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Sample records for cytometry-based dna hybridization

  1. Flow-cytometry-based DNA hybidization and polymorphism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Kommander, Kristina; White, P. S.; Nolan, John P.

    1998-05-01

    Functional analysis of the human genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well- suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. We are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. Our approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advantages of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  2. Electrical potential-assisted DNA hybridization. How to mitigate electrostatics for surface DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tymoczko, Jakub; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Gebala, Magdalena

    2014-12-24

    Surface-confined DNA hybridization reactions are sensitive to the number and identity of DNA capture probes and experimental conditions such as the nature and the ionic strength of the electrolyte solution. When the surface probe density is high or the concentration of bulk ions is much lower than the concentration of ions within the DNA layer, hybridization is significantly slowed down or does not proceed at all. However, high-density DNA monolayers are attractive for designing high-sensitivity DNA sensors. Thus, circumventing sluggish DNA hybridization on such interfaces allows a high surface concentration of target DNA and improved signal/noise ratio. We present potential-assisted hybridization as a strategy in which an external voltage is applied to the ssDNA-modified interface during the hybridization process. Results show that a significant enhancement of hybridization can be achieved using this approach. PMID:25102381

  3. Flow cytometry-based apoptosis detection

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    An apoptosing cell demonstrates multitude of characteristic morphological and biochemical features, which vary depending on the stimuli and cell type. The gross majority of classical apoptotic hallmarks can be rapidly examined by flow and image cytometry. Cytometry thus became a technology of choice in diverse studies of cellular demise. A large variety of cytometric methods designed to identify apoptotic cells and probe mechanisms associated with this mode of cell demise have been developed during the past two decades. In the present chapter we outline a handful of commonly used methods that are based on the assessment of: mitochondrial transmembrane potential, activation of caspases, plasma membrane alterations and DNA fragmentation. PMID:19609746

  4. Sequencing mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms by hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, M.S.; Lockhart, D.J.; Hubbell, E.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated the use of DNA chips for genetic analysis, using human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a model. The DNA chips are made up of ordered arrays of DNA oligonucleotide probes, synthesized on a glass substrate using photolithographic techniques. The synthesis site for each different probe is specifically addressed by illumination of the substrate through a photolithographic mask, achieving selective deprotection Nucleoside phosphoramidites bearing photolabile protecting groups are coupled only to exposed sites. Repeated cycles of deprotection and coupling generate all the probes in parallel. The set of 4{sup N} N-mer probes can be synthesized in only 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N or fewer steps. Sequences amplified from the D-loop region of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were fluorescently labelled and hybridized to DNA chips containing probes specific for mtDNA. Each nucleotide of a 1.3 kb region spanning the D loop is represented by four probes on the chip. Each probe has a different base at the position of interest: together they comprise a set of A, C, G and T probes which are otherwise identical. In principle, only one probe-target hybrid will be a perfect match. The other three will be single base mismatches. Fluorescence imaging of the hybridized chip allows quantification of hybridization signals. Heterozygous mixtures of sequences can also be characterized. We have developed software to quantitate and interpret the hybridization signals, and to call the sequence automatically. Results of sequence analysis of human mtDNAs will be presented.

  5. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  6. Automated DNA electrophoresis, hybridization and detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zapolski, E.J.; Gersten, D.M.; Golab, T.J.; Ledley, R.S.

    1986-05-01

    A fully automated, computer controlled system for nucleic acid hybridization analysis has been devised and constructed. In practice, DNA is digested with restriction endonuclease enzyme(s) and loaded into the system by pipette; /sup 32/P-labelled nucleic acid probe(s) is loaded into the nine hybridization chambers. Instructions for all the steps in the automated process are specified by answering questions that appear on the computer screen at the start of the experiment. Subsequent steps are performed automatically. The system performs horizontal electrophoresis in agarose gel, fixed the fragments to a solid phase matrix, denatures, neutralizes, prehybridizes, hybridizes, washes, dries and detects the radioactivity according to the specifications given by the operator. The results, printed out at the end, give the positions on the matrix to which radioactivity remains hybridized following stringent washing.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms in Morpholino-DNA Surface Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Wang, Kang; Liu, Yatao; Shepard, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic nucleic acid mimics provide opportunity for redesigning the specificity and affinity of hybridization with natural DNA or RNA. Such redesign is of great interest for diagnostic applications where it can enhance the desired signal against a background of competing interactions. This report compares hybridization of DNA analyte strands with morpholinos (MOs), which are uncharged nucleic acid mimics, to the corresponding DNA-DNA case in solution and on surfaces. In solution, MO-DNA hybridization is found to be independent of counterion concentration, in contrast to DNA-DNA hybridization. On surfaces, when immobilized MO or DNA “probe” strands hybridize with complementary DNA “targets” from solution, both the MO-DNA and DNA-DNA processes depend on ionic strength but exhibit qualitatively different behaviors. At lower ionic strengths, MO-DNA surface hybridization exhibits hallmarks of kinetic limitations when separation between hybridized probe sites becomes comparable to target dimensions, whereas extents of DNA-DNA surface hybridization are instead consistent with limits imposed by buildup of surface (Donnan) potential. The two processes also fundamentally differ at high ionic strength, under conditions when electrostatic effects are weak. Here, variations in probe coverage have a much diminished impact on MO-DNA than on DNA-DNA hybridization for similarly crowded surface conditions. These various observations agree with a structural model of MO monolayers in which MO-DNA duplexes segregate to the buffer interface while unhybridized probes localize near the solid support. A general perspective is presented on using uncharged DNA analogues, which also include compounds such as peptide nucleic acids (PNA), in surface hybridization applications. PMID:20572663

  8. Preparation and characterization of imogolite/DNA hybrid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jiravanichanun, Nattha; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kato, Kenichi; Kim, Jungeun; Horiuchi, Shin; Yah, Weng-On; Otsuka, Hideyuki; Takahara, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Imogolite is one of the clay minerals contained in volcanic ash soils. The novel hybrid hydrogels were prepared from imogolite nanofibers and DNA by utilizing strong interaction between the aluminol groups on imogolite surface and phosphate groups of DNA. The hybrid hydrogels of imogolite and DNA were prepared in various feed ratios, and their physicochemical properties and molecular aggregation states were investigated in both dispersion and gel states. The maximum DNA content in the hybrid gels was shown in equivalent molar ratio of imogolite and DNA. The physical properties of the hybrid gels were changed by varying DNA blend ratios. In the dispersion state, the hybrid gels showed a fibrous structure of imogolite, whereas a continuous network structure was observed in pure imogolite, indicating that the hybrid with DNA enhanced the dispersion of imogolite. In the gel state, DNA and imogolite nanofibers formed a 3D network structure. PMID:22148683

  9. Sensitivity, Specificity, and the Hybridization Isotherms of DNA Chips

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, A.; Buhot, A.; Zhulina, E.B.

    2004-01-01

    Competitive hybridization, at the surface and in the bulk, lowers the sensitivity of DNA chips. Competitive surface hybridization occurs when different targets can hybridize with the same probe. Competitive bulk hybridization takes place when the targets can hybridize with free complementary chains in the solution. The effects of competitive hybridization on the thermodynamically attainable performance of DNA chips are quantified in terms of the hybridization isotherms of the spots. These relate the equilibrium degree of the hybridization to the bulk composition. The hybridization isotherm emerges as a Langmuir isotherm modified for electrostatic interactions within the probe layer. The sensitivity of the assay in equilibrium is directly related to the slope of the isotherm. A simpler description is possible, in terms of c50 values specifying the bulk composition corresponding to 50% hybridization at the surface. The effects of competitive hybridization are important for the quantitative analysis of DNA chip results, especially when used to study point mutations. PMID:14747310

  10. DNA Hybridization: Nonradioactive Labeling Now Available for the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Lenore Gardner

    1984-01-01

    The advantages of DNA hybridization procedures for classroom and clinical use can now be realized by the recent development of nonradioactive DNA labeling/detection procedures. These methods (which are described) can replace the use of isotopes in standard DNA hybridization procedures. (JN)

  11. Hybrid DNA materials for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, R. A.; Thomas, J.; Peyghambarian, N.; Wang, J.; Li, L.; Ouchen, F.; Grote, J. E.

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the dielectric and electrical properties of sol-gel/DNA-CTMA blends, with particular interest in capacitor applications in energy storage. Methacryloyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MAPTMS) was the solgel precursor, and DNA-CTMA was blended in to the resulting sol-gel at various weight percentages. The blends were tested for their dielectric properties and dielectric breakdown strength; the 5% DNA blend was found to be optimal with a dielectric constant in the range of 7.5, while the breakdown strength was greater than 800 V/μm for 1 μm films and about 500 V/μm for 5μm films. Hybrid sol-gel/DNA-CTMA/barium titanate nanoparticle composites were also formulated and their dielectric properties measured. While a high dielectric constant was achieved (38), this came at the expense of a significantly reduced breakdown voltage (160V/μm). We discuss these results as well as other aspects of the dielectric and electrical properties of these blends.

  12. Signal enhancement in electronic detection of DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, C.; Philippin, G.; Bockelmann, U.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic detection of the specific recognition between complementary DNA sequences is investigated. DNA probes are immobilized at different lateral positions on a Poly( L -lysine)-coated surface of an integrated silicon transistor array. Hybridization and field effect detection are done with the solid surface immersed in electrolyte solutions. Differential measurements are performed, where DNA hybridization leads to surface potential shifts between the transistors of the array. We experimentally show that these differential signals of hybridization can be enhanced significantly by changing the salt concentration between hybridization and detection.

  13. Cytomegalovirus in urine: detection of viral DNA by sandwich hybridization.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, M; Syvänen, A C; Oram, J; Söderlund, H; Ranki, M

    1984-12-01

    A cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific sandwich hybridization test was constructed by using two adjacent BamHI DNA fragments of CMV DNA as reagents. The fragments were cloned into two different vectors. One of the recombinants was attached to the filter, and the other was the labeled probe. When present in the sample, CMV DNA mediated labeling of the filter by hybridizing to both the filter-bound DNA and the probe. The sandwich hybridization test was applied for the detection of CMV DNA from urine. DNA was released from virus by 2% Sarkosyl, concentrated by 2-butanol extraction and isopropanol precipitation, denatured, and finally subjected to the sandwich hybridization test. As a result, 70 to 90% of the original viral DNA could be recovered and demonstrated by the quantitative hybridization reaction. Urine could be stored at room temperature in Sarkosyl for at least 2 days without affecting the detectability of CMV. The clinical applicability of the test was evaluated by studying urine samples from four infants excreting CMV. Sandwich hybridization demonstrated the presence of CMV DNA in all of the specimens. These contained originally 10(5) to 10(8) CMV DNA molecules per ml. PMID:6097598

  14. Coulomb blockage of hybridization in two-dimensional DNA arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainrub, Arnold; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2002-10-01

    Experiments on DNA microarrays have revealed substantial differences in hybridization thermodynamics between DNA free in solution and surface tethered DNA. Here we develop a mean field model of the Coulomb effects in two-dimensional DNA arrays to understand the binding isotherms and thermal denaturation of the double helix. We find that the electrostatic repulsion of the assayed nucleic acid from the array of DNA probes dominates the binding thermodynamics, and thus causes the Coulomb blockage of the hybridization. The results explain, observed in DNA microarrays, the dramatic decrease of the hybridization efficiency and the thermal denaturation curve broadening as the probe surface density grows. We demonstrate application of the theory for evaluation and optimization of the sensitivity, specificity, and the dynamic range of DNA array devices.

  15. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  16. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  17. Dynamic Modulation of DNA Hybridization Using Allosteric DNA Tetrahedral Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Li, Min; Shen, Juwen; Pei, Hao; Chao, Jie; Su, Shao; Aldalbahi, Ali; Wang, Lihua; Shi, Jiye; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2016-08-16

    The fixed dynamic range of traditional biosensors limits their utility in several real applications. For example, viral load monitoring requires the dynamic range spans several orders of magnitude; whereas, monitoring of drugs requires extremely narrow dynamic range. To overcome this limitation, here, we devised tunable biosensing interface using allosteric DNA tetrahedral bioprobes to tune the dynamic range of DNA biosensors. Our strategy takes the advantage of the readily and flexible structure design and predictable geometric reconfiguration of DNA nanotechnology. We reconfigured the DNA tetrahedral bioprobes by inserting the effector sequence into the DNA tetrahedron, through which, the binding affinity of DNA tetrahedral bioprobes can be tuned. As a result, the detection limit of DNA biosensors can be programmably regulated. The dynamic range of DNA biosensors can be tuned (narrowed or extended) for up to 100-fold. Using the regulation of binding affinity, we realized the capture and release of biomolecules by tuning the binding behavior of DNA tetrahedral bioprobes. PMID:27435955

  18. Building a Phylogenetic Tree of the Human and Ape Superfamily Using DNA-DNA Hybridization Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Caroline Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The study describes the process of DNA-DNA hybridization and the history of its use by Sibley and Alquist in simple, straightforward, and interesting language that students easily understand to create their own phylogenetic tree of the hominoid superfamily. They calibrate the DNA clock and use it to estimate the divergence dates of the various…

  19. Identification of Lactobacillus UFV H2B20 (probiotic strain) using DNA-DNA hybridization

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, J.T.; Uetanabaro, A.P. T.; de Moraes, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analyses of the 16S rDNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization tests were performed for identification of the species of the probiotic Lactobacillus UFV H2b20 strain. Using these two tests, we concluded that this strain, originally considered Lact. acidophilus, should be classified as Lact. delbrueckii. PMID:24031263

  20. Comparing Charge Transport in Oligonucleotides: RNA:DNA Hybrids and DNA Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanhui; Artés, Juan M; Qi, Jianqing; Morelan, Ian A; Feldstein, Paul; Anantram, M P; Hihath, Joshua

    2016-05-19

    Understanding the electronic properties of oligonucleotide systems is important for applications in nanotechnology, biology, and sensing systems. Here the charge-transport properties of guanine-rich RNA:DNA hybrids are compared to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) duplexes with identical sequences. The conductance of the RNA:DNA hybrids is ∼10 times higher than the equivalent dsDNA, and conformational differences are determined to be the primary reason for this difference. The conductance of the RNA:DNA hybrids is also found to decrease more rapidly than dsDNA when the length is increased. Ab initio electronic structure and Green's function-based density of states calculations demonstrate that these differences arise because the energy levels are more spatially distributed in the RNA:DNA hybrid but that the number of accessible hopping sites is smaller. These combination results indicate that a simple hopping model that treats each individual guanine as a hopping site is insufficient to explain both a higher conductance and β value for RNA:DNA hybrids, and larger delocalization lengths must be considered. PMID:27145167

  1. DNA fluorescence shift sensor: a rapid method for the detection of DNA hybridization using silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin Yong; Hairul Bahara, Nur Hidayah; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon; Tye, Gee Jun

    2014-11-01

    DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNC) are a class of subnanometer sized fluorophores with good photostability and brightness. It has been applied as a diagnostic tool mainly for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection. Integration of DNA oligomers to generate AgNCs is interesting as varying DNA sequences can result in different fluorescence spectra. This allows a simple fluorescence shifting effect to occur upon DNA hybridization with the hybridization efficiency being a pronominal factor for successful shifting. The ability to shift the fluorescence spectra as a result of hybridization overcomes the issue of background intensities in most fluorescent based assays. Here we describe an optimized method for the detection of single-stranded and double-stranded synthetic forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) target by hybridization with the DNA fluorescence shift sensor. The system forms a three-way junction by successful hybridization of AgNC, G-rich strand (G-rich) to the target DNA, which generated a shift in fluorescence spectra with a marked increase in fluorescence intensity. The DNA fluorescence shift sensor presents a rapid and specific alternative to conventional DNA detection. PMID:25129336

  2. DNA hybridization and ligation for directed colloidal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyr, Margaret

    Colloidal assembly using DNA hybridization has been pursued as a means assemble non-conventional ordered colloidal structures. However, to date it is undetermined whether DNA hybridization can be used to achieve non-FCC colloidal crystals. Using microcontact printing techniques, we have fabricated covalently bound single stranded DNA (ssDNA) two-dimensional arrays on glass surfaces, which were used to direct the assembly of complementary DNA functionalized polystyrene colloids. Two of the hallmarks of DNA hybridization, sequence specificity and thermal reversibility, were demonstrated. Due to the periodicity of these arrays, laser diffraction was used to directly monitor these structures during assembly. To demonstrate the versatility of the 2D colloidal array assembled via DNA hybridization, a catalytic DNA sequence or DNAzyme was incorporated into the colloidal array system. By tethering the enzymatic strand to the patterned glass surface and the substrate strand to polystyrene colloids, we showed that the DNAzyme could prevent the assembly of the arrays when the required Pb2+ cofactor was provided. Attempts to assemble the colloid arrays and disassemble via the Pb2+-DNAzyme induced cleavage were unsuccessful, likely due to the incomplete cleavage of the multitude of hybridized linkages between each colloid and the surface. Since DNA is not only capable of catalyzing reactions, but also capable of being reacted upon by a variety of biological enzymes, we examined the use of DNA ligase as a means to control the assembly of DNA-functionalized colloids. A three-sequence linker system was used for the hybridization mediated assembly of colloids: one sequence was tethered to the surface of the glass slide or colloids, one was tethered to another colloid surface, and the linker sequence hybridizes simultaneously to both tethered sequences. Once hybridized, the two tethered fragments can be ligated using DNA ligase, resulting in a continuous sequence tethered on one end

  3. Optical fibre-based detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hine, Anna V; Chen, Xianfeng; Hughes, Marcus D; Zhou, Kaiming; Davies, Edward; Sugden, Kate; Bennion, Ian; Zhang, Lin

    2009-04-01

    A dual-peak LPFG (long-period fibre grating), inscribed in an optical fibre, has been employed to sense DNA hybridization in real time, over a 1 h period. One strand of the DNA was immobilized on the fibre, while the other was free in solution. After hybridization, the fibre was stripped and repeated detection of hybridization was achieved, so demonstrating reusability of the device. Neither strand of DNA was fluorescently or otherwise labelled. The present paper will provide an overview of our early-stage experimental data and methodology, examine the potential of fibre gratings for use as biosensors to monitor both nucleic acid and other biomolecular interactions and then give a summary of the theory and fabrication of fibre gratings from a biological standpoint. Finally, the potential of improving signal strength and possible future directions of fibre grating biosensors will be addressed. PMID:19290879

  4. Direct detection of DNA conformation in hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, George; Tsortos, Achilleas; Bender, Florian; Ferapontova, Elena E; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-02-21

    DNA hybridization studies at surfaces normally rely on the detection of mass changes as a result of the addition of the complementary strand. In this work we propose a mass-independent sensing principle based on the quantitative monitoring of the conformation of the immobilized single-strand probe and of the final hybridized product. This is demonstrated by using a label-free acoustic technique, the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D), and oligonucleotides of specific sequences which, upon hybridization, result in DNAs of various shapes and sizes. Measurements of the acoustic ratio ΔD/ΔF in combination with a "discrete molecule binding" approach are used to confirm the formation of straight hybridized DNA molecules of specific lengths (21, 75, and 110 base pairs); acoustic results are also used to distinguish between single- and double-stranded molecules as well as between same-mass hybridized products with different shapes, i.e., straight or "Y-shaped". Issues such as the effect of mono- and divalent cations to hybridization and the mechanism of the process (nucleation, kinetics) when it happens on a surface are carefully considered. Finally, this new sensing principle is applied to single-nucleotide polymorphism detection: a DNA hairpin probe hybridized to the p53 target gene gave products of distinct geometrical features depending on the presence or absence of the SNP, both readily distinguishable. Our results suggest that DNA conformation probing with acoustic wave sensors is a much more improved detection method over the popular mass-related, on/off techniques offering higher flexibility in the design of solid-phase hybridization assays. PMID:22248021

  5. APPLICATION OF DNA-DNA COLONY HYBRIDIZATION TO THE DETECTION OF CATABOLIC GENOTYPES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of preexisting DNA hybridization techniques was investigated for potential in determining populations of specific gene sequences in environmental samples. Cross-hybridizations among two degradative plasmids, TOL and NAH, and two cloning vehicles, pLAFRI and RSF101...

  6. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of DNA-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarotski, Dzmitry; Kilina, Svetlana; Talin, Alec; Balatsky, Alexander; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette

    2009-03-01

    Production of carbon nanotube-based (CNT) devices holds a great promise for bringing the size of electronic circuits down to molecular scales. Recently, yet another step has been made towards achieving this goal by developing a new method for metal-semiconductor CNT separation, which relies on wrapping the CNT with ssDNA molecule[1]. Though it was shown that the outcome of the separation process strongly depends on the DNA sequence, further investigations have to be conducted to determine detailed structure of the hybrids and their electronic properties. Here, we use STM to characterize structural and electronic properties of the CNT-DNA hybrids and compare experimental results to theoretical calculations. STM images reveal 3.3 nm DNA coiling period, which agrees very well with the theoretical predictions. Additional width modulations with characteristic lengths of 1.9 and 2.6 nm are observed along the molecule itself. Although scanning tunneling microscopy confirms the presence of DNA in the hybrid and visualizes its structure, further experimental work is required to reveal the dependence of electronic properties of hybrids on their internal structure. [1] M. Zheng et al., Science 302, 1545 (2004).

  7. Post-hybridization recovery of membrane filter-bound DNA for enzymatic DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Chong, K Y; Chen, C M; Choo, K B

    1993-04-01

    We describe here a simple and rapid method for enzymatic DNA amplification using DNA template recovered from membrane filters previously used in hybridization analysis. This is done by first solubilizing membrane pieces carrying DNA of interest in dimethyl sulfoxide, followed by isopropanol precipitation and polymerase chain reaction amplification. The source of membrane-bound DNA successfully tested includes plasmid and human leukocyte DNA and DNA immobilized on bacterial colony filters and plaque lifts. The sensitivity of the procedure is such that DNA recovered from 0.5 microgram of filter-bound total human DNA was enough for PCR amplification of a 0.3-kb fragment. Our protocol will be useful for recycling of scarce DNA samples for cloning and sequencing purposes. PMID:8476600

  8. Kinetic Mechanisms in Morpholino-DNA Surface Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao

    2011-01-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or “probe”, species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e. duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes, and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  9. Kinetic mechanisms in morpholino-DNA surface hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao; Levicky, Rastislav

    2011-08-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or "probe", species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e., duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  10. ESI-MS Investigation of an Equilibrium between a Bimolecular Quadruplex DNA and a Duplex DNA/RNA Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrento, Monica L.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Samosorn, Siritron; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) conditions were optimized for simultaneous observation of a bimolecular qDNA and a Watson-Crick base-paired duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. The DNA sequence used was telomeric DNA, and the RNA contained the template for telomerase-mediated telomeric DNA synthesis. Addition of RNA to the quadruplex DNA (qDNA) resulted in formation of the duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. Melting profiles obtained using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the DNA/RNA hybrid exhibited greater thermal stability than the bimolecular qDNA in solution. Binding of a 13-substituted berberine ( 1) derivative to the bimolecular qDNA stabilized its structure as evidenced by an increase in its stability in the mass spectrometer, and an increase in its circular dichroism (CD) melting temperature of 10°C. The DNA/RNA hybrid did not bind the ligand extensively and its thermal stability was unchanged in the presence of ( 1). The qDNA-ligand complex resisted unfolding in the presence of excess RNA, limiting the formation of the DNA/RNA hybrid. Previously, it has been proposed that DNA secondary structures, such as qDNA, may be involved in the telomerase mechanism. DNA/RNA hybrid structures occur at the active site of telomerase. The results presented in the current work show that if telomeric DNA was folded into a qDNA structure, it is possible for a DNA/RNA hybrid to form as is required during template alignment. The discrimination of ligand ( 1) for binding to the bimolecular qDNA over the DNA/RNA hybrid positions it as a useful compound for probing the role(s), if any, of antiparallel qDNA in the telomerase mechanism.

  11. DNA-DNA hybridization assay for detection of Salmonella spp. in foods.

    PubMed Central

    Fitts, R; Diamond, M; Hamilton, C; Neri, M

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a DNA-DNA hybridization test for the presence of Salmonella spp. in foods. This test requires an initial pre-enrichment of food samples in nutrient broth but does not require selective enrichment. Samples of food cultures are collected on membrane filters and assayed by molecular hybridization to labeled probes. The probes consist of DNA sequences which are unique to the genus Salmonella and are widely distributed in the genus. A diverse panel of foods was assayed successfully by this methodology. Images PMID:6360046

  12. DNA microarrays for hybridization detection by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kick, Alfred; Bönsch, Martin; Katzschner, Beate; Voigt, Jan; Herr, Alexander; Brabetz, Werner; Jung, Martin; Sonntag, Frank; Klotzbach, Udo; Danz, Norbert; Howitz, Steffen; Mertig, Michael

    2010-12-15

    We report on the development of a new platform technology for the detection of genetic variations by means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. TOPAS chips with integrated optics were exploited in combination with microfluidics. Within minutes, the detection of hybridization kinetics was achieved simultaneously at all spots of the DNA microarray. A nanoliter dispenser is used to deposit thiol-modified single-stranded probe DNA on the gold surface of the chips. We investigated the influence of different parameters on hybridization using model polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. These PCR products comprised a single-stranded tag sequence being complementary to an anti-tag sequence of probes immobilized on the gold surface. The signals increased with increasing length of PCR products (60, 100 or 300 base pairs) as well as with their concentration. We investigated hybridizations on DNA microarrays comprising 90 spots of probe DNA with three different sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sequences with possible hairpin structures significantly lower the binding rate, and thus, the SPR signals during hybridization. PMID:20729067

  13. DNA sequence copy number analysis by Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH)

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Kallioniemi, A.; Kallioniemi, O.; Waldman, F.; Sudar, D.; Gray, I. ); Rutovitz, D.; Piper, I. )

    1993-01-01

    Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) uses the kinetics of in situ hybridization to compare the copy numbers of different DNA sequences within the same genome and the copy numbers of the same sequences among different genomes. In a typical application genomic DNA from a tumor and from normal cells are differentially labeled and simultaneously hybridized to normal metaphase chromosomes, and detected with different fluorochromes. Properly registered images of each fluorochrome are obtained using a microscope equipped with multi-band filters and a CCD camera. Digital image analysis permits measurement of intensity ratio profiles along each of the target chromosomes. Studies of cells with known aberrations indicate that the intensity ratio at each position is proportional to the ratio of the copy numbers of the sequences that bind there in the tumor and normal genomes. Analytical challenges posed by the need to efficiently obtain copy number karyotypes are discussed.

  14. Coarse-grained DNA modeling: Hybridization and ionic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Daniel M.

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a biopolymer of enormous significance in living systems. The utility of DNA in such systems is derived from the programmable nature of DNA and its unique mechanical properties. Recently, material scientists have harnessed these properties in order to create systems that spontaneous self-assemble on the nanoscale. Both biologists and material scientists are hindered by an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions that together govern DNA's behavior. Computer simulations, especially those at the coarse-grained (CG) level, can potentially complete this understanding by resolving details indiscernible with current experimental techniques. In this thesis, we advance the state-of-the-art of DNA CG simulations by first reviewing the relevant theory and the evolution of CG DNA models since their inception. Then we present 3SPN.2, an improved CG model for DNA that should provide new insights into biological and nanotechnological systems which incorporate DNA. We perform forward flux sampling simulations in order to examine the effect of sequence, oligomer length, and ionic strength on DNA oligomer hybridization. Due to the limitations inherent in continuum treatments of electrostatic interactions in biological systems, we generate a CG model of biological ions for use with 3SPN.2 and other CG models. Lastly, we illustrate the potential of 3SPN.2 and CG ions by using the models in simulations of viral capsid packaging experiments. The models and results described in this thesis will be useful in future modeling efforts that seek to identify the fundamental physics that govern behavior such as nucleosome positioning, DNA hybridization, and DNA nanoassembly.

  15. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Li, Xiao-Bo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective. PMID:25664436

  16. Rapid genomic DNA changes in allotetraploid fish hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Ye, L H; Liu, Q Z; Peng, L Y; Liu, W; Yi, X G; Wang, Y D; Xiao, J; Xu, K; Hu, F Z; Ren, L; Tao, M; Zhang, C; Liu, Y; Hong, Y H; Liu, S J

    2015-06-01

    Rapid genomic change has been demonstrated in several allopolyploid plant systems; however, few studies focused on animals. We addressed this issue using an allotetraploid lineage (4nAT) of freshwater fish originally derived from the interspecific hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., ♀, 2n=100) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., ♂, 2n=100). We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from allotetraploid hybrids in the 20th generation (F20) and sequenced 14 BAC clones representing a total of 592.126 kb, identified 11 functional genes and estimated the guanine-cytosine content (37.10%) and the proportion of repetitive elements (17.46%). The analysis of intron evolution using nine orthologous genes across a number of selected fish species detected a gain of 39 introns and a loss of 30 introns in the 4nAT lineage. A comparative study based on seven functional genes among 4nAT, diploid F1 hybrids (2nF1) (first generation of hybrids) and their original parents revealed that both hybrid types (2nF1 and 4nAT) not only inherited genomic DNA from their parents, but also demonstrated rapid genomic DNA changes (homoeologous recombination, parental DNA fragments loss and formation of novel genes). However, 4nAT presented more genomic variations compared with their parents than 2nF1. Interestingly, novel gene fragments were found for the iqca1 gene in both hybrid types. This study provided a preliminary genomic characterization of allotetraploid F20 hybrids and revealed evolutionary and functional genomic significance of allopolyploid animals. PMID:25669608

  17. Identification of Lotus rhizobia by direct DNA hybridization of crushed root nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.E.; Bjourson, A.J.; Thompson, J.K.

    1987-07-01

    Hybridization of crushed Lotus pedunculatus root nodules with /sup 32/P-labeled total genomic DNA probes was used to identify Rhizobium loti and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lotus rhizobia). Probes always hybridized with homologous target DNA and frequency with DNAs of other strains from the same genus. Intergeneric hybridization did not occur. Results were comparable to those from colony hybridization.

  18. Multilayer DNA origami packed on hexagonal and hybrid lattices.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yonggang; Voigt, Niels V; Gothelf, Kurt V; Shih, William M

    2012-01-25

    "Scaffolded DNA origami" has been proven to be a powerful and efficient approach to construct two-dimensional or three-dimensional objects with great complexity. Multilayer DNA origami has been demonstrated with helices packing along either honeycomb-lattice geometry or square-lattice geometry. Here we report successful folding of multilayer DNA origami with helices arranged on a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This arrangement yields a higher density of helical packing and therefore higher resolution of spatial addressing than has been shown previously. We also demonstrate hybrid multilayer DNA origami with honeycomb-lattice, square-lattice, and hexagonal-lattice packing of helices all in one design. The availability of hexagonal close-packing of helices extends our ability to build complex structures using DNA nanotechnology. PMID:22187940

  19. Gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) mediated electrochemical DNA biosensor for DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Topkaya, Seda Nur

    2015-02-15

    In this study, an electrochemical biosensor system for the detection of DNA hybridization by using gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) modified electrodes was developed. Electrochemical behavior of GelMA modified Pencil Graphite Electrode (PGE) that serve as a functional platform was investigated by using Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and compared with those of the bare PGE. Hybridization was achieved in solution phase and guanine oxidation signal changes were evaluated. The decrease in the guanine oxidation peak currents at around +1.0 V was used as an indicator for the DNA hybridization. Also, more interestingly GelMA intrinsic oxidation peaks at around +0.7 V changed substantially by immobilization of different oligonucleotides such as probe, hybrid and control sequences to the electrode surface. It is the first study of using GelMA as a part of an electrochemical biosensor system. The results are very promising in terms of using GelMA as a new DNA hybridization indicator. Additionally, GelMA modified electrodes could be useful for detecting ultra low quantity of oligonucleotides by providing mechanical support to the bio-recognition layer. The detection limit of this method is at present 10(-12)mol. Signal suppressions were increased from 50% to 93% for hybrid with using GelMA when it was compared to bare electrode which facilitates the hybridization detection. PMID:25286352

  20. A flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter binding assay using antagonist-conjugated quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtun, Oleg; Ross, Emily; Tomlinson, Ian; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the development and validation of a flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter (DAT) binding assay that uses antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (QDs).We anticipate that our QD-based assay is of immediate value to the high throughput screening of novel DAT modulators.

  1. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  2. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  3. Probing DNA hybridization efficiency and single base mismatch by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Chun; Zhang, Xin; He, Nong-Yue; Lu, Zu-Hong; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study DNA hybridization. Target DNA labeled with hexachloro-fluorescein (HEX) was hybridized to DNA arrays with four different probes. Each probe dot of the hybridized arrays was detected with XPS. The XPS Cl2p peak areas were found to decrease with an increase in mismatched bases in DNA probes. The Cl2p core-level peak area ratio of a probe perfectly matched to one, two and three base-mismatched probes accorded well with the results of conventional fluorescent imaging, which shows that XPS is a potential tool for analyzing DNA arrays. The DNA arrays' hybridization efficiency was assessed by the molar ratio of chlorine to phosphorus in a DNA strand, which was determined from the relevant XPS Cl2p and P2p core-level peak areas after hybridization. This could provide a new method to detect DNA hybridization efficiency. PMID:19282155

  4. Charge transfer through DNA/DNA duplexes and DNA/RNA hybrids: complex theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Kratochvílová, Irena; Vala, Martin; Weiter, Martin; Špérová, Miroslava; Schneider, Bohdan; Páv, Ondřej; Šebera, Jakub; Rosenberg, Ivan; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotides conduct electric charge via various mechanisms and their characterization and understanding is a very important and complicated task. In this work, experimental (temperature dependent steady state fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy) and theoretical (Density Functional Theory) approaches were combined to study charge transfer processes in short DNA/DNA and RNA/DNA duplexes with virtually equivalent sequences. The experimental results were consistent with the theoretical model - the delocalized nature of HOMO orbitals and holes, base stacking, electronic coupling and conformational flexibility formed the conditions for more effective short distance charge transfer processes in RNA/DNA hybrids. RNA/DNA and DNA/DNA charge transfer properties were strongly connected with temperature affected structural changes of molecular systems - charge transfer could be used as a probe of even tiny changes of molecular structures and settings. PMID:23968861

  5. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors. PMID:27612755

  6. DNA Stains as Surrogate Nucleobases in Fluorogenic Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Hövelmann, Felix; Seitz, Oliver

    2016-04-19

    The increasing importance assigned to RNA dynamics in cells and tissues calls for probe molecules that enable fluorescence microscopy imaging in live cells. To achieve this goal, fluorescence dyes are conjugated with oligonucleotides so as to provide strong emission upon hybridization with the target molecule. The impressive 10(3)-fold fluorescence intensification observed when DNA stains such as thiazole orange (TO) interact with double-stranded DNA is intriguing and prompted the exploration of oligonucleotide conjugates. However, nonspecific interactions of DNA stains with polynucleotides tend to increase background, which would affect the contrast achievable in live-cell imaging. This Account describes the development of DNA-stain-labeled hybridization probes that provide high signal-to-background. We focus on our contributions in context with related advances from other laboratories. The emphasis will be on the requirements of RNA imaging in live cells. To reduce background, intercalator dyes such as TO were appended to peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is less avidly recognized by DNA stains than DNA/RNA. Constraining the TO dye as a nucleobase surrogate in "forced intercalation (FIT) probes" improved the target specificity, presumably by helping to prevent unspecific interactions. The enforcement of TO intercalation between predetermined base pairs upon formation of the probe-target duplex provided for high brightness and enabled match/mismatch selectivity beyond stringency of hybridization. We show examples that highlight the use of PNA FIT probes in the imaging of mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA in living cells. The "FIT approach" was recently extended to DNA probes. Signal brightness can become limiting when low-abundance targets ought to be visualized over cellular autofluorescence. We discuss strategies that further the brightness of signaling by FIT probes. Multilabeling with identical dyes does not solve the brightness issue. To avoid self-quenching, we

  7. DNA methylation in placentas of interspecies mouse hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Schütt, Sabine; Florl, Andrea R; Shi, Wei; Hemberger, Myriam; Orth, Annie; Otto, Sabine; Schulz, Wolfgang A; Fundele, Reinald H

    2003-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization in the genus Mus results in several hybrid dysgenesis effects, such as male sterility and X-linked placental dysplasia (IHPD). The genetic or molecular basis for the placental phenotypes is at present not clear. However, an extremely complex genetic system that has been hypothesized to be caused by major epigenetic changes on the X chromosome has been shown to be active. We have investigated DNA methylation of several single genes, Atrx, Esx1, Mecp2, Pem, Psx1, Vbp1, Pou3f4, and Cdx2, and, in addition, of LINE-1 and IAP repeat sequences, in placentas and tissues of fetal day 18 mouse interspecific hybrids. Our results show some tendency toward hypomethylation in the late gestation mouse placenta. However, no differential methylation was observed in hyper- and hypoplastic hybrid placentas when compared with normal-sized littermate placentas or intraspecific Mus musculus placentas of the same developmental stage. Thus, our results strongly suggest that generalized changes in methylation patterns do not occur in trophoblast cells of such hybrids. PMID:14504229

  8. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  9. Preparation of covalently linked DNA-RNA hybrids and arabinocytidine containing DNA fragments.

    PubMed Central

    de Vroom, E; Roelen, H C; Saris, C P; Budding, T N; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H

    1988-01-01

    It will be demonstrated that 5'-O-DMT-N-acyl-deoxyribonucleosides, 5'-O-Lev-2'-O-MTHP-N-acyl-ribonucleosides and, also, 2'-O-MTHP-N-acyl-ara-cytidine can be coupled, via the hydroxybenzotriazole phosphotriester approach, to afford two types of DNA-RNA hybrids as well as ara-C containing DNA-fragments. The final removal of acid-labile DMT and MTHP groups could be effected by 1 h treatment with 80% acetic acid of the otherwise unprotected DNA-RNA hybrids. The same acidic hydrolysis did not result in complete removal of the 2'-O-MTHP group from the ara-C unit. Complete deblocking was accomplished after an additional 2 h aqueous HC1 (0.01 M; pH 2.00) treatment. PMID:2453027

  10. Label-free monitoring of individual DNA hybridization using SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ji; Zeng, Jianbo; Zhao, Fusheng; Santos, Greggy M.; Lin, Steven Hsesheng; Raja, Balakrishnan; Strych, Ulrich; Willson, Richard C.; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Sequence-specific detection of DNA hybridization at the single-molecule level has been instrumental and gradually become a ubiquitous tool in a wide variety of biological and biomedical applications such as clinical diagnostics, biosensors, and drug development. Label-free and amplification-free schemes are of particular interest because they could potentially provide in situ monitoring of individual hybridization events, which may lead to techniques for discriminating subtle variations due to single-base modification without stringency control or repetitive thermal cycling. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been widely used for molecular detection and identification by exploiting the localized surface plasmon resonance effect when the target molecules are near gold or silver nanostructures. However, effective and robust SERS assays have yet become a reality for trace detection. Recently, we have developed a SERS substrate by shaping nanoporous gold thin films into monolithic submicron disks, called nanoporous gold disks (NPGD). Here we demonstrate in situ monitoring of the same immobilized ssDNA molecules and their individual hybridization events.

  11. [Use of photo-anchoring of DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Nasedkina, T V; Mal'kov, R B; Fedorova, L I; Godovikova, T S; Kolpashchikov, D M; Poletaev, A I

    1998-01-01

    A possibility was investigated to use photo-crosslinking DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). DNA probes were modified by incorporating photonucleotides in these, containing a photoreactive group (tetrafluorobenzazid) and capable of making covalent bonds with the examined DNA, when irradiated in 300-330 nm region. The photonucleotide was incorporated into the probe either by nick-translation, or upon elongation of the hybridized probe by the Kljonow fragment. It has been shown that the DNA probe, cross-linking to a chromosome as a result of covalent bonds, is not removed from the place of hybridization under consequent denaturating washing, which makes it possible to carry out the following DNA hybridization with selective conservation of signals obtained due to previous hybridization. This peculiarity of photo-linking DNA probes makes it possible to use them for the two-step DNA hybridization. To demonstrate this, preparations of human chromosomes were investigated. On the first step, chromosomal DNA was hybridized by means of DNA probe having nucleotide sequences of centromeric regions of chromosomes 13 and 21, the probe being linked to chromosomal DNA by the photonucleotide. Following the denaturation treatment of the preparation, and after the second chromosomal DNA hybridization with cosmid DNA, containing chromosome 13 DNA nucleotide sequence, the signal in chromosome 13 centromeric region was retained to serve a marker of this chromosome, thus fascilitating its easier identification following the hybridization of its DNA with cosmic DNA. The denaturation stability of photo-crosslinking probes opens some new possibilities in technology of DNA in situ hybridization. PMID:9821246

  12. Label-free photoelectrochemical strategy for hairpin DNA hybridization detection on titanium dioxide electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wu; Wang Geng; Jin Yan; Yao Xin; Hu Jianqiang; Li Jinghong

    2006-12-25

    A new photoelectrochemical strategy for hairpin DNA hybridization was devised, in which TiO{sub 2} served as the anchor and signal transducer, and no label or redox couples were required. Once the hybridization between hairpin DNA probe and target DNA occurred, the photocurrent would decrease, utilizing which the sequence of the target DNA could be identified. The sequence specificity experiment showed that one or more mismatches of DNA bases could be discriminated. This photoelectrochemical method would be a potential tool in DNA hybridization detection due to its great advantages: label-free, high sensitivity, specific recognition, low cost, and easy fabrication.

  13. Denaturation, renaturation, and loss of DNA during in situ hybridization procedures.

    PubMed

    Raap, A K; Marijnen, J G; Vrolijk, J; van der Ploeg, M

    1986-05-01

    With the aim of optimizing in situ hybridization methods, alkaline, acid, and thermal denaturation procedures have been studied for their ability to separate the DNA strands of nuclear DNA and for the DNA losses they induce. Isolated methanol/acetic acid-fixed mouse liver nuclei have been used as a biological object. The results, obtained with acridine orange staining and microfluorometry, show that all denaturations studied lead to almost complete strand separation. Quantitative DNA staining and cytometry indicated that with heat and alkaline denaturation about 40% of the DNA is lost. Acid denaturation led to about 20% DNA loss. For the alkaline denaturation, the DNA retention could be improved to a 20% DNA loss by adding 70% ethanol to the denaturation medium. During hybridization, another 20% DNA loss occurs. When denatured nuclei are brought under annealing conditions, a rapid renaturation of a considerable fraction of the remaining DNA occurs. The extent of renaturation was dependent on the type of denaturation used. For the ethanolic alkaline denaturation, it was estimated to be 35%. Quantitative nonautoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments with acetylaminofluorene-modified mouse satellite DNA showed that alkaline denaturation procedures are superior to the heat and acid denaturation. As proven by acridine orange fluorescence measurements, hybridization conditions can be designed that permit DNA.RNA hybridization under in situ DNA.DNA denaturing conditions. These conditions should be very useful, especially for in situ hybridization with single-stranded RNA probes. PMID:3709305

  14. Genome-Wide Profiling of Yeast DNA:RNA Hybrid Prone Sites with DRIP-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Phoebe Y. T.; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S.; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  15. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  16. Methods for assessing DNA hybridization of PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric M. B.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Wu, AiGuo; Thurn, K. Ted; Haley, Benjamin; Clark, Jimmy; Priester, Taisa; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoconjugates and the several novel methods developed to investigate the DNA hybridization behaviors of these constructs. PNAs are synthetic DNA analogs resistant to degradation by cellular enzymes, which hybridize to single strand DNA (ssDNA) with higher affinity than DNA oligonucleotides, invade double strand DNA (dsDNA), and form different PNA-DNA complexes. Previously, we developed a DNA-TiO2 nanoconjugate capable of hybridizing to target DNA intracellularly in a sequence-specific manner, with the ability to cleave DNA when excited by electromagnetic radiation, but susceptible to degradation which may lower its intracellular targeting efficiency and retention time. PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates described herein hybridize to target ssDNA, oligonucleotide dsDNA, and supercoiled plasmid DNA under physiological-like ionic and temperature conditions, enabling rapid and inexpensive, sequence-specific precipitation of nucleic acids in vitro. When modified by the addition of imaging agents or peptides, hybridization capabilities of PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates are enhanced which provides essential benefits for numerous in vitro and in vivo applications. The series of experiments shown here could not be done with either TiO2-DNA nanoconjugates or PNAs alone, and the novel methods developed will benefit studies of numerous other nanoconjugate systems. PMID:18786502

  17. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  18. Crowding-Induced Hybridization of Single DNA Hairpins.

    PubMed

    Baltierra-Jasso, Laura E; Morten, Michael J; Laflör, Linda; Quinn, Steven D; Magennis, Steven W

    2015-12-30

    It is clear that a crowded environment influences the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological molecules, but the complexity of this phenomenon demands the development of new experimental and theoretical approaches. Here we use two complementary single-molecule FRET techniques to show that the kinetics of DNA base pairing and unpairing, which are fundamental to both the biological role of DNA and its technological applications, are strongly modulated by a crowded environment. We directly observed single DNA hairpins, which are excellent model systems for studying hybridization, either freely diffusing in solution or immobilized on a surface under crowding conditions. The hairpins followed two-state folding dynamics with a closing rate increasing by 4-fold and the opening rate decreasing 2-fold, for only modest concentrations of crowder [10% (w/w) polyethylene glycol (PEG)]. These experiments serve both to unambiguously highlight the impact of a crowded environment on a fundamental biological process, DNA base pairing, and to illustrate the benefits of single-molecule approaches to probing the structure and dynamics of complex biomolecular systems. PMID:26654490

  19. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. PMID:24746923

  20. Quantitative hybridization to genomic DNA fractionated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leach, T J; Glaser, R L

    1998-10-15

    Hybridization to genomic DNA fractionated by CHEF electrophoresis can vary >100-fold if the DNA is acid depurinated prior to Southern blotting. The level of hybridization is high or low depending on whether the molecule being analyzed migrates at a size coincident with or different from the size of the majority of genomic DNA in the sample, respectively. Techniques that avoid acid depurination including in-gel hybridizations and UV irradiation of DNA prior to blotting provide more accurate quantitative results. CHEF analysis of DNA molecules containing repetitive satellite sequences is particularly prone to this effect. PMID:9753752

  1. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  2. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-01-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. Images PMID:6960359

  3. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-11-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. PMID:6960359

  4. Synthesis of hybrid bacterial plasmids containing highly repeated satellite DNA.

    PubMed

    Brutlag, D; Fry, K; Nelson, T; Hung, P

    1977-03-01

    Hybrid plasmid molecules containing tandemly repeated Drosophila satellite DNA were constructed using a modification of the (dA)-(dT) homopolymer procedure of Lobban and Kaiser (1973). Recombinant plasmids recovered after transformation of recA bacteria contained 10% of the amount of satellite DNA present in the transforming molecules. The cloned plasmids were not homogenous in size. Recombinant plasmids isolated from a single colony contained populations of circular molecules which varied both in the length of the satellite region and in the poly(dA)-(dt) regions linking satellite and vector. While subcloning reduced the heterogeneity of these plasmid populations, continued cell growth caused further variations in the size of the repeated regions. Two different simple sequence satellites of Drosophila melanogaster (1.672 and 1.705 g/cm3) were unstable in both recA and recBC hosts and in both pSC101 and pCR1 vectors. We propose that this recA-independent instability of tandemly repeated sequences is due to unequal intramolecular recombination events in replicating DNA molecules, a mechanism analogous to sister chromatid exchange in eucaryotes. PMID:403010

  5. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  6. DNA-melamine hybrid molecules: from self-assembly to nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rina; Banerjee, Shib Shankar; Bhowmick, Anil K; Das, Prolay

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-melamine hybrid molecular building blocks were synthesized using a phosphoramidation cross-coupling reaction with a zero linker approach. The self-assembly of the DNA-organic hybrid molecules was achieved by DNA hybridization. Following self-assembly, two distinct types of nanostructures in the form of linear chains and network arrays were observed. The morphology of the self-assembled nanostructures was found to depend on the number of DNA strands that were attached to a single melamine molecule. PMID:26199847

  7. Improved flow cytometry based cytotoxicity and binding assay for clinical antibody HLA crossmatching.

    PubMed

    Alheim, Mats; Paul, Prashanta Kumer; Hauzenberger, Dan-Mikael; Wikström, Ann-Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    The presence of preformed donor-specific HLA antibodies leads to early antibody mediated kidney allograft rejection. Therefore, detection and avoidance of donor reactive HLA antibodies prior to transplantation is of outmost importance in order to minimize the risk of rejection. Detection of pre-formed HLA antibodies is currently performed using complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay alone or together with a flow cytometry based crossmatch (FCXM). This study was initiated to further evaluate our recently developed flow cytometry based procedure for determination of both cytotoxicity of and IgG binding to donor-derived lymphocytes by HLA antibodies. Highly enriched immuno-magnetic bead purified T and B lymphocytes were used as target cells for patient sera using 96-well plates. Importantly, the assay shows high sensitivity and specificity as determined by HLA typed donor cells and serum with defined HLA antibody IgG and C1q. Based on this and additional data generated in this paper, such as evaluation of appropriate serum and complements incubation times and assay reproducibility and stability, will enable us to more rapidly implement this assay in our clinical laboratory routines. In addition, we demonstrate that FCtox crossmatching of deceased donor cells has superior specificity compared to conventional CDC assay especially regarding high frequencies of false-positive reactions. PMID:26429307

  8. In vitro flow cytometry-based screening platform for cellulase engineering

    PubMed Central

    Körfer, Georgette; Pitzler, Christian; Vojcic, Ljubica; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh throughput screening (uHTS) plays an essential role in directed evolution for tailoring biocatalysts for industrial applications. Flow cytometry-based uHTS provides an efficient coverage of the generated protein sequence space by analysis of up to 107 events per hour. Cell-free enzyme production overcomes the challenge of diversity loss during the transformation of mutant libraries into expression hosts, enables directed evolution of toxic enzymes, and holds the promise to efficiently design enzymes of human or animal origin. The developed uHTS cell-free compartmentalization platform (InVitroFlow) is the first report in which a flow cytometry-based screened system has been combined with compartmentalized cell-free expression for directed cellulase enzyme evolution. InVitroFlow was validated by screening of a random cellulase mutant library employing a novel screening system (based on the substrate fluorescein-di-β-D-cellobioside), and yielded significantly improved cellulase variants (e.g. CelA2-H288F-M1 (N273D/H288F/N468S) with 13.3-fold increased specific activity (220.60 U/mg) compared to CelA2 wildtype: 16.57 U/mg). PMID:27184298

  9. In vitro flow cytometry-based screening platform for cellulase engineering.

    PubMed

    Körfer, Georgette; Pitzler, Christian; Vojcic, Ljubica; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh throughput screening (uHTS) plays an essential role in directed evolution for tailoring biocatalysts for industrial applications. Flow cytometry-based uHTS provides an efficient coverage of the generated protein sequence space by analysis of up to 10(7) events per hour. Cell-free enzyme production overcomes the challenge of diversity loss during the transformation of mutant libraries into expression hosts, enables directed evolution of toxic enzymes, and holds the promise to efficiently design enzymes of human or animal origin. The developed uHTS cell-free compartmentalization platform (InVitroFlow) is the first report in which a flow cytometry-based screened system has been combined with compartmentalized cell-free expression for directed cellulase enzyme evolution. InVitroFlow was validated by screening of a random cellulase mutant library employing a novel screening system (based on the substrate fluorescein-di-β-D-cellobioside), and yielded significantly improved cellulase variants (e.g. CelA2-H288F-M1 (N273D/H288F/N468S) with 13.3-fold increased specific activity (220.60 U/mg) compared to CelA2 wildtype: 16.57 U/mg). PMID:27184298

  10. Hybrid magnetic nanoparticle/nanogold clusters and their distance-dependent metal-enhanced fluorescence effect via DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GuThese Authors Contributed Equally To This Study., Xuefan; Wu, Youshen; Zhang, Lingze; Liu, Yongchun; Li, Yan; Yan, Yongli; Wu, Daocheng

    2014-07-01

    To improve the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect of nanogolds (AuNPs) and accurately detect specific DNA sequences via DNA hybridization, novel hybrid magnetic nanoparticles/nanogold clusters (HMNCs) were designed based on finite-difference time-domain simulation results and prepared by using Fe3O4 and nanogolds. The nanogolds outside the HMNC were then conjugated with thiol-terminated DNA molecules, thus DNA modified-HMNCs (DNA-HMNCs) were obtained. The size distributions of these nanostructures were measured by a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultraviolet (UV)-visible (vis) absorption spectra of the samples were recorded with a UV-2600 spectrophotometer. Fluorescence spectra and the MEF effect were recorded using a spectrophotofluorometer, and lifetimes were determined using a time-correlated single photon counting apparatus. The prepared HMNCs were stable in aqueous solutions and had an average diameter of 87 +/- 3.2 nm, with six to eight AuNPs around a single Fe3O4 nanoparticle. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tagged DNA-HMNC conjugates exhibited a significant MEF effect and could accurately detect specific DNA sequences after DNA hybridization. This result indicates their various potential applications in sensors and biomedical fields.To improve the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect of nanogolds (AuNPs) and accurately detect specific DNA sequences via DNA hybridization, novel hybrid magnetic nanoparticles/nanogold clusters (HMNCs) were designed based on finite-difference time-domain simulation results and prepared by using Fe3O4 and nanogolds. The nanogolds outside the HMNC were then conjugated with thiol-terminated DNA molecules, thus DNA modified-HMNCs (DNA-HMNCs) were obtained. The size distributions of these nanostructures were measured by a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultraviolet (UV

  11. Simulation-Guided DNA Probe Design for Consistently Ultraspecific Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches for analyzing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of reaction conditions have been used to enable discrimination of single nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximate 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 different target single nucleotide variants sequences showed between 200- and 3000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wildtype sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach we developed probes which, in combination with PCR amplification, we use to detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA. PMID:26100802

  12. RNA∶DNA hybrids initiate quasi-palindrome-associated mutations in highly transcribed yeast DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayun; Cho, Jang-Eun; Li, Yue C; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-11-01

    RNase H enzymes promote genetic stability by degrading aberrant RNA:DNA hybrids and by removing ribonucleotide monophosphates (rNMPs) that are present in duplex DNA. Here, we report that loss of RNase H2 in yeast is associated with mutations that extend identity between the arms of imperfect inverted repeats (quasi-palindromes or QPs), a mutation type generally attributed to a template switch during DNA synthesis. QP events were detected using frameshift-reversion assays and were only observed under conditions of high transcription. In striking contrast to transcription-associated short deletions that also are detected by these assays, QP events do not require Top1 activity. QP mutation rates are strongly affected by the direction of DNA replication and, in contrast to their elevation in the absence of RNase H2, are reduced when RNase H1 is additionally eliminated. Finally, transcription-associated QP events are limited by components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway and are promoted by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. We suggest that QP mutations reflect either a transcription-associated perturbation of Okazaki-fragment processing, or the use of a nascent transcript to resume replication following a transcription-replication conflict. PMID:24244191

  13. Colorimetric detection of DNA hybridization based on a dual platform of gold nanoparticles and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Thavanathan, Jeevan; Huang, Nay Ming; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-05-15

    The unique property of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) to induce colour change and the versatility of graphene oxides (GO) in surface modification makes them ideal in the application of colorimetric biosensor. Thus we developed a label free optical method to detect DNA hybridization through a visually observed colour change. The Au NP is conjugated to a DNA probe and is allowed to hybridize with the DNA target to the GO thus causing a change in colour from pinkish-red to purplish blue. Spectrophometry analysis gave a wavelength shift of 22 nm with 1 µM of DNA target. Sensitivity testing using serially diluted DNA conjugated GO showed that the optimum detection was at 63 nM of DNA target with the limit at 8 nM. This proves the possibility for the detection of DNA hybridization through the use of dual nanoparticle system by visual observation. PMID:24368225

  14. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  15. Self-Assembled DNA Hydrogel Based on Enzymatically Polymerized DNA for Protein Encapsulation and Enzyme/DNAzyme Hybrid Cascade Reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Binbin; He, Kaiyu; Zhu, Rong; Liu, Zhuoliang; Zeng, Shu; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-09-01

    DNA hydrogel is a promising biomaterial for biological and medical applications due to its native biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we provide a novel, versatile, and cost-effective approach for self-assembly of DNA hydrogel using the enzymatically polymerized DNA building blocks. The X-shaped DNA motif was elongated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) to form the building blocks, and hybridization between dual building blocks via their complementary TdT-polymerized DNA tails led to gel formation. TdT polymerization dramatically reduced the required amount of original DNA motifs, and the hybridization-mediated cross-linking of building blocks endows the gel with high mechanical strength. The DNA hydrogel can be applied for encapsulation and controllable release of protein cargos (for instance, green fluorescent protein) due to its enzymatic responsive properties. Moreover, this versatile strategy was extended to construct a functional DNAzyme hydrogel by integrating the peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme into DNA motifs. Furthermore, a hybrid cascade enzymatic reaction system was constructed by coencapsulating glucose oxidase and β-galactosidase into DNAzyme hydrogel. This efficient cascade reaction provides not only a potential method for glucose/lactose detection by naked eye but also a promising modular platform for constructing a multiple enzyme or enzyme/DNAzyme hybrid system. PMID:27526861

  16. Blocking oligo--a novel approach for improving chip-based DNA hybridization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Tao, Sheng-ce; Gao, Hua-fang; Cao, Fei; Ma, Xue-mei; Cheng, Jing

    2003-08-01

    For most of the commonly used DNA chips, the probes are usually single-stranded oligonucleotides and the targets are double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs). Only one strand of the DNA serves as the target while the other competes with the probes immobilized on the chip for the target and therefore is regarded as the interfering strand. In this report, a novel technique was developed for improving the hybridization efficiency on DNA chips by using blocking oligos, which is complimentary to the target interfering strand to reduce the influence of the interfering strand. The hybridization efficiency of dsDNA was much lower than that of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) when synthesized DNA targets were tested on the DNA chip. Blocking oligos can improve the hybridization efficiency of dsDNA to about 2/3 that of ssDNA. Blocking oligos have also been applied to PCR products of different lengths for hybridization. The hybridization efficiency with blocking oligos is about three times higher than that without blocking oligos. We have tested PCR products of 1054 and 435 bp using our blocking procedure, and the results are consistent. PMID:12944123

  17. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  18. DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies enables detection of gene mutations without a fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Park, Lian-Chun; Shinohara, Toshimitsu; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a simple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis utilizing DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies. The novel technique enables the detection of a single-base mismatch in a DNA sequence without a fluorescent probe. This report describes for the first time that DNA hybridization occurs in the nanostructural molecular assemblies (termed reverse micelles) formed in an organic medium. The restricted nanospace in the reverse micelles amplifies the differences in the hybridization rate between mismatched and perfectly matched DNA probes. For a model system, we hybridized a 20-mer based on the p53 gene sequence to 20-mer complementary oligonucleotides with various types of mismatches. Without any DNA labeling or electrochemical apparatus, we successfully detected the various oligonucleotide mismatches by simply measuring the UV absorbance at 260 nm. PMID:14715007

  19. Characterization of Vibrio metschnikovii and Vibrio gazogenes by DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, J J; Hickman-Brenner, F W; Fanning, G R; Gordon, C M; Brenner, D J

    1988-01-01

    Vibrio metschnikovii and Vibrio gazogenes are two new Vibrio species that have been little studied. Thirteen strains of V. metschnikovii were highly related to the type strain, NCTC 8443, by DNA-DNA hybridization. Relatedness values were 83 to 90% at 60 degrees C and 75 to 84% at the more stringent 75 degrees C. Divergence values ranged from 0.7 to 1.9. Strains of V. metschnikovii were oxidase negative and did not reduce nitrate to nitrite. The other phenotypic characteristics agreed with published data. Twenty-three strains of V. gazogenes were isolated from salt marshes and marshy areas on the coast of North and South Carolina. A new medium, marine agar supplemented with an additional 2.5% agar, reduced the problem of swarming by marine Vibrio species and enhanced the isolation of V. gazogenes and other organisms. By DNA-DNA hybridization, 22 of 23 strains were 76% or more related to the type strain of V. gazogenes, ATCC 29988. However, four DNA hybridization subgroups were defined on the basis of divergence values and/or phenotype. Strains of DNA group 1 were more highly related to each other, and this group contained the type strain and six other strains. Strains of DNA group 2 were more highly related to each other, and this group contained reference strain ATCC 43942 and 14 other strains. Strains of DNA group 1 did not ferment melibiose or D-sorbitol (one strain was sorbitol positive), but strains of DNA group 2 fermented both sugars. A revised phenotypic description of V. gazogenes based on 24 strains was written on the basis of reactions (within 2 days of incubation) at 25 degrees C in media supplemented with Na+, K+, and Mg2+. Positive results (100% positive unless indicated) included motility; gas production during fermentation (96% at 2 days, 100% at 3 to 7 days); growth in nutrient broth with the addition of 1% NaCl (88%), 2% NaCl, 3.5% NaCl, 6% NaCl, 8% NaCl, and 10% NaCl (92%); dry red or orange colonies on marine agar; and fermentation of L

  20. Structure and DNA Hybridization Properties of Mixed Nucleic Acid/Maleimide-Ethylene Glycol Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Nguyen, P.; Grainger, D.; Gamble, L.; Castner, D.

    2007-01-01

    The surface structure and DNA hybridization performance of thiolated single-strand DNA (HS-ssDNA) covalently attached to a maleimide-ethylene glycol disulfide (MEG) monolayer on gold have been investigated. Monolayer immobilization chemistry and surface coverage of reactive ssDNA probes were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Orientation of the ssDNA probes was determined by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Target DNA hybridization on the DNA-MEG probe surfaces was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to demonstrate the utility of these probe surfaces for detection of DNA targets from both purified target DNA samples and complex biological mixtures such as blood serum. Data from complementary techniques showed that immobilized ssDNA density is strongly dependent on the spotted bulk DNA concentration and buffer ionic strength. Variation of the immobilized ssDNA density had a profound influence on the DNA probe orientation at the surface and subsequent target hybridization efficiency. With increasing surface probe density, NEXAFS polarization dependence results (followed by monitoring the N 1s {yields} {pi}* transition) indicate that the immobilized ssDNA molecules reorient toward a more upright position on the MEG monolayer. SPR assays of DNA targets from buffer and serum showed that DNA hybridization efficiency increased with decreasing surface probe density. However, target detection in serum was better on the 'high-density' probe surface than on the 'high-efficiency' probe surface. The amounts of target detected for both ssDNA surfaces were several orders of magnitude poorer in serum than in purified DNA samples due to nonspecific serum protein adsorption onto the sensing surface.

