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Sample records for cytopathology image cytometry

  1. Digital Imaging in Cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Khalbuss, Walid E.; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil V.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advances are occurring in the field of cytopathology, particularly in the field of digital imaging. Today, digital images are used in a variety of settings including education (E-education), as a substitute to multiheaded sessions, multisite conferences, publications, cytopathology web pages, cytology proficiency testing, telecytology, consultation through telecytology, and automated screening of Pap test slides. The accessibility provided by digital imaging in cytopathology can improve the quality and efficiency of cytopathology services, primarily by getting the expert cytopathologist to remotely look at the slide. This improved accessibility saves time and alleviates the need to ship slides, wait for glass slides, or transport pathologists. Whole slide imaging (WSI) is a digital imaging modality that uses computerized technology to scan and convert pathology and cytology glass slides into digital images (digital slides) that can be viewed remotely on a workstation using viewing software. In spite of the many advances, challenges remain such as the expensive initial set-up costs, workflow interruption, length of time to scan whole slides, large storage size for WSI, bandwidth restrictions, undefined legal implications, professional reluctance, and lack of standardization in the imaging process. PMID:21785680

  2. The impact of digital imaging in the field of cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Hornish, Maryanne; Goulart, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    With the introduction of digital imaging, pathology is undergoing a digital transformation. In the field of cytology, digital images are being used for telecytology, automated screening of Pap test slides, training and education (e.g. online digital atlases), and proficiency testing. To date, there has been no systematic review on the impact of digital imaging on the practice of cytopathology. This article critically addresses the emerging role of computer-assisted screening and the application of digital imaging to the field of cytology, including telecytology, virtual microscopy, and the impact of online cytology resources. The role of novel diagnostic techniques like image cytometry is also reviewed. PMID:19495408

  3. Diagnosis of leptomeningeal disease in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of the central nervous system by flow cytometry and cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Schroers, Roland; Baraniskin, Alexander; Heute, Christoph; Vorgerd, Matthias; Brunn, Anna; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Kowoll, Annika; Alekseyev, Andriy; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schlegel, Uwe; Deckert, Martina; Pels, Hendrik

    2010-12-01

    Reliable detection of leptomeningeal disease has the potential of facilitating the diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and is important for therapeutic considerations. Currently, the standard diagnostic procedure for the detection of lymphoma in the cerebrospinal fluid is cytopathology. To improve the limited specificity and sensitivity of cytopathology, flow cytometry has been suggested as an alternative. Here, we evaluated multi-parameter flow cytometry in combination with conventional cytopathology in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 30 patients with primary CNS lymphoma and seven patients with secondary CNS lymphoma. Overall, in 11 of 37 (29.7%) patients with CNS lymphoma, lymphoma cells were detected in CSF by flow cytometry, while cytopathology was less sensitive displaying unequivocally malignant CSF cells in only seven of all 37 (18.9%) patients. Six (16.2%) patients showed cytopathological results suspicious of lymphoma; however, in only one of these patients, the diagnosis of CSF lymphoma cells could be confirmed by flow cytometry. In primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSL), seven of 30 (23.3%) patients were positive for CSF lymphoma cells in flow cytometry, in contrast to four (13.3%) patients with PCNSL with definitely positive cytopathology. In summary, our results suggest that multi-parameter flow cytometry increases the sensitivity and specificity of leptomeningeal disease detection in CNS lymphomas. Both methods should be applied concurrently for complementary diagnostic assessment in patients with CNS lymphoma. PMID:20727005

  4. Microspectrofluorometry and fluorescence imaging in the study of human cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Kohen, E; Gatt, S; Schachtschabel, A; Schachtschabel, D O; Kohen, C; Agmon, V; Hirschberg, J G; Monti, M

    2000-12-01

    The study of energy pools and dynamics of specific pathways in living cells by microspectrofluorometry and fluorescence imaging produces spectral and topographic images characterizing structural and functional changes associated with cytopathology. Microspectro-fluorometry and fluorescence imaging have been applied, together with organelle morphometry to a number of cells mimicking certain cytopathologies, including melanoma cells, long-term malignant cells, and gene-defective cells. These investigations of cellular pathology indicate that there is a convergence of various physiopathological processes. Cellular states that have similarities include senescence, detoxification, and transformation. While the NAD(P)H metabolic transients have been studied before, our emphasis in this article is on very rapidly scanned fluorescence images related to organelle integration and photoinduced cellular senescence. PMID:11074618

  5. Cytopathology whole slide images and adaptive tutorials for postgraduate pathology trainees: a randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Van Es, Simone L; Kumar, Rakesh K; Pryor, Wendy M; Salisbury, Elizabeth L; Velan, Gary M

    2015-09-01

    To determine whether cytopathology whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials aid learning by postgraduate trainees, we designed a randomized crossover trial to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative impact of whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials compared with traditional glass slide and textbook methods of learning cytopathology. Forty-three anatomical pathology registrars were recruited from Australia, New Zealand, and Malaysia. Online assessments were used to determine efficacy, whereas user experience and perceptions of efficiency were evaluated using online Likert scales and open-ended questions. Outcomes of online assessments indicated that, with respect to performance, learning with whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials was equivalent to using traditional methods. High-impact learning, efficiency, and equity of learning from virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials were strong themes identified in open-ended responses. Participants raised concern about the lack of z-axis capability in the cytopathology whole slide images, suggesting that delivery of z-stacked whole slide images online may be important for future educational development. In this trial, learning cytopathology with whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials was found to be as effective as and perceived as more efficient than learning from glass slides and textbooks. The use of whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials has the potential to provide equitable access to effective learning from teaching material of consistently high quality. It also has broader implications for continuing professional development and maintenance of competence and quality assurance in specialist practice. PMID:26093936

