non-immunosuppressed patients with sepsis due to bloodstream infection, weekly testing for CMV viraemia was performed. Outcomes were assessed at 30 days or until death/discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU). CMV viraemia developed in 20% (20/100) of the patients. Age (P=0.044) and blood transfusions (P=0.022) were significantly associated with CMV viraemia. There was no difference in the primary endpoint (mortality and/or multi-organ failure) between patients with and without CMV viraemia (P=0.49). However, CMV viraemia was associated with significantly fewer ICU-free days (P=0.023) and fewer ventilator-free days (P=0.031). Patients hospitalised in the ICU for more than 48 hours prior to the onset of bloodstream infection were more likely to develop CMV viraemia (P=0.006), have high-grade viraemia (P=0.010), and fewer ICU-free days (P=0.018) and ventilator-free days (P=0.029) than those admitted within 48 hours of bloodstream infection. Thus, CMV reactivation was associated with fewer ICU- and ventilator-free days, however overall mortality was not affected. Patients already in the ICU at the onset of sepsis had higher risk of CMV reactivation and worse outcomes than new ICU-bound patients suggesting that a targeted approach for interventions for CMV could conceivably be directed towards those with a more protracted course of illness. PMID:27608339

  3. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection in inflammatory bowel disease: Need for mucosal viral load measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Paolucci, Stefania; Campanini, Giulia; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the best diagnostic technique and risk factors of the human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A cohort of 40 IBD patients (17 refractory) and 40 controls underwent peripheral blood and endoscopic colonic mucosal sample harvest. Viral infection was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and correlations with clinical and endoscopic indexes of activity, and risk factors were investigated. RESULTS: All refractory patients carried detectable levels of HCMV and/or EBV mucosal load as compared to 13/23 (56.5%) non-refractory and 13/40 (32.5%) controls. The median DNA value was significantly higher in refractory (HCMV 286 and EBV 5.440 copies/105 cells) than in non-refractory (HCMV 0 and EBV 6 copies/105 cells; P < 0.05 and < 0.001) IBD patients and controls (HCMV and EBV 0 copies/105 cells; P < 0.001 for both). Refractory patients showed DNA peak values ≥ 103 copies/105 cells in diseased mucosa in comparison to non-diseased mucosa (P < 0.0121 for HCMV and < 0.0004 for EBV), while non-refractory patients and controls invariably displayed levels below this threshold, thus allowing us to differentiate viral colitis from mucosal infection. Moreover, the mucosal load positively correlated with the values found in the peripheral blood, whilst no correlation with the number of positive cells at immunohistochemistry was found. Steroid use was identified as a significant risk factor for both HCMV (P = 0.018) and EBV (P = 0.002) colitis. Finally, a course of specific antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was successful in all refractory patients with HCMV colitis, whilst refractory patients with EBV colitis did not show any improvement despite steroid tapering and discontinuation of the other medications. CONCLUSION: Viral colitis appeared to contribute to mucosal lesions in refractory IBD, and its correct diagnosis and management require

  4. Latent infection of myeloid progenitors by human cytomegalovirus protects cells from FAS-mediated apoptosis through the cellular IL-10/PEA-15 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jonathan C. H.; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection of primary CD34+ progenitor cells by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in their increased survival in the face of pro-apoptotic signals. For instance, we have shown previously that primary myeloid cells are refractory to FAS-mediated killing and that cellular IL-10 (cIL-10) is an important survival factor for this effect. However, how cIL-10 mediates this protection is unclear. Here, we have shown that cIL-10 signalling leading to upregulation of the cellular factor PEA-15 mediates latency-associated protection of CD34+ progenitor cells from the extrinsic death pathway. PMID:25957098

  5. Progress in the prevention of cytomegalovirus infection after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Devergie, A; Traineau, R; Esperou-Bourdeau, H; Ribaud, P; Socié, G; Richard, P; Selimi, F; Hirsch, I; Gluckman, E

    1994-01-01

    There has been substantial progress in preventing and treating CMV infection. Prophylaxis with CMV screened blood products, IVIG and antiviral drugs (high dose acyclovir and/or Ganciclovir) considerably reduce the incidence of CMV disease and nearly eliminate CMV pneumonia after allogeneic BMT. PMID:8177726

  6. Congenital TORCH Infections in Infants and Young Children: Neurodevelopmental Sequelae and Implications for Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, M. Katherine; Sandall, Susan R.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes TORCH infections, a congenital cluster of infections including toxoplasmosis, syphilis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes which often results in developmental disabilities for infected children. Methods of transmission, incidence, and developmental outcomes for common TORCH infections are described, as are program…

  7. Mucosal and Parenteral Vaccination against Acute and Latent Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) Infection by Using an Attenuated MCMV Mutant

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Margaret R.; Li, Xi-Yang; Stenberg, Richard M.; Campbell, Ann E.; Virgin, Herbert W.

    1998-01-01

    We used a live attenuated murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) mutant to analyze mechanisms of vaccination against acute and latent CMV infection. We selected MCMV mutant RV7 as a vaccine candidate since this virus grows well in tissue culture but is profoundly attenuated for growth in normal and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice (V. J. Cavanaugh et al., J. Virol. 70:1365–1374, 1996). BALB/c mice were immunized twice (0 and 14 days) subcutaneously (s.c.) with tissue culture-passaged RV7 and then challenged with salivary gland-passaged wild-type MCMV (sgMCMV) intraperitoneally (i.p.) on day 28. RV7 vaccination protected mice against challenge with 105 PFU of sgMCMV, a dose that killed 100% of mock-vaccinated mice. RV7 vaccination reduced MCMV replication 100- to 500-fold in the spleen between 1 and 8 days after challenge. We used the capacity to control replication of MCMV in the spleen 4 days after challenge as a surrogate for protection. Protection was antigen specific and required both live RV7 and antigen-specific lymphocytes. Interestingly, RV7 was effective when administered s.c., i.p., perorally, intranasally, and intragastrically, demonstrating that attenuated CMV applied to mucosal surfaces can elicit protection against parenteral virus challenge. B cells and immunoglobulin G were not essential for RV7-induced immunity since B-cell-deficient mice were effectively vaccinated by RV7. CD8 T cells, but not CD4 T cells, were critical for RV7-induced protection. Depletion of CD8 T cells by passive transfer of monoclonal anti-CD8 (but not anti-CD4) antibody abrogated RV7-mediated protection, and RV7 vaccination was less efficient in CD8 T-cell-deficient mice with a targeted mutation in the β2-microglobulin gene. Although gamma interferon is important for innate resistance to MCMV, it was not essential for RV7 vaccination since gamma interferon receptor-deficient mice were protected by RV7 vaccination. Establishment of and/or reactivation from latency by sg

  8. Single Chain Antibodies Against gp55 of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) for Prophylaxis and Treatment of HCMV Infections

    PubMed Central

    Moazen, Bahareh; Ebrahimi, Elahe; Nejatollahi, Foroogh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Immunotherapy is a promising prospective new treatment for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections. Neutralizing effects have been reported using monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant single chain antibodies (scFvs) due to their advantages over monoclonal antibodies are potential alternatives and provide valuable clinical agents. Objectives: The aim of this study was to select specific single chain antibodies against gp55 of CMV and to evaluate their neutralizing effects. In the present study, we selected specific single chain antibodies against glycoprotein 55 (gp55) of CMV for their use in treatment and diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Single chain antibodies specific against an epitope located in the C-terminal part of gp55 were selected from a phage antibody display library. After four rounds of panning, twenty clones were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fingerprinted by MvaI restriction enzyme. The reactivities of the specific clones were tested by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the neutralizing effects were evaluated by the plaque reduction assay. Results: Fingerprinting of selected clones revealed three specific single chain antibodies (scFv1, scFv2 and scFv3) with frequencies 25%, 20 and 20%. The clones produced positive ELISA with the corresponding peptide. The percentages of plaque reduction for scFv1, scFv2 and scFv3 were 23.7, 68.8 and 11.6, respectively. Conclusions: Gp55 of human CMV is considered as an important candidate for immunotherapy. In this study, we selected three specific clones against gp55. The scFvs reacted only with the corresponding peptide in a positive ELISA. The scFv2 with 68.8% neutralizing effect showed the potential to be considered for prophylaxis and treatment of CMV infections, especially in solid organ transplant recipients, for whom treatment of CMV is urgently needed. The scFv2 with neutralizing effect of 68.8%, has the potential to be considered for treatment of these patients

  9. Results of a Quality Assurance Program for Detection of Cytomegalovirus Infection in the Pediatric Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Complications of Vertically Transmitted Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Study

    PubMed Central

    Demmler, Gail J.; Istas, Allison; Easley, Kirk A.; Kovacs, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    A quality assurance program was established by the Pediatric Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Complications of Vertically Transmitted Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection Study Group for monitoring cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibody and culture results obtained from nine different participating laboratories. Over a 3-year period, every 6 months, each laboratory was sent by the designated reference laboratory six coded samples: three urine samples for CMV detection and three serum samples for CMV immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibody determination. Overall, the participating laboratories exhibited the following composite performance statistics, relative to the reference laboratory (sensitivity and specificity, respectively): 100 and 97.4% for CMV cultures, 95.5 and 94.4% for CMV IgG antibody assays, and 92.6 and 90.2% for CMV IgM assays. The practice of having individual laboratories use different commercial methods and reagents for CMV detection and antibody determination was successfully monitored and provided useful information on the comparable performance of different assays. PMID:11060049

  10. Influenza Vaccination Generates Cytokine-Induced Memory-like NK Cells: Impact of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goodier, Martin R.; Rodriguez-Galan, Ana; Lusa, Chiara; Nielsen, Carolyn M.; Darboe, Alansana; Moldoveanu, Ana L.; White, Matthew J.; Behrens, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells are activated by cytokines, immune complexes, and signals transduced via activating ligands on other host cells. After vaccination, or during secondary infection, adaptive immune responses can enhance both cytokine-driven and Ab-dependent NK cell responses. However, induction of NK cells for enhanced function after in vitro exposure to innate inflammatory cytokines has also been reported and may synergize with adaptive signals to potentiate NK cell activity during infection or vaccination. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of seasonal influenza vaccination on NK cell function and phenotype in 52 previously unvaccinated individuals. Enhanced, IL-2–dependent, NK cell IFN-γ responses to Influenza A/California/7/2009 virus were detected up to 4 wk postvaccination and higher in human CMV (HCMV)-seronegative (HCMV−) individuals than in HCMV-seropositive (HCMV+) individuals. By comparison, robust NK cell degranulation responses were observed both before and after vaccination, due to high titers of naturally occurring anti-influenza Abs in human plasma, and did not differ between HCMV+ and HCMV− subjects. In addition to these IL-2–dependent and Ab-dependent responses, NK cell responses to innate cytokines were also enhanced after influenza vaccination; this was associated with proliferation of CD57− NK cells and was most evident in HCMV+ subjects. Similar enhancement of cytokine responsiveness was observed when NK cells were cocultured in vitro with Influenza A/California/7/2009 virus, and this was at least partially dependent upon IFN-αβR2. In summary, our data indicate that attenuated or live viral vaccines promote cytokine-induced memory-like NK cells and that this process is influenced by HCMV infection. PMID:27233958

  11. Influenza Vaccination Generates Cytokine-Induced Memory-like NK Cells: Impact of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Goodier, Martin R; Rodriguez-Galan, Ana; Lusa, Chiara; Nielsen, Carolyn M; Darboe, Alansana; Moldoveanu, Ana L; White, Matthew J; Behrens, Ron; Riley, Eleanor M

    2016-07-01

    Human NK cells are activated by cytokines, immune complexes, and signals transduced via activating ligands on other host cells. After vaccination, or during secondary infection, adaptive immune responses can enhance both cytokine-driven and Ab-dependent NK cell responses. However, induction of NK cells for enhanced function after in vitro exposure to innate inflammatory cytokines has also been reported and may synergize with adaptive signals to potentiate NK cell activity during infection or vaccination. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of seasonal influenza vaccination on NK cell function and phenotype in 52 previously unvaccinated individuals. Enhanced, IL-2-dependent, NK cell IFN-γ responses to Influenza A/California/7/2009 virus were detected up to 4 wk postvaccination and higher in human CMV (HCMV)-seronegative (HCMV(-)) individuals than in HCMV-seropositive (HCMV(+)) individuals. By comparison, robust NK cell degranulation responses were observed both before and after vaccination, due to high titers of naturally occurring anti-influenza Abs in human plasma, and did not differ between HCMV(+) and HCMV(-) subjects. In addition to these IL-2-dependent and Ab-dependent responses, NK cell responses to innate cytokines were also enhanced after influenza vaccination; this was associated with proliferation of CD57(-) NK cells and was most evident in HCMV(+) subjects. Similar enhancement of cytokine responsiveness was observed when NK cells were cocultured in vitro with Influenza A/California/7/2009 virus, and this was at least partially dependent upon IFN-αβR2. In summary, our data indicate that attenuated or live viral vaccines promote cytokine-induced memory-like NK cells and that this process is influenced by HCMV infection. PMID:27233958

  12. Fulminant Cytomegalovirus Myocarditis in an Immunocompetent Host: Resolution with Oral Valganciclovir

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anupam; Padala, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of fulminant myocarditis after a primary cytomegalovirus infection, in a previously healthy 72-year-old woman. The infection underwent clinical and immunologic resolution consequent to treatment with oral valganciclovir. In an immunocompetent host, the primary cytomegalovirus infection is usually asymptomatic or manifests itself as a heterophile-negative mononucleosis-like syndrome. Cytomegalovirus myocarditis is uncommon in immunocompetent patients. After presenting our case, we review the literature on cytomegalovirus myocarditis in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:25425988

  13. Ly49C Impairs NK Cell Memory in Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Catherine A; Scalzo, Anthony A; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A; Coudert, Jerome D

    2016-07-01

    NK cells possess inhibitory receptors that are responsible for self-MHC class I recognition; beyond their inhibitory function, accumulating evidence indicates that such receptors confer NK cell functional competence through an unclear process termed "licensing." Ly49C is the main self-specific inhibitory Ly49 receptor in H-2(b) C57BL/6 (B6) mice. We used B6 Ly49C-transgenic and B6 β2 microglobulin (β2m)-knockout Ly49C-transgenic mice to investigate the impact of licensing through this inhibitory receptor in precursor and mature NK cells. We found that self-specific inhibitory receptors affected NK cell precursor survival and proliferation at particular developmental stages in an MHC class I-dependent manner. The presence of Ly49C impacted the NK cell repertoire in a β2m-dependent manner, with reduced Ly49A(+), Ly49G2(+), and Ly49D(+) subsets, an increased DNAM-1(+) subset, and higher NKG2D expression. Licensed NK cells displayed a skewed distribution of the maturation stages, which was characterized by differential CD27 and CD11b expression, toward the mature phenotypes. We found that Ly49C-mediated licensing induced a split effect on NK cell functions, with increased cytokine-production capabilities following engagement of various activating receptors while cytotoxicity remained unchanged. Analysis of licensed NK cell functions in vivo, in a system of mouse CMV infection, indicated that licensing did not play a major role in the NK cell antiviral response during acute infection, but it strongly impaired the generation and/or persistence of memory NK cells. This study unravels multifaceted effects of licensing on NK cell populations and their functions. PMID:27233959

  14. HtrA2/Omi Terminates Cytomegalovirus Infection and Is Controlled by the Viral Mitochondrial Inhibitor of Apoptosis (vMIA)

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, A. Louise; Roback, Linda; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2008-01-01

    Viruses encode suppressors of cell death to block intrinsic and extrinsic host-initiated death pathways that reduce viral yield as well as control the termination of infection. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection terminates by a caspase-independent cell fragmentation process after an extended period of continuous virus production. The viral mitochondria-localized inhibitor of apoptosis (vMIA; a product of the UL37x1 gene) controls this fragmentation process. UL37x1 mutant virus-infected cells fragment three to four days earlier than cells infected with wt virus. Here, we demonstrate that infected cell death is dependent on serine proteases. We identify mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi as the initiator of this caspase-independent death pathway. Infected fibroblasts develop susceptibility to death as levels of mitochondria-resident HtrA2/Omi protease increase. Cell death is suppressed by the serine protease inhibitor TLCK as well as by the HtrA2-specific inhibitor UCF-101. Experimental overexpression of HtrA2/Omi, but not a catalytic site mutant of the enzyme, sensitizes infected cells to death that can be blocked by vMIA or protease inhibitors. Uninfected cells are completely resistant to HtrA2/Omi induced death. Thus, in addition to suppression of apoptosis and autophagy, vMIA naturally controls a novel serine protease-dependent CMV-infected cell-specific programmed cell death (cmvPCD) pathway that terminates the CMV replication cycle. PMID:18769594

  15. Mast cells expedite control of pulmonary murine cytomegalovirus infection by enhancing the recruitment of protective CD8 T cells to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Stefan; Becker, Marc; Lemmermann, Niels A W; Büttner, Julia K; Michel, Anastasija; Taube, Christian; Podlech, Jürgen; Böhm, Verena; Freitag, Kirsten; Thomas, Doris; Holtappels, Rafaela; Reddehase, Matthias J; Stassen, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The lungs are a noted predilection site of acute, latent, and reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections. Interstitial pneumonia is the most dreaded manifestation of CMV disease in the immunocompromised host, whereas in the immunocompetent host lung-infiltrating CD8 T cells confine the infection in nodular inflammatory foci and prevent viral pathology. By using murine CMV infection as a model, we provide evidence for a critical role of mast cells (MC) in the recruitment of protective CD8 T cells to the lungs. Systemic infection triggered degranulation selectively in infected MC. The viral activation of MC was associated with a wave of CC chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) in the serum of C57BL/6 mice that was MC-derived as verified by infection of MC-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) "sash" mutants. In these mutants, CD8 T cells were recruited less efficiently to the lungs, correlating with enhanced viral replication and delayed virus clearance. A causative role for MC was verified by MC reconstitution of "sash" mice restoring both, efficient CD8 T-cell recruitment and infection control. These results reveal a novel crosstalk axis between innate and adaptive immune defense against CMV, and identify MC as a hitherto unconsidered player in the immune surveillance at a relevant site of CMV disease. PMID:24763809

  16. Valvular Cytomegalovirus Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Stear, Timothy J; Shersher, David; Kim, George J; Smego, Douglas R

    2016-08-01

    Endocarditis is a rare presentation for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. We present the case of a 49-year-old man who underwent mitral and tricuspid valve replacement for valvular CMV endocarditis. The patient's past medical history was significant for human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and chronic hepatitis B. During his clinical course, he was found to have tricuspid and mitral valve vegetations. After progressive valvular destruction despite antibiotic therapy, he underwent successful mitral and tricuspid valve replacement. Pathologic analysis of the culture-negative valve specimens were found to contain inclusion bodies consistent with CMV, and quantitative serum polymerase chain reaction returned a highly elevated CMV DNA count. PMID:27449440

  17. Suppressive effects of sirtinol on human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection and hCMV-induced activation of molecular mechanisms of senescence and production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Mao, Genxiang; Li, Huifen; Ding, Xiang; Meng, Xin; Wang, Guofu; Leng, Sean X

    2016-09-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that chronic human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection contributes significantly to T-cell immunosenescence and adverse health outcomes in older adults. As such, it is important to search for compounds with anti-hCMV properties. Studies have shown that resveratrol, a sirtuin activator, suppresses hCMV infection. Here we report suppressive effects of sirtinol, a sirtuin antagonist, on hCMV infection and its cellular and molecular consequences. Human diploid fibroblast WI-38 cells were infected by hCMV Towne strain in the absence or presence of sirtinol. hCMV replication was measured using qPCR. Senescent phenotype was determined by senescence-associated β galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity. Expression of hCMV immediate early (IE) and early (E) proteins and senescence-associated proteins (pRb and Rb, p16(INK4), and p53) and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed using standard laboratory assays. The results demonstrated that sirtinol suppressed hCMV infection as well as hCMV-induced activation of molecular mechanisms of senescence and ROS production. While underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated, these findings indicate sirtinol as a novel and potent anti-hCMV agent with the potential to be developed as an effective treatment for chronic hCMV infection and its cellular and molecular consequences that are important to ageing and health of older adults. PMID:26763147

  18. Global Analysis of Host Cell Gene Expression Late during Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveals Extensive Dysregulation of Cell Cycle Gene Expression and Induction of Pseudomitosis Independent of US28 Function†

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Laura; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2004-01-01

    Replication of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) depends on host cell gene products working in conjunction with viral functions and leads to a dramatic dysregulation of cell cycle gene expression. Comprehensive transcriptional profiling was used to identify pathways most dramatically modulated by CMV at late times during infection and to determine the extent to which expression of the viral chemokine receptor US28 contributed to modulating cellular gene expression. Cells infected with the AD169 strain of virus or a fully replication competent US28-deficient derivative (RV101) were profiled throughout the late phase of infection (50, 72, and 98 h postinfection). Although sensitive statistical analysis showed striking global changes in transcript levels in infected cells compared to uninfected cells, the expression of US28 did not contribute to these alterations. CMV infection resulted in lower levels of transcripts encoding cytoskeletal, extracellular matrix, and adhesion proteins, together with small GTPases and apoptosis regulators, and in higher levels of transcripts encoding cell cycle, DNA replication, energy production, and inflammation-related gene products. Surprisingly, a large number of cellular transcripts encoding mitosis-related proteins were upmodulated at late times in infection, and these were associated with the formation of abnormal mitotic spindles and the appearance of pseudomitotic cells. These data extend our understanding of how broadly CMV alters the regulation of host cell cycle gene products and highlight the establishment of a mitosis-like environment in the absence of cellular DNA replication as important for viral replication and maturation. PMID:15479839

  19. The Viral Chemokine MCK-2 of Murine Cytomegalovirus Promotes Infection as Part of a gH/gL/MCK-2 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Prager, Adrian; Trsan, Tihana; Arapovic, Maja; Lemmermann, Niels A. W.; Podlech, Jürgen; Reddehase, Matthias J.; Lemnitzer, Frederic; Bosse, Jens Bernhard; Gimpfl, Martina; Marcinowski, Lisa; MacDonald, Margaret; Adler, Heiko; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.; Adler, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) forms two gH/gL glycoprotein complexes, gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/pUL(128,130,131A), which determine the tropism, the entry pathways and the mode of spread of the virus. For murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), which serves as a model for HCMV, a gH/gL/gO complex functionally homologous to the HCMV gH/gL/gO complex has been described. Knock-out of MCMV gO does impair, but not abolish, virus spread indicating that also MCMV might form an alternative gH/gL complex. Here, we show that the MCMV CC chemokine MCK-2 forms a complex with the glycoprotein gH, a complex which is incorporated into the virion. We could additionally show that mutants lacking both, gO and MCK-2 are not able to produce infectious virus. Trans-complementation of these double mutants with either gO or MCK-2 showed that both proteins can promote infection of host cells, although through different entry pathways. MCK-2 has been extensively studied in vivo by others. It has been shown to be involved in attracting cells for virus dissemination and in regulating antiviral host responses. We now show that MCK-2, by forming a complex with gH, strongly promotes infection of macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Thus, MCK-2 may play a dual role in MCMV infection, as a chemokine regulating the host response and attracting specific target cells and as part of a glycoprotein complex promoting entry into cells crucial for virus dissemination. PMID:23935483

  20. Rhesus and Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein L Are Required for Infection and Cell-to-Cell Spread of Virus but Cannot Complement Each Other▿

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. Jason; Lacayo, Juan C.; Burbelo, Peter; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2011-01-01

    Rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV), the homolog of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), serves as a model for understanding the pathogenesis of HCMV and for developing candidate vaccines. In order to develop a replication-defective virus as a vaccine candidate, we constructed RhCMV with glycoprotein L (gL) deleted. RhCMV gL was essential for viral replication, and virus with gL deleted could only replicate in cells expressing RhCMV gL. Noncomplementing cells infected with RhCMV with gL deleted released intact, noninfectious RhCMV particles that were indistinguishable from wild-type RhCMV by electron microscopy and could be rescued by treatment of cells with polyethylene glycol. In addition, noncomplementing cells infected with RhCMV with gL deleted produced levels of gB, the major target of neutralizing antibodies, at levels similar to those observed in cells infected with wild-type RhCMV. Since RhCMV and HCMV gL share 53% amino acid identity, we determined whether the two proteins could complement the heterologous virus. Cells transfected with an HCMV bacterial artificial chromosome with gL deleted yielded virus that could replicate in human cells expressing HCMV gL. This is the second HCMV mutant with an essential glycoprotein deleted that has been complemented in cell culture. Finally, we found that HCMV gL could not complement the replication of RhCMV with gL deleted and that RhCMV gL could not complement the replication of HCMV with gL deleted. These data indicate that RhCMV and HCMV gL are both essential for replication of their corresponding viruses and, although the two gLs are highly homologous, they are unable to complement each another. PMID:21191007

  1. Comparable incidence and severity of cytomegalovirus infections following T cell-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation preceded by reduced intensity or myeloablative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Kalpoe, J S; van der Heiden, P L J; Vaessen, N; Claas, E C J; Barge, R M; Kroes, A C M

    2007-07-01

    Reports on infectious complications following reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) are equivocal. This prospective follow-up study compared the impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections following RIC with fludarabine, ATG and busulphan or conventional myeloablative conditioning (MAC). Forty-eight RIC and 59 MAC patients were enrolled. The occurrence and severity of CMV infections within 100 days following allo-SCT were assessed, using plasma CMV DNA load kinetics. CMV DNAemia was observed in 21 RIC (60%) and in 19 MAC (44%) patients at risk for CMV. The mean CMV DNAemia free survival time was comparable following RIC and MAC: 70 days (95% (confidence interval) CI: 59-80 days) and 77 days (95% CI: 68-86 days), respectively (P=0.24). Parameters indicative for the level of CMV reactivation, including the area under the curve of CMV DNA load over time as well as the onset, the peak values and duration of CMV infection episodes, the numbers and duration of CMV treatment episodes and recurrent infections, were not different in both groups. During follow-up, none of the patients developed CMV disease. RIC with fludarabine, ATG and busulphan demonstrated safety comparable to conventional MAC with regard to frequency and severity of CMV infections within 100 days following T cell-depleted allo-SCT. PMID:17530007

  2. Cytomegalovirus infections in allogeneic stem cell recipients after reduced-intensity or myeloablative conditioning assessed by quantitative PCR and pp65-antigenemia.

    PubMed

    Schetelig, J; Oswald, O; Steuer, N; Radonic, A; Thulke, S; Held, T K; Oertel, J; Nitsche, A; Siegert, W

    2003-10-01

    Since the incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may depend on the intensity of the pretreatment, we studied the incidence of CMV infections after reduced-intensity compared to myeloablative conditioning. A total of 82 patients with matched related or unrelated donors were prospectively monitored for CMV infections after HSCT by CMV-PCR techniques, CMV-antigenemia and clinical observation. A total of 45 patients received reduced-intensity conditioning consisting of fludarabine, busulfan and ATG and 37 patients received myeloablative conditioning. Leukocyte engraftment occurred after a median of 15 vs 18 days (P=0.012) and platelet engraftment after 12 days vs 20 days (P=0.001), respectively. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grade II-IV was observed in 58 vs 54% patients (P=0.737), respectively. The onset and peak values of CMV-antigenemia and DNAemia and the incidence of CMV infections did not differ statistically significantly between the two treatment groups. Multivariate analysis confirmed CMV seropositivity of the recipient (P=0.035), acute GVHD II-IV (P=0.001) but not the type of conditioning as significant risk factors for CMV-antigenemia. In conclusion, the kinetics of CMV-antigenemia and DNAemia and the incidence of CMV infections were not statistically different in patients who received HSCT after reduced-intensity conditioning with fludarabine, busulfan and ATG compared to myeloablative conditioning. PMID:13130317

  3. An inducible promoter mediates abundant expression from the immediate-early 2 gene region of human cytomegalovirus at late times after infection.