  1. Advances in the theory and practice of DNA-hybridization as a systematic method.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, F H

    1994-01-01

    DNA hybridization continues in the 1990s to provide insight into phylogeny and evolution. The resilience of this 30-year-old distance technique may be attributed to its fundamental power as a comparative method, as well as to advances in our understanding of its operation and improvements in experimental design and data analysis. These attributes and advances, along with the assumptions and limitations of DNA hybridization, are discussed in this paper. Examples are provided of recent DNA hybridization studies of molecular, morphological, and behavioral systematics and evolution. PMID:7994110

  2. Self-assembly and hybridization mechanisms of DNA with cationic polythiophene.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Magnieto, Jenifer; Azene, Elias Gebremedhn; Knoops, Jérémie; Knippenberg, Stefan; Delcourt, Cécile; Thomas, Amandine; Richeter, Sébastien; Mehdi, Ahmad; Dubois, Philippe; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Beljonne, David; Clément, Sébastien; Surin, Mathieu

    2015-08-28

    The combination of DNA and π-conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) represents a promising approach to develop DNA hybridization biosensors, with potential applications for instance in the detection of DNA lesions and single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Here we exploit the remarkable optical properties of a cationic poly[3-(6'-(trimethylphosphonium)hexyl)thiophene-2,5-diyl] (CPT) to decipher the self-assembly of DNA and CPT. The ssDNA/CPT complexes have chiroptical signatures in the CPT absorption region that are strongly dependent on the DNA sequence, which we relate to differences in supramolecular interactions between the thiophene monomers and the various nucleobases. By studying DNA-DNA hybridization and melting processes on preformed ssDNA/CPT complexes, we observe sequence-dependent mechanisms that can yield DNA-condensed aggregates. Heating-cooling cycles show that non-equilibrium mixtures can form, noticeably depending on the working sequence of the hybridization experiment. These results are of high importance for the use of π-conjugated polyelectrolytes in DNA hybridization biosensors and in polyplexes. PMID:26179509

  3. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplex. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. (2011) Journal of Organic Chemistry 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γMPPNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that γMPPNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ∼ 0.030 ± 0.01 sec-1 for γMPPNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs. 0.375 ± 0.18 sec-1 for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γMPPNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γMPPNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  4. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-03-15

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplexes. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γ(MP)PNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that the γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ≈ 0.030 ± 0.01 s⁻¹ for γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs 0.375 ± 0.18 s⁻¹ for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γ(MP)PNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γ(MP)PNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  5. Dyes as bifunctional markers of DNA hybridization on surfaces and mutation detection.

    PubMed

    García-Mendiola, Tania; Cerro, María Ramos; López-Moreno, José María; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA has found diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we propose the use of two different dyes, in particular Azure A and Safranine, as bifunctional markers of on-surface DNA hybridization and potent tools for screening of specific gene mutations directly in real DNA PCR amplicons extracted from blood cells. By combining spectroscopic and electrochemical methods we demonstrate that both dyes can interact with single and double stranded DNA to a different extent, allowing reliable hybridization detection. From these data, we have also elucidated the nature of the interaction. We conclude that the binding mode is fundamentally intercalative with an electrostatic component. The dye fluorescence allows their use as nucleic acid stains for the detection of on-surfaces DNA hybridization. Its redox activity is exploited in the development of selective electrochemical DNA biosensors. PMID:27317997

  6. Influence of attachment strategy on the thermal stability of hybridized DNA on gold surfaces.

    PubMed

    Petty, Tyler J; Wagner, Caleb E; Opdahl, Aric

    2014-12-23

    The thermal stabilities of double-stranded DNA hybrids immobilized on gold surfaces are shown to be significantly affected by the conformation of the hybrid. To analyze this behavior, DNA probes were immobilized using attachment strategies where the nucleotides within the strand had varying levels of interactions with the gold substrate. The abilities of these probes to form double-stranded hybrids with solution DNA targets were evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) over a temperature range 25-60 °C. The measurements were used to construct thermal stability profiles for hybrids in each conformation. We observe that DNA hybrids formed with probe strands that interact extensively with the gold surface have stability profiles that are shifted lower by 5-10 °C compared to hybrids formed with end-tethered probes that have fewer interactions with the surface. The results provide an understanding of the experimental conditions in which these weaker DNA hybrids can form and show the additional complexity of evaluating denaturation profiles generated from DNA on surfaces. PMID:25457775

  7. Hairpin DNA Switch for Ultrasensitive Spectrophotometric Detection of DNA Hybridization Based on Gold Nanoparticles and Enzyme Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Maham, Aihui; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-08-01

    A novel DNA detection platform based on a hairpin-DNA switch, nanoparticles, and enzyme signal amplification for ultrasensitive detection of DNA hybridization has been developed in this work. In this DNA assay, a “stem-loop” DNA probe dually labeled with a thiol at its 5’ end and a biotin at its 3’ end, respectively, was used. This probe was immobilized on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) anchored by a protein, globulin, on a 96-well microplate. In the absence of target DNA, the immobilized probe with the stem-loop structure shields the biotin from being approached by a bulky horseradish peroxidase linked-avidin (avidin-HRP) conjugate due to the steric hindrance. However, in the presence of target DNA, the hybridization between the hairpin DNA probe and the target DNA causes significant conformational change of the probe, which forces biotin away from the surface of AuNPs. As a result, the biotin becomes accessible by the avidin-HRP, and the target hybridization event can be sensitively detected via the HRP catalyzed substrate 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine using spectrophometric method. Some experimental parameters governing the performance of the assay have been optimized. At optimal conditions, this DNA assay can detect DNA at the concentration of femtomolar level by means of a signal amplification strategy based on the combination of enzymes and nanoparticles. This approach also has shown excellent specificity to distinguish single-base mismatches of DNA targets because of the intrinsic high selectivity of the hairpin DNA probe.

  8. Measuring thermodynamic details of DNA hybridization using fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    You, Yong; Tataurov, Andrey V; Owczarzy, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Modern real-time PCR systems make it easy to monitor fluorescence while temperature is varied for hundreds of samples in parallel, permitting high-throughput studies. We employed such system to investigate melting transitions of ordered nucleic acid structures into disordered random coils. Fluorescent dye and quencher were attached to oligonucleotides in such a way that changes of fluorescence intensity with temperature indicated progression of denaturation. When fluorescence melting data were compared with traditional ultraviolet optical experiments, commonly used dye/quencher combinations, like fluorescein and tetramethylrhodamine, showed substantial discrepancies. We have therefore screened 22 commercially available fluorophores and quenchers for their ability to reliably report annealing and melting transitions. Dependence of fluorescence on temperature and pH was also investigated. The optimal performance was observed using Texas Red or ROX dyes with Iowa Black RQ or Black Hole quenchers. These labels did not alter two-state nature of duplex melting process and provided accurate melting temperatures, free energies, enthalpies, and entropies. We also suggest a new strategy for determination of DNA duplex thermodynamics where concentration of a dye-labeled strand is kept constant and its complementary strand modified with a quencher is added at increasing excess. These methodological improvements will help build predictive models of nucleic acid hybridization. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 95: 472–486, 2011. PMID:21384337

  9. Sequencing of megabase plus DNA by hybridization: Method development ENT. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-01-31

    Sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is the only sequencing method based on the experimental determination of the content of oligonucleotide sequences. The data acquisition relies on the natural process of base pairing. It is possible to determine the content of complementary oligosequences in the target DNA by the process of hybridization with oligonucleotide probes of known sequences.

  10. Short thio-multi-walled carbon nanotubes and Au nanoparticles enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo

    2010-07-01

    A novel and sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with a thio group (MWNTs-SH) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for covalent DNA immobilization and enhanced hybridization detection is described. The key step for developing this novel DNA biosensor is to cut the pristine MWNT into short and generate lots of active sites simultaneously. With this approach, the target DNA could be quantified in a linear range from 8.5×10-10 to 1.5×10-5 mol/L, with a detection limit of 1.67×10-11 mol/L by 3σ.

  11. A proposed mechanism of the influence of gold nanoparticles on DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H; Pekcevik, Idah C; Gates, Byron D

    2014-07-22

    A combination of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and nucleic acids has been used in biosensing applications. However, there is a poor fundamental understanding of how gold nanoparticle surfaces influence the DNA hybridization process. Here, we measured the rate constants of the hybridization and dehybridization of DNA on gold nanoparticle surfaces to enable the determination of activation parameters using transition state theory. We show that the target bases need to be detached from the gold nanoparticle surfaces before zipping. This causes a shift of the rate-limiting step of hybridization to the mismatch-sensitive zipping step. Furthermore, our results propose that the binding of gold nanoparticles to the single-stranded DNA segments (commonly known as bubbles) in the duplex DNA stabilizes the bubbles and accelerates the dehybridization process. We employ the proposed mechanism of DNA hybridization/dehybridization to explain the ability of 5 nm diameter gold nanoparticles to help discriminate between single base-pair mismatched DNA molecules when performed in a NanoBioArray chip. The mechanistic insight into the DNA-gold nanoparticle hybridization/dehybridization process should lead to the development of new biosensors. PMID:24965286

  12. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. PMID:26879193

  13. Hybridization and Introgression among Species of Sunfish (Lepomis): Analysis by Mitochondrial DNA and Allozyme Markers

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.; Saunders, Nancy C.

    1984-01-01

    We explore the potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, alone and in conjunction with allozymes, to study low-frequency hybridization and introgression phenomena in natural populations. MtDNAs from small samples of nine species of sunfish (Lepomis, Centrarchidae) were purified and digested with each of 13 informative restriction enzymes. Digestion profiles for all species were highly distinct: estimates of overall fragment homology between pairs of species ranged from 0–36%. Allozymes encoded by nine nuclear genes also showed large frequency differences among species and together with mtDNA provided many genetic markers for hybrid identification. A genetic analysis of 277 sunfish from two locations in north Georgia revealed the following: (1) a low frequency of interspecific hybrids, all of which appeared to be F1's; (2) the involvement of five sympatric Lepomis species in the production of these hybrids; (3) no evidence for introgression between species in our study locales (although for rare hybridization, most later-generation backcrosses would not be reliably distinguished from parentals); (4) a tendency for hybridizations to take place preferentially between parental species differing greatly in abundance; (5) a tendency for the rare species in a hybrid cross to provide the female parent. Our data suggest that absence of conspecific pairing partners and mating stimuli for females of rarer species may be important factors in increasing the likelihood of interspecific hybridization. The maternal inheritance of mtDNA offers at least two novel advantages for hybridization analysis: (1) an opportunity to determine direction in hybrid crosses; and (2) due to the linkage among mtDNA markers, an increased potential to distinguish effects of introgression from symplesiomorphy or character convergence. PMID:6090268

  14. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy.Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit

  15. Voltammetric detection of sequence-selective DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Gultekin; Erdem, Arzum; Ceylan, Cagdas; Akgöz, Muslum

    2016-03-01

    This work describes the single-use electrochemical DNA biosensor technology developed for voltammetric detection of sequence selective DNA hybridization related to important human and veterinary pathogen; Toxoplasma gondii. In the principle of electrochemical label-free detection assay, the duplex of DNA hybrid formation was detected by measuring guanine oxidation signal occured in the presence of DNA hybridization. The biosensor design consisted of the immobilization of an inosine-modified (guanine-free) probe onto the surface of pencil graphite electrode (PGE), and the detection of the duplex formation in connection with the differential pulse voltammetry(DPV) by measuring the guanine signal. Toxoplasma gondii capture probe was firstly immobilized onto the surface of the activated PGE by wet adsorption. The extent of hybridization at PGE surface between the probe and the target was then determined by measuring the guanine signal observed at +1.0V. The electrochemical monitoring of optimum DNA hybridization has been performed in the target concentration of 40µg/mL in 50min of hybridization time. The specificity of the electrochemical biosensor was then tested using non-complementary, or mismatch short DNA sequences. Under the optimum conditions, the guanine oxidation signal indicating full hybridization was measured in various target concentration from 0.5 to 25µg/mL and a detection limit was found to be 1.78µg/mL. This single-use biosensor platform was successfully applied for the voltammetric detection of DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons. PMID:26717837

  16. DNA hybrid dielectric film devices for energy storage and bioelectronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Donna M.; Venkat, Narayanan; Ouchen, Fahima; Singh, Kristi M.; Smith, Steven R.; Grote, James G.

    2013-10-01

    DNA biopolymer hybrids have been investigated for energy storage applications and also as potential high k gate dielectrics in bioelectronics applications such as BioFETs. DNA-based hybrid films incorporating sol-gel-derived ceramics have shown strong promise as insulating dielectrics for high voltage capacitor applications. Our studies of DNA-CTMA complex/sol-gel hybrid thin film devices have demonstrated reproducibility and stability in temperature-and frequency-dependent dielectric properties as well as reliability in DC voltage breakdown measurements, attaining values consistently in the 300 - 350 V/um range. We have also investigated DNA-inorganic hybrids by ex situ blending of aqueous solutions of DNA with high k ceramics such as BaTiO3 and TiO2. These systems are currently being investigated as potential gate dielectrics for BioFETs by virtue of their relatively high dielectric constant, high DC electrical resistivity, and lower leakage currents than pristine DNA. Functionally layered devices have also been designed, fabricated and characterized to determine any added benefit in dielectric applications. The electrical/dielectric characteristics of DNA and DNA-CTMA with sol-gel-derived ceramics, high k ceramic fillers, and in layered devices were examined to determine their effect on vital dielectric parameters for energy storage and bioelectronics applications.

  17. A Hybrid Computer Simulation to Generate the DNA Distribution of a Cell Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, John L.; Adams, William S.

    1981-01-01

    Described is a method of simulating the formation of a DNA distribution, on which statistical results and experimentally measured parameters from DNA distribution and percent-labeled mitosis studies are combined. An EAI-680 and DECSystem-10 Hybrid Computer configuration are used. (Author/CS)

  18. Taxonomic use of DNA G+C content and DNA-DNA hybridization in the genomic age.

    PubMed

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Göker, Markus

    2014-02-01

    The G+C content of a genome is frequently used in taxonomic descriptions of species and genera. In the past it has been determined using conventional, indirect methods, but it is nowadays reasonable to calculate the DNA G+C content directly from the increasingly available and affordable genome sequences. The expected increase in accuracy, however, might alter the way in which the G+C content is used for drawing taxonomic conclusions. We here re-estimate the literature assumption that the G+C content can vary up to 3-5 % within species using genomic datasets. The resulting G+C content differences are compared with DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) similarities calculated in silico using the GGDC web server, with 70% similarity as the gold standard threshold for species boundaries. The results indicate that the G+C content, if computed from genome sequences, varies no more than 1% within species. Statistical models based on larger differences alone can reject the hypothesis that two strains belong to the same species. Because DDH similarities between two non-type strains occur in the genomic datasets, we also examine to what extent and under which conditions such a similarity could be <70% even though the similarity of either strain to a type strain was ≥ 70%. In theory, their similarity could be as low as 50%, whereas empirical data suggest a boundary closer (but not identical) to 70%. However, it is shown that using a 50% boundary would not affect the conclusions regarding the DNA G+C content. Hence, we suggest that discrepancies between G+C content data provided in species descriptions on the one hand and those recalculated after genome sequencing on the other hand ≥ 1% are due to significant inaccuracies of the applied conventional methods and accordingly call for emendations of species descriptions. PMID:24505073

  19. Detection and analysis of leptospiral DNA in early Leptospirosis by polymerase chain reaction and DNA hybridization with Digoxingenin-AMPPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Lang; Yu, Ye-Rong; Terpstra, W. J.

    1994-07-01

    Fourteen serum specimens from patients with early Leptospirosis proven by blood culture and serological test were detected by PCR with the oligonucleotide primers obtained from a genomic library of leptospira interrogans. The amplified DNA were hybridized with the homologous DNA probe labeling with Digoxingenin-AMPPD. All of the samples revealed the presence of leptospira and the strong signals were visualized with homologous DNA probes hybridization. Negative and positive controls appeared correctly. The DNA fragment generated from PCR amplification homologically hybridized with the DNA of 16 strains of leptospira. The single recognized band (about 400 bps) from 6 out of the 16 strains has come out which are representative of the principal strains in Sichuan, China. The results demonstrated that PCR is an advanced diagnostic technique for early Leptospirosis. The treatment of samples is easy and has little risk of DNA loss and contamination. This is a considerable advantage over other detective techniques and can be available especially in China and other developing countries.

  20. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-25

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs. PMID:25305618

  1. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E.; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs.

  2. Synthesis and self-assembly of DNA-chromophore hybrid amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Albert, Shine K; Golla, Murali; Thelu, Hari Veera Prasad; Krishnan, Nithiyanandan; Deepak, Perapaka; Varghese, Reji

    2016-08-01

    DNA based spherical nanostructures are one of the promising nanostructures for several biomedical and biotechnological applications due to their excellent biocompatibility and DNA-directed surface addressability. Herein, we report the synthesis and amphiphilicity-driven self-assembly of two classes of DNA (hydrophilic)-chromophore (hydrophobic) hybrid amphiphiles into spherical nanostructures. A solid-phase "click" chemistry based modular approach is demonstrated for the synthesis of DNA-chromophore amphiphiles. Various spectroscopic and microscopic analyses reveal the self-assembly of the amphiphiles into vesicular and micellar assemblies with the corona made of hydrophilic DNA and the hydrophobic chromophoric unit as the core of the spherical nanostructures. PMID:27241196

  3. Multilocus sequence analysis supports the taxonomic position of Astragalus glycyphyllos symbionts based on DNA-DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gnat, Sebastian; Małek, Wanda; Oleńska, Ewa; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Kalita, Michał; Rogalski, Jerzy; Wójcik, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the phylogenetic relationship and taxonomic status of six strains, representing different phenons and genomic groups of Astragalus glycyphyllos symbionts, originating from Poland, were established by comparative analysis of five concatenated housekeeping gene sequences (atpD, dnaK, glnA, recA and rpoB), DNA-DNA hybridization and total DNA G+C content. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of combined atpD, dnaK, glnA, recA and rpoB sequence data placed the studied bacteria into the clade comprising the genus Mesorhizobium. In the core gene phylograms, four A. glycyphyllos nodule isolates (AG1, AG7, AG15 and AG27) formed a cluster common with Mesorhizobium ciceri, whereas the two other A. glycyphyllos symbionts (AG17 and AG22) were grouped together with Mesorhizobium amorphae and M. septentrionale. The species position of the studied bacteria was clarified by DNA-DNA hybridization. The DNA-DNA relatedness between isolates AG1, AG7, AG15 and AG27 and reference strain M. ciceri USDA 3383T was 76.4-84.2 %, and all these A. glycyphyllos nodulators were defined as members of the genomospecies M. ciceri. DNA-DNA relatedness for isolates AG17 and AG22 and the reference strain M. amorphae ICMP 15022T was 77.5 and 80.1 %, respectively. We propose that the nodule isolates AG17 and AG22 belong to the genomic species M. amorphae. Additionally, it was found that the total DNA G+C content of the six test A. glycyphyllos symbionts was 59.4-62.1 mol%, within the range for species of the genus Mesorhizobium. PMID:26704062

  4. Long-Range Charge Transport in Adenine-Stacked RNA:DNA Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanhui; Artés, Juan M; Hihath, Joshua

    2016-01-27

    An extremely important biological component, RNA:DNA can also be used to design nanoscale structures such as molecular wires. The conductance of single adenine-stacked RNA:DNA hybrids is rapidly and reproducibly measured using the break junction approach. The conductance decreases slightly over a large range of molecular lengths, suggesting that RNA:DNA can be used as an oligonucleotide wire. PMID:26596516

  5. Intense photoluminescence from dried double-stranded DNA and single-walled carbon nanotube hybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Hayashida, T.; Nii, D.; Umemura, K.; Homma, Y.

    2014-01-27

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show near-infrared photoluminescence (PL) when they are individually isolated. This was an obstacle to use photonic properties of SWNTs on a solid surface. We show that SWNTs wrapped with DNA maintain intense PL under the dry conditions. SWNTs are well isolated individually by DNA even when the DNA-SWNT hybrids are agglomerated. This finding opens up application of SWNTs to photonic devices.

  6. DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as a Detection Tool

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Park, Su-Moon

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in label free DNA hybridization sensors employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a detection tool are reviewed. These sensors are based on the modulation of the blocking ability of an electrode modified with a probe DNA by an analyte, i.e., target DNA. The probe DNA is immobilized on a self-assembled monolayer, a conducting polymer film, or a layer of nanostructures on the electrode such that desired probe DNA would selectively hybridize with target DNA. The rate of charge transfer from the electrode thus modified to a redox indicator, e.g., [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−, which is measured by EIS in the form of charge transfer resistance (Rct), is modulated by whether or not, as well as how much, the intended target DNA is selectively hybridized. Efforts made to enhance the selectivity as well as the sensitivity of DNA sensors and to reduce the EIS measurement time are briefly described along with brief future perspectives in developing DNA sensors. PMID:22303136

  7. Colloidal Au-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging: application in a DNA hybridization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manera, M. G.; Spadavecchia, J.; Taurino, A.; Rella, R.

    2010-03-01

    The detection of the DNA hybridization mechanism using monodispersed gold nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to increase the sensitivity of the SPR imaging technique. DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) containing single-stranded (ss) portions of DNA were prepared by monitoring their monolayer formation by UV-vis spectroscopy. The hybridization process between specific thio-oligonucleotides immobilized on the DNA-Au NPs and the corresponding complementary strands is reported and compared with the traditional hybridization process on properly self-assembled thin gold films deposited on glass substrates. A remarkable signal amplification is observed, following the incorporation of colloidal Au into a SPR biosensing experiment, resulting in an increased SPR response to DNA-DNA interactions. In particular Fusarium thiolated DNA (5'HS poly(T)15ATC CCT CAA AAA CTG CCG CT-3) and trichothecenes complementary DNA (5'-AGC GGC AGT TTT TGA GGG AT-3') sequences have been explored due to their possible application to agro-industry for the control of food quality.

  8. The kinetics of force-dependent hybridization and strand-peeling of short DNA fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, ZhouJie; Yuan, GuoHua; Zhai, WeiLi; Yan, Jie; Chen, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) carries the genetic information in all living organisms. It consists of two interwound single-stranded (ss) strands, forming a double-stranded (ds) DNA with a right-handed double-helical conformation. The two strands are held together by highly specific basepairing interactions and are further stabilized by stacking between adjacent basepairs. A transition from a dsDNA to two separated ssDNA is called melting and the reverse transition is called hybridization. Applying a tensile force to a dsDNA can result in a particular type of DNA melting, during which one ssDNA strand is peeled away from the other. In this work, we studied the kinetics of strand-peeling and hybridization of short DNA under tensile forces. Our results show that the force-dependent strand-peeling and hybridization can be described with a simple two-state model. Importantly, detailed analysis of the force-dependent transition rates revealed that the transition state consists of several basepairs dsDNA.

  9. Use of Multiple-Displacement Amplification and Checkerboard DNA-DNA Hybridization To Examine the Microbiota of Endodontic Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Brito, L. C. N.; Teles, F. R.; Teles, R. P.; França, E. C.; Ribeiro-Sobrinho, A. P.; Haffajee, A. D.; Socransky, S. S.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple-displacement amplification (MDA) has been used to uniformly amplify bacterial genomes present in small samples, providing abundant targets for molecular analysis. The purpose of this investigation was to combine MDA and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization to examine the microbiota of endodontic infections. Sixty-six samples were collected from teeth with endodontic infections. Nonamplified and amplified samples were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization for levels and proportions of 77 bacterial taxa. Counts, percentages of DNA probe counts, and percentages of teeth colonized for each species in amplified and nonamplified samples were computed. Significance of differences for each species between amplified and nonamplified samples was sought with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and adjusted for multiple comparisons. The amount of DNA in the samples ranged from 6.80 (± 5.2) ng before to 6.26 (± 1.73) μg after MDA. Seventy of the 77 DNA probes hybridized with one or more of the nonamplified samples. All probes hybridized with at least one sample after amplification. Most commonly detected species at levels of >104 in both amplified and nonamplified samples were Prevotella tannerae and Acinetobacter baumannii at frequencies between 89 and 100% of samples. The mean number of species at counts of >104 in amplified samples was 51.2 ± 2.2 and in nonamplified samples was 14.5 ± 1.7. The endodontic microbiota was far more complex than previously shown, although microbial profiles at teeth with or without periradicular lesions did not differ significantly. Species commonly detected in endodontic samples included P. tannerae, Prevotella oris, and A. baumannii. PMID:17634304

  10. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Gene Silencing using Small Interferin RNA: DNA Hybrid Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, L

    2006-02-08

    The recent discovery that short hybrid RNA:DNA molecules (siHybrids) induce long-term silencing of gene expression in mammalian cells conflicts with the currently hypothesized mechanisms explaining the action of small, interfering RNA (siRNA). As a first step to elucidating the mechanism for this effect, we set out to quantify the delivery of siHybrids and determine their cellular localization in mammalian cells. We then tracked the segregation of the siHybrids into daughter cells after cell division. Markers for siHybrid delivery were shown to enter cells with and without the use of a transfection agent. Furthermore, delivery without transfection agent only occurred after a delay of 2-4 hours, suggesting a degradation process occurring in the cell culture media. Therefore, we studied the effects of nucleases and backbone modifications on the stability of siHybrids under cell culture conditions.

  11. DNA hybridization and phosphinothricin acetyltransferase gene sequence detection based on zirconia/nanogold film modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Chen; Jiao, Kui

    2008-05-01

    This study reports a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on zirconia (ZrO 2) and gold nanoparticles (NG) film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). NG was electrodeposited onto the glassy carbon electrode at 1.5 V, and then zirconia thin film on the NG/GCE was fabricated by cyclic voltammetric method (CV) in an aqueous electrolyte of ZrOCl 2 and KCl at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. DNA probes were attached onto the ZrO 2/NG/GCE due to the strong binding of the phosphate group of DNA with the zirconia film and the excellent biocompatibility of nanogold with DNA. CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the modification of the electrode and the probe DNA immobilization. The electrochemical response of the DNA hybridization was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using methylene blue (MB) as the electroactive indicator. After the hybridization of DNA probe (ssDNA) with the complementary DNA (cDNA), the cathodic peak current of MB decreased obviously. The difference of the cathodic peak currents of MB between before and after the hybridization of the probe DNA was used as the signal for the detection of the target DNA. The sequence-specific DNA of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) gene in the transgenic plants was detected with a detection range from 1.0 × 10 -10 to 1.0 × 10 -6 mol/L, and a detection limit of 3.1 × 10 -11 mol/L.

  12. Layered zirconium phosphonate with inorganic–organic hybrid structure: Preparation and its assembly with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li-Min; Lu, Guo-Yuan; Jiang, Li-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-07-01

    An aminoethoxy-functionalized zirconium phosphonate (Zr(O{sub 3}POCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O), abbreviated as ZrRP (R=OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}), with layered structure has been synthesized. This layered compound possesses the characteristic of inorganic–organic hybrid, due to the covalently linked aminoethoxy in the host layer. The anion exchanged property of this zirconium phosphonate is suitable for the direct intercalation of negatively charged DNA, which is different from these reported zirconium phosphates or zirconium phosphonates. As a precursor, this prepared zirconium phosphonate was utilized to fabricate a novel DNA/ZrRP binary hybrid via a delamination-reassembly procedure. The release behavior of DNA from the DNA/ZrRP composite was investigated at different medium pH, because the combination between zirconium phosphonate sheets and DNA was pH-dependent sensitively. Moreover, the helical conformation of DNA was almost retained after the intercalation and release process. These properties of the DNA/ZrRP composite suggested the potential application of layered zirconium phosphonate as a non-viral vector in gene delivery. - Graphical abstract: The intercalation of DNA into zirconium phosphonate and the release of DNA from the interlayer of zirconium phosphonate. - Highlights: ●A layered aminoethoxy-functionalized zirconium phosphonate has been synthesized. ●DNA was intercalated directly into the prepared zirconium phosphonate. ●A novel zirconium phosphonate/DNA binary hybrid was fabricated. ●DNA can be reversibly released from the interlayer of zirconium phosphonate. ●The intercalation/release processes do not induce the denaturalization of DNA.

  13. Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation and RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation in Aicardi–Goutières syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yoong Wearn; Sanz, Lionel A; Xu, Xiaoqin; Hartono, Stella R; Chédin, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi–Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood inflammatory disorder that shows clinical and genetic overlap with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). AGS is thought to arise from the accumulation of incompletely metabolized endogenous nucleic acid species owing to mutations in nucleic acid-degrading enzymes TREX1 (AGS1), RNase H2 (AGS2, 3 and 4), and SAMHD1 (AGS5). However, the identity and source of such immunogenic nucleic acid species remain undefined. Using genome-wide approaches, we show that fibroblasts from AGS patients with AGS1-5 mutations are burdened by excessive loads of RNA:DNA hybrids. Using MethylC-seq, we show that AGS fibroblasts display pronounced and global loss of DNA methylation and demonstrate that AGS-specific RNA:DNA hybrids often occur within DNA hypomethylated regions. Altogether, our data suggest that RNA:DNA hybrids may represent a common immunogenic form of nucleic acids in AGS and provide the first evidence of epigenetic perturbations in AGS, furthering the links between AGS and SLE. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08007.001 PMID:26182405

  14. An efficient algorithm for the stochastic simulation of the hybridization of DNA to microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although oligonucleotide microarray technology is ubiquitous in genomic research, reproducibility and standardization of expression measurements still concern many researchers. Cross-hybridization between microarray probes and non-target ssDNA has been implicated as a primary factor in sensitivity and selectivity loss. Since hybridization is a chemical process, it may be modeled at a population-level using a combination of material balance equations and thermodynamics. However, the hybridization reaction network may be exceptionally large for commercial arrays, which often possess at least one reporter per transcript. Quantification of the kinetics and equilibrium of exceptionally large chemical systems of this type is numerically infeasible with customary approaches. Results In this paper, we present a robust and computationally efficient algorithm for the simulation of hybridization processes underlying microarray assays. Our method may be utilized to identify the extent to which nucleic acid targets (e.g. cDNA) will cross-hybridize with probes, and by extension, characterize probe robustnessusing the information specified by MAGE-TAB. Using this algorithm, we characterize cross-hybridization in a modified commercial microarray assay. Conclusions By integrating stochastic simulation with thermodynamic prediction tools for DNA hybridization, one may robustly and rapidly characterize of the selectivity of a proposed microarray design at the probe and "system" levels. Our code is available at http://www.laurenzi.net. PMID:20003312

  15. Label free detection of DNA hybridization by refractive index tapered fiber biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Ghanati, E.; Gholami, M.; Hosseini, S. M.

    2010-04-01

    We demonstrate a simple refractive index sensor (RI) sensing system based on a biconical tapered optical fiber (BTOF), which is fabricated by heat pulling method, utilizing a CO2 laser. In this work we explore the application of these sensors for the detection of label free single stranded DNA (ssDNA) in real time. During the experiment, the target ssDNA did not need to be labeled with a fluorescent tag, which is expensive and complicated. The change in output optical transmission of the tapered fiber was recorded for Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) coating, ssDNA probe immobilization and hybridization. The result indicated that due to the hybridization with the complementary target ssDNA on the tapered surface, the RI of surrounding medium changes which leads to changes in the characteristics of the tapered region and change in the output power of the sensor.

  16. DNA fingerprinting of Kentucky bluegrass cultivars and hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a high polyploidy, apomictic, self-incompatible, perennial grass, Kentucky bluegrass has such complex genetic architecture that conducting standard Mendelian genetic selection is currently impossible. One large hurdle is the inability to differentiate true hybrids from other apomictic progenies....

  17. PolyA-Mediated DNA Assembly on Gold Nanoparticles for Thermodynamically Favorable and Rapid Hybridization Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Song, Ping; Shen, Juwen; Su, Shao; Chao, Jie; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zhou, Ziang; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei; Tian, Yang; Wang, Lianhui; Pei, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of biomolecules on nanointerface is critical in bioanalysis, which is great challenge due to the instability and the difficulty to control the orientation and loading density of biomolecules. Here, we investigated the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization on gold nanoparticle, with the aim to improve the efficiency and speed of DNA analysis. We achieved precise and quantitative surface control by applying a recently developed poly adenines (polyA)-based assembly strategy on gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuNPs). PolyA served as an effective anchoring block based on the preferential binding with the AuNP surface and the appended recognition block adopted an upright conformation that favors DNA hybridization. The lateral spacing and surface density of DNA on AuNPs can be systematically modulated by adjusting the length of polyA block. We found the stability of duplex on AuNP was enhanced with the increasing length of polyA block. When the length of polyA block reached to 40 bases, the thermodynamic properties were more similar to that of duplex in solution. Fast hybridization rate was observed on the diblock DNA-AuNPs and was increased along with the length of polyA block. We consider the high stability and excellent hybridization performance come from the minimization of the DNA-DNA and DNA-AuNP interactions with the use of polyA block. This study provides better understanding of the behavior of biomolecules on the nanointerface and opens new opportunities to construct high-efficiency and high-speed biosensors for DNA analysis. PMID:27058116

  18. Impact parameters on hybridization process in detecting influenza virus (type A) using conductimetric-based DNA sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Tuan, Mai Anh; Van Hieu, Nguyen; Chien, Nguyen Duc

    2009-08-01

    This paper report various impact parameters on hybridization of probe/target DNA to detect the influenza virus (type A-H5N1) such as hybridization temperature, probe concentration, mismatch target and hybridization time. The DNA probe was attached to sensor surface by means of covalent bonding between amine of 3-aminopropyl-triethoxy-silance (APTS) and phosphate group of DNA sequence. The hybridization of probe/target DNA strands were detected by changing the surface conductance of sensors, which leads to the change in output signal of the system. The results reveal that the DNA sensor can detect as low as 0.5 nM of target DNA in real samples. The response time of DNA sensor is approximately 4 min, and the sensitivity of DNA sensor is about 0.03 mV/nM.

  19. Implication of Triticum searsii as the B-genome donor to wheat using DNA hybridizations.

    PubMed

    Nath, J; McNay, J W; Paroda, C M; Gulati, S C

    1983-08-01

    In vitro DNA:DNA hybridizations and hydroxyapatite thermal chromatography were employed to help identify the species ancestral to the B genome of the polyploid wheats. We hybridized 3H-Triticum aestivum DNA to the unlabeled DNAs of T. urartu, T. speltoides, T. sharonensis, T. bicorne, T. longissimum, and T. searsii, 3H-Labeled DNA of T. urartu was hybridized with the DNA of a synthetic tetraploid. AADD. The heteroduplex thermal stabilities indicated that T. searsii was most closely related to T. aestivum (ABD) and that the genome of T. urartu was more closely related to the A genome than the B genome. The degree of reassociation which may have occurred between the six diploid species and the D genome of T. aestivum was evaluated by hybridizing 3H-T. tauschii DNA with the DNAs of the diploids. The results indicated that T. urartu had the least sequence homology to T. tauschii, the D-genome donor lending additional support to the conclusion that T. urartu is related to the A genome. Thus, it is highly probable that T. searsii is the B-genome donor to the polyploid wheats or a major chromosome donor if the B genome is, in fact, polyphyletic in origin. PMID:6626143

  20. Competitive Assays of Label-Free DNA Hybridization with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging Detection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eric M; Manhart, Michael W; Harris, Joel M

    2016-06-21

    Single-molecule imaging of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is a powerful technique for measuring association interactions; however, care must be taken to ensure that the fluorescent labels do not influence the system being probed. Label-free techniques are needed to understand biomolecule interactions free from the influence of an attached label, but these techniques often lack sensitivity and specificity. To solve these challenges, we have developed a competitive assay that uses single-molecule detection to track the population of unlabeled target single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) hybridized with probe DNA immobilized at a glass interface by detecting individual duplexes with a fluorescently labeled "tracer" ssDNA. By labeling a small fraction (<0.2%) of target molecules, the "tracer" DNA tracks the available probe DNA sites without significant competition with the unlabeled target population. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is a good read-out scheme for competitive assays, as it is sufficiently sensitive to detect tracer DNA on substrates with relatively low densities of probe DNA, ∼10(-3) of a monolayer, so that steric interactions do not hinder DNA hybridization. Competitive assays are used to measure the association constant of complementary strand DNA hybridization of 9- and 10-base pair targets, where the tracer assay predicts the same association constant as a traditional displacement competitive assay. This methodology was used to compare the Ka of hybridization for identical DNA strands differing only by the presence of a fluorescent label tethered to the 5' end of the solution-phase target. The addition of the fluorescent label significantly stabilizes the DNA duplex by 3.6 kJmol(-1), adding more stability than an additional adenine-thymine base-pairing interaction, 2.7 kJmol(-1). This competitive tracer assay could be used to screen a number of labeled and unlabeled target DNA strands to measure the impact of fluorescent labeling on duplex stability

  1. DNA hybridization assay for detection of gypsy moth nuclear polyhedrosis virus in infected gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L. ) larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, S.T.; Burand, J.P.; Elkinton, J.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Radiolabeled Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA probes were used in a DNA hybridization assay to detect the presence of viral DNA in extracts from infected larvae. Total DNA was extracted from larvae, bound to nitrocellulose filters, and assayed for the presence of viral DNA by two methods: slot-blot vacuum filtration and whole-larval squashes. The hybridization results were closely correlated with mortality observed in reared larvae. Hybridization of squashes of larvae frozen 4 days after receiving the above virus treatments also produced accurate measures of the incidence of virus infection.

  2. Internalization of Locked Nucleic Acids/DNA Hybrid Oligomers into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German M; Sala, Carol Davies; Fuxman Bass, Juan I; Soler-Bistué, Alfonso J C; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Ramírez, María Soledad; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2012-10-01

    Delivery inside the cells is essential for practical application of antisense technologies. The hybrid locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA CAAGTACTGTTCCACCA (LNA residues are underlined) was labeled by conjugation to Alexa Fluor 488 (fLNA/DNA) and tested to determine its ability to penetrate Escherichia coli cells and reach the cytoplasm. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the fLNA/DNA was associated with 14% of cells from a stationary phase culture, while association with a labeled isosequential oligodeoxynucleotide was negligible. Laser scanning confocal microscopy confirmed that the fLNA/DNA was located inside the cytoplasm. PMID:23515318

  3. Chaos-based image encryption using a hybrid genetic algorithm and a DNA sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayatifar, Rasul; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2014-05-01

    The paper studies a recently developed evolutionary-based image encryption algorithm. A novel image encryption algorithm based on a hybrid model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) masking, a genetic algorithm (GA) and a logistic map is proposed. This study uses DNA and logistic map functions to create the number of initial DNA masks and applies GA to determine the best mask for encryption. The significant advantage of this approach is improving the quality of DNA masks to obtain the best mask that is compatible with plain images. The experimental results and computer simulations both confirm that the proposed scheme not only demonstrates excellent encryption but also resists various typical attacks.

  4. Detection and classification of Trypanosoma cruzi by DNA hybridization with nonradioactive probes.

    PubMed

    Solari, A; Venegas, J; Gonzalez, E; Vasquez, C

    1991-01-01

    Total or kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) from 72 isolates and clones of Trypanosoma cruzi as well as from nine related trypanosomatids were analyzed by dot hybridization using nonradioactive kDNA or cloned minicircle fragments as probes. Biotinylated-kDNA probes generated by nick-translation proved reliable for distinguishing Zymodeme 1 and Zymodeme 2bol of T. cruzi parasites. In contrast, digoxigenin-labeled kDNA obtained by random-priming did not distinguish among T. cruzi isolates but did distinguish among New World leishmanias. Cloned minicircle fragments labeled with digoxigenin gave the same results as digoxigenin-labeled kDNA, except for a 10-fold decrease in sensitivity. Digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes proved useful in unambiguously detecting T. cruzi from different geographic regions of America. However, T. rangeli and T. cruzi marinkellei were not distinguished by these probes. PMID:1667933

  5. Direct Measurement of Single-Molecule DNA Hybridization Dynamics with Single-Base Resolution.

    PubMed

    He, Gen; Li, Jie; Ci, Haina; Qi, Chuanmin; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-07-25

    Herein, we report label-free detection of single-molecule DNA hybridization dynamics with single-base resolution. By using an electronic circuit based on point-decorated silicon nanowires as electrical probes, we directly record the folding/unfolding process of individual hairpin DNAs with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio and bandwidth. These measurements reveal two-level current oscillations with strong temperature dependence, enabling us to determine the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hairpin DNA hybridization. More importantly, successive, stepwise increases and decreases in device conductance at low temperature on a microsecond timescale are successfully observed, indicating a base-by-base unfolding/folding process. The process demonstrates a kinetic zipper model for DNA hybridization/dehybridization at the single base-pair level. This measurement capability promises a label-free single-molecule approach to probe biomolecular interactions with fast dynamics. PMID:27272178

  6. Interspersion of sequences in avian myeloblastosis virus rna that rapidly hybridize with leukemic chicken cell DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Drohan, W N; Shoyab, M; Wall, R; Baluda, M A

    1975-01-01

    Liquid hybridization of progressively smaller fragments (35S, 27S, 15.5S, 12.5S, and 8S) of poly(A)-selected avian myeloblastosis virus RNA with excess DNA from leukemic chicken myeloblasts revealed that all sizes of RNA contained sequences complementary to both slowly and rapidly hybridizing cellular DNA sequences. Apparently, the RNA sequences which hybridize rapidly with excesses of cellular DNA are not restricted to any one region of the avian myeloblastosis virus 35S RNA. Instead, they appear to be randomly distributed over the entire 35S avian myeloblastosis virus RNA molecule with some positioned within 200 nucleotides of the poly(A) tract at the 3' end of the RNA. PMID:163372

  7. Multiplexed DNA sequencing and diagnostics by hybridization with enriched stable isotope labels

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinghaus, H.F.; Kwoka, M.N.; Guo, X.Q.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1997-04-15

    A new DNA diagnostic and sequencing system has been developed that uses time-of-flight resonance ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-RIMS) to provide a rapid method of analyzing stable isotope-labeled oligonucleotides in form 1 sequencing by hybridization (SBH). With form 1, the DNA is immobilized on a nylon membrane and enriched isotope-labeled individual oligonucleotide probes are free to seek out complementary DNAs during hybridization. The major advantage of this new approach is that multiple oligonucleotides can be labeled with different enriched isotopes and can all be simultaneously hybridized to the genosensor matrix. The probes can then be simultaneously detected with TOF-RIMS with high selectivity, sensitivity, and efficiency. By using isotopically enriched tin labels, up to 10 labeled oligonucleotides could be examined in a single hybridization to the DNA matrix. Greater numbers of labels are available if rare earth isotopes are employed. In the present study, matrices containing three different DNAs were prepared and simultaneously hybridized with two different probes under a variety of conditions. The results show that DNAs, immobilized on nylon surfaces, can be specifically hybridized to probes labeled with different enriched tin isotopes. Discrimination between complementary and noncomplementary sites of better than 100 was obtained in multiplexed samples. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  8. A Novel SERRS Sandwich-Hybridization Assay to Detect Specific DNA Target

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Benjamin; Montagnac, Gilles; Daniel, Isabelle; Hänni, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have applied Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) technology to the specific detection of DNA. We present an innovative SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay that allows specific DNA detection without any enzymatic amplification, such as is the case with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). In some substrates, such as ancient or processed remains, enzymatic amplification fails due to DNA alteration (degradation, chemical modification) or to the presence of inhibitors. Consequently, the development of a non-enzymatic method, allowing specific DNA detection, could avoid long, expensive and inconclusive amplification trials. Here, we report the proof of concept of a SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay that leads to the detection of a specific chamois DNA. This SERRS assay reveals its potential as a non-enzymatic alternative technology to DNA amplification methods (particularly the PCR method) with several applications for species detection. As the amount and type of damage highly depend on the preservation conditions, the present SERRS assay would enlarge the range of samples suitable for DNA analysis and ultimately would provide exciting new opportunities for the investigation of ancient DNA in the fields of evolutionary biology and molecular ecology, and of altered DNA in food frauds detection and forensics. PMID:21655320

  9. DNA Cleavage and Condensation Activities of Mono- and Binuclear Hybrid Complexes and Regulation by Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Dai, Mingxing; Zhang, Chunping; Jiang, Bingying; Xu, Junqiang; Zhou, Dewen; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid complexes with N,N'-bis(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine and cyclen moieties are novel enzyme mimics and controlled DNA release materials, which could interact with DNA through three models under different conditions. In this paper, the interactions between plasmid DNA and seven different complexes were investigated, and the methods to change the interaction patterns by graphene oxide (GO) or concentrations were also investigated. The cleavage of pUC19 DNA promoted by target complexes were via hydrolytic or oxidative mechanisms at low concentrations ranging from 3.13 × 10(-7) to 6.25 × 10(-5) mol/L. Dinuclear complexes 2a and 2b can promote the cleavage of plasmid pUC19 DNA to a linear form at pH values below 7.0. Furthermore, binuclear hybrid complexes could condense DNA as nanoparticles above 3.13 × 10(-5) mol/L and partly release DNA by graphene oxide with π-π stacking. Meanwhile, the results also reflected that graphene oxide could prevent DNA from breaking down. Cell viability assays showed dinuclear complexes were safe to normal human hepatic cells at relative high concentrations. The present work might help to develop novel strategies for the design and synthesis of DNA controllable releasing agents, which may be applied to gene delivery and also to exploit the new application for GO. PMID:27428945

  10. Hybridization thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides during microchip capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Thomas M; McCallum, Christopher; Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Crisalli, Pete; Pennathur, Sumita

    2015-03-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a powerful analytical tool for performing separations and characterizing properties of charged species. For reacting species during a CE separation, local concentrations change leading to nonequilibrium conditions. Interpreting experimental data with such nonequilibrium reactive species is nontrivial due to the large number of variables involved in the system. In this work we develop a COMSOL multiphysics-based numerical model to simulate the electrokinetic mass transport of short interacting ssDNAs in microchip capillary electrophoresis. We probe the importance of the dissociation constant, K(D), and the concentration of DNA on the resulting observed mobility of the dsDNA peak, μ(w), by using a full sweep of parametric simulations. We find that the observed mobility is strongly dependent on the DNA concentration and K(D), as well as ssDNA concentration, and develop a relation with which to understand this dependence. Furthermore, we present experimental microchip capillary electrophoresis measurements of interacting 10 base ssDNA and its complement with changes in buffer ionic strength, DNA concentration, and DNA sequence to vary the system equilibria. We then compare our results to thermodynamically calculated K(D) values. PMID:25634338

  11. A simple colorimetric DNA detection by target-induced hybridization chain reaction for isothermal signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cuiping; Wang, Wenshuo; Mulchandani, Ashok; Shi, Chao

    2014-07-15

    A novel DNA detection method is presented based on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) colorimetric assay and hybridization chain reaction (HCR). In this method, target DNA hybridized with probe DNA modified on AuNP, and triggered HCR. The resulting HCR products with a large number of negative charges significantly enhanced the stability of AuNPs, inhibiting aggregation of AuNPs at an elevated salt concentration. The approach was highly sensitive and selective. Using this enzyme-free and isothermal signal amplification method, we were able to detect target DNA at concentrations as low as 0.5 nM with the naked eye. Our method also has great potential for detecting other analytes, such as metal ions, proteins, and small molecules, if the target analytes could make HCR products attach to AuNPs. PMID:24780220

  12. Capacitive Monitoring of Morpholino-DNA Surface Hybridization: Experimental and Theoretical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tercero, Napoleon; Wang, Kang; Levicky, Rastislav

    2010-01-01

    Impedance and cyclic voltammetry methods, complemented by Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) modeling, are used to study hybridization of DNA analyte strands to monolayers of morpholino oligomers (MOs) immobilized by one end to mercaptopropanol-passivated gold electrodes. MOs, like peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), are uncharged molecules that recognize nucleic acids following conventional base-pairing rules. The capacitive response to hybridization, determined from real-time impedance measurements, is analyzed with emphasis on understanding the underlying structural changes and on providing a foundation for label-free diagnostics. The capacitive response is correlated with the instantaneous surface molecular populations by labeling DNA and MO strands with ferrocene tags and using cyclic voltammetry to monitor their respective coverages in real-time. This approach allows analysis of hybridization-induced changes in interfacial capacitance as a function of duplex coverage, the DC bias used for readout, buffer molarity, and probe coverage. The results indicate that unhybridized MO layers exist in a compact state on the solid support. For hybridized layers, the intrinsic signal per hybridization event is strongly enhanced at low ionic strengths but, interestingly, does not depend on the readout bias in the sampled range negative of the capacitive minimum. A PB model incorporating an effective medium description of the hybridizing films is used to establish how hybridization-derived changes in dielectric composition and charge distribution at the surface translate into experimentally-observed variations in interfacial capacitance. PMID:20690772

  13. Protocol for sortase-mediated construction of DNA-protein hybrids and functional nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Koussa, Mounir A.; Sotomayor, Marcos; Wong, Wesley P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent methods in DNA nanotechnology are enabling the creation of intricate nanostructures through the use of programmable, bottom-up self-assembly. However, structures consisting only of DNA are limited in their ability to act on other biomolecules. Proteins, on the other hand, perform a variety of functions on biological materials, but directed control of the self-assembly process remains a challenge. While DNA-protein hybrids have the potential to provide the best-of-both-worlds, they can be difficult to create as many of the conventional techniques for linking proteins to DNA render proteins dysfunctional. We present here a sortase-based protocol for covalently coupling proteins to DNA with minimal disturbance to protein function. To accomplish this we have developed a two-step process. First, a small synthetic peptide is bioorthogonally and covalently coupled to a DNA oligo using click chemistry. Next, the DNA-peptide chimera is covalently linked to a protein of interest under protein-compatible conditions using the enzyme sortase. Our protocol allows for the simple coupling and purification of a functional DNA-protein hybrid. We use this technique to form oligos bearing cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 protein fragments. Upon incorporation into a linear M13 scaffold, these protein-DNA hybrids serve as the gate to a binary nanoswitch. The outlined protocol is reliable and modular, facilitating the construction of libraries of oligos and proteins that can be combined to form functional DNA-protein nanostructures. These structures will enable a new class of functional nanostructures, which could be used for therapeutic and industrial processes. PMID:24568941

  14. Homologous PNA Hybridization to Noncanonical DNA G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Kormuth, Karen A; Woolford, John L; Armitage, Bruce A

    2016-03-29

    Potential guanine (G) quadruplex-forming sequences (QFSs) found throughout the genomes and transcriptomes of organisms have emerged as biologically relevant structures. These G-quadruplexes represent novel opportunities for gene regulation at the DNA and RNA levels. Recently, the definition of functional QFSs has been expanding to include a variety of unconventional motifs, including relatively long loop sequences (i.e., >7 nucleotides) separating adjacent G-tracts. We have identified a QFS within the 25S rDNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisae that features a long loop separating the two 3'-most G-tracts. An oligonucleotide based on this sequence, QFS3, folds into a stable G-quadruplex in vitro. We have studied the interaction between QFS3 and several loop mutants with a small, homologous (G-rich) peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer that is designed to form a DNA/PNA heteroquadruplex. The PNA successfully invades the DNA quadruplex target to form a stable heteroquadruplex, but with surprisingly high PNA:DNA ratios based on surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometric results. A model for high stoichiometry PNA-DNA heteroquadruplexes is proposed, and the implications for quadruplex targeting by G-rich PNA are discussed. PMID:26950608

  15. DNA Sequence Determination by Hybridization: A Strategy for Efficient Large-Scale Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoddy, J.; Funkhouser, W. K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L.; Crkvenjakov, R.

    1993-06-01

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project.

  16. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-21

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors. PMID:25177907

  17. DNA sequence determination by hybridization: A strategy for efficient large-scale sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoody, J.; Crkvenjakov, R. ); Funkhouser, W.K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L. )

    1993-06-11

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Highly sensitive electrochemical biosensor based on nonlinear hybridization chain reaction for DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liping; Shi, Shanshan; Ma, Rongna; Jia, Wenli; Wang, Huaisheng

    2016-06-15

    In the present work we demonstrated an ultrasensitive detection platform for specific DNA based on nonlinear hybridization chain reaction (HCR) by triggering chain-branching growth of DNA dendrimers. HCR was initiated by target DNA (tDNA) and finally formed dendritic structure by self-assembly. The electrochemical signal was drastically enhanced by capturing multiple catalytic peroxidase with high-ordered growth. Electrochemical signals were obtained by measuring the reduction current of oxidized 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine sulfate (TMB), which was generated by HRP in the presence of H2O2. This method exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity to tDNA with detection limit of 0.4fM. Furthermore, the biosensor was also capable of discriminating single-nucleotide difference among concomitant DNA sequences. PMID:26872213

  19. Detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus genome in leukocytes from persistently infected cattle by RNA-cDNA hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, J; Aiken, J; Schultz, R D

    1990-01-01

    A bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) cDNA library was constructed. One cloned complementary DNA sequence was used as a probe to detect BVDV RNA by hybridization in infected cell cultures and in mononuclear leukocytes from persistently infected cattle by dot blot and in situ hybridization. The cDNA probe hybridized with all cytopathic and noncytopathic BVDV isolates tested. The hybridization results were consistent with results obtained using conventional subculturing and immunofluorescent staining methods and by inoculation of seronegative test cattle. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2162729

  20. ATP-Responsive DNA-Graphene Hybrid Nanoaggregates for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Sun, Wujin; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems are primarily focused on the applications of the tumor microenvironmental or cellular physiological cues to enhance the release of drugs at the target site. In this study, we applied adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP), the primary “energy molecule”, as a trigger for enhanced release of preloaded drugs responding to the intracellular ATP concentration that is significantly higher than the extracellular level. A new ATP-responsive anticancer drug delivery strategy utilizing DNA-graphene crosslinked hybrid nanoaggregates as carriers was developed for controlled release of doxorubicin (DOX), which consists of graphene oxide (GO), two single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, denoted as DNA1 and DNA2) and ATP aptamer. The single-stranded DNA1 and DNA2 together with the ATP aptamer serve as the linkers upon hybridization for controlled assembly of the DNA-GO nanoaggregates, which effectively inhibited the release of DOX from the GO nanosheets. In the presence of ATP, the responsive formation of the ATP/ATP aptamer complex causes the dissociation of the aggregates, which promoted the release of DOX in the environment with a high ATP concentration such as cytosol compared with that in the ATP-deficient extracellular fluid. This supports the development of a novel ATP-responsive platform for targeted on-demand delivery of anticancer drugs inside specific cells. PMID:25736497

  1. Detection of DNA Hybridization by Methylene Blue Electrochemistry at Activated Nanoelectrode Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Morena; Fruk, Ljiljana; Moretto, Ligia Maria; Ugo, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) obtained by electroless gold deposition in track-etched poly-carbonate (PC) membranes are functionalized and applied for DNA hybridization detection, using methylene blue (MB) as electroactive probe. To this aim, an amine terminated (ss)DNA probe is immobilized on the PC surface of the NEE by reaction via carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide. In order to increase the number of carboxylic groups present on PC and suitable for the functionalization, the surface of NEEs is oxidized with potassium permanganate. The presence of carboxylic functionalities is verified by spectrochemical titration with thionin acetate (THA) and the effect of the activation treatment on the electrode performances is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). After activation and functionalization with the probes, the NEE-based sensor is hybridized with complementary target sequences. The effect of the functionalization of the NEEs both with the (ss)DNA probe alone and after hybridization with the target, is studied by measuring the changes in the MB reduction signal by square wave voltammetry (SWV), after incubation in a suitable MB solution, rinsing and transfer to the measurement cell. It was observed that this peak signal decreases significantly after hybridization of the probe with the complementary target. Experimental evidences suggest that the interaction between MB and the guanines of (ss)DNA and (ds)DNA is at the basis of the development of the here observed analytical signal. The proposed approach allows the easy preparation and testing of NEE-based sensors for the electrochemical DNA hybridization detection. PMID:26504963

  2. Broken Optical Symmetry in DNA-SWNT Hybrids: Spectroscopic Signaling of the Helical Wrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotkin, Slava V.

    2009-03-01

    Functionalizing single-stranded DNA on a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) has allowed isolating individual tubes, making them soluble, and separating SWNTs according to their chirality. Such strong technological impact motivated our study of the optical properties of the DNA-SWNT hybrids, commonly used now for the solution-based fabrication and experiments. The helicity of the DNA wrap may interfere with the intrinsic Hamiltonian of the SWNT and result in bandstructure modulation. Our modeling predicts a symmetry lowering in the hybrid due to the Coulomb potential of the regular helical wrap of the ionized backbone of the ssDNA, followed by the qualitative changes in the cross- or circularly polarized SWNT absorption spectrum (with no or little change in the parallel polarization). In particular, we predict the appearance of a new peak in the cross-polarized absorption of the ssDNA-SWNT at a frequency lower than that of all allowed transitions in the bare tube. Such effect can be used for optical identification of the wrap at sufficient ssDNA coverage. Wrap signaling happens also via another optical effect, a strong circular dichroism even in the complex with an achiral SWNT, and even at the frequencies where ss-DNA has no absorption features at all. Symmetry of the wrap is central to determine such a circular dichroism of the hybrid. Having in mind that the exact geometry of a DNA wrap for an arbitrary tube is not precisely known yet, we put forward a general model capable of tracking optical effects, varying the parameters of the wrap and/or tube diameter. For various ssDNA backbone helical angles and for various tubes we predict different absorption spectra, though a general qualitative feature of the helical symmetry breaking, the appearance of new van Hove singularities and circular dichroism, must be present.

  3. Enzymatic Reaction with Unnatural Substrates: DNA Photolyase (Escherichia coli) Recognizes and Reverses Thymine [2+2] Dimers in the DNA Strand of a DNA/PNA Hybrid Duplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaiah, Danaboyina; Kan, Yongzhi; Koch, Troels; Orum, Henrik; Schuster, Gary B.

    1998-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are mimics with normal bases connected to a pseudopeptide chain that obey Watson--Crick rules to form stable duplexes with itself and natural nucleic acids. This has focused attention on PNA as therapeutic or diagnostic reagents. Duplexes formed with PNA mirror some but not all properties of DNA. One fascinating aspect of PNA biochemistry is their reaction with enzymes. Here we show an enzyme reaction that operates effectively on a PNA/DNA hybrid duplex. A DNA oligonucleotide containing a cis, syn-thymine [2+2] dimer forms a stable duplex with PNA. The hybrid duplex is recognized by photolyase, and irradiation of the complex leads to the repair of the thymine dimer. This finding provides insight into the enzyme mechanism and provides a means for the selective repair of thymine photodimers.

  4. Redox polymer and probe DNA tethered to gold electrodes for enzyme-amplified amperometric detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Paul; Leech, Dónal

    2006-04-15

    The detection of nucleic acids based upon recognition surfaces formed by co-immobilization of a redox polymer mediator and DNA probe sequences on gold electrodes is described. The recognition surface consists of a redox polymer, [Os(2,2'-bipyridine)2(polyvinylimidazole)(10)Cl](+/2+), and a model single DNA strand cross-linked and tethered to a gold electrode via an anchoring self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of cysteamine. Hybridization between the immobilized probe DNA of the recognition surface and a biotin-conjugated target DNA sequence (designed from the ssrA gene of Listeria monocytogenes), followed by addition of an enzyme (glucose oxidase)-avidin conjugate, results in electrical contact between the enzyme and the mediating redox polymer. In the presence of glucose, the current generated due to the catalytic oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone is measured, and a response is obtained that is binding-dependent. The tethering of the probe DNA and redox polymer to the SAM improves the stability of the surface to assay conditions of rigorous washing and high salt concentration (1 M). These conditions eliminate nonspecific interaction of both the target DNA and the enzyme-avidin conjugate with the recognition surfaces. The sensor response increases linearly with increasing concentration of target DNA in the range of 1 x 10(-9) to 2 x 10(-6) M. The detection limit is approximately 1.4 fmol, (corresponding to 0.2 nM of target DNA). Regeneration of the recognition surface is possible by treatment with 0.25 M NaOH solution. After rehybridization of the regenerated surface with the target DNA sequence, >95% of the current is recovered, indicating that the redox polymer and probe DNA are strongly bound to the surface. These results demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach. PMID:16615783

  5. Hybridization accompanying FRET event in labeled natural nucleoside-unnatural nucleoside containing chimeric DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Das, Suman K; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar; Jana, Subhashis

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a highly efficient strategy in illuminating the structures, structural changes and dynamics of DNA, proteins and other biomolecules and thus is being widely utilized in studying such phenomena, in designing molecular/biomolecular probes for monitoring the hybridization event of two single stranded DNA to form duplex, in gene detection and in many other sensory applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. Moreover, FRET can give information about the positional status of chromophores within the associated biomolecules with much more accuracy than other methods can yield. Toward this end, we want to report here the ability of fluorescent unnatural nucleoside, triazolylphenanthrene ((TPhen)BDo) to show FRET interaction upon hybridization with fluorescently labeled natural nucleosides, (Per)U or (OxoPy)U or (Per)U, forming two stable chimeric DNA duplexes. The pairing selectivity and the thermal duplex stability of the chimeric duplexes are higher than any of the duplexes with natural nucleoside formed. The hybridization results in a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from donor triazolylphenanthrene of (TPhen)BDo to acceptor oxopyrene of (OxoPy)U and/or to perylene chromophore of (Per)U, respectively, in two chimeric DNA duplexes. Therefore, we have established the FRET process in two chimeric DNA duplexes wherein a fluorescently labeled natural nucleoside ((OxoPy)U or (Per)U) paired against an unnatural nucleoside ((TPhen)BDo) without sacrificing the duplex stability and B-DNA conformation. The hybridization accompanying FRET event in these classes of interacting fluorophores is new. Moreover, there is no report of such designed system of chimeric DNA duplex. Our observed phenomenon and the design can potentially be exploited in designing more of such efficient FRET pairs for useful application in the detection and analysis of biomolecular interactions and in material science application. PMID:27498231

  6. DNA sequence similarity recognition by hybridization to short oligomers

    DOEpatents

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    1999-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the comparison of nucleic acid sequences. Data is generated by hybridizing sets of oligomers with target nucleic acids. The data thus generated is manipulated simultaneously with respect to both (i) matching between oligomers and (ii) matching between oligomers and putative reference sequences available in databases. Using data compression methods to manipulate this mutual information, sequences for the target can be constructed.

  7. Ultrasensitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Using Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kerman, Kagan; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-12-01

    We have sensitively detected DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) in real time. Amino modified peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotides at 5' end were covalently immobilized onto the Au surface of the back gate. For 11-mer PNA oligonucletide probe, full-complementary DNA with concentration as low as 6.8 fM solution could be effectively detected. Our CNTFET-based biochip is a promising candidate for the development of an integrated, high-throughput, multiplexed DNA biosensor for medical, forensic and environmental diagnostics.

  8. [Three cases of vulvar bowenoid papulosis: the localization of HPV DNA by in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Kioka, H; Nagai, N; Tanioka, Y; Fujii, T; Katsube, Y; Egawa, K; Fujiwara, A

    1989-09-01

    Cytological, histological, and molecular biological studies were conducted in 3 cases of vulvar Bowenoid papulosis, using biotinylated HPV DNA probes by in situ hybridization. 1) Cytological findings showed dyskaryotic cells that revealed hyperchromatism with a coarse granular pattern, and a high N/C ratio was observed among the dyskeratotic cells. 2) In 2 cases of Bowenoid papulosis lesions, HPV 16 DNA was detected in the nucleus of the dysplastic cells. 3) In one case of Bowenoid papulosis, a complicated carcinoma in situ of the uterine cervix was observed, and the HPV 16 DNA was found to be positive in both the vulva and cervix. PMID:2550688

  9. Use of synthetic oligonucleotides for genomic DNA dot hybridization to split the DQw3 haplotype.

    PubMed Central

    Martell, M; Le Gall, I; Millasseau, P; Dausset, J; Cohen, D

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of two different HLA-DQ beta gene sequences from two DR4 individuals, probably corresponding to DQw3.2 (DQR4) and DQw3.1 (DQR5) specificities, has shown several nucleotide variations. Eight oligonucleotides (24 bases long), derived from these polymorphic areas, have been synthesized. Each oligonucleotide was hybridized to BamHI-digested DNA samples from eight families with HLA-DR4 individuals. Four polymorphic BamHI fragments were detected. Two of eight oligonucleotides gave a single signal (8.9 kilobases) on DQw3.2-positive haplotypes. We used one of these oligonucleotides in a genomic DNA dot hybridization and detected a hybridization signal only in DQw3.2-positive individuals. A very simple test like this allows the screening of a large population sample within a very short period. Images PMID:2895927

  10. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  11. Application of central composite design for DNA hybridization onto magnetic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Martins, S A M; Prazeres, D M F; Fonseca, L P; Monteiro, G A

    2009-08-01

    Central composite face-centered (CCF) design and response surface methodologies were used to investigate the effect of probe and target concentration and particle number in immobilization and hybridization on a microparticle-based DNA/DNA hybridization assay. The factors under study were combined according to the CCF design matrix, and the intensity of the hybridization signal was quantified by flow cytometry. A second-order polynomial was fitted to data and validated by analysis of variance. The results showed a complex relationship between variables and response given that all factors as well as some interactions were significant, yet it could explain 95% of the data. Probe and target concentration had the strongest impact on hybridization signal intensity. Increments in initial probe concentration in solution positively affected the hybridization signal until a negative influence of a compact probe layer emerged. This trend was attributed to probe-probe interactions. By manipulating particle number on both immobilization and hybridization, enhancements on the assay sensitivity could be obtained. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) at the 95% confidence level was determined to be 2.3 nM of target solution concentration. PMID:19435595

  12. SELECTION OF INTERSPECIFIC SUGARCANE HYBRIDS USING MICROSATELLITE DNA MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three types of species-specific DNA markers, namely, PCR, RAPD, and microsatellites, have been recently developed at the USDA-ARS, SRRC, Sugarcane Research Unit, Houma, Louisiana. Of these, the microsatellite markers are the most polymorphic and can produce distinctive fingerprints (or molecular al...

  13. Shape Analysis of DNA-Au Hybrid Particles by Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Urban, Maximilan J; Holder, Isabelle T; Schmid, Marius; Fernandez Espin, Vanesa; Garcia de la Torre, Jose; Hartig, Jörg S; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-08-23

    Current developments in nanotechnology have increased the demand for nanocrystal assemblies with well-defined shapes and tunable sizes. DNA is a particularly well-suited building block in nanoscale assemblies because of its scalable sizes, conformational variability, and convenient self-assembly capabilities via base pairing. In hybrid materials, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be assembled into nanoparticle structures with programmable interparticle distances by applying appropriate DNA sequences. However, the development of stoichiometrically defined DNA/NP structures is still challenging since product mixtures are frequently obtained and their purification and characterization is the rate-limiting step in the development of DNA-NP hybrid assemblies. Improvements in nanostructure fractionation and characterization techniques offer great potential for nanotechnology applications in general. This study reports the application of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) for the characterization of anisotropic DNA-linked metal-crystal assemblies. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy data and the DNA primary sequence, hydrodynamic bead models are set up for the interpretation of the measured frictional ratios and sedimentation coefficients. We demonstrate that the presence of single DNA strands on particle surfaces as well as the shape factors of multiparticle structures in mixtures can be quantitatively described by AUC. This study will significantly broaden the possibilities to analyze mixtures of shape-anisotropic nanoparticle assemblies. By establishing insights into the analysis of nanostructure mixtures based on fundamental principles of sedimentation, a wide range of potential applications in basic research and industry become accessible. PMID:27459174

  14. An impedimetric study of DNA hybridization on paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihalainen, Petri; Pettersson, Fredrik; Pesonen, Markus; Viitala, Tapani; Määttänen, Anni; Österbacka, Ronald; Peltonen, Jouko

    2014-03-01

    In this study, two different supramolecular recognition architectures for impedimetric detection of DNA hybridization have been formed on disposable paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes. The gold electrodes were fabricated using a gold nanoparticle based ink. The first recognition architecture consists of subsequent layers of biotinylated self-assembly monolayer (SAM), streptavidin and biotinylated DNA probe. The other recognition architecture is constructed by immobilization of thiol-functionalized DNA probe (HS-DNA) and subsequent backfill with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUOH) SAM. The binding capacity and selectivity of the recognition architectures were examined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements. SPR results showed that the HS-DNA/MUOH system had a higher binding capacity for the complementary DNA target. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the hybridization can be detected with impedimetric spectroscopy in picomol range for both systems. EIS signal indicated a good selectivity for both recognition architectures, whereas SPR showed very high unspecific binding for the HS-DNA/MUOH system. The factors affecting the impedance signal were interpreted in terms of the complexity of the supramolecular architecture. The more complex architecture acts as a less ideal capacitive sensor and the impedance signal is dominated by the resistive elements.

  15. Hybridization behavior of mixed DNA/alkylthiol monolayers on gold: characterization by surface plasmon resonance and 32P radiometric assay.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Lee, Chi-Ying; Gamble, Lara J; Castner, David G; Grainger, David W

    2006-05-15

    Nucleic acid assay from a complex biological milieu is attractive but currently difficult and far from routine. In this study, DNA hybridization from serum dilutions into mixed DNA/mercaptoundecanol (MCU) adlayers on gold was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Immobilized DNA probe and hybridized target densities on these surfaces were quantified using 32P-radiometric assays as a function of MCU diluent exposure. SPR surface capture results correlated with radiometric analysis for hybridization performance, demonstrating a maximum DNA hybridization on DNA/MCU mixed adlayers. The maximum target surface capture produced by MCU addition to the DNA probe layer correlates with structural and conformational data on identical mixed DNA/MCU adlayers on gold derived from XPS, NEXAFS, and fluorescence intensity measurements reported in a related study (Lee, C.-Y.; Gong, P.; Harbers, G. M.; Grainger, D. W.; Castner, D. G.; Gamble, L. J. Anal. Chem. 2006, 78, 3316-3325.). MCU addition into the DNA adlayer on gold also improved surface resistance to both nonspecific DNA and serum protein adsorption. Target DNA hybridization from serum dilutions was monitored with SPR on the optimally mixed DNA/MCU adlayers. Both hybridization kinetics and efficiency were strongly affected by nonspecific protein adsorption from a complex milieu even at a minimal serum concentration (e.g., 1%). No target hybridization was detected in SPR assays from serum concentrations above 30%, indicating nonspecific protein adsorption interference of DNA capture and hybridization from complex milieu. Removal of nonsignal proteins from nucleic acid targets prior to assay represents a significant issue for direct sample-to-assay nucleic acid diagnostics from food, blood, tissue, PCR mixtures, and many other biologically complex sample formats. PMID:16689533

  16. Quantum dot monolayer for surface plasmon resonance signal enhancement and DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2016-06-15

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequence specific to chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML). The SPR disk surface has been modified with octadecanethiol self-assembled monolayer followed by deposition of the tri-n-octylphosphine oxide capped cadmium selenide quantum dots (QD) Langmuir monolayer. The deposition is performed via Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. For the sensor chip preparation, covalent immobilization of the thiol-terminated DNA probe sequence (pDNA) using displacement reaction is accomplished. This integrated SPR chip has been used to detect target complementary DNA concentration by monitoring the change in coupling angle via hybridization. It is revealed that this biosensor exhibits high sensitivity (0.7859 m(0)pM(-1)) towards complementary DNA and can be used to detect it in the concentration range, 180 pM to 5 pM with detection limit as 4.21 pM. The results of kinetic studies yield the values of hybridization and dissociation rate constants as 9.6 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and 2.3 × 10(-2) s(-1), respectively, with the equilibrium constant for hybridization as 4.2 × 10(6) M(-1). PMID:26878485

  17. Synthetic Polymer Hybridization with DNA and RNA Directs Nanoparticle Loading, Silencing Delivery, and Aptamer Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhun; Xia, Xin; Bong, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    We report herein discrete triplex hybridization of DNA and RNA with polyacrylates. Length-monodisperse triazine-derivatized polymers were prepared on gram-scale by reversible addition–fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Despite stereoregio backbone heterogeneity, the triazine polymers bind T/U-rich DNA or RNA with nanomolar affinity upon mixing in a 1:1 ratio, as judged by thermal melts, circular dichroism, gel-shift assays, and fluorescence quenching. We call these polyacrylates “bifacial polymer nucleic acids” (bPoNAs). Nucleic acid hybridization with bPoNA enables DNA loading onto polymer nanoparticles, siRNA silencing delivery, and can further serve as an allosteric trigger of RNA aptamer function. Thus, bPoNAs can serve as tools for both non-covalent bioconjugation and structure–function nucleation. It is anticipated that bPoNAs will have utility in both bio- and nanotechnology. PMID:26138550

  18. Synthetic Polymer Hybridization with DNA and RNA Directs Nanoparticle Loading, Silencing Delivery, and Aptamer Function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhun; Xia, Xin; Bong, Dennis

    2015-07-22

    We report herein discrete triplex hybridization of DNA and RNA with polyacrylates. Length-monodisperse triazine-derivatized polymers were prepared on gram-scale by reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Despite stereoregio backbone heterogeneity, the triazine polymers bind T/U-rich DNA or RNA with nanomolar affinity upon mixing in a 1:1 ratio, as judged by thermal melts, circular dichroism, gel-shift assays, and fluorescence quenching. We call these polyacrylates "bifacial polymer nucleic acids" (bPoNAs). Nucleic acid hybridization with bPoNA enables DNA loading onto polymer nanoparticles, siRNA silencing delivery, and can further serve as an allosteric trigger of RNA aptamer function. Thus, bPoNAs can serve as tools for both non-covalent bioconjugation and structure-function nucleation. It is anticipated that bPoNAs will have utility in both bio- and nanotechnology. PMID:26138550

  19. Interpopulation hybridization generates meiotically stable rDNA epigenetic variants in allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus.

    PubMed

    Matyášek, Roman; Dobešová, Eva; Húska, Dalibor; Ježková, Ivana; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Kovařík, Aleš

    2016-02-01

    Uniparental silencing of 35S rRNA genes (rDNA), known as nucleolar dominance (ND), is common in interspecific hybrids. Allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus composed of Tragopogon dubius (d) and Tragopogon porrifolius (p) genomes shows highly variable ND. To examine the molecular basis of such variation, we studied the genetic and epigenetic features of rDNA homeologs in several lines derived from recently and independently formed natural populations. Inbred lines derived from T. mirus with a dominant d-rDNA homeolog transmitted this expression pattern over generations, which may explain why it is prevalent among natural populations. In contrast, lines derived from the p-rDNA dominant progenitor were meiotically unstable, frequently switching to co-dominance. Interpopulation crosses between progenitors displaying reciprocal ND resulted in d-rDNA dominance, indicating immediate suppression of p-homeologs in F1 hybrids. Original p-rDNA dominance was not restored in later generations, even in those segregants that inherited the corresponding parental rDNA genotype, thus indicating the generation of additional p-rDNA and d-rDNA epigenetic variants. Despite preserved intergenic spacer (IGS) structure, they showed altered cytosine methylation and chromatin condensation patterns, and a correlation between expression, hypomethylation of RNA Pol I promoters and chromatin decondensation was apparent. Reversion of such epigenetic variants occurred rarely, resulting in co-dominance maintained in individuals with distinct genotypes. Generally, interpopulation crosses may generate epialleles that are not present in natural populations, underlying epigenetic dynamics in young allopolyploids. We hypothesize that highly expressed variants with distinct IGS features may induce heritable epigenetic reprogramming of the partner rDNA arrays, harmonizing the expression of thousands of genes in allopolyploids. PMID:26711705

  20. Functionalized ensembles of nanoelectrodes as affinity biosensors for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Morena; Fruk, Ljiljana; Ugo, Paolo

    2013-02-15

    A novel electrochemical biosensor for DNA hybridization detection based on nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) is presented. NEEs are prepared by electroless deposition of gold into the pores of a templating track-etched polycarbonate (PC) membrane. The wide surface of the templating membrane surrounding the nanoelectrodes is exploited to bind the capture DNA probes via amide coupling with the carboxylic groups present on the PC surface. The probes are then hybridized with the complementary target labelled with glucose oxidase (GO(x)). The occurrence of the hybridization event is detected by adding, to the supporting electrolyte, excess glucose as the substrate and the (ferrocenylmethyl) trimethylammonium cation (FA(+)) as suitable redox mediator. In the case of positive hybridization, an electrocatalytic current is detected. In the proposed sensor, the biorecognition event and signal transduction occur in different but neighbouring sites, i.e., the PC surface and the nanoelectrodes, respectively; these sites are separated albeit in close proximity on a nanometer scale. Finally, the possibility to activate the PC surface by treatment with permanganate is demonstrated and the analytical performances of biosensors prepared with KMnO(4)-treated NEEs and native NEEs are compared and critically evaluated. The proposed biosensor displays high selectivity and sensitivity, with the capability to detect few picomoles of target DNA. PMID:22898659

  1. DNA Hybridization-Mediated Liposome Fusion at the Aqueous Liquid Crystal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Patrick S.; Mohan, Praveena; Goodwin, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    The prominence of receptor-mediated bilayer fusion in cellular biology motivates development of biomimetic strategies for studying fusogenic mechanisms. An approach is reported here for monitoring receptor-mediated fusion that exploits the unique physical and optical properties of liquid crystals (LC). PEG-functionalized lipids are used to create an interfacial environment capable of inhibiting spontaneous liposome fusion with an aqueous/LC interface. Then, DNA hybridization between oligonucleotides within bulk phase liposomes and a PEG-lipid monolayer at an aqueous/LC interface is exploited to induce receptor-mediated liposome fusion. These hybridization events induce strain within the liposome bilayer, promote lipid mixing with the LC interface, and consequently create an interfacial environment favoring re-orientation of the LC to a homeotropic (perpendicular) state. Furthermore, the bi-functionality of aptamers is exploited to modulate DNA hybridization-mediated liposome fusion by regulating the availability of the appropriate ligand (i.e., thrombin). Here, a LC-based approach for monitoring receptor (i.e., DNA hybridization)-mediated liposome fusion is demonstrated, liposome properties that dictate fusion dynamics are explored, and an example of how this approach may be used in a biosensing scheme is provided. PMID:25506314

  2. Analysis of common mitochondrial DNA mutations by allele-specific oligonucleotide and Southern blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sha; Halberg, Michelle C; Floyd, Kristen C; Wang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. There are a set of recurrent point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that are responsible for common mitochondrial diseases, including MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes), MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers), LHON (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy), NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa), and Leigh syndrome. Most of the pathogenic mtDNA point mutations are present in the heteroplasmic state, meaning that the wild-type and mutant-containing mtDNA molecules are coexisting. Clinical heterogeneity may be due to the degree of mutant load (heteroplasmy) and distribution of heteroplasmic mutations in affected tissues. Additionally, Kearns-Sayre syndrome and Pearson syndrome are caused by large mtDNA deletions. In this chapter, we describe a multiplex PCR/allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization method for the screening of 13 common point mutations. This method allows the detection of low percentage of mutant heteroplasmy. In addition, a nonradioactive Southern blot hybridization protocol for the analysis of mtDNA large deletions is also described. PMID:22215554

  3. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  4. Electronic hybridization detection in microarray format and DNA genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Blin, Antoine; Cissé, Ismaïl; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    We describe an approach to substituting a fluorescence microarray with a surface made of an arrangement of electrolyte-gated field effect transistors. This was achieved using a dedicated blocking of non-specific interactions and comparing threshold voltage shifts of transistors exhibiting probe molecules of different base sequence. We apply the approach to detection of the 35delG mutation, which is related to non-syndromic deafness and is one of the most frequent mutations in humans. The process involves barcode sequences that are generated by Tas-PCR, a newly developed replication reaction using polymerase blocking. The barcodes are recognized by hybridization to surface attached probes and are directly detected by the semiconductor device. PMID:24569823

  5. Electronic hybridization detection in microarray format and DNA genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin, Antoine; Cissé, Ismaïl; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    We describe an approach to substituting a fluorescence microarray with a surface made of an arrangement of electrolyte-gated field effect transistors. This was achieved using a dedicated blocking of non-specific interactions and comparing threshold voltage shifts of transistors exhibiting probe molecules of different base sequence. We apply the approach to detection of the 35delG mutation, which is related to non-syndromic deafness and is one of the most frequent mutations in humans. The process involves barcode sequences that are generated by Tas-PCR, a newly developed replication reaction using polymerase blocking. The barcodes are recognized by hybridization to surface attached probes and are directly detected by the semiconductor device.

  6. Hybrid joint formation in human V(D)J recombination requires nonhomologous DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Sathees C; Tong, Jiangen; Lieber, Michael R

    2006-02-01

    In V(D)J recombination, the RAG proteins bind at a pair of signal sequences adjacent to the V, D, or J coding regions and cleave the DNA, resulting in two signal ends and two hairpinned coding ends. The two coding ends are joined to form a coding joint, and the two signal ends are joined to form a signal joint; this joining is done by the nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) pathway. A recombinational alternative in which a signal end is recombined with a coding end can also occur in a small percentage of the V(D)J recombination events in murine and human cells, and these are called hybrids (or hybrid joints). Two mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of these hybrids. One mechanism is via NHEJ, after initial cutting by RAGs. The second mechanism does not rely on NHEJ, but rather invokes that the RAGs can catalyze joining of the signal to the hairpinned coding end, by using the 3'OH of the signal end as a nucleophile to attack the phosphodiester bonds of the hairpinned coding end. In the present study, we addressed the question of which type of hybrid joining occurs in a physiological environment, where standard V(D)J recombination presumably occurs and normal RAG proteins are endogenously expressed. We find that all hybrids in vivo require DNA ligase IV in human cells, which is the final component of the NHEJ pathway. Hence, hybrid joints rely on NHEJ rather than on the RAG complex for joining. PMID:16275127

  7. Demonstration of paternal inheritance of plastids in Picea (Pinaceae). [Hybridization of cloned, sup 32 -P labeled, petunia cpDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, M.

    1988-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) was purified from Picea glauca, P. pungens, P. engelmannii, and P. omorika, and was digested with several restriction endonucleases. Interspecific restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of cpDNA were identified. The RFLPs were identified as cpDNA by the hybridization of cloned, {sup 32}-P labeled, petunia cpDNA to the polymorphic bands, and by the lack of hybridization of a cloned and labeled mtDNA probe from maize. Chloroplast DNA RFLPs that showed no intraspecific variation when examined across the natural range for each species, were used as markers to follow the inheritance of plastids in interspecific hybrids. The inheritance of plastids was determined for F{sub 1}-hybrids from reciprocal crosses of P. glauca and P. pungens, P. glauca and P. omorika, and F{sub 1}-hybrids of P. engelmannii x pungens. All 31 F{sub 1}-hybrids examined showed the cpDNA genotypes of the pollen parent, or the paternal species.

  8. A supramolecular nanobiological hybrid as a PET sensor for bacterial DNA isolated from Streptomyces sanglieri.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Sudesna; Saikia, Dilip; Sharma, Priyanka; Adhikary, Nirab Chandra; Thakur, Debajit; Sen Sarma, Neelotpal

    2014-12-21

    The development of a rapid, label free, cost effective and highly efficient sensor for DNA detection is of great importance in disease diagnosis. Herein, we have reported a new hybrid fluorescent probe based on a cationic curcumin-tryptophan complex and water soluble mercapto succinic acid (MSA) capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of double stranded DNA (ds DNA) molecules. The cationic curcumin-tryptophan complex (CT) directly interacts with negatively charged MSA capped quantum dots via electrostatic coordination, resulting in photoluminescence (PL) quenching of QDs via the Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET) process. Further, addition of ds DNA results in restoration of PL, as CT would intercalate between DNA strands. Thus, this process can be utilized for selective sensing of ds DNA via fluorescence measurements. Under optimized experimental conditions, the PL quenching efficiency of QDs is found to be 99.4% in the presence of 0.31 × 10(-9) M CT. Interestingly, the regain in PL intensity of QD-CT is found to be 99.28% in the presence of 1 × 10(-8) M ds DNA. The detection limit for ds DNA with the developed sensing probe is 1.4 × 10(-10) M. Furthermore, the probe is found to be highly sensitive towards bacterial DNA isolated from Streptomyces sanglieri with a detection limit of 1.7 × 10(-6) M. The present work will provide a new insight into preparation of bio-inspired hybrid materials as efficient sensors for disease diagnosis and agricultural development. PMID:25343270

  9. Label-free field-effect-based single-molecule detection of DNA hybridization kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Sorgenfrei, Sebastian; Chiu, Chien-yang; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Philip; Nuckolls, Colin; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    Probing biomolecules at the single-molecule level can provide useful information about molecular interactions, kinetics and motions that is usually hidden in ensemble measurements. Techniques with improved sensitivity and time resolution are required to explore fast biomolecular dynamics. Here, we report the first observation of DNA hybridization at the single-molecule level using a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. By covalently attaching a single-stranded probe DNA sequence to a point defect in a carbon nanotube, we are able to measure two-level fluctuations in the nanotube conductance due to reversible hybridizing and melting of a complementary DNA target. The kinetics are studied as a function of temperature, allowing the measurement of rate constants, melting curves and activation energies for different sequences and target concentrations. The kinetics show non-Arrhenius behavior, in agreement with DNA hybridization experiments using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This technique is label-free and has the potential for studying single-molecule dynamics at sub-microsecond time-scales. PMID:21258331

  10. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels via peptide nucleic acid (PNA)/DNA complexation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Te-Wei; Feng, Jiayue; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-12-28

    This work presents a new concept in hybrid hydrogel design. Synthetic water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) polymers grafted with multiple peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are crosslinked upon addition of the linker DNA. The self-assembly is mediated by the PNA-DNA complexation, which results in the formation of hydrophilic polymer networks. We show that the hydrogels can be produced through two different types of complexations. Type I hydrogel is formed via the PNA/DNA double-helix hybridization. Type II hydrogel utilizes a unique "P-form" oligonucleotide triple-helix that comprises two PNA sequences and one DNA. Microrheology studies confirm the respective gelation processes and disclose a higher critical gelation concentration for the type I gel when compared to the type II design. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the interconnected microporous structure of both types of hydrogels. Type I double-helix hydrogel exhibits larger pore sizes than type II triple-helix gel. The latter apparently contains denser structure and displays greater elasticity as well. The designed hybrid hydrogels have potential as novel biomaterials for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:26394062

  11. A hybrid swarm population of Pinus densiflora x P. sylvestris hybrids inferred from sequence analysis of chloroplast DNA and morphological characters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To confirm a hybrid swarm population of Pinus densiflora × P. sylvestris in Jilin, China and to study whether shoot apex morphology of 4-year old seedlings can be correlated with the sequence of a chloroplast DNA simple sequence repeat marker (cpDNA SSR), needles and seeds from P. densiflora, P. syl...

  12. Mechanism and manipulation of DNA:RNA hybrid G-quadruplex formation in transcription of G-rich DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-yu; Zheng, Ke-wei; Xiao, Shan; Hao, Yu-hua; Tan, Zheng

    2014-01-29

    We recently reported that a DNA:RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (HQ) forms during transcription of DNA that bears two or more tandem guanine tracts (G-tract) on the nontemplate strand. Putative HQ-forming sequences are enriched in the nearby 1000 nt region right downstream of transcription start sites in the nontemplate strand of warm-blooded animals, and HQ regulates transcription under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, knowledge of the mechanism of HQ formation is important for understanding the biological function of HQ as well as for manipulating gene expression by targeting HQ. In this work, we studied the mechanism of HQ formation using an in vitro T7 transcription model. We show that RNA synthesis initially produces an R-loop, a DNA:RNA heteroduplex formed by a nascent RNA transcript and the template DNA strand. In the following round of transcription, the RNA in the R-loop is displaced, releasing the RNA in single-stranded form (ssRNA). Then the G-tracts in the RNA can jointly form HQ with those in the nontemplate DNA strand. We demonstrate that the structural cascade R-loop → ssRNA → HQ offers opportunities to intercept HQ formation, which may provide a potential method to manipulate gene expression. PMID:24392825

  13. An upconversion fluorescent resonant energy transfer biosensor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Lu, Feng; Wu, Xing-Cai; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-11-21

    A novel fluorescent resonant energy transfer (FRET) biosensor was fabricated for the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA using poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) modified upconversion nanoparticles (NH2-UCNPs) as energy donor and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as acceptor. The PEI modified upconversion nanoparticles were prepared directly with a simple one-pot hydrothermal method, which provides high quality amino-group functionalized UCNPs with uniform morphology and strong upconversion luminescence. Two single-stranded DNA strands, which were partially complementary to each other, were then conjugated with NH2-UCNPs and Au NPs. When DNA conjugated NH2-UCNPs and Au NPs are mixed together, the hybridization between complementary DNA sequences on UCNPs and Au NPs will lead to the quenching of the upconversion luminescence due to the FRET process. Meanwhile, upon the addition of target DNA, Au NPs will leave the surface of the UCNPs and the upconversion luminescence can be restored because of the formation of the more stable double-stranded DNA on the UCNPs. The sensor we fabricated here for target DNA detection shows good sensitivity and high selectivity, which has the potential for clinical applications in the analysis of HBV and other DNA sequences. PMID:26421323

  14. Sensitive electrochemical assaying of DNA methyltransferase activity based on mimic-hybridization chain reaction amplified strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linqun; Liu, Yuanjian; Li, Ying; Zhao, Yuewu; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2016-08-24

    A mimic-hybridization chain reaction (mimic-HCR) amplified strategy was proposed for sensitive electrochemically detection of DNA methylation and methyltransferase (MTase) activity In the presence of methylated DNA, DNA-gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuNPs) were captured on the electrode by sandwich-type assembly. It then triggered mimic-HCR of two hairpin probes to produce many long double-helix chains for numerous hexaammineruthenium (III) chloride ([Ru(NH3)6](3+), RuHex) inserting. As a result, the signal for electrochemically detection of DNA MTase activity could be amplified. If DNA was non-methylated, however, the sandwich-type assembly would not form because the short double-stranded DNAs (dsDNA) on the Au electrode could be cleaved and digested by restriction endonuclease HpaII (HapII) and exonuclease III (Exo III), resulting in the signal decrement. Based on this, an electrochemical approach for detection of M.SssI MTase activity with high sensitivity was developed. The linear range for M.SssI MTase activity was from 0.05 U mL(-1) to 10 U mL(-1), with a detection limit down to 0.03 U mL(-1). Moreover, this detecting strategy held great promise as an easy-to-use and highly sensitive method for other MTase activity and inhibition detection by exchanging the corresponding DNA sequence. PMID:27496999

  15. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Ryan C.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes—a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  16. DNA hybridization as a guide to phylogeny: chemical and physical limits.

    PubMed

    Schmid, C W; Marks, J

    1990-03-01

    The technique of forming interspecific DNA heteroduplexes and estimating phylogenetic distances from the depression in their duplex melting temperature has several physical and chemical constraints. These constraints determine the maximum phylogenetic distance that may be estimated by this technique and the most appropriate method of analyzing that distance. Melting curves of self-renatured single copy primate DNAs reveal the presence of components absent from the renaturation products of exactly paired sequences. This observation, which confirms existing literature, challenges a fundamental assumption: that orthologous (i.e., corresponding) DNA sequences in the divergent species are being compared in DNA heteroduplex melting experiments. As a model system, the thermal stabilities of heteroduplexes formed between a human alpha-globin cDNA and four alpha-like globin genes isolated from chimpanzee are qualitatively compared. The results of this comparison show that the cross-hybrids of imperfectly matched gene duplicates from divergent species can contribute to the additional components that are present in renatured single copy DNAs. Single copy DNA, as usually defined, includes sequence duplicates that will obscure phylogenetic comparisons in a mass hybridization of genomes. PMID:2109086

  17. Quantum Dot-Bead-DNA Probe-Based Hybridization Fluorescence Assays on Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-10-01

    The development of chip-based, quantum dot (QD)-bead-DNA conjugate probes for hybridization detection is a prime research focus in the field of microfluidics. QD-Bead-DNA probe-based hybridization detection methods are often called "bead-based assays," and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capabilities of microfluidic technology. Met was identified as a prognostic marker in different cancers including lung, renal, liver, head and neck, stomach, and breast. In this report, the cancer causing Met gene was detected with QDs attached to polystyrene microbeads. We constructed a microfluidic platform using a flexible PDMS polymer. The chip consists of two channels, with two inlets and two outlets. The two channels were integrated with QD-bead-DNA probes for simultaneous detection of wild type target DNA and mutant DNA, containing three nucleotide changes compared to the wild type sequence. The fluorescence quenching ability of QDs within the channels of microfluidic chips were compared for both DNAs. PMID:26726440

  18. Improvement of DNA recognition through molecular imprinting: hybrid oligomer imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs).

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, H; Poma, A; Pendergraff, H M; Watts, J K; Turner, N W

    2016-02-01

    High affinity and specific binding are cardinal properties of nucleic acids in relation to their biological function and their role in biotechnology. To this end, structural preorganization of oligonucleotides can significantly improve their binding performance, and numerous examples of this can be found in Nature as well as in artificial systems. Here we describe the production and characterization of hybrid DNA-polymer nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs) as a system in which we have preorganized the oligonucleotide binding by molecular imprinting technology. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are cost-effective "smart" polymeric materials capable of antibody-like detection, but characterized by superior robustness and the ability to work in extreme environmental conditions. Especially in the nanoparticle format, MIPs are dubbed as one of the most suitable alternatives to biological antibodies due to their selective molecular recognition properties, improved binding kinetics as well as size and dispersibility. Nonetheless, there have been very few attempts at DNA imprinting in the past due to structural complexity associated with these templates. By introducing modified thymine bases into the oligonucleotide sequences, which allow establishing covalent bonds between the DNA and the polymer, we demonstrate that such hybrid oligoMIP NPs specifically recognize their target DNA, and that the unique strategy of incorporating the complementary DNA strands as "preorganized selective monomers" improves the recognition properties without affecting the NPs physical properties such as size, shape or dispersibility. PMID:26509192

  19. Electrostatics of DNA nucleotide-carbon nanotube hybrids evaluated from QM:MM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehel Amirani, Morteza; Tang, Tian

    2015-11-01

    Biomolecule-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied vastly in recent years due to their potential applications for instance in cancer detection, purification and separation of CNTs, and nanoelectronics. Studying the electrostatic potential generated by a biomolecule-CNT hybrid is important in predicting its interactions with the surrounding environment such as charged particles and surfaces. In this paper, we performed atomistic simulations using a QM:MM approach to evaluate the electrostatic potential and charge transfer for a hybrid structure formed by a DNA nucleotide and a CNT in solution. Four types of DNA nucleotides and two CNTs with chiralities of (4,4) and (7,0) were considered. The types of nucleotides and CNTs were both found to play important roles in the electrostatic potential and charge transfer of the hybrid. At the same distance from the CNT axis, the electrostatic potential for the nucleotide-(4,4) CNT hybrids was found to be stronger compared with that for the nucleotide-(7,0) CNT hybrids. Higher electric charge was also shown to be transferred from the DNA nucleotides to the (7,0) CNT compared with the (4,4) CNT. These results correlate with the previous finding that the nucleotides bound more tightly to the (7,0) CNT compared with the (4,4) CNT.Biomolecule-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied vastly in recent years due to their potential applications for instance in cancer detection, purification and separation of CNTs, and nanoelectronics. Studying the electrostatic potential generated by a biomolecule-CNT hybrid is important in predicting its interactions with the surrounding environment such as charged particles and surfaces. In this paper, we performed atomistic simulations using a QM:MM approach to evaluate the electrostatic potential and charge transfer for a hybrid structure formed by a DNA nucleotide and a CNT in solution. Four types of DNA nucleotides and two CNTs with chiralities of (4,4) and (7

  20. Hybrid Pathogen DNA Detector:Users? Manual v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Schikora, B; Hietala, S; Shi, L; Lee, L; Skowronski, E; Ardans, A

    2004-01-12

    The Hybrid Unit uses an advanced fluidic design to move very small reagent samples through many unit operations to complete complex molecular biology experiments. The primary use of this machine is to analyze a small liquid sample for the highly specific presence of select agents known to be used in bio-warfare. The Hybrid Unit is coupled with a Luminex bead detection unit for the multiplexing of many assays in one tube. Because of this, multiple controls can be included in each run to avoid false positives. The built-in flow through PCR unit amplifies specific DNA signatures and increases sensitivity, thereby limiting exposure of handlers to highly concentrated (and potentially hazardous, spore containing) sample volumes. The reproducible precision of the Hybrid Unit also gives confidence when a signal is given that detects an agent in a given sample.

  1. DNA hybridization assay for detection of nucleopolyhedrovirus in whitemarked tussock moth (Orgyia leucostigma) larvae.

    PubMed

    Ebling, P M; Smith, P A; van Frankenhuyzen, K

    2001-01-01

    DNA dot-blot hybridization assays utilizing a horseradish peroxidase-labelled whole genomic DNA probe and enhanced chemiluminescence were conducted to quantify detection thresholds of nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) in whitemarked tussock moth (Orgyia leucostigma) larvae. The minimum detection thresholds for an aqueous suspension of occlusion bodies (OBs), OBs added to macerates of non-infected larvae and OBs in macerates of diseased larvae were 7.8 x 10(3), 7.8 x 10(3), and 1.5 x 10(3) OBs, respectively. Purified viral DNA was detected at a concentration of 1.6 x 10(-1) ng in a 20 microliters volume. The presence of pre-occluded viral nucleocapsids and DNA, inherent to infected larvae, improved the detection threshold five-fold compared with OBs alone. Larval tissues did not block the detection system utilized, nor did they bind non-specifically to the probe. Detection thresholds, upon sequential hybridization of the same membrane, on average deteriorated two-fold between the first and second hybridization and an additional six-fold between the second and third hybridization. NPV infection was detected two days post-inoculation (pi) in about one-third of the larvae examined and in almost all larvae three days pi. Microscopic analysis of stained larval smears missed NPV infection in almost all larvae two days pi and about two-thirds of the larvae three days pi. Results from the two methods of analysis were not comparable until four days pi. The detection system utilized is a reliable, efficient and simple method for the early detection of NPV infection in large numbers of larvae and may be used for further studies quantifying the role of this baculovirus in the ecology of whitemarked tussock moth populations. PMID:11455634

  2. Three-Dimensional Control of DNA Hybridization by Orthogonal Two-Color Two-Photon Uncaging.

    PubMed

    Fichte, Manuela A H; Weyel, Xenia M M; Junek, Stephan; Schäfer, Florian; Herbivo, Cyril; Goeldner, Maurice; Specht, Alexandre; Wachtveitl, Josef; Heckel, Alexander

    2016-07-25

    We successfully introduced two-photon-sensitive photolabile groups ([7-(diethylamino)coumarin-4-yl]methyl and p-dialkylaminonitrobiphenyl) into DNA strands and demonstrated their suitability for three-dimensional photorelease. To visualize the uncaging, we used a fluorescence readout based on double-strand displacement in a hydrogel and in neurons. Orthogonal two-photon uncaging of the two cages is possible, thus enabling complex scenarios of three-dimensional control of hybridization with light. PMID:27294300

  3. Novel electrochemical DNA hybridization biosensors for selective determination of silver ions.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Maryam; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Ojani, Reza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, novel electrochemical biosensors for Ag(+) determination based on Ag(+)-induced DNA hybridization, using Ethyl green (EG) as an electroactive label on the surface of bare carbon paste electrode (CPE) and gold nanoparticles-modified carbon paste electrode (GN-CPE) are reported. Two single-strand poly-C (100% cytosine bases) DNAs are used as oligonucleotide probe and target. In the presence of Ag(+), the target DNA with full cytosine-cytosine (C-C) mismatches could hybridize with the probe DNA by forming C-Ag(+)-C complex. The induced hybridization of the two oligonucleotides leads to the decrease in the reduction peak currents of EG, which could be used for electrochemical determination of Ag(+). This difference in the values of the reduction peak current of EG before and after DNA hybridization (∆I) was linear with the concentration of Ag(+) in the ranges from 3.0×10(-10) to 1.0×10(-9) mol L(-1) and 9.0×10(-11) to 1.0×10(-9) mol L(-1), for the biosensor and nanoparticles modified-biosensor, respectively. Calculated detection limits were 1.04×10(-10) and 2.64×10(-11) mol L(-1) for biosensor and nanoparticles modified-biosensor, respectively. The biosensors demonstrated good selectivity towards Ag(+) ions in the presence of some metal ions such as Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) and Hg(2+). The proposed biosensors were applied successfully to the voltammetric determination of Ag(+) in real samples. PMID:26452869

  4. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors.The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide

  5. Fabrication of Uniform DNA-Conjugated Hydrogel Microparticles via Replica Molding for Facile Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Christina L.; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-01-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection. PMID:20527819

  6. Fabrication of uniform DNA-conjugated hydrogel microparticles via replica molding for facile nucleic acid hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christina L; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-07-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of the probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined, these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high-capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high-throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection. PMID:20527819

  7. Method for isolating chromosomal DNA in preparation for hybridization in suspension

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. Chromosomal DNA in a sample containing cell debris is prepared for hybridization in suspension by treating the mixture with RNase. The treated DNA can also be fixed prior to hybridization.

  8. Synergistic effects of epoxy- and amine-silanes on microarray DNA immobilization and hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Sung-Kay; Hsu, Mandy; Ku, Wei-Chi; Tu, Ching-Yu; Tseng, Yu-Tien; Lau, Wai-Kwan; Yan, Rong-Yih; Ma, Jing-Tyan; Tzeng, Chi-Meng

    2003-01-01

    Most microarray slides are manufactured or coated with a layer of poly(L-lysine) or with silanes with different chemical functional groups, for the attachment of nucleic acids on to their surfaces. The efficiency with which nucleic acids bind to these surfaces is not high, because they can be washed away, especially in the case of spotting oligonucleotides. In view of this, we have developed a method to increase the binding capacity and efficiency of hybridization of DNA on to derivatized glass surfaces. This makes use of the synergistic effect of two binding interactions between the nucleic acids and the coating chemicals on the surface of the glass slides. The enhanced binding allows the nucleic acids to be bound tightly and to survive stringency washes. When immobilized, DNA exhibits a higher propensity for hybridization on the surface than on slides with only one binding chemical. By varying the silane concentrations, we have shown that maximal DNA oligonucleotide binding on glass surfaces occurs when the percentage composition of both of the surface-coating chemicals falls to 0.2%, which is different from that on binding PCR products. This new mixture-combination approach for nucleic-acid binding allows signals from immobilization and hybridization to have higher signal-to-noise ratios than for other silane-coated methods. PMID:12809552

  9. DNA-based hybridization chain reaction amplification for assaying the effect of environmental phenolic hormone on DNA methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenning; Yin, Huanshun; Han, Yunxiang; Zhou, Yunlei; Ai, Shiyun

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a novel electrochemical protocol with signal amplification for determination of DNA methylation and methyltransferase activity using DNA-based hybridization chain reaction (HCR) was proposed. After the gold electrode was modified with dsDNA, it was treated with M.SssI MTase, HpaII endonuclease, respectively. And then the HCR was initiated by the target DNA and two hairpin helper DNAs, which lead to the formation of extended dsDNA polymers on the electrode surface. The signal was amplified by the labeled biotin on the hairpin probes. As a result, the streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase (S-ALP) conjugated on the electrode surface through the specific interaction between biotin and S-ALP. ALP could convert 1-naphthyl phosphate into 1-naphthol and the latter could be electrochemically oxidized, which was used to monitor the methylation event and MTase activity. The HCR assay presents good electrochemical responses for the determination of M.SssI MTase at a concentration as low as 0.0067 uni tmL(-1). Moreover, the effects of anti-cancer drug and environmental phenolic hormone on M.SssI MTase activity were also investigated. The results indicated that 5-fluorouracil and daunorubicin hydrochloride could inhibit the activity, and the opposite results were obtained with bisphenol A and nonylphenol. Therefore, this method can not only provide a platform to screen the inhibitors of DNA MTase and develop new anticancer drugs, but also offer a novel technique to investigate the possible carcinogenesis mechanism. PMID:24856396

  10. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing. PMID:27534818

  11. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing. PMID:27534818

  12. Sentaurus® based modeling and simulation for GFET's characteristic for ssDNA immobilization and hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunfang, Jia; Cheng, Ju

    2016-01-01

    The graphene field effect transistor (GFET) has been widely studied and developed as sensors and functional devices. The first report about GFET sensing simulation on the device level is proposed. The GFET's characteristics, its responding for single strand DNA (ssDNA) and hybridization with the complimentary DNA (cDNA) are simulated based on Sentaurus, a popular CAD tool for electronic devices. The agreement between the simulated blank GFET feature and the reported experimental data suggests the feasibility of the presented simulation method. Then the simulations of ssDNA immobilization on GFET and hybridization with its cDNA are performed, the results are discussed based on the electron transfer (ET) mechanism between DNA and graphene. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61371028) and the Tianjin Natural Science Foundation (No. 12JCZDJC22400).

  13. Synthesis of eight-arm, branched oligonucleotide hybrids and studies on the limits of DNA-driven assembly.

    PubMed

    Schwenger, Alexander; Gerlach, Claudia; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2014-12-01

    Oligonucleotide hybrids with organic cores as rigid branching elements and four or six CG dimer strands have been shown to form porous materials from dilute aqueous solution. In order to explore the limits of this form of DNA-driven assembly, we prepared hybrids with three or eight DNA arms via solution-phase syntheses, using H-phosphonates of protected dinucleoside phosphates. This included the synthesis of (CG)8TREA, where TREA stands for the tetrakis[4-(resorcin-5-ylethynyl)phenyl]adamantane core. The ability of the new compounds to assemble in a DNA-driven fashion was studied by UV-melting analysis and NMR, using hybrids with self-complementary CG zipper arms or non-self-complementary TC dimer arms. The three-arm hybrid failed to form a material under conditions where four-arm hybrids did so. Further, the assembly of TREA hybrids appears to be dominated by hydrophobic interactions, not base pairing of the DNA arms. These results help in the design of materials forming by multivalent DNA-DNA interactions. PMID:25407332

  14. Methylation interactions in Arabidopsis hybrids require RNA-directed DNA methylation and are influenced by genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Dong; Lang, Zhaobo; He, Li; Yang, Lan; Zeng, Liang; Li, Yanqiang; Zhao, Cheng; Huang, Huan; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Huiming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-07-19

    DNA methylation is a conserved epigenetic mark in plants and many animals. How parental alleles interact in progeny to influence the epigenome is poorly understood. We analyzed the DNA methylomes of Arabidopsis Col and C24 ecotypes, and their hybrid progeny. Hybrids displayed nonadditive DNA methylation levels, termed methylation interactions, throughout the genome. Approximately 2,500 methylation interactions occurred at regions where parental DNA methylation levels are similar, whereas almost 1,000 were at differentially methylated regions in parents. Methylation interactions were characterized by an abundance of 24-nt small interfering RNAs. Furthermore, dysfunction of the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway abolished methylation interactions but did not affect the increased biomass observed in hybrid progeny. Methylation interactions correlated with altered genetic variation within the genome, suggesting that they may play a role in genome evolution. PMID:27382183

  15. Rotating rod renewable microcolumns for automated, solid-phase DNA hybridization studies.

    PubMed

    Bruckner-Lea, C J; Stottlemyre, M S; Holman, D A; Grate, J W; Brockman, F J; Chandler, D P

    2000-09-01

    The development of a new temperature-controlled renewable microcolumn flow cell for solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization in an automated sequential injection system is described. The flow cell included a stepper motor-driven rotating rod with the working end cut to a 45 degrees angle. In one position, the end of the rod prevented passage of microbeads while allowing fluid flow; rotation of the rod by 180 degrees releases the beads. This system was used to rapidly test many hybridization and elution protocols to examine the temperature and solution conditions required for sequence-specific nucleic acid hybridization. Target nucleic acids labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye were detected immediately postcolumn during all column perfusion and elution steps using a flow-through fluorescence detector. Temperature control of the column and the presence of Triton X-100 surfactant were critical for specific hybridization. Perfusion of the column with complementary oligonucleotide (200 microL, 10 nM) resulted in hybridization with 8% of the DNA binding sites on the microbeads with a solution residence time of less than 1 s and a total sample perfusion time of 40 s. The use of the renewable column system for detection of an unlabeled PCR product in a sandwich assay was also demonstrated. PMID:10994975

  16. Development of an electrochemical biosensor methods based on acrylic microsphere for the determination of Arowana DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Heng, Lee Yook; Futra, Dedi; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2015-09-01

    An electrochemical method of Arowana DNA determination based of N-acrylosuccinimide (NAS) modified acrylic microsphere was fabricated. Hydrophobic succinimide functional group containing poly(n-butylacrylate-N-acryloxysuccinimide) microspheres were synthesized with a simple one-step photopolymerization pocedure. Aminated DNA probe was covalently bonded to the succinimde functional group of the acrylic microspheres. The hybridization of the immobilized DNA probe with the complementary DNA was determined by the differential pulse voltametry using anthraquninone-2-sulfonic acid monohydrate sodium salt (AQMS) as the electroactive hybridization label. The influences of many factors such as duration of DNA probe immobilization and hybridization, operational temperature and non-complementary DNA on the biosensor performance were evaluated. Under optimized conditions, the DNA microbiosensor demonstrated a wide linear response range to target DNA is 1.0 × 10-16 and 1.0 × 10-8 M with a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 9.46 × 10-17 M (R2 = 0.99) were calculated. This biosensor had improved the overall analytical performance of the resultant DNA microbiosensor when compared with other reported DNA biosensors using other nano-materials for membranes and microspheres as DNA immobilization matrices.

  17. Chromosomal assignment of human DNA fingerprint sequences by simultaneous hybridization to arbitrarily primed PCR products from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Jun; Sekiya, Takao; Navarro, J.M.

    1996-05-15

    We have developed a technique for the simultaneous chromosomal assignment of multiple human DNA sequences from DNA fingerprints obtained by the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Radioactively labeled human AP-PCR products are hybridized to DNA fingerprints generated with the same arbitrary primer from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids after electroblotting to a nylong membrane. Human-specific hybridization bands in the human/rodent fingerprints unambiguously determine their chromosome of origin. We named this method simultaneous hybridization of arbitrarily primed PCR DNA fingerprinting products (SHARP). Using this approach, we determined the chromosomal origins of most major bands of human AP-PCR fingerprints obtained with two arbitrary primers. Altogether, the chromosomal localization of near 50 DNA fragments, comprehensive of all human chromosomes except chromosomes 21 and Y, was achieved in this simple manner. Chromosome assignment of fingerprint bands is essential for molecular karyotyping of cancer by AP-PCR DNA fingerprinting. The SHARP method provides a convenient and powerful tool for this purpose. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Thiazole Orange Dimers in DNA: Fluorescent Base Substitutions with Hybridization Readout.

    PubMed

    Berndl, Sina; Dimitrov, Stoichko D; Menacher, Florian; Fiebig, Torsten; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2016-02-12

    By using (S)-2-amino-1,3-propanediol as a linker, thiazole orange (TO) was incorporated in a dimeric form into DNA. The green fluorescence (λ=530 nm) of the intrastrand TO dimer is quenched, whereas the interstrand TO dimer shows a characteristic redshifted orange emission (λ=585 nm). Steady-state optical spectroscopic methods reveal that the TO dimer fluorescence is independent of the sequential base contexts. Time-resolved pump-probe measurements and excitation spectra reveal the coexistence of conformations, including mainly stacked TO dimers and partially unstacked ones, which yield exciton and excimer contributions to the fluorescence, respectively. The helicity of the DNA framework distorts the excitonic coupling. In particular, the interstrand TO dimer could be regarded as an excitonically interacting base pair with fluorescence readout for DNA hybridization. Finally, the use of this fluorescent readout was representatively demonstrated in molecular beacons. PMID:26773846

  19. rDNA genetic imbalance and nucleolar chromatin restructuring is induced by distant hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra.

    PubMed

    Long, Hong; Chen, Chunli; Wang, Bing; Feng, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs) in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins. PMID:25723542

  20. Coarse-grained simulation study of sequence effects on DNA hybridization in a concentrated environment.

    PubMed

    Markegard, Cade B; Fu, Iris W; Reddy, K Anki; Nguyen, Hung D

    2015-02-01

    A novel coarse-grained model is developed to elucidate thermodynamics and kinetic mechanisms of DNA self-assembly. It accounts for sequence and solvent conditions to capture key experimental results such as sequence-dependent thermal property and salt-dependent persistence length of ssDNA and dsDNA. Moreover, constant-temperature simulations on two single strands of a homogeneous sequence show two main mechanisms of hybridization: a slow slithering mechanism and a one-order faster zippering mechanism. Furthermore, large-scale simulations at a high DNA strand concentration demonstrate that DNA self-assembly is a robust and enthalpically driven process in which the formation of double helices is deciphered to occur via multiple self-assembly pathways including the strand displacement mechanism. However, sequence plays an important role in shifting the majority of one pathway over the others and controlling size distribution of self-assembled aggregates. This study yields a complex picture on the role of sequence on programmable self-assembly and demonstrates a promising simulation tool that is suitable for studies in DNA nanotechnology. PMID:25581253

  1. A novel hybrid single molecule approach reveals spontaneous DNA motion in the nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sijie; Falk, Samantha J.; Black, Ben E.; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Structural dynamics of nucleic acid and protein is an important physical basis of their functions. These motions are often very difficult to synchronize and too fast to be clearly resolved with the currently available single molecule methods. Here we demonstrate a novel hybrid single molecule approach combining stochastic data analysis with fluorescence correlation that enables investigations of sub-ms unsynchronized structural dynamics of macromolecules. Based on the method, we report the first direct evidence of spontaneous DNA motions at the nucleosome termini. The nucleosome, comprising DNA and a histone core, is the fundamental packing unit of eukaryotic genes that must be accessed during various genome transactions. Spontaneous DNA opening at the nucleosome termini has long been hypothesized to enable gene access in the nucleosome, but has yet to be directly observed. Our approach reveals that DNA termini in the nucleosome open and close repeatedly at 0.1–1 ms−1. The kinetics depends on salt concentration and DNA–histone interactions but not much on DNA sequence, suggesting that this dynamics is universal and imposes the kinetic limit to gene access. These results clearly demonstrate that our method provides an efficient and robust means to investigate unsynchronized structural changes of DNA at a sub-ms time resolution. PMID:26013809

  2. Genetic relatedness of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) hybrids using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Sharaf-Eldin, M A; Al-Tamimi, A; Alam, P; Elkholy, S F; Jordan, J R

    2015-01-01

    The artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) is an important food and medicinal crop that is cultivated in Mediterranean countries. Morphological characteristics, such as head shape and diameter, leaf shape, and bract shape, are mainly affected by environmental conditions. A molecular marker approach was used to analyze the degree of polymorphism between artichoke hybrid lines. The degree of genetic difference among three artichoke hybrids was evaluated using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR). In this study, the DNA fingerprints of three artichoke lines (A13-010, A11-018, and A12-179) were generated, and a total of 10 decamer primers were applied for RAPD-PCR analyses. Polymorphism  (16.66 to 62.50%) was identified using eight arbitrary decamers and total genomic DNA extracted from the hybrids. Of the 59 loci detected, there were 25 polymorphic and 34 monomorphic loci. Jaccard's similarity index (JSI) ranged between 1.0 and 0.84. Based on the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) similarity matrix and dendrogram, the results indicated that two hybrids (A13-010 and A11-018) were closely related to each other, and the A12-179 line showed more divergence. When identifying correct accessions, consideration of the genetic variation and genetic relationships among the genotypes are required. The RAPD-PCR fingerprinting of artichoke lines clearly showed that it is possible to analyze the RAPD patterns for correlation between genetic means and differences or resemblance between close accessions (A13-010 and A11- 018) at the genomic level. PMID:26782491

  3. DNA aptamer release from the DNA-SWNT hybrid by protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang-Hyuk; Jung, Seungwon; Bae, Jaehyun; Kim, Gunn; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-02-14

    Here we show the formation of the complex between a DNA aptamer and a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and its reaction with its target protein. The aptamer, which is specifically bound with thrombin, the target protein in this study, easily wraps and disperses the SWNT by noncovalent π-π stacking. PMID:26763942

  4. Fabrication of DNA/RNA Hybrids Through Sequence-Specific Scission of Both Strands by pcPNA-S1 Nuclease Combination.

    PubMed

    Futai, Kazuki; Sumaoka, Jun; Komiyama, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    By combining two strands of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acid (pcPNA) with S1 nuclease, a tool for site-selective and dual-strand scission of DNA/RNA hybrids has been developed. Both of the DNA and the RNA strands in the hybrids are hydrolyzed at desired sites to provide unique sticky ends. The scission fragments are directly ligated with other DNA/RNA hybrids by using T4 DNA ligase, resulting in the formation of desired recombinant DNA/RNA hybrids. PMID:27057646

  5. DNA hybridization-induced reorientation of liquid crystal anchoring at the nematic liquid crystal/aqueous interface.

    PubMed

    Price, Andrew D; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2008-07-01

    Interactions between DNA and an adsorbed cationic surfactant at the nematic liquid crystal (LC)/aqueous interface were investigated using polarized and fluorescence microscopy. The adsorption of octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTAB) surfactant to the LC/aqueous interface resulted in homeotropic (untilted) LC alignment. Subsequent adsorption of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to the surfactant-laden interface modified the interfacial structure, resulting in a reorientation of the LC from homeotropic alignment to an intermediate tilt angle. Exposure of the ssDNA/OTAB interfacial complex to its ssDNA complement induced a second change in the interfacial structure characterized by the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of lateral regions that induced homeotropic LC alignment. Fluorescence microscopy showed explicitly that the complement was colocalized in the same regions as the homeotropic domains. Exposure to noncomplementary ssDNA caused no such response, suggesting that the homeotropic regions were due to DNA hybridization. This hybridization occurred in the vicinity of the interface despite the fact that the conditions in bulk solution were such that hybridization did not occur (high stringency), suggesting that the presence of the cationic surfactant neutralized electrostatic repulsion and allowed for hydrogen bonding between DNA complements. This system has potential for label-less and portable DNA detection. Indeed, LC response to ssDNA target was detected with a lower limit of approximately 50 fmol of complement and was sufficiently selective to differentiate a one-base-pair mismatch in a 16-mer target. PMID:18528984

  6. Quantitative genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization on DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Andreas M; Ballvora, Agim; Matzner, Ulrich; Klemm, Manfred; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2005-08-01

    Genotyping of SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) has challenged the development of several novel techniques. Most of these methods have been introduced to discriminate binary SNPs in diploid species. In the present study, the quantitative genotyping of SNPs in natural DNA pools of a polyploid organism via DNA microarrays was analysed. Three randomly selected SNP loci were genotyped in the tetraploid species potato (Solanum tuberosum). For each SNP, 24 oligomers were designed, 12 with forward and 12 with reverse orientation. They contained the polymorphic site at one of the positions 11, 14 and 17. Several steps of optimizations were performed, including the 'materials' used and the establishment of hybridization conditions. Glass surfaces were either epoxy- or aldehyde-modified, and allele-specific oligonucleotides contained either SH or NH2 groups. Hybridization stringency conditions were established by varying the concentration of formamide in the hybridization buffer. For SNP BA213c14t7/403, the quantitative discrimination between all four different naturally occurring genotypes could be demonstrated. PMID:15847606

  7. An Engineered Kinetic Amplification Mechanism for Single Nucleotide Variant Discrimination by DNA Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Seelig, Georg

    2016-04-20

    Even a single-nucleotide difference between the sequences of two otherwise identical biological nucleic acids can have dramatic functional consequences. Here, we use model-guided reaction pathway engineering to quantitatively improve the performance of selective hybridization probes in recognizing single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Specifically, we build a detection system that combines discrimination by competition with DNA strand displacement-based catalytic amplification. We show, both mathematically and experimentally, that the single nucleotide selectivity of such a system in binding to single-stranded DNA and RNA is quadratically better than discrimination due to competitive hybridization alone. As an additional benefit the integrated circuit inherits the property of amplification and provides at least 10-fold better sensitivity than standard hybridization probes. Moreover, we demonstrate how the detection mechanism can be tuned such that the detection reaction is agnostic to the position of the SNV within the target sequence. in contrast, prior strand displacement-based probes designed for kinetic discrimination are highly sensitive to position effects. We apply our system to reliably discriminate between different members of the let-7 microRNA family that differ in only a single base position. Our results demonstrate the power of systematic reaction network design to quantitatively improve biotechnology. PMID:27010123

  8. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded estuarine samples by hybridization with cDNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.; Melnick, J.L

    1986-10-01

    The development and trials of a nucleic acid hybridization test for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in estuarine samples within 48 h are described. Approximately 10/sup 4/ physical particlels of HAV per dot could be detected. Test sensitivity was optimized by the consideration of hydbridization stringency, /sup 32/P energy level, probe concentration, and nucleic acid binding to filters. Test specificity was shown by a lack of cross-hybridization with other enteroviruses and unrelated nucleic acids. Potential false-positive reactions between bacterial DNA in samples and residual vector DNA contamination of purified nucleotide sequences in probes were eliminated by DNase treatment of samples. Humic acid at concentrations of up to 100 mg/liter caused only insignificant decreases in test sensitivity. Interference with hybridization by organic components of virus-containing eluates was removed by proteinase K digestion followed by phenol extraction and ethanol precipitation. The test is suitable for detecting naturally occurring HAV in samples from polluted estuarine environments.

  9. A genome-wide study of preferential amplification/hybridization in microarray-based pooled DNA experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.-C.; Liang, Y.-J.; Huang, M.-C.; Li, L.-H.; Lin, C.-H.; Wu, J.-Y.; Chen, Y.-T.; Fann, C.S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Microarray-based pooled DNA methods overcome the cost bottleneck of simultaneously genotyping more than 100 000 markers for numerous study individuals. The success of such methods relies on the proper adjustment of preferential amplification/hybridization to ensure accurate and reliable allele frequency estimation. We performed a hybridization-based genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping analysis to dissect preferential amplification/hybridization. The majority of SNPs had less than 2-fold signal amplification or suppression, and the lognormal distributions adequately modeled preferential amplification/hybridization across the human genome. Comparative analyses suggested that the distributions of preferential amplification/hybridization differed among genotypes and the GC content. Patterns among different ethnic populations were similar; nevertheless, there were striking differences for a small proportion of SNPs, and a slight ethnic heterogeneity was observed. To fulfill appropriate and gratuitous adjustments, databases of preferential amplification/hybridization for African Americans, Caucasians and Asians were constructed based on the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set. The robustness of allele frequency estimation using this database was validated by a pooled DNA experiment. This study provides a genome-wide investigation of preferential amplification/hybridization and suggests guidance for the reliable use of the database. Our results constitute an objective foundation for theoretical development of preferential amplification/hybridization and provide important information for future pooled DNA analyses. PMID:16931491

  10. Characterization of the structural and protein recognition properties of hybrid PNA-DNA four-way junctions.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Douglas; Serrano, Crystal; Brahan, Ann Marie; Shams, Arik; Totsingan, Filbert; Bell, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the structure and protein recognition properties of hybrid four-way junctions (4WJs) composed of DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) strands. We compare a classic immobile DNA junction, J1, vs. six PNA-DNA junctions, including a number with blunt DNA ends and multiple PNA strands. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis reveals that hybrid 4WJs are composed of helices that possess structures intermediate between A- and B-form DNA, the apparent level of A-form structure correlates with the PNA content. The structure of hybrids that contain one PNA strand is sensitive to Mg(+2). For these constructs, the apparent B-form structure and conformational stability (Tm) increase in high Mg(+2). The blunt-ended junction, b4WJ-PNA3, possesses the highest B-form CD signals and Tm (40.1 °C) values vs. all hybrids and J1. Protein recognition studies are carried out using the recombinant DNA-binding protein, HMGB1b. HMGB1b binds the blunt ended single-PNA hybrids, b4WJ-PNA1 and b4WJ-PNA3, with high affinity. HMGB1b binds the multi-PNA hybrids, 4WJ-PNA1,3 and b4WJ-PNA1,3, but does not form stable protein-nucleic acid complexes. Protein interactions with hybrid 4WJs are influenced by the ratio of A- to B-form helices: hybrids with helices composed of higher levels of B-form structure preferentially associate with HMGB1b. PMID:26348651

  11. Bright luminescence from pure DNA-curcumin-based phosphors for bio hybrid light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Siva Pratap; Park, Chinho

    2016-01-01

    Recently, significant advances have occurred in the development of phosphors for bio hybrid light-emitting diodes (Bio-HLEDs), which have created brighter, metal-free, rare-earth phosphor-free, eco-friendly, and cost-competitive features for visible light emission. Here, we demonstrate an original approach using bioinspired phosphors in Bio-HLEDs based on natural deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-curcumin complexes with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) in bio-crystalline form. The curcumin chromophore was bound to the DNA double helix structure as observed using field emission tunnelling electron microscopy (FE-TEM). Efficient luminescence occurred due to tightly bound curcumin chromophore to DNA duplex. Bio-HLED shows low luminous drop rate of 0.0551 s(-1). Moreover, the solid bio-crystals confined the activating bright luminescence with a quantum yield of 62%, thereby overcoming aggregation-induced quenching effect. The results of this study herald the development of commercially viable large-scale hybrid light applications that are environmentally benign. PMID:27572113

  12. Remote electronic control of DNA hybridization through inductive coupling to an attached metal nanocrystal antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Schwartz, John J.; Santos, Aaron T.; Zhang, Shuguang; Jacobson, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    Increasingly detailed structural and dynamic studies are highlighting the precision with which biomolecules execute often complex tasks at the molecular scale. The efficiency and versatility of these processes have inspired many attempts to mimic or harness them. To date, biomolecules have been used to perform computational operations and actuation, to construct artificial transcriptional loops that behave like simple circuit elements and to direct the assembly of nanocrystals. Further development of these approaches requires new tools for the physical and chemical manipulation of biological systems. Biomolecular activity has been triggered optically through the use of chromophores, but direct electronic control over biomolecular `machinery' in a specific and fully reversible manner has not yet been achieved. Here we demonstrate remote electronic control over the hybridization behaviour of DNA molecules, by inductive coupling of a radio-frequency magnetic field to a metal nanocrystal covalently linked to DNA. Inductive coupling to the nanocrystal increases the local temperature of the bound DNA, thereby inducing denaturation while leaving surrounding molecules relatively unaffected. Moreover, because dissolved biomolecules dissipate heat in less than 50picoseconds (ref. 16), the switching is fully reversible. Inductive heating of macroscopic samples is widely used, but the present approach should allow extension of this concept to the control of hybridization and thus of a broad range of biological functions on the molecular scale.