    PubMed Central

    Puchtler, E; Stamminger, T

    1991-01-01

    An abundant late transcript of 1.5 kb originates from the immediate-early 2 (IE-2) gene region of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) at late times after infection. The transcriptional start of this RNA was precisely mapped, and the putative promoter region was cloned in front of the CAT gene as reporter. This region, which comprises 78 nucleotides of IE-2 sequence upstream of the determined cap site, was strongly activated by viral superinfection at late times in the replicative cycle. As shown by RNase protection analyses, the authentic transcription start is used. No activation of this late promoter was observed after cotransfection with an expression plasmid containing the HCMV IE-1 and -2 gene region. This result suggests that, compared with early and early late promoters of HCMV, different or additional viral functions are required for the activation of true late promoters. Images PMID:1656096

  4. Heterogeneity of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to cytomegalovirus in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifen; Margolick, Joseph B; Bream, Jay H; Nilles, Tricia L; Langan, Susan; Bui, Hanhvy T; Sylwester, Andrew W; Picker, Louis J; Leng, Sean X

    2014-08-01

    Studies of T-cell immunity to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) primarily reflect anti-CMV pp65 or immediate early antigen 1 (IE-1) activity. We assessed responses of T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative and HIV-infected men to peptide pools spanning 19 CMV open reading frames selected because they previously correlated with total CMV-specific T-cell responses in healthy donors. Cells producing cytokines in response to pp65 or IE-1 together composed <12% and <40% of the total CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses to CMV, respectively. These proportions were generally similar regardless of HIV serostatus. Thus, analyses of total CMV-specific T-cell responses should extend beyond pp65 and IE-1 regardless of HIV serostatus. PMID:24532602

  5. Proapoptotic Bim regulates antigen-specific NK cell contraction and the generation of the memory NK cell pool after cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Bezman, Natalie A; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2014-06-30

    Apoptosis is critical for the elimination of activated lymphocytes after viral infection. Proapoptotic factor Bim (Bcl2l11) controls T lymphocyte contraction and the formation of memory T cells after infection. Natural killer (NK) cells also undergo antigen-driven expansion to become long-lived memory cells after mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection; therefore, we examined the role of Bim in regulating the MCMV-driven memory NK cell pool. Despite responding similarly early after infection, Bcl2l11(-/-) Ly49H(+) NK cells show impaired contraction and significantly outnumber wild-type (WT) cells after the expansion phase. The inability to reduce the effector pool leads to a larger Bcl2l11(-/-) NK memory subset, which displays a less mature phenotype (CD11b(lo), CD27(+)) and lower levels of NK cell memory-associated markers KLRG1 and Ly6C. Bcl2l11(-/-) memory NK cells demonstrate a reduced response to m157-mediated stimulation and do not protect as effectively as WT memory NK cells in an MCMV challenge model. Thus, Bim-mediated apoptosis drives selective contraction of effector NK cells to generate a pool of mature, MCMV-specific memory cells. PMID:24958849

  6. Activating Receptors for Self-MHC Class I Enhance Effector Functions and Memory Differentiation of NK Cells during Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Nabekura, Tsukasa; Lanier, Lewis L

    2016-07-19

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in host defense against pathogens, and they can subsequently differentiate into memory NK cells. The Ly49 and KIR gene families in rodents and humans encode both inhibitory and activating receptors for MHC class I. The physiological role of activating KIR or Ly49 receptors that recognize self-MHC class I during immune response to viral infections is unknown. Here, we address how the activating Ly49D receptor impacts the NK cell response to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection by comparing the activation and differentiation of Ly49D-bearing NK cells in mice lacking or expressing H-2D(d), the cognate MHC class I ligand of Ly49D. After MCMV infection, Ly49D augmented IFN-γ production by MCMV-specific Ly49H(+) NK cells and preferentially promoted the generation of memory Ly49H(+) NK cells. Thus, activating receptors for self-MHC class I modulate the differentiation of MCMV-specific NK cells and are beneficial for host defense against MCMV infection. PMID:27438766

  7. Impaired lymphoid chemokine-mediated migration due to a block on the chemokine receptor switch in human cytomegalovirus-infected dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moutaftsi, Magdalena; Brennan, Paul; Spector, Stephen A; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2004-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration from the site of infection to the site of T-cell priming is a crucial event in the generation of antiviral T-cell responses. Here we present to our knowledge the first functional evidence that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) blocks the migration of infected monocyte-derived DCs toward lymphoid chemokines CCL19 and CCL21. DC migration is blocked by viral impairment of the chemokine receptor switch at the level of the expression of CCR7 molecules. The inhibition occurs with immediate-early-early kinetics, and viral interference with NF-kappaB signaling is likely to be at least partially responsible for the lack of CCR7 expression. DCs which migrate from the infected cultures are HCMV antigen negative, and consequently they do not stimulate HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells, while CD4(+)-T-cell activation is not impaired. Although CD8(+) T cells can also be activated by alternative antigen presentation mechanisms, the spatial segregation of naive T cells and infected DCs seems a potent mechanism of delaying the generation of primary CD8(+)-T-cell responses and aiding early viral spread. PMID:14990723

  8. Impaired Lymphoid Chemokine-Mediated Migration due to a Block on the Chemokine Receptor Switch in Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moutaftsi, Magdalena; Brennan, Paul; Spector, Stephen A.; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration from the site of infection to the site of T-cell priming is a crucial event in the generation of antiviral T-cell responses. Here we present to our knowledge the first functional evidence that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) blocks the migration of infected monocyte-derived DCs toward lymphoid chemokines CCL19 and CCL21. DC migration is blocked by viral impairment of the chemokine receptor switch at the level of the expression of CCR7 molecules. The inhibition occurs with immediate-early-early kinetics, and viral interference with NF-κB signaling is likely to be at least partially responsible for the lack of CCR7 expression. DCs which migrate from the infected cultures are HCMV antigen negative, and consequently they do not stimulate HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells, while CD4+-T-cell activation is not impaired. Although CD8+ T cells can also be activated by alternative antigen presentation mechanisms, the spatial segregation of naive T cells and infected DCs seems a potent mechanism of delaying the generation of primary CD8+-T-cell responses and aiding early viral spread. PMID:14990723

  9. Fetal infection from rubeovirus or cytomegalovirus: correlation among maternal serological profiles, invasive diagnostic procedures, and long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Noia, G; Masini, L; De Santis, M; Scavo, M; Pomini, F; Grillo, R; Cattani, P; Ranno, O; Caruso, A; Mancuso, S

    1998-01-01

    Different variables influence the possibility that maternal viral infection may be transmitted to the fetus, although not all fetal infections result in fetal "illness" with consequent fetopathy. As concerns the fetus, prenatal diagnosis includes invasive techniques necessary for fetal tissue sampling. These techniques carry some risks. The fetal infectious risk, as determined by maternal clinico-serological profile and according to sonographic investigation, always should be weighed against the risks and benefits of invasive diagnostic procedures. The present study re-elaborates the criteria necessary for defining fetal risk as related to the maternal serological profile. In the 26 mothers with rubeola infection, the incidence of fetal mortality was 7.7%. Fetal prognosis worsens with the precocity of eruption. In these cases the esantema is the most reliable prognostic element as an indication to perform the invasive procedure. In the 15 patients with cytomegalovirus infection, no fetal or postnatal losses occurred. Morbidity occurred in 13.3% of cases, and the two ill fetuses were classified in the same risk group. In this group of patients, the maternal serological profile is a significant predictor of fetal morbidity. PMID:9502669

  10. A dynamic transmission model with age-dependent infectiousness and reactivation for cytomegalovirus in the United States: Potential impact of vaccination strategies on congenital infection.

    PubMed

    Hogea, Cosmina; Dieussaert, Ilse; Van Effelterre, Thierry; Guignard, Adrienne; Mols, Johann

    2015-01-01

    We present an age-structured dynamic transmission model for cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the United States, based on natural history and available data, primarily aiming to combine the available qualitative and quantitative knowledge toward more complex modeling frameworks to better reflect the underlying biology and epidemiology of the CMV infection. The model structure explicitly accounts for primary infections, reactivations and re-infections. Duration of infectiousness and likelihood of reactivation were both assumed to be age-dependent, and natural reduction in the re-infection risk following primary infection was included. We used an empirical social contact matrix (POLYMOD-based) as support for CMV transmission between different age groups. The baseline model reproduced well the age-stratified seroprevalence data (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III) used for calibration. The model was further used to explore the potential impact of hypothetical vaccination on reducing congenital CMV infection under various vaccine profiles and vaccination scenarios. Our preliminary model-based simulations suggested that while infant vaccination may represent an attractive way to reduce congenital CMV infection over time, adolescent female vaccination with an adequate routine booster platform may, under certain conditions, provide an alternative. However, for such tools to be considered toward actual decision-making, enhanced validations based on additional studies and data would be further necessary. The modeling framework presented in this paper was designed to be sufficiently general and flexible, such that it can allow for further adaptations to reflect new knowledge or data that may become available in the future. PMID:25984886

  11. A dynamic transmission model with age-dependent infectiousness and reactivation for cytomegalovirus in the United States: Potential impact of vaccination strategies on congenital infection

    PubMed Central

    Hogea, Cosmina; Dieussaert, Ilse; Van Effelterre, Thierry; Guignard, Adrienne; Mols, Johann

    2015-01-01

    We present an age-structured dynamic transmission model for cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the United States, based on natural history and available data, primarily aiming to combine the available qualitative and quantitative knowledge toward more complex modeling frameworks to better reflect the underlying biology and epidemiology of the CMV infection. The model structure explicitly accounts for primary infections, reactivations and re-infections. Duration of infectiousness and likelihood of reactivation were both assumed to be age-dependent, and natural reduction in the re-infection risk following primary infection was included. We used an empirical social contact matrix (POLYMOD-based) as support for CMV transmission between different age groups. The baseline model reproduced well the age-stratified seroprevalence data (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III) used for calibration. The model was further used to explore the potential impact of hypothetical vaccination on reducing congenital CMV infection under various vaccine profiles and vaccination scenarios. Our preliminary model-based simulations suggested that while infant vaccination may represent an attractive way to reduce congenital CMV infection over time, adolescent female vaccination with an adequate routine booster platform may, under certain conditions, provide an alternative. However, for such tools to be considered toward actual decision-making, enhanced validations based on additional studies and data would be further necessary. The modeling framework presented in this paper was designed to be sufficiently general and flexible, such that it can allow for further adaptations to reflect new knowledge or data that may become available in the future. PMID:25984886

  12. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Della Chiesa, Mariella

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C(+)CD57(+) natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects. PMID:26659918

  13. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Chiesa, Mariella Della

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C+CD57+ natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects. PMID:26659918

  14. Spatial Relationships between Markers for Secretory and Endosomal Machinery in Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells versus Those in Uninfected Cells▿†

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhendu; Pellett, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) induces extensive remodeling of the secretory apparatus to form the cytoplasmic virion assembly compartment (cVAC), where virion tegumentation and envelopment take place. We studied the structure of the cVAC by confocal microscopy to assess the three-dimensional distribution of proteins specifically associated with individual secretory organelles. In infected cells, early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1)-positive vesicles are concentrated at the center of the cVAC and, as previously seen, are distinct from structures visualized by markers for the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and trans-Golgi network (TGN). EEA1-positive vesicles can be strongly associated with markers for recycling endosomes, to a lesser extent with markers associated with components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT III) machinery, and then with markers of late endosomes. In comparisons of uninfected and infected cells, we found significant changes in the structural associations and colocalization of organelle markers, as well as in net organelle volumes. These results provide new evidence that the HCMV-induced remodeling of the membrane transport apparatus involves much more than simple relocation and expansion of preexisting structures and are consistent with the hypothesis that the shift in identity of secretory organelles in HCMV-infected cells results in new functional profiles. PMID:21471245

  15. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella; Mirandola, Prisco; De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina; Gatti, Rita; Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of THP-1 macrophages (a cell line irreversibly arrested in G0) by pushing them into S and G2 phases. Moreover, we show that HCMV infection of THP-1 macrophages leads to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Since various studies have indicated TLR4 to be involved in promoting cell proliferation, here we investigate the possible role of TLR4 in the observed HCMV-induced cell cycle perturbation. Our data strongly support TLR4 as a mediator of HCMV-triggered cell cycle activation in THP-1 macrophages favouring, in turn, the development of an efficient viral lytic cycle. - Highlights: ► We studied HCMV infection impact on THP-1 macrophage cell cycle. ► We analysed the role played by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 upon HCMV infection. ► HCMV pushes THP-1 macrophages (i.e. resting cells) to re-enter the cell cycle. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition strongly affects the effectiveness of HCMV replication. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition significantly decreases HCMV-induced cell cycle re-entry.

  16. Infection of Vascular Endothelial Cells with Human Cytomegalovirus under Fluid Shear Stress Reveals Preferential Entry and Spread of Virus in Flow Conditions Simulating Atheroprone Regions of the Artery

    PubMed Central

    DuRose, Jenny B.; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major pathogenic factor in cardiovascular diseases, which are the leading cause of mortality in developed countries. While risk factors for atherosclerosis tend to be systemic, the distribution of atherosclerotic plaques within the vasculature is preferentially located at branch points and curves where blood flow is disturbed and shear stress is low. It is now widely accepted that hemodynamic factors can modulate endothelial gene expression and function and influence the pathophysiological changes associated with atherosclerosis. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a ubiquitous pathogen, has long been proposed as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. To date, the role of HCMV in atherogenesis has been explored only in static conditions, and it is not known how HCMV infection is influenced by the physiological context of flow. In this study, we utilized a parallel-plate flow system to simulate the effects of shear stresses in different regions of the vasculature in vitro. We found that endothelial cells cultured under low shear stress, which simulates the flow condition of atheroprone regions in vivo, are more permissive to HCMV infection than cells experiencing high shear stress or static conditions. Cells exposed to low shear stress show increased entry of HCMV compared to cells exposed to high shear stress or static conditions. Viral structural gene expression, viral titers, and viral spread are also enhanced in endothelial cells exposed to low shear stress. These results suggest that hemodynamic factors modulate HCMV infection of endothelial cells, thus providing new insights into the induction/acceleration of atherosclerosis by HCMV. PMID:23055562

  17. Cytomegalovirus Colitis: An Uncommon Mimicker of Common Colitides.

    PubMed

    Baniak, Nick; Kanthan, Rani

    2016-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus latency, though ubiquitous in the human population, is known to cause colitis in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. Furthermore, the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic appearance of cytomegalovirus colitis can mimic that of inflammatory bowel disease, an extremely well-documented disease. In this context, though many reports have looked at inflammatory bowel disease with superimposed cytomegalovirus infection, less attention has been paid to cytomegalovirus as a primary cause of isolated colitis. Owing to the rarity of this phenomenon, it is important to consider this diagnosis and implement proper testing to avoid misdiagnosis and mismanagement. PMID:27472242

  18. Surveillance of active human cytomegalovirus infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HLA sibling identical donor): search for optimal cutoff value by real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection still causes significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Therefore, it is extremely important to diagnosis and monitor active CMV infection in HSCT patients, defining the CMV DNA levels of virus replication that warrant intervention with antiviral agents in order to accurately prevent CMV disease and further related complications. Methods During the first 150 days after allogeneic HSTC, thirty patients were monitored weekly for active CMV infection by pp65 antigenemia, nested-PCR and real-time PCR assays. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plot analysis was performed to determine a threshold value of the CMV DNA load by real-time PCR. Results Using ROC curves, the optimal cutoff value by real-time PCR was 418.4 copies/104 PBL (sensitivity, 71.4%; specificity, 89.7%). Twenty seven (90%) of the 30 analyzed patients had active CMV infection and two (6.7%) developed CMV disease. Eleven (40.7%) of these 27 patients had acute GVHD, 18 (66.7%) had opportunistic infection, 5 (18.5%) had chronic rejection and 11 (40.7%) died - one died of CMV disease associated with GVHD and bacterial infection. Conclusions The low incidence of CMV disease in HSCT recipients in our study attests to the efficacy of CMV surveillance based on clinical routine assay. The quantification of CMV DNA load using real-time PCR appears to be applicable to the clinical practice and an optimal cutoff value for guiding timely preemptive therapy should be clinically validated in future studies. PMID:20515464

  19. Postmortem diagnosis of cytomegalovirus and accompanying other infection agents by real-time PCR in cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI).

    PubMed

    Yagmur, Gulhan; Ziyade, Nihan; Elgormus, Neval; Das, Taner; Sahin, M Feyzi; Yildirim, Muzaffer; Ozgun, Ayse; Akcay, Arzu; Karayel, Ferah; Koc, Sermet

    2016-02-01

    As an opportunistic pathogen with high mortality rates, Cytomegalovirus (CMV) may lead to fatal disseminated CMV infection of the premature and newborn; thus necessitating the demonstration of CMV-DNA with clinical history and/or histopathological findings of CMV infection and defining other bacterial and viral infection agents with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in udden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) cases as we aimed in this study. 314 (144 female, 170 male) SUDI cases were prospectively investigated from January 2013 to January 2015 in Istanbul Forensic Medicine Institution. The study includes 87 tissue samples of 39 cases for post-mortem histopathological examination of interstitial pneumonia, myocarditis, meningitis, encephalitis, hepatitis, colitis or tubulointerstitial nephritis and/or accompanying chronic sialadenitis. CMV-DNA was found positive in 35 (40.2%) salivary gland, 19 (21.8%) lung, 1 (1.1%) tonsil, and 1 (1.1%) brain tissues. CMV sialadenitis and/or CMV pneumonia associated with other viral and/or bacterial agents were detected in 23 (60%) of 39 infant cases. The demonstration of CMV-DNA would significantly clarify the cause of death and collection of epidemiological data in SUDI cases with clinical history and histopathological findings of CMV infection accompanying chronic CMV sialadenitis. Furthermore, CMV suppresses the immune system, and may predispose to other bacterial and/or viral infections in these cases. Post-mortem molecular investigations are useful in explaining cause of death in SUDI with a suspicion of infection in forensic autopsies. PMID:26694873

  20. Human cytomegalovirus-specific T-cell immune reconstitution in preemptively treated heart transplant recipients identifies subjects at critical risk for infection.

    PubMed

    Abate, Davide; Fiscon, Marta; Saldan, Alda; Cofano, Simona; Mengoli, Carlo; Sgarabotto, Dino; d'Agostino, Chiara; Barzon, Luisa; Cusinato, Riccardo; Toscano, Giuseppe; Feltrin, Giuseppe; Gambino, Antonio; Gerosa, Gino; Palù, Giorgio

    2012-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection represents a major threat for heart transplant recipients (HTXs). CMV-specific T cells effectively control virus infection, and thus, assessment of antiviral immune recovery may have clinical utility in identifying HTXs at risk of infection. In this study, 10 CMV-seropositive (R(+)) pretransplant patients and 48 preemptively treated R(+) HTXs were examined before and after 100 days posttransplant. Preemptive treatment is supposed to favor the immune recovery. CMV DNAemia and gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay were employed to assess the viremia and immune reconstitution. HTXs could be categorized into three groups characterized by high (>100), medium (50 to 100), and low (<50) spot levels. Early-identified high responders efficiently controlled the infection and also maintained high immunity levels after 100 days after transplant. No episodes of grade ≥2R rejection occurred in the high responders. Midresponders were identified as a group with heterogeneous trends of immune reconstitution. Low responders were 41% and 21% of HTXs before and after 100 days posttransplant, respectively. Low responders were associated with a higher incidence of infection. The effect of viremia on immune recovery was investigated: a statistically significant inverse correlation between magnitude of viremia and immune recovery emerged; in particular, each 10-fold increase in viremia (>4 log(10) DNAemia/ml) was associated with a 36% decrease of the ELISPOT assay spot levels. All episodes of high viremia (>4 log(10) DNAemia/ml) occurred from 1 to 60 days after transplant. Thus, the concomitant evaluation of viremia and CMV immune reconstitution has clinical utility in identifying HTXs at risk of infection and may represent a helpful guide in making therapeutic choices. PMID:22461674

  1. Humoral immune response against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-specific proteins after HCMV infection in lung transplantation as detected with recombinant and naturally occurring proteins.

    PubMed Central

    van Zanten, J; Harmsen, M C; van der Giessen, M; van der Bij, W; Prop, J; de Leij, L; The, T H

    1995-01-01

    The humoral immune response to four intracellularly located cytomegalovirus (CMV) proteins was studied in 15 lung transplant recipients experiencing active CMV infections. Five patients had primary infections, and 10 had secondary infections. Antibodies of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG classes were measured in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system in which procaryotically expressed recombinant proteins were used as a substrate and also in a monoclonal antibody-based capture ELISA which uses naturally occurring proteins as a substrate. The proteins investigated were the lower matrix protein pp65 (ppUL83), the major DNA-binding protein p52 (ppUL44), and the two immediate early proteins IE1 and IE2 (different splicing products of UL123). Higher levels of antibodies were found to pp65 and especially to p52 than to the immediate early antigens. Antibody levels detected in the recombinant protein-based ELISAs were generally lower than antibody responses detected with the matching antigen capture ELISA. Moreover, some patients appeared to have antibodies mainly to epitopes present on naturally occurring proteins. The antibody responses detected in both assays were related to the viral load during infection as assessed by the CMV antigenemia test, which is a quantitative marker for CMV load. It was found that although epitopes on naturally occurring proteins induce higher antibody responses and responses in more patients, antibodies directed to epitopes present on the recombinant proteins were inversely related to the viral load during a CMV infection. Therefore, antibodies to epitopes on the recombinant proteins might be more clinically relevant in this group of lung transplant recipients. PMID:7535179

  2. Cis and Trans Acting Factors Involved in Human Cytomegalovirus Experimental and Natural Latent Infection of CD14 (+) Monocytes and CD34 (+) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pari, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    The parameters involved in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latent infection in CD14 (+) and CD34 (+) cells remain poorly identified. Using next generation sequencing we deduced the transcriptome of HCMV latently infected CD14 (+) and CD34 (+) cells in experimental as well as natural latency settings. The gene expression profile from natural infection in HCMV seropositive donors closely matched experimental latency models, and included two long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), RNA4.9 and RNA2.7 as well as the mRNAs encoding replication factors UL84 and UL44. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on experimentally infected CD14 (+) monocytes followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) were employed to demonstrate both UL84 and UL44 proteins interacted with the latent viral genome and overlapped at 5 of the 8 loci identified. RNA4.9 interacts with components of the polycomb repression complex (PRC) as well as with the MIE promoter region where the enrichment of the repressive H3K27me3 mark suggests that this lncRNA represses transcription. Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE), which identifies nucleosome-depleted viral DNA, was used to confirm that latent mRNAs were associated with actively transcribed, FAIRE analysis also showed that the terminal repeat (TR) region of the latent viral genome is depleted of nucleosomes suggesting that this region may contain an element mediating viral genome maintenance. ChIP assays show that the viral TR region interacts with factors associated with the pre replication complex and a plasmid subclone containing the HCMV TR element persisted in latently infected CD14 (+) monocytes, strongly suggesting that the TR region mediates viral chromosome maintenance. PMID:23717203

  3. Natural Killer Cell Sensing of Infected Cells Compensates for MyD88 Deficiency but Not IFN-I Activity in Resistance to Mouse Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Cocita, Clément; Guiton, Rachel; Bessou, Gilles; Chasson, Lionel; Boyron, Marilyn; Crozat, Karine; Dalod, Marc

    2015-05-01

    In mice, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and natural killer (NK) cells both contribute to resistance to systemic infections with herpes viruses including mouse Cytomegalovirus (MCMV). pDCs are the major source of type I IFN (IFN-I) during MCMV infection. This response requires pDC-intrinsic MyD88-dependent signaling by Toll-Like Receptors 7 and 9. Provided that they express appropriate recognition receptors such as Ly49H, NK cells can directly sense and kill MCMV-infected cells. The loss of any one of these responses increases susceptibility to infection. However, the relative importance of these antiviral immune responses and how they are related remain unclear. In humans, while IFN-I responses are essential, MyD88 is dispensable for antiviral immunity. Hence, a higher redundancy has been proposed in the mechanisms promoting protective immune responses against systemic infections by herpes viruses during natural infections in humans. It has been assumed, but not proven, that mice fail to mount protective MyD88-independent IFN-I responses. In humans, the mechanism that compensates MyD88 deficiency has not been elucidated. To address these issues, we compared resistance to MCMV infection and immune responses between mouse strains deficient for MyD88, the IFN-I receptor and/or Ly49H. We show that selective depletion of pDC or genetic deficiencies for MyD88 or TLR9 drastically decreased production of IFN-I, but not the protective antiviral responses. Moreover, MyD88, but not IFN-I receptor, deficiency could largely be compensated by Ly49H-mediated antiviral NK cell responses. Thus, contrary to the current dogma but consistent with the situation in humans, we conclude that, in mice, in our experimental settings, MyD88 is redundant for IFN-I responses and overall defense against a systemic herpes virus infection. Moreover, we identified direct NK cell sensing of infected cells as one mechanism able to compensate for MyD88 deficiency in mice. Similar mechanisms likely

  4. Utility of the Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Interferon-γ–Release Assay to Predict the Risk of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nesher, Lior; Shah, Dimpy P.; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J.; Azzi, Jacques M.; Siddiqui, Hala K.; Ghantoji, Shasank S.; Marsh, Lisa Y.; Michailidis, Lamprinos; Makedonas, George; Rezvani, Katy; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Chemaly, Roy F.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to distinguish allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients at risk for cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation from those who are not is central for optimal CMV management strategies. Interferon γ (IFN-γ) produced by CMV-challenged T cells may serve as an immune marker differentiating these 2 populations. We prospectively monitored 63 CMV-seropositive allo-HCT recipients with a CMV-specific enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and for CMV infection from the period before transplantation to day 100 after transplantation. Assay results above certain thresholds (50 spots per 250 000 cells for immediate early 1 or 100 spots per 250 000 cells for phosphoprotein 65) identified patients who were protected against CMV infection as long as they had no graft-versus-host disease and/or were not receiving systemic corticosteroids. Based on the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model, the only significant factor for preventing CMV reactivation was a CMV-specific ELISPOT response above the determined thresholds (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, .05–.97; P = .046). Use of this assay as an additional tool for managing allo-HCT recipients at risk for CMV reactivation needs further validation in future studies. Application of this new approach may reduce the duration and intensity of CMV monitoring and the duration of prophylaxis or treatment with antiviral agents in those who have achieved CMV-specific immune reconstitution. PMID:26908740

  5. Treatment of cytomegalovirus infection and disease pre- and post-quantitative nucleic acid test standardization: does use of a more sensitive assay lead to longer treatment duration?

    PubMed

    Dioverti, M Veronica; Lahr, Brian; Razonable, Raymund R

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative cytomegalovirus (CMV) nucleic acid testing (NAT) has been standardized using the World Health Organization (WHO) international calibration standard. A new FDA-approved WHO-calibrated assay (CA) was found to be more sensitive than a laboratory-developed test (LDT). We hypothesized that monitoring therapeutic response using a more sensitive assay may lead to longer antiviral therapy in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with CMV infection. We reviewed transplant patients with CMV disease retrospectively, and divided them into two groups: those diagnosed and managed based on LDT and those managed using WHO-CA. Compared to patients monitored by LDT, the time to reach an undetectable viral load was significantly longer in the group monitored by the WHO-CA. However, a trend toward shorter duration of antiviral treatment was observed (median, 34 vs. 41 d; p = 0.058), with earlier discontinuation of induction antiviral therapy upon reaching undetectable viral load using WHO-CA (11 vs. 18 d; p = 002). We concluded that despite using a more sensitive CMV NAT, the total duration of antiviral treatment was not significantly prolonged in transplant patients with CMV infection and disease. Relapse rates did not differ between the two groups. PMID:26589482

  6. Utility of the Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Interferon-γ-Release Assay to Predict the Risk of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Lior; Shah, Dimpy P; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Azzi, Jacques M; Siddiqui, Hala K; Ghantoji, Shasank S; Marsh, Lisa Y; Michailidis, Lamprinos; Makedonas, George; Rezvani, Katy; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2016-06-01

    The ability to distinguish allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients at risk for cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation from those who are not is central for optimal CMV management strategies. Interferon γ (IFN-γ) produced by CMV-challenged T cells may serve as an immune marker differentiating these 2 populations. We prospectively monitored 63 CMV-seropositive allo-HCT recipients with a CMV-specific enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and for CMV infection from the period before transplantation to day 100 after transplantation. Assay results above certain thresholds (50 spots per 250 000 cells for immediate early 1 or 100 spots per 250 000 cells for phosphoprotein 65) identified patients who were protected against CMV infection as long as they had no graft-versus-host disease and/or were not receiving systemic corticosteroids. Based on the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model, the only significant factor for preventing CMV reactivation was a CMV-specific ELISPOT response above the determined thresholds (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, .05-.97; P = .046). Use of this assay as an additional tool for managing allo-HCT recipients at risk for CMV reactivation needs further validation in future studies. Application of this new approach may reduce the duration and intensity of CMV monitoring and the duration of prophylaxis or treatment with antiviral agents in those who have achieved CMV-specific immune reconstitution. PMID:26908740

  7. PUL21a-Cyclin A2 Interaction is Required to Protect Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells from the Deleterious Consequences of Mitotic Entry

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Martin; Uecker, Ralf; Weisbach, Henry; Bogdanow, Boris; Richter, Ellen; König, Lydia; Vetter, Barbara; Lenac-Rovis, Tihana; Jonjic, Stipan; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Hagemeier, Christian; Wiebusch, Lüder

    2014-01-01

    Entry into mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in cellular architecture, metabolism and gene expression. Many viruses have evolved cell cycle arrest strategies to prevent mitotic entry, presumably to ensure sustained, uninterrupted viral replication. Here we show for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) what happens if the viral cell cycle arrest mechanism is disabled and cells engaged in viral replication enter into unscheduled mitosis. We made use of an HCMV mutant that, due to a defective Cyclin A2 binding motif in its UL21a gene product (pUL21a), has lost its ability to down-regulate Cyclin A2 and, therefore, to arrest cells at the G1/S transition. Cyclin A2 up-regulation in infected cells not only triggered the onset of cellular DNA synthesis, but also promoted the accumulation and nuclear translocation of Cyclin B1-CDK1, premature chromatin condensation and mitotic entry. The infected cells were able to enter metaphase as shown by nuclear lamina disassembly and, often irregular, metaphase spindle formation. However, anaphase onset was blocked by the still intact anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) inhibitory function of pUL21a. Remarkably, the essential viral IE2, but not the related chromosome-associated IE1 protein, disappeared upon mitotic entry, suggesting an inherent instability of IE2 under mitotic conditions. Viral DNA synthesis was impaired in mitosis, as demonstrated by the abnormal morphology and strongly reduced BrdU incorporation rates of viral replication compartments. The prolonged metaphase arrest in infected cells coincided with precocious sister chromatid separation and progressive fragmentation of the chromosomal material. We conclude that the Cyclin A2-binding function of pUL21a contributes to the maintenance of a cell cycle state conducive for the completion of the HCMV replication cycle. Unscheduled mitotic entry during the course of the HCMV replication has fatal consequences, leading to abortive infection and cell death. PMID

  8. Toxoplasmosis, Parvovirus, and Cytomegalovirus in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Deborah M; Keller, Rebecca; Borgida, Adam F

    2016-06-01

    There are several infections in adults that warrant special consideration in pregnant women given the potential fetal consequences. Among these are toxoplasmosis, parvovirus B19, and cytomegalovirus. These infections have an important impact on the developing fetus, depending on the timing of infection. This article reviews the modes of transmission as well as maternal and neonatal effects of each of these infections. In addition, the article outlines recommended testing, fetal surveillance, and treatment where indicated. PMID:27235921

  9. Inflammation, Infection, and Future Cardiovascular Risk

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-15

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Myocardial Infarction; Venous Thromboembolism; Heart Diseases; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Herpesviridae Infections; Inflammation

  10. Characterization of Murine Cytomegalovirus m157 from Infected Cells and Identification of Critical Residues Mediating Recognition by the NK Cell Receptor, Ly49H

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Aja H.; Guseva, Natalya V.; Ball, Brianne L.; Heusel, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Activated natural killer (NK) cells mediate potent cytolytic and secretory effector functions, and are vital components of the early antiviral immune response. NK cell activities are regulated by the assortment of inhibitory receptors that recognize major histocompatibility class I ligands expressed on healthy cells and activating receptors that recognize inducible host ligands or ligands that are not well characterized. The activating Ly49H receptor of mouse NK cells is unique in that it specifically recognizes a virally encoded ligand, the m157 glycoprotein of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). The Ly49H-m157 interaction underlies a potent resistance mechanism (Cmv1) in C57BL/6 mice, and serves as an excellent model in which to understand how NK cells are specifically activated in vivo, as similar receptor systems are operative for human NK cells. For transduced cells expressing m157 in isolation and for MCMV-infected cells, we show that m157 is expressed in multiple isoforms with marked differences in abundance between infected fibroblasts (high) and macrophages (low). At the cell surface m157 is exclusively a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-associated protein in MCMV-infected cells. Through random and site-directed mutagenesis of m157 we identify unique residues that provide for efficient cell surface expression of m157, but fail to activate Ly49H-expressing reporter cells. These m157 mutations are predicted to alter the conformation of a putative m157 interface with Ly49H, one that relies on the position of a critical α0-helix of m157. These findings support an emerging model for a novel interaction between this important NK cell receptor and its viral ligand. PMID:18566392

  11. Mechanisms for virus-induced liver disease: tumor necrosis factor-mediated pathology independent of natural killer and T cells during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J S; Salazar-Mather, T P; Opal, S M; Biron, C A