  13. Construction of Hypericin Gland-Specific cDNA Library via Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rupesh Kumar; Hou, Weina; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Hypericin, an important determinant of the pharmacological properties of the genus Hypericum, is considered as a major molecule for drug development. However, biosynthesis and accumulation of hypericin is not well understood. Identification of genes differentially expressed in tissues with and without hypericin accumulation is a useful strategy to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the dark glands and hypericin biosynthesis. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) is a unique method for PCR-based amplification of specific cDNA fragments that differ between a control (driver) and experimental (tester) transcriptome. This technique relies on the removal of dsDNA formed by hybridization between a control and test sample, thus eliminating cDNAs of similar abundance, and retaining differentially expressed or variable in sequence cDNAs. In our laboratory we applied this method to identify the genes involved in the development of dark glands and accumulation of hypericin in Hypericum perforatum. Here we describe the complete procedure for the construction of hypericin gland-specific subtracted cDNA library. PMID:27108327

  14. Bright luminescence from pure DNA-curcumin–based phosphors for bio hybrid light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M. Siva Pratap; Park, Chinho

    2016-01-01

    Recently, significant advances have occurred in the development of phosphors for bio hybrid light-emitting diodes (Bio-HLEDs), which have created brighter, metal-free, rare-earth phosphor-free, eco-friendly, and cost-competitive features for visible light emission. Here, we demonstrate an original approach using bioinspired phosphors in Bio-HLEDs based on natural deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-curcumin complexes with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) in bio-crystalline form. The curcumin chromophore was bound to the DNA double helix structure as observed using field emission tunnelling electron microscopy (FE-TEM). Efficient luminescence occurred due to tightly bound curcumin chromophore to DNA duplex. Bio-HLED shows low luminous drop rate of 0.0551 s−1. Moreover, the solid bio-crystals confined the activating bright luminescence with a quantum yield of 62%, thereby overcoming aggregation-induced quenching effect. The results of this study herald the development of commercially viable large-scale hybrid light applications that are environmentally benign. PMID:27572113

  15. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas. PMID:26972953

  16. Hybridization chain reaction amplification for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA with dextran coated microarrays.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jing; Peng, Hongzhen; Su, Shao; Li, Qian; Zhu, Changfeng; Zuo, Xiaolei; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Wang, Lihua

    2016-07-15

    Microarrays of biomolecules hold great promise in the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays on account of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. However, the fluorescence detection used in most conventional DNA microarrays is still limited by sensitivity. In this study, we have demonstrated a novel universal and highly sensitive platform for fluorescent detection of sequence specific DNA at the femtomolar level by combining dextran-coated microarrays with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. Three-dimensional dextran matrix was covalently coated on glass surface as the scaffold to immobilize DNA recognition probes to increase the surface binding capacity and accessibility. DNA nanowire tentacles were formed on the matrix surface for efficient signal amplification by capturing multiple fluorescent molecules in a highly ordered way. By quantifying microscopic fluorescent signals, the synergetic effects of dextran and HCR greatly improved sensitivity of DNA microarrays, with a detection limit of 10fM (1×10(5) molecules). This detection assay could recognize one-base mismatch with fluorescence signals dropped down to ~20%. This cost-effective microarray platform also worked well with samples in serum and thus shows great potential for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26922047

  17. Competitive Metagenomic DNA Hybridization Identifies Host-Specific Microbial Genetic Markers in Cow Fecal Samples†

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Orin C.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Lamendella, Regina; Kelty, Catherine A.; Graham, James E.

    2006-01-01

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host-specific markers. Here we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment (GFE) method to identify host-specific genetic markers from fecal microbial community DNA. As a proof of concept, bovine fecal DNA was challenged against a porcine fecal DNA background to select for bovine-specific DNA sequences. Bioinformatic analyses of 380 bovine enriched metagenomic sequences indicated a preponderance of Bacteroidales-like regions predicted to encode membrane-associated and secreted proteins. Oligonucleotide primers capable of annealing to select Bacteroidales-like bovine GFE sequences exhibited extremely high specificity (>99%) in PCR assays with total fecal DNAs from 279 different animal sources. These primers also demonstrated a broad distribution of corresponding genetic markers (81% positive) among 148 different bovine sources. These data demonstrate that direct metagenomic DNA analysis by the competitive solution hybridization approach described is an efficient method for identifying potentially useful fecal genetic markers and for characterizing differences between environmental microbial communities. PMID:16751515

  18. FY02 CBNP Annual Report: Discovery of DNA Signature of Biothreat Detection Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G L; Radnedge, L

    2002-11-19

    Our goal is to develop robust DNA signatures for rapid and specific DNA-based detection platforms that can be employed by CBNP to detect a wide range of potential agents. Our approach has resulted in highly specific DNA signatures for Yersina pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Brucella species. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to any genome (even uncharacterized ones), which facilitates DNA signature development for detection of newly emerging pathogens. We are using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) as a tool to define large DNA regions specific to multiple biothreat pathogens by comparing them to genomes of the most closely related organisms. This approach has become increasingly accurate as we continue to find new, distinctive strains and ever-closer near-neighbors. With the huge costs incurred by whole genome sequencing, it is not possible to sequence each new bacterial genome. However, it is completely practical to identify genome differences in the laboratory using SSH, and becomes especially useful when comparing new strains to previously sequenced genomes.

  19. The minimal amount of starting DNA for Agilent's hybrid capture-based targeted massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jongsuk; Son, Dae-Soon; Jeon, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Gahee; Ryu, Gyu Ha; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Donghyun

    2016-01-01

    Targeted capture massively parallel sequencing is increasingly being used in clinical settings, and as costs continue to decline, use of this technology may become routine in health care. However, a limited amount of tissue has often been a challenge in meeting quality requirements. To offer a practical guideline for the minimum amount of input DNA for targeted sequencing, we optimized and evaluated the performance of targeted sequencing depending on the input DNA amount. First, using various amounts of input DNA, we compared commercially available library construction kits and selected Agilent's SureSelect-XT and KAPA Biosystems' Hyper Prep kits as the kits most compatible with targeted deep sequencing using Agilent's SureSelect custom capture. Then, we optimized the adapter ligation conditions of the Hyper Prep kit to improve library construction efficiency and adapted multiplexed hybrid selection to reduce the cost of sequencing. In this study, we systematically evaluated the performance of the optimized protocol depending on the amount of input DNA, ranging from 6.25 to 200 ng, suggesting the minimal input DNA amounts based on coverage depths required for specific applications. PMID:27220682

  20. Activation of different split functionalities on re-association of RNA-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Kirill A; Viard, Mathias; Martins, Angelica N; Lockett, Stephen J; Maciag, Anna E; Freed, Eric O; Heldman, Eliahu; Jaeger, Luc; Blumenthal, Robert; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2013-04-01

    Split-protein systems, an approach that relies on fragmentation of proteins with their further conditional re-association to form functional complexes, are increasingly used for various biomedical applications. This approach offers tight control of protein functions and improved detection sensitivity. Here we report a similar technique based on a pair of RNA-DNA hybrids that can be used generally for triggering different split functionalities. Individually, each hybrid is inactive but when two cognate hybrids re-associate, different functionalities are triggered inside mammalian cells. As a proof of concept, this work mainly focuses on the activation of RNA interference. However, the release of other functionalities (such as resonance energy transfer and RNA aptamer) is also shown. Furthermore, in vivo studies demonstrate a significant uptake of the hybrids by tumours together with specific gene silencing. This split-functionality approach presents a new route in the development of 'smart' nucleic acid-based nanoparticles and switches for various biomedical applications. PMID:23542902

  1. Rotating Rod Renewable Microcolumns for Automated, Solid-Phase DNA Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. ); Stottlemyre, Mark R.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Chandler, Darrell P.

    1999-12-01

    The development of a new temperature-controlled renewable microcolumn flow cell for solid-phase nucleic acid analysis in a sequential injection system is described. The flow cell includes a stepper motor-driven rotating rod with the working end cut to a 45 degree angle. In one position, the end of the rod prevents passage of microbeads while allowing fluid flow; rotation of the rod by 180 degrees release the beads. This system was used to rapidly test many hybridization and elution protocols to examine the temperature and solution conditions required for sequence specific nucleic acid hybridization. Target nucleic acids labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye were detected immediately post-column using a flow-through fluorescence detector, with a detection limit of 40 pM dye concentration at a flow rate of 5 mu l/s. Temperature control of the column and the presence of Triton X-100 surfactant were critical for specific hybridization. Perfusion of the column with complementary oligonucleotide (200 mu l, 10nM) resulted in hybridization with 8% of the DNA binding sites on the microbeads with a solution residence time of less than a second and a total sample perfusion time of 40 seconds. The use of the renewable column system for detection of an unlabeled PCR product in a sandwich assay was also demonstrated.

  2. Genetic characterization of inbred lines of Chinese cabbage by DNA markers; towards the application of DNA markers to breeding of F1 hybrid cultivars.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazutaka; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Shimizu, Motoki; Okazaki, Keiichi; Kaji, Makoto; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Osabe, Kenji; Fujimoto, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. var. pekinensis) is an important vegetable in Asia, and most Japanese commercial cultivars of Chinese cabbage use an F1 hybrid seed production system. Self-incompatibility is successfully used for the production of F1 hybrid seeds in B. rapa vegetables to avoid contamination by non-hybrid seeds, and the strength of self-incompatibility is important for harvesting a highly pure F1 seeds. Prediction of agronomically important traits such as disease resistance based on DNA markers is useful. In this dataset, we identified the S haplotypes by DNA markers and evaluated the strength of self-incompatibility in Chinese cabbage inbred lines. The data described the predicted disease resistance to Fusarium yellows or clubroot in 22 Chinese cabbage inbred lines using gene associated or gene linked DNA markers. PMID:26862564

  3. [Detection of human papillomavirus (H.P.V.) DNA in genital lesions using molecular hybridization].

    PubMed

    Meguenni, S; el-Mehdaoui, S; Bandoui, D; Bouguermouh, A; Allouache, A; Bendib, A; Chouiter, A; Djenaoui, T; Lalliam, N; Bouhadef, A

    1992-01-01

    Detection of human papilloma virus in genitals lesions by molecular hybridization. Some H.P.V. types are sexually transmitted and infect genital organs. We have used molecular hybridization to examine the distribution of H.P.V. 6 or II and H.P.V. 16 in benign, premalignant and malignant genital lesions from 344 patients. The frequency of H.P.V. 16 positive cases increases as the cervical lesions progress to malignancy: 57/78 are positive (73%) in the carcinomas, 29/83 are positive (35%) in mild or moderate dysplasia. The majority of benign condylomata acuminata harbors DNA of other types, namely H.P.V. 6 and II. PMID:1339249

  4. [DNA fingerprinting of individual species and intergeneric and interspecific hybrids of genera Bos and Bison, subfamily Bovinae].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, V A; Steklenev, E P; Morozova, E V; Semenova, S K

    2002-04-01

    Genome fingerprinting with a hypervariable minisatellite sequence of phage M13 DNA was used to study the genetic variation in individual species of the genera Bos and Bison (subfamily Bovinae) and in their interspecific and intergeneric hybrids. DNA fingerprints were obtained for domestic cow Bos taurus primigenius, vatussy Bos taurus macroceros, banteng Bos javanicus, gaur Bos gaurus, wisent Bison bonasus, bison Bison bison, and for the interspecific and intergeneric hybrids. Compared with the original species, most hybrids showed a greater variation in number and size of hybridization fragments. An association was revealed between the number of hybridization fragments and blood composition of interspecific hybrids resulting from unique crossing of domestic cow and banteng. Pairwise similarity coefficients were calculated to construct a dendrogram of genetic similarity, which reflected the relationships between the parental species and hybrids varying in blood composition. The applicability of the method for identifying interspecific and intergeneric hybrids and for studying the consequences of distant hybridization in the subfamily Bovinae is discussed. PMID:12018169

  5. Highly sensitive DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-01-01

    A novel highly sensitive colorimetric assay for DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization was established. The DNA modified superparamagnetic beads were demonstrated to capture and enrich the target DNA in the hybridization buffer or human plasma. The hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced silver metallization on the gold nanoparticles were used as cascade signal amplification for the detection of target DNA. The metalization of silver on the gold nanoparticles induced a significant colour change from red to yellow until black depending on the concentration of the target DNA, which could be recognized by naked eyes. This method showed a good specificity for the target DNA detection, with the capabilty to discriminate single-base-pair mismatched DNA mutation (single nucleotide polymorphism). Meanwhile, this approach exhibited an excellent anti-interference capability with the convenience of the magentic seperation and washing, which enabled its usage in complex biological systems such as human blood plasma. As an added benefit, the utilization of hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization improved detection sensitivity down to 10 pM, which is about 100-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assays. PMID:25500528

  6. Microfluidic enzymatic DNA extraction on a hybrid polyester-toner-PMMA device.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brandon L; Birch, Christopher; Li, Jingyi; DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Le Roux, Delphine; Nelson, Daniel A; Tsuei, An-Chi; Mills, Daniel L; Krauss, Shannon T; Root, Brian E; Landers, James P

    2016-08-01

    To date, the forensic community regards solid phase extraction (SPE) as the most effective methodology for the purification of DNA for use in short tandem repeat (STR) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. While a dominant methodology, SPE protocols generally necessitate the use of PCR inhibitors (guanidine, IPA) and, in addition, can demand timescales of up to 30 min due to the necessary load, wash and elution steps. The recent discovery and characterization of the EA1 protease has allowed the user to enzymatically extract (not purify) DNA, dramatically simplifying the task of producing a PCR-ready template. Despite this, this procedure has yet to make a significant impact on microfluidic technologies. Here, we describe a microfluidic device that implements the EA1 enzyme for DNA extraction by incorporating it into a hybrid microdevice comprising laminated polyester (Pe) and PMMA layers. The PMMA layer provides a macro-to-micro interface for introducing the biological sample into the microfluidic architecture, whilst also possessing the necessary dimensions to function as the swab acceptor. Pre-loaded reagents are then introduced to the swab chamber centrifugally, initiating DNA extraction at 75 °C. The extraction of DNA occurs in timescales of less than 3 min and any external hardware associated with the transportation of reagents by pneumatic pumping is eliminated. Finally, multiplexing is demonstrated with a circular device containing eight separate chambers for the simultaneous processing of eight buccal swab samples. The studies here provide DNA concentrations up to 10 ng μL(-1) with a 100% success rate in less than 3 minutes. The STR profiles generated using these extracted samples demonstrate that the DNA is of PCR forensic-quality and adequate for human identification. PMID:27250903

  7. [Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms shared between modern humans and neanderthals: adaptive convergence or evidence for interspecific hybridization?].

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    An analysis of the variability of the nucleotide sequences in the mitochondrial genome of modern humans, neanderthals, Denisovans, and other primates has shown that there are shared polymorphisms at positions 2758 and 7146 between modern Homo sapiens (in phylogenetic cluster L2'3'4'5'6) and Homo neanderthalensis (in the group of European neanderthals younger than 48000 years). It is suggested that the convergence may be due to adaptive changes in the mitochondrial genomes of modern humans and neanderthals or interspecific hybridization associated with mtDNA recombination. PMID:25508911

  8. [Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms shared between modern humans and neanderthals: adaptive convergence or evidence for interspecific hybridization?].

    PubMed

    Maliarchuk, B A

    2013-09-01

    An analysis of the variability of the nucleotide sequences in the mitochondrial genome of modern humans, neanderthals, Denisovans, and other primates has shown that there are shared polymorphisms at positions 2758 and 7146 between modern Homo sapiens (in phylogenetic cluster L2'3'4'5'6) and Homo neanderthalensis (in the group of European neanderthals younger than 48000 years). It is suggested that the convergence may be due to adaptive changes in the mitochondrial genomes of modern humans and neanderthals or interspecific hybridization associated with mtDNA recombination. PMID:25486780

  9. Evidence for and Localization of Vegetative Viral DNA Replication by Autoradiographic Detection of RNA·DNA Hybrids in Sections of Tumors Induced by Shope Papilloma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Gérard; Jeanteur, Philippe; Croissant, Odile

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence and localization of vegetative viral DNA replication was studied in sections of tumors induced by the rabbit Shope papilloma virus, in cottontail and domestic rabbit papillomas, in primary domestic rabbit carcinoma, and in transplantable VX2 carcinoma, by in situ hybridization of radioactive RNA complementary to viral DNA. Vegetative viral DNA replication and viral protein synthesis were compared by means of cytological hybridization and immunofluorescence techniques on adjacent frozen sections. Vegetative viral DNA replication is completely repressed in the proliferating cellular layers of these tumors, which suggests a provirus state of the viral genome, as in other cells transformed by oncogenic DNA viruses. Vegetative viral DNA replication is induced, after initiation of the keratinization, in cells of cottonail rabbit papillomas, where it is usually followed by viral protein synthesis; this illustrates the influence of the physiological state of the host cell on the control of viral functions. Vegetative viral DNA replication is deteced only in a few cells of domestic rabbit papillomas, at the end of the keratinization process; this observation provides indirect evidence that the DNA synthesis specifically induced in these tumors after the onset of keratinization reflects mostly the induction of cellular DNA synthesis. Images PMID:4331563

  10. Detection and mapping of amplified DNA sequences in breast cancer by comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Kallioniemi, A.; Tanner, M.; Kallioniemi, O.P.; Piper, J.; Stokke, T.; Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.W.; Waldman, F.M.; Chen, L.; Smith, H.S.

    1994-03-15

    Comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 5 breast cancer cell lines and 33 primary tumors to discover and map regions of the genome with increased DNA-sequence copy-number. Two-thirds of primary tumors and almost all cell lines showed increased DNA-sequence copy-number affecting a total of 26 chromosomal subregions. Most of these loci were distinct from those of currently known amplified genes in breast cancer, with sequences originating from 17q22-q24 and 20q13 showing the highest frequency of amplification. The results indicate that these chromosomal regions may contain previously unknown genes whose increased expression contributes to breast cancer progression. Chromosomal regions with increased copy-number often spanned tens of Mb, suggesting involvement of more than one gene in each region.

  11. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using transistors based on CVD grown graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzu-Yin; Loan, Phan Thi Kim; Hsu, Chang-Lung; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Tse-Wei Wang, Jacob; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Lin, Cheng-Te; Li, Lain-Jong

    2013-03-15

    The high transconductance and low noise of graphene-based field-effect transistors based on large-area monolayer graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition are used for label-free electrical detection of DNA hybridization. The gate materials, buffer concentration and surface condition of graphene have been optimized to achieve the DNA detection sensitivity as low as 1 pM (10(-12) M), which is more sensitive than the existing report based on few-layer graphene. The graphene films obtained using conventional PMMA-assisted transfer technique exhibits PMMA residues, which degrade the sensing performance of graphene. We have demonstrated that the sensing performance of the graphene samples prepared by gold-transfer is largely enhanced (by 125%). PMID:22944023

  12. Development of single-cell array for large-scale DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingru; Kirkland, Brett; Shirley, James; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Peipei; Stembridge, Jacquelyn; Wong, Wilson; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Gilbert, David M.; Lenhert, Steven

    2013-01-01

    DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful cytogenetic assay, but conventional sample-preparation methods for FISH do not support large-scale high-throughput data acquisition and analysis, which are potentially useful for several biomedical applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel FISH sample-preparation method based on generating a centimetre-sized cell array, in which all cells are precisely positioned and separated from their neighbours. This method is simple and easy and capable of patterning nonadherent human cells. We have successfully performed DNA FISH on the single-cell arrays, which facilitate analysis of FISH results with the FISH-FINDER computer program. PMID:23370691

  13. Immobilization, hybridization, and oxidation of synthetic DNA on gold surface: electron transfer investigated by electrochemistry and scanning tunneling microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Gerald D.; Chen, Fan; Zhou, Anhong

    2009-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of interfacial electron transfer (ET) among electrolyte/DNA/solid-surface will facilitate the design for electrical detection of DNA molecules. In this report, the electron transfer characteristics of synthetic DNA (sequence from pathogenic Cryptosporidium parvum) self-assembled on a gold surface was electrochemically studied. The effects of immobilization order on the interface ET related parameters such as diffusion coefficient (D0), surface coverage (θR), and monolayer thickness (di) were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). DNA surface density (ΓDNA) was determined by the integration of the charge of the electro-oxidation current peaks during the initial cyclic voltammetry scans. It was found that the DNA surface density at different modifications followed the order: ΓDNA (dsS-DNA/Au) > ΓDNA (MCH/dsS-DNA/Au) > ΓDNA (dsS-DNA/MCH/Au). It was also revealed that the electro-oxidation of the DNA modified gold surface would involve the oxidation of nucleotides (guanine and adenine) with a 5.51 electron transfer mechanism and the oxidative desorption of DNA and MCH molecules by a 3 electron transfer mechanism. STM topography and current image analysis indicated that the surface conductivity after each surface modification followed the order: dsS-DNA/Au < MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < Hoechst/oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au. The results from this study suggested a combination of variations in immobilization order may provide an alternative approach for the optimization of DNA hybridization and the further development for electrical detection of DNA. PMID:19446060

  14. Comparison of field-collected ascovirus isolates by DNA hybridization, host range, and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Hamm, J J; Styer, E L; Federici, B A

    1998-09-01

    Six field-collected ascovirus isolates obtained from five noctuid species in the continental United States were compared with respect to the general relatedness of their DNA, host range, and histopathology. Two isolates were from Spodoptera frugiperda, and the other four were from Autographa precationis, Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa zea, and Trichoplusia ni. DNA-DNA hybridization studies showed that the six isolates belonged to three distinct viral species, with the isolates from S. frugiperda composing one species, those from A. precationis and H. virescens a second species, and those from H. zea and T. ni a third species. The host range and histopathology of each isolate was studied in eight noctuid species, S. frugiperda, Spodoptera ornithogalli, Spodoptera exigua, Spodoptera eridania, H. virescens, H. zea, A. precationis, and Feltia subterranea. Though some variation existed between the different isolates of each viral species, distinct patterns were apparent for each. The viral species from S. frugiperda had a host range that was limited primarily to Spodoptera species and both isolates of this virus only replicated and caused significant pathology in the fat body, whereas the viral species from A. precationis and H. virescens had a much broader host range that included most of the species tested, but also had a tissue tropism primarily restricted to the fat body. The viral species from T. ni and H. zea readily infected all the hosts tested, where the principal site of replication and significant pathology was the epidermis. In many test hosts, however, this viral species also replicated and caused significant pathology in the tracheal epithelium and to a lesser extent in the fat body. Aside from contributing to knowledge of ascovirus biology, these studies indicate that DNA hybridization profiles combined with studies of host range and tissue tropism can be used as characters for defining ascovirus species. PMID:9709014

  15. DNA-based hybridization chain reaction for an ultrasensitive cancer marker EBNA-1 electrochemical immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Song, Chao; Xie, Guoming; Wang, Li; Liu, Lingzhi; Tian, Guang; Xiang, Hua

    2014-08-15

    An ultrasensitive and selective electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the detection of Epstein Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1). Firstly, a suspension of graphene sheets (GS) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was prepared with the aid of chitosan (CS) solution and then modified on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were then electrodeposited onto the surface of the GS-MWCNTs film by cyclic voltammetry (CV) to immobilize the captured antibodies. After that, specific sandwich immunoreactions were formed among the captured antibody, EBNA-1, and secondary antibody, DNA-coated carboxyl multi-wall carbon nanotubes (DNA-MWCNTs-Ab2). DNA initiator strands (S0) and secondary antibodies linked to the MWCNTs and double-helix DNA polymers were obtained by hybridization chain reaction (HCR), and here S0 on the MWCNTs propagates a chain reaction of hybridization events between two alternating hairpins to form a nicked double-helix. Finally, electroactive indicator doxorubicin hydrochloride was intercalated into the CG-GC steps between the HCR products and could produce an electrochemical signal, which was monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Under optimum conditions, the amperometric signal increased linearly with the target concentrations (0.05-6.4ngmL(-1)), and the immunosensor exhibited a detection limit as low as 0.7pgmL(-1) (S/N=3). The proposed method showed acceptable stability and reproducibility, as well as favorable recovery for EBNA-1 in human serum. The proposed immunosensor provides a novel avenue for signal amplification and potential applications in bioanalysis and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24632131

  16. Three dimensional dual labelled DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis in fixed tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Kernohan, Kristin D.; Bérubé, Nathalie G.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging studies demonstrate that three-dimensional organization of chromatin in the nucleus plays a vital role in regulating the genome. DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common molecular technique used to visualize the location of DNA sequences. The vast majority of DNA FISH studies are conducted on cultured cells due to the technical difficulties encountered using fixed tissue sections. However, the use of cultured cells poses important limitations that could yield misleading results, making in vivo analysis a far superior approach. Here we present a protocol for multiplexed three dimensional DNA FISH in mouse brain sections, which is also applicable to other tissues. Paraffin-embedded tissues could be used but the embedding and preparation of the samples is time-consuming and often associated with poor antigenicity. To overcome this problem we:•developed a FISH technique using fixed, frozen cryosections;•provide specific instructions for tissue processing for proper fixation and freezing, including equilibration in sucrose gradients to maintain proper cellular structure;•include optimized permeabilization and washing steps to achieve specific signal and to limit background fluorescence in tissue sections. PMID:26150931

  17. Fixation conditions for DNA and RNA in situ hybridization: a reassessment of molecular morphology dogma.

    PubMed Central

    Tbakhi, A.; Totos, G.; Hauser-Kronberger, C.; Pettay, J.; Baunoch, D.; Hacker, G. W.; Tubbs, R. R.

    1998-01-01

    Neutral buffered formalin (NBF) (4% neutral buffered formaldehyde) has been advocated by most investigators as the primary fixative of choice for in situ hybridization (ISH), and specific anecdotal cautions interdicting the use of precipitating fixatives, which otherwise may offer certain advantages such as superior nuclear detail, are common. Few systematic studies addressing ISH fixation conditions have been published. We reasoned that heavy metals present in some precipitating fixatives may compromise duplex formation during ISH. Cell lines containing known viral gene content (CaSki, 200 to 600 human papilloma virus 16 copies/cell, and SiHa, 1 to 2 human papilloma virus 16 copies/cell) and two negative cell lines (K562 and MOLT 4) were expanded to >10(10) and pellets fixed in NBF, zinc formalin, B5, and Bouin's and Hollande's solutions, and subjected to DNA ISH using biotinylated genomic probes. Ten tissue biopsies fixed in both Hollande's and NBF solutions were also evaluated for human papilloma virus content using DNA ISH. Additionally, 17 cases of Hodgkin's disease fixed in B5 and formalin were compared for Epstein-Barr encoded RNA detection using RNA ISH with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled oligonucleotides. Catalyzed reporter deposition combined with Streptavidin-Nanogold staining and silver acetate autometallography (Catalyzed reporter deposition-Ng-autometallography ISH) and a conventional indirect alkaline phosphatase method were used for detection for both DNA and RNA. Contaminating heavy metals entrapped in fixed tissues were removed by two exposures to Lugol's iodine. Results for both DNA and RNA ISH comparing B5 and NBF fixatives were virtually identical. Hollande's, Bouin's, B5, and zinc formalin fixed tissue showed results indistinguishable from NBF fixed tissue in DNA ISH. Precipitating fixatives such as B5 and Hollande's solution may be used for DNA and RNA ISH under appropriate conditions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9422521

  18. Locational diversity of alpha satellite DNA and intergeneric hybridization aspects in the Nomascus and Hylobates genera of small apes.

    PubMed

    Baicharoen, Sudarath; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Yuriko; Duangsa-ard, Kwanruen; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Domae, Hiroshi; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that alpha satellite DNA has unique and genus-specific localizations on the chromosomes of small apes. This study describes the details of alpha satellite localization in the genera Nomascus and Hylobates and explores their usefulness in distinguishing parental genome sets in hybrids between these genera. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to establish diagnostic criteria of alpha satellite DNA markers in discriminating small ape genomes. In particular we established the genus specificity of alpha satellite distribution in three species of light-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus leucogenys, N. siki, and N. gabriellae) in comparison to that of Hylobates lar. Then we determined the localization of alpha satellite DNA in a hybrid individual which resulted from a cross between these two genera. In Nomascus the alpha satellite DNA blocks were located at the centromere, telomere, and four interstitial regions. In Hylobates detectable amounts of alpha satellite DNA were seen only at centromeric regions. The differences in alpha satellite DNA locations between Nomascus and Hylobates allowed us to easily distinguish the parental chromosomal sets in the genome of intergeneric hybrid individuals found in Thai and Japanese zoos. Our study illustrates how molecular cytogenetic markers can serve as diagnostic tools to identify the origin of individuals. These molecular tools can aid zoos, captive breeding programs and conservation efforts in managing small apes species. Discovering more information on alpha satellite distribution is also an opportunity to examine phylogenetic and evolutionary questions that are still controversial in small apes. PMID:25290445

  19. A novel flow cytometry-based tool for determining the efficiency of human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifen; Mao, Genxiang; Carlson, Joshua; Leng, Sean X

    2015-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that causes congenital infection and severe infections in immunocompromised patients. Chronic hCMV infection may also play an important role in immunosenescence and adverse health outcomes in older adults. THP-1, a human monocytic cell line and its derived macrophages serve as a useful cell culture model for mechanistic studies of hCMV infection and its underlying biology. A major methodological challenge is the lack of a quick and reliable tool to accurately determine the efficiency of hCMV infection in THP-1 derived macrophages. In this study, we developed a flow cytometry based method using commercially available monoclonal antibody (MAb) against hCMV immediate early (IE) antigen that can accurately determine infection efficiency. We used 0.5% formaldehyde for fixation, 90% methanol for permeabilization, and incubation with FITC conjugated MAb at 37°C. The method was tested by hCMV infection with laboratory Towne strain in the presence or absence of hydrocortisone. It was also compared with the routine flow cytometry protocol using Cytofix/Cytoperm solution and with immunofluorescence. The results indicate that this new method is reliable and time saving for accurate determination of infection efficiency. It may facilitate further investigations into the underlying biological mechanisms of hCMV infection. PMID:25958130

  20. In vitro construction of bacteriophage lambda carrying segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome: selection of hybrids containing the gene for DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Panasenko, S M; Lehman, I R; Davis, R W

    1975-01-01

    DNA from lambdagt-lambdaB bacteriophage was cleaved with EcoRI endonuclease and fragments from EcoRI-digested E. coli DNA were inserted. This DNA was used to infect E. coli, and phages containing the gene for DNA ligase were isolated by genetic selection. Two different hybrids were found with the same E. coli segment inserted in opposite orientations. Both hybrids produced similar levels of ligase as measured in crude extracts of infected cells. Images PMID:1103146

  1. Resolution-improved in situ DNA hybridization detection based on microwave photonic interrogation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Guo, Tuan; Wang, Xudong; Sun, Dandan; Ran, Yang; Feng, Xinhuan; Guan, Bai-ou

    2015-10-19

    In situ bio-sensing system based on microwave photonics filter (MPF) interrogation method with improved resolution is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A microfiber Bragg grating (mFBG) is used as sensing probe for DNA hybridization detection. Different from the traditional wavelength monitoring technique, we use the frequency interrogation scheme for resolution-improved bio-sensing detection. Experimental results show that the frequency shift of MPF notch presents a linear response to the surrounding refractive index (SRI) change over the range of 1.33 to 1.38, with a SRI resolution up to 2.6 × 10(-5) RIU, which has been increased for almost two orders of magnitude compared with the traditional fundamental mode monitoring technique (~3.6 × 10(-3) RIU). Due to the high Q value (about 27), the whole process of DNA hybridization can be in situ monitored. The proposed MPF-based bio-sensing system provides a new interrogation method over the frequency domain with improved sensing resolution and rapid interrogation rate for biochemical and environmental measurement. PMID:26480367

  2. Tabu search algorithm for DNA sequencing by hybridization with isothermic libraries.

    PubMed

    Błazewicz, Jacek; Formanowicz, Piotr; Kasprzak, Marta; Markiewicz, Wojciech T; Swiercz, Aleksandra

    2004-02-01

    In this paper, a problem of isothermic DNA sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is considered. In isothermic SBH a new type of oligonucleotide libraries is used. The library consists of oligonucleotides of different lengths depending on an oligonucleotide content. It is assumed that every oligonucleotide in such a library has an equal melting temperature. Each nucleotide adds its increment to the oligonucleotide temperature and it is assumed that A and T add 2 degrees C and C and G add 4 degrees C. The hybridization experiment using isothermic libraries should provide data with a lower number of errors due to an expected similarity of melting temperatures. From the computational point of view the problem of isothermic DNA sequencing with errors is hard, similarly like its classical counterpart. Hence, there is a need for developing heuristic algorithms that construct good suboptimal solutions. The aim of the paper is to propose a heuristic algorithm based on tabu search approach. The algorithm solves the problem with both positive and negative errors. Results of an extensive computational experiment are presented, which prove the high quality of the proposed method. PMID:14871640

  3. Automatic on-chip RNA-DNA hybridization assay with integrated phase change microvalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Xuan; Jiang, Hai; Wang, Junsheng; Chen, Shu; Cao, Honghe; Li, Dongqing

    2012-07-01

    An RNA-DNA hybridization assay microfluidic chip integrated with electrothermally actuated phase change microvalves for detecting pathogenic bacteria is presented in this paper. In order to realize the sequential loading and washing processes required in such an assay, gravity-based pressure-driven flow and phase-change microvalves were used in the microfluidic chip. Paraffin wax was used as the phase change material in the valves and thin film heaters were used to electrothermally actuate microvalves. Light absorption measured by a photodetector to determine the concentrations of the samples. The automatic control of the complete assay was implemented by a self-coded LabVIEW program. To examine the performance of this chip, Salmonella was used as a sample pathogen. Significantly, reduction in reagent/sample consumption (up to 20 folds) was achieved by this on-chip assay, compared with using the commercial test kit following the same protocol in conventional labs. The experimental results show that the quantitative detection can be obtained in approximately 26 min, and the detection limit is as low as 103 CFU ml-1. This RNA-DNA hybridization assay microfluidic chip shows an excellent potential in the development of a portable device for point-of-testing applications.

  4. Electron microscopic in situ hybridization and autoradiography: Localization and transcription of rDNA in human lymphocyte nucleoli

    SciTech Connect

    Wachtler, F.; Mosgoeller, W.S.; Schwarzacher, H.G. )

    1990-04-01

    The distribution of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in the nucleoli of human lymphocytes was revealed by in situ hybridization with a nonautoradiographic procedure at the electron microscopic level. rDNA is located in the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus but not in the fibrillar centers. In the same cells the incorporation of tritiated uridine takes place in the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus as seen by autoradiography followed by gold latensification. From these findings it can be concluded that the transcription of ribosomal DNA takes place in the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus.

  5. Gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles based disposable magnetic genosensors for the detection of DNA hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Óscar A; Jubete, Elena; Ochoteco, Estibalitz; Cabañero, German; Grande, Hans; Rodríguez, Javier

    2011-01-15

    In this article, a disposable magnetic DNA sensor using an enzymatic amplification strategy for the detection of specific hybridization processes, based on the coupling of streptavidin-peroxidase to biotinylated target sequences, has been developed. A thiolated 19-mer capture probe was attached to gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles and hybridization with the biotinylated target was allowed to proceed. Then, a streptavidin-peroxide was attached to the biotinylated target and the resulting modified gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles were captured by a magnetic field on the surface of a home-made carbon screen printed electrode (SPE). Using hydroquinone as a mediator, a square wave voltammetric procedure was chosen to detect the hybridization process after the addition of hydrogen peroxide. Different aspects concerning the assay protocol and nanoparticles fabrication were optimized in order to improve the sensitivity of the developed methodology. A low detection limit (31 pM) with good stability (RSD=7.04%, n=10) was obtained without the need of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. PMID:20951565

  6. Analysis of changes in DNA sequence copy number by comparative genomic hybridization in archival paraffin-embedded tumor samples.

    PubMed Central

    Isola, J.; DeVries, S.; Chu, L.; Ghazvini, S.; Waldman, F.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously unknown genetic aberrations in solid tumors has become possible through the use of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), which is based on competitive binding of tumor and control DNA to normal metaphase chromosomes. CGH allows detection of DNA sequence copy number changes (deletions, gains, and amplifications) on a genome-wide scale in a single hybridization. We describe here an improved CGH technique, which enables reliable detection of copy number changes in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples. The technique includes a modified DNA extraction protocol, which produces high molecular weight DNA which is necessary for high quality CGH. The DNA extraction includes a 3-day digestion with proteinase K, which remarkably improves the yield of high molecular weight DNA. Labeling of the test DNA with a directly fluorescein-conjugated nucleotide (instead of biotin labeling) improved significantly the quality of hybridization. Using the paraffin-block technique, we could analyze 70 to 90% of paraffin blocks, including very old samples as well as samples taken at autopsy. CGH from paraffin blocks was highly concordant (95%) with analyses done from matched freshly frozen tumor samples (n = 5 sample pairs; kappa coefficient = 0.83). The method described here has wide applicability in tumor pathology, allowing large retrospective prognostic studies of genetic aberrations as well as studies on genetic pathogenesis of solid tumors, inasmuch as premalignant lesions and primary and metastatic tumors can be analyzed by using archival paraffin-embedded samples. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7992835

  7. Programmable Self-Assembly of DNA-Protein Hybrid Hydrogel for Enzyme Encapsulation with Enhanced Biological Stability.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lan; Chen, Qiaoshu; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Huang, Jin; Li, Li; Guo, Xi; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Kemin

    2016-04-11

    A DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel was constructed based on a programmable assembly approach, which served as a biomimetic physiologic matrix for efficient enzyme encapsulation. A dsDNA building block tailored with precise biotin residues was fabricated based on supersandwich hybridization, and then the addition of streptavidin triggered the formation of the DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel. The biocompatible hydrogel, which formed a flower-like porous structure that was 6.7 ± 2.1 μm in size, served as a reservoir system for enzyme encapsulation. Alcohol oxidase (AOx), which served as a representative enzyme, was encapsulated in the hybrid hydrogel using a synchronous assembly approach. The enzyme-encapsulated hydrogel was utilized to extend the duration time for ethanol removal in serum plasma and the enzyme retained 78% activity after incubation with human serum for 24 h. The DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel can mediate the intact immobilization on a streptavidin-modified and positively charged substrate, which is very beneficial to solid-phase biosensing applications. The hydrogel-encapsulated enzyme exhibited improved stability in the presence of various denaturants. For example, the encapsulated enzyme retained 60% activity after incubation at 55 °C for 30 min. The encapsulated enzyme also retains its total activity after five freeze-thaw cycles and even suspended in solution containing organic solvents. PMID:27008186

  8. A highly oriented hybrid microarray modified electrode fabricated by a template-free method for ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Chu, Zhenyu; Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Dempsey, Eithne

    2013-10-01

    Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and influence the morphologies of hybrid films. A highly oriented hybrid microarray was formed on the highly aligned and vertical SAMs of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules with rigid backbones, which afforded an intense structure-directing power for the oriented growth of hybrid crystals. Additionally, the density of the microarray could be adjusted by controlling the surface coverage of assembled molecules. Based on the hybrid microarray modified electrode with a large specific area (ca. 10 times its geometrical area), a label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed for the detection of an oligonucleotide fragment of the avian flu virus H5N1. The DNA biosensor displayed a significantly low detection limit of 5 pM (S/N = 3), a wide linear response from 10 pM to 10 nM, as well as excellent selectivity, good regeneration and high stability. We expect that the proposed template-free method can provide a new reference for the fabrication of a highly oriented hybrid array and the as-prepared microarray modified electrode will be a promising paradigm in constructing highly sensitive and selective biosensors.Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and

  9. Development of genome-specific 5S rDNA markers in Brassica and related species for hybrid testing.

    PubMed

    La Mura, Maurizio; Norris, Carol; Sporle, Sue; Jayaweera, Dasuni; Greenland, Andy; Lee, David

    2010-08-01

    The Brassicaceae are targets for DNA manipulation to modify oil content and composition. However, any strategy for creating novel products using genetic modification or traditional breeding must take into account the potential for hybridization with other Brassica species, many of which are important sources of edible oils. In this study we have tested Brassica carinata, a possible target for oil modification, to establish whether it can cross with other Brassica species and related genera, and we have developed molecular DNA assays to confirm hybridization. PMID:20725152

  10. Rapid and correct identification of intestinal Bacteroides spp. with chromosomal DNA probes by whole-cell dot blot hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morotomi, M.; Ohno, T.; Mutai, M.

    1988-05-01

    A dot blot hybridization procedure with /sup 32/P-labeled whole chromosomal DNA of the type strains as probes was developed as a rapid and simple method for identification of intestinal Bacteroides species. Bacterial cells were fixed onto membrane filters by slight suction, treated with 0.5 N NaOH, and hybridized with these probes. Of 65 Bacteroides strains isolated from 19 human fecal specimens, which were identified as B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus, B. caccae, B. uniformis, B. stercoris, B. vulgatus, B. distasonis, and B. merdae by conventional phenotypic characterization, 62 (95%) were correctly identified with this hybridization procedure.

  11. Development of Ionic Liquid Modified Disposable Graphite Electrodes for Label-Free Electrochemical Detection of DNA Hybridization Related to Microcystis spp.

    PubMed Central

    Sengiz, Ceren; Congur, Gulsah; Erdem, Arzum

    2015-01-01

    In this present study, ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (IL)) modified pencil graphite electrode (IL-PGEs) was developed for electrochemical monitoring of DNA hybridization related to Microcystis spp. (MYC). The characterization of IL-PGEs was performed using microscopic and electrochemical techniques. DNA hybridization related to MYC was then explored at the surface of IL-PGEs using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique. After the experimental parameters were optimized, the sequence-selective DNA hybridization related to MYC was performed in the case of hybridization between MYC probe and its complementary DNA target, noncomplementary (NC) or mismatched DNA sequence (MM), or and in the presence of mixture of DNA target: NC (1:1) and DNA target: MM (1:1). PMID:26371004

  12. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1. PMID:23429197

  13. A Xenopus zinc finger protein that specifically binds dsRNA and RNA-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Finerty, P J; Bass, B L

    1997-08-15

    Proteins containing C2H2 type zinc finger motifs represent one of the largest classes of nucleic acid-binding proteins found in nature. We describe a novel zinc finger protein, dsRBP-ZFa, isolated by screening an expression library with dsRNA. The dsRBP-ZFa cDNA encodes a protein containing seven zinc finger motifs and an acidic C-terminal domain. Mobility shift experiments demonstrate that dsRBP-ZFa binds dsRNA and RNA-DNA hybrids with nanomolar dissociation constants and in a sequence independent manner. We also show that DNA and single stranded RNA fail to compete with dsRNA for binding suggesting dsRBP-ZFa prefers to bind an A-form helix. Using western analyses we have localized dsRBP-ZFa primarily to the nucleus of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The identification of dsRBP-ZFa provides the first example of a zinc finger protein that is specific for dsRNA. In addition, dsRBP-ZFa does not contain the previously described dsRNA binding motif, suggesting certain zinc fingers may provide an alternative way to recognize the A-form helix. PMID:9268652

  14. Enzymatic Amplification of DNA/RNA Hybrid Molecular Beacon Signaling in Nucleic Acid Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jacroux, Thomas; Rieck, Daniel C.; Cui, Rong; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2012-01-01

    A rapid assay operable under isothermal or non-isothermal conditions is described wherein the sensitivity of a typical molecular beacon (MB) system is improved by utilizing thermostable RNase H to enzymatically cleave an MB comprised of a DNA stem and RNA loop (R/D-MB). Upon hybridization of the R/D-MB to target DNA, there was a modest increase in fluorescence intensity (~5.7x above background) due to an opening of the probe and concomitant reduction in the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency. Addition of thermostable RNase H resulted in the cleavage of the RNA loop which eliminated energy transfer. The cleavage step also released bound target DNA, enabling it to bind to another R/D-MB probe and rendering the approach a cyclic amplification scheme. Full processing of R/D-MBs maximized the fluorescence signal to the fullest extent possible (12.9x above background), resulting in a ~2–2.8 fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio observed isothermally at 50 °C following the addition of RNase H. The probe was also used to monitor real-time PCR reactions by measuring enhancement of donor fluorescence upon R/D-MB binding to amplified pUC19 template dilutions. Hence, the R/D-MB-RNase H scheme can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid amplification methods. PMID:23000602

  15. Enzymatic amplification of DNA/RNA hybrid molecular beacon signaling in nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Jacroux, Thomas; Rieck, Daniel C; Cui, Rong; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2013-01-15

    A rapid assay operable under isothermal or nonisothermal conditions is described, where the sensitivity of a typical molecular beacon (MB) system is improved by using thermostable RNase H to enzymatically cleave an MB composed of a DNA stem and an RNA loop (R/D-MB). On hybridization of the R/D-MB to target DNA, there was a modest increase in fluorescence intensity (~5.7× above background) due to an opening of the probe and a concomitant reduction in the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency. The addition of thermostable RNase H resulted in the cleavage of the RNA loop, which eliminated energy transfer. The cleavage step also released bound target DNA, enabling it to bind to another R/D-MB probe and rendering the approach a cyclic amplification scheme. Full processing of R/D-MBs maximized the fluorescence signal to the fullest extent possible (12.9× above background), resulting in an approximately 2- to 2.8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio observed isothermally at 50 °C following the addition of RNase H. The probe was also used to monitor real-time polymerase chain reactions by measuring enhancement of donor fluorescence on R/D-MB binding to amplified pUC19 template dilutions. Hence, the R/D-MB-RNase H scheme can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid amplification methods. PMID:23000602

  16. Detection of circovirus infection in pigeons by in situ hybridization using cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Smyth, J A; Weston, J; Moffett, D A; Todd, D

    2001-11-01

    Degenerate primers were designed based on known sequence information for the circoviruses psittacine beak and feather disease virus and porcine circovirus and applied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to known virus-infected bursa of Fabricius (BF) from a pigeon. A 548-bp DNA fragment was amplified and shown to be specific to a novel circovirus, named pigeon circovirus (PiCV), and was used to produce sensitive and specific probes for detection of circovirus DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH). Using ISH on BF from 107 pigeons submitted for necropsy, infection was detected in 89%, compared with a histologic detection rate of 66%. Using the ISH technique, infected cells were also found in liver, kidney, trachea, lung, brain, crop, intestine, spleen, bone marrow, and heart of some birds. Large quantities of DNA were present in some of these tissues, and in the absence of BF, liver in particular is identified as a potentially useful organ to examine for presence of PiCV. This high prevalence of infection in diseased birds is noteworthy, emphasizing the need for studies to determine the precise role of this virus as a disease-producing agent. PMID:11724137

  17. In situ hybridization to cytogenetic bands of yeast artificial chromosomes covering 50% of human Xq24-Xq28 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Vittorio; Casamassimi, Amelia; D'Urso, Michele; Yoon, Jae-Young; Freije, Wadiha; Schlessinger, David; Muenke, Maximilian; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Saccone, Salvatore; Maugeri, Silvana; Santoro, Anna Maria; Motta, Salvatore; Della Valle, Giuliano

    1991-01-01

    From the collection described by Abidi et al., 102 yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) with human DNA inserts more than 300 kb in length were assigned to chromosomal band positions on early metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization using the biotin-avidin method. All the YACs hybridized within the Xq24-Xqter region, supporting the origin of the vast majority of the YACs from single human X-chromosomal sites. With assignments precise to ±0.5 bands, YACs were distributed among cytogenetic bands to roughly equal extents. Thus, there is no gross bias in the cloning of DNA from different bands into large YACs. To test band assignments further, hybridizations were carried out blind, and band positions were then compared with (1) probe localizations in cases in which a reported location was present in one of the YACs; (2) cross-hybridization of a labeled YAC with others in the collection; and (3) hybridization to a panel of DNAs from a series of hybrid cells containing Xq DNA truncated at various regions. Of 31 cases in which YACs contained a probe with a previously reported location, 28 in situ assignments were in agreement, and 14 other assignments, including one of the three discordant with probe localization, were confirmed by YAC cross-hybridization studies. Results with a group of nine YACs were further confirmed with a panel of somatic cell hybrid DNAs from that region. Five YACs hybridized both to Xq25 and to a second site (four in Xq27 and one in Xq28), suggestive of some duplication of DNA of the hybrid cell and perhaps in normal X chromosomes. The in situ assignments are thus sufficient to place YACs easily and systematically within bins of about 7–10 Mb and to detect some possible anomalies. Furthermore, on the basis of expectations for random cloning of DNA in YACs, the assigned YACs probably cover more than 50% of the total Xq24-Xq28 region. This provides one way to initiate the assembly of YAC contigs over extended chromosomal regions. Images

  18. The application of magnetic bead hybridization for the recovery and STR amplification of degraded and inhibited forensic DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; McCord, Bruce

    2011-06-01

    A common problem in the analysis of forensic DNA evidence is the presence of environmentally degraded and inhibited DNA. Such samples produce a variety of interpretational problems such as allele imbalance, allele dropout and sequence specific inhibition. In an attempt to develop methods to enhance the recovery of this type of evidence, magnetic bead hybridization has been applied to extract and preconcentrate DNA sequences containing short tandem repeat (STR) alleles of interest. In this work, genomic DNA was fragmented by heating, and sequences associated with STR alleles were selectively hybridized to allele-specific biotinylated probes. Each particular biotinylated probe-DNA complex was bound to streptavidin-coated magnetic beads using enabling enrichment of target DNA sequences. Experiments conducted using degraded DNA samples, as well as samples containing a large concentration of inhibitory substances, showed good specificity and recovery of missing alleles. Based on the favorable results obtained with these specific probes, this method should prove useful as a tool to improve the recovery of alleles from degraded and inhibited DNA samples. PMID:21706494

  19. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, R. L.; Mir, M.; Samitier, J.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications.

  20. Hybridization between multiple fence lizard lineages in an ecotone: locally discordant variation in mitochondrial DNA, chromosomes, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Leaché, Adam D; Cole, Charles J

    2007-03-01

    We investigated a hybrid zone between two major lineages of fence lizards (Sceloporus cowlesi and Sceloporus tristichus) in the Sceloporus undulatus species complex in eastern Arizona. This zone occurs in an ecotone between Great Basin Grassland and Conifer Woodland habitats. We analysed spatial variation in mtDNA (N=401; 969 bp), chromosomes (N=217), and morphology (N=312; 11 characters) to characterize the hybrid zone and assess species limits. A fine-scale population level phylogenetic analysis refined the boundaries between these species and indicated that four nonsister mtDNA clades (three belonging to S. tristichus and one to S. cowlesi) are sympatric at the centre of the zone. Estimates of cytonuclear disequilibria in the population closest to the centre of the hybrid zone suggest that the S. tristichus clades are randomly mating, but that the S. cowlesi haplotype has a significant nonrandom association with nuclear alleles. Maximum-likelihood cline-fitting analyses suggest that the karyotype, morphology, and dorsal colour pattern clines are all coincident, but the mtDNA cline is skewed significantly to the south. A temporal comparison of cline centres utilizing karyotype data collected in the early 1970s and in 2002 suggests that the cline may have shifted by approximately 1.5 km to the north over a 30-year period. The recent northward expansion of juniper trees into the Little Colorado River Basin resulting from intense cattle overgrazing provides a plausible mechanism for a shifting hybrid zone and the introgression of the mtDNA haplotypes, which appear to be selectively neutral. It is clear that complex interactions are operating simultaneously in this contact zone, including the formation of hybrids between populations within S. tristichus having diagnostic mtDNA, morphology, karyotypes, and dorsal colour patterns, and secondary contact between these and a distantly related yet morphologically cryptic mtDNA lineage (S. cowlesi). PMID:17305859

  1. Not just "a clever way to detect whether DNA really made RNA": The invention of DNA-RNA hybridization and its outcome.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Susie

    2015-10-01

    The invention of DNA-RNA hybridization in 1960 by Ben Hall and Sol Spiegelman had a powerful impact on the theory and discourse of molecular biology. Yet, despite its importance, the story of this invention has barely been told. Hybridization allowed biologists to bridge the theoretical realm and the material world of organisms, to correlate a hypothetical concept of biological information transfer with a mechanism capable of making an RNA copy of DNA. During the early 1960s, Spiegelman and coworkers employed hybridization to investigate the origin of RNAs found in cells. They operationally defined messenger RNA and elucidated several aspects of genome organization. For Spiegelman, this was the culmination of his longstanding interest in the mechanism of enzyme/protein synthesis; for Hall, it was the beginning of a successful career in genetics. Other scientists immediately recognized the power of the technique and introduced improvements. In 1965, Gillespie and Spiegelman combined several modifications and described a procedure for hybridization that became standard. Since the 1970s, it has become an essential tool in biology and in biotechnology, and a core component in molecular techniques such as DNA microarrays. Notwithstanding its current success, the inventors' names have disappeared from the literature. This curiosity is discussed. PMID:26209888

  2. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA based on Zn²⁺ assistant DNA recycling followed with hybridization chain reaction dual amplification.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Wang, Chunyan; Gao, Fenglei

    2015-01-15

    A new strategy to combine Zn(2+) assistant DNA recycling followed with hybridization chain reaction dual amplification was designed for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA. A gold electrode was used to immobilize molecular beacon (MB) as the recognition probe and perform the amplification procedure. In the presence of the target DNA, the hairpin probe 1 was opened, and the DNAzyme was liberated from the caged structure. The activated DNAzyme hybridized with the MB and catalyzed its cleavage in the presence of Zn(2+) cofactor and resulting in a free DNAzyme strand. Finally, each target-induced activated DNAzyme underwent many cycles triggering the cleavage of MB, thus forming numerous MB fragments. The MB fragments triggered the HCR and formed a long double-helix DNA structure. Because both H1 and H2 were labeled by biotin, a lot of SA-ALP was captured on the electrode surface, thus catalyzing a silver deposition process for electrochemical stripping analysis. This novel cascade signal amplification strategy can detect target DNA down to the attomolar level with a dynamic range spanning 6 orders of magnitude. This highly sensitive and specific assay has a great potential to become a promising DNA quantification method in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. PMID:25128622

  3. Species-Specific Detection of Vibrio anguillarum in Marine Aquaculture Environments by Selective Culture and DNA Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, J.; Alsina, M.; Blanch, A. R.; Cerda, M.; Jofre, J.

    1996-01-01

    Methods for specific detection of Vibrio anguillarum in complex microbial communities within diverse marine aquaculture environments were evaluated. A system for the detection of culturable cells based on the combined use of a selective medium and a nonradioactively labeled oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to 16S rRNA was developed. Four hundred fourteen bacterial cultures were evaluated in order to assess the specificity of the method. When both the selective medium and the specific probe gave positive results, the cultures were always identified as V. anguillarum. The selectivity for colony hybridization was 1 V. anguillarum cell in 10,000 total bacterial cells in environmental samples. The utility of the method was also compared with detection by dot blot hybridization of either raw DNA purified from environmental samples or PCR-amplified DNA of 16S rRNA genes, using universal eubacterial primers. The post-PCR hybridization was more sensitive (8 x 10(sup2) cells) than direct hybridization of the whole purified DNA (10(sup6) cells). However, the selective medium-probe combined method was as sensitive as post-PCR hybridization, albeit more specific. PMID:16535233

  4. A hybrid molecular dynamics study of the translocation of DNA through entropic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotmar, Petr

    2010-11-01

    The interplay between thermal diffusion and electrophoretic migration of λ-phage DNA in entropic traps was studied using a hybrid molecular dynamics algorithm. The governing systems of field equations are discretized by finite differences on curvilinear overlapping grids with the solvent modeled as a continuum in unsteady creeping flow. Similar to Brownian dynamics, the polymer segments are coarse-grained into a bead-spring model that follows Langevin dynamics. The hydrodynamic interactions are captured on a semi-empirical level with localized force-transfer. We have established the non-monotonic dependence of electrophoretic mobility on chain length, which characterizes the transition from the free flowing to the trapping behavior. We further quantify the subtle effects of dielectrophoresis and induced-charge electroosmosis on the polymer dynamics.

  5. Polymer Conformation and Topological Defects in Systems of Hairy and DNA hybridized Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorowski, Chris; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Systems of hairy and DNA hybridized Nanoparticles are able to self-assemble into an array of superlattices. Understanding the role the polymer plays is critical to predicting the superlattice structure. In this talk, we use Molecular Dynamics to study hairy nanoparticles where the grafted polymer is modeled explicitly. We study self-assembly starting from a liquid and following the nucleation and growth of large nanoparticle superlattices (2000NP). We explore the role of polymer stretching as well as the geometric frustration of the polymer for both spherical and cubic nanoparticles. We also provide a characterization of the dynamics, including topological defects. Further, we will discuss the difficulties and methods for simulating large lattices in molecular dynamics.

  6. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  7. Use of Unamplified RNA/cDNA-Hybrid Nanopore Sequencing for Rapid Detection and Characterization of RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Kilianski, Andy; Roth, Pierce A; Liem, Alvin T; Hill, Jessica M; Willis, Kristen L; Rossmaier, Rebecca D; Marinich, Andrew V; Maughan, Michele N; Karavis, Mark A; Kuhn, Jens H; Honko, Anna N; Rosenzweig, C Nicole

    2016-08-01

    Nanopore sequencing, a novel genomics technology, has potential applications for routine biosurveillance, clinical diagnosis, and outbreak investigation of virus infections. Using rapid sequencing of unamplified RNA/cDNA hybrids, we identified Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus and Ebola virus in 3 hours from sample receipt to data acquisition, demonstrating a fieldable technique for RNA virus characterization. PMID:27191483

  8. Self-assembling DNA-peptide hybrids: morphological consequences of oligonucleotide grafting to a pathogenic amyloid fibrils forming dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Gour, Nidhi; Kedracki, Dawid; Safir, Ilyès; Ngo, Kien Xuan; Vebert-Nardin, Corinne

    2012-06-01

    For the very first time, highly efficient synthesis of DNA-peptide hybrids to scaffold self-assembled nanostructures is described. Oligonucleotide conjugation to the diphenylalanine dipeptide triggers a morphological transition from fibrillar to vesicular structures which may potentially be used as delivery vehicles, since they exhibit pH triggered release. PMID:22534735

  9. Rapid transcriptional response of apple to fire blight disease revealed by cDNA suppression subtractive hybridization analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Ea), is a destructive disease of many tree and shrub species of the Rosaceae. Suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization (SSH) was used to identify genes that are differentially up- and down- regulated in apple (Malus X domestica) in response ...

  10. Molecular cytogenetics of Alstroemeria: identification of parental genomes in interspecific hybrids and characterization of repetitive DNA families in constitutive heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, A G; van Os, D P; de Jong, J H; Ramanna, M S

    1997-02-01

    The genus Alstroemeria consists of diploid (2n = 2x = 16) species originating mainly from Chile and Brazil. Most cultivars are triploid or tetraploid interspecific hybrids. C-banding of eight species revealed obvious differentiation of constitutive heterochromatin within the genus. The present study focused on the molecular (cyto)genetic background of this differentiation. Genomic slot-blot analysis demonstrated strong conservation of major parts of the genomes among six species. The chromosomes of A. aurea and A. ligtu, species with pronounced interstitial C-bands, were found to contain large amounts of highly repetitive and species-specific DNA. The variation in size, number and intensity of strongly probed bands of major repetitive DNA families observed in genomic Southern blots of Sau3A, HaeIII, and MseI digests indicated a strong correlation between variation in genomic DNA composition and different C-banding patterns among Alstroemeria species. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) revealed a clear distinction between parental chromosomes in the hybrids between Chilean and Brazilian species and also between Chilean species, as long as at least one of the parental species possessed prominent C-banding. Regarding the latter, discriminative hybridization resulted from highly repetitive species specific DNA in the heterochromatic chromosome regions of A. aurea and A. ligtu, and caused GISH banding patterns that coincided with the C-banding patterns. PMID:9088641

  11. HyDEn: A Hybrid Steganocryptographic Approach for Data Encryption Using Randomized Error-Correcting DNA Codes

    PubMed Central

    Regoui, Chaouki; Durand, Guillaume; Belliveau, Luc; Léger, Serge

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid DNA encryption (HyDEn) approach that uses randomized assignments of unique error-correcting DNA Hamming code words for single characters in the extended ASCII set. HyDEn relies on custom-built quaternary codes and a private key used in the randomized assignment of code words and the cyclic permutations applied on the encoded message. Along with its ability to detect and correct errors, HyDEn equals or outperforms existing cryptographic methods and represents a promising in silico DNA steganographic approach. PMID:23984392

  12. HyDEn: a hybrid steganocryptographic approach for data encryption using randomized error-correcting DNA codes.

    PubMed

    Tulpan, Dan; Regoui, Chaouki; Durand, Guillaume; Belliveau, Luc; Léger, Serge

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid DNA encryption (HyDEn) approach that uses randomized assignments of unique error-correcting DNA Hamming code words for single characters in the extended ASCII set. HyDEn relies on custom-built quaternary codes and a private key used in the randomized assignment of code words and the cyclic permutations applied on the encoded message. Along with its ability to detect and correct errors, HyDEn equals or outperforms existing cryptographic methods and represents a promising in silico DNA steganographic approach. PMID:23984392

  13. Hybridization modeling of oligonucleotide SNP arrays for accurate DNA copy number estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lin; Sun, Kelian; Ding, Qi; Cui, Yuehua; Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Elston, Robert C.; Qian, Minping; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2009-01-01

    Affymetrix SNP arrays have been widely used for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype calling and DNA copy number variation inference. Although numerous methods have achieved high accuracy in these fields, most studies have paid little attention to the modeling of hybridization of probes to off-target allele sequences, which can affect the accuracy greatly. In this study, we address this issue and demonstrate that hybridization with mismatch nucleotides (HWMMN) occurs in all SNP probe-sets and has a critical effect on the estimation of allelic concentrations (ACs). We study sequence binding through binding free energy and then binding affinity, and develop a probe intensity composite representation (PICR) model. The PICR model allows the estimation of ACs at a given SNP through statistical regression. Furthermore, we demonstrate with cell-line data of known true copy numbers that the PICR model can achieve reasonable accuracy in copy number estimation at a single SNP locus, by using the ratio of the estimated AC of each sample to that of the reference sample, and can reveal subtle genotype structure of SNPs at abnormal loci. We also demonstrate with HapMap data that the PICR model yields accurate SNP genotype calls consistently across samples, laboratories and even across array platforms. PMID:19586935

  14. Two hybrid plasmids with D. melanogaster DNA sequences complementary to mRNA coding for the major heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Schedl, P; Artavanis-Tsakonas, S; Steward, R; Gehring, W J; Mirault, M E; Goldschmidt-Clermont, M; Moran, L; Tissières, A

    1978-08-01

    The isolation and partial characterization of two cloned segments of Drosophila melanogaster DNA containing "heat shock" gene sequences is described. We have inserted sheared embryonic D. melanogaster DNA by the poly(dA-dt) connector method (Lobban and Kaiser, 1973) into the R1 restriction site of the ampicillin-resistant plasmid pSF2124 (So, Gill and Falkow, 1975). A collection of independent hybrid plasmids was screened by colony hybridization (Grunstein and Hogness, 1975) for sequences complementary to in vitro labeled polysomal poly(A)+ heat shock RNA. Two clones were identified which contain sequences complementary to a heat shock mRNA species that directs the in vitro synthesis of the 70,000 dalton heat-induced polypeptide. Both cloned segments hybridize in situ to the heat-induced puff sites located at 87A and 87C of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes. PMID:99246

  15. [Unidirectional Hybridization of Kaluga Acipenser dauricus Georgi, 1775 and Amur Sturgeon Acipenser schrenckii Brandt, 1869, Inferred from the Mitochondrial DNA Genotyping of Their Natural Hybrids].

    PubMed

    Shedko, S V; Shedko, M B

    2016-03-01

    In 2009 through 2011, among 730 individuals of kaluga and Amur sturgeon collected in the lower reaches of the Amur River and the Amursky Liman, 17 morphologically intermediate individuals (hybrids) with the body length of 56 to 202 cm (median, 81 cm) were identified, including 11 individuals (4.6%) found in 2009, three individuals (1.6%) found in 2010, and three individuals (1.1%), in 2011. In 16 hybrids 819 bp of the mtDNA control regions were sequences and 11 haplotypes were identified. Since all these haplotypes were from the mtDNA lineages of kaluga, it was concluded that hybridization occurred in one direction, kaluga (♀) x Amur sturgeon (♂). This asymmetry could be caused by the large difference in sizes of these species. Since the earlier examined morphologically typical Amur sturgeons showed the absence of alien haplotypes (Shedko, et al., 2015), the absence of the mtDNA introgression is claimed. This can be caused by low viability or sterility of the backcross females (kaluga (♀) x Amur sturgeon (♂)) x Amur sturgeon (♂). The samples of hybrids and typical kaluga individuals demonstrated no differences in the frequency spectra of the mtDNA haplotypes. However, haplotype and nucleotide diversity in the first sample was somewhat higher than in the second one (0.950 versus 0.927 and 0.0054 versus 0.0044, respectively). The data obtained will be useful for population monitoring of kaluga and Amur sturgeon, Amur River endemics, which are classified as critically endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. PMID:27281853

  16. Templated Formation of Discrete RNA and DNA:RNA Hybrid G-Quadruplexes and Their Interactions with Targeting Ligands.

    PubMed

    Bonnat, Laureen; Dejeu, Jérôme; Bonnet, Hugues; Génnaro, Béatrice; Jarjayes, Olivier; Thomas, Fabrice; Lavergne, Thomas; Defrancq, Eric

    2016-02-24

    G-rich RNA and DNA oligonucleotides derived from the human telomeric sequence were assembled onto addressable cyclopeptide platforms through oxime ligations and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAc) reactions. The resulting conjugates were able to fold into highly stable RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (G4) architectures as demonstrated by UV, circular dichroism (CD), and NMR spectroscopic analysis. Whereas rationally designed parallel RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G4 topologies could be obtained, we could not force the formation of an antiparallel RNA G4 structure, thus supporting the idea that this topology is strongly disfavored. The binding affinities of four representative G4 ligands toward the discrete RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G4 topologies were compared to the one obtained with the corresponding DNA G4 structure. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis suggests that the accessibility to G4 recognition elements is different among the three structures and supports the idea that G4 ligands might be shaped to achieve structure selectivity in a biological context. PMID:26808196

  17. Rapid sex determination on buccal smears using DNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldez, R.A.; Harris, C.

    1994-09-01

    Hybridization of dual-labeled DNA probes for the repetitive sequences on the X and Y chromosomes allows a fast, non-invasive, more reliable method for sex determination that current cytogenetic Barr body and Y chromatin assays. Scrapes of squamous epithelial cells were collected from the oral cavity of 14 subjects (5{male}, 9{female}) and smeared onto silanized slides. The smears were allowed to air dry. Samples were blinded and then fixed in 50% methanol/50% glacial acetic acid for 10 minutes, and allowed to dry. The slides were incubated in a pretreatment solution containing 30% sodium bisulfite at 45{degrees}C for 10 minutes. They were rinsed in 2XSSC pH 7.0 and then dehydrated through a series of 70%, 85%, and 100% ethanols at room temperature and allowed to air dry. A probe mixture (30 {mu}L containing 10 ng/{mu}L biotin-labeled DXZ1 and digoxigenin-labeled DYZ1/DYZ3 in 70% Formamide/2XSSC) was aliquoted onto each slide, coverslipped, and sealed with rubber cement. Probe and target DNA were simultaneously denatured at 72{degrees}C on a slide warmer for 6 minutes. Probe was allowed to hybridize overnight in a humidified chamber at 37{degrees}C. Slides were postwashed at 72{degrees}C in 0.5xSSC pH 7.0 for 5 minutes, then soaked at room temperature 1XPBD for 2 minutes, and detected with rhodamine/anti-digoxigenin-FITC/avidin for 15 minutes at 37{degrees}C. Slides were soaked 3X in 1XPBD and then counterstained with 15 {mu}L 0.05 {mu}g/mL DAP1/Antifade. 200 nuclei were scored for the presence of one green (X), two green (XX), one green and one red (XY), or a single red (Y) signal, using a fluorescent microscope equipped with a triple band pass filter. Greater than 90% of the hybridized nuclei from each of the 14 cases studied conformed to the sex chromosome pattern. The modal number in 9 cases showed two green signals (XX), and a green and a red signal (XY) in the other 5 cases; this was in complete agreement with the cytogenetic results.

  18. Kinetics of Oligonucleotide Hybridization to DNA Probe Arrays on High-Capacity Porous Silica Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Marc I.; Fidanza, Jacqueline A.; McGall, Glenn H.; Trulson, Mark O.; Forman, Jonathan E.; Frank, Curtis W.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of DNA hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays on high-capacity porous silica films that were deposited by two techniques. Films created by spin coating pure colloidal silica suspensions onto a substrate had pores of ∼23 nm, relatively low porosity (35%), and a surface area of 17 times flat glass (for a 0.3-μm film). In the second method, latex particles were codeposited with the silica by spin coating and then pyrolyzed, which resulted in larger pores (36 nm), higher porosity (65%), and higher surface area (26 times flat glass for a 0.3-μm film). As a result of these favorable properties, the templated silica hybridized more quickly and reached a higher adsorbed target density (11 vs. 8 times flat glass at 22°C) than the pure silica. Adsorption of DNA onto the high-capacity films is controlled by traditional adsorption and desorption coefficients, as well as by morphology factors and transient binding interactions between the target and the probes. To describe these effects, we have developed a model based on the analogy to diffusion of a reactant in a porous catalyst. Adsorption values (ka, kd, and K) measured on planar arrays for the same probe/target system provide the parameters for the model and also provide an internally consistent comparison for the stability of the transient complexes. The interpretation of the model takes into account factors not previously considered for hybridization in three-dimensional films, including the potential effects of heterogeneous probe populations, partial probe/target complexes during diffusion, and non-1:1 binding structures. The transient complexes are much less stable than full duplexes (binding constants for full duplexes higher by three orders of magnitude or more), which may be a result of the unique probe density and distribution that is characteristic of the photolithographically patterned arrays. The behavior at 22°C is described well by the predictive equations for

  19. Polyglycerol-functionalized nanodiamond as a platform for gene delivery: Derivatization, characterization, and hybridization with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Nakae, Yuki; Qin, Hongmei; Ito, Tadamasa; Kimura, Takahide; Kojima, Hideto; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Summary A gene vector consisting of nanodiamond, polyglycerol, and basic polypeptide (ND-PG-BPP) has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The ND-PG-BPP was synthesized by PG functionalization of ND through ring-opening polymerization of glycidol on the ND surface, multistep organic transformations (–OH → –OTs (tosylate) → –N3) in the PG layer, and click conjugation of the basic polypeptides (Arg8, Lys8 or His8) terminated with propargyl glycine. The ND-PG-BPP exhibited good dispersibility in water (>1.0 mg/mL) and positive zeta potential ranging from +14.2 mV to +44.1 mV at neutral pH in Milli-Q water. It was confirmed by gel retardation assay that ND-PG-Arg8 and ND-PG-Lys8 with higher zeta potential hybridized with plasmid DNA (pDNA) through electrostatic attraction, making them promising as nonviral vectors for gene delivery. PMID:24778723

  20. Hybrid nonviral/viral vector systems for improved piggyBac DNA transposon in vivo delivery.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Ashley L; Singh, Brajesh K; Sinn, Patrick L

    2015-04-01

    The DNA transposon piggyBac is a potential therapeutic agent for multiple genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Recombinant piggyBac transposon and transposase are typically codelivered by plasmid transfection; however, plasmid delivery is inefficient in somatic cells in vivo and is a barrier to the therapeutic application of transposon-based vector systems. Here, we investigate the potential for hybrid piggyBac/viral vectors to transduce cells and support transposase-mediated genomic integration of the transposon. We tested both adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as transposon delivery vehicles. An Ad vector expressing hyperactive insect piggyBac transposase (iPB7) was codelivered. We show transposase-dependent transposition activity and mapped integrations in mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo from each viral vector platform. We also demonstrate efficient and persistent transgene expression following nasal delivery of piggyBac/viral vectors to mice. Furthermore, using piggyBac/Ad expressing Cystic Fibrosis transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR), we show persistent correction of chloride current in well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells derived from CF patients. Combining the emerging technologies of DNA transposon-based vectors with well-studied adenoviral and AAV delivery provides new tools for in vivo gene transfer and presents an exciting opportunity to increase the delivery efficiency for therapeutic genes such as CFTR. PMID:25557623

  1. Polyglycerol-functionalized nanodiamond as a platform for gene delivery: Derivatization, characterization, and hybridization with DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Nakae, Yuki; Qin, Hongmei; Ito, Tadamasa; Kimura, Takahide; Kojima, Hideto; Chan, Lawrence; Komatsu, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    A gene vector consisting of nanodiamond, polyglycerol, and basic polypeptide (ND-PG-BPP) has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The ND-PG-BPP was synthesized by PG functionalization of ND through ring-opening polymerization of glycidol on the ND surface, multistep organic transformations (-OH → -OTs (tosylate) → -N3) in the PG layer, and click conjugation of the basic polypeptides (Arg8, Lys8 or His8) terminated with propargyl glycine. The ND-PG-BPP exhibited good dispersibility in water (>1.0 mg/mL) and positive zeta potential ranging from +14.2 mV to +44.1 mV at neutral pH in Milli-Q water. It was confirmed by gel retardation assay that ND-PG-Arg8 and ND-PG-Lys8 with higher zeta potential hybridized with plasmid DNA (pDNA) through electrostatic attraction, making them promising as nonviral vectors for gene delivery. PMID:24778723

  2. DNA Immobilization and Hybridization Detection by the Intrinsic Molecular Charge Using Capacitive Field-Effect Sensors Modified with a Charged Weak Polyelectrolyte Layer.

    PubMed

    Bronder, Thomas S; Poghossian, Arshak; Scheja, Sabrina; Wu, Chunsheng; Keusgen, Michael; Mewes, Dieter; Schöning, Michael J

    2015-09-16

    Miniaturized setup, compatibility with advanced micro- and nanotechnologies, and ability to detect biomolecules by their intrinsic molecular charge favor the semiconductor field-effect platform as one of the most attractive approaches for the development of label-free DNA chips. In this work, a capacitive field-effect EIS (electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor) sensor covered with a layer-by-layer prepared, positively charged weak polyelectrolyte layer of PAH (poly(allylamine hydrochloride)) was used for the label-free electrical detection of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) immobilization and hybridization. The negatively charged probe single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules were electrostatically adsorbed onto the positively charged PAH layer, resulting in a preferentially flat orientation of the ssDNA molecules within the Debye length, thus yielding a reduced charge-screening effect and a higher sensor signal. Each sensor-surface modification step (PAH adsorption, probe ssDNA immobilization, hybridization with complementary target DNA (cDNA), reducing an unspecific adsorption by a blocking agent, incubation with noncomplementary DNA (ncDNA) solution) was monitored by means of capacitance-voltage and constant-capacitance measurements. In addition, the surface morphology of the PAH layer was studied by atomic force microscopy and contact-angle measurements. High hybridization signals of 34 and 43 mV were recorded in low-ionic strength solutions of 10 and 1 mM, respectively. In contrast, a small signal of 4 mV was recorded in the case of unspecific adsorption of fully mismatched ncDNA. The density of probe ssDNA and dsDNA molecules as well as the hybridization efficiency was estimated using the experimentally measured DNA immobilization and hybridization signals and a simplified double-layer capacitor model. The results of field-effect experiments were supported by fluorescence measurements, verifying the DNA-immobilization and hybridization event. PMID:26327272

  3. Detection of human papillomavirus type 6/11 DNA in conjunctival papillomas by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, P.J.; McDonnell, J.M.; Kessis, T.; Green, W.R.; Shah, K.V.

    1987-11-01

    Twenty-three conjunctival papillomas and 28 conjunctival dysplasias were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA sequences by in situ hybridization with nick-translated /sup 35/S-labeled HPV probes. Adjacent paraffin sections were hybridized with HPV type 2, 6, 16, and 18 probes at Tm - 17 degrees C. Fifteen tissues, all papillomas, displayed positive hybridization with the HPV-6 probe. Infection with HPV-6 (or the closely related HPV-11) appeared to be responsible for most of the conjunctival papillomas of children and young adults. The presence of genital tract HPV-6 in these lesions suggests that some of the infections were acquired during passage through an infected birth canal. The lack of hybridization in adult conjunctival dysplasias indicates either that HPVs are not associated with this condition or that the probes and the technique utilized were not adequate for demonstration of this association.

  4. Comprehensive splicing functional analysis of DNA variants of the BRCA2 gene by hybrid minigenes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The underlying pathogenic mechanism of a large fraction of DNA variants of disease-causing genes is the disruption of the splicing process. We aimed to investigate the effect on splicing of the BRCA2 variants c.8488-1G > A (exon 20) and c.9026_9030del (exon 23), as well as 41 BRCA2 variants reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core (BIC) mutation database. Methods DNA variants were analyzed with the splicing prediction programs NNSPLICE and Human Splicing Finder. Functional analyses of candidate variants were performed by lymphocyte RT-PCR and/or hybrid minigene assays. Forty-one BIC variants of exons 19, 20, 23 and 24 were bioinformatically selected and generated by PCR-mutagenesis of the wild type minigenes. Results Lymphocyte RT-PCR of c.8488-1G > A showed intron 19 retention and a 12-nucleotide deletion in exon 20, whereas c.9026_9030del did not show any splicing anomaly. Minigene analysis of c.8488-1G > A displayed the aforementioned aberrant isoforms but also exon 20 skipping. We further evaluated the splicing outcomes of 41 variants of four BRCA2 exons by minigene analysis. Eighteen variants presented splicing aberrations. Most variants (78.9%) disrupted the natural splice sites, whereas four altered putative enhancers/silencers and had a weak effect. Fluorescent RT-PCR of minigenes accurately detected 14 RNA isoforms generated by cryptic site usage, exon skipping and intron retention events. Fourteen variants showed total splicing disruptions and were predicted to truncate or eliminate essential domains of BRCA2. Conclusions A relevant proportion of BRCA2 variants are correlated with splicing disruptions, indicating that RNA analysis is a valuable tool to assess the pathogenicity of a particular DNA change. The minigene system is a straightforward and robust approach to detect variants with an impact on splicing and contributes to a better knowledge of this gene expression step. PMID:22632462

  5. Human secreted carbonic anhydrase: cDNA cloning, nucleotide sequence, and hybridization histochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, P.; Fu, Ping; Barrett, G.; Penschow, J.D.; Wright, R.D.; Coghlan, J.P.; Fernley, R.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones coding for the human secreted carbonic anhydrase isozyme (CAVI) have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences determined. These clones identify a 1.45-kb mRNA that is present in high levels in parotid submandibular salivary glands but absent in other tissues such as the sublingual gland, kidney, liver, and prostate gland. Hybridization histochemistry of human salivary glands shows mRNA for CA VI located in the acinar cells of these glands. The cDNA clones encode a protein of 308 amino acids that includes a 17 amino acid leader sequence typical of secreted proteins. The mature protein has 291 amino acids compared to 259 or 260 for the cytoplasmic isozymes, with most of the extra amino acids present as a carboxyl terminal extension. In comparison, sheep CA VI has a 45 amino acid extension. Overall the human CA VI protein has a sequence identity of 35 {percent} with human CA II, while residues involved in the active site of the enzymes have been conserved. The human and sheep secreted carbonic anhydrases have a sequence identity of 72 {percent}. This includes the two cysteine residues that are known to be involved in an intramolecular disulfide bond in the sheep CA VI. The enzyme is known to be glycosylated and three potential N-glycosylation sites (Asn-X-Thr/Ser) have been identified. Two of these are known to be glycosylated in sheep CA VI. Southern analysis of human DNA indicates that there is only one gene coding for CA VI.

  6. DNA hybridization detection with 100 zM sensitivity using piezoelectric plate sensors with an improved noise-reduction algorithm†

    PubMed Central

    Kirimli, Ceyhun E.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have examined real-time, in situ hybridization detection of target DNA (tDNA) in a buffer solution and in urine using 8 μm-thick lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate (PMN–PT) piezoelectric plate sensors (PEPSs) about 1.1–1.2 mm long and 0.45 mm wide with improved 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) insulation and a new multiple-parabola (>50) resonance peak position fitting algorithm. With probe DNA (pDNA) immobilized on the PEPS surface and by monitoring the first width extension mode (WEM) resonance frequency shift we detected tDNA in real time at concentration as low as 1 × 10−19 M in urine (100 zM) with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 13 without DNA isolation and amplification at room temperature in 30 min. The present multiple-parabola fitting algorithm increased the detection of SNR by about 10 times compared to those obtained using the raw data and by about 5 times compared to those obtained using single parabola fitting. The detection was validated by in situ follow-up detection and subsequent visualization of fluorescent reporter microspheres (FRMs) coated with reporter DNA complementary to the tDNA but different from the probe pDNA. PMID:24759937

  7. DNA hybridization detection with 100 zM sensitivity using piezoelectric plate sensors with an improved noise-reduction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kirimli, Ceyhun E; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y

    2014-06-01

    We have examined real-time, in situ hybridization detection of target DNA (tDNA) in a buffer solution and in urine using 8 μm-thick lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensors (PEPSs) about 1.1-1.2 mm long and 0.45 mm wide with improved 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) insulation and a new multiple-parabola (>50) resonance peak position fitting algorithm. With probe DNA (pDNA) immobilized on the PEPS surface and by monitoring the first width extension mode (WEM) resonance frequency shift we detected tDNA in real time at concentration as low as 1 × 10(-19) M in urine (100 zM) with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 13 without DNA isolation and amplification at room temperature in 30 min. The present multiple-parabola fitting algorithm increased the detection of SNR by about 10 times compared to those obtained using the raw data and by about 5 times compared to those obtained using single parabola fitting. The detection was validated by in situ follow-up detection and subsequent visualization of fluorescent reporter microspheres (FRMs) coated with reporter DNA complementary to the tDNA but different from the probe pDNA. PMID:24759937

  8. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Hiett, Kelli L; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the "gold standard" enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples. PMID:25548939

  9. A controlled microfluidic electrochemical lab-on-a-chip for label-free diffusion-restricted DNA hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-02-15

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices for electrochemical analysis of DNA hybridization events offer a technology for real-time and label-free assessment of biomarkers at the point-of-care. Here, we present a microfluidic LOC, with 3 × 3 arrayed electrochemical sensors for the analysis of DNA hybridization events. A new dual layer microfluidic valved manipulation system is integrated providing controlled and automated capabilities for high throughput analysis. This feature improves the repeatability, accuracy, and overall sensing performance (Fig. 1). The electrochemical activity of the fabricated microfluidic device is validated and demonstrated repeatable and reversible Nernstian characteristics. System design required detailed analysis of energy storage and dissipation as our sensing modeling involves diffusion-related electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effect of DNA hybridization on the calculated charge transfer resistance and the diffusional resistance components is evaluated. We demonstrate a specific device with an average cross-reactivity value of 27.5%. The device yields semilogarithmic dose response and enables a theoretical detection limit of 1 nM of complementary ssDNA target. This limit is lower than our previously reported non-valved device by 74% due to on-chip valve integration providing controlled and accurate assay capabilities. PMID:25310492

  10. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    PubMed

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions. PMID:24310436

  11. Cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon: A novel efficient signal translator for sensitive fluorescence anisotropy bioassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pan; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-15

    Due to its unique features such as high sensitivity, homogeneous format, and independence on fluorescent intensity, fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay has become a hotspot of study in oligonucleotide-based bioassays. However, until now most FA probes require carefully customized structure designs, and thus are neither generalizable for different sensing systems nor effective to obtain sufficient signal response. To address this issue, a cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was successfully engineered for signal amplified FA bioassay, via combining the unique stable structure of molecular beacon and the large molecular mass of streptavidin. Compared with single DNA strand probe or conventional molecular beacon, the DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon exhibited a much higher FA value, which was potential to obtain high signal-background ratio in sensing process. As proof-of-principle, this novel DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was further applied for FA bioassay using DNAzyme-Pb(2+) as a model sensing system. This FA assay approach could selectively detect as low as 0.5nM Pb(2+) in buffer solution, and also be successful for real samples analysis with good recovery values. Compatible with most of oligonucleotide probes' designs and enzyme-based signal amplification strategies, the molecular beacon can serve as a novel signal translator to expand the application prospect of FA technology in various bioassays. PMID:26592607

  12. Fluorescent cDNA microarray hybridization reveals complexity and heterogeneity of cellular genotoxic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Amundson, S A; Bittner, M; Chen, Y; Trent, J; Meltzer, P; Fornace, A J

    1999-06-17

    The fate of cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) may depend greatly on changes in gene expression, so that an improved view of gene induction profiles is important for understanding mechanisms of checkpoint control, repair and cell death following such exposures. We have used a quantitative fluorescent cDNA microarray hybridization approach to identify genes regulated in response to 7-irradiation in the p53 wild-type ML-1 human myeloid cell line. Hybridization of the array to fluorescently-labeled RNA from treated and untreated cells was followed by computer analysis to derive relative changes in expression levels of the genes present in the array, which agreed well with actual quantitative changes in expression. Forty-eight sequences, 30 not previously identified as IR-responsive, were significantly regulated by IR. Induction by IR and other stresses of a subset of these genes, including the previously characterized CIP1/ WAF1, MDM2 and BAX genes, as well as nine genes not previously reported to be IR-responsive, was examined in a panel of 12 human cell lines. Responses varied widely in cell lines with different tissues of origin and different genetic backgrounds, highlighting the importance of cellular context to genotoxic stress responses. Two of the newly identified IR-responsive genes, FRA-1 and ATF3, showed a p53-associated component to their IR-induction, and this was confirmed both in isogenic human cell lines and in mouse thymus. The majority of the IR-responsive genes, however, showed no indication of p53-dependent regulation, representing a potentially important class of stress-responsive genes in leukemic cells. PMID:10380890

  13. A highly oriented hybrid microarray modified electrode fabricated by a template-free method for ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Chu, Zhenyu; Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Dempsey, Eithne

    2013-11-01

    Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and influence the morphologies of hybrid films. A highly oriented hybrid microarray was formed on the highly aligned and vertical SAMs of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules with rigid backbones, which afforded an intense structure-directing power for the oriented growth of hybrid crystals. Additionally, the density of the microarray could be adjusted by controlling the surface coverage of assembled molecules. Based on the hybrid microarray modified electrode with a large specific area (ca. 10 times its geometrical area), a label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed for the detection of an oligonucleotide fragment of the avian flu virus H5N1. The DNA biosensor displayed a significantly low detection limit of 5 pM (S/N = 3), a wide linear response from 10 pM to 10 nM, as well as excellent selectivity, good regeneration and high stability. We expect that the proposed template-free method can provide a new reference for the fabrication of a highly oriented hybrid array and the as-prepared microarray modified electrode will be a promising paradigm in constructing highly sensitive and selective biosensors. PMID:24061929

  14. Ultrasensitive Multiplexed Immunoassay for Tumor Biomarkers Based on DNA Hybridization Chain Reaction Amplifying Signal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinjin; Wang, Junchun; Zhao, Junqing; Guo, Zilin; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2016-03-23

    In this work, a novel electrochemical immunoassay protocol has been reported for simultaneous determination of multiple tumor biomarkers based on DNA hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) were selected as model biomarkers. The immunoassay protocol contained primary antibodies immobilized on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), secondary antibodies conjugated with DNA concatemer from HCR of primer, auxiliary probe, and signal probe labeled with signal molecules (methyleneblue (MB) and ferrocene (Fc)). In the presence of target biomarkers, the sandwich immunocomplex was formed between the primary antibodies and secondary antibodies bioconjugates carrying numerous signal molecules. As a result, two well-resolved reduction peaks, one was at -0.35 V (corresponding to MB) and other was at 0.33 V (corresponding to Fc; both vs SCE), were obtained in differential pulse voltammetry, and peak currents changed were related to the level of biomarkers. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunoassay exhibited a wide linear response range (0.5 pg mL(-1) to 50 ng mL(-1)) and low detection limits (PSA, 0.17 pg mL(-1); AFP, 0.25 pg mL(-1)) (at S/N = 3). In addition, the immunoassay was evaluated by analyzing simulate human serum sample, and the recoveries obtained were within 99.4-107.6% for PSA and 97.9-108.2% for AFP, indicating the immnuoassay could be applied to the simultaneous detection of AFP and PSA in human serum samples. PMID:26937717

  15. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization for the detection of DNA sequence copy number changes in Barrett's adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Bettina; Hausmann, Michael; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Stein, Hubert; Siewert, Jörg Rüdiger; Hopt, Ulrich; Langer, Rupert; Höfler, Heinz; Werner, Martin; Walch, Axel

    2004-07-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) allows the identification of DNA sequence copy number changes at high resolution by co-hybridizing differentially labelled test and control DNAs to a micro-array of genomic clones. The present study has analysed a series of 23 formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples of Barrett's adenocarcinoma (BCA, n = 18) and non-neoplastic squamous oesophageal (n = 2) and gastric cardia mucosa (n = 3) by aCGH. The micro-arrays used contained 287 genomic targets covering oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA sequences localized within chromosomal regions previously reported to be altered in BCA. DNA sequence copy number changes for a panel of approximately 50 genes were identified, most of which have not been previously described in BCA. DNA sequence copy number gains (mean 41 +/- 25/BCA) were more frequent than DNA sequence copy number losses (mean 20 +/- 15/BCA). The highest frequencies for DNA sequence copy number gains were detected for SNRPN (61%); GNLY (44%); NME1 (44%); DDX15, ABCB1 (MDR), ATM, LAMA3, MYBL2, ZNF217, and TNFRSF6B (39% each); and MSH2, TERC, SERPINE1, AFM137XA11, IGF1R, and PTPN1 (33% each). DNA sequence copy number losses were identified for PDGFB (44%); D17S125 (39%); AKT3 (28%); and RASSFI, FHIT, CDKN2A (p16), and SAS (CDK4) (28% each). In all non-neoplastic tissue samples of squamous oesophageal and gastric cardia mucosa, the measured mean ratios were 1.00 (squamous oesophageal mucosa) or 1.01 (gastric mucosa), indicating that no DNA sequence copy number chances were present. For validation, the DNA sequence copy number changes of selected clones (SNRPN, CMYC, HER2, ZNF217) detected by aCGH were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These data show the sensitivity of aCGH for the identification of DNA sequence copy number changes at high resolution in BCA. The newly identified genes may include so far unknown biomarkers in BCA and are therefore a starting point for

  16. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gosálvez, J; Crespo, F; Vega-Pla, J L; López-Fernández, C; Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Devila-Rodriguez, M I; Mezzanotte, R

    2010-01-01

    The genome of stallion (Spanish breed) and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés) were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH) technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome. PMID:20353909

  17. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Gosálvez, J.; Crespo, F.; Vega-Pla, J.L.; López-Fernández, C.; Cortés-Gutiérrez, E.I.; Devila-Rodriguez, M.I.; Mezzanotte, R.

    2010-01-01

    The genome of stallion (Spanish breed) and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés) were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH) technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome. PMID:20353909

  18. Labeling of islet cells with iron oxide nanoparticles through DNA hybridization for highly sensitive detection by MRI.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Narufumi; Nakai, Ryusuke; Kohda, Haruyasu; Furuta-Okamoto, Keiko; Iwata, Hiroo

    2013-11-15

    A labeling method for islet cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) based on DNA hybridization is proposed for monitoring of transplanted islets by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The surfaces of SPIOs were modified by via Michael reaction by reacting oligo-(deoxyadenylic acid)-bearing a terminal thiol group at the 5'-end ((dA)20-SH) with maleic acid functional groups on the SPIOs. The SPIOs were immobilized on islet cells which had been pretreated with oligo-(thymidylic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipid conjugates ((dT)20-PEG-DPPE) through DNA hybridization. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that SPIOs were initially anchored on the islet cell surfaces and subsequently transferred to endosomes or exfoliated with time. The SPIO-labeled islet cells could be clearly detected as dark spots by T2(*)-weighted MR image, whereas non-labeled islet cells could not be detected. PMID:24084295

  19. Influence of perylenediimide–pyrene supramolecular interactions on the stability of DNA-based hybrids: Importance of electrostatic complementarity

    PubMed Central

    Winiger, Christian B; Langenegger, Simon M; Khorev, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aromatic π–π stacking interactions are ubiquitous in nature, medicinal chemistry and materials sciences. They play a crucial role in the stacking of nucleobases, thus stabilising the DNA double helix. The following paper describes a series of chimeric DNA–polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) hybrids. The PAH building blocks are electron-rich pyrene and electron-poor perylenediimide (PDI), and were incorporated into complementary DNA strands. The hybrids contain different numbers of pyrene–PDI interactions that were found to directly influence duplex stability. As the pyrene–PDI ratio approaches 1:1, the stability of the duplexes increases with an average value of 7.5 °C per pyrene–PDI supramolecular interaction indicating the importance of electrostatic complementarity for aromatic π–π stacking interactions. PMID:25161715

  20. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  1. Emerging role of RNA•DNA hybrids in C9orf72-linked neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiou; Haeusler, Aaron R; Simko, Eric A J

    2015-01-01

    RNA plays an active role in structural polymorphism of the genome through the formation of stable RNA•DNA hybrids (R-loops). R-loops can modulate normal physiological processes and are also associated with pathological conditions, such as those related to nucleotide repeat expansions. A guanine-rich hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) has been linked to a spectrum of neurological conditions including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here we discuss the possible roles, both locally and genome-wide, of R-loops that may arise from the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat. R-loops have the potential to influence the pathological processes identified in many repeat expansion diseases, such as repeat instability, transcriptional dysregulation, epigenetic modification, and antisense-mediated gene regulation. We propose that, given the wide-ranging consequences of R-loops in the cell, these structures could underlie multiple pathological processes in C9orf72-linked neurodegeneration. PMID:25590632

  2. The platypus is not a rodent: DNA hybridization, amniote phylogeny and the palimpsest theory.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, J A; Mayer, G C

    1998-07-29

    We present DNA-hybridization data on 21 amniotes and two anurans showing that discrimination is obtained among most of these at the class and lower levels. Trees generated from these data largely agree with conventional views, for example in not associating birds and mammals. However, the sister relationships found here of the monotremes to marsupials, and of turtles to the alligator, are surprising results which are nonetheless consistent with the results of some other studies. The Marsupionta hypothesis of Gregory is reviewed, as are opinions about the placement of chelonians. Anatomical and reproductive data considered by Gregory do not unequivocally preclude a marsupial-monotreme special relationship, and there is other recent evidence for placing turtles within the Diapsida. We conclude that the evidential meaning of the molecular data is as shown in the trees, but that the topologies may be influenced by a base-compositional bias producing a seemingly slow evolutionary rate in monotremes, or by algorithmic artefacts (in the case of turtles as well). PMID:9720117

  3. Regulated Formation of lncRNA-DNA Hybrids Enables Faster Transcriptional Induction and Environmental Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Sara C; Wang, Siwen; Ma, Wai Kit; Al Husini, Nadra; Dhoondia, Zuzer; Ansari, Athar; Pascuzzi, Pete E; Tran, Elizabeth J

    2016-02-01

    Long non-coding (lnc)RNAs, once thought to merely represent noise from imprecise transcription initiation, have now emerged as major regulatory entities in all eukaryotes. In contrast to the rapidly expanding identification of individual lncRNAs, mechanistic characterization has lagged behind. Here we provide evidence that the GAL lncRNAs in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae promote transcriptional induction in trans by formation of lncRNA-DNA hybrids or R-loops. The evolutionarily conserved RNA helicase Dbp2 regulates formation of these R-loops as genomic deletion or nuclear depletion results in accumulation of these structures across the GAL cluster gene promoters and coding regions. Enhanced transcriptional induction is manifested by lncRNA-dependent displacement of the Cyc8 co-repressor and subsequent gene looping, suggesting that these lncRNAs promote induction by altering chromatin architecture. Moreover, the GAL lncRNAs confer a competitive fitness advantage to yeast cells because expression of these non-coding molecules correlates with faster adaptation in response to an environmental switch. PMID:26833086

  4. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  5. Molecular docking and dynamics simulations on the interaction of cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids with DNA G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Arba, Muhammad; Kartasasmita, Rahmana E; Tjahjono, Daryono H

    2016-01-01

    A series of cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids bearing either pyridine, imidazole, or pyrazole rings at the meso-positions have been investigated for their interaction with DNA G-quadruplexes by employing molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Three types of DNA G-quadruplexes were utilized, which comprise parallel, antiparallel, and mixed hybrid topologies. The porphyrin hybrids have a preference to bind with parallel and mixed hybrid structures compared to the antiparallel structure. This preference arises from the end stacking of porphyrin moiety following G-stem and loop binding of anthraquinone tail, which is not found in the antiparallel due to the presence of diagonal and lateral loops that crowd the G-quartet. The binding to the antiparallel, instead, occurred with poorer affinity through both the loop and wide groove. All sites of porphyrin binding were confirmed by 6 ns molecular dynamics simulation, as well as by the negative value of the total binding free energies that were calculated using the MMPBSA method. Free energy analysis shows that the favorable contribution came from the electrostatic term, which supposedly originated from the interaction of either cationic pyridinium, pyrazole, or imidazole groups and the anionic phosphate backbone, and also from the van der Waals energy, which primarily contributed through end stacking interaction. PMID:25808513

  6. Application of DNA Hybridization Biosensor as a Screening Method for the Detection of Genetically Modified Food Components

    PubMed Central

    Tichoniuk, Mariusz; Ligaj, Marta; Filipiak, Marian

    2008-01-01

    An electrochemical biosensor for the detection of genetically modified food components is presented. The biosensor was based on 21-mer single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssDNA probe) specific to either 35S promoter or nos terminator, which are frequently present in transgenic DNA cassettes. ssDNA probe was covalently attached by 5′-phosphate end to amino group of cysteamine self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold electrode surface with the use of activating reagents – water soluble 1-ethyl-3(3′-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxy-sulfosuccinimide (NHS). The hybridization reaction on the electrode surface was detected via methylene blue (MB) presenting higher affinity to ssDNA probe than to DNA duplex. The electrode modification procedure was optimized using 19-mer oligoG and oligoC nucleotides. The biosensor enabled distinction between DNA samples isolated from soybean RoundupReady® (RR soybean) and non-genetically modified soybean. The frequent introduction of investigated DNA sequences in other genetically modified organisms (GMOs) give a broad perspectives for analytical application of the biosensor.

  7. Development of an electrochemical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-SERS) aptasensor for direct detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Karaballi, R A; Nel, A; Krishnan, S; Blackburn, J; Brosseau, C L

    2015-09-01

    Rapid detection of disease biomarkers at the patient point-of-care is essential to timely and effective treatment. The research described herein focuses on the development of an electrochemical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-SERS) DNA aptasensor capable of direct detection of tuberculosis (TB) DNA. Specifically, a plausible DNA biomarker present in TB patient urine was chosen as the model target for detection. Cost-effective screen printed electrodes (SPEs) modified with silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were used as the aptasensor platform, onto which the aptamer specific for the target DNA was immobilized. Direct detection of the target DNA was demonstrated through the appearance of SERS peaks characteristic for adenine, present only in the target strand. Modulation of the applied potential allowed for a sizeable increase in the observed SERS response and the use of thiol back-filling prevented non-specific adsorption of non-target DNA. To our knowledge, this work represents the first EC-SERS study of an aptasensor for the direct, label-free detection of DNA hybridization. Such a technology paves the way for rapid detection of disease biomarkers at the patient point-of-care. PMID:25780805

  8. Application of DNA hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugess in Thailand. [Shigella; Escherichia coli; Campylobacter; Cryptosporidium

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.N.; Echeverria, P.; Pitarangsi, C.; Seriwatana, J.; Sethabutr, O.; Bodhidatta, L.; Brown, C.; Herrmann, J.E.; Blacklow, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    The epidemiology and etiology of acute diarrheal disease were determined in a Hmong refugee camp on the Thai-Laotian border from April 11 to May 14, 1985. DNA hybridization techniques were used to detect Shigella species, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli. A monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect rotavirus, and standard microbiology was used to detect other enteropathogens. The age-specific diarrheal disease rates were 47 episodes per month per 1000 children less than five years old and 113 episodes per month per 1000 children less than one year old. Rotavirus, enterotoxigenic E. coli, Campylobacter, and Cryptosporidium were the predominant pathogens in children less than two years old. The DNA probe hybridized with 94% of 31 specimens identified as enterotoxigenic E. coli by the standard assays and with none of the specimens in which the standard assays were negative. The probe for Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli hybridized in eight of 10 stools that contained Shigella and four of 314 stools from which Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli were not isolated. The use of DNA probes allows specimens to be collected in remote areas with a minimum amount of equipment and technical expertise so that they can be easily transported to a central laboratory for further processing.

  9. Parity among the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA method, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and Southern blot hybridization with the moderately repetitive DNA probe Ca3 for fingerprinting Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, C; Joly, S; Lockhart, S R; Noel, S; Tibayrenc, M; Soll, D R

    1997-01-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and Southern blot hybridization with moderately repetitive DNA probes have emerged as effective fingerprinting methods for the infectious fungus Candida albicans. The three methods have been compared for their capacities to identify identical or highly related isolates, to cluster weakly related isolates, to discriminate between unrelated isolates, and to assess microevolution within a strain. By computing similarity coefficients between 29 isolates from three cities within the continental United States, strong concordance of the results is demonstrated for RAPD analysis, MLEE, and Southern blot hybridization with the moderately repetitive probe Ca3, and weaker concordance of the results is demonstrated for these three fingerprinting methods and Southern blot hybridization with the moderately repetitive probe CARE2. All methods were also demonstrated to be able to resolve microevolution within a strain, with the Ca3 probe exhibiting the greatest resolving power. The strong correlations demonstrated between polymorphic markers assessed by the four independent fingerprinting methods and the nonrandom association between loci demonstrated by RAPD analysis and MLEE provide evidence for strong linkage disequilibrium and a clonal population structure for C. albicans. In addition, a synapomorphic allele, Pep-3A, was found to be present in all members of one of the three clusters discriminated by RAPD analysis, MLEE, and Ca3 fingerprinting, supporting the concordance of the clustering capacities of the three methods, the robustness of the clusters, and the clonal nature of the clusters. PMID:9276415

  10. Device fabrication processes of DNA-CTMA based photonic devices: improving the processability by using DNA-CTMA-OMMA hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Junichi; Kawabe, Yutaka; Ogata, Naoya

    2010-08-01

    DNA-CTMA or DNA-CTMA-PMMA films have been studied as a potential material for waveguide type thin-film photonic devices such as dye-doped thin film lasers, optical waveguide amplifiers, or optical waveguide switches. For the purpose of evaluate processability, not only optical characteristics of the fluorescence intensity but also moisture resistance of the film have been investigated. It is found that optical characteristics of those films are equally matched to the conventional DNA-CTMA films with better moisture resistivity. Waveguide fabrication experiments by using DNA-CTMA-PMMA films showed good moisture resistant nature and processability.

  11. Design and synthesis of C3-pyrazole/chalcone-linked beta-carboline hybrids: antitopoisomerase I, DNA-interactive, and apoptosis-inducing anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Srinivasulu, Vunnam; Nayak, V Lakshma; Sathish, Manda; Shankaraiah, Nagula; Bagul, Chandrakant; Reddy, N V Subba; Rangaraj, Nandini; Nagesh, Narayana

    2014-09-01

    A series of β-carboline hybrids bearing a substituted phenyl and a chalcone/(N-acetyl)-pyrazole moiety at the C1 and C3 positions, respectively, was designed, synthesized, and evaluated for anticancer activity. These new hybrid molecules showed significant cytotoxic activity, with IC50 values ranging from <2.0 μM to 80 μM, and the structure-activity relationships (SAR) associated with substitutions at positions 1 and 3 of these hybrids was clearly addressed. Further, induction of apoptosis was confirmed by Annexin V-FITC, Hoechst staining, and DNA fragmentation analysis. In addition, DNA photocleavage studies proved that two of the hybrids, (E)-1-(furan-2-yl)-3-(1-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (7 d) and 1-(3-(furan-2-yl)-5-(1-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)ethanone (8 d) could effectively cleave pBR322 plasmid DNA upon irradiation with UV light. Active hybrid 8 d inhibited DNA topoisomerase I activity efficiently and preserved DNA in the supercoiled form. To further corroborate the biological activities, as well as to understand the nature of the interaction of these hybrids with DNA, spectroscopic studies were also performed. Unlike simple β-carboline alkaloids, the binding mode of these new hybrid molecules with DNA was not similar, and both biophysical as well as molecular docking studies speculated a combilexin-type of interaction with DNA. Further, an in silico study of these β-carboline hybrids revealed their drug-like properties. PMID:24470122

  12. Self-assembly of multiferroic core-shell particulate nanocomposites through DNA-DNA hybridization and magnetic field directed assembly of superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Lochbiler, Thomas A.; Panda, Manashi; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Chavez, Ferman A.

    2016-04-01

    Multiferroic composites of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phases are of importance for studies on mechanical strain mediated coupling between the magnetic and electric subsystems. This work is on DNA-assisted self-assembly of superstructures of such composites with nanometer periodicity. The synthesis involved oligomeric DNA-functionalized ferroelectric and ferromagnetic nanoparticles, 600 nm BaTiO3 (BTO) and 200 nm NiFe2O4 (NFO), respectively. Mixing BTO and NFO particles, possessing complementary DNA sequences, resulted in the formation of ordered core-shell heteronanocomposites held together by DNA hybridization. The composites were imaged by scanning electron microscopy and scanning microwave microscopy. The presence of heteroassemblies along with core-shell architecture is clearly observed. The reversible nature of the DNA hybridization allows for restructuring the composites into mm-long linear chains and 2D-arrays in the presence of a static magnetic field and ring-like structures in a rotating-magnetic field. Strong magneto-electric (ME) coupling in as-assembled composites is evident from static magnetic field H induced polarization and low-frequency magnetoelectric voltage coefficient measurements. Upon annealing the nanocomposites at high temperatures, evidence for the formation of bulk composites with excellent cross-coupling between the electric and magnetic subsystems is obtained by H-induced polarization and low-frequency ME voltage coefficient. The ME coupling strength in the self-assembled composites is measured to be much stronger than in bulk composites with randomly distributed NFO and BTO prepared by direct mixing and sintering.

  13. Parallel Characterization of Anaerobic Toluene- and Ethylbenzene-Degrading Microbial Consortia by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, RNA-DNA Membrane Hybridization, and DNA Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kelly, John J.; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El-Fantroussi, Saïd; Al-Muzaini, Saleh; Fukui, Manabu; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A mesophilic toluene-degrading consortium (TDC) and an ethylbenzene-degrading consortium (EDC) were established under sulfate-reducing conditions. These consortia were first characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, followed by sequencing. The sequences of the major bands (T-1 and E-2) belonging to TDC and EDC, respectively, were affiliated with the family Desulfobacteriaceae. Another major band from EDC (E-1) was related to an uncultured non-sulfate-reducing soil bacterium. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 16S rRNAs of target organisms corresponding to T-1, E-1, and E-2 were designed, and hybridization conditions were optimized for two analytical formats, membrane and DNA microarray hybridization. Both formats were used to characterize the TDC and EDC, and the results of both were consistent with DGGE analysis. In order to assess the utility of the microarray format for analysis of environmental samples, oil-contaminated sediments from the coast of Kuwait were analyzed. The DNA microarray successfully detected bacterial nucleic acids from these samples, but probes targeting specific groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria did not give positive signals. The results of this study demonstrate the limitations and the potential utility of DNA microarrays for microbial community analysis. PMID:12088997

  14. Parallel characterization of anaerobic toluene- and ethylbenzene-degrading microbial consortia by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, RNA-DNA membrane hybridization, and DNA microarray technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kelly, John J.; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El-Fantroussi, Said; Al-Muzaini, Saleh; Fukui, Manabu; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A mesophilic toluene-degrading consortium (TDC) and an ethylbenzene-degrading consortium (EDC) were established under sulfate-reducing conditions. These consortia were first characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, followed by sequencing. The sequences of the major bands (T-1 and E-2) belonging to TDC and EDC, respectively, were affiliated with the family Desulfobacteriaceae. Another major band from EDC (E-1) was related to an uncultured non-sulfate-reducing soil bacterium. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 16S rRNAs of target organisms corresponding to T-1, E-1, and E-2 were designed, and hybridization conditions were optimized for two analytical formats, membrane and DNA microarray hybridization. Both formats were used to characterize the TDC and EDC, and the results of both were consistent with DGGE analysis. In order to assess the utility of the microarray format for analysis of environmental samples, oil-contaminated sediments from the coast of Kuwait were analyzed. The DNA microarray successfully detected bacterial nucleic acids from these samples, but probes targeting specific groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria did not give positive signals. The results of this study demonstrate the limitations and the potential utility of DNA microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  15. Hybridization and massive mtDNA unidirectional introgression between the closely related Neotropical toads Rhinella marina and R. schneideri inferred from mtDNA and nuclear markers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The classical perspective that interspecific hybridization in animals is rare has been changing due to a growing list of empirical examples showing the occurrence of gene flow between closely related species. Using sequence data from cyt b mitochondrial gene and three intron nuclear genes (RPL9, c-myc, and RPL3) we investigated patterns of nucleotide polymorphism and divergence between two closely related toad species R. marina and R. schneideri. By comparing levels of differentiation at nuclear and mtDNA levels we were able to describe patterns of introgression and infer the history of hybridization between these species. Results All nuclear loci are essentially concordant in revealing two well differentiated groups of haplotypes, corresponding to the morphologically-defined species R. marina and R. schneideri. Mitochondrial DNA analysis also revealed two well-differentiated groups of haplotypes but, in stark contrast with the nuclear genealogies, all R. schneideri sequences are clustered with sequences of R. marina from the right Amazon bank (RAB), while R. marina sequences from the left Amazon bank (LAB) are monophyletic. An Isolation-with-Migration (IM) analysis using nuclear data showed that R. marina and R. schneideri diverged at ≈ 1.69 Myr (early Pleistocene), while R. marina populations from LAB and RAB diverged at ≈ 0.33 Myr (middle Pleistocene). This time of divergence is not consistent with the split between LAB and RAB populations obtained with mtDNA data (≈ 1.59 Myr), which is notably similar to the estimate obtained with nuclear genes between R. marina and R. schneideri. Coalescent simulations of mtDNA phylogeny under the speciation history inferred from nuclear genes rejected the hypothesis of incomplete lineage sorting to explain the conflicting signal between mtDNA and nuclear-based phylogenies. Conclusions The cytonuclear discordance seems to reflect the occurrence of interspecific hybridization between these two closely related

  16. AgNP-DNA@GQDs hybrid: new approach for sensitive detection of H2O2 and glucose via simultaneous AgNP etching and DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Zheng, Jing; Li, Yinhui; Yang, Sheng; Liu, Changhui; Xiao, Yue; Li, Jishan; Cao, Zhong; Yang, Ronghua

    2014-12-16

    A growing body of evidence suggests that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays an active role in the regulation of various physiological processes. Development of sensitive probes for H2O2 is an urgent work. In this study, we proposed a DNA-mediated silver nanoparticle and graphene quantum dot hybrid nanocomposite (AgNP-DNA@GQDs) for sensitive fluorescent detection of H2O2. The sensing mechanism is based on the etching effect of H2O2 to AgNPs and the cleavage of DNA by as-generated hydroxyl radicals (•OH). The formation of AgNP-DNA@GQDs nanocomposite can result in fluorescence quenching of GQDs by AgNPs through the resonance energy transfer. Upon H2O2 addition, the energy transfer between AgNPs and GQDs mediated by DNA was weakened and obvious fluorescence recovery of GQDs could be observed. It is worth noting that the reaction product •OH between H2O2 and AgNPs could cleave the DNA-bridge and result in the disassembly of AgNP-DNA@GQDs to achieve further signal enhancement. With optimal conditions, the approach achieves a low detection limit of 0.10 μM for H2O2. Moreover, this nanocomposite is further extended to the glucose sensing in human urine combining with glucose oxidase (GOx) for the oxidation of glucose and formation of H2O2. The glucose concentrations in human urine are detected with satisfactory recoveries of 94.6-98.8% which holds potential for ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of glucose and supplies valuable information for diabetes mellitus research and clinical diagnosis. PMID:25390796

  17. Clumping and Viability of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells under Different Preparation Procedures: A Flow Cytometry-Based In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Li-li; Kinnunen, Tuure; Boltze, Johannes; Nystedt, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Complications of microocclusions have been reported after intra-arterial delivery of mesenchymal stromal cells. Hence, quantification and efficient limitation of cell clumps in suspension before transplantation is important to reduce the risk. We used a flow cytometry-based pulse-width assay to assess the effects of different cell suspension concentrations (0.2–2.0 × 106/mL), storage solutions (complete growth medium, Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline, and normal saline), storage time in suspension (0–9 h), and freeze-thawing procedure on the clumping of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) and also evaluated cell viability at the same time. Surprisingly, increasing the cell concentration did not result in more cell clumps in vitro. Freshly harvested (fresh) cells in normal saline had significantly fewer cell clumps and also displayed high viability (>90%). A time-dependent reduction in viability was observed for cells in all three storage solutions, without any significant change in the clumping tendency except for cells in medium. Fresh cells were more viable than their frozen-thawed counterparts, and fresh cells in normal saline had fewer cell clumps. In conclusion, cell clumping and viability could be affected by different cell preparation procedures, and quantification of cell clumping can be conducted using the flow cytometry-based pulse-width assay before intra-arterial cell delivery. PMID:27022399

  18. Behavior of meiotic chromosomes in Pinus wallichiana, P. strobus and their hybrid and nrDNA localization in pollen mother cells of the hybrid by using FISH.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hui-Sheng; Zhang, Da-Ming; Fu, Cheng-Xin; Hong, De-Yuan

    2008-03-01

    The complete process of meiosis was investigated in Pinus wallichiana, P. strobus and their artificial hybrid (F1) using microsporocytes. It is revealed that there were slightly lower chiasma frequency, lower ring bivalent frequency, lower meiotic index and distinctly higher frequency of aberrance (chromosomal bridges, fragments or micronuclei) in pollen mother cells (PMCs) of the hybrid (F1) than those of the parental species, which showed a certain degree of differentiation between homologous chromosomes of the two parents. However, relatively higher frequency of ring bivalents and higher meiotic index in all the three entities indicate the great stability of genomes of parental species, and the differentiation of genomes between the two parents must have been slight. Total nineteen signal loci of 18S rDNA were observed in nine bivalents of the hybrid (F1), among which one bivalent bears two loci, while the others have only one. It is suggested that distinct differentiation at genetic level existed in homologous chromosomes of the two parental species, whereas only slight differentiation at karyotypic and genomic levels take place between the parent species. PMID:18713369

  19. DNA hybridization evidence for the principal lineages of hummingbirds (Aves:Trochilidae).

    PubMed

    Bleiweiss, R; Kirsch, J A; Matheus, J C

    1997-03-01

    The spectacular evolutionary radiation of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) has served as a model system for many biological studies. To begin to provide a historical context for these investigations, we generated a complete matrix of DNA hybridization distances among 26 hummingbirds and an outgroup swift (Chaetura pelagica) to determine the principal hummingbird lineages. FITCH topologies estimated from symmetrized delta TmH-C values and subjected to various validation methods (bootstrapping, weighted jackknifing, branch length significance) indicated a fundamental split between hermit (Eutoxeres aquila, Threnetes ruckeri; Phaethornithinae) and nonhermit (Trochilinae) hummingbirds, and provided strong support for six principal nonhermit clades with the following branching order: (1) a predominantly lowland group comprising caribs (Eulampis holosericeus) and relatives (Androdon aequatorialis and Heliothryx barroti) with violet-ears (Colibri coruscans) and relatives (Doryfera ludovicae); (2) an Andean-associated clade of highly polytypic taxa (Eriocnemis, Heliodoxa, and Coeligena); (3) a second endemic Andean clade (Oreotrochilus chimborazo, Aglaiocercus coelestis, and Lesbia victoriae) paired with thorntails (Popelairia conversii); (4) emeralds and relatives (Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Amazilia tzacatl, Thalurania colombica, Orthorhyncus cristatus and Campylopterus villaviscensio); (5) mountain-gems (Lampornis clemenciae and Eugenes fulgens); and (6) tiny bee-like forms (Archilochus colubris, Myrtis fanny, Acestrura mulsant, and Philodice mitchellii). Corresponding analyses on a matrix of unsymmetrized delta values gave similar support for these relationships except that the branching order of the two Andean clades (2, 3 above) was unresolved. In general, subsidiary relationships were consistent and well supported by both matrices, sometimes revealing surprising associations between forms that differ dramatically in plumage and bill morphology. Our results also reveal some

  20. A DNA hybridization detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between dye-doped core-shell silica nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Cui, Peng; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Ye, Qingqing; Li, Maoguo; Wang, Lun

    2011-10-01

    A novel and efficient method to evaluate the DNA hybridization based on a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system, with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-doped fluorescent silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) as donor and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as acceptor, has been reported. The strategy for specific DNA sequence detecting is based on DNA hybridization event, which is detected via excitation of SiNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates and energy transfer to AuNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates. The proximity required for FRET arises when the SiNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates hybridize with partly complementary AuNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates, resulting in the fluorescence quenching of donors, SiNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates, and the formation of a weakly fluorescent complex, SiNPs-dsDNA-AuNPs. Upon the addition of the target DNA sequence to SiNPs-dsDNA-AuNPs complex, the fluorescence restores (turn-on). Based on the restored fluorescence, a homogeneous assay for the target DNA is proposed. Our results have shown that the linear range for target DNA detection is 0-35.0 nM with a detection limit (3σ) of 3.0 picomole. Compared with FITC-dsDNA-AuNPs probe system, the sensitivity of the proposed probe system for target DNA detection is increased by a factor of 3.4-fold. PMID:21845282

  1. Pulsatilla tongkanensis, a natural hybrid population hybridized with P. Koraiensis based on RAPD and SNPs of Chloroplast DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new putative species of Pulsatilla, P. tongkangensis, growing in calcified rock cavities was discovered along the Donggang, Jeongseon Kun, Kangwon Province, Korea. Accessions of P. tongkangensis and P. koreana were characterized with randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and single n...

  2. Nuclear corroboration of DNA-DNA hybridization in deep phylogenies of hummingbirds, swifts, and passerines: the phylogenetic utility of ZENK (ii).