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of endogenous NK cells and cytokines to virus-induced liver pathology was evaluated during murine cytomegalovirus infections of mice. In immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, the virus induced a self-limited liver disease characterized by hepatitis, with focal inflammation, and large grossly visible subcapsular necrotic foci. The inflammatory foci were most numerous and contained the greatest number of cells 3 days after infection; they colocalized with areas of viral antigen expression. The largest number of necrotic foci was found 2 days after infection. Overall hepatic damage, assessed as increased expression of liver enzymes in serum, accompanied the development of inflammatory and necrotic foci. Experiments with neutralizing antibodies demonstrated that although virus-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) can have antiviral effects, it also mediated significant liver pathology. TNF was required for development of hepatic necrotic foci and increased levels of liver enzymes in serum but not for increased numbers of inflammatory foci. The necrotic foci and liver enzyme indications of pathology occurred independently of NK and T cells, because mice rendered NK-cell deficient by treatment with antibodies, T- and B-cell-deficient Rag-/- mice, and NK- and T-cell-deficient E26 mice all manifested both parameters of disease. Development of necrotic foci and maximally increased levels of liver enzymes in serum also were TNF dependent in NK-cell-deficient mice. Moreover, in the immunodeficient E26 mice, virus-induced liver disease was progressive, with eventual death of the host, and neutralization of TNF significantly increased longevity. These results establish conditions separating hepatitis from significant liver damage and demonstrate a cytokine-mediated component to viral pathogenesis. PMID:9371583

  12. NEOREG: design and implementation of an online Neonatal Registration System to access, follow and analyse the data of newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Steurbaut, Kristof; De Backere, Femke; Keymeulen, Annelies; De Leenheer, Marc; Smets, Koenraad; De Turck, Filip

    2013-09-01

    Today's registration of newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is still performed on paper-based forms in Flanders, Belgium. This process has a large administrative impact. It is important that all screening tests are registered to have a complete idea of the impact of cCMV. Although these registrations are usable in computerised data analysis, these data are not available in a format to perform electronic processing. An online Neonatal Registry (NEOREG) System was designed and developed to access, follow and analyse the data of newborns remotely. It allows remote access and monitoring by the physician. The Java Enterprise layered application provides patients' diagnostic registration and treatment follow-up through a web interface and uses document forms in Portable Document Format (PDF), which incorporate all the elements from the existing forms. Forms are automatically processed to structured EHRs. Modules are included to perform statistical analysis. The design was driven by extendibility, security and usability requirements. The website load time, throughput and execution time of data analysis were evaluated in detail. The NEOREG system is able to replace the existing paper-based CMV records. PMID:23323747

  13. CD73 Is Dispensable for the Regulation of Inflationary CD8+ T-Cells after Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection and Adenovirus Immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Stuart; Colston, Julia; Emery, Vince; Klenerman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) is expressed by T-cell subsets, myeloid derived suppressive cells and endothelial cells. It works in conjunction with CD39 to regulate the formation and degradation of adenosine in vivo. Adenosine has previously been shown to suppress the proliferation and cytokine secretion of T-cells and recent evidence suggests that inhibition of CD73 has the potential to enhance T-cell directed therapies. Here we utilised a CD73 knockout mouse model to assess the suppressive ability of CD73 on CD8+ T-cell classical memory and memory “inflation”, induced by murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection and adenovirus immunisation. We show that CD73 is dispensable for normal CD8+ T-cell differentiation and function in both models. Thus CD73 as a suppressor of CD8+ T-cells is unlikely to play a deterministic role in the generation and functional characteristics of antiviral memory in these settings. PMID:25490556

  14. Elimination of complement interference can improve the diagnostic performance of the VIDAS CMV IgG assay in acute cytomegalovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Berth, Mario; Willaert, Sofie

    2016-05-01

    In this study we showed that complement factors are responsible for assay interference in the VIDAS cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunoglobulin G (IgG) assay. Three different serum treatments were applied to show the cause of interference: heat treatment (56 °C), adding cobra venom factor, and adding EDTA. Elimination of complement interference by EDTA treatment of serum was prospectively evaluated on 215 CMV IgM positive samples and a sensitivity increase of the VIDAS CMV IgG assay was noticed. On average the CMV IgG level increased 100% after EDTA treatment of the serum. In paired serum samples from 38 patients we could show that serum treatment with EDTA can make the CMV IgG level changes more obvious in recent CMV infections. Since the CMV IgG avidity II assay on VIDAS depends on the determination of CMV IgG, the CMV IgG avidity was also evaluated in this study but only a limited effect of the complement interference was observed. PMID:26971633

  15. Are female daycare workers at greater risk of cytomegalovirus infection? A secondary data analysis of CMV seroprevalence between 2010 and 2013 in Hamburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Stranzinger, Johanna; Kozak, Agnessa; Schilgen, Benjamin; Paris, Diana; Nießen, Thomas; Schmidt, Lutz; Wille, Andreas; Wagner, Norbert L.; Nienhaus, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Close contact with asymptomatic children younger than three years is a risk factor for a primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. In pregnant women, such primary infection increases the risk of CMV-induced feto- or embryopathy. Daycare providers have therefore implemented working restrictions for pregnant daycare workers (DCWs) in accordance with legislation and guidelines for maternity protection. However, little is known about the infection risk for DCWs. We therefore compared the prevalence of CMV antibodies of pregnant DCWs to that of female blood donors (BDs). Method: In a secondary data analysis, the prevalence of anti-CMV IgG among pregnant DCWs (N=509) in daycare centers (DCCs) was compared to the prevalence of female first-time BDs (N=14,358) from the greater region of Hamburg, Germany. Data collection took place between 2010 and 2013. The influence of other risk factors such as age, pregnancies and place of residence was evaluated using logistic regression models. Results: The prevalence of CMV antibodies in pregnant DCWs was higher than in female BDs (54.6 vs 41.5%; OR 1.6; 95%CI 1.3–1.9). The subgroup of BDs who had given birth to at least one child and who lived in the city of Hamburg (N=2,591) had a prevalence of CMV antibodies similar to the prevalence in pregnant DCWs (53.9 vs 54.6%; OR 0.9; 95%CI 0.8–1.2). Age, pregnancy history and living in the center of Hamburg were risk factors for CMV infections. Conclusion: The comparison of pregnant DCWs to the best-matching subgroup of female first-time BDs with past pregnancies and living in the city of Hamburg does not indicate an elevated risk of CMV infection among DCWs. However, as two secondary data sets from convenience samples were used, a more detailed investigation of the risk factors other than place of residence, age and maternity was not possible. Therefore, the CMV infection risk in DCWs should be further studied by taking into consideration the potential preventive effect of

  16. Regulatory T cells generated during cytomegalovirus in vitro stimulation of mononuclear cells from HIV-infected individuals on HAART correlate with decreased lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Jesser, Renee D.; Li, Shaobing; Weinberg, Adriana . E-mail: Adriana.Weinberg@uchsc.edu

    2006-09-01

    HIV-infected patients fail to fully recover cell-mediated immunity despite HAART. To identify regulatory factors, we studied the phenotype and function of in vitro cytomegalovirus (CMV)-stimulated T cells from HAART recipients. CFSE-measured proliferation showed CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} cells dividing in CMV-stimulated cultures. Compared with healthy controls, CMV-stimulated lymphocytes from HAART recipients had lower {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation; lower IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} production; higher CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} and CD8{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} frequencies; lower CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}; and higher FoxP3 expression in CD8{sup +}CD25{sup hi} cells. CMV-specific proliferation correlated with higher IFN{gamma}, TNF{alpha} and IL10 levels and higher CD4{sup +}perforin{sup +} and CD8{sup +}perforin{sup +} frequencies. Decreased proliferation correlated with higher CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} frequencies and TGF{beta}1 production, which also correlated with each other. Anti-TGF{beta}1 neutralizing antibodies restored CMV-specific proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion. In HIV-infected subjects, decreased proliferation correlated with higher CMV-stimulated CD8{sup +}CD25{sup hi} frequencies and their FoxP3 expression. These data indicate that FoxP3- and TGF{beta}1-expressing regulatory T cells contribute to decreased immunity in HAART recipients.

  17. Efficacy and Safety of a Preemptive Antiviral Therapy Strategy Based on Combined Virological and Immunological Monitoring for Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, David; Amat, Paula; de la Cámara, Rafael; López, Javier; Vázquez, Lourdes; Serrano, David; Nieto, José; Rovira, Monserrat; Piñana, José Luis; Giménez, Estela; Solano, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preemptive antiviral therapy for active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients (Allo-SCT) results in overtreatment and a high rate of recurrences. Monitoring of CMV-specific T-cell immunity may help to individualize treatments and minimize these problems. Methods. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, matched comparison-group study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel strategy that consisted of interrupting anti-CMV therapy upon CMV DNAemia clearance and concurrent detection of phosphoprotein 65/immediate-early-1-specific interferon-γ-producing CD8+ T cells at levels of >1 cell/µL (within 30 days after the initiation of therapy). Immunological monitoring was performed on days +7, +14, +21, and +28 after treatment initiation. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of recurrent DNAemia within 2 months after treatment cessation. Secondary endpoints were the length of antiviral treatment courses and the incidence of hematological toxicity. Results. Sixty-one patients were enrolled in the study group. Fifty-six patients were included in the matched-control group. Eleven patients (18%) fulfilled the criteria for antiviral treatment interruption. The cumulative incidence of recurrent CMV DNAemia was significantly lower (P = .02) in these patients than in patients in the comparative groups. Likewise, the length of antiviral treatment courses was significantly shorter in these patients than that in patients in the matched-control group (P = .003). No significant differences in the incidence of hematological toxicity was observed between the comparative groups. Conclusions. Our data support the clinical utility of combining immunological and virological monitoring for the management of CMV infection in a subset of Allo-SCT recipients. PMID:27419179

  18. Infection of a Single Cell Line with Distinct Strains of Human Cytomegalovirus Can Result in Large Variations in Virion Production and Facilitate Efficient Screening of Virus Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Anamaria G.; O'Dowd, John M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, we reported that the absence of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, a critical DNA damage response (DDR) signaling component for double-strand breaks, caused no change in HCMV Towne virion production. Later, others reported decreased AD169 viral titers in the absence of ATM. To address this discrepancy, human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF) and three ATM− lines (GM02530, GM05823, and GM03395) were infected with both Towne and AD169. Two additional ATM− lines (GM02052 and GM03487) were infected with Towne. Remarkably, both previous studies' results were confirmed. However, the increased number of cell lines and infections with both lab-adapted strains confirmed that ATM was not necessary to produce wild-type-level titers in fibroblasts. Instead, interactions between individual virus strains and the cellular microenvironment of the individual ATM− line determined efficiency of virion production. Surprisingly, these two commonly used lab-adapted strains produced drastically different titers in one ATM− cell line, GM05823. The differences in titer suggested a rapid method for identifying genes involved in differential virion production. In silico comparison of the Towne and AD169 genomes determined a list of 28 probable candidates responsible for the difference. Using serial iterations of an experiment involving virion entry and input genome nuclear trafficking with a panel of related strains, we reduced this list to four (UL129, UL145, UL147, and UL148). As a proof of principle, reintroduction of UL148 largely rescued genome trafficking. Therefore, use of a battery of related strains offers an efficient method to narrow lists of candidate genes affecting various virus life cycle checkpoints. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection of multiple cell lines lacking ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein produced wild-type levels of infectious virus. Interactions between virus strains and the microenvironment of individual

  19. Infection Prophylaxis and Management in Treating Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Mast Cell Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma

  20. Cytomegalovirus appendicitis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Canterino, Joseph E; McCormack, Michael; Gurung, Ananta; Passarelli, James; Landry, Marie L; Golden, Marjorie

    2016-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common viral pathogen. Asymptomatic infection or a mononucleosis syndrome are the most common manifestations in otherwise healthy individuals. End-organ disease is rare in immunocompetent individuals. Here, we describe a case of CMV appendicitis in a patient without an immune-compromising condition. PMID:26942831

  1. Cytomegalovirus-infected human endothelial cells can stimulate allogeneic CD4+ memory T cells by releasing antigenic exosomes1

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jason D.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2008-01-01

    Human CMV infection is controlled by T cell-mediated immunity and in immunosuppressed transplant patients it is associated with acute allograft rejection as well as chronic allograft vasculopathy. CMV infects endothelial cells (EC) and it is thought that CMV-specific host immune responses to infected allograft EC contribute to rejection. In vitro, CD4+ T cells from CMV-positive donors (but not CMV-negative donors) are readily activated by CMV-infected allogeneic EC, although it is unclear how allogeneic CMV-infected EC activate self-class II MHC-restricted memory CD4+ T cells. In this study we confirm that purified CD4+ T cells from CMV+ donors are activated by allogeneic CMV-infected EC, but find that the response is dependent upon co-purified APC expressing class II MHC that are autologous to the T cells. The transfer of CMV antigens from infected EC to APC can be mediated by EC-derived exosome-like particles. These results provide a mechanism by which CMV can exacerbate allograft rejection, and suggest a novel function of EC-derived exosomes that could contribute in a more general manner to immune surveillance. PMID:19155503

  2. Emerging infections - implications for dental care.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, N P

    2016-07-01

    Over the last 20 years the majority of emerging infections which have spread rapidly across the globe have been respiratory infections that are spread via droplets, a trend which is likely to continue. Aerosol spray generation in the dental surgery has the potential to spread such infections to staff or other patients. Although the diseases may differ, some common approaches can reduce the risk of transmission. Dental professionals should be aware of areas affected by emerging infections, the incubation period and the recent travel history of patients. Elective dental care for those returning from areas affected by emerging infections should be delayed until the incubation period for the infection is over. PMID:27388077

  3. Analysis of Mutations in the Gene Encoding Cytomegalovirus DNA Polymerase in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Brincidofovir Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, E. Randall; Foster, Scott; Brundage, Tom; Chou, Sunwen; Prichard, Mark N.; Kleiboeker, Steven; Wilson, Chad; Colville, Donella; Mommeja-Marin, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Brincidofovir is an oral antiviral in development for prevention of cytomegalovirus disease. Cytomegalovirus genotyping results from a phase 2 trial comparing brincidofovir to placebo for prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus infection in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients provided initial data on the clinical resistance profile for brincidofovir. In this study, no known resistance-associated mutations were detected in brincidofovir-treated subjects; identified genotypic substitutions did not confer resistance to cytomegalovirus antivirals in vitro, suggesting that these changes represent polymorphisms unrelated to brincidofovir resistance. Lack of evidence for genotypic resistance during prophylaxis suggests that first-line use of brincidofovir for prevention of cytomegalovirus infection may preserve downstream options for patients. PMID:26941282

  4. Analysis of Mutations in the Gene Encoding Cytomegalovirus DNA Polymerase in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Brincidofovir Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lanier, E Randall; Foster, Scott; Brundage, Tom; Chou, Sunwen; Prichard, Mark N; Kleiboeker, Steven; Wilson, Chad; Colville, Donella; Mommeja-Marin, Herve

    2016-07-01

    Brincidofovir is an oral antiviral in development for prevention of cytomegalovirus disease. Cytomegalovirus genotyping results from a phase 2 trial comparing brincidofovir to placebo for prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus infection in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients provided initial data on the clinical resistance profile for brincidofovir. In this study, no known resistance-associated mutations were detected in brincidofovir-treated subjects; identified genotypic substitutions did not confer resistance to cytomegalovirus antivirals in vitro, suggesting that these changes represent polymorphisms unrelated to brincidofovir resistance. Lack of evidence for genotypic resistance during prophylaxis suggests that first-line use of brincidofovir for prevention of cytomegalovirus infection may preserve downstream options for patients. PMID:26941282

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus Inhibits Erythropoietin Production

    PubMed Central

    Dzabic, Mensur; Bakker, Frank; Davoudi, Belghis; Jeffery, Hannah; Religa, Piotr; Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Yaiw, Koon-Chu; Rahbar, Afsar; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is a feature of CKD and a complication of renal transplantation, often caused by impaired production of erythropoietin. The kidney is a target organ for human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) in such patients, but it is not known whether hCMV effects erythropoietin production. We found that kidneys from patients with CKD were positive for hCMV protein and that blood levels of hCMV IgG inversely correlated with red blood cell count. In mice, systemic murine cytomegalovirus infection decreased serum erythropoietin levels. In human erythropoietin-producing cells, hCMV inhibited hypoxia-induced expression of erythropoietin mRNA and protein. hCMV early gene expression was responsible, as ultraviolet-inactivated virus had no effect and valganciclovir treatment showed that late gene expression was nonessential. Hypoxia-induced gene transcription is controlled by the transcription factors hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α and HIF2α, which are constitutively produced but stable only under low oxygen conditions. We found that hCMV inhibited constitutive production of HIF2α mRNA. HIF2α is thought to be the master regulator of erythropoietin transcription. Single-cell analysis revealed that nuclear accumulation of HIF2α was inhibited in hCMV-infected cells, and the extent of inhibition correlated with hCMV protein expression. Our findings suggest that renal hCMV infection could induce or exacerbate anemia in patients. PMID:24722450

  6. Treatment of gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus infection with twice-daily foscarnet: a pilot study of safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, D T; Poles, M A; Lew, E A; Martin-Munley, S; Johnson, J; Nix, D; Faust, M J

    1997-01-01

    Ten patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) gastrointestinal infection were included in an open-label study to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of 90 mg of intravenous foscarnet/kg of body weight twice daily accompanied by (pre)hydration of 500 to 750 ml. Efficacy was documented endoscopically, while safety was evaluated clinically by patient reports and physical and laboratory observation. The pharmacokinetics of foscarnet was evaluated after the first dose and following approximately 20 days of therapy. Nine patients (90%) responded histopathologically, nine (90%) responded endoscopically, and nine (90%) responded symptomatically to foscarnet therapy. Adverse events resulted in discontinuance of medication in the case of one patient. The mean maximal concentration was 621 microM following the first dose and 687 microM at steady state (P = 0.11). The apparent elimination rate constant and elimination half-life were not different between dose 1 and steady state. There were no significant changes in foscarnet excretion or renal clearance between dose 1 and steady state. The steady-state volume of distribution was 23.4 liters following the first dose and 19.0 liters at steady state (P < 0.002). Twice-daily foscarnet appeared to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of CMV gastrointestinal disease in this study, resulting in endoscopic or histologic improvement in 9 of the 10 (90%) patients. Minor changes in clearance and volume of distribution noted at steady state compared to single-dose administration are readily explained by study design, known information about foscarnet pharmacokinetics, and changes in body weight and creatinine clearance in the patients. PMID:9174175

  7. Cytomegalovirus Infection Leads to Development of High Frequencies of Cytotoxic Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells Targeted to Vascular Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Pachnio, Annette; Ciaurriz, Miriam; Begum, Jusnara; Lal, Neeraj; Zuo, Jianmin; Beggs, Andrew; Moss, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection elicits a very strong and sustained intravascular T cell immune response which may contribute towards development of accelerated immune senescence and vascular disease in older people. Virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses have been investigated extensively through the use of HLA-peptide tetramers but much less is known regarding CMV-specific CD4+ T cells. We used a range of HLA class II-peptide tetramers to investigate the phenotypic and transcriptional profile of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells within healthy donors. We show that such cells comprise an average of 0.45% of the CD4+ T cell pool and can reach up to 24% in some individuals (range 0.01-24%). CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display a highly differentiated effector memory phenotype and express a range of cytokines, dominated by dual TNF-α and IFN-γ expression, although substantial populations which express IL-4 were seen in some donors. Microarray analysis and phenotypic expression revealed a profile of unique features. These include the expression of CX3CR1, which would direct cells towards fractalkine on activated endothelium, and the β2-adrenergic receptor, which could permit rapid response to stress. CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display an intense cytotoxic profile with high level expression of granzyme B and perforin, a pattern which increases further during aging. In addition CMV-specific CD4+ T cells demonstrate strong cytotoxic activity against antigen-loaded target cells when isolated directly ex vivo. PD-1 expression is present on 47% of cells but both the intensity and distribution of the inhibitory receptor is reduced in older people. These findings reveal the marked accumulation and unique phenotype of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells and indicate how such T cells may contribute to the vascular complications associated with CMV in older people. PMID:27606804

  8. Risk Factors and Utility of a Risk-Based Algorithm for Monitoring Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, and Adenovirus Infections in Pediatric Recipients after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rustia, Evelyn; Violago, Leah; Jin, Zhezhen; Foca, Marc D; Kahn, Justine M; Arnold, Staci; Sosna, Jean; Bhatia, Monica; Kung, Andrew L; George, Diane; Garvin, James H; Satwani, Prakash

    2016-09-01

    Infectious complications, particularly viral infections, remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Only a handful of studies in children have analyzed the risks for and impact of viremia on alloHCT-related outcomes. We conducted a retrospective study of 140 pediatric patients undergoing alloHCT to investigate the incidence of and risk factors for cytomegalovirus (CMV), adenovirus (ADV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia and viral disease after alloHCT. Furthermore, we assessed the impact of viremia on days of hospitalization and develop an algorithm for routine monitoring of viremia. Patients were monitored before alloHCT and then weekly for 180 days after alloHCT. Patients were considered to have viremia if CMV were > 600 copies/mL, EBV were > 1000 copies/mL, or ADV were > 1000 copies/mL on 2 consecutive PCRs. The overall incidences of viremia and viral disease in all patients from day 0 to +180 after alloHCT were 41.4% (n = 58) and 17% (n = 24), respectively. The overall survival for patients with viremia and viral disease was significantly lower compared with those without viremia (58% versus 74.2%, P = .03) and viral disease (48.2% versus 71.2%, P = .024). We identified that pretransplantation CMV risk status, pre-alloHCT viremia, and use of alemtuzumab were associated with the risk of post-alloHCT viremia. The average hospitalization days in patients with CMV risk (P = .011), viremia (P = .024), and viral disease (P = .002) were significantly higher. The algorithm developed from our data can potentially reduce viral PCR testing by 50% and is being studied prospectively at our center. Improved preventative treatment strategies for children at risk of viremia after alloHCT are needed. PMID:27252110

  9. [Chronic cytomegalovirus infection that present specific clinical course--a case of a boy with common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Wada, Y; Sato, T; Kitajima, H; Kubo, M

    1995-04-01

    We describe an 8-year-old boy with CVID and chronic CMV infection. Although at onset he was diagnosed as IgA deficiency, 4 years after his clinical manifestations because compatible to CVID. During his clinical course he had suffered from various disorders as follows; AIHA, interstitial pneumonia, hemophagocytic syndrome, chronic gastroenterocolitis and so forth. At the age of 8 the PCR of CMV-DNA of biopsy specimen from colon, lung and bone marrow were confirmed to be positive. Hematological examinations revealed abnormal cellular immunity such as decreased CD 4/8 ratio with increased HLA- DR+ CD 8+ T cell, decrease of absolute blood lymphocytes count and reduced response of lymphocytes to blastogenetic agents. These findings brought us to diagnose him as having CVID complicated with chronic CMV infection. This case gives us some impact to speculate what role CMV infection plays in CVID, Whose etiology is unknown. PMID:7553061

  10. IL-33 receptor ST2 amplifies the expansion of NK cells and enhances host defense during mouse cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Nabekura, Tsukasa; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-06-15

    NK cells provide important host defense against viruses and can differentiate into self-renewing memory NK cells after infection, alloantigen stimulation, and cytokine stimulation. In this study, we investigated the role of the IL-33 receptor ST2 in the differentiation of NK cells during mouse CMV (MCMV) infection. Although ST2-deficient (Il1rl1 (-/-)) Ly49H(+) NK cells develop normally and differentiate into memory cells after MCMV infection, naive and memory Il1rl1 (-/-) Ly49H(+) NK cells exhibited profound defects in MCMV-specific expansion, resulting in impaired protection against MCMV challenge. Additionally, IL-33 enhanced m157 Ag-specific proliferation of Ly49H(+) NK cells in vitro. Thus, an IL-33/ST2 signaling axis in NK cells contributes to host defense against MCMV. PMID:25926677

  11. Inhibition of IKKα by BAY61-3606 Reveals IKKα-Dependent Histone H3 Phosphorylation in Human Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Catherine M. K.; Donovan-Banfield, I’ah Z.; Tan, Li; Zhang, Tinghu; Gray, Nathanael S.; Strang, Blair L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors can be used as tools to identify proteins and pathways required for virus replication. Using virus replication assays and western blotting we found that the widely used protein kinase inhibitor BAY61-3606 inhibits replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 and the accumulation of HCMV immediate-early proteins in AD169 infected cells, but has no effect on replication of HCMV strain Merlin. Using in vitro kinase assays we found that BAY61-3606 is a potent inhibitor of the cellular kinase IKKα. Infection of cells treated with siRNA targeting IKKα indicated IKKα was required for efficient AD169 replication and immediate-early protein production. We hypothesized that IKKα was required for AD169 immediate-early protein production as part of the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. However, although BAY61-3606 inhibited phosphorylation of the IKKα substrate IκBα, we found no canonical or non-canonical NF-κB signaling in AD169 infected cells. Rather, we observed that treatment of cells with BAY61-3606 or siRNA targeting IKKα decreased phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 (H3S10p) in western blotting assays. Furthermore, we found treatment of cells with BAY61-3606, but not siRNA targeting IKKα, inhibited the accumulation of histone H3 acetylation (H3K9ac, H3K18ac and H3K27ac) and tri-methylation (H3K27me3 and H3K36me3) modifications. Therefore, the requirement for IKKα in HCMV replication was strain-dependent and during replication of an HCMV strain requiring IKKα, IKKα-dependent H3S10 phosphorylation was associated with efficient HCMV replication and immediate-early protein production. Plus, inhibition of HCMV replication by BAY61-3606 is associated with acetylation and tri-methylation modifications of histone H3 that do not involve IKKα. PMID:26930276

  12. Inhibition of IKKα by BAY61-3606 Reveals IKKα-Dependent Histone H3 Phosphorylation in Human Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Catherine M K; Donovan-Banfield, I'ah Z; Tan, Li; Zhang, Tinghu; Gray, Nathanael S; Strang, Blair L

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors can be used as tools to identify proteins and pathways required for virus replication. Using virus replication assays and western blotting we found that the widely used protein kinase inhibitor BAY61-3606 inhibits replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 and the accumulation of HCMV immediate-early proteins in AD169 infected cells, but has no effect on replication of HCMV strain Merlin. Using in vitro kinase assays we found that BAY61-3606 is a potent inhibitor of the cellular kinase IKKα. Infection of cells treated with siRNA targeting IKKα indicated IKKα was required for efficient AD169 replication and immediate-early protein production. We hypothesized that IKKα was required for AD169 immediate-early protein production as part of the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. However, although BAY61-3606 inhibited phosphorylation of the IKKα substrate IκBα, we found no canonical or non-canonical NF-κB signaling in AD169 infected cells. Rather, we observed that treatment of cells with BAY61-3606 or siRNA targeting IKKα decreased phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 (H3S10p) in western blotting assays. Furthermore, we found treatment of cells with BAY61-3606, but not siRNA targeting IKKα, inhibited the accumulation of histone H3 acetylation (H3K9ac, H3K18ac and H3K27ac) and tri-methylation (H3K27me3 and H3K36me3) modifications. Therefore, the requirement for IKKα in HCMV replication was strain-dependent and during replication of an HCMV strain requiring IKKα, IKKα-dependent H3S10 phosphorylation was associated with efficient HCMV replication and immediate-early protein production. Plus, inhibition of HCMV replication by BAY61-3606 is associated with acetylation and tri-methylation modifications of histone H3 that do not involve IKKα. PMID:26930276

  13. Comparison of cytomegalovirus (CMV) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot and CMV quantiferon gamma interferon-releasing assays in assessing risk of CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Abate, Davide; Saldan, Alda; Mengoli, Carlo; Fiscon, Marta; Silvestre, Cristina; Fallico, Loredana; Peracchi, Marta; Furian, Lucrezia; Cusinato, Riccardo; Bonfante, Luciana; Rossi, Barbara; Marchini, Francesco; Sgarabotto, Dino; Rigotti, Paolo; Palù, Giorgio

    2013-08-01

    Assessing cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) represents an appealing strategy for identifying transplant recipients at risk of infection. In this study, we compared two gamma interferon-releasing assays (IGRAs), Quantiferon-CMV and CMV enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT), to determine the ability of each test to predict protective CMV-specific T-cell responses. Two hundred twenty-one Quantiferon-CMV and ELISPOT tests were conducted on 120 adult kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), including 100 CMV-seropositive transplant recipients (R+) and 20 CMV-seronegative transplant recipients of a CMV-positive donor (D+/R-). As a control cohort, 39 healthy adult subjects (including 33 CMV-seropositive and 6 CMV-seronegative subjects) were enrolled. CMV IgG serology was used as a reference for both tests. In the CMV-seropositive individuals, the ELISPOT and Quantiferon-CMV assays provided 46% concordance with the serology, 12% discordance, 18% disagreement between ELISPOT or Quantiferon-CMV and the serology, and 24% gray areas when one or both tests resulted in weak positives. None of the CMV-seronegative subjects showed detectable responses in the ELISPOT or the Quantiferon-CMV test. In transplant recipients, both the ELISPOT and Quantiferon-CMV assays positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with CMV DNAemia in a significant way (P<0.05). During the antiviral prophylaxis, all 20 D+/R- KTRs we examined displayed undetectable Quantiferon-CMV and ELISPOT results, and there was no evidence of CMV seroconversion. The receiving operator curve (ROC) statistical analysis revealed similar specificities and sensitivities in predicting detectable viremia (areas under the curve [AUC], 0.66 and 0.62 for Quantiferon-CMV and ELISPOT, respectively). ELISPOT and Quantiferon-CMV values of >150 spots/200,000 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and >1 to 6 IU gamma interferon (IFN-γ) were associated with protection from CMV

  14. Comparison of Monovalent Glycoprotein B with Bivalent gB/pp65 (GP83) Vaccine for Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection in a Guinea Pig Model: Inclusion of GP83 Reduces Antibody Response but Provides Equivalent Protection Against Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Elizabeth C.; Gillis, Pete; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Fernández-Alarcón, Claudia; Schmit, Megan; Zabeli, Jason C.; Wussow, Felix; Diamond, Don J.; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) subunit vaccine candidates include glycoprotein B (gB), and phosphoprotein ppUL83 (pp65). Using a guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) model, this study compared immunogenicity, pregnancy outcome, and congenital viral infection following pre-pregnancy immunization with a three-dose series of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)- vectored vaccines consisting either of gB administered alone, or simultaneously with a pp65 homolog (GP83)-expressing vaccine. Vaccinated and control dams were challenged at midgestation with salivary gland-adapted GPCMV. Comparisons included ELISA and neutralizing antibody responses, maternal viral load, pup mortality, and congenital infection rates. Strikingly, ELISA and neutralization titers were significantly lower in the gB/GP83 combined vaccine group than in the gB group. However, both vaccines protected against pup mortality (60.5% in controls vs. 11.4% and 8.3% in gB and gB/GP83 combination groups, respectively; p<0.0001). Reductions in pup viral load were noted for both groups compared to control, but preconception vaccine resulted in a significant reduction in GPCMV transmission in the monovalent gB group only (26/44, 59 % v. 27/34, 79 % in controls; p<0.05). We conclude that, in the MVA platform, adding GP83 to a gB subunit vaccine interferes with antibody responses and diminishes protection against congenital GPCMV infection, but does not decrease protection against pup mortality. PMID:26079615

  15. MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS HOST RESISTANCE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) is a well developed and extremely useful and relevant host resistance model for immunotoxicity testing. at cytomegalovirus (RCMV) is currently under development and may have similar applications. ytomegaloviruses are species specific; RCMV is a distin...