    PubMed

    Chubb, Alison L

    2004-01-01

    This paper documents the phylogenetic utility of ZENK at the avian intra-ordinal level using hummingbirds, swifts, and passerines as case studies. ZENK sequences (1.7 kb) were used to reconstruct separate gene trees containing the major lineages of each group, and the three trees were examined for congruence with existing DNA-DNA hybridization trees. The results indicate both that ZENK is an appropriate nuclear marker for resolving relationships deep in the avian tree, and that many relationships within these three particular groups are congruent among the different datasets. Specifically, within hummingbirds there was topological agreement that the major hummingbird lineages diverged in a graded manner from the "hermits," to the "mangoes," to the "coquettes," to the "emeralds," and finally to a sister relationship between the "mountain-gems" and the "bees." Concerning swifts, the deepest divergences were congruent: treeswifts (Hemiprocnidae) were sister to the typical swifts (Apodidae), and the subfamily Apodinae was monophyletic relative to Cypseloidinae. Within Apodinae, however, were short, unresolved branches among the swiftlets, spinetails, and more typical swifts; a finding which coincides with other datasets. Within passerine birds, there was congruent support for monophyly of sub-oscines and oscines, and within sub-oscines, for monophyly of New World groups relative to the Old World lineages. New World sub-oscines split into superfamilies Furnaroidea and Tyrannoidea, with the Tyrannoid relationships completely congruent among ZENK and DNA-DNA hybridization trees. Within Furnaroidea, however, there was some incongruence regarding the positions of Thamnophilidae and Formicariidae. Concerning oscine passerines, both datasets showed a split between Corvida and Passerida and confirmed the traditional membership of passerid superfamilies Muscicapoidea and Passeroidea. Monophyly of Sylvioidea, however, remained uncertain, as did the relationships among the

  3. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2014-12-16

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved. PMID:25414342

  4. A DNA hybridization system for labeling of neural stem cells with SPIO nanoparticles for MRI monitoring post-transplantation.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Edgar Y; Kitamura, Narufumi; Nakai, Ryusuke; Arima, Yusuke; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) demonstrate encouraging results in cell replacement therapy for neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic injury in the central nervous system. Monitor the survival and migration of transplanted cells would provide us important information concerning the performance and integration of the graft during the therapy time course. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow us to monitor the transplanted cells in a non-invasive way. The only requirement is to use an appropriate contrast agent to label the transplanted cells. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are one of the most commonly used contrast agent for MRI detection of transplanted cells. SPIO nanoparticles demonstrated to be suitable for labeling several types of cells including NSCs. However, the current methods for SPIO labeling are non-specific, depending mostly on electrostatic interactions, demanding relatively high SPIO concentration, and long incubation time, which can affect the viability of cells. In this study, we propose a specific and relatively fast method to label NSCs with SPIO nanoparticles via DNA hybridization. Two short single stranded DNAs (ssDNAs), oligo[dT]20 and oligo[dA]20 were conjugated with a lipid molecule and SPIO nanoparticle respectively. The labeling process comprises two simple steps; first the cells are modified to present oligo[dT]20 ssDNA on the cell surface, then the oligo[dA]20 ssDNA conjugated with SPIO nanoparticles are presented to the modified cells to allow the oligo[dT]20-oligo[dA]20 hybridization. The method showed to be non-toxic at concentrations up to 50 μg/mL oligo[dA]20-SPIO nanoparticles. Presence of SPIO nanoparticles at cell surface and cell cytoplasm was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SPIO labeling via DNA hybridization demonstrated to not interfere on NSCs proliferation, aggregates formation, and differentiation. NSCs labeled with SPIO nanoparticles via DNA hybridization system were successfully

  5. Comparison of biotinylated DNA and RNA probes for rapid detection of varicella-zoster virus genome by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, B; Yu, G J; Hurst, J W

    1991-01-01

    We describe a general method for the production of nonisotopic DNA and RNA probes for the detection of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) genome by in situ hybridization. VZV DNA was extracted from purified viral nucleocapsids, cleaved with restriction enzyme (RE) BamHI, and cloned into plasmid pBR322 by the standard vector insert procedure. We cloned over 85% of the VZV genome and obtained 18 recombinants. Plasmids containing the B, F, G, H, and J fragments of VZV DNA were labeled by the nick translation method with biotin-11-dUTP as the dTTP analog. Additionally, the B fragment was cleaved with RE AvaI, subcloned into the plasmid pGEM-4 transcription vector, and subsequently linearized with REs PstI and EcoRI. RNA was transcribed with T7 or SP6 polymerase, with a substitution of allylamine-UTP as the UTP analog, and labeled with epsilon-caproylamidobiotin-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. The DNA and RNA probes were used under full-stringency conditions for in situ hybridization with alkaline phosphatase as the detector and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate-Nitro Blue Tetrazolium as the substrate. When tested under comparable conditions, the RNA probe was slightly more sensitive than was the DNA probe: both probes showed homology only with VZV-infected cells and clinical tissues and not with the other herpesviruses. Probes prepared from variable regions of the genome (fragments F and J) performed as well as did those from conserved regions (fragments B. G. and H). Biotinylated probes have distinct advantages over isotopic probes and retain their full potency for more than 2 years when stored properly. Images PMID:1645371

  6. Detection of Neospora from tissues of experimentally infected rhesus macaques by PCR and specific DNA probe hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ho, M S; Barr, B C; Tarantal, A F; Lai, L T; Hendrickx, A G; Marsh, A E; Sverlow, K W; Packham, A E; Conrad, P A

    1997-07-01

    Neospora is a newly recognized Toxoplasma-like cyst-forming coccidian parasite that causes abortion or congenital infections in naturally or experimentally infected animals. In this study, pregnant rhesus macaques were inoculated with culture-derived tachyzoites of a bovine Neospora isolate, and tissue samples from various major organs were collected from dams and fetuses for the detection of parasite DNA by using oligonucleotide primers COC-1 and COC-2 for PCR amplification of a conserved coccidial nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene sequence, and amplification products were confirmed by hybridization with a Neospora-specific DNA probe. PCR products were amplified from DNAs of different fetal monkey tissues, including brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, skin, and placenta. In addition, Neospora DNA was amplified from the brain, heart, and lung tissues of infected rhesus macaque dams. The PCR and probe hybridization system may provide an effective method for the detection of Neospora infection in fetuses and dams from nonhuman primates and may be useful in determining the zoonotic potential of Neospora. PMID:9196184

  7. Visual detection of cancer cells by colorimetric aptasensor based on aggregation of gold nanoparticles induced by DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Borghei, Yasaman-Sadat; Hosseini, Morteza; Dadmehr, Mehdi; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Sheikhnejad, Reza

    2016-01-21

    A simple but highly sensitive colorimetric method was developed to detect cancer cells based on aptamer-cell interaction. Cancer cells were able to capture nucleolin aptamers (AS 1411) through affinity interaction between AS 1411 and nucleolin receptors that are over expressed in cancer cells, The specific binding of AS 1411 to the target cells triggered the removal of aptamers from the solution. Therefore no aptamer remained in the solution to hybridize with complementary ssDNA-AuNP probes as a result the solution color is red. In the absence of target cells or the presence of normal cells, ssDNA-AuNP probes and aptamers were coexisted in solution and the aptamers assembled DNA-AuNPs, produced a purple solution. UV-vis spectrometry demonstrated that this hybridization-based method exhibited selective colorimetric responses to the presence or absence of target cells, which is detectable with naked eye. The linear response for MCF-7 cells in a concentration range from 10 to 10(5) cells was obtained with a detection limit of 10 cells. The proposed method could be extended to detect other cells and showed potential applications in cancer cell detection and early cancer diagnosis. PMID:26724767

  8. Proposition of a Silica Nanoparticle-Enhanced Hybrid Spin-Microcantilever Sensor Using Nonlinear Optics for Detection of DNA in Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Hao; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically propose a method based on the combination of a nonlinear optical mass sensor using a hybrid spin-microcantilever and the nanoparticle-enhanced technique, to detect and monitor DNA mutations. The technique theoretically allows the mass of external particles (ssDNA) landing on the surface of a hybrid spin-microcantilever to be detected directly and accurately at 300 K with a mass responsivity 0.137 Hz/ag in situ in liquid. Moreover, combined with the nanoparticle-enhanced technique, even only one base pair mutation in the target DNA sequence can be identified in real time accurately, and the DNA hybridization reactions can be monitored quantitatively. Furthermore, in situ detection in liquid and measurement of the proposed nonlinear optical spin resonance spectra will minimize the experimental errors. PMID:26404276

  9. Methods of DNA sequencing by hybridization based on optimizing concentration of matrix-bound oligonucleotide and device for carrying out same

    DOEpatents

    Khrapko, Konstantin R.; Khorlin, Alexandr A.; Ivanov, Igor B.; Ershov, Gennady M.; Lysov, Jury P.; Florentiev, Vladimir L.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    1996-09-03

    A method for sequencing DNA by hybridization that includes the following steps: forming an array of oligonucleotides at such concentrations that either ensure the same dissociation temperature for all fully complementary duplexes or allows hybridization and washing of such duplexes to be conducted at the same temperature; hybridizing said oligonucleotide array with labeled test DNA; washing in duplex dissociation conditions; identifying single-base substitutions in the test DNA by analyzing the distribution of the dissociation temperatures and reconstructing the DNA nucleotide sequence based on the above analysis. A device for carrying out the method comprises a solid substrate and a matrix rigidly bound to the substrate. The matrix contains the oligonucleotide array and consists of a multiplicity of gel portions. Each gel portion contains one oligonucleotide of desired length. The gel portions are separated from one another by interstices and have a thickness not exceeding 30 .mu.m.

  10. Comparative genomic in situ hybridization (cGISH) analysis on plant chromosomes revealed by labelled Arabidopsis DNA.

    PubMed

    Zoller, J F; Yang, Y; Herrmann, R G; Hohmann, U

    2001-01-01

    A new approach for comparative cytogenetic banding analysis of plant chromosomes has been established. The comparative GISH (cGISH) technique is universally applicable to various complex genomes of Monocotyledonae (Triticum aestivum, Agropyron elongatum, Secale cereale, Hordeum vulgare, Allium cepa, Muscari armenaticum and Lilium longiflorum) and Dicotyledonae (Vicia faba, Beta vulgaris, Arabidopsis thaliana). Labelled total genomic DNA of A. thaliana generates signals at conserved chromosome regions. The nucleolus organizing regions (NORs) containing the majority of tandemly repeated rDNA sequences, N-band regions containing satellite DNA, conserved homologous sequences at telomeres and additional chromosome-characteristic markers were detected in heterologous FISH experiments. Multicolour FISH analysis with repetitive DNA probes simultaneously revealed the chromosome assignment of 56 cGISH signals in rye and 61 cGISH signals in barley. Further advantages of this technique are: (1) the fast and straightforward preparation of the probe; (2) the generation of signals with high intensity and reproducibility even without signal amplification; and (3) no requirement of species-specific sequences suitable for molecular karyotype analysis. Hybridization can be performed without competitive DNA. Signal detection without significant background is possible under low stringency conditions. The universal application of this fast and simple one-step fluorescence banding technique for plant cytogenetic and plant genome evolution is discussed. PMID:11448038

  11. Use of 3,3',5,5' tetramethylbenzidine as new electrochemical indicator of DNA hybridization and its application in genossensor.

    PubMed

    Alves-Balvedi, R P; Caetano, L P; Madurro, J M; Brito-Madurro, A G

    2016-11-15

    Electrochemical tools are important biosensor platforms for disease diagnosis, due to their speediness, easiness, low cost and portability. However, for DNA detection, the use of indicators and/or intercalators is necessary to improve electrochemical sensitivity. Currently, ethidium bromide (EthBr) is the cheapest and most used DNA intercalators, but presents carcinogenic and teratogenic properties. Other indicators may be important for DNA photonic detection, and besides being more expensive, they behave similarly to EthBr. This investigation shows for the first time the use of tetramethylbenzidine(TMB) as a new remarkable non-carcinogenic DNA indicator for genosensing purposes, which may be used for nucleic acid detection of microorganisms, based on complementarity of base-pairing between probe and target molecules. The results indicate that TMB can be used as a new electrochemical indicator readily applicable in genosensors, which is able to detect the hybridization of single stranded DNA probe with its complementary target strand. An additional advantage of TMB, beside its non-genotoxicity, is the electrochemical reduction property, which prevents interference of serum components and other oxidative samples in the electrochemical analysis. PMID:27179563

  12. The minimal amount of starting DNA for Agilent’s hybrid capture-based targeted massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jongsuk; Son, Dae-Soon; Jeon, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Gahee; Ryu, Gyu Ha; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Donghyun

    2016-01-01

    Targeted capture massively parallel sequencing is increasingly being used in clinical settings, and as costs continue to decline, use of this technology may become routine in health care. However, a limited amount of tissue has often been a challenge in meeting quality requirements. To offer a practical guideline for the minimum amount of input DNA for targeted sequencing, we optimized and evaluated the performance of targeted sequencing depending on the input DNA amount. First, using various amounts of input DNA, we compared commercially available library construction kits and selected Agilent’s SureSelect-XT and KAPA Biosystems’ Hyper Prep kits as the kits most compatible with targeted deep sequencing using Agilent’s SureSelect custom capture. Then, we optimized the adapter ligation conditions of the Hyper Prep kit to improve library construction efficiency and adapted multiplexed hybrid selection to reduce the cost of sequencing. In this study, we systematically evaluated the performance of the optimized protocol depending on the amount of input DNA, ranging from 6.25 to 200 ng, suggesting the minimal input DNA amounts based on coverage depths required for specific applications. PMID:27220682

  13. Chromosome specific DNA hybridization in suspension for flow cytometric detection of chimerism in bone marrow transplantation and leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Arkesteijn, G.J.A.; Erpelinck, S.L.A.; Martens, A.C.M.; Hagenbeek, A.

    1995-04-01

    Flow cytometry was used to measure the fluorescence intensity of nuclei that were subjected to fluorescent in situ hybridization in suspension with chromosome specific DNA probes. Paraformaldehyde-fixed nuclei were protein digested with trypsin and hybridized simultaneously with a biotin- and DIG labeled probe specific for chromosome 8 and the biotin labeled Y chromosome probe. Y chromosome positive or negative nuclei were sorted onto microscope slides and subsequently classified as being leukemic or not by fluorescence microscopy, on the basis of the presence of a trisomy for chromosome 8. A 120-fold enrichment could be achieved when 300 Y positive nuclei were sorted from a mixture originally containing 0.5% leukemia cells. Given the specificity of the flow cytometry and FISH procedure, the combination of the two methods can reach a lower detection level of 1 per 250,000. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Gold nanoparticle based signal enhancement liquid crystal biosensors for DNA hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengyuan; Liu, Yanmei; Tan, Hui; Wu, Chao; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2012-03-18

    A novel signal enhanced liquid crystal biosensor based on using AuNPs for highly sensitive DNA detection has been developed. This biosensor not only significantly decreases the detection limit, but also offers a simple detection process and shows a good selectivity to distinguish perfectly matched target DNA from two-base mismatched DNA. PMID:22302154

  15. Correlation between DNA ploidy, metaphase high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization results and clinical outcome of synovial sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although synovial sarcoma is the 3rd most commonly occurring mesenchymal tumor in young adults, usually with a highly aggressive clinical course; remarkable differences can be seen regarding the clinical outcome. According to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data published in the literature, the simple and complex karyotypes show a correlation between the prognosis and clinical outcome. In addition, the connection between DNA ploidy and clinical course is controversial. The aim of this study was using a fine-tuning interpretation of our DNA ploidy results and to compare these with metaphase high-resolution CGH (HR-CGH) results. Methods DNA ploidy was determined on Feulgen-stained smears in 56 synovial sarcoma cases by image cytometry; follow up was available in 46 cases (average: 78 months). In 9 cases HR-CGH analysis was also available. Results 10 cases were found DNA-aneuploid, 46 were DNA-diploid by image cytometry. With fine-tuning of the diploid cases according to the 5c exceeding events (single cell aneuploidy), 33 cases were so called "simple-diploid" (without 5c exceeding events) and 13 cases were "complex-diploid"; containing 5c exceeding events (any number). Aneuploid tumors contained large numbers of genetic alterations with the sum gain of at least 2 chromosomes (A-, B- or C-group) detected by HR-CGH. In the "simple-diploid" cases no or few genetic alterations could be detected, whereas the "complex-diploid" samples numerous aberrations (equal or more than 3) could be found. Conclusions Our results show a correlation between the DNA-ploidy, a fine-tuned DNA-ploidy and the HR-CGH results. Furthermore, we found significant correlation between the different ploidy groups and the clinical outcome (p < 0.05). PMID:22053830

  16. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    van Loenhout, Marijn T J; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Flebus, Benedetta; den Blanken, Johan F; Zweifel, Ludovit P; Hooning, Koen M; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Dekker, Cees

    2013-01-01

    The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions. PMID:23755219

  17. Hybrid Coupled Cluster and Molecular Dynamics Approach: Application to the Excitation Spectrum of Cytosine in the Native DNA Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Kowalski, Karol

    2006-12-07

    Evolution of the excited state energies of cytosine base in the native DNA environment was investigated using hybrid coupled cluster and classical molecular dynamics approach. The time averaged excitation energies obtained with the variant of the completely renormalized equation-of-motion with singles, doubles, and non-iterative triples approach that includes a bulk of the correlation effects for excited states, are compared with the analogous calculations in the gas phase. Significant blue shifts for the two lowest singlet excitation energies can be observed as a result of interaction of the quantum system with surrounding environment.

  18. A Metal-Organic Framework/DNA Hybrid System as a Novel Fluorescent Biosensor for Mercury(II) Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan-Lan; Wang, Zhuo; Zhao, Shu-Na; Meng, Xing; Song, Xue-Zhi; Feng, Jing; Song, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-11

    Mercury(II) ions have emerged as a widespread environmental hazard in recent decades. Despite different kinds of detection methods reported to sense Hg(2+) , it still remains a challenging task to develop new sensing molecules to replenish the fluorescence-based apparatus for Hg(2+) detection. This communication demonstrates a novel fluorescent sensor using UiO-66-NH2 and a T-rich FAM-labeled ssDNA as a hybrid system to detect Hg(2+) sensitively and selectively. To the best of our knowledge, it has rarely been reported that a MOF is utilized as the biosensing platform for Hg(2+) assay. PMID:26555340

  19. Differential gene expression in the murine thymus assayed by quantitative hybridization of arrayed cDNA clones

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, C.; Rocha, D.; Granjeaud, S.

    1995-09-01

    High-throughput measurement of hybridization signatures obtained using complex probes prepared from poly(A){sup +} RNA and high-density cDNA colony filters is described. The performance of the system, elimination of artifacts, and verification of the validity of the data are discussed. cDNAs corresponding to sequences present at levels of approximately 0.01% in the complex probe can be detected. Good correlation is observed between expression profiles determined by this method and by Northern blotting. The method is applied to a preliminary investigation of differential expression in three cell types present in the murine thymus. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Development of a Flow Cytometry-Based Method for Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli and Shigella Spp. Using an Oligonucleotide Probe

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yong; Wilkes, Jon G.; Moskal, Ted J.; Williams, Anna J.; Cooper, Willie M.; Nayak, Rajesh; Rafii, Fatemeh; Buzatu, Dan A.

    2016-01-01

    Standard methods to detect Escherichia coli contamination in food use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agar culture plates. These methods require multiple incubation steps and take a long time to results. An improved rapid flow-cytometry based detection method was developed, using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe specifically binding a16S rRNA sequence. The method positively detected 51 E. coli isolates as well as 4 Shigella species. All 27 non-E. coli strains tested gave negative results. Comparison of the new genetic assay with a total plate count (TPC) assay and agar plate counting indicated similar sensitivity, agreement between cytometry cell and colony counts. This method can detect a small number of E.coli cells in the presence of large numbers of other bacteria. This method can be used for rapid, economical, and stable detection of E. coli and Shigella contamination in the food industry and other contexts. PMID:26913737

  1. Purification of Immune Cell Populations from Freshly Isolated Murine Tumors and Organs by Consecutive Magnetic Cell Sorting and Multi-parameter Flow Cytometry-Based Sorting.

    PubMed

    Salvagno, Camilla; de Visser, Karin E

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that tumors evolve together with nonmalignant cells, such as fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells. These cells constantly entangle and interact with each other creating the tumor microenvironment. Immune cells can exert both tumor-promoting and tumor-protective functions. Detailed phenotypic and functional characterization of intra-tumoral immune cell subsets has become increasingly important in the field of cancer biology and cancer immunology. In this chapter, we describe a method for isolation of viable and pure immune cell subsets from freshly isolated murine solid tumors and organs. First, we describe a protocol for the generation of single-cell suspensions from tumors and organs using mechanical and enzymatic strategies. In addition, we describe how immune cell subsets can be purified by consecutive magnetic cell sorting and multi-parameter flow cytometry-based cell sorting. PMID:27581019

  2. Development of a Flow Cytometry-Based Method for Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli and Shigella Spp. Using an Oligonucleotide Probe.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yong; Wilkes, Jon G; Moskal, Ted J; Williams, Anna J; Cooper, Willie M; Nayak, Rajesh; Rafii, Fatemeh; Buzatu, Dan A

    2016-01-01

    Standard methods to detect Escherichia coli contamination in food use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agar culture plates. These methods require multiple incubation steps and take a long time to results. An improved rapid flow-cytometry based detection method was developed, using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe specifically binding a16S rRNA sequence. The method positively detected 51 E. coli isolates as well as 4 Shigella species. All 27 non-E. coli strains tested gave negative results. Comparison of the new genetic assay with a total plate count (TPC) assay and agar plate counting indicated similar sensitivity, agreement between cytometry cell and colony counts. This method can detect a small number of E.coli cells in the presence of large numbers of other bacteria. This method can be used for rapid, economical, and stable detection of E. coli and Shigella contamination in the food industry and other contexts. PMID:26913737

  3. A model of binding on DNA microarrays: understanding the combined effect of probe synthesis failure, cross-hybridization, DNA fragmentation and other experimental details of affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays are used both for research and for diagnostics. In research, Affymetrix arrays are commonly used for genome wide association studies, resequencing, and for gene expression analysis. These arrays provide large amounts of data. This data is analyzed using statistical methods that quite often discard a large portion of the information. Most of the information that is lost comes from probes that systematically fail across chips and from batch effects. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive model for hybridization that predicts probe intensities for Affymetrix arrays and that could provide a basis for improved microarray analysis and probe development. The first part of the model calculates probe binding affinities to all the possible targets in the hybridization solution using the Langmuir isotherm. In the second part of the model we integrate details that are specific to each experiment and contribute to the differences between hybridization in solution and on the microarray. These details include fragmentation, wash stringency, temperature, salt concentration, and scanner settings. Furthermore, the model fits probe synthesis efficiency and target concentration parameters directly to the data. All the parameters used in the model have a well-established physical origin. Results For the 302 chips that were analyzed the mean correlation between expected and observed probe intensities was 0.701 with a range of 0.88 to 0.55. All available chips were included in the analysis regardless of the data quality. Our results show that batch effects arise from differences in probe synthesis, scanner settings, wash strength, and target fragmentation. We also show that probe synthesis efficiencies for different nucleotides are not uniform. Conclusions To date this is the most complete model for binding on microarrays. This is the first model that includes both probe synthesis efficiency and hybridization kinetics/cross-hybridization. These

  4. Synthesis, structure, and electrochemical properties of nano-layered organic-inorganic perovskites containing Fe(CN)6 3- layers and its application for detection of DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Hanxing; Lin, Zhidong; Cao, Minghe; Yu, Zhiyong; Hao, Hua; Guo, Linlin

    2009-07-01

    Steady organic-inorganic perovskite hybrids with [H22-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6, [H23-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 and [H24- AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 (AMP = aminomethylpyridine) were formed in the air. Each structure shows an unusual layered organic-inorganic structural type. The hybrids enveloped in paraffin, respectively, to prepare hybrid paste electrode (HPE) (HPE-2 with [H22-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6, HPE-3 with [H23-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6, HPE-4 with [H24-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6). Three hybrids in HPEs showed good electrochemical characteristics. The sequence of redox activity is [H24- AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 > [H22-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 > [H23-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 and that of electrocatalytical characteristics is [H23- AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 > [H22-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 > [H24-AMP]3/2 Fe(CN)6. Three hybrids have been employed to investigate the interaction between DNA and three hybrids. The results indicate that between [H23-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 and DNA is useful and [H23-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 can detect the hybridization of DNA. And the interaction between [H22-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 and DNA and between [H24-AMP]3/2Fe(CN)6 and DNA is slender. Three HPEs display remarkable electrochemical sensitivity and stability. The variation coefficients (RSD) of repeatedly successive and interval assays are less than 2.5%. The chemical and physical stability of three hybrids is satisfactory.

  5. Surface-enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance biosensing of avian influenza DNA hybridization using subwavelength metallic nanoarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Shin Ae; Byun, Kyung Min; Kim, Kyujung; Jang, Sung Min; Ma, Kyungjae; Oh, Youngjin; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Sung Guk; Shuler, Michael L.; Kim, Sung June

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrated enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing based on subwavelength gold nanoarrays built on a thin gold film. Arrays of nanogratings (1D) and nanoholes (2D) with a period of 200 nm were fabricated by electron-beam lithography and used for the detection of avian influenza DNA hybridization. Experimental results showed that both nanoarrays provided significant sensitivity improvement and, especially, 1D nanogratings exhibited higher SPR signal amplification compared with 2D nanohole arrays. The sensitivity enhancement is associated with changes in surface-limited reaction area and strong interactions between bound molecules and localized plasmon fields. Our approach is expected to improve both the sensitivity and sensing resolution and can be applicable to label-free detection of DNA without amplification by polymerase chain reaction.

  6. Correlation of microscopic phenotype with genotype in a formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded testicular germ cell tumor with universal DNA amplification, comparative genomic hybridization, and interphase cytogenetics.

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, M. R.; Jauch, A.; Walt, H.; du Manoir, S.; Ried, T.; Jochum, W.; Sulser, T.; Cremer, T.

    1995-01-01

    We present a strategy for the evaluation of numerical copy number changes of DNA segments within a solid tumor genome that allows the correlation of microscopic phenotype with genotype in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor material. Cells from a human testicular germ cell tumor and adjacent tissue areas with normal seminiferous tubules were selected separately from microscopically analyzed histological tissue sections, and DNA was extracted from the selected areas. After universal DNA amplification, the amplification products were subjected to comparative genomic hybridization. The results confirmed balanced chromosome copy numbers for the normal tissue area, although the analysis of the tumor tissue area revealed numerous gains and losses of chromosome segments. The comparative genomic hybridization results were used to select DNA probes for interphase cytogenetics on serial sections. We conclude that this technique allows the screening of selected tissue areas for numerical DNA alterations, thus enabling a direct phenotype-genotype comparison. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7778673

  7. A novel sandwich hybridization method for selecting cDNAs from large genomic regions: Identification of cDNAs from the cloned genomic DNA spanning the XLRP locus

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, D.; McHenry, C.; Fujita, R.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed an efficient hybridization-based cDNA-selection method. A sandwich of three species - single-stranded cDNA, tagged RNA derived from genomic DNA, and biotinylated RNA complementary to the tag - allows specific retention of hybrids on an avidin-matrix. Previously, using model experiments, we demonstrated highly specific and efficient selection of a retinal gene, NRL, from complex mixtures of cDNA clones, using a sub-library from a 5 kb NRL genomic clone. We have now applied this selection strategy to isolate cDNAs from human adult retina and fetal eye libraries, with the {open_quotes}genomic RNA{close_quotes} derived from two YAC clones (OTC-C and 55B) spanning the region of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) locus RP3 at Xp21.1. Effectiveness of the selection-method was monitored by enrichment of TCTEX-1L gene that maps within the 55B YAC. Of the 15 selected cDNA clones that hybridized to the 55B YAC DNA, five appear to the map to specific cosmid clones derived from the 55B YAC. Inserts in these selected cDNA clones range from 0.5 to 2.3 kb in size. Additional clones are now being isolated and characterized. This procedure should be independent of the size or complexity of genomic DNA being used for selection, allow for the isolation of full-length cDNAs, and may have wider application.

  8. Preparations of meiotic pachytene chromosomes and extended DNA fibers from cotton suitable for fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Renhai; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  9. Preparations of Meiotic Pachytene Chromosomes and Extended DNA Fibers from Cotton Suitable for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  10. Label-free, disposable fiber-optic biosensors for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming-jie; Wu, Chuang; Shao, Li-yang; Chan, Wing Kin Edward; Zhang, A Ping; Lu, Chao; Tam, Hwa-yaw

    2013-04-01

    A novel and highly sensitive fiber-optic DNA sensor based on a thin-core fiber modal interferometer (TCFMI) is demonstrated by using a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technology. Poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) were used for the preparation of a polyelectrolyte multilayer film for DNA detection. The film thickness was measured through a surface profilometer. The surface morphologies of (PEI/PAA)4, (PEI/PAA)4.5 and (PEI/PAA)4(PEI/DNA)1 multilayer films were characterized by atomic force microscopy. The fabricated DNA sensors were tested with different types of target ssDNA solutions with a concentration of 1 μM. The results show that the sensitivity of the TCFMI-based ssDNA sensor is 0.27 nm/matched-base at the concentration of 1 μM and can even distinguish the number of matched bases of ssDNA chains. PMID:23397583

  11. Does hybridization increase evolutionary rate? Data from the 28S-rDNA D8 domain in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Chenuil, Anne; Egea, Emilie; Rocher, Caroline; Touzet, Hélène; Féral, Jean-Pierre

    2008-11-01

    The divergent domain D8 of the large ribosomal RNA is very variable and extended in vertebrates compared to other eukaryotes. We provide data from 31 species of echinoderms and present the first comparative analysis of the D8 in nonvertebrate deuterostomes. In addition, we obtained 16S mitochondrial DNA sequences for the sea urchin taxa and analyzed single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of D8 in several populations within the species complex Echinocardium cordatum. A common secondary structure supported by compensatory substitutions and indels is inferred for echinoderms. Variation mostly arises at the tip of the longest stem (D8a), and the most variable taxa also display the longest and most stable D8. The most stable variants are the only ones displaying bulges in the terminal part of the stem, suggesting that selection, rather than maximizing stability of the D8 secondary structure, maintains it in a given range. Striking variation in D8 evolutionary rates was evidenced among sea urchins, by comparison with both 16S mitochondrial DNA and paleontological data. In Echinocardium cordatum and Strongylocentrotus pallidus and S. droebachiensis, belonging to very distant genera, the increase in D8 evolutionary rate is extreme. Their highly stable D8 secondary structures rule out the possibility of pseudogenes. These taxa are the only ones in which interspecific hybridization was reported. We discuss how evolutionary rates may be affected in nuclear relative to mitochondrial genes after hybridization, by selective or mutational processes such as gene silencing and concerted evolution. PMID:18949506

  12. SHAMS: Combining chemical modification of RNA with mass spectrometry to examine polypurine tract-containing RNA/DNA hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kevin B.; Yi-Brunozzi, Hye Young; Brinson, Robert G.; Marino, John P.; Fabris, Daniele; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) has gained popularity as a facile method of examining RNA structure both in vitro and in vivo, exploiting accessibility of the ribose 2′-OH to acylation by N-methylisatoic anhydride (NMIA) in unpaired or flexible configurations. Subsequent primer extension terminates at the site of chemical modification, and these products are fractionated by high-resolution gel electrophoresis. When applying SHAPE to investigate structural features associated with the wild-type and analog-substituted polypurine tract (PPT)–containing RNA/DNA hybrids, their size (20–25 base pairs) rendered primer extension impractical. As an alternative method of detection, we reasoned that chemical modification could be combined with tandem mass spectrometry, relying on the mass increment of RNA fragments containing the NMIA adduct (Mr = 133 Da). Using this approach, we demonstrate both specific modification of the HIV-1 PPT RNA primer and variations in its acylation pattern induced by replacing template nucleotides with a non-hydrogen-bonding thymine isostere. Our selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by mass spectrometry strategy (SHAMS) should find utility when examining the structure of small RNA fragments or RNA/DNA hybrids where primer extension cannot be performed. PMID:19535461

  13. Phenotypic variability confirmed by nuclear ribosomal DNA suggests a possible natural hybrid zone of Triatoma brasiliensis species complex.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jane; Bargues, Maria Dolores; Neiva, Vanessa Lima; Lawrence, Gena G; Gumiel, Marcia; Oliveira, Genova; Cabello, Pedro; Lima, Marli Maria; Dotson, Ellen; Provance, David William; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Mateo, Lucia; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Dujardin, Jean Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma occurs in Pernambuco state, Brazil, which is situated between the distribution areas of Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis (north) and Triatoma juazeirensis (south). T. b. macromelasoma displays greater variations in its chromatic phenotype than either T. b. brasiliensis or T. juazeirensis, and patterns reminiscent of one or the other. Experimental crosses from each of these members of the T. brasiliensis species complex generated fertile offspring suggesting that viable hybrids could be present in nature, despite their significant genetic distances. Considering the geographical position of occurrence of the T. b. macromelasoma (in Pernambuco) it was proposed to be an area capable of supporting natural hybridization between T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis. Since phenotypic variability is expected, this study investigated the existence of intermediate chromatic phenotypes for T. b. macromelasoma in various locations in areas between the T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis occurrences. Thirteen different color patterns were for the first time characterized and nine of those displayed intermediate phenotypes. Molecular analysis performed using ribosomal DNA intergenic region, grouped all within the T. brasiliensis complex. The intermediate chromatic phenotypes, molecular analysis and experimental crosses all support the distinction of a zone of hybridization that gave rise to the T. b. macromelasoma through homoploidal evolution. PMID:26520796

  14. Development of species-specific hybridization probes for marine luminous bacteria by using in vitro DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wimpee, C.F.; Nadeau, T.L.; Nealson, K.H. )

    1991-05-01

    By using two highly conserved regions of the luxA gene as primers, polymerase chain reaction amplification methods were used to prepare species-specific probes against the luciferase gene from four major groups of marine luminous bacteria. Laboratory studies with test strains indicated that three of the four probes cross-reacted with themselves and with one or more of the other species at low stringencies but were specific for members of their own species at high stringencies. The fourth probe, generated from Vibrio harveyi DNA, a cross-reacted with DNAs from two closely related species, V. orientalis and V. vulnificus. When nonluminous cultures were tested with the species-specific probes, no false-positive results were observed, even at low stringencies. Two field isolates were correctly identified as Photobacterium phosphoreum by using the species-specific hybridization probes at high stringency. A mixed probe (four different hybridization probes) used at low stringency gave positive results with all of the luminous bacteria tested, including the terrestrial species Xenorhabdus luminescens, and the taxonomically distinct marine bacterial species Shewanella hanedai; minimal cross-hybridization with these species was seen at higher stringencies.

  15. DNA Fingerprint Database for Crapemyrtle Cultivar Identification, Hybrid Verification, and Parentage Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to create DNA fingerprints for the Razzle Dazzle® crape myrtle series using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, and compare them with the DNA fingerprints of a database made up of over 50 popular crape myrtle cultivars currently available in the trade. Data consiste...

  16. Instability of chromosome number and DNA methylation variation induced by hybridization and amphidiploid formation between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Distant hybridization can result genome duplication and allopolyploid formation which may play a significant role in the origin and evolution of many plant species. It is unclear how the two or more divergent genomes coordinate in one nucleus with a single parental cytoplasm within allopolyploids. We used cytological and molecular methods to investigate the genetic and epigenetic instabilities associated with the process of distant hybridization and allopolyploid formation, measuring changes in chromosome number and DNA methylation across multiple generations. Results F1 plants from intergeneric hybridization between Raphanus sativus L. (2n = 18, RR) and Brassica alboglabra Bailey (2n = 18, CC) were obtained by hand crosses and subsequent embryo rescue. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to identify the F1 hybrid plants. The RAPD data indicated that the hybrids produced specific bands similar to those of parents and new bands that were not present in either parent. Chromosome number variation of somatic cells from allotetraploids in the F4 to F10 generations showed that intensive genetic changes occurred in the early generations of distant hybridization, leading to the formation of mixopolyploids with different chromosome numbers. DNA methylation variation was revealed using MSAP (methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism), which showed that cytosine methylation patterns changed markedly in the process of hybridization and amphidiploid formation. Differences in cytosine methylation levels demonstrated an epigenetic instability of the allopolyploid of Raphanobrassica between the genetically stable and unstable generations. Conclusions Our results showed that chromosome instability occurred in the early generations of allopolyploidy and then the plants were reverted to largely euploidy in later generations. During this process, DNA methylation changed markedly. These results suggest that, epigenetic mechanisms play an

  17. DNA translocation through small channels and pores from molecular models. Hydrodynamic, electrostatic, and hybridization considerations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Juan

    2009-03-01

    The flow and translocation of long DNA molecules are of considerable applied and fundamental interest. Design of effective genomic devices requires control of molecular shape and positioning at the level of microns and nanometers, and understanding the manner in which DNA is packaged into small channels and cavities is of interest to biology and medicine. This presentation will present an overview of hierarchical models and computational approaches developed by our research group to investigate the effects of confinement, hydrodynamic interactions, and salt concentration, on the structure and properties of DNA, both at equilibrium and beyond equilibrium. The talk will include a discussion of coarse grain descriptions of the flow of DNA in microfluidic and nanofluidic channels over multiple length and time scales, and a discussion of emerging, detailed models that are capable of describing melting and rehybridization at the single nucleotide level, as well as the packaging of DNA into viral capsids and small pores.

  18. Optical detection of PNA/DNA hybridization in resonant porous silicon-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotiroti, Lucia; Arcari, Paolo; Lamberti, Annalisa; Sanges, Carmen; De Tommasi, Edoardo; Rea, Ilaria; Rendina, Ivo; De Stefano, Luca

    2008-04-01

    The development of label-free optical biosensors could have a great impact on life sciences as well as on screening techniques for medical and environmental applications. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a nucleic acid analog in which the sugar phosphate backbone of natural nucleic acid has been replaced by a synthetic peptide backbone, resulting in an achiral and uncharged mimic. Due to the uncharged nature of PNA, PNA-DNA duplexes show a better thermal stability respect the DNA-DNA equivalents. In this work, we used an optical biosensor, based on the porous silicon (PSi) nanotechnology, to detect PNA-DNA interactions. PSi optical sensors are based on changes of reflectivity spectrum when they are exposed to the target analytes. The porous silicon surface was chemically modified to covalently link the PNA which acts as a very specific probe for its ligand (cDNA).

  19. DNA-Functionalized MFe2O4 (M = Fe, Co, or Mn) Nanoparticles and Their Hybridization to DNA-Functionalized Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, David B.; Persson, Henrik H. J.; Zeng, Hao; Li, Guanxiong; Pourmand, Nader; Sun, Shouheng; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic MFe2O4 (M = Fe, Co, or Mn) nanoparticles with uniform diameters in the 4–20 nm range and with excellent material properties, reported previously, can be rendered soluble in water or aqueous buffers using a combination of alkylphosphonate surfactants and other surfactants such as ethoxylated fatty alcohols or phospholipids. Surfactant-modified oligonucleotides can be incorporated into the particles’ organic shell. The particles can withstand salt concentrations up to 0.3 M, temperatures up to 90 °C, and various operations such as concentration to dryness, column or membrane separations, and electrophoresis. The particles can be selectively hybridized to DNA-functionalized gold surfaces with high coverages using a two-story monolayer structure. These particles may find valuable applications involving the magnetic detection of small numbers of biomolecules using spin valves, magnetic tunnel junctions, or other sensors. PMID:15779990

  20. Flow cytometric analysis and microsatellite genotyping reveal extensive DNA content variation in Trypanosoma cruzi populations and expose contrasts between natural and experimental hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michael D.; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Gaunt, Michael W.; Yeo, Matthew; Carrasco, Hernán J.; Miles, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi exhibits remarkable genetic heterogeneity. This is evident at the nucleotide level but also structurally, in the form of karyotypic variation and DNA content differences between strains. Although natural populations of T. cruzi are predominantly clonal, hybrid lineages (TcIId and TcIIe) have been identified and hybridisation has been demonstrated in vitro, raising the possibility that genetic exchange may continue to shape the evolution of this pathogen. The mechanism of genetic exchange identified in the laboratory is unusual, apparently involving fusion of diploid parents followed by genome erosion. We investigated DNA content diversity in natural populations of T. cruzi in the context of its genetic subdivisions by using flow cytometric analysis and multilocus microsatellite genotyping to determine the relative DNA content and estimate the ploidy of 54 cloned isolates. The maximum difference observed was 47.5% between strain Tu18 cl2 (TcIIb) and strain C8 cl1 (TcI), which we estimated to be equivalent to ∼73 Mb of DNA. Large DNA content differences were identified within and between discrete typing units (DTUs). In particular, the mean DNA content of TcI strains was significantly less than that for TcII strains (P < 0.001). Comparisons of hybrid DTUs TcIId/IIe with corresponding parental DTUs TcIIb/IIc indicated that natural hybrids are predominantly diploid. We also measured the relative DNA content of six in vitro-generated TcI hybrid clones and their parents. In contrast to TcIId/IIe hybrid strains these experimental hybrids comprised populations of sub-tetraploid organisms with mean DNA contents 1.65–1.72 times higher than the parental organisms. The DNA contents of both parents and hybrids were shown to be relatively stable after passage through a mammalian host, heat shock or nutritional stress. The results are discussed in the context of hybridisation mechanisms in both natural and in vitro settings. PMID:19393242

  1. In-situ detection of DNA hybridization with a microfiber Bragg grating biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dandan; Guo, Tuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Ran, Yang; Huang, Yunyun; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2014-05-01

    Microfiber Bragg gratings (mFBGs) can be used as cost-effective and relatively simple-to-implement biosensors for monitoring DNA interactions in situ. The sensors are functionalized by a monolayer of poly-L-lysine (PLL) with the specific molecular recognition probe DNA sequences to bind with high specificity to a given target. By recording the wavelength seperation between the two resonant peaks of a single mFBG, the mFBG biosensor is capable of detecting the presence of specific target DNA in situ.

  2. DanQ: a hybrid convolutional and recurrent deep neural network for quantifying the function of DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Daniel; Xie, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the properties and functions of DNA sequences is an important, but challenging task in the broad field of genomics. This task is particularly difficult for non-coding DNA, the vast majority of which is still poorly understood in terms of function. A powerful predictive model for the function of non-coding DNA can have enormous benefit for both basic science and translational research because over 98% of the human genome is non-coding and 93% of disease-associated variants lie in these regions. To address this need, we propose DanQ, a novel hybrid convolutional and bi-directional long short-term memory recurrent neural network framework for predicting non-coding function de novo from sequence. In the DanQ model, the convolution layer captures regulatory motifs, while the recurrent layer captures long-term dependencies between the motifs in order to learn a regulatory ‘grammar’ to improve predictions. DanQ improves considerably upon other models across several metrics. For some regulatory markers, DanQ can achieve over a 50% relative improvement in the area under the precision-recall curve metric compared to related models. We have made the source code available at the github repository http://github.com/uci-cbcl/DanQ. PMID:27084946

  3. Cyclometalated iridium complex-based label-free photoelectrochemical biosensor for DNA detection by hybridization chain reaction amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunxiang; Wang, Hongyang; Shen, Jing; Tang, Bo

    2015-04-21

    Photoactive material is the most crucial factor which intimately determines analytical performances of the photoelectrochemical sensor. On the basis of the high affinity of dipyrido [3,2-a:2',3'-c] phenazine (dppz) with DNA helix, a novel photoactive intercalator, [(ppy)2Ir(dppz)](+)PF6(-)(ppy = 2-phenylpyridine and dppz = dipyrido [3,2-a:2',3'-c] phenazine) was prepared and characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The photoelectrochemical properties of the as-prepared iridium(III) complex immobilized on the ITO electrode was investigated. Either cathodic or anodic photocurrent generation can be observed when triethanolamine (TEOA) or dissolved O2 is used as a sacrificial electron donor/acceptor, respectively. The probable photocurrent-generation mechanisms are speculated. A highly sensitive iridium(III) complex-based photoelectrochemical sensor was proposed for DNA detection via hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor was found to be linearly proportional to the logarithm of target DNA concentration in the range from 0.025 to 100 pmol L(-1) with a detection limit of 9.0 fmol L(-1) (3σ). Moreover, the proposed sensor displayed high selectivity and good reproducibility, demonstrating efficient and stable photoelectric conversion ability of the Ir(III) complex. PMID:25816127

  4. DanQ: a hybrid convolutional and recurrent deep neural network for quantifying the function of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Quang, Daniel; Xie, Xiaohui

    2016-06-20

    Modeling the properties and functions of DNA sequences is an important, but challenging task in the broad field of genomics. This task is particularly difficult for non-coding DNA, the vast majority of which is still poorly understood in terms of function. A powerful predictive model for the function of non-coding DNA can have enormous benefit for both basic science and translational research because over 98% of the human genome is non-coding and 93% of disease-associated variants lie in these regions. To address this need, we propose DanQ, a novel hybrid convolutional and bi-directional long short-term memory recurrent neural network framework for predicting non-coding function de novo from sequence. In the DanQ model, the convolution layer captures regulatory motifs, while the recurrent layer captures long-term dependencies between the motifs in order to learn a regulatory 'grammar' to improve predictions. DanQ improves considerably upon other models across several metrics. For some regulatory markers, DanQ can achieve over a 50% relative improvement in the area under the precision-recall curve metric compared to related models. We have made the source code available at the github repository http://github.com/uci-cbcl/DanQ. PMID:27084946

  5. Hypoxia-induced regulation of MAPK phosphatase-1 as identified by subtractive suppression hybridization and cDNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Seta, K A; Kim, R; Kim, H W; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    2001-11-30

    Subtractive suppression hybridization was used to generate a cDNA library enriched in cDNA sequences corresponding to mRNA species that are specifically up-regulated by hypoxia (6 h, 1% O(2)) in the oxygen-responsive pheochromocytoma cell line. The dual specificity protein-tyrosine phosphatase MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) was highly represented in this library. Clones were arrayed on glass slides to create a hypoxia-specific cDNA microarray chip. Microarray, northern blot, and western blot analyses confirmed that MKP-1 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated by hypoxia by approximately 8-fold. The magnitude of the effect of hypoxia on MKP-1 was approximately equal to that induced by KCl depolarization and much larger than the effects of either epidermal growth factor or nerve growth factor on MKP-1 mRNA levels. In contrast to the calcium-dependent induction of MKP-1 by KCl depolarization, the effect of hypoxia on MKP-1 persisted under calcium-free conditions. Cobalt and deferoxamine also increased MKP-1 mRNA levels, suggesting that hypoxia-inducible factor proteins may play a role in the regulation of MKP-1 by hypoxia. Pretreatment of cells with SB203580, which inhibits p38 kinase activity, significantly reduced the hypoxia-induced increase in MKP-1 RNA levels. Thus, hypoxia robustly increases MKP-1 levels, at least in part through a p38 kinase-mediated mechanism. PMID:11577072

  6. Quantitative Real-Time Measurements of DNA Hybridization with Alkylated Non-Oxidized Silicon Nanowires in Electrolyte Solution

    PubMed Central

    Bunimovich, Yuri L.; Shin, Young Shik; Yeo, Woon-Seok; Amori, Michael; Kwong, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative, real time detection of single stranded oligonucleotides with silicon nanowires (SiNWs) in physiologically relevant electrolyte solution is demonstrated. Debye screening of the hybridization event is minimized by utilizing electrostatically adsorbed primary DNA on an amine-terminated NW surface. Two surface functionalization chemistries are compared: an amine terminated siloxane monolayer on the native SiO2 surface of the SiNW, and an amine terminated alkyl monolayer grown directly on a hydrogen-terminated SiNW surface. The SiNWs without the native oxide exhibit improved solution-gated field-effect transistor characteristics and a significantly enhanced sensitivity to single stranded DNA detection, with an accompanying two orders of magnitude improvement in the dynamic range of sensing. A model for the detection of analyte by SiNW sensors is developed and utilized to extract DNA binding kinetic parameters. Those values are directly compared with values obtained by the standard method of surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and demonstrated to be similar. The nanowires, however, are characterized by higher detection sensitivity. The implication is that Si NWs can be utilized to quantitate the solution phase concentration of biomolecules at low concentrations. This work also demonstrates the importance of surface chemistry for optimizing biomolecular sensing with silicon nanowires. PMID:17165787

  7. Density functional study of the phosphate diester hydrolysis of RNA in RNA/DNA hybrid by RNase HI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Makoto; Nakamura, Haruki; Takano, Yu

    2014-02-01

    Ribonuclease HI (RNase HI) catalyses the non-specific hydrolysis of RNA in an RNA/DNA hybrid. This enzyme is found in almost all organisms and involved in replication initiation and DNA topology restoration. A similar fold has been observed in other enzymes such as DNA transposases. In particular, RNases HI has emerged as important therapeutic targets because the enzymatic activity is absolutely required for proliferation of HIV and other retroviruses. The X-ray crystallographic structures of RNase HI revealed that the Mg2+ ion is essential for the enzymatic reaction and that Asp and Glu coordinate to the Mg2+ ion. There are, however, controversies about the catalytic mechanism of RNase HI, the number of Mg2+ ions, the proton transfer pathway, and the protonation states of the active site residues. In the present study, we have explored the hydrolysis of the phosphate diester group of RNA by RNase HI using density functional theory to elucidate how many Mg2+ ions are required for the catalysis of RNase HI. Our computation demonstrates that both one- and two-metal models show the stepwise hydrolysis pathway via a pentacovalent intermediate. However, the activation barrier of the two-metal model is lower than that of the one-metal model by 11.7 kcal/mol.

  8. Mismatch discrimination of lipidated DNA and LNA-probes (LiNAs) in hybridization-controlled liposome assembly.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Vogel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Assays for mismatch discrimination and detection of single nucleotide variations by hybridization-controlled assembly of liposomes, which do not require tedious surface chemistry, are versatile for both DNA and RNA targets. We report herein a comprehensive study on different DNA and LNA (locked nucleic acids) probe designs, including membrane-anchoring requirements, studies on different probes and target lengths (including overhangs), DNA and RNA targets (including sequences associated with pathogens) for lipidated nucleic acids (LiNAs). Advantages and limitations of the liposome assembly based assay in the context of mismatch discrimination and SNP detection are presented. The advantages of membrane-anchored LiNA-probes compared to chemically attached probes on solid nanoparticles (e.g. gold nanoparticles) are described. Key functionalities such as non-covalent attachment of LiNA probes without the need for long spacers and the inherent mobility of membrane-anchored probes in lipid-bilayer membranes will be described for several different probe designs. PMID:27356098

  9. Nanosilver-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic determination of DNA methyltransferase activity through real-time hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping Ping; Liu, Hui; Zhen, Shu Jun; Li, Chun Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-11-15

    In this manuscript, a nanosilver enhanced SERS strategy was successfully constructed for the determination of DNA methyltransferase activity in soulution combined with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The proposed method was mainly on the basis of excellent separation ability of magnetic microparticles (MMPs), HCR as signal amplification unit and assembled AgNPs as enhancement substrate. In the presence of M. SssI MTase, the duplex sequence (5'-CCGG-3') tethered to MMPs was methylated, which cannot be cleaved by HpaII endonuclease. The resulted DNA skeleton captured on MMPs then triggered the HCR reaction, generated a polymerized and extended symmetrical sequence, in which more biotin terminal was available for the conjugation of AgNPs-SA, leading to significantly amplified SERS response. When it was used to analyze M. SssI activity, a linear equation ∆ISERS=1215.32+446.80 cM.SssI was obtained with the M. SssI activity ranged from 0.1 to 10.0 U with the correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.97. The most important advantage of this method is the combination of SERS and HCR in solution for the first time and its good selectivity, which enabled the detection of even one-base mismatched sequence. The new assay method holds great promising application to be a versatile platform for sensitive, high-throughput detection, and the screening of new anticancer drugs on DNA MTase. PMID:26086442

  10. Synthesis and hybridization properties of an acyclic achiral phosphonate DNA analogue.

    PubMed

    Kehler, J; Henriksen, U; Vejbjerg, H; Dahl, O

    1998-03-01

    Protected N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-(nucleobase-acetyl)aminomethanephosphonic+ ++ acid (6a-d) of all four DNA nucleobases have been prepared and oligomerized by solid-phase synthesis. Four DNA decamers containing 1-10 of these 'PPNA' monomers were prepared and evaluated by Tm measurements (medium salt) for binding to their DNA and RNA complements. One central modification reduced the binding strongly (delta Tm = -10 degrees C), but contiguous PPNA monomers gave smaller effects, and the all-PPNA decamer bound to RNA with a delta Tm of -1.2 degrees C per modification. Thus PPNA oligomers are inferior DNA and RNA binders compared to the closely related and strongly binding PNA oligomers. PMID:9568285

  11. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN HUMAN FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although recent technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology now allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for mo...

  12. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded solid tumors by comparative genomic hybridization after universal DNA-amplification.

    PubMed

    Speicher, M R; du Manoir, S; Schröck, E; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Schoell, B; Lengauer, C; Cremer, T; Ried, T

    1993-11-01

    We present a technique which allows the detection and chromosomal localization of DNA sequence copy number changes in solid tumor genomes from frozen sections and paraffin embedded, formalin fixed specimens. Based on comparative genomic hybridization and on universal DNA amplification procedures this technique is possible even if only a few tumor cells are available. We demonstrate the feasibility of this method to visualize complete and partial chromosome gains and losses and gene amplifications in archived solid tumor samples. PMID:8281155

  13. A rapid procedure to detect in situ DNA/RNA hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.R.; Sofer, W.

    1981-12-15

    A new method was developed for detecting DNA/RNA hydrids formed in situ using anti-DNA/RNA antibodies and the Peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunohistochemical procedure. Using RNA synthesized in vitro from cloned Drosophila histone genes (pDm 500H), we localized by this procedure, the histone genes to the 39 D-E region of the left arm of the second chromosome. This method has several advantages compared to conventional procedures.

  14. Electrochemical Investigation of Oligonucleotide-DNA Hybridization on Poly(4-Methoxyphenethylamine)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francielle B.; Vieira, Sabrina N.; Goulart Filho, Luiz R.; Boodts, Julien F. C.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.; Madurro, João M.

    2008-01-01

    This work describes the immobilization of purine and pyrimidine bases and immobilization/hybridization of synthetic oligonucleotides on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-methoxyphenethylamine) produced in acid medium. The immobilization of adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine on these modified electrodes was efficient, producing characteristic peaks. Another relevant observation is that, according to the literature, pyrimidine bases, cytosine and thymine are more difficult to detect. However, when immobilized onto the poly(4-methoxyphenethylamine), a significant increase in the magnitude of the current was obtained. The observation of the hybridization between the poly(GA) probe and its complementary, poly(CT) target, was possible by monitoring the guanosine and adenosine peaks or through methylene blue indicator, using differential pulse voltammetry. Hybridization results in a decrease of the peak current of guanosine and adenosine or the signal of methylene blue accumulated on the modified electrode surface. The hybridization with the complementary target was also investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed a significant modification in the Nyquist plot, after addition of the complementary target, with increase of the charge transference resistance. PMID:19325797

  15. Male-killing Wolbachia and mitochondrial DNA: selective sweeps, hybrid introgression and parasite population dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Jiggins, Francis M

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences are widely used as neutral genetic markers in insects. However, patterns of mtDNA variability are confounded by the spread of maternally transmitted parasites, which are genetically linked to the mitochondria. We have investigated these effects in the butterflies Acraea encedon (which is host to two strains of male-killing Wolbachia bacteria) and A. encedana (which is host to one strain). Within a population, the mitochondria are in linkage disequilibrium with the different male-killers. Furthermore, there has been a recent selective sweep of the mtDNA, which has led to the loss of mitochondrial variation within populations and erased any geographical structure. We also found that one of the male-killers, together with the associated mtDNA, has introgressed from A. encedana into A. encedon within the last 16,000 years. Interestingly, because butterflies are female heterogametic, this will presumably have also led to the introgression of genes on the W sex chromosome. Finally, in A. encedon the mitochondria in uninfected females are unaltered by the spread of the male-killer and have diverse, geographically structured mtDNA. This means we can reject the hypothesis that the male-killer is at a stable equilibrium maintained by imperfect transmission of the bacterium. Instead, some other form of balancing selection may be maintaining uninfected females in the population and preventing the species from going extinct due to a shortage of males. PMID:12750316

  16. Molecular cloning of a Drosophila potential Z-DNA forming sequence hybridizing in situ to a developmentally regulated subdivision of the polytene chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Ruiz, A; Requena, J M; Lancillotti, F; Morales, G; Lopez, M C; Alonso, C

    1989-01-01

    We describe the selection of a group of plasmids with potential to form Z-DNA, from libraries of Drosophila hydei nuclear DNA using anti Z-DNA monoclonal (22) or polyclonal (10c) antibodies. The supercoiled closed circular forms of most of the selected recombinant plasmids from the 10c Z-DNA library show affinity to the polyclonal 10c antibody as indicated by DNA binding assays. One of these plasmids, pF17, was selected for further study. The insert in this plasmid adopts the Z conformation at bacterial supercoiled density. Analysis of deletion plasmids indicates that a Z-epitope is located within a short fragment of the insert in which 3 GC repetitions are found. The Drosophila DNA insert in pF17 hybridizes in situ with locus 4-75C1-2 of the polytene chromosomes, a locus whose transcriptional activity is developmentally regulated during the third instar. Images PMID:2473437

  17. Combined DNA-RNA Fluorescent In situ Hybridization (FISH) to Study X Chromosome Inactivation in Differentiated Female Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Gribnau, Joost

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular technique which enables the detection of nucleic acids in cells. DNA FISH is often used in cytogenetics and cancer diagnostics, and can detect aberrations of the genome, which often has important clinical implications. RNA FISH can be used to detect RNA molecules in cells and has provided important insights in regulation of gene expression. Combining DNA and RNA FISH within the same cell is technically challenging, as conditions suitable for DNA FISH might be too harsh for fragile, single stranded RNA molecules. We here present an easily applicable protocol which enables the combined, simultaneous detection of Xist RNA and DNA encoded by the X chromosomes. This combined DNA-RNA FISH protocol can likely be applied to other systems where both RNA and DNA need to be detected. PMID:24961515

  18. Detection of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene and related DNA sequences in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and other vibrio species by the DNA colony hybridization test.

    PubMed Central

    Nishibuchi, M; Ishibashi, M; Takeda, Y; Kaper, J B

    1985-01-01

    A specific gene probe for the Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin gene was constructed and used to examine the presence or absence of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene or related DNA sequences in V. parahaemolyticus and other vibrios by the DNA colony hybridization method. The gene probe consisted of a 406-base-pair, completely internal fragment covering 71% of the structural gene with PstI linkers added to the ends. Six copies of this 415-base-pair PstI fragment were cloned into plasmid pBR322, which yielded large amounts of the probe DNA. One hundred forty-one V. parahaemolyticus strains were tested with the gene probe, and the results were compared with those of phenotypic assays for the thermostable direct hemolysin. All Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strains were gene positive. However, 86% of the strains that exhibited weak Kanagawa phenomenon and 16% of Kanagawa phenomenon-negative strains also reacted with the gene probe. Immunological methods for the detection of the thermostable direct hemolysin (modified Elek test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) showed better correlation with gene probe results. All gene-positive strains produced hemolysin detectable in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, although occasional strains showed weak reaction. The modified Elek test was slightly less sensitive than the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All gene-negative strains were also negative in these immunological assays. One hundred twenty-one strains of Vibrio spp. other than V. parahaemolyticus were tested with the gene probe; only Vibrio hollisae strains reacted with the probe under stringent conditions. PMID:4030087

  19. Development and Functional Analysis of Novel Genetic Promoters Using DNA Shuffling, Hybridization and a Combination Thereof

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Rajiv; Patro, Sunita; Pradhan, Bhubaneswar; Kumar, Alok; Maiti, Indu B.; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of novel synthetic promoters with enhanced regulatory activity is of great value for a diverse range of plant biotechnology applications. Methodology Using the Figwort mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter (F) and the sub-genomic transcript promoter (FS) sequences, we generated two single shuffled promoter libraries (LssF and LssFS), two multiple shuffled promoter libraries (LmsFS-F and LmsF-FS), two hybrid promoters (FuasFScp and FSuasFcp) and two hybrid-shuffled promoter libraries (LhsFuasFScp and LhsFSuasFcp). Transient expression activities of approximately 50 shuffled promoter clones from each of these libraries were assayed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) protoplasts. It was observed that most of the shuffled promoters showed reduced activity compared to the two parent promoters (F and FS) and the CaMV35S promoter. In silico studies (computer simulated analyses) revealed that the reduced promoter activities of the shuffled promoters could be due to their higher helical stability. On the contrary, the hybrid promoters FuasFScp and FSuasFcp showed enhanced activities compared to F, FS and CaMV 35S in both transient and transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis plants. Northern-blot and qRT-PCR data revealed a positive correlation between transcription and enzymatic activity in transgenic tobacco plants expressing hybrid promoters. Histochemical/X-gluc staining of whole transgenic seedlings/tissue-sections and fluorescence images of ImaGene Green™ treated roots and stems expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the FuasFScp and FSuasFcp promoters also support the above findings. Furthermore, protein extracts made from protoplasts expressing the human defensin (HNP-1) gene driven by hybrid promoters showed enhanced antibacterial activity compared to the CaMV35S promoter. Significance/Conclusion Both shuffled and hybrid promoters developed in the present study can be used as molecular tools to study the

  20. DNA-Hybrid-Gated Photothermal Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for NIR-Responsive and Aptamer-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanxin; Hou, Zhiyao; Ge, Yakun; Deng, Kerong; Liu, Bei; Li, Xuejiao; Li, Quanshun; Cheng, Ziyong; Ma, Ping'an; Li, Chunxia; Lin, Jun

    2015-09-23

    Near-infrared light is an attractive stimulus due to its noninvasive and deep tissue penetration. Particularly, NIR light is utilized for cancer thermotherapy and on-demand release of drugs by the disruption of the delivery carriers. Here we have prepared a novel NIR-responsive DNA-hybrid-gated nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica-coated Cu1.8S nanoparticles. Cu1.8S nanoparticles, possessing high photothermal conversion efficiency under a 980 nm laser, were chosen as photothermal agents. The mesoporous silica structure could be used for drug storage/delivery and modified with aptamer-modified GC-rich DNA-helix as gatekeepers, drug vectors, and targeting ligand. Simultaneously, the as-produced photothermal effect caused denaturation of DNA double strands, which triggered the drug release of the DNA-helix-loaded hydrophilic drug doxorubicin and mesopore-loaded hydrophobic drug curcumin, resulting in a synergistic therapeutic effect. The Cu1.8S@mSiO2 nanocomposites endocytosed by cancer cells through the aptamer-mediated mode are able to generate rational release of doxorubicin/curcumin under NIR irradiation, strongly enhancing the synergistic growth-inhibitory effect of curcumin against doxorubicin in MCF-7 cells, which is associated with a strong mitochondrial-mediated cell apoptosis progression. The underlying mechanism of apoptosis showed a strong synergistic inhibitory effect both on the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, and upregulated caspase 3/9 activity and on the expression level of Bak and Bax. Therefore, Cu1.8S@mSiO2 with efficient synergistic therapeutic efficiency is a potential multifunctional cancer therapy nanoplatform. PMID:26325285

  1. DNA sequence-dependent morphological evolution of silver nanoparticles and their optical and hybridization properties.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiangjiexing; Tan, Li Huey; Hwang, Kevin; Xing, Hang; Wu, Peiwen; Li, Wei; Lu, Yi

    2014-10-29

    A systematic investigation of the effects of different DNA sequences on the morphologies of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) grown from Ag nanocube seeds is reported. The presence of 10-mer oligo-A, -T, and -C directed AgNPs growth from cubic seeds into edge-truncated octahedra of different truncation extents and truncated tetrahedral AgNPs, while AgNPs in the presence of oligo-G remained cubic. The shape and morphological evolution of the nanoparticle growth for each system is investigated using SEM and TEM and correlated with UV-vis absorption kinetic studies. In addition, the roles of oligo-C and oligo-G secondary structures in modulating the morphologies of AgNPs are elucidated, and the morphological evolution for each condition of AgNPs growth is proposed. The shapes were found to be highly dependent on the binding affinity of each of the bases and the DNA secondary structures, favoring the stabilization of the Ag{111} facet. The AgNPs synthesized through this method have morphologies and optical properties that can be varied by using different DNA sequences, while the DNA molecules on these AgNPs are also stable against glutathione. The AgNP functionalization can be realized in a one-step synthesis while retaining the biorecognition ability of the DNA, which allows for programmable assembly. PMID:25243485

  2. Implications of hybridization, NUMTs, and overlooked diversity for DNA Barcoding of Eurasian ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Oleg A; Simonov, Evgeniy; Surin, Vadim L; Titov, Sergey V; Brandler, Oleg V; Ivanova, Natalia V; Borisenko, Alex V

    2015-01-01

    The utility of DNA Barcoding for species identification and discovery has catalyzed a concerted effort to build the global reference library; however, many animal groups of economical or conservational importance remain poorly represented. This study aims to contribute DNA barcode records for all ground squirrel species (Xerinae, Sciuridae, Rodentia) inhabiting Eurasia and to test efficiency of this approach for species discrimination. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene sequences were obtained for 97 individuals representing 16 ground squirrel species of which 12 were correctly identified. Taxonomic allocation of some specimens within four species was complicated by geographically restricted mtDNA introgression. Exclusion of individuals with introgressed mtDNA allowed reaching a 91.6% identification success rate. Significant COI divergence (3.5-4.4%) was observed within the most widespread ground squirrel species (Spermophilus erythrogenys, S. pygmaeus, S. suslicus, Urocitellus undulatus), suggesting the presence of cryptic species. A single putative NUMT (nuclear mitochondrial pseudogene) sequence was recovered during molecular analysis; mitochondrial COI from this sample was amplified following re-extraction of DNA. Our data show high discrimination ability of 100 bp COI fragments for Eurasian ground squirrels (84.3%) with no incorrect assessments, underscoring the potential utility of the existing reference librariy for the development of diagnostic 'mini-barcodes'. PMID:25617768

  3. Implications of Hybridization, NUMTs, and Overlooked Diversity for DNA Barcoding of Eurasian Ground Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Oleg A.; Simonov, Evgeniy; Surin, Vadim L.; Titov, Sergey V.; Brandler, Oleg V.; Ivanova, Natalia V.; Borisenko, Alex V.

    2015-01-01

    The utility of DNA Barcoding for species identification and discovery has catalyzed a concerted effort to build the global reference library; however, many animal groups of economical or conservational importance remain poorly represented. This study aims to contribute DNA barcode records for all ground squirrel species (Xerinae, Sciuridae, Rodentia) inhabiting Eurasia and to test efficiency of this approach for species discrimination. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene sequences were obtained for 97 individuals representing 16 ground squirrel species of which 12 were correctly identified. Taxonomic allocation of some specimens within four species was complicated by geographically restricted mtDNA introgression. Exclusion of individuals with introgressed mtDNA allowed reaching a 91.6% identification success rate. Significant COI divergence (3.5–4.4%) was observed within the most widespread ground squirrel species (Spermophilus erythrogenys, S. pygmaeus, S. suslicus, Urocitellus undulatus), suggesting the presence of cryptic species. A single putative NUMT (nuclear mitochondrial pseudogene) sequence was recovered during molecular analysis; mitochondrial COI from this sample was amplified following re-extraction of DNA. Our data show high discrimination ability of 100 bp COI fragments for Eurasian ground squirrels (84.3%) with no incorrect assessments, underscoring the potential utility of the existing reference librariy for the development of diagnostic ‘mini-barcodes’. PMID:25617768

  4. Cytometry-based single-cell analysis of intact epithelial signaling reveals MAPK activation divergent from TNF-α-induced apoptosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Alan J; Banerjee, Amrita; McKinley, Eliot T; Scurrah, Cherie' R; Herring, Charles A; Gewin, Leslie S; Masuzaki, Ryota; Karp, Seth J; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Gerdes, Michael J; Irish, Jonathan M; Coffey, Robert J; Lau, Ken S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding heterogeneous cellular behaviors in a complex tissue requires the evaluation of signaling networks at single-cell resolution. However, probing signaling in epithelial tissues using cytometry-based single-cell analysis has been confounded by the necessity of single-cell dissociation, where disrupting cell-to-cell connections inherently perturbs native cell signaling states. Here, we demonstrate a novel strategy (Disaggregation for Intracellular Signaling in Single Epithelial Cells from Tissue—DISSECT) that preserves native signaling for Cytometry Time-of-Flight (CyTOF) and fluorescent flow cytometry applications. A 21-plex CyTOF analysis encompassing core signaling and cell-identity markers was performed on the small intestinal epithelium after systemic tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) stimulation. Unsupervised and supervised analyses robustly selected signaling features that identify a unique subset of epithelial cells that are sensitized to TNF-α-induced apoptosis in the seemingly homogeneous enterocyte population. Specifically, p-ERK and apoptosis are divergently regulated in neighboring enterocytes within the epithelium, suggesting a mechanism of contact-dependent survival. Our novel single-cell approach can broadly be applied, using both CyTOF and multi-parameter flow cytometry, for investigating normal and diseased cell states in a wide range of epithelial tissues. PMID:26519361

  5. Cytometry-based single-cell analysis of intact epithelial signaling reveals MAPK activation divergent from TNF-α-induced apoptosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Alan J; Banerjee, Amrita; McKinley, Eliot T; Scurrah, Cherie' R; Herring, Charles A; Gewin, Leslie S; Masuzaki, Ryota; Karp, Seth J; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Gerdes, Michael J; Irish, Jonathan M; Coffey, Robert J; Lau, Ken S

    2015-10-01

    Understanding heterogeneous cellular behaviors in a complex tissue requires the evaluation of signaling networks at single-cell resolution. However, probing signaling in epithelial tissues using cytometry-based single-cell analysis has been confounded by the necessity of single-cell dissociation, where disrupting cell-to-cell connections inherently perturbs native cell signaling states. Here, we demonstrate a novel strategy (Disaggregation for Intracellular Signaling in Single Epithelial Cells from Tissue-DISSECT) that preserves native signaling for Cytometry Time-of-Flight (CyTOF) and fluorescent flow cytometry applications. A 21-plex CyTOF analysis encompassing core signaling and cell-identity markers was performed on the small intestinal epithelium after systemic tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) stimulation. Unsupervised and supervised analyses robustly selected signaling features that identify a unique subset of epithelial cells that are sensitized to TNF-α-induced apoptosis in the seemingly homogeneous enterocyte population. Specifically, p-ERK and apoptosis are divergently regulated in neighboring enterocytes within the epithelium, suggesting a mechanism of contact-dependent survival. Our novel single-cell approach can broadly be applied, using both CyTOF and multi-parameter flow cytometry, for investigating normal and diseased cell states in a wide range of epithelial tissues. PMID:26519361

  6. Detection of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 in environmental waters of rural Bangladesh: a flow-cytometry-based field trial.

    PubMed

    Righetto, L; Zaman, R U; Mahmud, Z H; Bertuzzo, E; Mari, L; Casagrandi, R; Gatto, M; Islam, S; Rinaldo, A

    2015-08-01

    Presence of Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 in the waters of the rural area of Matlab, Bangladesh, was investigated with quantitative measurements performed with a portable flow cytometer. The relevance of this work relates to the testing of a field-adapted measurement protocol that might prove useful for cholera epidemic surveillance and for validation of mathematical models. Water samples were collected from different water bodies that constitute the hydrological system of the region, a well-known endemic area for cholera. Water was retrieved from ponds, river waters, and irrigation canals during an inter-epidemic time period. Each sample was filtered and analysed with a flow cytometer for a fast determination of V. cholerae cells contained in those environments. More specifically, samples were treated with O1- and O139-specific antibodies, which allowed precise flow-cytometry-based concentration measurements. Both serogroups were present in the environmental waters with a consistent dominance of V. cholerae O1. These results extend earlier studies where V. cholerae O1 and O139 were mostly detected during times of cholera epidemics using standard culturing techniques. Furthermore, our results confirm that an important fraction of the ponds' host populations of V. cholerae are able to self-sustain even when cholera cases are scarce. Those contaminated ponds may constitute a natural reservoir for cholera endemicity in the Matlab region. Correlations of V. cholerae concentrations with environmental factors and the spatial distribution of V. cholerae populations are also discussed. PMID:25496520

  7. Acquisition of double-stranded DNA-binding ability in a hybrid protein between Escherichia coli CspA and the cold shock domain of human YB-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, N; Yamanaka, K; Inouye, M

    2000-11-01

    Escherichia coli CspA, a major cold shock protein, is dramatically induced upon temperature downshift. As it binds co-operatively to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and RNA without apparent sequence specificity, it has been proposed that CspA acts as an RNA chaperone to facilitate transcription and translation at low temperature. CspA consists of a five-stranded beta-barrel structure containing two RNA-binding motifs, RNP1 and RNP2. Eukaryotic Y-box proteins, such as human YB-1, are a family of nucleic acid-binding proteins that share a region of high homology with CspA (43% identity), termed the cold shock domain (CSD). Their cellular functions are very diverse and are associated with growth-related processes. Here, we replaced the six-residue loop region of CspA between the beta3 and beta4 strands with the corresponding region of the CSD of human YB-1 protein. The resulting hybrid protein became capable of binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in addition to ssDNA and RNA. The dsDNA-binding ability of an RNP1 point mutant (F20L) of the hybrid was almost unchanged. On the other hand, the dsDNA-binding ability of the hybrid protein was abolished in high salt concentrations in contrast to its ssDNA-binding ability. These results indicate that the loop region between the beta3 and beta4 strands of Y-box proteins, which is a little longer and more basic than that of CspA, plays an important role in their binding to dsDNA. PMID:11069676

  8. Label free detection of DNA on Au/ZnO/Ag hybrid structure based SERS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Anil Kumar; Mohan, D. Bharathi

    2016-04-01

    Au/ZnO/Ag based SERS substrate was fabricated for the label free detection of DNA of Escherichia Coli bacteria. The SERS substrate was fabricated by growing ZnO nanorod arrays on thermally evaporated ultrathin Ag film of 5 nm thickness using hydrothermal process. Non-spherical like Au nanoparticles were decorated on ZnO nanorod arrays by sputtering technique with sputtering time of 45 sec. The surface of Au/ZnO/Ag was observed to be nearly superhydrophobic exhibiting the contact angle of 144 °. A low volume (5 µl) of aqueous solution of DNA of laboratory strain Escherichia Coli with very low concentration was adsorbed on fabricated SERS substrate by drop casting. The SERS detection of DNA molecules was achieved up to lower concentration of 10-8 M due to strong local electric field enhancement at the nanometer gap among Au nanoparticles and superhydrophobic nature of Au/ZnO/Ag surface.

  9. A label-free colorimetric platform for DNA via target-catalyzed hairpin assembly and the peroxidase-like catalytic of graphene/Au-NPs hybrids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaohui; Li, Ningxing; Lan, Jingwen; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2016-01-01

    A target-catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) and graphene/Au-NPs hybrids-based platform has been developed for the determination of DNA. This new sensor not only avoided any labeling but also reduced the background signal. In the absence of target, the assembly of H1 and H2 couldn't be triggered. The catalytic activity of graphene/Au-NPs hybrids was inhibited by adsorption of H1 and H2, leading to the "inactive" hybrids unable to catalyze the oxidation reaction of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB). However, with the addition of target DNA, the target-catalyzed hairpin assembly was initiated and produced plenty of H1-H2 duplex, which had a weak binding affinity with the graphene/Au-NPs. Thus, the protected interface of graphene/Au-NPs hybrids became active and catalyzed the oxidation reaction of TMB accompanied with a colorless to-blue color change. This approach exhibited good sensitivity and specificity for target DNA with a detection limit of 5.74 × 10(-11) M, and realized the assay of target DNA in human serum samples. Besides, this sensor could be further expanded to detect viruses or proteins by adapting the corresponding aptamers, showing great potential in biochemical detections. PMID:26703265

  10. Coupled equilibrium model of hybridization error for the DNA microarray and tag-antitag systems.

    PubMed

    Rose, John A; Deaton, Russell J; Hagiya, Masami; Suyama, Akira

    2007-03-01

    In this work, a detailed coupled equilibrium model is presented for predicting the ensemble average probability of hybridization error per chip-hybridized input strand, providing the first ensemble average method for estimating postannealing microarray/TAT system error rates. Following a detailed presentation of the model and implementation via the software package NucleicPark, under a mismatched statistical zipper model of duplex formation, error response is simulated for both mean-energy and randomly encoded TAT systems versus temperature and input concentration. Limiting expressions and simulated model behavior indicate the occurrence of a transition in hybridization error response, from a logarithmically convex function of temperature for excess inputs (high-error behavior), to a monotonic, log-linear function of temperature for dilute inputs (low-error behavior), a novel result unpredicted by uncoupled equilibrium models. Model scaling behavior for random encodings is investigated versus system size and strand-length. Application of the model to TAT system design is also undertaken, via the in silico evolution of a high-fidelity 100-strand TAT system, with an error response improved by nine standard deviations over the performance of the mean random encoding. PMID:17393846

  11. New high performance hybrid magnet plates for DNA separation andbio-technology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, David; Pollard, Martin; Elkin, Chris; Petermann, Karl; Reiter, Charles; Cepeda, Mario

    2004-08-02

    A new class of magnet plates for biological and industrial applications has recently been developed at the D.O.E. Joint Genome Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (JGI/LBNL). These devices utilize hybrid technology that combines linear permanent magnet material and ferromagnetic material to produce significantly higher fields and gradients than currently available commercial magnet plates. These hybrid structures incorporate ferromagnetic poles that can be easily shaped to produce complex field distributions for specialized applications. The higher maximum fields and strong gradients of the hybrid structures result in greater holding forces on magnetized targets that are being processed as well as faster draw-down. Current development versions of these magnet plates have exhibited maximum fields in excess of 9000.0 Gauss. The design of these structures is easily scalable to allow for field increases to significantly above 1.0 tesla (10000.0gauss). Author's note: 11000.0 Gauss peak fields have been achieved as of January 2005.

  12. An ultrasensitive DNA biosensor based on covalent immobilization of probe DNA on fern leaf-like α-Fe2O3 and chitosan Hybrid film using terephthalaldehyde as arm-linker.

    PubMed

    Xu, Biyan; Zheng, Delun; Qiu, Weiwei; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Shaoxiong; Wang, Qingxiang

    2015-10-15

    In this work, a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor has been developed based on the hybrid film of fern leaf-like α-Fe2O3 microparticles and chitosan (CS). The fern leaf-like α-Fe2O3 microparticles were synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal method, and their morphologies were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. Electrochemical characterization assays revealed that the hybrid film modified electrode had remarkable synergistic effects of the large accessible surface area and high electrical conductivity of semiconductive Fe2O3, and the good film stability of CS. Based on the rich amino groups on CS, the CS-Fe2O3 hybrid film was employed as a functional matrix for probe DNA immobilization using terephthalaldehyde (TPA) as a bifunctional arm-linker. The hybridization capacity of the developed biosensor was evaluated with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) as the indicating probe. A wide dynamic detection range from 1.0 × 10(-14) to 1.0 × 10(-10)M with ultralow detection limit of 5.6 × 10(-15)M was achieved for the target DNA. The hybridization selectivity experiments further revealed that the biosensor could discriminate fully complementary sequences from one-base mismatched, three-base mismatched, and non-complementary sequences. Moreover, the biosensor showed the advantage of good regeneration ability and reproducibility. PMID:25982725

  13. Isothermal DNA origami folding: avoiding denaturing conditions for one-pot, hybrid-component annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopielski, Andreas; Schneider, Anne; Csáki, Andrea; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The DNA origami technique offers great potential for nanotechnology. Using biomolecular self-assembly, defined 2D and 3D nanoscale DNA structures can be realized. DNA origami allows the positioning of proteins, fluorophores or nanoparticles with an accuracy of a few nanometers and enables thereby novel nanoscale devices. Origami assembly usually includes a thermal denaturation step at 90 °C. Additional components used for nanoscale assembly (such as proteins) are often thermosensitive, and possibly damaged by such harsh conditions. They have therefore to be attached in an extra second step to avoid defects. To enable a streamlined one-step nanoscale synthesis - a so called one-pot folding - an adaptation of the folding procedures is required. Here we present a thermal optimization of this process for a 2D DNA rectangle-shaped origami resulting in an isothermal assembly protocol below 60 °C without thermal denaturation. Moreover, a room temperature protocol is presented using the chemical additive betaine, which is biocompatible in contrast to chemical denaturing approaches reported previously.The DNA origami technique offers great potential for nanotechnology. Using biomolecular self-assembly, defined 2D and 3D nanoscale DNA structures can be realized. DNA origami allows the positioning of proteins, fluorophores or nanoparticles with an accuracy of a few nanometers and enables thereby novel nanoscale devices. Origami assembly usually includes a thermal denaturation step at 90 °C. Additional components used for nanoscale assembly (such as proteins) are often thermosensitive, and possibly damaged by such harsh conditions. They have therefore to be attached in an extra second step to avoid defects. To enable a streamlined one-step nanoscale synthesis - a so called one-pot folding - an adaptation of the folding procedures is required. Here we present a thermal optimization of this process for a 2D DNA rectangle-shaped origami resulting in an isothermal assembly

  14. Chromosome painting in plants: in situ hybridization with a DNA probe from a specific microdissected chromosome arm of common wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Vega, M; Abbo, S; Feldman, M; Levy, A A

    1994-01-01

    We report here on the successful painting of a specific plant chromosome within its own genome. Isochromosomes for the long arm of chromosome 5 of the wheat B genome (5BL) were microdissected from first meiotic metaphase spreads of a monoisosomic 5BL line of the common wheat Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring. The dissected isochromosomes were amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR in a single tube reaction. The amplified DNA was used as a complex probe mixture for fluorescent in situ hybridization on first meiotic metaphase spreads of lines carrying 5BL as a distinctive marker. Hybridization signals were observed, specifically, along the entire 5BL. In some of the cells, labeling was also detected in two bivalents, presumably those of the 5B "homoeologues" (partial homologues) found in common wheat (5A and 5D). The probe also revealed discrete domains in tapetal nuclei at interphase, further supporting the probe's high specificity. These data suggest that chromosome and homoeologous group-specific sequences are more abundant in 5BL than genome-specific sequences. Chromosome-painting probes, such as the one described here for 5BL, can facilitate the study of chromosome evolution in polyploid wheat. Images PMID:7991581

  15. Full-Length Enriched cDNA Libraries and ORFeome Analysis of Sugarcane Hybrid and Ancestor Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Scott; Pörtner-Taliana, Antje; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane is a major crop used for food and bioenergy production. Modern cultivars are hybrids derived from crosses between Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum. Hybrid cultivars combine favorable characteristics from ancestral species and contain a genome that is highly polyploid and aneuploid, containing 100–130 chromosomes. These complex genomes represent a huge challenge for molecular studies and for the development of biotechnological tools that can facilitate sugarcane improvement. Here, we describe full-length enriched cDNA libraries for Saccharum officinarum, Saccharum spontaneum, and one hybrid genotype (SP803280) and analyze the set of open reading frames (ORFs) in their genomes (i.e., their ORFeomes). We found 38,195 (19%) sugarcane-specific transcripts that did not match transcripts from other databases. Less than 1.6% of all transcripts were ancestor-specific (i.e., not expressed in SP803280). We also found 78,008 putative new sugarcane transcripts that were absent in the largest sugarcane expressed sequence tag database (SUCEST). Functional annotation showed a high frequency of protein kinases and stress-related proteins. We also detected natural antisense transcript expression, which mapped to 94% of all plant KEGG pathways; however, each genotype showed different pathways enriched in antisense transcripts. Our data appeared to cover 53.2% (17,563 genes) and 46.8% (937 transcription factors) of all sugarcane full-length genes and transcription factors, respectively. This work represents a significant advancement in defining the sugarcane ORFeome and will be useful for protein characterization, single nucleotide polymorphism and splicing variant identification, evolutionary and comparative studies, and sugarcane genome assembly and annotation. PMID:25222706

  16. A multilevel ant colony optimization algorithm for classical and isothermic DNA sequencing by hybridization with multiplicity information available.

    PubMed

    Kwarciak, Kamil; Radom, Marcin; Formanowicz, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The classical sequencing by hybridization takes into account a binary information about sequence composition. A given element from an oligonucleotide library is or is not a part of the target sequence. However, the DNA chip technology has been developed and it enables to receive a partial information about multiplicity of each oligonucleotide the analyzed sequence consist of. Currently, it is not possible to assess the exact data of such type but even partial information should be very useful. Two realistic multiplicity information models are taken into consideration in this paper. The first one, called "one and many" assumes that it is possible to obtain information if a given oligonucleotide occurs in a reconstructed sequence once or more than once. According to the second model, called "one, two and many", one is able to receive from biochemical experiment information if a given oligonucleotide is present in an analyzed sequence once, twice or at least three times. An ant colony optimization algorithm has been implemented to verify the above models and to compare with existing algorithms for sequencing by hybridization which utilize the additional information. The proposed algorithm solves the problem with any kind of hybridization errors. Computational experiment results confirm that using even the partial information about multiplicity leads to increased quality of reconstructed sequences. Moreover, they also show that the more precise model enables to obtain better solutions and the ant colony optimization algorithm outperforms the existing ones. Test data sets and the proposed ant colony optimization algorithm are available on: http://bioserver.cs.put.poznan.pl/download/ACO4mSBH.zip. PMID:26878124

  17. Reexamination of Culex pipiens Hybridization Zone in the Eastern United States by Ribosomal DNA-Based Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaoming; Molaei, Goudarz; Andreadis, Theodore G.

    2011-01-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex are important vectors of several disease-causing pathogens, including West Nile virus. In North America, the complex consists of Cx. pipiens pipiens form pipiens, Cx. pipiens pipiens form molestus, Cx. pipiens quinquefasciatus, and their hybrids that exhibit substantial diversity in physiology, behavior, and geographic range. Hybridization among these mosquitoes is of concern because of potential implications for disease transmission. Currently, several morphological and molecular markers exist for differentiating members of the Cx. pipiens complex; however, these markers have specific limitations. We report here two highly reliable ribosomal DNA-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, CxpG2T and CxpA2d, for detecting Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes containing Cx. p. quinquefasciatus alleles. Both CxpG2T and CxpA2d contain one allele that is present in all members of the Cx. pipiens complex, and the other allele is specific to Cx. p. quinquefasciatus. Testing of field populations from the eastern United States showed that these two SNP markers are capable of identifying a south to north gradient of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and hybrids. The northern limit of detection of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus alleles in this study was in Fort Totten, NY (40.79°N), whereas the southern boundary was determined between Atlanta, GA (33.81°N) and Gainesville, FL (29.64°N). CxpG2T and CxpA2d were more accurate than the ACE-2 marker, and they may conceivably provide comparable resolution with microsatellite markers for detecting Cx. p. quinquefasciatus alleles. PMID:21896800

  18. First Evidence of a Hybrid of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis/L. (V.) peruviana DNA Detected from the Phlebotomine Sand Fly Lutzomyia tejadai in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The natural infection of sand flies by Leishmania was examined in the Department of Huanuco of Peru, where cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by a hybrid of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis/L. (V.) peruviana is endemic. A total of 2,997 female sand flies were captured by CDC light traps and Shannon traps, of which 2,931 and 66 flies were identified as Lutzomyia tejadai and Lu fischeri, respectively. Using crude DNA extracted from individual sand flies as a template, Leishmania DNA was detected from one Lu. tejadai. The parasite species was identified as a hybrid of L. (V.) braziliensis/L. (V.) peruviana on the basis of cytochrome b and mannose phosphate isomerase gene analyses. The result suggested that Lu. tejadai is responsible for the transmission of the hybrid Leishmania circulating in this area. PMID:26735142

  19. First Evidence of a Hybrid of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis/L. (V.) peruviana DNA Detected from the Phlebotomine Sand Fly Lutzomyia tejadai in Peru.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hirotomo; Cáceres, Abraham G; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The natural infection of sand flies by Leishmania was examined in the Department of Huanuco of Peru, where cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by a hybrid of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis/L. (V.) peruviana is endemic. A total of 2,997 female sand flies were captured by CDC light traps and Shannon traps, of which 2,931 and 66 flies were identified as Lutzomyia tejadai and Lu fischeri, respectively. Using crude DNA extracted from individual sand flies as a template, Leishmania DNA was detected from one Lu. tejadai. The parasite species was identified as a hybrid of L. (V.) braziliensis/L. (V.) peruviana on the basis of cytochrome b and mannose phosphate isomerase gene analyses. The result suggested that Lu. tejadai is responsible for the transmission of the hybrid Leishmania circulating in this area. PMID:26735142

  20. Predicting DNA binding proteins using support vector machine with hybrid fractal features.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Xue-Hai; Shi, Feng; Xia, Jing-Bo

    2014-02-21

    DNA-binding proteins play a vitally important role in many biological processes. Prediction of DNA-binding proteins from amino acid sequence is a significant but not fairly resolved scientific problem. Chaos game representation (CGR) investigates the patterns hidden in protein sequences, and visually reveals previously unknown structure. Fractal dimensions (FD) are good tools to measure sizes of complex, highly irregular geometric objects. In order to extract the intrinsic correlation with DNA-binding property from protein sequences, CGR algorithm, fractal dimension and amino acid composition are applied to formulate the numerical features of protein samples in this paper. Seven groups of features are extracted, which can be computed directly from the primary sequence, and each group is evaluated by the 10-fold cross-validation test and Jackknife test. Comparing the results of numerical experiments, the group of amino acid composition and fractal dimension (21-dimension vector) gets the best result, the average accuracy is 81.82% and average Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) is 0.6017. This resulting predictor is also compared with existing method DNA-Prot and shows better performances. PMID:24189096

  1. Quantum dot-based isothermal chain elongation for fluorescence detection of specific DNA sequences via template-dependent surface-hybridization.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenqing; Lau, Choiwan; Lu, Jianzhong

    2012-04-01

    A new quantum dot-based method to detect specific sequences of DNA is proposed. The capture and reporter probes do not hybridize to each other, but in the presence of a template they can anneal to each other via the formation of a stable ternary complex. Because of the specific design of the capture and reporter probes, the 5' end of the template target DNA remains free to hybridize with another reporter. In this way, each capture DNA is an initiator strand that triggers a cascade of hybridization events between the target DNA and the reporter probe. This forms a superstructure, enhances base stacking, and produces a strong fluorescent signal. The introduction of T4 DNA ligase further stabilizes the superstructure and greatly increases the fluorescence intensity, and the detection limit is as low as 10 fM. This fluorescence method is advantageous over conventional techniques because of its excellent ability to discriminate single base-pair mismatches and single nucleotide gap or flap. This simple technique is promising for improving medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22343986

  2. Enumeration of Tn5 mutant bacteria in soil by using a most- probable-number-DNA hybridization procedure and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, J K; Bezdicek, D F; Brockman, F J; Li, S W

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were made into the utility of DNA hybridization in conjunction with a microdilution most-probable-number procedure for the enumeration of Rhizobium spp. and Pseudomonas putida in soil. Isolates of Rhizobium spp. and P. putida carrying the transposon Tn5 were added to sterile and nonsterile Burbank sandy loam soil and enumerated over time. Soil populations of rhizobia were enumerated by colony hybridization, most-probable-number-DNA hybridization procedure, plate counts, plant infectivity most probable number, and fluorescent antibody counts. Population values compared well for all methods at 5 and 30 days after the addition of cells, although the fluorescent antibody method tended to overestimate the viable population. In nonsterile soil, most-probable-number-DNA hybridization procedure enumerated as few as 10 P. putida Tn5 cells g of soil-1 and 100 R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli Tn5 cells g of soil-1 and should have utility for following the fate of genetically engineered microorganisms released to the environment. Among the Kmr isolates containing Tn5, approximately 5% gave a dark, more intense autoradiograph when probed with 32P-labeled pGS9 DNA, which facilitated their detection in soil. Hybridization with a pCU101 probe (pGS9 without Tn5) indicated that donor plasmid sequences were being maintained in the bacterial chromosome. Transposon-associated antibiotic resistance was also utilized as a phenotypic marker. Tn5 vector-integrate mutants were successfully enumerated at low populations (10 to 100 cells g of soil-1) in soil by both phenotypic (Kmr) and genotypic (DNA probe) analysis. However, determination of the stability of Tn5 or Tn5 and vector sequences in the bacteria is necessary. Images PMID:2833161

  3. Identification of a tumor marker chromosome by flow sorting, DNA amplification in vitro, and in situ hybridization of the amplified product

    SciTech Connect

    Boschman, G.; Rens, W.; Slater, R.; Aten, J. ); Buys, C.; Veen, A. van der; Osinga, J. )

    1993-01-01

    A method combining flow sorting and molecular cytogenetic techniques was used to identify an unknown marker chromosome in the bladder tumor cell line J82. The marker chromosome was isolated by dual parameter sorting after staining with Hoechst 33258 and chromomycin [Lambda]3. DNA amplification of 300 isolated chromosomes by polymerase chain reaction using the Alu-primer Bk33 and the Lines-primer LH5 was carried out. The DNA was labelled using Bio-11-dUTP and applied to human lymphocyte metaphase cells in a suppressive in situ hybridization procedure. Fluorescence was visible over chromosome 20 and over the distal one-half of 6p. Together the fluorescent regions accounted for only 60% of the marker length, indicating a possible duplication of chromosome 20 material. This was subsequently confirmed by applying bicolor in-situ hybridization using chromosome 6- and 20-specific DNA libraries to metaphase cells of the J82 culture.

  4. Design and synthesis of novel quinoline-aminopiperidine hybrid analogues as Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyraseB inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Medapi, Brahmam; Renuka, Janupally; Saxena, Shalini; Sridevi, Jonnalagadda Padma; Medishetti, Raghavender; Kulkarni, Pushkar; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotics with good therapeutic value and novel mechanism of action are becoming increasingly important in today's battle against bacterial resistance. One of the popular targets being DNA gyrase, is currently becoming well-established and clinically validated for the development of novel antibacterials. In the present work, a series of forty eight quinoline-aminopiperidine based urea and thiourea derivatives were synthesized as pharmacophoric hybrids and evaluated for their biological activity. Compound, 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(1-(6-methoxy-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)piperidin-4-yl)thiourea (45) was found to exhibit promising in vitro Mycobacterium smegmatis GyrB IC₅₀ of 0.95 ± 0.12 μM and a well correlated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) DNA gyrase supercoiling IC₅₀ of 0.62 ± 0.16 μM. Further, compound 45 also exhibited commendable MTB MIC, safe eukaryotic cytotoxic profile with no signs of cardiotoxicity in zebrafish ether-a-go-go-related gene (zERG). PMID:25801151

  5. Hybrid detectors improved time-lapse confocal microscopy of PML and 53BP1 nuclear body colocalization in DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Foltánková, Veronika; Matula, Pavel; Sorokin, Dmitry; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva

    2013-04-01

    We used hybrid detectors (HyDs) to monitor the trajectories and interactions of promyelocytic leukemia (GFP-PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) and mCherry-53BP1-positive DNA lesions. 53BP1 protein accumulates in NBs that occur spontaneously in the genome or in γ-irradiation-induced foci. When we induced local DNA damage by ultraviolet irradiation, we also observed accumulation of 53BP1 proteins into discrete bodies, instead of the expected dispersed pattern. In comparison with photomultiplier tubes, which are used for standard analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy, HyDs significantly eliminated photobleaching of GFP and mCherry fluorochromes during image acquisition. The low laser intensities used for HyD-based confocal analysis enabled us to observe NBs for the longer time periods, necessary for studies of the trajectories and interactions of PML and 53BP1 NBs. To further characterize protein interactions, we used resonance scanning and a novel bioinformatics approach to register and analyze the movements of individual PML and 53BP1 NBs. The combination of improved HyD-based confocal microscopy with a tailored bioinformatics approach enabled us to reveal damage-specific properties of PML and 53BP1 NBs. PMID:23410959

  6. Label-free in-situ real-time DNA hybridization kinetics detection employing microfiber-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Song, Binbin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Bo; Lin, Wei; Wu, Jixuan

    2016-07-15

    A label-free DNA biosensor based on microfiber-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MAMZI) for in-situ real-time DNA hybridization kinetics detection has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A microfiber of hundreds of microns in length is fabricated by tapering a segment of standard single-mode fiber (SMF) to construct the U-shaped microcavity between the lead-in and lead-out SMFs. Thanks to the mode field mismatching between the SMF and microfiber, the incident guided mode light would separate into two beams that respectively propagate in the air microcavity and the microfiber. Consequently, interference between different light modes would occur at the joint between the microfiber and the lead-out SMF. Experimental results indicate that owing to the participation of opening cavity modes in the modal interference process, the interferometric spectrum of our proposed microcavity sensor is highly sensitive to the variation of environmental refractive index (RI), especially for the RI range around 1.34 which is useful for most biological applications. The microfiber functionalization is achieved by stepwise modifying the microfiber with monolayer Poly-l-lysine (PLL) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes to produce the sensitive surface that could uniquely attach specific target ssDNAs. The fiber surface functionalization as well as DNA hybridization processes have been experimentally investigated for different target ssDNA solutions in real time. The interferometric transmission spectrum shows large wavelength shift for different biological phases, and a detection limit conservatively down to 0.0001pmol/μL has been acquired by employing the U-shaped microcavity of 176.88μm in length. Our proposed DNA biosensor possesses several advantages such as compact size, ease of fabrication, and strong response for DNA hybridization, which make it a promising candidate for potential applications in such rapidly expanding areas as medical diagnosis, cancer

  7. A sandwich-hybridization assay for simultaneous determination of HIV and tuberculosis DNA targets based on signal amplification by quantum dots-PowerVision™ polymer coding nanotracers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhongdan; Gan, Ning; Zhang, Huairong; Wang, De; Qiao, Li; Cao, Yuting; Li, Tianhua; Hu, Futao

    2015-09-15

    A novel sandwich-hybridization assay for simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple DNA targets related to human immune deficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) was developed based on the different quantum dots-PowerVision(TM) polymer nanotracers. The polymer nanotracers were respectively fabricated by immobilizing SH-labeled oligonucleotides (s-HIV or s-TB), which can partially hybrid with virus DNA (HIV or TB), on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and then modified with PowerVision(TM) (PV) polymer-encapsulated quantum dots (CdS or PbS) as signal tags. PV is a dendrimer enzyme linked polymer, which can immobilize abundant QDs to amplify the stripping voltammetry signals from the metal ions (Pb or Cd). The capture probes were prepared through the immobilization of SH-labeled oligonucleotides, which can complementary with HIV and TB DNA, on the magnetic Fe3O4@Au (GMPs) beads. After sandwich-hybridization, the polymer nanotracers together with HIV and TB DNA targets were simultaneously introduced onto the surface of GMPs. Then the two encoding metal ions (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) were used to differentiate two viruses DNA due to the different subsequent anodic stripping voltammetric peaks at -0.84 V (Cd) and -0.61 V (Pb). Because of the excellent signal amplification of the polymer nanotracers and the great specificity of DNA targets, this assay could detect targets DNA as low as 0.2 femtomolar and exhibited excellent selectivity with the dynamitic range from 0.5 fM to 500 pM. Those results demonstrated that this electrochemical coding assay has great potential in applications for screening more viruses DNA while changing the probes. PMID:25911447

  8. An experimentally-informed coarse-grained 3-Site-Per-Nucleotide model of DNA: structure, thermodynamics, and dynamics of hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hinckley, Daniel M; Freeman, Gordon S; Whitmer, Jonathan K; de Pablo, Juan J

    2013-10-14

    A new 3-Site-Per-Nucleotide coarse-grained model for DNA is presented. The model includes anisotropic potentials between bases involved in base stacking and base pair interactions that enable the description of relevant structural properties, including the major and minor grooves. In an improvement over available coarse-grained models, the correct persistence length is recovered for both ssDNA and dsDNA, allowing for simulation of non-canonical structures such as hairpins. DNA melting temperatures, measured for duplexes and hairpins by integrating over free energy surfaces generated using metadynamics simulations, are shown to be in quantitative agreement with experiment for a variety of sequences and conditions. Hybridization rate constants, calculated using forward-flux sampling, are also shown to be in good agreement with experiment. The coarse-grained model presented here is suitable for use in biological and engineering applications, including nucleosome positioning and DNA-templated engineering. PMID:24116642

  9. An experimentally-informed coarse-grained 3-site-per-nucleotide model of DNA: Structure, thermodynamics, and dynamics of hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hinckley, Daniel M.; Freeman, Gordon S.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    A new 3-Site-Per-Nucleotide coarse-grained model for DNA is presented. The model includes anisotropic potentials between bases involved in base stacking and base pair interactions that enable the description of relevant structural properties, including the major and minor grooves. In an improvement over available coarse-grained models, the correct persistence length is recovered for both ssDNA and dsDNA, allowing for simulation of non-canonical structures such as hairpins. DNA melting temperatures, measured for duplexes and hairpins by integrating over free energy surfaces generated using metadynamics simulations, are shown to be in quantitative agreement with experiment for a variety of sequences and conditions. Hybridization rate constants, calculated using forward-flux sampling, are also shown to be in good agreement with experiment. The coarse-grained model presented here is suitable for use in biological and engineering applications, including nucleosome positioning and DNA-templated engineering. PMID:24116642

  10. Incorporation of cyclic azobenzene into oligodeoxynucleotides for the photo-regulation of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Eljabu, Fatma; Dhruval, Joshi; Yan, Hongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic azobenzene carboxylic acid was synthesized using a shortened route. After reaction with D-threolinol, the resulting cyclic azobenzene-D-threolinol (cAB-Thr) building block was transformed into the corresponding DMTr-protected phosphoramidite, and incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides at various positions and frequencies by solid phase synthesis. The melting temperatures of these modified oligonucleotides were determined by UV spectrometry. Photo-regulation of cAB-Thr-modified oligonucleotides with their complementary sequence was evaluated by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer experiments using a fluorescein-Black Hole Quencher pair. Results suggest that while cis-cAB destabilizes DNA duplexes, trans-cAB can be accommodated in double stranded DNA. PMID:26592170

  11. Label-free electrical detection of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotubes and graphene

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dongliang; Li, Lain-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The interface between biosystems and nanomaterials is emerging for detection of various biomolecules and subtle cellular activities. In particular, the development of cost-effective and sequence-selective DNA detection is urgent for the diagnosis of genetic or pathogenic diseases. Graphene-based nanocarbon materials, such as carbon nanotubes and thin graphene layers, have been employed as biosensors because they are biocompatible, extraordinarily sensitive, and promising for large-area detection. Electrical and label-free detection of DNA can be achieved by monitoring the conductance change of devices fabricated from these carbon materials. Here, the recent advances in this research area are briefly reviewed. The key issues and perspectives of future development are also discussed. PMID:22110861

  12. Identification of rat lung – prominent genes by a parallel DNA microarray hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongming; Chen, Jiwang; Weng, Tingting; Jin, Nili; Liu, Lin

    2006-01-01

    Background The comparison of organ transcriptomes is an important strategy for understanding gene functions. In the present study, we attempted to identify lung-prominent genes by comparing the normal transcriptomes of rat lung, heart, kidney, liver, spleen, and brain. To increase the efficiency and reproducibility, we first developed a novel parallel hybridization system, in which 6 samples could be hybridized onto a single slide at the same time. Results We identified the genes prominently expressed in the lung (147) or co-expressed in lung-heart (23), lung-liver (37), lung-spleen (203), and lung-kidney (98). The known functions of the lung-prominent genes mainly fell into 5 categories: ligand binding, signal transducer, cell communication, development, and metabolism. Real-time PCR confirmed 13 lung-prominent genes, including 5 genes that have not been investigated in the lung, vitamin D-dependent calcium binding protein (Calb3), mitogen activated protein kinase 13 (Mapk13), solute carrier family 29 transporters, member 1 (Slc29a1), corticotropin releasing hormone receptor (Crhr1), and lipocalin 2 (Lcn2). Conclusion The lung-prominent genes identified in this study may provide an important clue for further investigation of pulmonary functions. PMID:16533406

  13. Detection of DNA hybridization and extension reactions by an extended-gate field-effect transistor: characterizations of immobilized DNA-probes and role of applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage onto a reference electrode.

    PubMed

    Kamahori, Masao; Ishige, Yu; Shimoda, Maki

    2008-02-28

    As we have already shown in a previous publication [Kamahori, M., Ihige, Y., Shimoda, M., 2007. Anal. Sci. 23, 75-79], an extended-gate field-effect transistor (FET) sensor with a gold electrode, on which both DNA probes and 6-hydroxyl-1-hexanethiol (6-HHT) molecules are immobilized, can detect DNA hybridization and extension reactions by applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage to a reference electrode. However, kinetic parameters such as the dissociation constant (K(d)(s)) and the apparent DNA-probe concentration (C(probe)(s)) on a surface were not clarified. In addition, the role of applying the superimposed high-frequency voltage was not considered in detail. In this study, the values of K(d)(s) and C(probe)(s) were estimated using a method involving single-base extension reaction combined with bioluminescence detection. The value of K(d)(s) on the surface was 0.38 microM, which was about six times that in a liquid phase. The value of C(probe)(s), which expressed the upper detection limit for the solid phase reaction, was 0.079 microM at a DNA-probe density of 2.6 x 10(12)molecules/cm(2). We found that applying the superimposed high-frequency voltage accelerated the DNA molecules to reach the gold surface. Also, the distance between the DNA-probes immobilized on the gold surface was controlled to be over 6 nm by applying a method of competitive reaction with DNA probes and 6-HHT molecules. This space was sufficient to enable the immobilized DNA-probes to lie down on the 6-HHT monolayer in the space between them. Thus, the FET sensor could detect DNA hybridization and extension reactions by applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage to the DNA-probes density-controlling gold surface. PMID:18054478

  14. Hybridization probes for conventional DNA fingerprinting used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction to distinguish strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, W; Mitchell, T G; Freedman, E Z; Vilgalys, R

    1993-01-01

    In conventional DNA fingerprinting, hypervariable and repetitive sequences (minisatellite or microsatellite DNA) are detected with hybridization probes. As demonstrated here, these probes can be used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate individual fingerprints. Several conventional DNA fingerprinting probes were used to prime the PCR, yielding distinctive, hypervariable multifragment profiles for different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. PCR fingerprinting with the oligonucleotide primers (GTG)5, (GACA)4, and the phage M13 core sequence (GAGGGTGGXGGXTCT), but not with (CA)8 or (CT)8, generated DNA polymorphisms with all 42 strains of C. neoformans investigated. PCR fingerprints produced by priming with (GTG)5, (GACA)4, or the M13 core sequence differentiated the two varieties of C. neoformans, C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B and C). Furthermore, strains of serotypes A, D, and B or C could be distinguished from each other by specific PCR fingerprint patterns. These primers, which also successfully amplified hypervariable DNA segments from other species, provide a convenient method of identification at the species or individual level. Amplification of polymorphic DNA patterns by PCR with these primers offers several advantages over classical DNA fingerprinting techniques, appears to be more reliable than other PCR-based methods for detecting polymorphic DNA, such as analysis of random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and should be applicable to many other organisms. Images PMID:8408543

  15. Preparation of bio-deep eutectic solvent triggered cephalopod shaped silver chloride-DNA hybrid material having antibacterial and bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Jitkumar; Mondal, Dibyendu; Bhojani, Gopal; Chatterjee, Shruti; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2015-11-01

    2.5% w/w DNA (Salmon testes) was solubilized in a bio-deep eutectic solvent [(bio-DES), obtained by the complexation of choline chloride and ethylene glycol at 1:2 molar ratio] containing 1% w/w of silver chloride (AgCl) to yield a AgCl decorated DNA based hybrid material. Concentration dependent formation of AgCl crystals in the DES was observed and upon interaction with DNA it gave formation of a cephalopod shaped hybrid material. DNA was found to maintain its chemical and structural stability in the material. Further, AgCl microstructures were found to have orderly self assembled on the DNA helices indicating the electrostatic interaction between Ag(+) and phosphate side chain of DNA as a driving force for the formation of the material with ordered microstructural distribution of AgCl. Furthermore, the functionalized material exhibited excellent antibacterial and bactericidal activity against both Gram negative and Gram positive pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26249573

  16. Synthesis of Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms and their use as DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ma, Zhanfang

    2011-06-01

    A simple synthetic route to prepare Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms consists of the facile addition of Na(2) S to a solution of triangular Ag nanoprisms. The resulting Ag(2) S-Ag nanoparticles are more stable in solution than the original Ag nanoprisms, and two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of the original Ag nanoprisms still remain. In addition, the SPR bands of the Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms are tunable over a wide range. The Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms can be directly bioconjugated via well-established stable Ag(2) S surface chemistry with readily available sulfur coupling agents. The nanoprisms are used in the hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides, and show promise as probes for future biosensing applications. PMID:21538868

  17. RNF4-dependent hybrid SUMO-ubiquitin chains are signals for RAP80 and thereby mediate the recruitment of BRCA1 to sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, Catherine M; Berndsen, Christopher E; Zhu, Jianmei; Gupta, Vibhor; Datta, Ajit; Greenberg, Roger A; Wolberger, Cynthia; Matunis, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    The DNA repair function of the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA1 depends in part on its interaction with RAP80, which targets BRCA1 to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through recognition of K63-linked polyubiquitin chains. The localization of BRCA1 to DSBs also requires sumoylation. We demonstrated that, in addition to having ubiquitin-interacting motifs, RAP80 also contains a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) that is critical for recruitment to DSBs. In combination with the ubiquitin-binding activity of RAP80, this SIM enabled RAP80 to bind with nanomolar affinity to hybrid chains consisting of ubiquitin conjugated to SUMO. Furthermore, RNF4, a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase that synthesizes hybrid SUMO-ubiquitin chains, localized to DSBs and was critical for the recruitment of RAP80 and BRCA1 to sites of DNA damage. Our findings, therefore, connect ubiquitin- and SUMO-dependent DSB recognition, revealing that RNF4-synthesized hybrid SUMO-ubiquitin chains are recognized by RAP80 to promote BRCA1 recruitment and DNA repair. PMID:23211528

  18. Detection of virus-specific RNA in simian sarcoma-leukemia virus-infected cells in in situ hybridization to viral complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, S L; Gallo, R C; Miller, N R

    1979-01-01

    An in situ molecular hybridization system which will detect retrovirus RNA in the cytoplasm of individual virus-infected cells has been developed. The technique was applied to cells infected with simian sarcoma-leukemia virus, where the virus-specific RNA was detected by hybridization to simian sarcoma-leukemia virus 3H-labeled complementary DNA. The system is useful for detecting viral RNA-containing cells in the presence of an excess of virus-negative cells and for determining which type of cell in a heterogenous population is expressing viral RNA. Images PMID:224220

  19. DNA barcoding and microsatellites help species delimitation and hybrid identification in endangered galaxiid fishes.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecke, Delphine; Garcia de Leaniz, Carlos; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Young, Kyle; Sanzana, Jose; Orellana, Gabriel; Fowler, Daniel; Howes, Paul; Monzon-Arguello, Catalina; Consuegra, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    The conservation of data deficient species is often hampered by inaccurate species delimitation. The galaxiid fishes Aplochiton zebra and Aplochiton taeniatus are endemic to Patagonia (and for A. zebra the Falkland Islands), where they are threatened by invasive salmonids. Conservation of Aplochiton is complicated because species identification is hampered by the presence of resident as well as migratory ecotypes that may confound morphological discrimination. We used DNA barcoding (COI, cytochrome b) and a new developed set of microsatellite markers to investigate the relationships between A. zebra and A. taeniatus and to assess their distributions and relative abundances in Chilean Patagonia and the Falkland Islands. Results from both DNA markers were 100% congruent and revealed that phenotypic misidentification was widespread, size-dependent, and highly asymmetric. While all the genetically classified A. zebra were correctly identified as such, 74% of A. taeniatus were incorrectly identified as A. zebra, the former species being more widespread than previously thought. Our results reveal, for the first time, the presence in sympatry of both species, not only in Chilean Patagonia, but also in the Falkland Islands, where A. taeniatus had not been previously described. We also found evidence of asymmetric hybridisation between female A. taeniatus and male A. zebra in areas where invasive salmonids have become widespread. Given the potential consequences that species misidentification and hybridisation can have for the conservation of these endangered species, we advocate the use of molecular markers in order to reduce epistemic uncertainty. PMID:22412956

  20. DNA Barcoding and Microsatellites Help Species Delimitation and Hybrid Identification in Endangered Galaxiid Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Vanhaecke, Delphine; Garcia de Leaniz, Carlos; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Young, Kyle; Sanzana, Jose; Orellana, Gabriel; Fowler, Daniel; Howes, Paul; Monzon-Arguello, Catalina; Consuegra, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    The conservation of data deficient species is often hampered by inaccurate species delimitation. The galaxiid fishes Aplochiton zebra and Aplochiton taeniatus are endemic to Patagonia (and for A. zebra the Falkland Islands), where they are threatened by invasive salmonids. Conservation of Aplochiton is complicated because species identification is hampered by the presence of resident as well as migratory ecotypes that may confound morphological discrimination. We used DNA barcoding (COI, cytochrome b) and a new developed set of microsatellite markers to investigate the relationships between A. zebra and A. taeniatus and to assess their distributions and relative abundances in Chilean Patagonia and the Falkland Islands. Results from both DNA markers were 100% congruent and revealed that phenotypic misidentification was widespread, size-dependent, and highly asymmetric. While all the genetically classified A. zebra were correctly identified as such, 74% of A. taeniatus were incorrectly identified as A. zebra, the former species being more widespread than previously thought. Our results reveal, for the first time, the presence in sympatry of both species, not only in Chilean Patagonia, but also in the Falkland Islands, where A. taeniatus had not been previously described. We also found evidence of asymmetric hybridisation between female A. taeniatus and male A. zebra in areas where invasive salmonids have become widespread. Given the potential consequences that species misidentification and hybridisation can have for the conservation of these endangered species, we advocate the use of molecular markers in order to reduce epistemic uncertainty. PMID:22412956

  1. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  2. Identification of human DNA in forensic evidence by loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a colorimetric gold nanoparticle hybridization probe.

    PubMed

    Watthanapanpituck, Khanistha; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Chu, Eric; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2014-11-01

    A DNA test based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and colorimetric gold nanoparticle (AuNP) hybridization probe to detect the presence of human DNA in forensic evidence was developed. The LAMP primer set targeted eight regions of the human cytochrome b, and its specificity was verified against the DNA of 11 animal species, which included animals closely related to humans, such as chimpanzee and orangutan. By using the AuNP probe, sequence-specific LAMP product could be detected and the test result could be visualized through the change in color. The limit of detection was demonstrated with reproducibility to be as low as 718 fg of genomic DNA, which is equivalent to approximately 100 plasmid DNA copies containing the cytochrome b DNA target region. A simple DNA extraction method for the commonly found forensic biological samples was also devised to streamline the test process. This LAMP-AuNP human DNA test showed to be a robust, specific, and cost-effective tool for the forensic identification of human specimens without requiring sophisticated laboratory instruments. PMID:24827529

  3. Comparison of ribosomal DNA sites in Lolium species by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Thomas, H M; Harper, J A; Meredith, M R; Morgan, W G; Thomas, I D; Timms, E; King, I P

    1996-11-01

    The position of the 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S rRNA genes have been physically mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lolium taxa. 18S-5.8S-26S sites were seen on two pairs of chromosomes in the inbreeding taxa. In the outbreeding taxa six sites were found in the L. multiflorum, seven in L. perenne and nine in L. rigidum var. rigidum. Two 5S sites were found in each of the taxa. In the inbreeders, the 5S sites were found adjacent to the 18S-5.8S-26S sites on chromosome 2. In L. multifiorum and L.perenne the 5S sites were on the short arm of chromosome 3. However, in L. rigidum var. rigidum the 5S rDNA site was found in either of the two positions. PMID:8939359

  4. Study on the Keggin zinctungstates based hybrid compound with like DNA spiral chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Sha, Jing-Quan; Zong, Xi-Ming; Liu, Cui-Juan; Zhang, Qian-Nan; Wang, Dong-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Yu

    2014-05-01

    A new compound based on polyoxometalates (POMs) and the quinolone antibacterial pipemidic acid (HPPA), {[Zn(HPPA)2H2O]2[H2ZnW12O40]}ṡ9H2O (1), was hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR and XPRD. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the [ clusters and Zn-HPPA complexes constructed both right- and left-double-stranded like DNA helical chains in the title compound, and these helical chains are further connected together forming the fascinating quadruple-stranded helices via sharing the ZnW12 clusters. Note that the compound 1 represents the first example of zinctungstate POMs modified by antibacterial drugs. In addition, the antibacterial properties of the compound 1 were investigated.

  5. The lower genital tract microbiota in relation to cytokine-, SLPI- and endotoxin levels: application of checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization (CDH).

    PubMed

    Nikolaitchouk, Natalia; Andersch, Björn; Falsen, Enevold; Strömbeck, Louise; Mattsby-Baltzer, Inger

    2008-04-01

    In the present study the lower genital tract microbiota in asymptomatic fertile women (n=34) was identified and quantified by culturing vaginal secretions. Also, vaginal and cervical samples were analyzed by a semiquantitative checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique (CDH) based on genomic probes prepared from 13 bacterial species (Bacteroides ureolyticus, Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii ss curtisii, Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Prevotella melaninogenica, Atopobium vaginae, Lactobacillus iners, Staphylococcus aureus ss aureus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Streptococcus agalactiae). The bacterial species found by either culture or CDH were correlated with proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8), secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and endotoxin in the cervicovaginal samples. Grading the women into healthy, intermediate, or bacterial vaginosis (BV) as based on Gram staining of vaginal smears, the viable counts of lactobacilli (L. gasseri) and of streptococci-staphylococci combined were highest in the intermediate group. In BV, particularly the high concentrations of Actinomyces urogenitalis, Atopobium vaginae, and Peptoniphilus harei were noted (>or=10(11) per ml). The total viable counts correlated with both cervical IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta. A strong negative correlation was observed between L. iners and total viable counts, G. vaginalis, or cervical IL-1 alpha, while it correlated positively with SLPI. Analysis of vaginal and cervical samples from 26 out of the 34 women by CDH showed that anaerobic bacteria were more frequently detected by CDH compared to culture. By this method, A. vaginae correlated with G. vaginalis, and L. iners with S. aureus. With regard to cytokines, B. ureolyticus correlated with both cervical and vaginal IL-1 alpha as well as with cervical IL-8, while F. nucleatum, S. agalactiae, S. anginosus, or S. aureus correlated with vaginal IL-1 alpha

  6. Real-time detection of DNA hybridization on microarray using a CCD-based imaging system equipped with a rotated microlens array disk.

    PubMed

    Mogi, Takeyuki; Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Taguchi, Tomoyuki; Wake, Hitoshi; Tanaami, Takeo; Hosokawa, Masahito; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2011-01-15

    This work describes a novel charge-coupled device (CCD)-based imaging system (MB Biochip Reader™) for real-time detection of DNA hybridization to DNA microarrays. The MB Biochip Reader™ consisted of a laser light source (532 nm), a microlens array for generation of a multi-beam laser, and a CCD for 2-D signal imaging. The MB Biochip Reader™ with a rotated microlens array, allowed large-field imaging (6.2 mm × 7.6 mm with 6.45 μm resolution) with fast time-resolution at 0.2 s without speckle noise. Furthermore, real-time detection of DNA hybridization, which is sufficient to obtain accurate data from tens of thousands of array element per field, was successfully performed without the need for laser scanning. The performance of the MB Biochip Reader™ for DNA microarray imaging was similar to the commercially available photomultiplier tube (PMT)-based microarray scanner, ScanArray Lite. The system potentially could be applied toward real-time analysis in many other fluorescent techniques in addition to real-time DNA microarray analysis. PMID:20951567

  7. A flow cytometry-based workflow for detection and quantification of anti-plasmodial antibodies in vaccinated and naturally exposed individuals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antibodies play a central role in naturally acquired immunity against Plasmodium falciparum. Current assays to detect anti-plasmodial antibodies against native antigens within their cellular context are prone to bias and cannot be automated, although they provide important information about natural exposure and vaccine immunogenicity. A novel, cytometry-based workflow for quantitative detection of anti-plasmodial antibodies in human serum is presented. Methods Fixed red blood cells (RBCs), infected with late stages of P. falciparum were utilized to detect malaria-specific antibodies by flow cytometry with subsequent automated data analysis. Available methods for data-driven analysis of cytometry data were assessed and a new overlap subtraction algorithm (OSA) based on open source software was developed. The complete workflow was evaluated using sera from two GMZ2 malaria vaccine trials in semi-immune adults and pre-school children residing in a malaria endemic area. Results Fixation, permeabilization, and staining of infected RBCs were adapted for best operation in flow cytometry. As asexual blood-stage vaccine candidates are designed to induce antibody patterns similar to those in semi-immune adults, serial dilutions of sera from heavily exposed individuals were compared to naïve controls to determine optimal antibody dilutions. To eliminate investigator effects introduced by manual gating, a non-biased algorithm (OSA) for data-driven gating was developed. OSA-derived results correlated well with those obtained by manual gating (r between 0.79 and 0.99) and outperformed other model-driven gating methods. Bland-Altman plots confirmed the agreement of manual gating and OSA-derived results. A 1.33-fold increase (p=0.003) in the number of positive cells after vaccination in a subgroup of pre-school children vaccinated with 100 μg GMZ2 was present and in vaccinated adults from the same region we measured a baseline-corrected 1.23-fold, vaccine

  8. COMPARISON OF COMPARATIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATIONS TECHNOLOGIES ACROSS MICROARRAY PLATFORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) measures DNA copy number differences between a reference genome and a test genome. The DNA samples are differentially labeled and hybridized to an immobilized substrate. In early CGH experiments, the DNA targets were hybridized to metaphase...

  9. Chromosome mapping of 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization in the half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Jiang, J; Liu, J; Yuan, J; Chen, Y; Zhang, Q; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) is an important aquaculture flatfish in China. Cytogenetic analysis has revealed that its sex determination system is female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW). The W chromosome is morphologically larger and has been considered evolutionarily younger than any other chromosome in the set. However, the genetic origin and evolution process of this neo-chromosome remains unclear. In this study, 2 tandem arrays of rRNA genes were chosen to address this question. Both the major rDNA (18S rDNA) and the minor rDNA (5S rDNA) were located on the C. semilaevis chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Six 18S rDNA signals were observed on the centromeric regions of 3 pairs of autosomes in both males and females. In females, there was an additional 18S rDNA signal mapping to the telomeric region of the W chromosome long arm. With respect to the 5S rDNA, 12 signals were mapped to the centromeric regions of six pairs of autosomes. Two-color FISH further confirmed that the two pairs of the 5S rDNA signals were correspondingly located at the same positions of the same autosomes as those of the 18S rDNA signals. These results allowed us to speculate about the evolution process of the W chromosome. Chromosome fusions and repetitive sequence accumulations might have occurred in C. semilaevis. The synteny and non-synteny of C. semilaevis 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA might imply the original and evolutionary characteristics of this species. These findings will facilitate studies on karyotype evolution of the order Pleuronectiformes. PMID:25526196

  10. Characterization of serovars of the genus Leptospira by DNA hybridization with hardjobovis and icterohaemorrhagiae recombinant probes with special attention to serogroup sejroe.

    PubMed Central

    Van Eys, G J; Gerritsen, M J; Korver, H; Schoone, G J; Kroon, C C; Terpstra, W J

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant DNA probes derived from genomic libraries of serovars hardjobovis and icterohaemorrhagiae were applied for the characterization of leptospires. Differences in hybridization signals in combination with the banding pattern appear to provide good characteristics for strain typing. The banding patterns were easy to distinguish, since the recombinant DNA probes hybridized with a limited number of fragments. They were also indicative of genomic relationships between serovars. The probes suggested the existence of four subgroups with extensive genomic homology within the serogroup Sejroe. A number of serovars outside the serogroup Sejroe showed genomic homology with these subgroups. Amplification with the polymerase chain reaction showed a correlation with the genomic homologies demonstrated by Southern analysis. Knowledge about genomic relationships between leptospiral strains, as revealed by Southern analysis, may lead to a more rational approach for primer selection for polymerase chain reaction or cloning of particular genes. Images PMID:2056039

  11. [Genetic variability of sable Martes zibellina L., pine marten M. martes L., and their hybrids in Western Siberia: protein and DNA polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Zhigileva, O N; Politov, D V; Golovacheva, I M; Petrovicheva, S V

    2014-05-01

    Using four types of markers, the genetic variability of sable and pine marten inhabiting Western Siberia was examined. Izoenzyme and restriction endonuclease analysis of the mtDNA cytochrome b gene fragment, as well as the ISSR-PCR and analysis of microsatellite variation, revealed a low differentiation level of sable and pine marten and confirmed the hybrid origin of atypical representatives of these species. The hybrids were characterized by an increased heterozygosity level and were genetically closer to sable than to pine marten. In atypical martens, the presence of mtDNA haplotypes of eastern sable was identified. This could be the consequence of the reintroduction of the Barguzin sable in the 20th century. In Western Siberia, the introgression of genes between sable and pine marten was massive and symmetrical. It apparently occurred in the past and continues in the present. PMID:25715474

  12. Bioresponsive antisense DNA gold nanobeacons as a hybrid in vivo theranostics platform for the inhibition of cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Chenchen; Conde, João; Curtin, James; Artzi, Natalie; Tian, Furong; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-07-01

    Gold nanobeacons can be used as a powerful tool for cancer theranostics. Here, we proposed a nanomaterial platform based on gold nanobeacons to detect, target and inhibit the expression of a mutant Kras gene in an in vivo murine gastric cancer model. The conjugation of fluorescently-labeled antisense DNA hairpin oligonucleotides to the surface of gold nanoparticles enables using their localized surface plasmon resonance properties to directly track the delivery to the primary gastric tumor and to lung metastatic sites. The fluorescently labeled nanobeacons reports on the interaction with the target as the fluorescent Cy3 signal is quenched by the gold nanoparticle and only emit light following conjugation to the Kras target owing to reorganization and opening of the nanobeacons, thus increasing the distance between the dye and the quencher. The systemic administration of the anti-Kras nanobeacons resulted in approximately 60% tumor size reduction and a 90% reduction in tumor vascularization. More important, the inhibition of the Kras gene expression in gastric tumors prevents the occurrence of metastasis to lung (80% reduction), increasing mice survival in more than 85%. Our developed platform can be easily adjusted to hybridize with any specific target and provide facile diagnosis and treatment for neoplastic diseases.