  16. Human cytomegalovirus induces JC virus DNA replication in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Albrecht, I; Stephan, S; Bürkle, A; zur Hausen, H

    1993-01-01

    JC virus, a human papovavirus, is the causative agent of the demyelinating brain disease progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a rare but fatal disease which develops as a complication of severe immunosuppression. Latent JC virus is harbored by many asymptomatic carriers and is transiently reactivated from the latent state upon immunosuppression. JC virus has a very restricted host range, with human glial cells being the only tissue in which it can replicate at reasonable efficiency. Evidence that latent human cytomegalovirus is harbored in the kidney similar to latent JC virus led to the speculation that during episodes of impaired immunocompetence, cytomegalovirus might serve as helper virus for JC virus replication in otherwise nonpermissive cells. We show here that cytomegalovirus infection indeed leads to considerable JC virus DNA replication in cultured human fibroblasts that are nonpermissive for the replication of JC virus alone. Cytomegalovirus-mediated JC virus replication is dependent on the JC virus origin of replication and T antigen. Ganciclovir-induced inhibition of cytomegalovirus replication is associated with a concomitant inhibition of JC virus replication. These results suggest that reactivation of cytomegalovirus during episodes of immunosuppression might lead to activation of latent JC virus, which would enhance the probability of subsequent PML development. Ganciclovir-induced repression of both cytomegalovirus and JC virus replication may form the rational basis for the development of an approach toward treatment or prevention of PML. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248262

  17. Glove powder: implications for infection control.

    PubMed

    Dave, J; Wilcox, M H; Kellett, M

    1999-08-01

    Gloves are increasingly promoted for use by healthcare workers, but this use is not without risk. Data associating powdered gloves with an increased risk of latex allergy is available and there is circumstantial evidence that the powder used may increase bacterial environmental contamination. In animal models, corn starch, the material used as glove powder, promotes wound infection. Infection control teams need to be aware of this evidence and should support switching from use of powdered to powder free gloves. PMID:10467541

  18. The Effects of Age and Latent Cytomegalovirus Infection on NK-Cell Phenotype and Exercise Responsiveness in Man

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Austin B.; Spielmann, Guillaume; Agha, Nadia; Simpson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The redeployment of NK-cells in response to an acute bout of exercise is thought to be an integral component of the “fight-or-flight” response, preparing the body for potential injury or infection. We showed previously that CMV seropositivity impairs the redeployment of NK-cells with exercise in the young. In the current study, we examined the effect of aging on the redeployment of NK-cells with exercise in the context of CMV. We show here that CMV blunts the exercise-induced redeployment of NK-cells in both younger (23–39 yrs) and older (50–64 yrs) subjects with older CMVneg subjects showing the largest postexercise mobilization and 1 h postexercise egress of NK-cells. The blunted exercise response in CMVpos individuals was associated with a decreased relative redeployment of the CD158a+ and CD57+ NK-cell subsets in younger and older individuals. In addition, we show that aging is associated with a CMV-independent increase in the proportion of NK-cells expressing the terminal differentiation marker CD57, while CMV is associated with an age-dependent decrease in the proportion of NK-cells expressing the inhibitory receptors KLRG1 (in the younger group) and CD158a (in the older group). Collectively, these data suggest that CMV may decrease NK-cell mediated immunosurveillance after exercise in both younger and older individuals. PMID:26583066

  19. The Effects of Age and Latent Cytomegalovirus Infection on NK-Cell Phenotype and Exercise Responsiveness in Man.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Austin B; Spielmann, Guillaume; Agha, Nadia; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    The redeployment of NK-cells in response to an acute bout of exercise is thought to be an integral component of the "fight-or-flight" response, preparing the body for potential injury or infection. We showed previously that CMV seropositivity impairs the redeployment of NK-cells with exercise in the young. In the current study, we examined the effect of aging on the redeployment of NK-cells with exercise in the context of CMV. We show here that CMV blunts the exercise-induced redeployment of NK-cells in both younger (23-39 yrs) and older (50-64 yrs) subjects with older CMV(neg) subjects showing the largest postexercise mobilization and 1 h postexercise egress of NK-cells. The blunted exercise response in CMV(pos) individuals was associated with a decreased relative redeployment of the CD158a+ and CD57+ NK-cell subsets in younger and older individuals. In addition, we show that aging is associated with a CMV-independent increase in the proportion of NK-cells expressing the terminal differentiation marker CD57, while CMV is associated with an age-dependent decrease in the proportion of NK-cells expressing the inhibitory receptors KLRG1 (in the younger group) and CD158a (in the older group). Collectively, these data suggest that CMV may decrease NK-cell mediated immunosurveillance after exercise in both younger and older individuals. PMID:26583066

  20. Molecular Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Among Infants with Congenital Anomalies in Khartoum State, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Maha G.; Ali, Aisha S.; Mustafa, Mohamed O.; Musa, Dalal F.; El Hussein, Abdel Rahim M.; Elkhidir, Isam M.; Enan, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection still represents the most common potentially serious viral complication in humans and is a major cause of congenital anomalies in infants. This study is aimed to detect HCMV in infants with congenital anomalies. Study subjects consisted of infants born with neural tube defect, hydrocephalus and microcephaly. Fifty serum specimens (20 males, 30 females) were collected from different hospitals in Khartoum State. The sera were investigated for cytomegalovirus specific immunoglobin M (IgM) antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and for Cytomegalovirus DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of the 50 sera tested, one patient’s (2%) sample showed HCMV IgM, but with no detectable DNA, other 4(8.2 %) sera were positive for HCMV DNA but with no detectable IgM. Various diagnostic techniques should be considered to evaluate HCMV disease and routine screening for HCMV should be introduced for pregnant women in this setting. It is vital to initiate further research work with many samples from different area to assess prevalence and characterize HCMV and evaluate its maternal health implications. PMID:26862356

  1. Overview: cytomegalovirus and the herpesviruses in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J A

    2013-02-01

    Herpesviruses infect most animal species. Infections due to the eight human herpesviruses (HHV) are exacerbated by immunosuppression in organ transplantation. The special features of the herpesvirus life cycle include the ability to establish latent, nonproductive infection and the life-long capacity for reactivation to productive, lytic infection. Interactions between latent virus and the immune system determine the frequency and severity of symptomatic infections. The immunologic and cellular effects of herpesvirus infections contribute to risk for opportunistic infections and graft rejection. Among the most important advances in transplantation are laboratory assays for the diagnosis and monitoring of herpesvirus infections and antiviral agents with improved efficacy in prophylaxis and therapy. For herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus and cytomegalovirus, these advances have significantly reduced the morbidity of infection. The syndromes of EBV-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) and Kaposi's sarcoma remain important complications of immunosuppression. The epidemiology and essential biology of human herpesvirus is reviewed. PMID:23347210

  2. Infrequency of cytomegalovirus genome in coronary arteriopathy of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Kandolf, R.; Kendall, T. J.; Thieszen, S. L.; Wilson, J. E.; Radio, S. J.; Costanzo, M. R.; Winters, G. L.; Miller, L. L.; McManus, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    In heart transplantation, long-term engraftment success is severely limited by the rapid development of obliterative disease of the coronary arteries. Data from various groups have been suggestive of a pathogenetic role of herpesviruses, particularly human cytomegalovirus, in accelerated allograft coronary artery disease; however, results are not yet conclusive. This study examines the hypothesis that human cytomegalovirus infection of allograft tissues is related pathogenetically and directly to accelerated coronary artery disease. Using in situ DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, we examined particular coronary artery segments from 41 human heart allografts (ranging from 4 days to greater than 4 years after transplantation; mean, 457 days) and 22 donor age- and gender-comparable, coronary site-matched trauma victims for presence of human cytomegalovirus DNA. Human cytomegalovirus genome was detected in 8 of 41 (19.5%) allografts and in 1 of 22 (4.5%) control hearts. This difference in positivity was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). In the human cytomegalovirus-positive hearts, viral genome was localized to perivascular myocardium or coronary artery media or adventitia. Human cytomegalovirus genome was not detected in arterial intima of any allograft or control heart, although human cytomegalovirus genome was readily identified within intima of small pulmonary arteries from lung tissue with human cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. By statistical analyses, the presence of human cytomegalovirus genome was not associated with the nature or digitized extent of transplant arteriopathy, evidence of rejection, allograft recipient or donor serological data suggestive of human cytomegalovirus infection, duration of allograft implantation, or causes of death or retransplantation. Thus, our data indicate a low frequency of detectable human cytomegalovirus genome in accelerated coronary artery disease and do not support a direct role for human cytomegalovirus

  3. Acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In healthy subjects, Cytomegalovirus infection can be asymptomatic or manifest as mononucleosis syndrome, but organ disease has also been reported. However, in immunocompromised patients this infection can lead to its most significant and severe disease and even mortality. When Cytomegalovirus causes a gastrointestinal tract infection, it more commonly manifests with luminal tract disease and is usually characterized by ulcerative lesions. Appendicitis is a rare manifestation, and has been reported mainly in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients or patients with other causes of immunocompromise. Case presentation The authors report on a case of acute primary Cytomegalovirus infection complicated with acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent 24-year-old Caucasian man also suffering from primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations, serology results, as well as microbiological and histological findings. Treatment consisted of surgery and anti-Cytomegalovirus therapy. Conclusions Cytomegalovirus should be included among the etiologic agents of acute appendicitis in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Currently, there are no definitive data regarding the frequency of Cytomegalovirus appendicitis and the role of anti-Cytomegalovirus treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-negative and apparently immunocompetent subjects. PMID:24612821

  4. Activity of trifluorothymidine against cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Wingard, J R; Stuart, R K; Saral, R; Burns, W H

    1981-01-01

    Trifluorothymidine (TFT) was tested for antiviral activity against mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in one-step replication assays. The TFT concentration required to reduce virus yield by 50% (ID50) was 0.22 microM for MCMV and 0.012 microM for HCMV. The antiviral activity of TFT against MCMV was reversed by addition of equimolar thymidine, and no antiviral activity was demonstrable in a host cell line lacking thymidine kinase. Thus, TFT's anti-MCMV activity is dependent on a host cell TK since this herpesvirus lacks thymidine kinase. A continuous subcutaneous infusion of TFT achieving a serum concentration of 1 microM failed to protect mice from lethal MCMV infection, perhaps because serum levels of thymidine were comparable to the drug level. Comparison of the ID50 against HCMV and the ID50 against human bone marrow progenitor cells resulted in an in vitro therapeutic ratio of 108, suggesting that TFT might offer some promise as a clinically useful anti-HCMV agent. PMID:6272627

  5. Expansion of a unique CD57⁺NKG2Chi natural killer cell subset during acute human cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vergès, Sandra; Milush, Jeffrey M; Schwartz, Brian S; Pando, Marcelo J; Jarjoura, Jessica; York, Vanessa A; Houchins, Jeffrey P; Miller, Steve; Kang, Sang-Mo; Norris, Phillip J; Nixon, Douglas F; Lanier, Lewis L

    2011-09-01

    During human CMV infection, there is a preferential expansion of natural killer (NK) cells expressing the activating CD94-NKG2C receptor complex, implicating this receptor in the recognition of CMV-infected cells. We hypothesized that NK cells expanded in response to pathogens will be marked by expression of CD57, a carbohydrate antigen expressed on highly mature cells within the CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cell compartment. Here we demonstrate the preferential expansion of a unique subset of NK cells coexpressing the activating CD94-NKG2C receptor and CD57 in CMV(+) donors. These CD57(+)NKG2C(hi) NK cells degranulated in response to stimulation through their NKG2C receptor. Furthermore, CD57(+)NKG2C(hi) NK cells preferentially lack expression of the inhibitory NKG2A receptor and the inhibitory KIR3DL1 receptor in individuals expressing its HLA-Bw4 ligand. Moreover, in solid-organ transplant recipients with active CMV infection, the percentage of CD57(+)NKG2C(hi) NK cells in the total NK cell population preferentially increased. During acute CMV infection, the NKG2C(+) NK cells proliferated, became NKG2C(hi), and finally acquired CD57. Thus, we propose that CD57 might provide a marker of "memory" NK cells that have been expanded in response to infection. PMID:21825173

  6. Human trophoblasts confer resistance to viruses implicated in perinatal infection

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Avraham; DELORME-AXFORD, Elizabeth; SLEIGHER, Christie; FREY, Teryl K.; TROBAUGH, Derek W.; KLIMSTRA, William B.; EMERT-SEDLAK, Lori A.; SMITHGALL, Thomas E.; KINCHINGTON, Paul R.; VADIA, Stephen; SEVEAU, Stephanie; Boyle, Jon P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Primary human trophoblasts were previously shown to be resistant to viral infection, and able to confer this resistance to non-trophoblast cells. Can trophoblasts protect non-trophoblastic cells from infection by viruses or other intracellular pathogens that are implicated in perinatal infection? Study Design Isolated primary term human trophoblasts were cultured for 72 h. Diverse non-placental human cell lines (U2OS, HFF, TZM-bl, MeWo, and Caco-2) were pre-exposed to either trophoblast conditioned, non-conditioned medium, or miR-517-3p for 24 h. Cells were infected with several viral and non-viral pathogens known to be associated with perinatal infections. Cellular infection was defined and quantified by plaque assays, luciferase assays, microscopy, and/or colonization assays. Differences in infection were assessed by Student's t-test or ANOVA with Bonferroni's correction. Results Infection by rubella and other togaviruses, HIV-1, and varicella zoster, was attenuated in cells pre-exposed to trophoblast conditioned medium (p <0.05), and a partial effect by the Ch.19 microRNA miR-517-3p on specific pathogens. The conditioned medium had no effect on infection by Toxoplasma gondii or Listeria monocytogenes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that medium conditioned by primary human trophoblasts attenuate viral infection in non-trophoblastic cells. Our data point to a trophoblast-specific antiviral effect that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:25108145

  7. Distinctive in vitro effects of T-cell growth cytokines on cytomegalovirus-stimulated T-cell responses of HIV-infected HAART recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Julie; Jesser, Renee; Weinberg, Adriana

    2008-08-15

    Functional immune reconstitution is limited after HAART, maintaining the interest in adjunctive immune-modulators. We compared in vitro the effects of the {gamma}-chain T-cell growth cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IL-7 and IL-15 on cytomegalovirus-stimulated cell-mediated immunity. IL-2 and IL-15 increased cytomegalovirus-specific lymphocyte proliferation in HAART recipients, whereas IL-4 and IL-7 did not. The boosting effect of IL-2 and IL-15 on proliferation correlated with their ability to prevent late apoptosis. However, IL-2 increased the frequency of cells in early apoptosis, whereas IL-15 increased the frequency of fully viable cells. Both IL-2 and IL-15 increased cytomegalovirus-induced CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T-cell proliferation and the synthesis of Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. However, only IL-2 increased the frequency of regulatory T cells and Th2 cytokine production, both of which have the potential to attenuate antiviral immune responses. Overall, compared to other {gamma}-chain cytokines, IL-15 had the most favorable profile for boosting antiviral cell-mediated immunity.

  8. Vaccination with a Live Attenuated Cytomegalovirus Devoid of a Protein Kinase R Inhibitory Gene Results in Reduced Maternal Viremia and Improved Pregnancy Outcome in a Guinea Pig Congenital Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Bierle, Craig J.; Swanson, Elizabeth C.; McVoy, Michael A.; Wang, Jian Ben; Al-Mahdi, Zainab; Geballe, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of a vaccine to prevent congenital cytomegalovirus infection is a major public health priority. Live vaccines attenuated through mutations targeting viral mechanisms responsible for evasion of host defense may be both safe and efficacious. Safety and vaccine efficacy were evaluated using a guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) model. Recombinant GPCMV with a targeted deletion of gp145 (designated Δ145), a viral protein kinase R (PKR) inhibitor, was generated. Attenuation was evaluated following inoculation of 107 PFU of Δ145 or parental virus into guinea pigs immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide. Efficacy was evaluated by immunizing GPCMV-naive guinea pigs twice with either 105 or 106 PFU of Δ145, establishing pregnancy, and challenging the guinea pigs with salivary gland-adapted GPCMV. The immune response, maternal viral load, pup mortality, and congenital infection rates in the vaccine and control groups were compared. Δ145 was substantially attenuated for replication in immunocompromised guinea pigs. Vaccination with Δ145 induced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralizing antibody levels comparable to those achieved in natural infection. In the higher- and lower-dose vaccine groups, pup mortality was reduced to 1/24 (4%) and 4/29 (14%) pups, respectively, whereas it was 26/31 (81%) in unvaccinated control pups (P < 0.0001 for both groups versus the control group). Congenital infection occurred in 20/31 (65%) control pups but only 8/24 (33%) pups in the group vaccinated with 106 PFU (P < 0.05). Significant reductions in the magnitude of maternal DNAemia and pup viral load were noted in the vaccine groups compared to those in the controls. Deletion of a GPCMV genome-encoded PKR inhibitor results in a highly attenuated virus that is immunogenic and protective as a vaccine against transplacental infection. IMPORTANCE Previous attempts to develop successful immunization against cytomegalovirus have largely centered on subunit

  9. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  10. Evaluation of a standardised real-time PCR based DNA-detection method (Realstar®) in whole blood for the diagnosis of primary human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Berth, M; Benoy, I; Christensen, N

    2016-02-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA detection in blood could, as a supplementary test to serology, improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis of an acute CMV infection. In this study we evaluated the performance of a commercially available and standardised CMV PCR assay in whole blood for the diagnosis of a primary infection in immunocompetent adults. Moreover, the kinetics of viral DNA was evaluated in order to provide a time frame in which viral DNA could be detected during an acute primary infection. Whole blood samples were collected from 66 patients with an acute CMV infection, 65 patients with an acute Epstein-Barr virus infection, 27 patients with various other acute infections (parvovirus B19, HIV, Toxoplasma gondii), 20 patients with past CMV infections (>1 year) and 20 apparently healthy persons. For CMV DNA detection and quantification a commercially available real-time PCR was applied (RealStar®, altona Diagnostics). The clinical sensitivity of CMV PCR in whole blood for the diagnosis of a recent primary CMV infection was 93.9 % and the diagnostic specificity 99.2 %. In the majority of the patients CMV DNA was not detectable anymore approximately within 4 weeks after the first blood sample was taken. From these data we concluded that, together with a suggestive serological profile, a positive CMV PCR result in whole blood can be regarded as a diagnostic confirmation of a recent CMV infection on a single blood sample in an immunocompetent patient. However, a negative CMV PCR result does not exclude a recent CMV infection. PMID:26661089

  11. Neurological Consequences of Cytomegalovirus Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may affect the brain (encephalitis), spinal cord (myelitis), eye (retinitis), or other organs such as the lungs (pneumonia) or intestinal gract (gastritis, enteritis, or colitis). In addition, transplant recipients may develop organ rejection or graft-versus- ...

  12. Diverse immune evasion strategies by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Vanessa; Redmann, Veronika; Gardner, Thomas; Tortorella, Domenico

    2012-12-01

    Members of the Herpesviridae family have the capacity to undergo both lytic and latent infection to establish a lifelong relationship with their host. Following primary infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can persist as a subclinical, recurrent infection for the lifetime of an individual. This quiescent portion of its life cycle is termed latency and is associated with periodic bouts of reactivation during times of immunosuppression, inflammation, or stress. In order to exist indefinitely and establish infection, HCMV encodes a multitude of immune modulatory mechanisms devoted to escaping the host antiviral response. HCMV has become a paradigm for studies of viral immune evasion of antigen presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. By restricting the presentation of viral antigens during both productive and latent infection, HCMV limits elimination by the human immune system. This review will focus on understanding how the virus manipulates the pathways of antigen presentation in order to modulate the host response to infection. PMID:22454101

  13. Pediatric Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Complications of Vertically Transmitted HIV Infection (P2C2)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Lung Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure; HIV Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Pneumocystis Carinii Infections; Ebstein-Barr Virus Infections

  14. The clinical implications of HIV infection and aging.

    PubMed

    John, M

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study, presented as part of a plenary session at WW7 in Hyderabad, India were to review (i) the epidemiology and current clinical issues of HIV infection with regard to HIV and older populations and (ii) models for increased morbidity and mortality in older HIV-positive individuals with implications for clinical care. HIV infection for those in treatment has become a complex chronic disease in which end-organ injury and resulting morbidity, functional decline, and mortality do not have a single etiology but reflect cumulative loss of organ system reserve from multiple interacting sources leading to functional decline, organ system failure, and death. Emerging guidelines and recommendations suggest a need for increased awareness and treatment of the multifaceted needs of the aging HIV-infected patient. PMID:27109276

  15. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and cytomegalovirus reactivation during late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Hernández, D L; Benítez-Sánchez, A; Rodríguez-Cuevas, J S; Rosales-Saavedra, T; Guerra-Palomares, S E; Comas-García, A; Noyola, D E; García-Sepúlveda, C A

    2016-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) represents an important public health concern as it is associated with severe morbidity and mortality in transplant recipients, HIV-infected individuals and pregnant women given the risk of congenital infection. Congenital CMV is a leading cause of neurological sequelae, developmental delay and birth defects worldwide. Cytomegalovirus can be transmitted to the foetus following maternal infection or reactivation. NK cells expressing killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are part of the innate immune system and the first line of defence against viral incursions. Previous reports have shown that KIR genes are associated with CMV infections in the post-transplant setting. In this study, we set out to determine whether a protective effect of KIR genes over CMV infection is seen in Mexican pregnant women. Cytomegalovirus infection was assessed through nucleic acid testing in 200 pregnant women and 600 healthy blood donors comprising the Mexican mestizo reference population. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and HLA-C genotypes were obtained from 200 pregnant women and 300 reference samples using a comprehensive PCR-SSP approach. We observed statistically lower carrier frequencies of cB03|tA01 gene-content haplotype, of cB03 haplotype motif, of the KIR2DL5 + 2DS3/2DS5 gene pair and of KIR2DL5 amongst CMV-positive pregnant women in comparison with those CMV negative. None of these were associated with CMV status in the reference population. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the most important factor determining CMV status during third-trimester pregnancies was the KIR2DL5 + 2DS3/2DS5 gene pair (OR 0.376 (95%CI 0.174, 0.811, P = 0.013). Our results indicate that CMV-protective KIR gene associations described in Caucasoid populations are also present in the genetically distinct Mexican mestizo population. Our results suggest that certain KIR gene combinations provide protection against CMV infections occurring

  16. Cytomegalovirus Meningitis in an Infant with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Vicetti Miguel, Claudia P; Mejias, Asuncion; Ramilo, Octavio; Ardura, Monica I; Sánchez, Pablo J

    2016-06-01

    A 35-day-old female with severe combined immunodeficiency developed cytomegalovirus (CMV) meningitis before undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Strategies for timely diagnosis of neonates with congenital or acquired CMV infection and prevention of CMV acquisition in the era of universal newborn severe combined immunodeficiency screening are needed. PMID:26996725

  17. An intact sequence-specific DNA-binding domain is required for human cytomegalovirus-mediated sequestration of p53 and may promote in vivo binding to the viral genome during infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenke, Kyle; Samuel, Melanie A.; McDowell, Eric T.; Toerne, Melissa A.; Fortunato, Elizabeth A. . E-mail: lfort@uidaho.edu

    2006-04-25

    The p53 protein is stabilized during infection of primary human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). However, the p53 in HCMV-infected cells is unable to activate its downstream targets. HCMV accomplishes this inactivation, at least in part, by sequestering p53 into viral replication centers within the cell's nucleus soon after they are established. In order to better understand the interplay between HCMV and p53 and the mechanism of sequestration, we constructed a panel of mutant p53-GFP fusion constructs for use in transfection/infection experiments. These mutants affected several post-translational modification sites and several sites within the central sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of the protein. Two categories of p53 sequestration were observed when the mutant constructs were transfected into primary fibroblasts and then infected at either high or low multiplicity. The first category, including all of the post-translational modification mutants, showed sequestration comparable to a wild-type (wt) control, while the second category, mutants affecting the DNA-binding core, were not specifically sequestered above control GFP levels. This suggested that the DNA-binding ability of the protein was required for sequestration. When the HCMV genome was analyzed for p53 consensus binding sites, 21 matches were found, which localized either to the promoters or the coding regions of viral proteins involved in DNA replication and processing as well as structural proteins. An analysis of in vivo binding to these identified sites via chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed differential binding to several of the sites over the course of infection.

  18. Cytomegalovirus myelitis in perinatally acquired HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, T; Funk, M; Linde, R; Jacobi, G; Horn, M; Kreuz, W

    1993-01-01

    A 7 year old child perinatally infected with HIV who died from progressive muscular paralysis and central nervous respiratory failure is described. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis with a special intravenous CMV hyper-immunoglobulin had been successfully conducted for more than four years. Macroscopic and microscopic immunohistochemical examination of the spinal cord revealed a diffuse CMV infiltration of the entire myelon. CMV infected cells were identified as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, macrophages, ependymal, endothelial, and Schwann cells. Other organs had no signs of CMV infection. Central nervous spinal CMV infection was most probably due to insufficient penetration of the blood-brain barrier by the CMV hyper-immunoglobulin. In suspicious cases early spinal magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 tesla) combined with an examination of urine and cerebrospinal fluid for CMV is recommended. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8385439

  19. Hepatitis E virus infection: Epidemiology and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ga Young; Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Intharasongkroh, Duangnapa; Sa-nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Chirathaworn, Chintana; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is now established as an emerging enteric viral hepatitis. Standard treatments in acute and chronic hepatitis E remain to be established. This study undertakes a review of the epidemiology, treatment implication and vaccine prevention from published literature. HEV infection is a worldwide public health problem and can cause acute and chronic hepatitis E. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are primarily found in developing countries due to waterborne transmission, while the zoonotic potential of genotypes 3 and 4 affects mostly industrialized countries. An awareness of HEV transmission through blood donation, especially in the immunocompromised and solid organ transplant patients, merits an effective anti-viral therapy. There are currently no clear indications for the treatment of acute hepatitis E. Despite concerns for side effects, ribavirin monotherapy or in combination with pegylated interferon alpha for at least 3 mo appeared to show significant efficacy in the treatment of chronic hepatitis E. However, there are no available treatment options for specific patient population groups, such as women who are pregnant. Vaccination and screening of HEV in blood donors are currently a global priority in managing infection. New strategies for the treatment and control of hepatitis E are required for both acute and chronic infections, such as prophylactic use of medications, controlling large outbreaks, and finding acceptable antiviral therapy for pregnant women and other patient groups for whom the current options of treatment are not viable. PMID:26568916

  20. Deletion of the Human Cytomegalovirus US17 Gene Increases the Ratio of Genomes per Infectious Unit and Alters Regulation of Immune and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Genes at Early and Late Times after Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gurczynski, Stephen J.; Das, Subhendu

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) employs numerous strategies to combat, subvert, or co-opt host immunity. One evolutionary strategy for this involves capture of a host gene and then its successive duplication and divergence, forming a family of genes, many of which have immunomodulatory activities. The HCMV US12 family consists of 10 tandemly arranged sequence-related genes in the unique short (US) region of the HCMV genome (US12 to US21). Each gene encodes a protein possessing seven predicted transmembrane domains, patches of sequence similarity with cellular G-protein-coupled receptors, and the Bax inhibitor 1 family of antiapoptotic proteins. We show that one member, US17, plays an important role during virion maturation. Microarray analysis of cells infected with a recombinant HCMV isolate with a US17 deletion (the ΔUS17 mutant virus) revealed blunted host innate and interferon responses at early times after infection (12 h postinfection [hpi]), a pattern opposite that previously seen in the absence of the immunomodulatory tegument protein pp65 (pUL83). Although the ΔUS17 mutant virus produced numbers of infectious particles in fibroblasts equal to the numbers produced by the parental virus, it produced >3-fold more genome-containing noninfectious viral particles and delivered increased amounts of pp65 to newly infected cells. These results suggest that US17 has evolved to control virion composition, to elicit an appropriately balanced host immune response. At later time points (96 hpi), ΔUS17 mutant-infected cells displayed aberrant expression of several host endoplasmic reticulum stress response genes and chaperones, some of which are important for the final stages of virion assembly and egress. Our results suggest that US17 modulates host pathways to enable production of virions that elicit an appropriately balanced host immune response. PMID:24335296

  1. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for the detection of porcine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Maki; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Miyazaki, Ayako; Tajima, Tomoko; Shimizu, Shinya; Kabali, Emmanuel; Takano, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Yosuke; Kubo, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    To establish in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry based-assays for the detection of porcine cytomegalovirus, routinely processed renal tissue sections from 34 diseased piglets suspected of having the infection were obtained and examined. Using hematoxylin and eosin, porcine cytomegalovirus inclusion bodies were found in the nucleus of renal epithelial cells and capillary endothelial cells in the renal medulla in 30 cases. Inclusion bodies corresponding to porcine cytomegalovirus mRNA after in situ hybridization or porcine cytomegalovirus antigens after immunohistochemistry were easily determined. The cells were characterized by cytomegaly and basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Using in situ hybridization, porcine cytomegalovirus mRNA were clearly detected in the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cells in 28 of the 30 (93.3%) cases. Using immunohistochemistry, porcine cytomegalovirus antigens were clearly detected in the cytoplasm of the cells in 21 of the 30 (70.0%) cases. Higher specificities and increased intensity of staining was observed with minimal background using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry compared with hematoxylin and eosin. Thus, the two established methods are useful and helpful tools for detecting the presence of a porcine cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:22008295

  2. Cytomegalovirus as an Insidious Pathogen Causing Duodenitis.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Iwamuro, Masaya; Tanaka, Takehiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Otsuka, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate for a decade complained of slight epigastric discomfort. A positive cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigenemia test indicated the probability of CMV-related gastrointestinal infection, for which esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed. Endoscopic findings showed a non-specific duodenal mucosal lesion;however, pathological investigation revealed evidence of CMV duodenitis. There is scarce information on the clinical and pathological features of CMV-related duodenitis, likely due to its low prevalence. CMV infection in the upper gastrointestinal tract should be considered as a differential diagnosis in high-risk individuals, particularly those with symptoms relating to the digestive system. Biopsy examinations are preferable for the definitive diagnosis of CMV gastrointestinal infection, even without specific endoscopic features. PMID:26490030

  3. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Does Not Require the Presence of the gH/gL/UL128-131A Complex and Is Blocked after Nuclear Deposition of Viral Genomes in Immature Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lauron, Elvin J.; Yu, Dong; Fehr, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) enters its host via the oral and genital mucosae. Langerhans-type dendritic cells (LC) are the most abundant innate immune cells at these sites, where they constitute a first line of defense against a variety of pathogens. We previously showed that immature LC (iLC) are remarkably resistant to CMV infection, while mature LC (mLC) are more permissive, particularly when exposed to clinical-strain-like strains of CMV, which display a pentameric complex consisting of the viral glycoproteins gH, gL, UL128, UL130, and UL131A on their envelope. This complex was recently shown to be required for the infection of immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells. We thus sought to establish if the presence of this complex is also necessary for virion penetration of LC and if defects in entry might be the source of iLC resistance to CMV. Here we report that the efficiency of LC infection is reduced, but not completely abolished, in the absence of the pentameric complex. While virion penetration and nuclear deposition of viral genomes are not impaired in iLC, the transcription of the viral immediate early genes UL122 and UL123 and of the delayed early gene UL50 is substantially lower than that in mLC. Together, these data show that the UL128, UL130, and UL131A proteins are dispensable for CMV entry into LC and that progression of the viral cycle in iLC is restricted at the step of viral gene expression. PMID:24155395

  4. Intracellular Trafficking of the Human Cytomegalovirus-Encoded 7-trans-Membrane Protein Homologs pUS27 and pUL78 during Viral Infection: A Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Ina; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes four G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) homologs, termed pUS27, pUS28, pUL33, and pUL78. In contrast to the extensively characterized vGPCRs pUS28 and pUL33, knowledge concerning pUS27 and pUL78 is limited. Previous studies already demonstrated constitutive internalization of pUS27 and pUL78, as well as an association with the endosomal machinery, however, these results were mainly obtained using transiently transfected cells. To explore the subcellular localization of both receptors during viral infection, we constructed recombinant HCMVs expressing tagged vGPCRs. Colocalization analyses revealed a predominant association of pUS27 or pUL78 with the trans-Golgi network or the endoplasmic reticulum, respectively. Intriguingly, our data emphasize that protein sorting is highly regulated by viral functions as we detected dramatic changes in the colocalization of pUS27 and pUL78 with endosomal markers during progression of HCMV replication. Furthermore, we observed cell type-dependent differences in trafficking of both vGPCRs between fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Most importantly, infection experiments with a recombinant HCMV carrying tagged versions of pUS27 and pUL78 simultaneously, revealed that these two proteins do not colocalize during viral infection. This contrasts to results of transient expression experiments. In conclusion, our results highlight the importance to investigate vGPCR trafficking in a viral context. PMID:24517969

  5. Acute exercise preferentially redeploys NK-cells with a highly-differentiated phenotype and augments cytotoxicity against lymphoma and multiple myeloma target cells. Part II: impact of latent cytomegalovirus infection and catecholamine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Austin B; Rezvani, Katayoun; Pistillo, Mira; Reed, Justin; Agha, Nadia; Kunz, Hawley; O'Connor, Daniel P; Sekine, Takuya; Bollard, Catherine M; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    We showed previously that acute exercise is associated with a preferential redeployment of highly-differentiated NK-cells and increased cytotoxicity against HLA-expressing tumor cell lines during exercise recovery. In this part II study, we retrospectively analyzed these findings in the context of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and performed additional experiments to explore potential mechanisms underpinning the marked reduction in NK-cell redeployment with exercise in CMV-seropositive individuals. We show here that latent CMV infection impairs NK-cell mobilization with exercise, only when the intensity of the exercise bout exceeds the individual blood lactate threshold (BLT). This impaired mobilization is associated with increased proportions of poorly exercise-responsive NK-cell subsets (NKG2C+/KIR-, NKG2C+/NKG2A-, and NKG2C+/CD57+) and decreased NK-cell β(2)-adrenergic receptor (AR) expression in those with CMV. As a result, NK-cell production of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in response to in vitro isoproterenol (synthetic β-agonist) stimulation was drastically lower in those with CMV (6.0 vs. 20.3pmol/mL, p<0.001) and correlated highly with the proportion of NKG2C+/CD57+ NK-cells (R(2)=0.97). Moreover, NK-cell cytotoxic activity (NKCA) against the K562 (36.6% vs. 22.7%, p<0.05), U266 (23.6% vs. 15.9%, p<0.05), and 221.AEH (41.3% vs. 13.3%, p<0.001) cell lines was increased at baseline in those infected with CMV; however, latent CMV infection abated the post-exercise increase in NKCA as a result of decreased NK-cell mobilization. Additionally, NKCA per cell against the U266 (0.24 vs. 0.12, p<0.01), RPMI-8226 (0.17 vs. 0.11, p<0.05), and 221.AEH (0.18 vs. 0.11, p<0.05) cell lines was increased 1h post-exercise (relative to baseline) in CMV-seronegative subjects, but not in those infected with CMV. Collectively, these data indicate that latent CMV infection may compromise NK-cell mediated immunosurveillance after acute exercise due to an increased proportion of

  6. Cytomegalovirus Colitis in a Burn Patient.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Jeff T; Zieger, Madeline; Sood, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cytomegalovirus in the burn population is high. However, its role in the clinical management of burn patients is still being defined. This report documents a 41-year-old man who developed cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis after being admitted with a 72% burn. Before the administration of ganciclovir, the authors had difficulty controlling his quantitative wound cultures with serial debridements, topical agents, and systemic antibiotics for known pathogens, which led to graft loss. After the ganciclovir was given, his quantitative wound cultures improved without changing the authors' topical agents or systemic antibiotics and had improved graft take. Whether CMV infection alone contributed to an increased morbidity in this patient or the combination of bacteria/fungal infection with CMV led to a synergistic effect is still not clearly understood. CMV may have contributed to a dysfunction in his cell mediated immunity, which, in turn, lowered the bacterial and fungal load necessary to cause graft loss. Patients who continue to do poorly despite adequate treatment for known pathogens may need to be screened for CMV and treated. PMID:26056763

  7. Cytomegalovirus Colitis and Subsequent New Diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in an Immunocompetent Host: A Case Study and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tipu V.; Toms, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 40 Final Diagnosis: CMV colitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • diarrhea • jaundice Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Flexible sigmoidoscopy • colonoscopy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Infection with gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus in an immunocompetent host is a rather rare occurrence in the literature. There are a few reports of gastrointestinal infection in the immunocompetent who are then subsequently given a new diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. It is speculated that the initial cytomegalovirus colitis infection triggers the onset of inflammatory bowel disease. Case Report: Herein we report a case of cytomegalovirus colitis and new diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease identified in a 40-year-old immunocompetent adult man who presented with gastrointestinal symptoms and disseminated cytomegalovirus infection requiring anti-viral therapy, which successfully treated the episode of cytomegalovirus infection. He then went on to have persistent symptomatic inflammatory bowel disease confirmed by pathology. Conclusions: In this paper we will review the literature and explore the rare case of cytomegalovirus colitis in the immunocompetent host and discuss the pathology, physiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cytomegalovirus colitis. PMID:27460032

  8. Epstein-Barr and cytomegalovirus DNA salivary shedding correlate with long-term plasma HIV RNA detection in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Scaggiante, Renzo; Andreis, Samantha; Basso, Monica; Franchin, Elisa; Franzetti, Marzia; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Torti, Carlo; Mengoli, Carlo; Cruciani, Mario; Sarmati, Loredana; Palù, Giorgio; Parisi, Saverio Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA salivary shedding in HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) and to determine whether viro-immunological parameters and long-term (24 months) plasma HIV RNA (pHIV) detection may predict herpesviruses replication. A total of 193 HIV-positive MSM were consecutively recruited (mean CD4+ cell count 607 cells/mm(3) and mean nadir value 333 cells/mm(3) ); pHIV was analyzed for 24 months prior to saliva sampling: patients were categorized as successfully suppressed (SS) and not suppressed (NS). The EBV viral load was categorized as high viral load (HVL), intermediate (IVL), or low (LVL), CMV DNA as positive or negative. NS patients experienced both herpesviruses detectability more frequently respect to SS patients (P = 0.034); conversely, no salivary shedding was more frequent in SS patients (P = 0.014). HVL EBV was more frequent in NS patients than in SS subjects (P = 0.038 for isolated EBV detection and P = 0.001 when CMV shedding was associated). NS subjects with HVL EBV had a median pHIV of 43,820 copies/ml, significantly higher respect to IVL and LVL patients (P = 0.027 and P = 0.0005, respectively). CMV shedding was mostly associated to EBV shedding. NS patients showed a significantly higher frequency of saliva HVL EBV detection compared to SS patients; moreover, NS patients with HVL EBV had a higher pHIV respect to those with IVL and LVL shedding. Our results suggest that a successful pHIV suppression could reduce the burden of salivary EBV replication and likely the risk of herpesviruses-related cancers. PMID:26636290

  9. Cytomegalovirus reactivation in critically ill immunocompetent hosts: A decade of progress and remaining challenges

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Charles H.; Trgovcich, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an undisputed pathogen in humans with severe immunocompromise that has historically been thought to carry little consequence in immunecompetent hosts. During the past decade, however, accumulating data suggest that significant numbers of immunocompetent humans reactivate HCMV during critical illness, and that these reactivation episodes are associated with worsened outcomes. Because most people are infected with this ubiquitous virus by adulthood, confirming pathogenicity has now become a clinical priority. In this article, we will review the incidence and implications of reactivation, the relevant immune responses and reactivation triggers relevant to the immunocompetent host. We will summarize the progress made during the past ten years, outline work ongoing in this field, and identify the major gaps remaining in our emerging understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:21439328

  10. Prevalence and clinical management of cytomegalovirus retinitis in AIDS patients in shanghai, china

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus retinitis is a common AIDS-associated illness, leading to blindness in up to 30% of patients. This study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical management of the cytomegalovirus retinitis associated with AIDS in a large municipality of China. Methods Clinical and laboratory data from 23 cytomegalovirus retinitis patients (35 eyes) out of 303 hospitalized AIDS individuals in a single medical center were analyzed retrospectively. Two of 23 patients were diagnosed cytomegalovirus retinitis just before hospitalization without anti-CMV therapy. Ganciclovir combined with the high active anti-retroviral therapy was installed for treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis after diagnosis was confirmed. The data were analyzed by specialists and statistics was also applied. Results The prevalence of cytomegalovirus retinitis in hospitalized AIDS patients was 7.6% in this study. The level of CD4+ T lymphocytes was correlated well with the occurrence of cytomegalovirus retinitis, showing 16.8% (19/113) (95% confidence interval: 10.4,25.0), 5.4% (3/56) (95% confidence interval: 1.1,14.9), and 1.4% (1/69) (95% confidence interval: 0.0,7.8) occurrence in the patients with CD4+ T lymphocyte counts < 50, 50~99, and 100~199 cells/μl, respectively. The mean CD4+ T lymphocyte counts was 31.7 ± 38.6 cells/μl in 23 AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis. Median CD4+ T lymphocyte count is 20 cells/μl with inter-quartile range as (5, 36). Seven patients died (11 eyes) and 16 patients (24 eyes) survived. The proportion of blindness and low vision in eyes infected with cytomegalovirus retinitis respectively was 20.8% (5/24) and 29.2% (7/24) when they were diagnosed in survivors. The ganciclovir therapy was effective in 16 patients (24 eyes). Clinical recovery of cytomegalovirus retinitis was 41.7% (10/24) and clinical improvement 58.3% (14/24). After anti-CMV treatment, the proportion of blindness or low vision was 16.7% (4/24). Conclusions The AIDS

  11. Methods to evaluate nutritional and economic implications of Ascaris infection.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, L S

    1984-01-01

    Ascaris infection has important economic implications for human populations, due to its negative effects on growth of undernourished children and its less common role in causing intestinal obstruction. The deleterious effects of Ascaris infection on growth of undernourished children have been demonstrated in studies conducted in India, Kenya and Tanzania; deworming has resulted in improved weight gains of 20-35% compared with uninfected children. However other studies in Ethiopia, Bangladesh and Guatemala have not found statistically significant improvements in growth of children after treatment for Ascaris infection, most likely due to inadequacies in choice of population, sample size, experimental design, data analysis and/or relative failure of drug treatment. Field studies which attempt to measure the magnitude of growth deficits due to Ascaris must take the following into account: (1) rapidly growing preschool age children from communities with a high prevalence of protein-energy malnutrition are the most important group to study. (2) A longitudinal design, preferably using randomly allocated treatment and placebo groups, is highly desirable. (3) A sufficient period of time for growth improvement must be allowed between the beginning of the intervention and final measurements. (4) The sample sizes necessary to test hypotheses adequately should be calculated in advance. (5) The drug chosen for treatment of Ascaris should produce high cure rates and reinfection rates should be determined. Possible effects of the drug on other diseases prevalent in the population should be considered in the data analysis. (6) Evaluation of worm loads are very important in interpretation of results. (7) The data analysis must be appropriate for the individual study and must be designed to consider confounding factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6441259

  12. Lymph Node Macrophages Restrict Murine Cytomegalovirus Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Davis-Poynter, Nick; Bruce, Kimberley; Lawler, Clara; Dolken, Lars; Mach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) establish chronic infections that spread from a primary entry site to secondary vascular sites, such as the spleen, and then to tertiary shedding sites, such as the salivary glands. Human CMV (HCMV) is difficult to analyze, because its spread precedes clinical presentation. Murine CMV (MCMV) offers a tractable model. It is hypothesized to spread from peripheral sites via vascular endothelial cells and associated monocytes. However, viral luciferase imaging showed footpad-inoculated MCMV first reaching the popliteal lymph nodes (PLN). PLN colonization was rapid and further spread was slow, implying that LN infection can be a significant bottleneck. Most acutely infected PLN cells were CD169+ subcapsular sinus macrophages (SSM). Replication-deficient MCMV also reached them, indicating direct infection. Many SSM expressed viral reporter genes, but few expressed lytic genes. SSM expressed CD11c, and MCMV with a cre-sensitive fluorochrome switch showed switched infected cells in PLN of CD11c-cre mice but yielded little switched virus. SSM depletion with liposomal clodronate or via a CD169-diphtheria toxin receptor transgene shifted infection to ER-TR7+ stromal cells, increased virus production, and accelerated its spread to the spleen. Therefore, MCMV disseminated via LN, and SSM slowed this spread by shielding permissive fibroblasts and poorly supporting viral lytic replication. IMPORTANCE HCMV chronically infects most people, and it can cause congenital disability and harm the immunocompromised. A major goal of vaccination is to prevent systemic infection. How this is established is unclear. Restriction to humans makes HCMV difficult to analyze. We show that peripheral MCMV infection spreads via lymph nodes. Here, MCMV infected filtering macrophages, which supported virus replication poorly. When these macrophages were depleted, MCMV infected susceptible fibroblasts and spread faster. The capacity of filtering macrophages to limit

  13. Human Cytomegalovirus Secretome Contains Factors That Induce Angiogenesis and Wound Healing

    SciTech Connect

    Dumortier, Jerome; Streblow, Daniel N.; Moses, Ashlee V.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Kreklywich, Craig N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Orloff, Susan L.; Nelson, Jay

    2008-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is implicated in the acceleration of a number of vascular diseases including transplant vascular sclerosis (TVS), the lesion associated with chronic rejection (CR) of solid organ transplants. Although the virus persists in the allograft throughout the course of disease, few cells are directly infected by CMV. This observation is in contrast to the global effects that CMV has on the acceleration of TVS/CR, suggesting that CMV infection indirectly promotes the vascular disease process. Recent transcriptome analysis of CMV-infected heart allografts indicates that the virus induces cytokines and growth factors associated with angiogenesis (AG) and wound healing (WH), suggesting that CMV may accelerate TVS/CR through the induction and secretion of AG/WH factors from infected cells. We analyzed virus-free supernatants from HCMV-infected cells (HCMV secretomes) for growth factors, by mass spectrometry and immunoassays, and found that the HCMV secretome contains over 1,000 cellular proteins, many of which are involved in AG/WH. Importantly, functional assays demonstrated that CMV but not herpes simplex virus secretomes not only induce AG/WH but also promote neovessel stabilization and endothelial cell survival for 2 weeks. These findings suggest that CMV acceleration of TVS occurs through virus-induced growth factors and cytokines in the CMV secretome.

  14. Expansion and Protection by a Virus-Specific NK Cell Subset Lacking Expression of the Inhibitory NKR-P1B Receptor during Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Mir Munir A; Wight, Andrew; Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Aguilar, Oscar A; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Vidal, Silvia M; Carlyle, James R; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2016-09-15

    NK cells play a major role in immune defense against human and murine CMV (MCMV) infection. Although the MCMV genome encodes for MHC class I-homologous decoy ligands for inhibitory NK cell receptors to evade detection, some mouse strains have evolved activating receptors, such as Ly49H, to recognize these ligands and initiate an immune response. In this study, we demonstrate that approximately half of the Ly49H-expressing (Ly49H(+)) NK cells in the spleen and liver of C57BL/6 mice also express the inhibitory NKR-P1B receptor. During MCMV infection, the NKR-P1B(-)Ly49H(+) NK cell subset proliferates to constitute the bulk of the NK cell population. This NK cell subset also confers better protection against MCMV infection compared with the NKR-P1B(+)Ly49H(+) subset. The two populations are composed of cells that differ in their surface expression of receptors such as Ly49C/I and NKG2A/C/E, as well as developmental markers, CD27 and CD11b, and the high-affinity IL-2R (CD25) following infection. Although the NKR-P1B(+) NK cells can produce effector molecules such as IFNs and granzymes, their proliferation is inhibited during infection. A similar phenotype in MCMV-infected Clr-b-deficient mice, which lack the ligand for NKR-P1B, suggests the involvement of ligands other than the host Clr-b. Most interestingly, genetic deficiency of the NKR-P1B, but not Clr-b, results in accelerated virus clearance and recovery from MCMV infection. This study is particularly significant because the mouse NKR-P1B:Clr-b receptor:ligand system represents the closest homolog of the human NKR-P1A:LLT1 system and may have a direct relevance to human CMV infection. PMID:27511735

  15. T-cell homeostasis: implications in HIV infection .

    PubMed

    Adleman, L M; Wofsy, D

    1993-02-01

    Evidence is presented that a homeostatic mechanism exists that maintains a normal T-cell count, but is unresponsive to abnormalities in CD4+ T-cell count and CD8+ T-cell count. Specifically, we hypothesize that in all cases of T-cell loss, whether selective or not, both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells will be produced until the absolute T-cell count returns to normal, even if this produces or exacerbates abnormalities in the absolute CD4+ T-cell count and absolute CD8+ T-cell count. This hypothesis implies that the selective loss of CD4+ T cells will induce the production of both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells with the result that T-cell count will return to normal, but a persistent CD8+ T-cell lymphocytosis and CD4+ T-cell lymphopenia will be produced. To test this hypothesis, we monitored T-cell reconstitution in mice selectively depleted of CD4+ T cells through treatment with a CD4-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb). Consistent with our hypothesis, the absolute peripheral blood T-cell count in treated mice returned to that of controls after approximately 4 months. However, the absolute CD8+ cell count became 163% of controls and the absolute CD4+ cell count remained less than 63% of controls. Our hypothesis may have implications regarding the pathogenesis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In particular, the hypothesis implies that the unresolved CD4+ T-cell lymphopenia seen in the first several years of HIV infection is the "natural" consequence of the interaction of a selective CD4+ T-cell depleting virus and a nonselective T-cell replacing homeostatic mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8094457

  16. Caprylic acid in the effective treatment of intractable medical problems of frequent urination, incontinence, chronic upper respiratory infection, root canalled tooth infection, ALS, etc., caused by asbestos & mixed infections of Candida albicans, Helicobacter pylori & cytomegalovirus with or without other microorganisms & mercury.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; O'Young, Brian; Jones, Marilyn; Pallos, Andrew; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    There are many causes of frequent urination. Whenever water or fluids are consumed, the patient has to urinate within 10 or 20 min. Often urinary bladder examinations & blood tests show no significant abnormalities, & treatment by anti-bacterial or anti-viral agents does not improve the symptoms significantly. In intractable frequent urination with difficulty holding urine, as well as other intractable medical problems such as frequent coughing, white pus in gingiva, infection of the apex of a root canalled tooth, slow-healing wounds, & ALS, the authors often found coexisting mixed infections of Candida albicans (C.A.), Helicobacter pylori (H.P.), & Cytomegalovirus (CMV) with or without additional bacterial (Chlamydia trachomatis, etc.) or viral infections & increased Asbestos, with or without Hg deposits. We often found various degrees of mixed infections with C.A., H.P., & CMV in the external sphincters of the urethra & in the Trigone of the urinary bladder which consists of (1) a horizontal, band-like area between the 2 ureter openings & (2) the funnel shaped part of the Trigone at the lower half of the urinary bladder. In the coexistence of significant amounts of C.A., H.P. & CMV, the infection cannot be reduced by otherwise effective medicines for H.P. & CMV. However, one optimal dose of Diflucan, or Caprylic acid taken orally or externally applied, rapidly reduced the symptoms significantly. We found the best treatment is to give a combination of an optimal dose of Caprylic acid orally in the form of "CaprilyCare" or "Caprylic Acid," with a capsule of Omega-3 Fish Oil as an anti-viral agent, Amoxicillin, Substance Z & a Cilantro tablet. We found that an optimal dose of Caprylic acid increases normal cell telomere (NCT) to a desirable 750 ng BDORT units while Diflucan increases NCT by only 25 ng BDORT units, & with Omega-3 fish oil, leads to a mutual cancellation of both drugs. Thus, Caprylic acid is superior to & less expensive than Diflucan, & has potential

  17. Comparison of monovalent glycoprotein B with bivalent gB/pp65 (GP83) vaccine for congenital cytomegalovirus infection in a guinea pig model: Inclusion of GP83 reduces gB antibody response but both vaccine approaches provide equivalent protection against pup mortality.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Elizabeth C; Gillis, Pete; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Fernández-Alarcón, Claudia; Schmit, Megan; Zabeli, Jason C; Wussow, Felix; Diamond, Don J; Schleiss, Mark R

    2015-07-31

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) subunit vaccine candidates include glycoprotein B (gB), and phosphoprotein ppUL83 (pp65). Using a guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) model, this study compared immunogenicity, pregnancy outcome, and congenital viral infection following pre-pregnancy immunization with a three-dose series of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-vectored vaccines consisting either of gB administered alone, or simultaneously with a pp65 homolog (GP83)-expressing vaccine. Vaccinated and control dams were challenged at midgestation with salivary gland-adapted GPCMV. Comparisons included ELISA and neutralizing antibody responses, maternal viral load, pup mortality, and congenital infection rates. Strikingly, ELISA and neutralization titers were significantly lower in the gB/GP83 combined vaccine group than in the gB group. However, both vaccines protected against pup mortality (63.2% in controls vs. 11.4% and 13.9% in gB and gB/GP83 combination groups, respectively; p<0.0001). Reductions in pup viral load were noted for both vaccine groups compared to control, but preconception vaccination resulted in a significant reduction in GPCMV transmission only in the monovalent gB group (26/44, 59% v. 27/34, 79% in controls; p<0.05). We conclude that, using the MVA platform, the addition of GP83 to a gB subunit vaccine interferes with antibody responses and diminishes protection against congenital GPCMV infection, but does not decrease protection against pup mortality. PMID:26079615

  18. The effects of age and latent cytomegalovirus infection on the redeployment of CD8+ T cell subsets in response to acute exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Guillaume; Bollard, Catherine M; Bigley, Austin B; Hanley, Patrick J; Blaney, James W; LaVoy, Emily C P; Pircher, Hanspeter; Simpson, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic exercise evokes a rapid redeployment of cytotoxic T cell subsets with high expression of β2 adrenergic receptors, presumably to enhance immunosurveillance during acute stress. As this response is affected by age and infection history, this study examined latent CMV infection as a potential confounder to age-related differences in blood CD8+ T-cell responses to exercise. Healthy young (n=16) and older (n=16) humans counterbalanced by CMV IgG serostatus (positive or negative) exercised for 30-min at ∼80% peak cycling power. Those with CMV redeployed ∼2-times more CD8+ T-cells and ∼6-times more KLRG1+/CD28- and CD45RA+/CCR7- CD8+ subsets than non-infected exercisers. Seronegative older exercisers had an impaired redeployment of total CD8+ T-cells, CD45RA+/CCR7+ and KLRG1-/CD28+ CD8+ subsets compared to young. Redeployed CD8+ T-cell numbers were similar between infected young and old. CMVpp65 specific CD8+ cells in HLA/A2(∗) subjects increased ∼2.7-fold after exercise, a response that was driven by the KLRG1+/CD28-/CD8+ subset. Stimulating PBMCs before and after exercise with CMVpp65 and CMV IE-1 antigens and overlapping peptide pools revealed a 2.1 and 4.4-fold increases in CMVpp65 and CMV IE-1 IFN-γ secreting cells respectively. The breadth of the T cell response was maintained after exercise with the magnitude of the response being amplified across the entire epitope repertoire. To conclude, latent CMV infection overrides age-related impairments in CD8+ T-cell redeployment with exercise. We also show for the first time that many T-cells redeployed with exercise are specific to CMVpp65 and CMV IE-1 antigens, have broad epitope specificity, and are mostly of a high-differentiated effector memory phenotype. PMID:23684819

  19. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R-). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  20. Differential effects of Cytomegalovirus carriage on the immune phenotype of middle-aged males and females

    PubMed Central

    van der Heiden, Marieke; van Zelm, Menno C.; Bartol, Sophinus J. W.; de Rond, Lia G. H.; Berbers, Guy A. M.; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The elderly population is more susceptible to infections as a result of an altered immune response, commonly referred to as immunosenescence. Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infection associated changes in blood lymphocytes are known to impact this process, but the interaction with gender remains unclear. Therefore, we analysed the effects and interaction of gender and CMV on the absolute numbers of a comprehensive set of naive and memory T- and B-cell subsets in people between 50 and 65 years of age. Enumeration and characterisation of lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry was performed on fresh whole blood samples from 255 middle-aged persons. CMV-IgG serostatus was determined by ELISA. Gender was a major factor affecting immune cell numbers. CMV infection was mainly associated with an expansion of late-differentiated T-cell subsets. CMV+ males carried lower numbers of total CD4+, CD4+ central memory (CM) and follicular helper T-cells than females and CMV− males. Moreover, CMV+ males had significantly lower numbers of regulatory T (Treg)-cells and memory B-cells than CMV+ females. We here demonstrate an interaction between the effects of CMV infection and gender on T- and B-cells in middle-aged individuals. These differential effects on adaptive immunity between males and females may have implications for vaccination strategies at middle-age. PMID:27243552

  1. Viral and host control of cytomegalovirus maturation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ritesh; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2012-01-01

    Maturation in herpesviruses initiates in the nucleus of the infected cell with encapsidation of viral DNA to form nucleocapsids and concludes with envelopment in the cytoplasm to form infectious virions that egress the cell. The entire process of virus maturation is orchestrated by protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities of viral and host origin. Viral tegument proteins play important roles in maintaining the structural stability of capsids and directing the acquisition of virus envelope. Envelopment occurs at modified host membranes and exploits host vesicular trafficking. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and concepts in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) maturation and their parallels in other herpesviruses with an emphasis on viral and host factors regulating this process. PMID:22633075

  2. Acute Cytomegalovirus Hepatitis in an Immunocompetent Host as a Reason for Upper Right Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kai Oliver; Angst, Eliane; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich; Gingert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infections are widely distributed with a seroprevalence of up to 100%. The majority of the cases take a silent course or deal with unspecific clinical symptoms. Complications in immunocompetent patients are rare but may affect the liver and lead up to an acute organ failure. In this case report, we describe a 35-year-old immunocompetent female with an acute cytomegalovirus infection presenting as acute hepatitis with ongoing upper right abdominal pain after cholecystectomy. Upper right abdominal pain is a common symptom with a wide range of differential diagnoses. If common reasons can be excluded, we want to sensitize for cytomegalovirus infection as a minor differential diagnosis even in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27403100

  3. Asymptomatic brucellosis infection in humans: implications for diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Q; Lu, Y; Yuan, X; Qiu, Y; Xu, J; Li, W; Ke, Y; Yu, Y; Huang, L; Wang, Y; Chen, Z

    2013-09-01

    Human brucellosis is mainly caused by contact with Brucella-infected animals and their secretions and carcasses. Individuals who are continuously in contact with animals are considered to be at a high risk but only some show symptoms and are diagnosed as cases of brucellosis. Here, we showed that asymptomatic brucellosis infections occur among humans. Asymptomatic infections mainly result from less frequent contact with Brucella and/or contact with low-virulence Brucella. In our study, patients with asymptomatic infection had low antibody titres and different contact patterns. Awareness of asymptomatic infection is important for early diagnosis of brucellosis and prevention of chronic infection. PMID:23668532

  4. The combination of specific IgM antibodies and IgG antibodies of low avidity does not always indicate primary infection with cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Lumley, S; Patel, M; Griffiths, P D

    2014-05-01

    The detection of CMV specific IgM antibodies coupled with IgG antibodies of low avidity is taken as diagnostic of primary CMV infection. In a study of 64 pregnant women referred for avidity testing, six women were identified with bloods with positive IgM and low/equivocal avidity IgG on the Abbott Architect assay persisting over 18 weeks. Avidity increased to an "equivocal" level in two women over the course of follow up but remained "low" in four women. On repeat testing with the Diasorin Liaison assay, bloods from two women with low avidity with Architect gave high avidity results with Liaison. Blood from one woman giving low/equivocal results with Architect was reported as moderate avidity on repeat with Liaison. There is concern from these small numbers of cases that some women with positive IgM and low avidity IgG using the Abbott Architect assay may not have primary infections. This implies that they could be entered inappropriately into trials of experimental treatments aiming to prevent transmission of CMV to the fetus if the laboratory is asked to test patients for this purpose. It is suggested that larger series of patients should be examined to determine how frequently this phenomenon occurs. PMID:24395084

  5. Microgravity Analogues of Herpes Virus Pathogenicity: Human Cytomegalovirus (hCMV) and Varicella Zoster (VZV) Infectivity in Human Tissue Like Assemblies (TLAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Albrecht, T.; Cohrs, R.