  13. Novel method for high throughput DNA methylation marker evaluation using PNA-probe library hybridization and MALDI-TOF detection.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Philipp; Distler, Jürgen; Berlin, Kurt; Schuster, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The methylation of CpG dinucleotides has become a topic of great interest in cancer research, and the methylation of promoter regions of several tumor suppressor genes has been identified as a marker of tumorigenesis. Evaluation of DNA methylation markers in tumor tissue requires hundreds of samples, which must be analyzed quantitatively due to the heterogeneous composition of biological material. Therefore novel, fast and inexpensive methods for high throughput analysis are needed. Here we introduce a new assay based on peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-library hybridization and subsequent MALDI-TOF analysis. This method is multiplexable, allows the use of standard 384 well automated pipetting, and is more specific and flexible than established methods, such as microarrays and MS-SNuPE. The approach was used to evaluate three candidate colon cancer methylation markers previously identified in a microarray study. The methylation of the genes Ade-nomatous polyposis coli (APC), glycogen synthase kinase-beta-3 (GSK3beta) and eyes absent 4 (EYA4) was analyzed in 12 colon cancer and 12 normal tissues. APC and EYA4 were confirmed as being differentially methylated in colon cancer patients whereas GSK3beta did not show differential methylation. PMID:16670426

  14. Bioresponsive antisense DNA gold nanobeacons as a hybrid in vivo theranostics platform for the inhibition of cancer cells and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Chenchen; Conde, João; Curtin, James; Artzi, Natalie; Tian, Furong; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanobeacons can be used as a powerful tool for cancer theranostics. Here, we proposed a nanomaterial platform based on gold nanobeacons to detect, target and inhibit the expression of a mutant Kras gene in an in vivo murine gastric cancer model. The conjugation of fluorescently-labeled antisense DNA hairpin oligonucleotides to the surface of gold nanoparticles enables using their localized surface plasmon resonance properties to directly track the delivery to the primary gastric tumor and to lung metastatic sites. The fluorescently labeled nanobeacons reports on the interaction with the target as the fluorescent Cy3 signal is quenched by the gold nanoparticle and only emit light following conjugation to the Kras target owing to reorganization and opening of the nanobeacons, thus increasing the distance between the dye and the quencher. The systemic administration of the anti-Kras nanobeacons resulted in approximately 60% tumor size reduction and a 90% reduction in tumor vascularization. More important, the inhibition of the Kras gene expression in gastric tumors prevents the occurrence of metastasis to lung (80% reduction), increasing mice survival in more than 85%. Our developed platform can be easily adjusted to hybridize with any specific target and provide facile diagnosis and treatment for neoplastic diseases. PMID:26189409

  15. Novel method for high throughput DNA methylation marker evaluation using PNA-probe library hybridization and MALDI-TOF detection

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, Philipp; Distler, Jürgen; Berlin, Kurt; Schuster, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The methylation of CpG dinucleotides has become a topic of great interest in cancer research, and the methylation of promoter regions of several tumor suppressor genes has been identified as a marker of tumorigenesis. Evaluation of DNA methylation markers in tumor tissue requires hundreds of samples, which must be analyzed quantitatively due to the heterogeneous composition of biological material. Therefore novel, fast and inexpensive methods for high throughput analysis are needed. Here we introduce a new assay based on peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-library hybridization and subsequent MALDI-TOF analysis. This method is multiplexable, allows the use of standard 384 well automated pipetting, and is more specific and flexible than established methods, such as microarrays and MS-SNuPE. The approach was used to evaluate three candidate colon cancer methylation markers previously identified in a microarray study. The methylation of the genes Ade-nomatous polyposis coli (APC), glycogen synthase kinase-β-3 (GSK3β) and eyes absent 4 (EYA4) was analyzed in 12 colon cancer and 12 normal tissues. APC and EYA4 were confirmed as being differentially methylated in colon cancer patients whereas GSK3β did not show differential methylation. PMID:16670426

  16. Vesicles tethered to microbubbles by hybridized DNA oligonucleotides: Flow cytometry analysis of this new drug delivery vehicle design

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Monica M.; Starkel, Cambrie D.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2010-01-01

    Hybridization of complementary lipid-linked DNA oligonucleotides was used to tether small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) to the lipid monolayer shells of air-microbubbles, a new attachment design for a drug delivery vehicle to be used in tandem with ultrasound imaging. Flow cytometry was used and a novel analysis was developed, based upon light scattering and fluorescence intensity, to quantify the fraction of microbubbles of chosen size-ranges with oligonucleotide-tethered fluorescently labeled SUVs. Fluorescence microscopy was used to verify that our methodology results in successful high-density SUV tethering to a similar fraction of the microbubbles when compared to the flow cytometry statistics. The fraction of successful tetherings increased with the concentration of the complementary lipid-linked oligonucleotide as expected and decreased with the time that microbubbles were incubated with SUVs, which was not expected. Also unexpected, a large fraction of microbubbles had only background fluorescence levels while a much smaller fraction (at most one-eighth, for the shortest incubation and highest concentration of lipid-linked oligonucleotide) had oligonucleotide-tethered fluorescently labeled SUVs and, according to our fluorescence microscopy, that small fraction was densely covered with SUVs. Ejection of the lipid-linked oligonucleotide during high surface pressure compression of the monolayer shells of actively shrinking microbubbles subjected to the Laplace overpressure is speculated as a qualitatively explanation for the statistics. PMID:20229988

  17. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this proposal is to create a cDNA map of the human genome. Mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach will generate 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  18. The presence of an RNA:DNA hybrid that is prone to slippage promotes termination by T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Molodtsov, Vadim; Anikin, Michael; McAllister, William T

    2014-09-01

    Intrinsic termination signals for multisubunit bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAPs) encode a GC-rich stem-loop structure followed by a polyuridine [poly(U)] tract, and it has been proposed that steric clash of the stem-loop with the exit pore of the RNAP imposes a shearing force on the RNA in the downstream RNA:DNA hybrid, resulting in misalignment of the active site. The structurally unrelated T7 RNAP terminates at a similar type of signal (TΦ), suggesting a common mechanism for termination. In the absence of a hairpin (passive conditions), T7 RNAP slips efficiently in both homopolymeric A and U tracts, and we have found that replacement of the U tract in TΦ with a slippage-prone A tract still allows efficient termination. Under passive conditions, incorporation of a single G residue following a poly(U) tract (which is the situation during termination at TΦ) results in a "locked" complex that is unable to extend the transcript. Our results support a model in which transmission of the shearing force generated by steric clash of the hairpin with the exit pore is promoted by the presence of a slippery tracts downstream, resulting in alterations in the active site and the formation of a locked complex that represents an early step in the termination pathway. PMID:24976131

  19. Bioresponsive antisense DNA gold nanobeacons as a hybrid in vivo theranostics platform for the inhibition of cancer cells and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chenchen; Conde, João; Curtin, James; Artzi, Natalie; Tian, Furong; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanobeacons can be used as a powerful tool for cancer theranostics. Here, we proposed a nanomaterial platform based on gold nanobeacons to detect, target and inhibit the expression of a mutant Kras gene in an in vivo murine gastric cancer model. The conjugation of fluorescently-labeled antisense DNA hairpin oligonucleotides to the surface of gold nanoparticles enables using their localized surface plasmon resonance properties to directly track the delivery to the primary gastric tumor and to lung metastatic sites. The fluorescently labeled nanobeacons reports on the interaction with the target as the fluorescent Cy3 signal is quenched by the gold nanoparticle and only emit light following conjugation to the Kras target owing to reorganization and opening of the nanobeacons, thus increasing the distance between the dye and the quencher. The systemic administration of the anti-Kras nanobeacons resulted in approximately 60% tumor size reduction and a 90% reduction in tumor vascularization. More important, the inhibition of the Kras gene expression in gastric tumors prevents the occurrence of metastasis to lung (80% reduction), increasing mice survival in more than 85%. Our developed platform can be easily adjusted to hybridize with any specific target and provide facile diagnosis and treatment for neoplastic diseases. PMID:26189409

  20. Vasopressin mRNA in situ hybridization: localization and regulation studied with oligonucleotide cDNA probes in normal and Brattleboro rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.R.; Zingg, H.H.; Habener, J.F.

    1985-08-01

    Hybridizable vasopressin mRNA may be quantitatively localized in situ in sections from rat hypothalamus. Radiolabeled oligonucleotide cDNA probes, synthesized by chemical and enzymatic means, provide strong hybridization in zones known to contain vasopressin cell bodies. Multiple single-stranded /sup 32/P-, /sup 35/S-, or /sup 3/H-labeled oligonucleotides demonstrate localized hybridization that increases as probes are lengthened from 8 to 75 bases. Competition studies, RNase experiments, anatomic localization, and use of multiple probes all support hybridization specificity. An approximate doubling of hybridizable mRNA in both supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei can be detected with dehydration of the animals. Hybridizable mRNA densities are virtually normal in hypothalamic nuclei of Brattleboro rats given free access to water. These methods can provide insight into regional mRNA dynamics and may reflect functional activity of peptidergic neurons.

  1. A hybrid DNA-templated gold nanocluster for enhanced enzymatic reduction of oxygen

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Babanova, Sofia; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Desireddy, Anil; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Boncella, Amy E.; Atanassov, Plamen; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2015-08-19

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a new DNA-templated gold nanocluster (AuNC) of ~1 nm in diameter and possessing ~7 Au atoms. When integrated with bilirubin oxidase (BOD) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the AuNC acts as an enhancer of electron transfer (ET) and lowers the overpotential of electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by ~15 mV as compared to the enzyme alone. In addition, the presence of AuNC causes significant enhancements in the electrocatalytic current densities at the electrode. Control experiments show that such enhancement of ORR by the AuNC is specific to nanoclusters and not to plasmonicmore » gold particles. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) measurements confirm 4e– reduction of O2 to H2O with minimal production of H2O2, suggesting that the presence of AuNC does not perturb the mechanism of ORR catalyzed by the enzyme. This unique role of the AuNC as enhancer of ET at the enzyme-electrode interface makes it a potential candidate for the development of cathodes in enzymatic fuel cells, which often suffer from poor electronic communication between the electrode surface and the enzyme active site. In conclusion, the AuNC displays phosphorescence with large Stokes shift and microsecond lifetime.« less

  2. A hybrid DNA-templated gold nanocluster for enhanced enzymatic reduction of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Babanova, Sofia; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Desireddy, Anil; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Boncella, Amy E.; Atanassov, Plamen; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2015-08-19

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a new DNA-templated gold nanocluster (AuNC) of ~1 nm in diameter and possessing ~7 Au atoms. When integrated with bilirubin oxidase (BOD) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the AuNC acts as an enhancer of electron transfer (ET) and lowers the overpotential of electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by ~15 mV as compared to the enzyme alone. In addition, the presence of AuNC causes significant enhancements in the electrocatalytic current densities at the electrode. Control experiments show that such enhancement of ORR by the AuNC is specific to nanoclusters and not to plasmonic gold particles. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) measurements confirm 4e– reduction of O2 to H2O with minimal production of H2O2, suggesting that the presence of AuNC does not perturb the mechanism of ORR catalyzed by the enzyme. This unique role of the AuNC as enhancer of ET at the enzyme-electrode interface makes it a potential candidate for the development of cathodes in enzymatic fuel cells, which often suffer from poor electronic communication between the electrode surface and the enzyme active site. In conclusion, the AuNC displays phosphorescence with large Stokes shift and microsecond lifetime.

  3. The AMeX method: a multipurpose tissue-processing and paraffin-embedding method. II. Extraction of spooled DNA and its application to Southern blot hybridization analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Y.; Mukai, K.; Matsuno, Y.; Furuya, S.; Kagami, Y.; Miwa, M.; Shimosato, Y.

    1990-01-01

    In our previous report, we described a new fixation and paraffin-embedding method (the AMeX method) that preserves many of the antigens that are normally destroyed by routine formalin fixation. The current study was conducted to examine the preservation of high-molecular-weight DNA in tissues processed by this method. DNA was extracted from AMeX-processed tissue sections after deparaffinization by the same method as that used to extract DNA from fresh tissues. The total amounts of DNA extracted from 10 mg each in wet weight of AMeX-processed and fresh mouse liver tissues were identical. In tissues of malignant lymphoma, the total amount of spooled DNA extracted from 50 sections, each 20 microns thick, was about 8 micrograms/mm2. The electrophoretic pattern of DNA digested with restriction endonucleases on agarose gel from AMeX-processed tissue sections did not differ from that of fresh materials. Southern blot hybridization analysis also revealed that the mobility of specific DNA fragments was identical for AMeX-processed and fresh tissues. The AMeX method was thus proved to be a versatile multipurpose tissue-processing procedure, which is expected to provide important information regarding the correlation between morphology, phenotypic expression, and gene alteration. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5A Figure 5B PMID:2407122

  4. Introgression of wheat DNA markers from A, B and D genomes in early generation progeny of Aegilops cylindrica Host x Triticum aestivum L. hybrids.

    PubMed

    Schoenenberger, N; Felber, F; Savova-Bianchi, D; Guadagnuolo, R

    2005-11-01

    Introgression from allohexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD) to allotetraploid jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host, CCDD) can take place in areas where the two species grow in sympatry and hybridize. Wheat and Ae. cylindrica share the D genome, issued from the common diploid ancestor Aegilops tauschii Coss. It has been proposed that the A and B genome of bread wheat are secure places to insert transgenes to avoid their introgression into Ae. cylindrica because during meiosis in pentaploid hybrids, A and B genome chromosomes form univalents and tend to be eliminated whereas recombination takes place only in D genome chromosomes. Wheat random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fragments, detected in intergeneric hybrids and introgressed to the first backcross generation with Ae. cylindrica as the recurrent parent and having a euploid Ae. cylindrica chromosome number or one supernumerary chromosome, were assigned to wheat chromosomes using Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic wheat lines. Introgressed fragments were not limited to the D genome of wheat, but specific fragments of A and B genomes were also present in the BC1. Their presence indicates that DNA from any of the wheat genomes can introgress into Ae. cylindrica. Successfully located RAPD fragments were then converted into highly specific and easy-to-use sequence characterised amplified regions (SCARs) through sequencing and primer design. Subsequently these markers were used to characterise introgression of wheat DNA into a BC1S1 family. Implications for risk assessment of genetically modified wheat are discussed. PMID:16133306

  5. Effects of Concentration and Temperature on DNA Hybridization by Two Closely Related Sequences via Large-Scale Coarse-Grained Simulations.

    PubMed

    Markegard, Cade B; Gallivan, Cameron P; Cheng, Darrell D; Nguyen, Hung D

    2016-08-18

    A newly developed coarse-grained model called BioModi is utilized to elucidate the effects of temperature and concentration on DNA hybridization in self-assembly. Large-scale simulations demonstrate that complementary strands of either the tetrablock sequence or randomized sequence with equivalent number of cytosine or guanine nucleotides can form completely hybridized double helices. Even though the end states are the same for the two sequences, there exist multiple kinetic pathways that are populated with a wider range of transient aggregates of different sizes in the system of random sequences compared to that of the tetrablock sequence. The ability of these aggregates to undergo the strand displacement mechanism to form only double helices depends upon the temperature and DNA concentration. On one hand, low temperatures and high concentrations drive the formation and enhance stability of large aggregating species. On the other hand, high temperatures destabilize base-pair interactions and large aggregates. There exists an optimal range of moderate temperatures and low concentrations that allow minimization of large aggregate formation and maximization of fully hybridized dimers. Such investigation on structural dynamics of aggregating species by two closely related sequences during the self-assembly process demonstrates the importance of sequence design in avoiding the formation of metastable species. Finally, from kinetic modeling of self-assembly dynamics, the activation energy for the formation of double helices was found to be in agreement with experimental results. The framework developed in this work can be applied to the future design of DNA nanostructures in both fields of structural DNA nanotechnology and dynamic DNA nanotechnology wherein equilibrium end states and nonequilibrium dynamics are equally important requiring investigation in cooperation. PMID:27447850

  6. DNAzyme-based magneto-controlled electronic switch for picomolar detection of lead (II) coupling with DNA-based hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Junyang; Fu, Libing; Xu, Mingdi; Zhou, Qian; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2013-07-15

    A novel magneto-controlled electrochemical DNA biosensor is designed for the ultrasensitive detection of lead coupling a lead-specific DNAzyme with DNA-based hybridization chain reaction (HCR). To construct such a magnetic lead sensor, DNAzyme-based molecular beacons, selective to cleavage in the presence of Pb(2+), are initially immobilized onto magnetic beads, which were used as the recognition elements. Upon addition of target lead, catalytic cleavage of substrate DNA segments in the double-stranded DNAzymes results in the capture of the initiator strands via the conjugated catalytic strands on magnetic beads. The captured DNA initiator strands trigger the hybridization chain reaction between two alternating hairpin DNA structures labeled with ferrocene to form a nicked double-helix on the magnetic beads. Numerous ferrocene molecules are formed on the neighboring probes, each of which produces an electrochemical signal within the applied potential. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical signal of the magnetic lead sensor increases with the increasing lead level in the sample, and exhibits a linear response over a Pb(2+) concentration range of 0.1-75 nM with a detection limit of 37 pM. Quantitative measurement of Pb(2+) in the complex sample demonstrates the selectivity of the sensor scheme and points favorably to the application of such technologies to the analysis of environmental samples. The unique combination of a DNAzyme with hybridization chain reaction makes it possible to change the DNAzyme to select for other compounds of interest. This work represents the initial steps toward the creation of a robust field sensor for lead in groundwater or drinking water. PMID:23454343

  7. DNA-LCEB: a high-capacity and mutation-resistant DNA data-hiding approach by employing encryption, error correcting codes, and hybrid twofold and fourfold codon-based strategy for synonymous substitution in amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Ibbad; Khan, Asifullah; Qadir, Abdul

    2014-11-01

    Data-hiding in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences can be used to develop an organic memory and to track parent genes in an offspring as well as in genetically modified organism. However, the main concerns regarding data-hiding in DNA sequences are the survival of organism and successful extraction of watermark from DNA. This implies that the organism should live and reproduce without any functional disorder even in the presence of the embedded data. Consequently, performing synonymous substitution in amino acids for watermarking becomes a primary option. In this regard, a hybrid watermark embedding strategy that employs synonymous substitution in both twofold and fourfold codons of amino acids is proposed. This work thus presents a high-capacity and mutation-resistant watermarking technique, DNA-LCEB, for hiding secret information in DNA of living organisms. By employing the different types of synonymous codons of amino acids, the data storage capacity has been significantly increased. It is further observed that the proposed DNA-LCEB employing a combination of synonymous substitution, lossless compression, encryption, and Bose-Chaudary-Hocquenghem coding is secure and performs better in terms of both capacity and robustness compared to existing DNA data-hiding schemes. The proposed DNA-LCEB is tested against different mutations, including silent, miss-sense, and non-sense mutations, and provides substantial improvement in terms of mutation detection/correction rate and bits per nucleotide. A web application for DNA-LCEB is available at http://111.68.99.218/DNA-LCEB. PMID:25195035

  8. Minimizing DNA microarrays to a single molecule per spot: using zero-mode waveguide technology to obtain kinetic data for a large number of short oligonucleotide hybridization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, Jens; Rehrauer, Hubert; Kuhn, Gerrit; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    We have shown recently that the hybridization of short oligonucleotides can be studied in a zero-mode waveguide nanostructure (ZMW) chip using a modified DNA sequencer.[1] Here we present an extension of this method enabling the parallel measurement of kinetic constants of a large number of hybridization reactions on a single chip. This can be achieved by immobilization of a mixture of oligonucleotides, which leads to a statistical and random distribution of single molecules in the 150'000 ZMWs of a SMRT™ cell. This setup is comparable to a classical microarray with ZMWs in place of spots but unknown allocation of probes. The probe surface density is reduced by a factor of ~1010 allowing the study of hybridization in the absence of interactions with neighboring probes. Hybridization with a dye labelled oligonucleotide results in trains of fluorescence pulses from which interpulse durations (IPDs) and pulse widths (PWs) can be extracted. Since the identity of a probe in a ZMW is unknown, the immobilized oligonucleotide is sequenced in a subsequent step. After mapping the fluorescence traces to the sequence, the association and dissociation rate constant for each oligonucleotide can be calculated. By selecting suitable probes, the method can be used to determine rate constants of hybridization for a large number of mismatch oligonucleotides in a single measurement and at single-molecule level.

  9. The role of topoisomerase I in suppressing genome instability associated with a highly transcribed guanine-rich sequence is not restricted to preventing RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Puja; Owiti, Norah; Kim, Nayun

    2016-01-01

    Highly transcribed guanine-run containing sequences, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, become unstable when topoisomerase I (Top1) is disrupted. Topological changes, such as the formation of extended RNA:DNA hybrids or R-loops or non-canonical DNA structures including G-quadruplexes has been proposed as the major underlying cause of the transcription-linked genome instability. Here, we report that R-loop accumulation at a guanine-rich sequence, which is capable of assembling into the four-stranded G4 DNA structure, is dependent on the level and the orientation of transcription. In the absence of Top1 or RNase Hs, R-loops accumulated to substantially higher extent when guanine-runs were located on the non-transcribed strand. This coincides with the orientation where higher genome instability was observed. However, we further report that there are significant differences between the disruption of RNase Hs and Top1 in regards to the orientation-specific elevation in genome instability at the guanine-rich sequence. Additionally, genome instability in Top1-deficient yeasts is not completely suppressed by removal of negative supercoils and further aggravated by expression of mutant Top1. Together, our data provide a strong support for a function of Top1 in suppressing genome instability at the guanine-run containing sequence that goes beyond preventing the transcription-associated RNA:DNA hybrid formation. PMID:26527723

  10. The role of topoisomerase I in suppressing genome instability associated with a highly transcribed guanine-rich sequence is not restricted to preventing RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Puja; Owiti, Norah; Kim, Nayun

    2016-01-29

    Highly transcribed guanine-run containing sequences, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, become unstable when topoisomerase I (Top1) is disrupted. Topological changes, such as the formation of extended RNA:DNA hybrids or R-loops or non-canonical DNA structures including G-quadruplexes has been proposed as the major underlying cause of the transcription-linked genome instability. Here, we report that R-loop accumulation at a guanine-rich sequence, which is capable of assembling into the four-stranded G4 DNA structure, is dependent on the level and the orientation of transcription. In the absence of Top1 or RNase Hs, R-loops accumulated to substantially higher extent when guanine-runs were located on the non-transcribed strand. This coincides with the orientation where higher genome instability was observed. However, we further report that there are significant differences between the disruption of RNase Hs and Top1 in regards to the orientation-specific elevation in genome instability at the guanine-rich sequence. Additionally, genome instability in Top1-deficient yeasts is not completely suppressed by removal of negative supercoils and further aggravated by expression of mutant Top1. Together, our data provide a strong support for a function of Top1 in suppressing genome instability at the guanine-run containing sequence that goes beyond preventing the transcription-associated RNA:DNA hybrid formation. PMID:26527723

  11. Enhanced photoelectrochemical strategy for ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two different sizes of CdTe quantum dots cosensitized TiO2/CdS:Mn hybrid structure.

    PubMed

    Fan, Gao-Chao; Han, Li; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-11-01

    A TiO2/CdS:Mn hybrid structure cosensitized with two different sizes of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) was designed to develop a novel and ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical DNA assay. In this protocol, TiO2/CdS:Mn hybrid structure was prepared by successive adsorption and reaction of Cd(2+)/Mn(2+) and S(2-) ions on the surface of TiO2 film and then was employed as matrix for immobilization of hairpin DNA probe, whereas large-sized CdTe-COOH QDs and small-sized CdTe-NH2 QDs as signal amplification elements were successively labeled on the terminal of hairpin DNA probe. The target DNA detection was based upon the photocurrent change originated from conformation change of the hairpin DNA probe after hybridization with target DNA. In the absence of target DNA, the immobilized DNA probe was in the hairpin form and the anchored different sizes of CdTe-COOH and CdTe-NH2 QDs were close to the TiO2/CdS:Mn electrode surface, which led to a very strong photocurrent intensity because of the formation of the cosensitized structure. However, in the presence of target DNA, the hairpin DNA probe hybridized with target DNA and changed into a more rigid, rodlike double helix, which forced the multianchored CdTe QDs away from the TiO2/CdS:Mn electrode surface, resulting in significantly decreased photocurrent intensity because of the vanished cosensitization effect. By using this cosensitization signal amplification strategy, the proposed DNA assay could offer an ultrasensitive and specific detection of DNA down to 27 aM, and it opened up a new promising platform to detect various DNA targets at ultralow levels for early diagnoses of different diseases. PMID:25294102

  12. Evaluation of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for detecting microbial DNA in blood culture bottles using PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungho; Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Seoyong; Park, Soon Deok; Yu, Kwangmin; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2016-09-01

    DNA extraction efficiency affects the success of PCR-based method applications. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for extracting DNA by using paper chromatography is technically easy to use and requires just two reagents and only 10min to complete. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit could be offered as a rapid, accurate, and convenient method for extracting bacterial and fungal DNA from blood culture bottles. We compared the efficiencies of the commercial kit (Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit) and an in-house conventional boiling method with Chelex-100 resin for DNA extraction from blood culture bottles. The efficiency of the two DNA extraction methods was assessed by PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay (PCR-REBA, REBA Sepsis-ID) for detecting Gram positive (GP) bacteria, Gram negative (GN) bacteria, and Candida species with 196 positive and 200 negative blood culture bottles. The detection limits of the two DNA extraction methods were 10(3)CFU/mL for GP bacteria, 10(3)CFU/mL for GN bacteria, and 10(4)CFU/mL for Candida. The sensitivity and specificity of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit by REBA Sepsis-ID were 95.4% (187/196) and 100% (200/200), respectively. The overall agreement of the two DNA extraction methods was 98.9% (392/396). Three of four samples showing discrepant results between the two extraction methods were more accurately matched up with the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit based on conventional culture methods. The results indicated that the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit extracted bacterial and fungal DNA in blood culture bottles and allowed extracted DNA to be used in molecular assay. PMID:27263831

  13. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  14. Complex hybridization dynamics between golden-winged and blue-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera and Vermivora pinus) revealed by AFLP, microsatellite, intron and mtDNA markers.

    PubMed

    Vallender, R; Robertson, R J; Friesen, V L; Lovette, I J

    2007-05-01

    Blue-winged (Vermivora pinus) and golden-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) have an extensive mosaic hybrid zone in eastern North America. Over the past century, the general trajectory has been a rapid replacement of chrysoptera by pinus in a broad, northwardly moving area of contact. Previous mtDNA-based studies on these species' hybridization dynamics have yielded variable results: asymmetric and rapid introgression from pinus into chrysoptera in some areas and bidirectional maternal gene flow in others. To further explore the hybridization genetics of this otherwise well-studied complex, we surveyed variation in three nuclear DNA marker types--microsatellites, introns, and a panel of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs)--with the goal of generating a multilocus assay of hybrid introgression. All markers were first tested on birds from phenotypically and mitochondrially pure parental-type populations from outside the hybrid zone. Searches for private alleles and assignment test approaches found no combination of microsatellite or intron markers that could separate the parental populations, but seven AFLP characters exhibited significant frequency differences among them. We then used the AFLP markers to examine the extent and pattern of introgression in a population where pinus-phenotype individuals have recently invaded a region that previously supported only a chrysoptera-phenotype population. Despite the low frequency of phenotypic hybrids at this location, the AFLP data suggest that almost a third of the phenotypically pure chrysoptera have introgressed genotypes, indicating the presence of substantial cryptic hybridization in the history of this species. The evidence for extensive cryptic introgression, combined with the lack of differentiation at other nuclear loci, cautions against hybrid assessments based on single markers or on phenotypic traits that are likely to be determined by a small number of loci. Considered in concert, these

  15. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric DNA probes as a new approach to distinguish chromosome breakage from aneuploidy in interphase cells and micronuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Eastmond, D.A.; Rupa, D.S.; Chen, H.W.; Hasegawa, L.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosomal abnormalities are believed to contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, carcinogenesis and other pathophysiological conditions. For example, approximately 15% of recognized pregnancies terminate in spontaneous abortion, and of these approximately 30% have been shown to be chromosomally abnormal. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to early embryonic and fetal death appears to decrease with gestational age, suggesting that as many as 67% of the aborted embryos in early embryonic deaths are chromosomally abnormal. Furthermore, clinically significant chromosomal abnormalities can also be found to be present in approximately 0.58 to 0.67% of live births. These figures indicate that within a given year, hundreds of thousands of chromosomally abnormal babies will be born throughout the world and additional millions of chromosomally abnormal embryos will have been spontaneously aborted. For the past several years, our research has focused on utilizing new molecular cytogenetic techniques to develop assays for detecting aneuploidy-inducing agents in mammalian cells. One approach that we have sucessfully employed involves the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes to determine the number of copies of a representative chromosome present within the nucleus following chemical exposure. DNA sequences (probes) which hybridize to blocks of repetitive centromeric DNA on specific chromosomes have been developed for most of the human chromosomes. In situ hybridization with these probes results in the staining of a compact chromosomal region which can be easily detected in interphase nuclei. The presence of 3 (or more) hybridization domains in an interphase nucleus indicates the presence of three centromeric regions and has been presumed to indicate that three copies of the entire chromosome were present in the nucleus.

  16. Label-free and turn-on aptamer strategy for cancer cells detection based on a DNA-silver nanocluster fluorescence upon recognition-induced hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jinjin; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; Shi, Hui

    2013-12-17

    We present here a label-free and turn-on aptamer strategy for cancer cell detection based on the recognition-induced conformation alteration of aptamer and hybridization-induced fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA-silver nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs) in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequences. In this strategy, two tailored DNA probes were involved. One is designed as a hairpin-shaped structure consisting of a target specific aptamer sequence at the 3'-end, a guanine-rich DNA sequence, and an arm segment at the 5'-end (denote as recognition probe). The other, serving as a signal probe, contains a sequence for Ag NCs templated synthesis and a link sequence complementary to the arm segment of the recognition probe. Recognizing and binding of the aptamer to cancer cells enforces the recognition probe to undergo a conformational alteration and then initiates hybridization between the arm segment of the recognition probe and the link sequence of the signal probe. The Ag NCs are then close to the guanine-rich DNA, leading to an enhanced fluorescence readout. As proof-of-concept, the CCRF-CEM cancer cell detection were performed by using the specific aptamer, sgc8c. It was demonstrated that this strategy could specially image the CCRF-CEM cells. Determination by flow cytometry allowed for detection of as low as 150 CCRF-CEM cells in 200 μL binding buffer. The general applicability of the strategy is also achieved in the successful detection of Ramos cells. These results implied that this strategy holds considerable potential for simple, sensitive, universal, and specific cancer cell detection with no required washing and separation steps. PMID:24266455

  17. A method of layer-by-layer gold nanoparticle hybridization in a quartz crystal microbalance DNA sensing system used to detect dengue virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sz-Hau; Chuang, Yao-Chen; Lu, Yi-Chen; Lin, Hsiu-Chao; Yang, Yun-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2009-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is nowadays the most important arthropod-spread virus affecting humans existing in more than 100 countries worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection method for the early diagnosis of infectious dengue virus urgently needs to be developed. In the present study, a circulating-flow quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensing method combining oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (i.e. AuNP probes) used to detect DENV has been established. In the DNA-QCM method, two kinds of specific AuNP probes were linked by the target sequences onto the QCM chip to amplify the detection signal, i.e. oscillatory frequency change (ΔF) of the QCM sensor. The target sequences amplified from the DENV genome act as a bridge for the layer-by-layer AuNP probes' hybridization in the method. Besides being amplifiers of the detection signal, the specific AuNP probes used in the DNA-QCM method also play the role of verifiers to specifically recognize their target sequences in the detection. The effect of four AuNP sizes on the layer-by-layer hybridization has been evaluated and it is found that 13 nm AuNPs collocated with 13 nm AuNPs showed the best hybridization efficiency. According to the nanoparticle application, the DNA-QCM biosensing method was able to detect dengue viral RNA in virus-contaminated serum as plaque titers being 2 PFU ml-1 and a linear correlation (R2 = 0.987) of ΔF versus virus titration from 2 × 100 to 2 × 106 PFU ml-1 was found. The sensitivity and specificity of the present DNA-QCM method with nanoparticle technology showed it to be comparable to the fluorescent real-time PCR methods. Moreover, the method described herein was shown to not require expensive equipment, was label-free and highly sensitive.

  18. Self-catalytic growth of unmodified gold nanoparticles as conductive bridges mediated gap-electrical signal transduction for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Nie, Huagui; Wu, Zhan; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Lijie; Xu, Xiangju; Huang, Shaoming

    2014-01-21

    A simple and sensitive gap-electrical biosensor based on self-catalytic growth of unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as conductive bridges has been developed for amplifying DNA hybridization events. In this strategy, the signal amplification degree of such conductive bridges is closely related to the variation of the glucose oxidase (GOx)-like catalytic activity of AuNPs upon interaction with single- and double-stranded DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA), respectively. In the presence of target DNA, the obtained dsDNA product cannot adsorb onto the surface of AuNPs due to electrostatic interaction, which makes the unmodified AuNPs exhibit excellent GOx-like catalytic activity. Such catalytic activity can enlarge the diameters of AuNPs in the glucose and HAuCl4 solution and result in a connection between most of the AuNPs and a conductive gold film formation with a dramatically increased conductance. For the control sample, the catalytic activity sites of AuNPs are fully blocked by ssDNA due to the noncovalent interaction between nucleotide bases and AuNPs. Thus, the growth of the assembled AuNPs will not happen and the conductance between microelectrodes will be not changed. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the developed strategy exhibited a sensitive response to target DNA with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, this strategy was also demonstrated to provide excellent differentiation ability for single-nucleotide polymorphism. Such performances indicated the great potential of this label-free electrical strategy for clinical diagnostics and genetic analysis under real biological sample separation. PMID:24313362

  19. In situ molecular hybridization for detection of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus DNA by using strand-specific probes: identification of target cells for viral replication in cell cultures and in mink kits with virus-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E; Wolfinbarger, J; Race, R E

    1987-01-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were utilized in in situ molecular hybridization specifically to localize replicative form DNA of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Throughout in vitro infection, duplex replicative form DNA of ADV was located in the cell nuclei. Single-stranded virion DNA and capsid proteins were present in the nuclei early in infection, but were later translocated to the cytoplasm. In neonatal mink, ADV causes acute interstitial pneumonia, and replicative forms of viral DNA were found predominantly in alveolar type II cells of the lung. Viral DNA was also found in other organs, but strand-specific probes made it possible to show that most of this DNA represented virus sequestration. In addition, glomerular immune complexes containing intact virions were detected, suggesting that ADV virions may have a role in the genesis of ADV-induced glomerulonephritis. Images PMID:3037104

  20. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus DNA based on isothermal exponential amplification coupled with hybridization chain reaction of DNAzyme nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Zuanguang; Jian, Wensi; Sun, Duanping; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Xinchun; Yao, Meicun

    2015-02-15

    In this work, a simple and label-free electrochemical biosensor with duel amplification strategy was developed for DNA detection based on isothermal exponential amplification (EXPAR) coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) of DNAzymes nanowires. Through rational design, neither the primer nor the DNAzymes containing molecular beacons (MBs) could react with the duplex probe which were fixed on the electrode surface. Once challenged with target, the duplex probe cleaved and triggered the EXPAR mediated target recycle and regeneration circles as well as the HCR process. As a result, a greater amount of targets were generated to cleave the duplex probes. Subsequently, the nanowires consisting of the G-quadruplex units were self-assembled through hybridization with the strand fixed on the electrode surface. In the presence of hemin, the resulting catalytic G-quadruplex-hemin HRP-mimicking DNAzymes were formed. Electrochemical signals can be obtained by measuring the increase in reduction current of oxidized 3.3',5.5'-tetramethylbenzidine sulfate (TMB), which was generated by DNAzyme in the presence of H2O2. This method exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity towards avian influenza A (H7N9) virus DNA sequence with detection limits of 9.4 fM and a detection range of 4 orders of magnitude. The biosensor was also capable of discriminating single-nucleotide difference among concomitant DNA sequences and performed well in spiked cell lysates. PMID:25310490

  1. Proton NMR studies on the covalently linked RNA-DNA hybrid r(GCG)d(TATACGC). Assignment of proton resonances by application of the nuclear Overhauser effect.

    PubMed Central

    Mellema, J R; Haasnoot, C A; van der Marel, G A; Wille, G; van Boeckel, C A; van Boom, J H; Altona, C

    1983-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of a covalently linked self-complementary RNA X DNA hybrid, r(GCG)-d(TATACGC), are recorded in H2O and D2O. Imino proton resonances as well as the non-exchangeable base and H-1' resonances are unambiguously assigned by means of nuclear. Overhauser effect measurements. Additional information was obtained by 31P NMR and circular dichroism spectra. The RNA parts in the duplex attain full conformational purity and adopt the usual A-RNA conformation. The DNA residues opposite the RNA tract do not adopt an A-type structure completely. Their respective sugar rings still appear to possess a certain conformational freedom. The same holds true for the central d(-TATA-) sequence which forms a DNA X DNA duplex. There appears to be a structural break in this part: the first two residues, T(4) and A(5), are clearly influenced by the adjacent RNA structure, whereas residues T(6) and A(7) behave quite similar to what usually is found in DNA duplexes in aqueous solution. PMID:6193486

  2. Staphylococcus aureus DNA ligase: characterization of its kinetics of catalysis and development of a high-throughput screening compatible chemiluminescent hybridization protection assay

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    DNA ligases are key enzymes involved in the repair and replication of DNA. Prokaryotic DNA ligases uniquely use NAD+ as the adenylate donor during catalysis, whereas eukaryotic enzymes use ATP. This difference in substrate specificity makes the bacterial enzymes potential targets for therapeutic intervention. We have developed a homogeneous chemiluminescence-based hybridization protection assay for Staphylococcus aureus DNA ligase that uses novel acridinium ester technology and demonstrate that it is an alternative to the commonly used radiometric assays for ligases. The assay has been used to determine a number of kinetic constants for S. aureus DNA ligase catalysis. These included the Km values for NAD+ (2.75±0.1 μM) and the acridinium-ester-labelled DNA substrate (2.5±0.2 nM). A study of the pH-dependencies of kcat, Km and kcat/Km has revealed values of kinetically influential ionizations within the enzyme–substrate complexes (kcat) and free enzyme (kcat/Km). In each case, the curves were shown to be composed of one kinetically influential ionization, for kcat, pKa=6.6±0.1 and kcat/Km, pKa=7.1±0.1. Inhibition characteristics of the enzyme against two Escherichia coli DNA ligase inhibitors have also been determined with IC50 values for these being 3.30±0.86 μM for doxorubicin and 1.40±0.07 μM for chloroquine diphosphate. The assay has also been successfully miniaturized to a sufficiently low volume to allow it to be utilized in a high-throughput screen (384-well format; 20 μl reaction volume), enabling the assay to be used in screening campaigns against libraries of compounds to discover leads for further drug development. PMID:15283677

  3. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Activities of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Family by One-Hybrid Experiments in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Zsolt; Sebastian, Alvaro; Xu, Wenjia; Grain, Damaris; Salsac, Fabien; Avon, Alexandra; Berger, Nathalie; Tran, Joseph; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Lurin, Claire; Lepiniec, Loïc; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Dubos, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The control of growth and development of all living organisms is a complex and dynamic process that requires the harmonious expression of numerous genes. Gene expression is mainly controlled by the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins called transcription factors (TFs). Amongst the various classes of eukaryotic TFs, the MYB superfamily is one of the largest and most diverse, and it has considerably expanded in the plant kingdom. R2R3-MYBs have been extensively studied over the last 15 years. However, DNA-binding specificity has been characterized for only a small subset of these proteins. Therefore, one of the remaining challenges is the exhaustive characterization of the DNA-binding specificity of all R2R3-MYB proteins. In this study, we have developed a library of Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB open reading frames, whose DNA-binding activities were assayed in vivo (yeast one-hybrid experiments) with a pool of selected cis-regulatory elements. Altogether 1904 interactions were assayed leading to the discovery of specific patterns of interactions between the various R2R3-MYB subgroups and their DNA target sequences and to the identification of key features that govern these interactions. The present work provides a comprehensive in vivo analysis of R2R3-MYB binding activities that should help in predicting new DNA motifs and identifying new putative target genes for each member of this very large family of TFs. In a broader perspective, the generated data will help to better understand how TF interact with their target DNA sequences. PMID:26484765

  4. Hybridization between Crocodylus acutus and Crocodylus moreletii in the Yucatan Peninsula: I. Evidence from mitochondrial DNA and morphology.

    PubMed

    Cedeño-Vázquez, José Rogelio; Rodriguez, David; Calmé, Sophie; Ross, James Perran; Densmore, Llewellyn D; Thorbjarnarson, John B

    2008-12-01

    The American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) and the Morelet's crocodile (C. moreletii) are broadly sympatric in Belize and Mexico. The presence of morphologically anomalous individuals in the overlapping range area suggests possible hybridization between these species. Analysis of 477 base pairs of the mitochondrial tRNA(Pro)-tRNA(Phe)-Dloop region revealed the presence of pure C. acutus (N=43) and C. moreletii (N=56), as well as a high proportion of interspecific hybrids (N=17, 14.6%) in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Although all individuals could be assigned to one species or other based on phenotypic characters, some had been characterized as potential hybrids in the field by anomalous scale counts. The hybridization zone lies along the area of sympatry between C. acutus and C. moreletii investigated in this study, but extends further inland if hybrid localities from Belize are included. Hybridization in the Yucatan Peninsula is bidirectional, which indicates considerably more genetic contact between these species than previously recognized, and is probably more detrimental to the genetic integrity of smaller C. acutus populations. A more intensive study of the pattern of hybridization is warranted and supports continued classification of C. acutus as a critically threatened species in the Yucatan Peninsula. PMID:18626922

  5. PATTERNS OF RNA SYNTHESIS IN T5-INFECTED CELLS I. AS STUDIED BY THE TECHNIQUE OF DNA-RNA HYBRIDIZATION-COMPETITION*

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Richard W.; Buchanan, John M.

    1969-01-01

    The RNA-labeling patterns obtained after T5 infection of Escherichia coli F agree with the patterns of protein labeling published by McCorquodale and Buchanan.1 Three distinct classes of RNA formed sequentially during the period of viral development can be recognized by the DNA-RNA hybridization-competition technique. Class I RNA is formed within 5 minutes after the beginning of viral metabolism and corresponds to the RNA synthesized in response to infection with the 8 per cent segment of T5 DNA. Protein synthesis directed by this 8 per cent segment is required in some capacity for the cessation of class I synthesis and the beginning of the synthesis of class II at 4 to 5 min after infection. Class III RNA synthesis begins between 9 and 12 minutes. Its appearance is prevented when chloramphenicol is added immediately after complete expression of class I functions. PMID:4916923

  6. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing generates high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms for assessing hybridization between bighead and silver carp in the United States and China.

    PubMed

    Lamer, James T; Sass, Greg G; Boone, Jason Q; Arbieva, Zarema H; Green, Stefan J; Epifanio, John M

    2014-01-01

    Bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver carp (H. molitrix) are invasive species and listed as US federally injurious species under the Lacy Act. They have established populations in much of the Mississippi River Basin (MRB; Mississippi, Illinois, and Missouri rivers) and are capable of producing fertile hybrids and complex introgression. Characterizing the composition of this admixture requires a large set of high-quality, evolutionarily conserved, diagnostic genetic markers to aid in the identification and management of these species in the midst of morphological ambiguity. Restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing of 45 barcoded bighead and silver carp from the United States and China produced reads that were aligned to the silver carp transcriptome yielded 261 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with fixed allelic differences between the two species. We selected the highest quality 112 SNP loci for validation using 194 putative pure-species and F1 hybrids from the MRB and putative bighead carp and silver carp pure species from China (Amur, Pearl and Yangtze rivers). Fifty SNPs were omitted due to design/amplification failure or lack of diagnostic utility. A total of 57 species-diagnostic SNPs conserved between carp species in US and Chinese rivers were identified; 32 were annotated to functional gene loci. Twenty-seven of the 181 (15%) putative pure species were identified as hybrid backcrosses after validation, including three backcrosses from the Amur River, where hybridization has not been documented previously. The 57 SNPs identified through RAD sequencing provide a diagnostic tool to detect population admixture and to identify hybrid and pure-species Asian carps in the United States and China. PMID:23957862

  7. Isolation of novel and known genes from a human fetal cochlear cDNA library using subtractive hybridization and differential screening

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, N.G.; Gutierrez-Espeleta, G.A.; Bieber, F.R. |

    1994-09-01

    We used a combination of subtractive hybridization and differential screening strategies to identify genes that may function normally in hearing and, when mutated, result in deafness. A human fetal cochlear (membranous labyrinth) cDNA library was subtracted against total human fetal brain RNAs by an avidin-biotin-based procedure to enrich for cochlear transcripts. Subtracted cochlear clones were differentially screened with {sup 32}P-labeled total cochlear and total brain cDNA probes. Sequence analysis of clones that hybridized more intensely with cochlear than with brain cDNA probes revealed some previously characterized genes, including mitochondrial sequences, collagen type I {alpha}-2 (COL1A2), collagen type II {alpha}-1 (COL2A1), collagen type III {alpha}-1 (COL3A1), spermidine/spermine N{sup 1}-acetyltransferase (SAT), osteonectin (SPARC), and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). Also identified were clones that are potential novel cochlear genes. Northern blots of cochlear and brain RNAs probed with COL1A2, COL2A1, COL3A1, SAT, SPARC, PMP22, and a novel sequence, designated Coch-5B2, confirm results of the subtractive procedure by showing preferential cochlear expression. A number of these genes serve structural or regulatory functions in extracellular matrix or neural conduction; defects in some of these genes are associated with disorders involving hearing loss. Partial sequence analysis of Coch-5B2 reveals a von Willebrand factor type A-like domain in this cDNA. To assess the cochlear specificity of Coch-5B2, a Northern blot panel of 14 human fetal tissue RNAs was probed with Coch-5B2, showing differential expression of this novel gene in the cochlea. 68 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Prediction of DNA-binding residues in proteins from amino acid sequences using a random forest model with a hybrid feature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiansheng; Liu, Hongde; Duan, Xueye; Ding, Yan; Wu, Hongtao; Bai, Yunfei; Sun, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: In this work, we aim to develop a computational approach for predicting DNA-binding sites in proteins from amino acid sequences. To avoid overfitting with this method, all available DNA-binding proteins from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are used to construct the models. The random forest (RF) algorithm is used because it is fast and has robust performance for different parameter values. A novel hybrid feature is presented which incorporates evolutionary information of the amino acid sequence, secondary structure (SS) information and orthogonal binary vector (OBV) information which reflects the characteristics of 20 kinds of amino acids for two physical–chemical properties (dipoles and volumes of the side chains). The numbers of binding and non-binding residues in proteins are highly unbalanced, so a novel scheme is proposed to deal with the problem of imbalanced datasets by downsizing the majority class. Results: The results show that the RF model achieves 91.41% overall accuracy with Matthew's correlation coefficient of 0.70 and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.913. To our knowledge, the RF method using the hybrid feature is currently the computationally optimal approach for predicting DNA-binding sites in proteins from amino acid sequences without using three-dimensional (3D) structural information. We have demonstrated that the prediction results are useful for understanding protein–DNA interactions. Availability: DBindR web server implementation is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/DBindR/DBindR.htm. Contact: xsun@seu.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19008251

  9. Label-free electrochemiluminescent detection of DNA by hybridization with a molecular beacon to form hemin/G-quadruplex architecture for signal inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shengyuan; Cheng, Lingxiao; Lei, Jianping; Cheng, Yan; Huang, Yin; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-05-01

    A facile label-free electrochemiluminescent (ECL) DNA sensor was designed using a molecular beacon with a guanine-rich stem as a recognition probe. The ECL emission was produced from surface unpassivated CdTe quantum dots (QDs) co-immobilized with colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a chitosan-modified electrode surface. The molecular beacon was adsorbed onto the AuNPs by the thiolated stem. Upon the hybridization of the molecular beacon with target DNA to open the cycle in the presence of hemin, the dissociated guanine-rich sequence could conjugate hemin to form a G-quadruplex architecture. The formed DNAzyme then catalyzed the reduction of dissolved oxygen, the endogenous coreactant for ECL emission of QDs, leading to a decrease in ECL signal. The variations in surface morphology during the fabrication and recognition processes of the ECL sensor were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The ECL signal inhibition depended linearly on the logarithmic value of DNA concentration ranging from 5.0 fM to 0.1 nM, with a detection limit of 0.9 fM. This proposed label-free method is a promising application of QDs-based ECL emission for ultrasensitive DNA assay.

  10. Detection of the Genome and Transcripts of a Persistent DNA Virus in Neuronal Tissues by Fluorescent In situ Hybridization Combined with Immunostaining

    PubMed Central

    Catez, Frédéric; Rousseau, Antoine; Labetoulle, Marc; Lomonte, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Single cell codetection of a gene, its RNA product and cellular regulatory proteins is critical to study gene expression regulation. This is a challenge in the field of virology; in particular for nuclear-replicating persistent DNA viruses that involve animal models for their study. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) establishes a life-long latent infection in peripheral neurons. Latent virus serves as reservoir, from which it reactivates and induces a new herpetic episode. The cell biology of HSV-1 latency remains poorly understood, in part due to the lack of methods to detect HSV-1 genomes in situ in animal models. We describe a DNA-fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) approach efficiently detecting low-copy viral genomes within sections of neuronal tissues from infected animal models. The method relies on heat-based antigen unmasking, and directly labeled home-made DNA probes, or commercially available probes. We developed a triple staining approach, combining DNA-FISH with RNA-FISH and immunofluorescence, using peroxidase based signal amplification to accommodate each staining requirement. A major improvement is the ability to obtain, within 10 µm tissue sections, low-background signals that can be imaged at high resolution by confocal microscopy and wide-field conventional epifluorescence. Additionally, the triple staining worked with a wide range of antibodies directed against cellular and viral proteins. The complete protocol takes 2.5 days to accommodate antibody and probe penetration within the tissue. PMID:24514006

  11. Ordered DNA-Surfactant Hybrid Nanospheres Triggered by Magnetic Cationic Surfactants for Photon- and Magneto-Manipulated Drug Delivery and Release.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Wang, Yitong; Wei, Guangcheng; Feng, Lei; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-12-14

    Here we construct for the first time ordered surfactant-DNA hybrid nanospheres of double-strand (ds) DNA and cationic surfactants with magnetic counterion, [FeCl3Br](-). The specificity of the magnetic cationic surfactants that can compact DNA at high concentrations makes it possible for building ordered nanospheres through aggregation, fusion, and coagulation. Cationic surfactants with conventional Br(-) cannot produce spheres under the same condition because they lose the DNA compaction ability. When a light-responsive magnetic cationic surfactant is used to produce nanospheres, a dual-controllable drug-delivery platform can be built simply by the applications of external magnetic force and alternative UV and visible light. These nanospheres obtain high drug absorption efficiency, slow release property, and good biocompatibility. There is potential for effective magnetic-field-based targeted drug delivery, followed by photocontrollable drug release. We deduce that our results might be of great interest for making new functional nucleic-acid-based nanomachines and be envisioned to find applications in nanotechnology and biochemistry. PMID:26571346

  12. Cost-Effective Sequencing of Full-Length cDNA Clones Powered by a De Novo-Reference Hybrid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequencing full-length cDNA clones is important to determine gene structures including alternative splice forms, and provides valuable resources for experimental analyses to reveal the biological functions of coded proteins. However, previous approaches for sequencing cDNA clones were expensive or time-consuming, and therefore, a fast and efficient sequencing approach was demanded. Methodology We developed a program, MuSICA 2, that assembles millions of short (36-nucleotide) reads collected from a single flow cell lane of Illumina Genome Analyzer to shotgun-sequence ∼800 human full-length cDNA clones. MuSICA 2 performs a hybrid assembly in which an external de novo assembler is run first and the result is then improved by reference alignment of shotgun reads. We compared the MuSICA 2 assembly with 200 pooled full-length cDNA clones finished independently by the conventional primer-walking using Sanger sequencers. The exon-intron structure of the coding sequence was correct for more than 95% of the clones with coding sequence annotation when we excluded cDNA clones insufficiently represented in the shotgun library due to PCR failure (42 out of 200 clones excluded), and the nucleotide-level accuracy of coding sequences of those correct clones was over 99.99%. We also applied MuSICA 2 to full-length cDNA clones from Toxoplasma gondii, to confirm that its ability was competent even for non-human species. Conclusions The entire sequencing and shotgun assembly takes less than 1 week and the consumables cost only ∼US$3 per clone, demonstrating a significant advantage over previous approaches. PMID:20479877

  13. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA in Hepatocytes, Bile Duct Epithelium, and Vascular Elements by in situ Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Hubert E.; Stowring, Linda; Figus, Annalena; Montgomery, Carolyn K.; Haase, Ashley T.; Vyas, Girish N.

    1983-11-01

    A radiolabeled probe specific for hepatitis B virus (HBV) nucleotide sequences was hybridized in situ to liver tissue from three patients with chronic hepatitis B. The HBV genome was detected not only in infected hepatocytes but also in bile duct epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. These findings extend the known host cell range for HBV, suggest new mechanisms of viral dissemination, and illustrate the usefulness of in situ hybridization in the study of pathogenesis of HBV infection.

  14. Hybridization chain reaction modulated DNA-hosted silver nanoclusters for fluorescent identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the let-7 miRNA family.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xue; Wang, Pei; Cao, Zhijuan

    2014-10-15

    A simple microRNA (miRNA) detection system based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) has been developed using highly fluorescent DNA-hosted silver (Ag) nanoclusters. In this assay, a new type of hairpin DNA probe (MB1) containing a poly-cytosine nucleotide loop is designed and used as one of the HCR monomers, which is also demonstrated to be an ideal template for in situ synthesis of highly fluorescent Ag nanoclusters. Correspondingly, another HCR monomer (MB2) contains a poly-guanine nucleotide sticky end. Two monomers are stable to coexist in solution until the introduction of the initiator strand (let-7a) triggers a cascade of hybridization events that yields nicked double helices analogous. By taking advantage of HCR, a small amount of let-7a leads to the conformational change of a large amount of MB1, which results in the decrease of fluorescent signal greatly. Overall, this label-free, enzyme-free method allows the sensitive detection of let-7a with high specificity towards single nucleotide polymorphisms in the let-7 miRNA family. In addition, the simple "mix and measure" assay can be extended to detect other types of targets upon slight modification, and thus provides a tool for the early diagnosis and risk assessment of malignancy. PMID:24836018

  15. Architecture based on the integration of intermolecular G-quadruplex structure with sticky-end pairing and colorimetric detection of DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongbo; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Zhifa; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2014-01-01

    An interesting discovery is reported in that G-rich hairpin-based recognition probes can self-assemble into a nano-architecture based on the integration of an intermolecular G-quadruplex structure with the sticky-end pairing effect in the presence of target DNAs. Moreover, GNPs modified with partly complementary DNAs can intensively aggregate by hybridization-based intercalation between intermolecular G-quadruplexes, indicating an inspiring assembly mechanism and a powerful colorimetric DNA detection. The proposed intermolecular G-quadruplex-integrated sticky-end pairing assembly (called GISA)-based colorimetric system allows a specific and quantitative assay of p53 DNA with a linear range of more than two orders of magnitude and a detection limit of 0.2 nM, suggesting a considerably improved analytical performance. And more to the point, the discrimination of single-base mismatched target DNAs can be easily conducted via visual observation. The successful development of the present colorimetric system, especially the GISA-based aggregation mechanism of GNPs is different from traditional approaches, and offers a critical insight into the dependence of the GNP aggregation on the structural properties of oligonucleotides, opening a good way to design colorimetric sensing probes and DNA nanostructure. An interesting discovery is reported in that G-rich hairpin-based recognition probes can self-assemble into a nano-architecture based on the integration of an intermolecular G-quadruplex structure with the sticky-end pairing effect in the presence of target DNAs. Moreover, GNPs modified with partly complementary DNAs can intensively aggregate by hybridization-based intercalation between intermolecular G-quadruplexes, indicating an inspiring assembly mechanism and a powerful colorimetric DNA detection. The proposed intermolecular G-quadruplex-integrated sticky-end pairing assembly (called GISA)-based colorimetric system allows a specific and quantitative assay of p53 DNA

  16. Isolation of a Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific DNA probe by subtraction hybridization and construction of species-specific oligonucleotide primers for sensitive detection by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Seal, S E; Jackson, L A; Daniels, M J

    1992-01-01

    A subtraction hybridization technique was employed to make a library enriched for Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific sequences. One cloned fragment, PS2096, hybridized under stringent conditions to DNA of 82 P. solanacearum strains representing all subgroups of the species. Other plant-associated bacteria, including closely related species such as Pseudomonas capacia, Pseudomonas picketti, or Pseudomonas syzygii, did not hybridize to PS2096. A minimum number of between 4 x 10(5) and 4 x 10(6) P. solanacearum cells could routinely be detected with PS2096 labelled either with [32P]dCTP or with digoxigenin-11-dUTP. To improve the sensitivity of detection, PS2096 was sequenced to allow the construction of specific oligonucleotide primers to be used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. After 50 cycles of amplification, 5 to 116 cells, depending on the strain, could reproducibly be detected by visualization of a 148-bp PCR product on an agarose gel. A preliminary field trial in Burundi with the probe and PCR primers has confirmed that they are sensitive tools for specifically detecting low-level infections of P. solanacearum in potato tubers. Images PMID:1482193

  17. Genetic Differentiation and Hybridization Among Festuca Idahoensis, F. Roemeri, and F. Ovina Detected From AFLP, ITS, and Chloroplast DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    North American forms of the F. ovina complex, Festuca idahoensis and F. roemert are distributed broadly east and narrowly west of the Cascade Mountains, respectively. The psbA-trnH and rps16-trnK chloroplast DNA intergenic sequences, 18S-5.8S-26S nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (I...

  18. A Checkpoint-Related Function of the MCM Replicative Helicase Is Required to Avert Accumulation of RNA:DNA Hybrids during S-phase and Ensuing DSBs during G2/M.

    PubMed

    Vijayraghavan, Sriram; Tsai, Feng-Ling; Schwacha, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    The Mcm2-7 complex is the catalytic core of the eukaryotic replicative helicase. Here, we identify a new role for this complex in maintaining genome integrity. Using both genetic and cytological approaches, we find that a specific mcm allele (mcm2DENQ) causes elevated genome instability that correlates with the appearance of numerous DNA-damage associated foci of γH2AX and Rad52. We further find that the triggering events for this genome instability are elevated levels of RNA:DNA hybrids and an altered DNA topological state, as over-expression of either RNaseH (an enzyme specific for degradation of RNA in RNA:DNA hybrids) or Topoisomerase 1 (an enzyme that relieves DNA supercoiling) can suppress the mcm2DENQ DNA-damage phenotype. Moreover, the observed DNA damage has several additional unusual properties, in that DNA damage foci appear only after S-phase, in G2/M, and are dependent upon progression into metaphase. In addition, we show that the resultant DNA damage is not due to spontaneous S-phase fork collapse. In total, these unusual mcm2DENQ phenotypes are markedly similar to those of a special previously-studied allele of the checkpoint sensor kinase ATR/MEC1, suggesting a possible regulatory interplay between Mcm2-7 and ATR during unchallenged growth. As RNA:DNA hybrids primarily result from transcription perturbations, we suggest that surveillance-mediated modulation of the Mcm2-7 activity plays an important role in preventing catastrophic conflicts between replication forks and transcription complexes. Possible relationships among these effects and the recently discovered role of Mcm2-7 in the DNA replication checkpoint induced by HU treatment are discussed. PMID:27556397

  19. A Checkpoint-Related Function of the MCM Replicative Helicase Is Required to Avert Accumulation of RNA:DNA Hybrids during S-phase and Ensuing DSBs during G2/M

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Mcm2-7 complex is the catalytic core of the eukaryotic replicative helicase. Here, we identify a new role for this complex in maintaining genome integrity. Using both genetic and cytological approaches, we find that a specific mcm allele (mcm2DENQ) causes elevated genome instability that correlates with the appearance of numerous DNA-damage associated foci of γH2AX and Rad52. We further find that the triggering events for this genome instability are elevated levels of RNA:DNA hybrids and an altered DNA topological state, as over-expression of either RNaseH (an enzyme specific for degradation of RNA in RNA:DNA hybrids) or Topoisomerase 1 (an enzyme that relieves DNA supercoiling) can suppress the mcm2DENQ DNA-damage phenotype. Moreover, the observed DNA damage has several additional unusual properties, in that DNA damage foci appear only after S-phase, in G2/M, and are dependent upon progression into metaphase. In addition, we show that the resultant DNA damage is not due to spontaneous S-phase fork collapse. In total, these unusual mcm2DENQ phenotypes are markedly similar to those of a special previously-studied allele of the checkpoint sensor kinase ATR/MEC1, suggesting a possible regulatory interplay between Mcm2-7 and ATR during unchallenged growth. As RNA:DNA hybrids primarily result from transcription perturbations, we suggest that surveillance-mediated modulation of the Mcm2-7 activity plays an important role in preventing catastrophic conflicts between replication forks and transcription complexes. Possible relationships among these effects and the recently discovered role of Mcm2-7 in the DNA replication checkpoint induced by HU treatment are discussed. PMID:27556397

  20. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  1. Real-time, in situ DNA hybridization detection with attomolar sensitivity without amplification using (pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.65-(PbTiO3)0.35 piezoelectric plate sensors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Kirimli, Ceyhun E; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y

    2013-05-15

    In this paper we have investigated real-time, in situ DNA hybridization detection using piezoelectric plate sensors (PEPSs) consisting of a highly piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) layer 8μm in thickness thinly coated with Cr/Au electrodes and electrically insulated with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) encapsulation. With probe complementary DNA (cDNA) immobilized on the PEPS surface and by monitoring the first longitudinal extension mode (LEM) resonance frequency shift of the PEPS we detected hybridization of the target DNA (tDNA) to the probe cDNA on the PEPS surface in real time at concentration 1.6×10(-18)M with a signal to noise ratio of 8 without isolation and amplification at room temperature in 30min in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. The detection was validated in situ by two different methods: (1) the detection of fluorescently labeled microspheres coated with reporter cDNA complementary to the tDNA but different from the probe cDNA; (2) fluorescent visualization. PMID:23356996

  2. Detection of {open_quotes}cryptic{close_quotes}karyotypic rearrangements in closely related primate species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using human subtelomeric DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblom, J.J.; Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Specific human subtelomeric DNA probes were used to reveal cryptic chromosomal rearrangements that cannot be detected by conventional high resolution cytogenetic techniques, or by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization using whole chromosome paint analysis. Two cosmids containing different subtelomeric DNA sequences were derived from human chromosome 19 and designated as 7501 and 16432. Cosmid 7501 was hybridized to chromosomes from humans, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. In humans, 7501 consistently labeled chromosomes 3q, 15q, and 19p. Additional chromosomes were labeled in different individuals, indicating a polymorphic distribution of this sequence in the human genome. In contrast, 7501 consistently and strongly labeled only the q arm terminus of chromosome 3 in both chimp and gorilla. The identification of the chromosome was made by two-color FISH analysis using human chromosome 4-specific paint and homologous to human chromosome 4. None of the human subjects showed labeling of chromosome 4 with 7501. This finding suggests that in the course of human evolution, subsequent to the divergence of humans and African apes, a cryptic translocation occurred between the ancestral human chromosome 4 and one or more of the other human chromosomes that now contain this DNA segment. In orangutan, 7501 labeled a single acrocentric chromosome pair, a distinctly different chromosome than that labeled in chimp and gorilla. Comparison of chromosome sites labeled with cosmid 16432 showed the distribution of signals on chromosome 1q arm is the same for humans and chimp, but different in the gorilla. Humans and chimps show distinct labeling on sites 1q terminus and 1q41-42. In gorilla, there is instead a large cluster of intense signal near the terminus of 1q that clearly does not extend all the way to the terminus. A paracentric inversion or an unequal cross-over event may account for the observed difference between these species.

  3. Mosaicism in female hybrid hares heterozygous for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. V. The recovery of DNA synthesis of hare fibroblasts after ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Janakidevi, K.; Lee, K.T.; Thomas, W.A.; Kroms, M.; Murray, C.D.

    1984-12-01

    The effect of uv irradiation on the recovery of DNA synthesis is examined in a population of hare fibroblasts exhibiting heterozygosity with reference to the X-linked enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G-6-PD). These cells have been grown from skin explants of a hybrid female cross between Lepus timidus (female) and L. europaeus (male), the former carrying the G-6-PD gene for the slow-moving T variant and the latter with the fast-moving E variant gene. The hybrid, therefore, exhibits genetic mosaicism due to random inactivation in each cell, of one of the two X chromosomes in the embryonic stage. Exponentially growing cells from 13 fibroblast strains, comprising a wide range of E to T ratios, were exposed to moderately low dose of uv irradiation (6 J/m2). The recovery in DNA synthesis during the 2- to 8-h postirradiation period was calculated as the mean percentage rates of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporated during the time as compared to the unirradiated zero-time controls. The results show a statistically significant positive correlation as determined by linear regression analysis between the levels of E and the rate of recovery in DNA synthesis. This i