    2009-01-01

    The old adage we are our own worst enemies may perhaps be the most profound statement ever made when applied to man s desire for extraterrestrial exploration and habitation of Space. Consider the immune system protects the integrity of the entire human physiology and is comprised of two basic elements the adaptive or circulating and the innate immune system. Failure of the components of the adaptive system leads to venerability of the innate system from opportunistic microbes; viral, bacteria, and fungal, which surround us, are transported on our skin, and commonly inhabit the human physiology as normal and imunosuppressed parasites. The fine balance which is maintained for the preponderance of our normal lives, save immune disorders and disease, is deregulated in microgravity. Thus analogue systems to study these potential Risks are essential for our progress in conquering Space exploration and habitation. In this study we employed two known physiological target tissues in which the reactivation of hCMV and VZV occurs, human neural and lung systems created for the study and interaction of these herpes viruses independently and simultaneously on the innate immune system. Normal human neural and lung tissue analogues called tissue like assemblies (TLAs) were infected with low MOIs of approximately 2 x 10(exp -5) pfu hCMV or VZV and established active but prolonged low grade infections which spanned .7-1.5 months in length. These infections were characterized by the ability to continuously produce each of the viruses without expiration of the host cultures. Verification and quantification of viral replication was confirmed via RT_PCR, IHC, and confocal spectral analyses of the respective essential viral genomes. All host TLAs maintained the ability to actively proliferate throughout the entire duration of the experiments as is analogous to normal in vivo physiological conditions. These data represent a significant advance in the ability to study the triggering

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  7. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk for CMV infection? Women who work in day-care centers or women who are around toddlers and ... saliva. Mouth-to-mouth kissing with children attending day-care is discouraged. Pregnant women should refrain from sharing ...

  8. Acute cervicitis and vulvovaginitis may be associated with Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Abou, Magali; Dällenbach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunocompetent hosts is generally asymptomatic or may present as a mononucleosic syndrome. Its association with acute cervicitis and vulvovaginitis has rarely been reported. A 24-year-old woman presented with pelvic pain, vulvodynia, abnormal vaginal discharge, burning with urination, fatigue, fever, vomiting and diarrhoea. The vulva and cervix were red with vesicular lesions on the cervix. Genital herpes simplex infection (HSV) was suspected and valacyclovir was given orally. However, serial viral cultures performed 7 weeks apart did not isolate HSV as suspected, but CMV was confirmed by immunofluorescence and early antigen research. Blood tests confirmed an acute CMV infection. Typical inclusions were found at histology. Symptoms resolved slowly with persistence of cervical lesions at 7 weeks from diagnosis. The frequency of CMV genital infection is probably underestimated. The infection is not always asymptomatic and might be confused with genital HSV infection. The clinical course is longer. PMID:23606387

  9. Impairment of cytomegalovirus and host balance in elderly subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Musiani, M; Zerbini, M; Zauli, D; Cometti, G; La Placa, M

    1988-01-01

    The titres of IgG antibody against "late antigens", "immediate early antigens", and "early antigens" induced by cytomegalovirus (CMV) and IgM antibody against "late antigens" induced by CMV were analysed in 67 geriatric subjects by immunocytochemical techniques. The titres obtained were compared with those of an adult control population. Significantly increased titres of IgG antibody against induced antigens and a significant increase in CMV reactivated infections occurred in the elderly compared with control subjects. These findings indicate that the CMV and host balance in the elderly is disturbed, leading to activation of the CMV latent carrier state that follows primary CMV infection. PMID:2842379

  10. Programmatic Implications of Acute and Early HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Amitabh B; Granich, Reuben M; Kato, Masaya; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Montaner, Julio S G; Williams, Brian G

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes acute, early, chronic, and late stages. Acute HIV infection lasts approximately 3 weeks and early HIV infection, which includes acute HIV infection, lasts approximately 7 weeks. Many testing and blood screening algorithms detect HIV antibodies about 3 weeks after HIV infection. Incidence estimates are based on results of modeling, cohort studies, surveillance, and/or assays. Viral load is the key modifiable risk factor for HIV transmission and peaks during acute and early HIV infection. Empirical evidence characterizing the impact of acute and early HIV infection on the spread of the HIV epidemic are limited. Time trends of HIV prevalence collected from concentrated and generalized epidemics suggest that acute and early HIV infection may have a limited role in population HIV transmission. Collectively, these data suggest that acute and early HIV infection is relatively short and does not currently require fundamentally different programmatic approaches to manage the HIV/AIDS epidemic in most settings. Research and surveillance will inform which epidemic contexts and phases may require tailored strategies for these stages of HIV infection. PMID:26310309

  11. Quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA by real-time PCR for occurrence of CMV disease in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gourlain, Karine; Salmon, Dominique; Gault, Elyanne; Leport, Catherine; Katlama, Christine; Matheron, Sophie; Costagliola, Dominique; Mazeron, Marie-Christine; Fillet, Anne-Marie

    2003-03-01

    In HIV-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) included in the Predivir cohort, we have evaluated the usefulness of CMV DNA quantitation by a TaqMan PCR assay from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to predict CMV disease occurrence. In parallel with the immune restoration after treatment by HAART, the percentage of positive samples decreased progressively from 7.3% at Day 0 to 3.5% at Month 12. Among the CMV markers, the smallest concordance with PBL CMV TaqMan PCR, as evaluated by kappa, was observed with pp65 antigenemia, whereas concordance with all other CMV markers was high. Among the 16 patients with CMV DNA copies at least once >100/150,000 cells, CMV disease occurred in six during follow-up, whereas among the 159 patients with CMV DNA copies always <10/150,000 cells, CMV disease occurred in three and among the seven patients with CMV DNA copies >10 and <100 occurred in only one. In univariate Cox models, all the CMV markers including PBL CMV TaqMan PCR >10/150,000 cells (RR: 27.6, IC95: 7.1-107.2), the CD4 cell count <75 cells/mm(3) and the HIV viral load >100,000 copies/ml were predictive for CMV disease. In a stepwise multivariate analysis, which should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of events (n = 10), three covariates were associated independently with CMV disease: pp65 antigenemia >100 nuclei/200,000, PBL CMV TaqMan PCR >10 copies/150,000 cells and HIV viral load remaining or increasing >100,000 copies/ml. PMID:12526052

  12. Immunomodulation by cytomegaloviruses: manipulative strategies beyond evasion.

    PubMed

    Mocarski, Edward S

    2002-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains the major infectious cause of birth defects as well as an important opportunistic pathogen. Individuals infected with CMV mount a strong immune response that suppresses persistent viral replication and maintains life-long latency. Loss of immune control opens the way to virus reactivation and disease. The large number of immunomodulatory functions encoded by CMV increases the efficiency of infection, dissemination, reactivation and persistent infection in hosts with intact immune systems and could contribute to virulence in immunocompromised hosts. These functions modulate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response and appear to target cellular rather than humoral responses preferentially. CMV encodes a diverse arsenal of proteins focused on altering and/or mimicking: (1) classical and non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein function; (2) leukocyte migration, activation and cytokine responses; and (3) host cell susceptibility to apoptosis. Evidence that the host evolves mechanisms to counteract virus immune modulation is also accumulating. Although immune evasion is certainly one clear goal of the virus, the pro-inflammatory impact of certain viral functions suggests that increased inflammation benefits viral dissemination. The ability of such viral functions to successfully 'face off' against the host immune system ensures the success of this pathogen in the human population and could provide key insights into disease mechanisms. PMID:12110212

  13. [H. pylori infections in children: clinical, diagnostic and treatment implications].

    PubMed

    Iwańczak, Franciszek; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the most widespread infection all over the Word. The rate of this infection varies, depending on age, geographic region, socioeconomic and hygienic conditions. Most infected children live in the poor, developing countries without adequate living and hygienic conditions. Prevalence of H. pylori infections in children in Poland was 32.01%. The course of infection in children depends on individual predisposition, environmental factors and virulence of H. pylori. In children in Poland infection with cagA+s1m1 genotype occurs most frequently. In children, a connection of H. pylori infection to ulcer disease of the duodenum was demonstrated. Additionally, the diagnostic tests of infection and diagnostic assessing eradication were discussed in the work. Recommendations on the treatment of H. pylori taking into account the necessity of the assessment of bacteria sensitivity to antibiotics were outlined. It is particularly important in the regions with high resistance of H. pylori to clarythromycin, which in children can exceed 20%. PMID:24340886

  14. Comparative magnitude and kinetics of human cytomegalovirus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses in pregnant women with primary versus remote infection and in transmitting versus non-transmitting mothers: Its utility for dating primary infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fornara, Chiara; Furione, Milena; Arossa, Alessia; Gerna, Giuseppe; Lilleri, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    To discriminate between primary (PI) and remote (RI) human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, several immunological parameters were monitored for a 2-year period in 53 pregnant women with PI, and 33 pregnant women experiencing HCMV PI at least 5 years prior. Cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-2) production by and phenotype (effector/memory CD45RA(+) ) of HCMV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells as well as the lymphoproliferative responses (LPR) were evaluated, with special reference to the comparison between a group of women transmitting (T) and a group of non-transmitting (NT) the infection to fetus. While HCMV-specific CD4(+) T-cells reached at 90 days post-infection (p.i.) values comparable to RI, CD8(+) T-cells reached at 60 days p.i. levels significantly higher and persisting throughout the entire follow-up. Instead, IL-2 production and lymphoproliferative responses were lower in PI than RI for the entire follow-up period. Effector memory CD45RA(+) CD4(+) and CD8(+) HCMV-specific T-cells increased until 90 days p.i., reaching and maintaining levels higher than RI. The comparison between T and NT women showed that, at 30 days p.i., in NT women there was a significantly higher IL-2 production by HCMV-specific CD4(+) T-cells, and at 60 days p.i. a significantly higher frequency of both specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD45RA(+) T-cells. HCMV T-cell response appears to correlate with virus transmission to fetus and some parameters (CD4(+) lymphoproliferation, and frequency of HCMV-specific CD8(+) IL2(+) T-cells) may help in dating PI during pregnancy. J. Med. Virol. 88:1238-1246, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26680747

  15. A case of invasive cytomegalovirus duodenitis in an immunosuppressed patient 15 months after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kazanji, N; Davila, F; Manickam, P; Wang, Y; Bossory, L

    2015-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains one of the most important infections in kidney transplantation. Only a handful of images have been reported in the literature thus far. We present classic pathologic and gross images of CMV duodenitis in an immunosuppressed patient more than one year post-renal transplantation. PMID:25582982

  16. Child Care Provider Awareness and Prevention of Cytomegalovirus and Other Infectious Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Magnusson, Brianna M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Child care facilities are prime locations for the transmission of infectious and communicable diseases. Children and child care providers are at high risk for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection which causes severe birth defects and developmental delays. Objective: The goals of study were: (1) to determine the level of cytomegalovirus…

  17. Silent oophoritis due to cytomegalovirus in a patient with advanced HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, R; Alampi, G; Talò, S; Calza, L; Tadolini, M; Martinelli, G N; Chiodo, F

    2000-06-01

    A case of isolated necrotizing cytomegalovirus (CMV) oophoritis disclosed only by necropsy studies in a patient with AIDS, is described. This unusual case report is discussed with a review of the literature dealing with CMV involvement of genital organs in the immunocompromised host, and in patients with HIV infection and AIDS. PMID:10872916

  18. Antigenic glycans in parasitic infections: implications for vaccines and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Nyame, A Kwame; Kawar, Ziad S; Cummings, Richard D

    2004-06-15

    Infections by parasitic protozoans and helminths are a major world-wide health concern, but no vaccines exist to the major human parasitic diseases, such as malaria, African trypanosomiasis, amebiasis, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, and lymphatic filariasis. Recent studies on a number of parasites indicate that immune responses to parasites in infected animals and humans are directed to glycan determinants within cell surface and secreted glycoconjugates and that glycoconjugates are important in host-parasite interactions. Because of the tremendous success achieved recently in generating carbohydrate-protein conjugate vaccines toward microbial infections, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b, there is renewed interest in defining parasite-derived glycans in the prospect of developing conjugate vaccines and new diagnostics for parasitic infections. Parasite-derived glycans are compelling vaccine targets because they have structural features that distinguish them from mammalian glycans. There have been exciting new developments in techniques for glycan analysis and the methods for synthesizing oligosaccharides by chemical or combined chemo-enzymatic approaches that now make it feasible to generate parasite glycans to test as vaccine candidates. Here, we highlight recent progress made in elucidating the immunogenicity of glycans from some of the major human and animal parasites, the potential for developing conjugate vaccines for parasitic infections, and the possible utilization of these novel glycans in diagnostics. PMID:15158669

  19. Human Cytomegalovirus Modulates Expression of Noncanonical Wnt Receptor ROR2 To Alter Trophoblast Migration

    PubMed Central

    van Zuylen, Wendy J.; Ford, Caroline E.; Wong, Diana D. Y.

    2015-01-01

    primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, reactivation, or reinfection with a different viral strain may cause fetal injury and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Increasing evidence indicates that fetal injury results not only from direct viral cytopathic damage to the CMV-infected fetus but also from indirect effects through placental infection and placental dysfunction. No effective therapy is currently proven to prevent or treat congenital CMV infection. Understanding the molecular underpinnings of CMV infection of the placenta is essential for therapeutic innovations and vaccine design. CMV alters canonical Wingless (Wnt) signaling, an essential cellular pathway involved in placental development. This study suggests a mechanism in which CMV alters the expression of noncanonical Wnt receptor ROR2 to alter motility of placental cells, which has important implications in the pathogenesis of CMV-induced placental dysfunction. Inhibition of this mechanism may be a target for therapeutic intervention for CMV-induced placental damage and consequent fetal damage in congenital CMV infection. PMID:26559837

  20. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of valacyclovir in cytomegalovirus prevention in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reischig, Tomas; Kacer, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Prevention of cytomegalovirus infection using antiviral prophylaxis or the pre-emptive therapy approach is an integral part of management of patients after solid organ transplantation. Regarding renal transplantation, valacyclovir is currently the only antiviral agent recommended for prophylaxis as an alternative to valganciclovir. This review article discusses studies documenting the efficacy and safety of valacyclovir prophylaxis as well as those comparing valacyclovir with other prophylactic regimens or with pre-emptive therapy. Also addressed are the economic aspects supporting the cost-effectiveness of valacyclovir prophylaxis and demonstrating lower costs compared with other cytomegalovirus preventive strategies. PMID:25252996

  1. Cytomegalovirus Replicates in Differentiated but not in Undifferentiated Human Embryonal Carcinoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonczol, Eva; Andrews, Peter W.; Plotkin, Stanley A.

    1984-04-01

    To study the mode of action of human cytomegalovirus, an important teratogenic agent in human populations, the susceptibility of a pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cell line to the virus was investigated. Viral antigens were not expressed nor was infectious virus produced by human embryonal carcinoma cells after infection, although the virus was able to penetrate these cells. In contrast, retinoic acid-induced differentiated derivatives of embryonal carcinoma cells were permissive for antigen expression and infectious virus production. Replication of human cytomegalovirus in human teratocarcinoma cells may therefore depend on cellular functions associated with differentiation.

  2. Vaccination with synthetic constructs expressing cytomegalovirus immunogens is highly T cell immunogenic in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Talbott, Kendra T.; Wu, Stephan J.; Wilson, Christine M.; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Boyer, Jean D.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Awasthi, Sita; Weiner, David B.

    2012-01-01

    There is no licensed vaccine or cure for human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ubiquitous β-herpesvirus infecting 60–95% of adults worldwide. Infection can cause congenital abnormalities, result in severe disease in immunocompromised patients, and is a major impediment during successful organ transplantation. In addition, it has been associated with numerous inflammatory diseases and cancers, as well as being implicated in the development of essential hypertension, a major risk factor for heart disease. To date, limited data regarding the identification of immunogenic viral targets has frustrated CMV vaccine development. Based upon promising clinical data suggesting an important role for T cells in protecting against disease in the transplantation setting, we designed a novel panel of highly-optimized synthetic vaccines encoding major CMV proteins and evaluated their immune potential in murine studies. Vaccination induced robust CD8+ and CD4+ T cells of great epitopic breadth as extensively analyzed using a novel modified T cell assay described herein. Together with improved levels of CMV-specific T cells as driven by a vaccine, further immune evaluation of each target is warranted. The present model provides an important tool for guiding future immunization strategies against CMV. PMID:23151448

  3. Infection Control and Prevention: A Review of Hospital-Acquired Infections and the Economic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Deoine; Kemmerly, Sandra A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 2 million patients suffer from hospital-acquired infections every year and nearly 100,000 of them die. Most of these medical errors are preventable. Hospital-acquired infections result in up to $4.5 billion in additional healthcare expenses annually. The U.S. government has responded to this financial loss by focusing on healthcare quality report cards and by taking strong action to curb healthcare spending. The Medicare Program has proposed changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year Rates: Proposed Rule CMS 1488-P-Healthcare-associated infection. Payment will be linked to performance. Under the new rule, payment will be withheld from hospitals for care associated with treating certain catheter-associated urinary tract infections, vascular catheter-associated infections, and mediastinitis after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Infection-prevention strategies are essential. In the healthcare setting, the infection control department is categorized as non-revenue-producing. Funds dedicated to resources such as staff, educational programs, and prevention measures are vastly limited. Hospital leaders will need to balance the upfront cost needed to prevent hospital-related infections with the non-reimbursed expense accrued secondary to potentially preventable infections. The purpose of this paper is to present case studies and cost analysis of hospital-acquired infections and present strategies that reduce infections and cost. PMID:21603406

  4. Cytomegalovirus and HIV: A Dangerous Pas de Deux.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Sara; Letendre, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults who take stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at risk for early onset of age-related diseases. This is likely due to a complex interaction between traditional risk factors, HIV infection itself, and other factors, such as underlying immune dysfunction and persistent inflammation. HIV disrupts the balance between the host and coinfecting microbes, worsening control of these potential pathogens. For example, HIV-infected adults are more likely than the general population to have subclinical bursts of cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication at mucosal sites. Production of antigens can activate the immune system and stimulate HIV replication, and it could contribute to the pathogenesis of adverse outcomes of aging, like cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive impairment. Further investigation of the relationships between CMV, immune dysfunction, and unsuccessful aging during chronic HIV infection is warranted. PMID:27625433

  5. Community-Acquired Clostridium Difficile Infection: Awareness and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Juneau, Cheryl; Mendias, Elnora (Nonie) P.; Wagal, Nihas; Loeffelholz, Michael; Savidge, Tor; Croisant, Sharon; Dann, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is changing. CDI, usually depicted as a nosocomial infection in the elderly, is now occurring in community-dwelling persons who are younger and otherwise dissimilar. A more virulent isolate (North American Pulsed Field type 1 (NAP1) associated with increased morbidity and mortality, has been identified. In 2005, similar strains were associated with severe disease in community-dwelling patients at a rate of 7.6/100,000. Screening patients with potential CDI symptoms and implementing preventative measures, including judicious use of antibiotics, can reduce disease burden. PMID:23814528

  6. [Emerging and reemerging infections of Northern Eurasia: global implications].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents selected results of the studies on emerging and reemerging infections caried out in D I Ivanovsky Research Institute of Virology with special reference to comprehensive ecological, virological, and molecular-genetic analysis of the following viruses: California encephalaitis serocomplex, West Nile fever, highly virulent avian influenza A virus (H5N 1), and new pandemic influenza A vires (HIN1). Special attention is given to the role of emerging and reemerging infections at the territory of Northern Eurasia in national and world-wide epidemiological cataclysms and their prognostication for minimizing their consequences based on monitoring pathogen evolution. PMID:21786591

  7. [Historical outlook on cytomegalovirus research].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, T

    1998-01-01

    In historical point of view, cytomegalovirus (CMV) research could be divided into two phases, before and after discovery of the virus from a baby with severe jaundice. CMV is an ubiquitous virus which makes it difficult to diagnose CMV diseases. Therefore criteria for definite CMV disease has been proposed by the expert committee. Basic research is concentrating on analysis of functional map of the sequences, which helps to develop more genetically engineered vaccine and clarify the mechanism of latency of CMV. I hope increased awareness of CMV disease in organ transplantation advances the development of both chemotherapy and preventive method in near future. PMID:9465657

  8. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia in transplant patients: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Eun-Young Kang; Patz, E.F. Jr.; Mueller, N.L.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the CT findings of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia in transplant patients. The study included 10 transplant patients who had chest CT scan and pathologically proven isolated pulmonary CMV infection. Five patients had bone marrow transplant and five had solid organ transplant. The CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for pattern and distribution of disease and the CT findings compared with the findings on open lung biopsy (n = 9) and autopsy (n = 1). Nine of 10 patients had parenchymal abnormalities apparent at CT and I had normal CT scans. The findings in the nine patients included small nodules (n = 6), consolidation (n = 4), ground-glass attenuation (n = 4), and irregular lines (n = 1). The nodules had a bilateral and symmetric distribution and involved all lung zones. The consolidation was most marked in the lower lung zones. The CT findings of CMV pneumonia in transplant patients are heterogeneous. The most common patterns include small nodules and areas of consolidation. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Comparative efficacy of handwashing agents against cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Faix, R G

    1987-04-01

    Conscientious handwashing is often recommended as an important method for limiting transmission of cytomegalovirus (CMV) from infected individuals to health, education, and child care professionals. To assess the efficacy of handwashing, fingertips of radiation-sterilized latex gloves were inoculated with 0.2 mL of ten different CMV strains. Virus in each inoculum was quantitated by plaque assay. After five minutes, viral inocula were allowed to remain (control), or were washed away by dropwise application of 10 mL of distilled water (DI), 5 mL of 0.08% soap followed by 5 mL of DI, 5 mL of 0.01% chlorhexidine gluconate followed by 5 mL of DI, or 5 mL of 0.025% povidone-iodine solution followed by 5 mL of DI. Separate glove fingertips were sampled 5, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes after washing and cultured in duplicate for CMV. Similar studies were performed using human cadaver skin. Ordinary soap was as effective at preventing CMV recovery as other more expensive agents. For inocula with less than 5 log10 pfu CMV/mL, washing with water alone was as effective as other agents. This was confirmed in similar studies with human hands using five CMV stains. Handwashing is probably an effective method for removing CMV from contaminated hands. PMID:3034815

  10. RhoB is a component of the human cytomegalovirus assembly complex and is required for efficient viral production

    PubMed Central

    Goulidaki, Nektaria; Alarifi, Saud; Alkahtani, Saad H; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Stournaras, Christos; Sourvinos, George

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV), an ubiquitous β-herpesvirus, is a significant pathogen that causes medically severe diseases in immunocompromised individuals and in congenitally infected neonates. RhoB belongs to the family of Rho GTPases, which regulates diverse cellular processes. Rho proteins are implicated in the entry and egress from the host cell of mainly α- and γ-herpesviruses, whereas β-herpesviruses are the least studied in this regard. Here, we studied the role of RhoB GTPase during HCMV lytic infection. Microscopy analysis, both in fixed and live infected cells showed that RhoB was translocated to the assembly complex/compartment (AC) of HCMV, a cytoplasmic zone in infected cells where many viral structural proteins are known to accumulate and assembly of new virions takes place. Furthermore, RhoB was localized at the AC even when the expression of the late HCMV AC proteins was inhibited. At the very late stages of infection, cellular projections were formed containing RhoB and HCMV virions, potentially contributing to the successful viral spread. Interestingly, the knockdown of RhoB in HCMV-infected cells resulted in a significant reduction of the virus titer and could also affect the accumulation of AC viral proteins at this subcellular compartment. RhoB knockdown also affected actin fibers' structure. Actin reorganization was observed at late stages of infection originating from the viral AC and surrounding the cellular projections, implying a potential interplay between RhoB and actin during HCMV assembly and egress. In conclusion, our results demonstrate for the first time that RhoB is a constituent of the viral AC and is required for HCMV productive infection. PMID:26114383

  11. Cytomegalovirus and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Criscuoli, Valeria; Rizzuto, Maria Rosa; Cottone, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this report is to give an overall view of the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic features of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A review of published reports on this topic was carried out, with particular attention paid to the selection of patients included in studies and the diagnostic methods employed. CMV is frequently associated with IBD. In some cases, CMV infection is associated with a poor outcome but it is not clear which patients are more likely to be affected and in which stage of the disease. The use of anti-viral therapy in IBD is controversial and an empirical study with controls is needed. The natural history of CMV infection related to the development and treatment of IBD has not been clarified but it is important to take it in consideration because of the possibility of viral persistence in the immunocompromised host and viral interaction with the immune system. PMID:16937462

  12. Breastfeeding and chronic HBV infection: Clinical and social implications

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mihaela; Kamburov, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is among the most important causes of chronic HBV infection and is the commonest mode of transmission worldwide. Currently, the presence of HBsAg, HBeAg and HBV DNA in breast milk is confirmed. Several studies have reported that breastfeeding carries no additional risk that might lead to vertical transmission. Beyond some limitations, the surveys have not demonstrated any differences in HBV transmission rate regarding feeding practices in early childhood. Promotion of breastfeeding is substantial, especially for low-income individuals and regions with uncertain, unfeasible, and unsafe water supplies. Lactoferrin, minimal inflammation or activation within the infant gut during exclusive breastfeeding, and nonspecific biological molecules in the milk are identified as major factors of breast-milk defense. This review discusses preemptive antiviral therapy during pregnancy and lactation. Long-term follow up of breast-milk HBV concentrations and correlation with serum viral load; nucleos(t)ide analogue concentrations in breast milk in HBV-positive mothers in the setting of chronic HBV infection; safety of antiviral therapy during pregnancy and lactation; and the difference in viral load in the milk in exclusive or non-exclusive breastfeeding are still open questions. The paper reviews the current data and outlines the course of further investigation into this often underestimated issue. PMID:20976840

  13. Human cytomegalovirus and transplantation: drug development and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Megan; Hauschild, Benjamin; Miller, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is highly prevalent worldwide and can cause serious disease among immunocompromised individuals, including persons with HIV and transplant recipients on immunosuppressive therapies. It can also result in congenital cytomegalovirus when women are infected during pregnancy. Treatment and prevention of CMV in solid organ and haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients is accomplished in one of three ways: (1) prophylactic therapy to prevent CMV viraemia; (2) pre-emptive therapy for those with low levels of replicating virus; and (3) treatment for established disease. Despite the high prevalence of CMV, there are few available approved drug therapies, and those that are available are hampered by toxicity and less-than-optimal efficacy. New therapies are being developed and tested; however, inconsistency in standardisation of virus levels and questions about potential endpoints in clinical trials present regulatory hurdles that must be addressed. This review covers the current state of CMV therapy, drugs currently under investigation, and clinical trial issues and questions that are in need of resolution. PMID:27482453

  14. Cytomegalovirus seropositivity is associated with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Ogunjimi, Benson; Hens, Niel; Pebody, Richard; Jansens, Hilde; Seale, Holly; Quinlivan, Mark; Theeten, Heidi; Goossens, Herman; Breuer, Judy; Beutels, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is caused by VZV reactivation that is facilitated by a declined immunity against varicella-zoster virus (VZV), but also occurs in immunocompetent individuals. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with immunosenescence meaning that VZV-specific T-cells could be less responsive. This study aimed to determine whether CMV infection could be a risk factor for the development of HZ. CMV IgG serostatus was determined in stored serum samples from previously prospectively recruited ambulatory adult HZ patients in the UK (N = 223) in order to compare the results with those from UK population samples (N = 1545) by means of a logistic regression (controlling for age and gender). Furthermore, we compared the UK population CMV seroprevalence with those from population samples from other countries (from Belgium (N1 = 1741, N2 = 576), USA (N = 5572) and Australia (N = 2080)). Furthermore, CMV IgG titers could be compared between UK HZ patients and Belgium N2 population samples because the same experimental set-up for analysis was used. We found UK ambulatory HZ patients to have a higher CMV seroprevalence than UK population samples (OR 1.56 [1.11 2.19]). CMV IgG seropositivity was a significant risk factor for HZ in the UK (OR 3.06 [1.32 7.04]. Furthermore, high CMV IgG titers (exceeding the upper threshold) were less abundant in CMV-seropositive Belgian N2 population samples than in CMV-seropositive UK HZ patients (OR 0.51 [0.31 0.82]. We found CMV-seroprevalence to increase faster with age in the UK than in other countries (P < 0.05). We conclude that CMV IgG seropositivity is associated with HZ. This finding could add to the growing list of risk factors for HZ. PMID:25905443

  15. Cytomegalovirus seropositivity is associated with herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Ogunjimi, Benson; Hens, Niel; Pebody, Richard; Jansens, Hilde; Seale, Holly; Quinlivan, Mark; Theeten, Heidi; Goossens, Herman; Breuer, Judy; Beutels, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is caused by VZV reactivation that is facilitated by a declined immunity against varicella-zoster virus (VZV), but also occurs in immunocompetent individuals. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with immunosenescence meaning that VZV-specific T-cells could be less responsive. This study aimed to determine whether CMV infection could be a risk factor for the development of HZ. CMV IgG serostatus was determined in stored serum samples from previously prospectively recruited ambulatory adult HZ patients in the UK (N = 223) in order to compare the results with those from UK population samples (N = 1545) by means of a logistic regression (controlling for age and gender). Furthermore, we compared the UK population CMV seroprevalence with those from population samples from other countries (from Belgium (N1 = 1741, N2 = 576), USA (N = 5572) and Australia (N = 2080)). Furthermore, CMV IgG titers could be compared between UK HZ patients and Belgium N2 population samples because the same experimental set-up for analysis was used. We found UK ambulatory HZ patients to have a higher CMV seroprevalence than UK population samples (OR 1.56 [1.11 2.19]). CMV IgG seropositivity was a significant risk factor for HZ in the UK (OR 3.06 [1.32 7.04]. Furthermore, high CMV IgG titers (exceeding the upper threshold) were less abundant in CMV-seropositive Belgian N2 population samples than in CMV-seropositive UK HZ patients (OR 0.51 [0.31 0.82]. We found CMV-seroprevalence to increase faster with age in the UK than in other countries (P < 0.05). We conclude that CMV IgG seropositivity is associated with HZ. This finding could add to the growing list of risk factors for HZ. PMID:25905443

  16. TORCH infections.

    PubMed

    Neu, Natalie; Duchon, Jennifer; Zachariah, Philip

    2015-03-01

    TORCH infections classically comprise toxoplasmosis, Treponema pallidum, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus, hepatitis viruses, human immunodeficiency virus, and other infections, such as varicella, parvovirus B19, and enteroviruses. The epidemiology of these infections varies; in low-income and middle-income countries, TORCH infections are major contributors to prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal morbidity and mortality. Evidence of infection may be seen at birth, in infancy, or years later. For many of these pathogens, treatment or prevention strategies are available. Early recognition, including prenatal screening, is key. This article covers toxoplasmosis, parvovirus B19, syphilis, rubella, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25677998

  17. Cytomegalovirus

    MedlinePlus

    ... be contagious? I have CMV. Should I stop breastfeeding my baby? I work at a daycare center. How long should I stay home? Will my newborn have any problems because I had CMV while I was pregnant? I have HIV. Do I need any special treatments? Should I ...

  18. Pulmonary embolism in an immunocompetent patient with acute cytomegalovirus colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs commonly in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, but is usually asymptomatic in the latter. Vascular events associated with acute CMV infection have been described, but are rare. Hence, such events are rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary embolism secondary to acute CMV colitis in an immunocompetent 78-year-old man. The patient presented with fever and diarrhea. Colonic ulcers were diagnosed based on colonoscopy findings, and CMV was the proven etiology on pathological examination. The patient subsequently experienced acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed based on the chest radiography and computed tomography findings. A diagnosis of acute CMV colitis complicated by pulmonary embolism was made. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous administration of unfractionated heparin and intravenous ganciclovir. PMID:27175121

  19. Knowledge and Awareness of Congenital Cytomegalovirus Among Women

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jeon, Jiyeon; Victor, Marcia; Adler, Stuart P.; Arwady, Abigail; Demmler, Gail; Fowler, Karen; Goldfarb, Johanna; Keyserling, Harry; Massoudi, Mehran; Richards, Kristin; et al

    2006-01-01

    Bmore » ackground . Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of disabilities in children, yet the general public appears to have little awareness of CMV. Methods . Women were surveyed about newborn infections at 7 different geographic locations. Results . Of the 643 women surveyed, 142 ( 22 % ) had heard of congenital CMV. Awareness increased with increasing levels of education ( P < .0001 ). Women who had worked as a healthcare professional had a higher prevalence of awareness of CMV than had other women ( 56 % versus 16 % , P < .0001 ). Women who were aware of CMV were most likely to have heard about it from a healthcare provider ( 54 % ), but most could not correctly identify modes of CMV transmission or prevention. Among common causes of birth defects and childhood illnesses, women's awareness of CMV ranked last. Conclusion . Despite its large public health burden, few women had heard of congenital CMV, and even fewer were aware of prevention strategies.« less

  20. Is human cytomegalovirus associated with breast cancer progression?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) may be associated with breast cancer progression. However, the role of HCMV infection in breast cancer remains controversial. We aimed to assess whether HCMV genes (UL122 and UL83) could be detected in breast carcinomas and reinvestigated their possible association with breast cancer progression. DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues was analyzed by real-time PCR. We investigated 20 fibroadenomas and 27 primary breast carcinomas (stages II, III, and IV). Findings Two carcinomas were positive for HCMV, one was positive for two TaqMan viral detection probes, and one was positive for a sole TaqMan viral detection probe (UL83), whereas the remainder of the samples was negative. Conclusions Samples studied showed no association between HCMV infection and breast cancer progression. PMID:23557440

  1. The Human Cytomegalovirus-Specific UL1 Gene Encodes a Late-Phase Glycoprotein Incorporated in the Virion Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Shikhagaie, Medya; Mercé-Maldonado, Eva; Isern, Elena; Muntasell, Aura; Albà, M. Mar; López-Botet, Miguel; Hengel, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the previously uncharacterized human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL1 open reading frame (ORF), a member of the rapidly evolving HCMV RL11 family. UL1 is HCMV specific; the absence of UL1 in chimpanzee cytomegalovirus (CCMV) and sequence analysis studies suggest that UL1 may have originated by the duplication of an ancestor gene from the RL11-TRL cluster (TRL11, TRL12, and TRL13). Sequence similarity searches against human immunoglobulin (Ig)-containing proteins revealed that HCMV pUL1 shows significant similarity to the cellular carcinoembryonic antigen-related (CEA) protein family N-terminal Ig domain, which is responsible for CEA ligand recognition. Northern blot analysis revealed that UL1 is transcribed during the late phase of the viral replication cycle in both fibroblast-adapted and endotheliotropic strains of HCMV. We characterized the protein encoded by hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged UL1 in the AD169-derived HB5 background. UL1 is expressed as a 224-amino-acid type I transmembrane glycoprotein which becomes detectable at 48 h postinfection. In infected human fibroblasts, pUL1 colocalized at the cytoplasmic site of virion assembly and secondary envelopment together with TGN-46, a marker for the trans-Golgi network, and viral structural proteins, including the envelope glycoprotein gB and the tegument phosphoprotein pp28. Furthermore, analyses of highly purified AD169 UL1-HA epitope-tagged virions revealed that pUL1 is a novel constituent of the HCMV envelope. Importantly, the deletion of UL1 in HCMV TB40/E resulted in reduced growth in a cell type-specific manner, suggesting that pUL1 may be implicated in regulating HCMV cell tropism. PMID:22345456

  2. Outcomes of co-infection by two potyviruses: implications for the evolution of manipulative strategies.

    PubMed

    Salvaudon, Lucie; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Mescher, Mark C

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies have documented effects of plant viruses on host plants that appear to enhance transmission by insect vectors. But, almost no empirical work has explored the implications of such apparent manipulation for interactions among co-infecting pathogens. We examined single and mixed infections of two potyviruses, watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), that frequently co-occur in cucurbitaceae populations and share the same aphid vectors. We found that ZYMV isolates replicated at similar rates in single and mixed infections, whereas WMV strains accumulated to significantly lower levels in the presence of ZYMV. Furthermore, ZYMV induced changes in leaf colour and volatile emissions that enhanced aphid (Aphis gossypii) recruitment to infected plants. By contrast, WMV did not elicit strong effects on plant-aphid interactions. Nevertheless, WMV was still readily transmitted from mixed infections, despite fairing poorly in in-plant competition. These findings suggest that pathogen effects on host-vector interactions may well influence competition among co-infecting pathogens. For example, if non-manipulative pathogens benefit from the increased vector traffic elicited by manipulative competitors, their costs of competition may be mitigated to some extent. Conversely, the benefits of manipulation may be limited by free-rider effects in systems where there is strong competition among pathogens for host resources and/or access to vectors. PMID:23407835

  3. Assessing coughing-induced influenza droplet transmission and implications for infection risk control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y-H; Wang, C-H; You, S-H; Hsieh, N-H; Chen, W-Y; Chio, C-P; Liao, C-M

    2016-01-01

    Indoor transmission of respiratory droplets bearing influenza within humans poses high risks to respiratory function deterioration and death. Therefore, we aimed to develop a framework for quantifying the influenza infection risk based on the relationships between inhaled/exhaled respiratory droplets and airborne transmission dynamics in a ventilated airspace. An experiment was conducted to measure the size distribution of influenza-containing droplets produced by coughing for a better understanding of potential influenza spread. Here we integrated influenza population transmission dynamics, a human respiratory tract model, and a control measure approach to examine the indoor environment-virus-host interactions. A probabilistic risk model was implemented to assess size-specific infection risk for potentially transmissible influenza droplets indoors. Our results found that there was a 50% probability of the basic reproduction number (R0) exceeding 1 for small-size influenza droplets of 0·3-0·4 µm, implicating a potentially high indoor infection risk to humans. However, a combination of public health interventions with enhanced ventilation could substantially contain indoor influenza infection. Moreover, the present dynamic simulation and control measure assessment provide insights into why indoor transmissible influenza droplet-induced infection is occurring not only in upper lung regions but also in the lower respiratory tract, not normally considered at infection risk. PMID:26211781

  4. Herpes simplex virus infection in human arterial cells. Implications in arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, D P; Pomerantz, K B; Falcone, D J; Weksler, B B; Grant, A J

    1987-01-01

    Herpesviruses have been implicated as etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of human arteriosclerosis. We have examined the pathobiological effects of human herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) infection in influencing lipid accumulation and metabolism in human and bovine arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Significantly greater amounts of saturated cholesteryl esters (CE) and triacylglycerols (TG) accumulate in HSV-1-infected human and bovine arterial SMC than uninfected cells. This CE accumulation results, in part, from decreased CE hydrolysis. Furthermore, arachidonate-stimulated, HSV-1-infected arterial SMC have a reduced capacity to produce prostacyclin (an agonist of intracellular CE hydrolytic activity) than uninfected, stimulated SMC. It appears that HSV-1 may induce lipid accumulation in arterial SMC similar, in part, to the lipid accumulation observed in vivo during human atherogenesis. Thus, herpesviruses may contribute to lipid accumulation, which is a characteristic feature of atherosclerosis. PMID:3119662

  5. Inactivation of Influenza A virus, Adenovirus, and Cytomegalovirus with PAXgene tissue fixative and formalin.

    PubMed

    Kap, Marcel; Arron, Georgina I; Loibner, M; Hausleitner, Anja; Siaulyte, Gintare; Zatloukal, Kurt; Murk, Jean-Luc; Riegman, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Formalin fixation is known to inactivate most viruses in a vaccine production context, but nothing is published about virus activity in tissues treated with alternative, non-crosslinking fixatives. We used a model assay based on cell culture to test formalin and PAXgene Tissue fixative for their virus-inactivating abilities. MDCK, A549, and MRC-5 cells were infected with Influenza A virus, Adenovirus, and Cytomegalovirus, respectively. When 75% of the cells showed a cytopathic effect (CPE), the cells were harvested and incubated for 15 min, or 1, 3, 6, or 24 hours, with PBS (positive control), 4% formalin, or PAXgene Tissue Fix. The cells were disrupted and the released virus was used to infect fresh MDCK, A549, and MRC-5 cells cultured on cover slips in 24-well plates. The viral cultures were monitored for CPE and by immunocytochemistry (ICC) to record viral replication and infectivity. Inactivation of Adenovirus by formalin occurred after 3 h, while Influenza A virus as well as Cytomegalovirus were inactivated by formalin after 15 min. All three virus strains were inactivated by PAXgene Tissue fixative after 15 min. We conclude that PAXgene Tissue fixative is at least as effective as formalin in inactivating infectivity of Influenza A virus, Adenovirus, and Cytomegalovirus. PMID:24845590

  6. Analysis of the complete DNA sequence of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, W D; Farrell, H E; Barrell, B G

    1996-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Smith strain of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was determined from virion DNA by using a whole-genome shotgun approach. The genome has an overall G+C content of 58.7%, consists of 230,278 bp, and is arranged as a single unique sequence with short (31-bp) terminal direct repeats and several short internal repeats. Significant similarity to the genome of the sequenced human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 is evident, particularly for 78 open reading frames encoded by the central part of the genome. There is a very similar distribution of G+C content across the two genomes. Sequences toward the ends of the MCMV genome encode tandem arrays of homologous glycoproteins (gps) arranged as two gene families. The left end encodes 15 gps that represent one family, and the right end encodes a different family of 11 gps. A homolog (m144) of cellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes is located at the end of the genome opposite the HCMV MHC class I homolog (UL18). G protein-coupled receptor (GCR) homologs (M33 and M78) occur in positions congruent with two (UL33 and UL78) of the four putative HCMV GCR homologs. Counterparts of all of the known enzyme homologs in HCMV are present in the MCMV genome, including the phosphotransferase gene (M97), whose product phosphorylates ganciclovir in HCMV-infected cells, and the assembly protein (M80). PMID:8971012

  7. Cytomegalovirus in inflammatory bowel disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Römkens, Tessa EH; Bulte, Geert J; Nissen, Loes HC; Drenth, Joost PH

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify definitions of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and intestinal disease, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to determine the prevalence associated with these definitions. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and interrogated PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane for literature on prevalence and diagnostics of CMV infection and intestinal disease in IBD patients. As medical headings we used “cytomegalovirus” OR “CMV” OR “cytomegalo virus” AND “inflammatory bowel disease” OR “IBD” OR “ulcerative colitis” OR “colitis ulcerosa” OR “Crohn’s disease”. Both MeSH-terms and free searches were performed. We included all types of English-language (clinical) trials concerning diagnostics and prevalence of CMV in IBD. RESULTS: The search strategy identified 924 citations, and 52 articles were eligible for inclusion. We identified 21 different definitions for CMV infection, 8 definitions for CMV intestinal disease and 3 definitions for CMV reactivation. Prevalence numbers depend on used definition, studied population and region. The highest prevalence for CMV infection was found when using positive serum PCR as a definition, whereas for CMV intestinal disease this applies to the use of tissue PCR > 10 copies/mg tissue. Most patients with CMV infection and intestinal disease had steroid refractory disease and came from East Asia. CONCLUSION: We detected multiple different definitions used for CMV infection and intestinal disease in IBD patients, which has an effect on prevalence numbers and eventually on outcome in different trials. PMID:26811669

  8. Disruption of Murine Cardiac Allograft Acceptance by Latent Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Charles H.; Bickerstaff, Alice A.; Wang, Jiao-Jing; Zimmerman, Peter D.; Forster, Meghan R.; Nadasdy, Tibor; Colvin, Robert B.; Hadley, Gregg A.; Orosz, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation is a well described complication of solid organ transplantation. These studies were performed to 1.) determine if cardiac allograft transplantation of latently infected recipients results in reactivation of CMV, and 2.) determine what impact CMV might have on development of graft acceptance/tolerance. BALB/c cardiac allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 mice with/without latent murine CMV (MCMV). Recipients were treated with gallium nitrate induction and monitored for graft survival, viral immunity, and donor reactive DTH responses. Latently infected allograft recipients had ∼80% graft loss by 100 days after transplant, compared with ∼8% graft loss in naïve recipients. PCR evaluation demonstrated that MCMV was transmitted to cardiac grafts in all latently infected recipients, and 4/8 allografts had active viral transcription compared to 0/6 isografts. Latently infected allograft recipients showed intragraft IFN-α expression consistent with MCMV reactivation, but MCMV did not appear to negatively influence regulatory gene expression. Infected allograft recipients had disruption of splenocyte DTH regulation, but recipient splenocytes remained unresponsive to donor antigen even after allograft losses. These data suggest that transplantation in an environment of latent CMV infection may reactivate virus, and that intragraft responses disrupt development of allograft acceptance. PMID:18976295

  9. Imaging infection.

    PubMed

    Ketai, Loren; Jordan, Kirk; Busby, Katrina H

    2015-06-01

    Thoracic imaging is widely used to detect lower respiratory tract infections, identify their complications, and aid in differentiating infectious from noninfectious thoracic disease. Less commonly, the combination of imaging findings and a clinical setting can favor infection with a specific organism. This confluence can occur in cases of bronchiectatic nontuberculous mycobacterial infections in immune-competent hosts, invasive fungal disease among neutropenic patients, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia in patients with AIDS, and in cytomegalovirus infections in patients with recent hematopoietic cell transplantation. These specific diagnoses often depend on computed tomography scanning rather than chest radiography alone. PMID:26024600

  10. Estrogen-related receptor α is required for efficient human cytomegalovirus replication

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jesse; Purdy, John G.; Wu, Kai; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Shenk, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An shRNA-mediated screen of the 48 human nuclear receptor genes identified multiple candidates likely to influence the production of human cytomegalovirus in cultured human fibroblasts, including the estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor. The 50-kDa receptor and a 76-kDa variant were induced posttranscriptionally following infection. Genetic and pharmacological suppression of the receptor reduced viral RNA, protein, and DNA accumulation, as well as the yield of infectious progeny. In addition, RNAs encoding multiple metabolic enzymes, including enzymes sponsoring glycolysis (enolase 1, triosephosphate isomerase 1, and hexokinase 2), were reduced when the function of ERRα was inhibited in infected cells. Consistent with the effect on RNAs, a substantial number of metabolites, which are normally induced by infection, were either not increased or were increased to a reduced extent in the absence of normal ERRα activity. We conclude that ERRα is needed for the efficient production of cytomegalovirus progeny, and we propose that the nuclear receptor contributes importantly to the induction of a metabolic environment that supports optimal cytomegalovirus replication. PMID:25512541

  11. Cytomegalovirus and ulcerative colitis: Place of antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Sylvie; Pozzetto, Bruno; Roblin, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The link between cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and inflammatory bowel diseases remains an important subject of debate. CMV infection is frequent in ulcerative colitis (UC) and has been shown to be potentially harmful. CMV reactivation needs to be diagnosed using methods that include in situ detection of viral markers by immunohistochemistry or by nucleic acid amplification techniques. Determination of the density of infection using quantitative tools (numbers of infected cells or copies of the genome) is particularly important. Although CMV reactivation can be considered as an innocent bystander in active flare-ups of refractory UC, an increasing number of studies suggest a deleterious role of CMV in this situation. The presence of colonic CMV infection is possibly linked to a decreased response to steroids and other immunosuppressive agents. Some treatments, notably steroids and cyclosporine A, have been shown to favor CMV reactivation, which seems not to be the case for therapies using anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs. According to these findings, in flare-ups of refractory UC, it is now recommended to look for the presence of CMV reactivation by using quantitative tools in colonic biopsies and to treat them with ganciclovir in cases of high viral load or severe disease. PMID:26877608

  12. Cytomegalovirus and ulcerative colitis: Place of antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Sylvie; Pozzetto, Bruno; Roblin, Xavier

    2016-02-14

    The link between cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and inflammatory bowel diseases remains an important subject of debate. CMV infection is frequent in ulcerative colitis (UC) and has been shown to be potentially harmful. CMV reactivation needs to be diagnosed using methods that include in situ detection of viral markers by immunohistochemistry or by nucleic acid amplification techniques. Determination of the density of infection using quantitative tools (numbers of infected cells or copies of the genome) is particularly important. Although CMV reactivation can be considered as an innocent bystander in active flare-ups of refractory UC, an increasing number of studies suggest a deleterious role of CMV in this situation. The presence of colonic CMV infection is possibly linked to a decreased response to steroids and other immunosuppressive agents. Some treatments, notably steroids and cyclosporine A, have been shown to favor CMV reactivation, which seems not to be the case for therapies using anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs. According to these findings, in flare-ups of refractory UC, it is now recommended to look for the presence of CMV reactivation by using quantitative tools in colonic biopsies and to treat them with ganciclovir in cases of high viral load or severe disease. PMID:26877608

  13. Molecular and Culture-Based Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Testing for the Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Susanna K; Burgener, Elizabeth B; Waggoner, Jesse J; Gajurel, Kiran; Gonzalez, Sarah; Chen, Sharon F; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, with CMV pneumonitis among the most severe manifestations of infection. Although bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples are frequently tested for CMV, the clinical utility of such testing remains uncertain. Methods.  Retrospective analysis of adult patients undergoing BAL testing via CMV polymerase chain reaction (PCR), shell vial culture, and conventional viral culture between August 2008 and May 2011 was performed. Cytomegalovirus diagnostic methods were compared with a comprehensive definition of CMV pneumonitis that takes into account signs and symptoms, underlying host immunodeficiency, radiographic findings, and laboratory results. Results.  Seven hundred five patients underwent 1077 bronchoscopy episodes with 1090 BAL specimens sent for CMV testing. Cytomegalovirus-positive patients were more likely to be hematopoietic cell transplant recipients (26% vs 8%, P < .0001) and less likely to have an underlying condition not typically associated with lung disease (3% vs 20%, P < .0001). Histopathology was performed in only 17.3% of CMV-positive bronchoscopy episodes. When CMV diagnostic methods were evaluated against the comprehensive definition, the sensitivity and specificity of PCR, shell vial culture, and conventional culture were 91.3% and 94.6%, 54.4% and 97.4%, and 28.3% and 96.5%, respectively. Compared with culture, PCR provided significantly higher sensitivity and negative predictive value (P ≤ .001), without significantly lower positive predictive value. Cytomegalovirus quantitation did not improve test performance, resulting in a receiver operating characteristic curve with an area under the curve of 0.53. Conclusions.  Cytomegalovirus PCR combined with a comprehensive clinical definition provides a pragmatic approach for the diagnosis of CMV pneumonitis. PMID:26885542

  14. Molecular and Culture-Based Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Testing for the Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Susanna K.; Burgener, Elizabeth B.; Waggoner, Jesse J.; Gajurel, Kiran; Gonzalez, Sarah; Chen, Sharon F.; Pinsky, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, with CMV pneumonitis among the most severe manifestations of infection. Although bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples are frequently tested for CMV, the clinical utility of such testing remains uncertain. Methods. Retrospective analysis of adult patients undergoing BAL testing via CMV polymerase chain reaction (PCR), shell vial culture, and conventional viral culture between August 2008 and May 2011 was performed. Cytomegalovirus diagnostic methods were compared with a comprehensive definition of CMV pneumonitis that takes into account signs and symptoms, underlying host immunodeficiency, radiographic findings, and laboratory results. Results. Seven hundred five patients underwent 1077 bronchoscopy episodes with 1090 BAL specimens sent for CMV testing. Cytomegalovirus-positive patients were more likely to be hematopoietic cell transplant recipients (26% vs 8%, P < .0001) and less likely to have an underlying condition not typically associated with lung disease (3% vs 20%, P < .0001). Histopathology was performed in only 17.3% of CMV-positive bronchoscopy episodes. When CMV diagnostic methods were evaluated against the comprehensive definition, the sensitivity and specificity of PCR, shell vial culture, and conventional culture were 91.3% and 94.6%, 54.4% and 97.4%, and 28.3% and 96.5%, respectively. Compared with culture, PCR provided significantly higher sensitivity and negative predictive value (P ≤ .001), without significantly lower positive predictive value. Cytomegalovirus quantitation did not improve test performance, resulting in a receiver operating characteristic curve with an area under the curve of 0.53. Conclusions. Cytomegalovirus PCR combined with a comprehensive clinical definition provides a pragmatic approach for the diagnosis of CMV pneumonitis. PMID:26885542

  15. Species distribution in human immunodeficiency virus-related mycobacterial infections: implications for selection of initial treatment.

    PubMed

    Montessori, V; Phillips, P; Montaner, J; Haley, L; Craib, K; Bessuille, E; Black, W

    1996-06-01

    Management of mycobacterial infection is species specific; however, treatment is prompted by positive smears or cultures, often several weeks before species identification. The objective of this study was to determine the species distribution of mycobacterial isolates from various body sites in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All mycobacterial isolates recovered at St. Paul's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) from April 1989 to March 1993 were reviewed. Among 357 HIV-positive patients with mycobacterial infections, 64% (96) of the sputum isolates were Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), 18% were Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 17% were Mycobacterium kansasii. Lymph node involvement (25 patients) was due to either MAC (72%) or M. tuberculosis (24%). Two hundred ninety-eight episodes of mycobacteremia were due to MAC (98%), M. tuberculosis (1%), and M. kansasii (1%). Similarly, cultures of 84 bone marrow biopsy specimens (99%), 19 intestinal biopsy specimens (100%), and 30 stool specimens (97%) yielded predominantly MAC. These results have implications for initial therapy, particularly in areas where rapid methods for species identification are not readily available. Because of considerable geographic variation, development of guidelines for selection of initial therapy depends on regional determination of species distribution in HIV-related mycobacterial infections. PMID:8783698

  16. Changes in Epithelial Barrier Function in Response to Parasitic Infection: Implications for IBD Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Blanco, Joan Antoni; Estévez, Javier; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Vergara, Patri

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Mast cells [MCs] are implicated in epithelial barrier alterations that characterize inflammatory and functional bowel disorders. In this study, we describe mast cell proteinases [chymases and tryptases] and tight junction [TJ] proteins kinetics in a rat model of postinfectious gut dysfunction. Methods: Jejunal tissues of control and -infected rats were used. Inflammation-related changes in MCs and the expression of TJ-related proteins were evaluated by immunostaining and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Epithelial barrier function was assessed in vitro (Ussing chambers) and in vivo. Results: After infection, intestinal inflammation was associated with a generalized overexpression of MC chymases, peaking between Days 6 and 14. Thereafter, a mucosal MC hyperplasia and a late increase in connective tissue MC counts were observed. From Day 2 post-infection, TJ proteins occludin and claudin-3 expression was down-regulated whereas the pore-forming protein claudin-2 was overexpressed. The expression of proglucagon, precursor of the barrier-enhancing factor glucagon-like peptide-2, was reduced. These changes were associated with an increase in epithelial permeability, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions: Proteinases expression and location of mucosal and connective tissue MCs indicate a time-related pattern in the maturation of intestinal MCs following infection. Altered expression of TJ-related proteins is consistent with a loss of epithelial tightness, and provides a molecular mechanism for the enhanced epithelial permeability observed in inflammatory conditions of the gut. PMID:25820018

  17. HIV-Infected Prison Inmates: Depression and Implications for Release Back to Communities

    PubMed Central

    Scheyett, Anna; Parker, Sharon; Golin, Carol; White, Becky; Davis, Carrie Pettus; Wohl, David

    2010-01-01

    High rates of both HIV and depression are seen in prison populations; depression has been linked to disease progression in HIV, risky behaviors, and medication non-adherence. Despite this, few studies have examined HIV-infected inmates with depression. We therefore conducted an exploratory study of a sample of HIV-infected inmates in North Carolina prisons (N=101) to determine what proportion of this sample screened positive for depression and whether depression was associated with different pre-incarceration characteristics or post-release needs. A high proportion of HIV infected inmates (44.5%) screened positive for depression. Depressed inmates were significantly more likely have low coping self-efficacy scores (180 vs. 214), to report having had resource needs (OR=2.91) prior to incarceration and to anticipate needing income (OR=2.81), housing (OR=4.07), transportation (OR=9.15), and assistance with adherence (OR=8.67) post-release. We conclude by discussion the implications of our findings for prison based care and effective prison release planning for HIV infected inmates. PMID:18709452

  18. Implications of co-infection of Leptomonas in visceral leishmaniasis in India.

    PubMed

    Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Ahuja, Kavita; Puri, Niti; Krishnan, Anuja

    2015-12-01

    Protozoan parasites Leishmania donovani (family: Trypanosomatidae) cause fatal visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and the infection relapses in apparently cured population as post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) in the Indian subcontinent. In recent years co-infection of another Trypanosomatid parasite Leptomonas with L. donovani during VL/PKDL in this region has become prominent. The observation of clinically lesser-known insect parasite, Leptomonas in leishmaniasis is intriguing to researchers. The presence of Leishmania look alike Leptomonas in the cultures of clinical isolates of Leishmania has been worrisome to those, who prefer to work with pure Leishmania cultures for drug and vaccine development or immune response studies. The exact implications of such a co-habitation, which might lead to a delay in the diagnostics of VL and elevate mortality, need a thorough investigation. Also whether Leptomonas is involved in leishmaniasis manifestation needs to be ascertained. Thus we are currently witnessing a new paradigm of a parasitic co-infection in VL/PKDL cases in India and this review outlines various opportunities for further research in understanding such emerging co-infection. PMID:26492813

  19. Lack of XBP-1 Impedes Murine Cytomegalovirus Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Drori, Adi; Messerle, Martin; Brune, Wolfram; Tirosh, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-nucleus signaling cascade induced in response to ER stress. The UPR aims at restoring homeostasis, but can also induce apoptosis if stress persists. Infection by human and murine cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) provokes ER stress and induces the UPR. However, both CMVs manipulate the UPR to promote its prosurvival activity and delay apoptosis. The underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that MCMV and HCMV encode a late protein to target IRE1 for degradation. However, the importance of its downstream effector, X Box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), has not been directly studied. Here we show that deletion of XBP-1 prior to or early after infection confers a transient delay in viral propagation in fibroblasts that can be overcome by increasing the viral dose. A similar phenotype was demonstrated in peritoneal macrophages. In vivo, acute infection by MCMV is reduced in the absence of XBP-1. Our data indicate that removal of XBP-1 confers a kinetic delay in early stages of MCMV infection and suggest that the late targeting of IRE1 is aimed at inhibiting activities other than the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA. PMID:25333725

  20. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) in Africa: a neglected but important pathogen.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Brantsaeter, Arne Broch

    2016-01-01

    In Africa, human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an important pathogen in a diverse range of patient groups. Congenital CMV infection is common, and most children undergo primary infection during the first year of life. Preliminary studies suggest that these early primary CMV infections could have population-wide effects on growth and development. In most studies of adults, CMV seroprevalence is close to 100%, but some studies have found that significant minorities of adults are seronegative. CMV is a common cause of pneumonia and meningitis in hospitalised immunosuppressed patient groups, and CMV DNAemia may be an important marker of rapid progression and poor outcomes of HIV infection, despite roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Diagnosis and treatment of CMV-related disease is broadly neglected in Africa, and no randomised clinical trials of anti-CMV drugs have been conducted to date. Autopsy is rarely performed in Africa, but identifies CMV as a frequent pathogen when it is carried out. Here we review the available literature on CMV in Africa, primarily in adult patients, and discuss this in the context of contemporary understanding of CMV as a human pathogen. PMID:27482452

  1. Manipulation of dendritic cell functions by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, John

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the mammalian immune system and are central to the initiation and maintenance of the adaptive immune response. They are crucial for the presentation of antigen to T cells and B cells, as well as the induction of chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines, which orchestrate the balance of the cell-mediated (Th1) and antibody (Th2) response. This ability of dendritic cells to present antigen and release chemokines and cytokines also bridges the innate and adaptive immune responses by driving T cell activation. These cells thus possess key immunological functions that make them the front line of defence for the targeting and clearance of any invading pathogen and, as such, they underpin the host immune response to infection. For efficient infection, invading pathogens often need to overcome these sentinel immune functions. It is therefore not surprising that pathogens have evolved numerous mechanisms to target dendritic cell functions directly or indirectly during infection, and at least one herpesvirus--human cytomegalovirus--has evolved a life cycle that hijacks dendritic cells for its long-term persistence in the infected host. PMID:19025715

  2. Murine Cytomegalovirus Exploits Olfaction To Enter New Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Tan, Cindy S. E.; MacDonald, Kate; Bruce, Kimberley; Mach, Michael; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Viruses transmit via the environmental and social interactions of their hosts. Herpesviruses have colonized mammals since their earliest origins, suggesting that they exploit ancient, common pathways. Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are assumed to enter new hosts orally, but no site has been identified. We show by live imaging that murine CMV (MCMV) infects nasally rather than orally, both after experimental virus uptake and during natural transmission. Replication-deficient virions revealed the primary target as olfactory neurons. Local, nasal replication by wild-type MCMV was not extensive, but there was rapid systemic spread, associated with macrophage infection. A long-term, transmissible infection was then maintained in the salivary glands. The viral m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which influences tropism, promoted salivary gland colonization after nasal entry but was not required for entry per se. The capacity of MCMV to transmit via olfaction, together with previous demonstrations of experimental olfactory infection by murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), suggest that this is a common, conserved route of mammalian herpesvirus entry. PMID:27118588

  3. The Excess Burden of Cytomegalovirus in African American Communities: A Geospatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Paul M.; Permar, Sallie R.; Hoffman, Kate; Swamy, Geeta K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common cause of birth defects and hearing loss in infants and opportunistic infections in the immunocompromised. Previous studies have found higher CMV seroprevalence rates among minorities and among persons with lower socioeconomic status. No studies have investigated the geographic distribution of CMV and its relationship to age, race, and poverty in the community. Methods. We identified patients from 6 North Carolina counties who were tested in the Duke University Health System for CMV immunoglobulin G. We performed spatial statistical analyses to analyze the distributions of seropositive and seronegative individuals. Results. Of 1884 subjects, 90% were either white or African American. Cytomegalovirus seropositivity was significantly more common among African Americans (73% vs 42%; odds ratio, 3.31; 95% confidence interval, 2.7–4.1), and this disparity persisted across the life span. We identified clusters of high and low CMV odds, both of which were largely explained by race. Clusters of high CMV odds were found in communities with high proportions of African Americans. Conclusions. Cytomegalovirus seropositivity is geographically clustered, and its distribution is strongly determined by a community's racial composition. African American communities have high prevalence rates of CMV infection, and there may be a disparate burden of CMV-associated morbidity in these communities. PMID:26716106

  4. Retinal arteriolar occlusions due to cytomegalovirus retinitis in elderly patients without HIV

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Five of 7 (71%) elderly immunocompetent patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis had retinal arteriolar occlusions versus 2 of 8 (25%) elderly immunocompromised patients and 1 of 19 (5%) younger HIV-infected patients. Compared to HIV-infected patients, elderly patients were more likely to have occlusive events, neovascularization or hemorrhage, and underlying vasculopathy. The purpose of this study is to report the novel finding of extensive retinal arteriolar occlusions and neovascularization in immunocompetent patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis. This is a retrospective observational cohort study of cytomegalovirus retinitis (CMVR) in a university setting. Seven patients were elderly but not immunocompromised, 8 were elderly and iatrogenically immunocompromised, and 16 were HIV-infected. All patients underwent polymerase chain reaction testing of intraocular fluid. Primary outcome measure was visual acuity. Secondary outcome measures were vascular occlusions, ischemic complications, and response to treatment. Results Mean age was 73, 70, and 41 years for immunocompetent, immunocompromised, and HIV-infected patients, respectively. Diabetes and vascular disease were common in the elderly. Vision loss to less than 5/200 occurred in 50% of the immunocompetent elderly patients, and 17% of CMV eyes in immunocompromised and HIV patients. Occlusion of the entire retinal vasculature occurred in 4/7 (57%) of immunocompetent patients despite lack of Zone I involvement, and rubeosis occurred in three, disc neovascularization in one, and vitreous hemorrhage in two patients. Vascular occlusive events were less common in immunocompromised patients and rare in the HIV-infected. Conclusions CMVR in non-HIV-infected elderly patients is associated with retinal arteriolar occlusions. An intact host immune response may increase damage to retinal vessels. Prompt diagnosis may avert catastrophic vision loss. PMID:23514532

  5. Induction of cellular hsp70 expression by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Santomenna, L D; Colberg-Poley, A M

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the cellular heat shock protein 70 gene (hsp70) is transiently induced by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection of permissive human diploid fibroblasts. Induction of the cellular heat shock response during critical times of infection had previously been reported to alter the growth of HCMV in vitro. Thus, a potential interaction between heat shock proteins and HCMV expression was indicated. HCMV dramatically increased expression of hsp70 RNA within 8 h of infection. hsp70 RNA remained elevated at 24 and 48 h postinfection and decreased to low levels of 72 h postinfection. Induction of HSP70 protein occurred more slowly; inducible HSP70 protein encoded by this RNA increased within 16 h postinfection and continued to increase throughout infection until 72 h postinfection, when the highest abundance of inducible HSP70 protein was observed. Cells that received both heat (43 degrees C for 70 min) treatment and HCMV infection expressed hsp70 RNA to levels above the sum of levels present in cells given either treatment alone. Furthermore, hsp70 RNA induction occurred earlier and remained elevated longer than in cells infected with HCMV alone or in cells treated with heat alone, respectively. Nevertheless, the pattern of HCMV immediate-early transcript expression at 2, 4, and 6 h postinfection appeared to be unchanged by this prior heat treatment. Our results suggest that heat shock treatment and HCMV infection can act additively in stimulating hsp70 RNA expression. The previously reported stimulation of HCMV growth in vitro following the heat shock response apparently does not result from alterations in the steady-state expression of HCMV immediate-early transcripts. Images PMID:2157870

  6. Seroprevalence and Seroconversion Rates of Cytomegalovirus pp65 Antigen and Cord Blood Screening of Pregnant Women in Malatya, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Keziban; Kafkasli, Ayse; Kaya, Cihan; Cengiz, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The rates of seropositivity, seroconversion and fetal infection with human cytomegalovirus were analyzed in pregnant women and newborn cord blood in this study. The relationships between maternal age, parity, cytomegalovirus serology and polymerase chain reaction results were evaluated. Materials and Methods: A total of 217 pregnant women attended our pregnancy clinic between April 2004 and October 2005. During each trimester, 5 cc of maternal blood was obtained and 5 cc of cord blood was collected after birth. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess these samples for the presence of human cytomegalovirus protein pp65 antigen (in leukocytes) and cytomegalovirus DNA (in plasma). Results: The mean age of the pregnant women in our study was 28.1±5.3 years. No seroconversion was observed. Among the pregnant women, 212 (97.7%) were IgG positive, and 29 (13.4%) were IgM positive. Five of the pregnant women were positive for IgM alone (2.3%), whereas 24 (11.3%) were positive for both IgM and IgG. The 29 IgM-positive patients were reevaluated using the polymerase chain reaction, and no seropositivity was found. None of the cord blood samples were IgM positive, whereas 211 (97.3%) were IgG positive. There was no significant correlation between parity and seropositivity (p=0.487). The relationship between human cytomegalovirus seropositivity and maternal age was evaluated by dividing the pregnant women into two groups, with a cut-off age of 35 years. There was a significant difference in seropositivity between these two groups (p=0.045). Conclusion: Clearly, there is no need to screen pregnant women for Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the Malatya region. Confirming serology results using the polymerase chain reaction and antigenemia testing to detect false positive results offers the advantage of avoiding unnecessary invasive interventions. PMID:25610259

  7. Cytomegalovirus Retinitis and the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: Bench to Bedside: LXVII Edward Jackson Memorial Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To update information on cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and to integrate information on its pathogenesis and clinical outcomes. Design Literature review. Methods Selected articles from the medical literature, particularly large epidemiologic studies, including the Johns Hopkins Cytomegalovirus Retinitis Cohort Study, the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS, and the Cytomegalovirus Retinitis and Viral Resistance Study, were reviewed. Clinical information is discussed in light of knowledge on CMV, its pathogenesis, and its interactions with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Results Cytomegalovirus uses several mechanisms to evade the immune system and establish latent infection in immunologically normal hosts. With immune deficiency, such as late-stage AIDS, CMV reactivates, is disseminated to the eye, and establishes a productive infection, resulting in retinal necrosis. HIV and CMV potentiate each other: CMV accelerates HIV disease, and CMV retinitis is associated with increased mortality. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of treatments for CMV retinitis. Systemically-administered treatment for CMV retinitis decreases AIDS mortality. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), effectively suppresses HIV replication, resulting in immune recovery, which, if sufficient, controls retinitis without anti-CMV therapy. Resistant CMV, detected in the blood, correlates with resistant virus in the eye and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including mortality. Host factors, including host genetics and access to care, play a role in the development of CMV retinitis. Conclusions Clinical outcomes of CMV retinitis in patients with AIDS are dependent on characteristics of the virus and host and on HIV–CMV interactions. PMID:21168815

  8. Wimbo: implications for risk of HIV infection among circumcised fishermen in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ombere, Stephen Okumu; Nyambedha, Erick Otieno; Bukachi, Salome Atieno

    2015-01-01

    Medical male circumcision has been shown to reduce the risk of heterosexual transmission of HIV infection in men by up to 60% in three randomised controlled trials. However, not much anthropological literature exists to provide a holistic understanding of sexual behaviour among migrating fishermen who have been circumcised. This qualitative study used cultural ecology theory and anthropological methods to develop a more holistic understanding of Luo fishermen's sexual behaviour after circumcision when they migrate (wimbo) to islands in western Kenya. Results from focus-group discussions show that during wimbo there is a deviation from community norms governing sexual expression, influenced by the belief that circumcision provides protection against HIV infection. Through the exchange of sex for fish, circumcised men access new sexual partners in the destination beaches and engage in risky sexual behaviours without any HIV prevention measures. The processes and practices associated with wimbo may therefore help explain why rates of HIV infection are increasing among fisherfolk despite new interventions to combat HIV. These results have relevant implications for HIV-related intervention and policy in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25774858

  9. Human Cytomegalovirus Strategies to Maintain and Promote mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Heather A.; Ziehr, Benjamin; Moorman, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    mRNA translation requires the ordered assembly of translation initiation factors and ribosomal subunits on a transcript. Host signaling pathways regulate each step in this process to match levels of protein synthesis to environmental cues. In response to infection, cells activate multiple defenses that limit viral protein synthesis, which viruses must counteract to successfully replicate. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) inhibits host defenses that limit viral protein expression and manipulates host signaling pathways to promote the expression of both host and viral proteins necessary for virus replication. Here we review key regulatory steps in mRNA translation, and the strategies used by HCMV to maintain protein synthesis in infected cells. PMID:27089357

  10. Identification and Characterization of a Spliced C-Type Lectin-Like Gene Encoded by Rat Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Sebastian; Sandford, Gordon R.; Ding, Lijun; Burns, William H.

    2001-01-01

    The English isolate of rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV) encodes a 20-kDa protein with a C-type lectin-like domain that is expressed in the delayed-early and late phases of the viral replication cycle. Genomic sequence analysis of the restriction fragment KpnR of RCMV revealed significant homology to several C-type lectin-containing molecules implicated in natural killer (NK) and T-cell interactions, as well as genes from four poxviruses and African swine fever virus. The gene is spliced into five exons and shows a splicing pattern with exon boundaries similar to those observed in the human differentiation antigen CD69. The cap site of the gene was mapped by RNase protection, 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends, and primer extension experiments. This analysis demonstrated that the core promoter of the RCMV lectin-like gene contains a GATA rather than a TATA box. Splicing patterns were confirmed with isolates from an infected-cell cDNA library. A unique aspect of the protein is that its translation is not initiated by the canonical methionine but rather by alanine. To study its role in virus replication and pathogenesis, a recombinant virus was constructed in which the gene is interrupted. Replication in tissue culture was similar to that of wild-type virus. PMID:11134273

  11. γδ T Cells Confer Protection against Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV)

    PubMed Central

    Villacreces, Arnaud; Juzan, Marina; Rousseau, Benoît; Dulanto, Sara; Giese, Alban; Costet, Pierre; Praloran, Vincent; Moreau, Jean-François; Dubus, Pierre; Vermijlen, David

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading infectious cause of morbidity in immune-compromised patients. γδ T cells have been involved in the response to CMV but their role in protection has not been firmly established and their dependency on other lymphocytes has not been addressed. Using C57BL/6 αβ and/or γδ T cell-deficient mice, we here show that γδ T cells are as competent as αβ T cells to protect mice from CMV-induced death. γδ T cell-mediated protection involved control of viral load and prevented organ damage. γδ T cell recovery by bone marrow transplant or adoptive transfer experiments rescued CD3ε−/− mice from CMV-induced death confirming the protective antiviral role of γδ T cells. As observed in humans, different γδ T cell subsets were induced upon CMV challenge, which differentiated into effector memory cells. This response was observed in the liver and lungs and implicated both CD27+ and CD27− γδ T cells. NK cells were the largely preponderant producers of IFNγ and cytotoxic granules throughout the infection, suggesting that the protective role of γδ T cells did not principally rely on either of these two functions. Finally, γδ T cells were strikingly sufficient to fully protect Rag−/−γc−/− mice from death, demonstrating that they can act in the absence of B and NK cells. Altogether our results uncover an autonomous protective antiviral function of γδ T cells, and open new perspectives for the characterization of a non classical mode of action which should foster the design of new γδ T cell based therapies, especially useful in αβ T cell compromised patients. PMID:25747674

  12. Childhood Environments and Cytomegalovirus Serostatus and Reactivation in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Janicki-Deverts, Denise; Cohen, Sheldon; Doyle, William J.; Marsland, Anna L.; Bosch, Jos A.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood adversity, defined in terms of material hardship or physical or emotional maltreatment has been associated with risk for infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) among children and adolescents, and with CMV reactivation in children and adults. The present study examined whether different dimensions of childhood experience—those pertaining to socioeconomic status (SES), physical environment, or family relationships, relate differentially to CMV serostatus and reactivation during adulthood. Participants were 140 healthy adults, aged 18–55 years (41% female; 64% white). Childhood environments were assessed retrospectively and included family SES (parental housing tenure); childhood neighborhood environment (urban residence; physical conditions; safety; and social atmosphere); residential exposures (parental smoking and physical condition of home); and family relationships (parental divorce; warmth; harmony; dysfunction; parental bonding). Approximately 39% (n = 53) of participants were CMV+. In individual analyses controlling for age, sex, race, body mass, current adult SES and smoking status, fewer years of parental home ownership, having a parent who smoked, and living in a poorly maintained or unsafe neighborhood each were associated with greater odds of infection with CMV. By comparison, in individual analyses limited to CMV+ participants, less family warmth, less harmony, greater dysfunction, and suboptimal parental bonding each were related to higher antibody levels, independent of the aforementioned covariates. Findings were not attributable to current adult perceptions of psychological stress or relative levels of emotional stability. These results suggest that different types of childhood adversity may be associated with differential effects on CMV infection and latency. PMID:24675032

  13. Use of recombinant approaches to construct human cytomegalovirus mutants.

    PubMed

    Dekhtiarenko, Iryna; Cičin-Šain, Luka; Messerle, Martin

    2014-01-01

    To fully understand the function of cytomegalovirus (CMV) genes, it is imperative that they be studied in the context of infection. Therefore, the targeted deletion of individual viral genes and the comparison of loss of function viral mutants to the wild-type virus allow the identification of the relevance and role for a particular gene in the viral replication cycle. Targeted CMV mutagenesis has made huge advances over the past 15 years. The cloning of CMV genomes into (E. coli) as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) allows not only quick and efficient deletion of viral genomic regions, individual genes, or single nucleotide exchanges in the viral genome but also the insertion of heterologous genetic sequences for gain of function approaches. The conceptual advantage of this strategy is that it overcomes the restrictions of recombinant technologies in cell culture systems. Namely, recombination in infected cells occurs only in a few clones, and their selection is not possible if the targeted genes are relevant for virus replication and are not able to compete for growth against the unrecombined viruses. On the other hand, BAC mutagenesis enables the selection for antibiotic resistance in E. coli, allowing a selective growth advantage to the recombined genomes. Here we describe the methods used for the generation of a CMV BAC, targeted mutagenesis of BAC clones, and transfection of human cells with CMV BAC DNA in order to reconstitute the viral infection process. PMID:24639218

  14. Childhood environments and cytomegalovirus serostatus and reactivation in adults.

    PubMed

    Janicki-Deverts, Denise; Cohen, Sheldon; Doyle, William J; Marsland, Anna L; Bosch, Jos

    2014-08-01

    Childhood adversity, defined in terms of material hardship or physical or emotional maltreatment has been associated with risk for infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) among children and adolescents, and with CMV reactivation in children and adults. The present study examined whether different dimensions of childhood experience-those pertaining to socioeconomic status (SES), physical environment, or family relationships-relate differentially to CMV serostatus and reactivation during adulthood. Participants were 140 healthy adults, aged 18-55years (41% female; 64% white). Childhood environments were assessed retrospectively and included family SES (parental housing tenure); childhood neighborhood environment (urban residence; physical conditions; safety; and social atmosphere); residential exposures (parental smoking and physical condition of home); and family relationships (parental divorce; warmth; harmony; dysfunction; parental bonding). Approximately 39% (n=53) of participants were CMV+. In individual analyses controlling for age, sex, race, body mass, current adult SES and smoking status, fewer years of parental home ownership, having a parent who smoked, and living in a poorly maintained or unsafe neighborhood each were associated with greater odds of infection with CMV. By comparison, in individual analyses limited to CMV+ participants, less family warmth, less harmony, greater dysfunction, and suboptimal parental bonding each were related to higher antibody levels, independent of the aforementioned covariates. Findings were not attributable to current adult perceptions of psychological stress or relative levels of emotional stability. These results suggest that different types of childhood adversity may be associated with differential effects on CMV infection and latency. PMID:24675032

  15. Limits and patterns of cytomegalovirus genomic diversity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Renzette, Nicholas; Pokalyuk, Cornelia; Gibson, Laura; Bhattacharjee, Bornali; Schleiss, Mark R.; Hamprecht, Klaus; Yamamoto, Aparecida Y.; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M.; Britt, William J.; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Kowalik, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) exhibits surprisingly high genomic diversity during natural infection although little is known about the limits or patterns of HCMV diversity among humans. To address this deficiency, we analyzed genomic diversity among congenitally infected infants. We show that there is an upper limit to HCMV genomic diversity in these patient samples, with ∼25% of the genome being devoid of polymorphisms. These low diversity regions were distributed across 26 loci that were preferentially located in DNA-processing genes. Furthermore, by developing, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide mutation and recombination rate maps for HCMV, we show that genomic diversity is positively correlated with these two rates. In contrast, median levels of viral genomic diversity did not vary between putatively single or mixed strain infections. We also provide evidence that HCMV populations isolated from vascular compartments of hosts from different continents are genetically similar and that polymorphisms in glycoproteins and regulatory proteins are enriched in these viral populations. This analysis provides the most highly detailed map of HCMV genomic diversity in human hosts to date and informs our understanding of the distribution of HCMV genomic diversity within human hosts. PMID:26150505

  16. Characteristics of catheter-related bloodstream infections in children with intestinal failure: implications for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Drews, Barbara B; Sanghavi, Rinarani; Siegel, Jane D; Metcalf, Pat; Mittal, Naveen K

    2009-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the intestinal-failure population. This study reports characteristics of CRBSI with implications for clinical management in parenteral nutrition-dependent children with intestinal failure. The researchers report the rate of central catheter infections, and the causative organisms, as well as identify risk factors in our intestinal-failure patients that would be amenable to preventive measures.The study is a retrospective review of the medical records of 101 patients with intestinal failure (IF), seen in the Intestinal Rehabilitation Clinic at Children's Medical Center of Dallas from May 2005 to March 2007. Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) were categorized as nosocomial or community-acquired. Data collected for each episode include microorganisms isolated from blood and potential risk factors. Z test was done to compare the infection rates.There were 92 episodes of CRBSIs in 45 parenteral nutrition (PN)-dependent patients with central venous catheters (CVC) in place for a total of 13,978 days. Eighty-three percent (n = 76) of CRBSIs developed in the community at a rate of 7.0 per 1,000 days. Seventeen percent (n = 16) nosocomial CRBSIs were observed at a rate of 5.5 per 1,000 catheter days. CRBSI rate was not statistically different between the two groups (7.0 vs. 5.5, p = .378).CRBSI in the intestinal-failure population is due to a wide variety of organisms with numerous risk factors. Education of CVC management with the practice of consistent guidelines may reduce CRBSI incidence, thus reducing the morbidity and mortality in the intestinal-failure patients. PMID:20010229

  17. Cytomegalovirus retinitis after central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppression: does venooclusive disease predispose to cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients already at risk?

    PubMed Central

    Welling, John D; Tarabishy, Ahmad B; Christoforidis, John B

    2012-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis remains the most common opportunistic ocular infection in immunocompromised patients. Patients with immunocompromising diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, inherited immunodeficiency states, malignancies, and those on systemic immunosuppressive therapy, are known to be at risk. Recently, it has been suggested that patients undergoing intravitreal injection of immunosuppressive agents may also be predisposed. One previous case report speculated that there may be an additional risk for CMV retinitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with venoocclusive disease. This case study presents a case of CMV retinitis following central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppressants. PMID:22570539

  18. Role of the infections in recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Giovanni; Mazzocco, Manuela; Mattia, Elisabetta; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Carta, Gaspare; Anceschi, Maurizio M

    2011-08-01

    Embryo-fetal infections have been reported to cause recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSAs) at a rate lower than 4%. The possible mechanisms include production of toxic metabolic byproducts, fetal or placental infection, chronic endometrial infection, and chorio-amnionitis. Viruses appear to be the most frequently involved pathogens, since some of them can produce chronic or recurrent maternal infection. In particular, cytomegalovirus during pregnancy can reach the placenta by viremia, following both primary and recurrent infection, or by ascending route from the cervix, mostly following reactivation. Another herpesvirus, herpes simplex virus type 2, less frequently type 1, causes recurrent infections of the genital tract, which can involve the feto-placental unit. Parvoviruses have also been implicated in the development of repeated fetal loss. Among bacterial infections, Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum,and Mycoplasma hominis have been mostly associated with occurrence of RSA. An increased risk of abortion among women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) during early pregnancy was also shown, but questions arise about the role of chronic BV in its occurrence. Although a definitive relationship between recurrently active infections and RSA is still lacking, mostly due to difficulties in demonstrating the pathogenic role of each individual isolated pathogen, diagnosis and therapy of RSA-related infections should be attempted. The diagnosis of infectious agents as a possible cause of RSA might lead to a therapeutic approach with antiviral drugs and antibiotics or using immunoglobulins, which can display both anti-infective neutralizing and immunomodulating properties. PMID:21261443

  19. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  20. American Bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) Resist Infection by Multiple Isolates of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Including One Implicated in Wild Mass Mortality.

    PubMed

    Eskew, Evan A; Worth, S Joy; Foley, Janet E; Todd, Brian D

    2015-09-01

    The emerging amphibian disease chytridiomycosis varies in severity depending on host species. Within species, disease susceptibility can also be influenced by pathogen variation and environmental factors. Here, we report on experimental exposures of American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) to three different isolates of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), including one implicated in causing mass mortality of wild American bullfrogs. Exposed frogs showed low infection prevalence, relatively low infection load, and lack of clinical disease. Our results suggest that environmental cofactors are likely important contributors to Bd-associated American bullfrog mortality and that this species both resists and tolerates Bd infection. PMID:26065669

  1. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-07-14

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  2. Detection of herpes simplex virus DNA in plasma of patients with primary but not with recurrent infection: implications for transfusion medicine?

    PubMed

    Juhl, D; Mosel, C; Nawroth, F; Funke, A-M; Dadgar, S M; Hagenström, H; Kirchner, H; Hennig, H

    2010-02-01

    Among the family of herpes viruses, only cytomegalovirus (CMV) and, to a lesser extent, human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) are of relevance in transfusion medicine. Due to neutropism, herpes simplex viruses (HSV) types 1 and 2 are considered to be of minor relevance. However, several reports gave evidence that a HSV DNAemia might occur and HSV could therefore be transmissible by blood products. The aim of our study was to collect data about prevalence of HSV antibodies among blood donors and to clarify whether HSV DNAemia is possible. HSV antibody states of 653 blood donors were investigated. Blood specimens of 46 patients with primary and recurrent HSV infection were tested for HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA using TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. In 505 of the 653 blood donors HSV antibodies were detectable, most of which were HSV-1 antibodies. HSV DNA was detected in plasma, but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of seven rather seriously ill patients with primary herpes genitalis. No HSV viraemia was detectable in otherwise healthy patients with recurrent herpes labialis. Thus, HSV DNAemia is possible, but seems to be limited to primary infections and could not be detected in the recurrent infection. Therefore, blood donors with primary herpes infection should be deferred from donation. Blood donors with recurrent HSV infection are probably not at risk of transmitting HSV, but further studies are necessary to prove this hypothesis. Detection of HSV DNA in PBMCs as described formerly could not be confirmed by this study. PMID:19708895

  3. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) genome

    PubMed Central

    Schleiss, Mark R; McGregor, Alistair; Choi, K Yeon; Date, Shailesh V; Cui, Xiaohong; McVoy, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    In this report we describe the genomic sequence of guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) assembled from a tissue culture-derived bacterial artificial chromosome clone, plasmid clones of viral restriction fragments, and direct PCR sequencing of viral DNA. The GPCMV genome is 232,678 bp, excluding the terminal repeats, and has a GC content of 55%. A total of 105 open reading frames (ORFs) of > 100 amino acids with sequence and/or positional homology to other CMV ORFs were annotated. Positional and sequence homologs of human cytomegalovirus open reading frames UL23 through UL122 were identified. Homology with other cytomegaloviruses was most prominent in the central ~60% of the genome, with divergence of sequence and lack of conserved homologs at the respective genomic termini. Of interest, the GPCMV genome was found in many cases to bear stronger phylogenetic similarity to primate CMVs than to rodent CMVs. The sequence of GPCMV should facilitate vaccine and pathogenesis studies in this model of congenital CMV infection. PMID:19014498

  4. Host cellular annexin II is associated with cytomegalovirus particles isolated from cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J F; Kurosky, A; Pryzdial, E L; Wasi, S

    1995-01-01

    A significant amount of host cellular annexin II was found to be associated with human cytomegalovirus isolated from cultured human fibroblasts (approximately 1,160 molecules per virion). This composition was established by four different analytical approaches that included (i) Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of gradient-purified virions with a monoclonal antibody specific for annexin II, (ii) peptide mapping and sequence analysis of virus-associated proteins and proteins dissociated from virus following EDTA treatment, (iii) electron microscopic immunocytochemistry of gradient-purified virions, and (iv) labeling of virus-associated proteins by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination. These results indicated that annexin II was primarily localized to the viral surface, where it bound in a divalent cation-dependent manner. In functional experiments, a rabbit antiserum raised against annexin II inhibited cytomegalovirus plaque formation in human foreskin fibroblast monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner. Cumulatively, these studies demonstrate an association of host annexin II with cytomegalovirus particles and provide evidence for the involvement of this cellular protein in virus infectivity. PMID:7609045

  5. Point-of-care testing for sexually transmitted infections: recent advances and implications for disease control

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joseph D.; Bien, Cedric H.; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain a major global public health issue, with more than 448 million incident bacterial infections each year. We review recent advances in STI point-of-care (POC) testing and implications for STI prevention and control. Recent findings Accurate immunochromatographic assays to detect HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis antibodies have made home or supervised self-testing possible. Several studies have demonstrated feasibility and excellent test characteristics for HIV, HCV and syphilis POC tests. Rapid oral HIV tests are now available for purchase at retail sites across the United States. Combined HIV and syphilis tests using a single finger prick blood sample are under evaluation. Summary Oral POC STI tests with comparable performance to blood-based POC tests are available for self-testing. POC tests can expand screening, improve syndromic management and reduce loss to follow up. POC STI tests have the potential to facilitate prompt treatment and partner services. POC STI tests create opportunities for new social and financial models of community-based testing services. Increasing equity and access to testing will create challenges in linkage to care, quality assurance, partner services and surveillance. These important developments warrant research to understand appropriate contexts for implementation. PMID:23242343

  6. Behavioral Convergence: Implications for Mathematical Models of Sexually Transmitted Infection Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Aral, Sevgi O.; Ward, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Recent trends in the behaviors of some groups with high sexual activity and of the general population in some countries suggest that sexual behavior profiles of high and low sexual activity categories may be converging and may call into question the assumptions around sexual mixing that are built into theoretical models of sexually transmitted infections (STIs)/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission dynamics. One category of high sexual activity, sex work, has been undergoing modification in many societies, becoming more acceptable, more dispersed, and larger in volume in some societies and shrinking in others. Concurrent with changes in the characteristics of sex work, the accumulating data on the sexual behaviors of the general population suggest a shift toward those of sex workers, including large numbers of sex partners and short-duration partnerships. The closing of the gap between behaviors associated with high and low sexual activity may have important implications for theories of sexual structure and models of transmission dynamics for STIs, including HIV infection. PMID:25381381

  7. B-cell clonality and infection with Helicobacter pylori: implications for development of gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, D; Ferraccioli, G F; DeVita, S; Avellini, C; Beltrami, C A; Labombarda, A; Bernardis, V; De Biase, F; Trevisi, A; Pivetta, B; Boiocchi, M; Bartoli, E

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and MALT lymphoma, it is not known how it may trigger these lesions and whether there is an identifiable pre-neoplastic stage. AIMS: To investigate the relation between MALT, H pylori infection, and B-cell clonality (a potential marker of pre-neoplastic lesions). PATIENTS: 141 subjects with simple dyspepsia. METHODS: Gastric biopsy specimens from all patients were examined for MALT and H pylori. Of these, 25 consecutive MALT positive specimens were scored for features of MALT lymphoma and VDJ clonality studied by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Overall, prevalence was 62% for H pylori and 46% for MALT. VDJ clonality was frequent in the sub-group studied (nine of 25), mostly associated with lymphoid follicles (eight of nine or 89%), and with a high scoring for MALT lymphoma. VDJ clonality was equally frequent in patients with and without H pylori (seven of 20 and two of five or 35% and 40% respectively). CONCLUSIONS: B-cell clonality is unexpectedly common in subjects with simple dyspepsia and MALT raising clinical management questions. These findings also suggest that the cascade MALT formation--B-cell clonality--MALT lymphoma may not be uniquely associated with H pylori infection. PMID:8984020

  8. Cytomegalovirus pp65 limits dissemination but is dispensable for persistence

    PubMed Central

    Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Marshall, Emily E.; Hughes, Colette M.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Xu, Guangwu; Kreklywich, Craig; Whizin, Nathan; Fischer, Miranda; Legasse, Alfred W.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Siess, Don; Camp, David G.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Kahl, Christoph; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Smith, Richard D.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The most abundantly produced virion protein in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the immunodominant phosphoprotein 65 (pp65), which is frequently included in CMV vaccines. Although it is nonessential for in vitro CMV growth, pp65 displays immunomodulatory functions that support a potential role in primary and/or persistent infection. To determine the contribution of pp65 to CMV infection and immunity, we generated a rhesus CMV lacking both pp65 orthologs (RhCMVΔpp65ab). While deletion of pp65ab slightly reduced growth in vitro and increased defective particle formation, the protein composition of secreted virions was largely unchanged. Interestingly, pp65 was not required for primary and persistent infection in animals. Immune responses induced by RhCMVΔpp65ab did not prevent reinfection with rhesus CMV; however, reinfection with RhCMVΔUS2-11, which lacks viral-encoded MHC-I antigen presentation inhibitors, was prevented. Unexpectedly, induction of pp65b-specific T cells alone did not protect against RhCMVΔUS2-11 challenge, suggesting that T cells targeting multiple CMV antigens are required for protection. However, pp65-specific immunity was crucial for controlling viral dissemination during primary infection, as indicated by the marked increase of RhCMVΔpp65ab genome copies in CMV-naive, but not CMV-immune, animals. Our data provide rationale for inclusion of pp65 into CMV vaccines but also demonstrate that pp65-induced T cell responses alone do not recapitulate the protective effect of natural infection. PMID:24691437

  9. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Sim