  6. Cytopathology whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials: A software pilot

    PubMed Central

    Van Es, Simone L.; Pryor, Wendy M.; Belinson, Zack; Salisbury, Elizabeth L.; Velan, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The constant growth in the body of knowledge in medicine requires pathologists and pathology trainees to engage in continuing education. Providing them with equitable access to efficient and effective forms of education in pathology (especially in remote and rural settings) is important, but challenging. Methods: We developed three pilot cytopathology virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials (VMATs) to explore a novel adaptive E-learning platform (AeLP) which can incorporate whole slide images for pathology education. We collected user feedback to further develop this educational material and to subsequently deploy randomized trials in both pathology specialist trainee and also medical student cohorts. Cytopathology whole slide images were first acquired then novel VMATs teaching cytopathology were created using the AeLP, an intelligent tutoring system developed by Smart Sparrow. The pilot was run for Australian pathologists and trainees through the education section of Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia website over a period of 9 months. Feedback on the usability, impact on learning and any technical issues was obtained using 5-point Likert scale items and open-ended feedback in online questionnaires. Results: A total of 181 pathologists and pathology trainees anonymously attempted the three adaptive tutorials, a smaller proportion of whom went on to provide feedback at the end of each tutorial. VMATs were perceived as effective and efficient E-learning tools for pathology education. User feedback was positive. There were no significant technical issues. Conclusion: During this pilot, the user feedback on the educational content and interface and the lack of technical issues were helpful. Large scale trials of similar online cytopathology adaptive tutorials were planned for the future. PMID:26605119

  7. Quantitative Functional Morphology by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Vorobjev, Ivan A; Barteneva, Natasha S

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes advantages and limitations of imaging flow cytometry (IFC) based on Imagestream instrumentation using a hybrid approach of morphometric measurement and quantitation of multiparametric fluorescent intensities' distribution in cells and particles. Brief comparison is given of IFC with conventional flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Some future directions of the IFC technology are described and discussed. PMID:27460234

  8. Applications of Imaging Flow Cytometry for Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Mark; Davis, Aubrey; Abbriano, Raffaela; Pugsley, Haley R; Traller, Jesse C; Smith, Sarah R; Shrestha, Roshan P; Cook, Orna; Sánchez-Alvarez, Eva L; Manandhar-Shrestha, Kalpana; Alderete, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image large numbers of cells at high resolution enhances flow cytometric analysis of cells and cell populations. In particular, the ability to image intracellular features adds a unique aspect to analyses, and can enable correlation between molecular phenomena resulting in alterations in cellular phenotype. Unicellular microalgae are amenable to high-throughput analysis to capture the diversity of cell types in natural samples, or diverse cellular responses in clonal populations, especially using imaging cytometry. Using examples from our laboratory, we review applications of imaging cytometry, specifically using an Amnis(®) ImageStream(®)X instrument, to characterize photosynthetic microalgae. Some of these examples highlight advantages of imaging flow cytometry for certain research objectives, but we also include examples that would not necessarily require imaging and could be performed on a conventional cytometer to demonstrate other concepts in cytometric evaluation of microalgae. We demonstrate the value of these approaches for (1) analysis of populations, (2) documentation of cellular features, and (3) analysis of gene expression. PMID:27460237

  9. Resources for flow and image cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes resources available to the flow and image cytometry community. I have been asked to limit the discussion to resources available in the United States, so reference to resources exclusively available in Japan, Europe, or Australia are not included. It is not the intention of this paper to include each and every resource available, rather, to describe the types available and give some examples. Included in this manuscript are listings of some of the examples of resources which readers may find useful. Addresses of commercial companies are not included in the interest of space. Most of the examples listed advertise on a regular basis in journals publishing in cytometry fields. The resources to be described are divided into five categories: instrument resources, computer and software resources, standards, physical or user'' resources, and instructional resources. Each of these resources will be discussed separately. 4 tabs.

  10. Infrared imaging of small molecules in living cells: from in vitro metabolic analysis to cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Quaroni, Luca; Zlateva, Theodora; Wehbe, Katia; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2016-06-23

    A major topic in InfraRed (IR) spectroscopic studies of living cells is the complexity of the vibrational spectra, involving hundreds of overlapping absorption bands from all the cellular components present at detectable concentrations. We focus on the relative contribution of both small-molecule metabolites and macromolecules, while defining the spectroscopic properties of cells and tissue in the middle IR (midIR) region. As a consequence, we show the limitations of current interpretative schemes that rely on a small number of macromolecules for IR band assignment. The discussion is framed specifically around the glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells because of the potential pharmacological applications. Several metabolites involved in glycolysis by A549 lung cancer cells can be identified by this approach, which we refer to as Correlated Cellular Spectro-Microscopy (CSM). It is noteworthy that the rate of formation or consumption of specific molecules could be quantitatively assessed by this approach. We now extend this analysis to the two-dimensional case by performing IR imaging on single cells and cell clusters, detecting variations of metabolite concentration in time and space across the sample. The molecular detail obtained from this analysis allows its use in evaluating the pharmacological effect of inhibitors of glycolytic enzymes with potential consequences for in vitro drug testing. Finally we highlight the implications of the spectral contribution from cellular metabolites on applications in IR spectral cytopathology (SCP). PMID:27049435

  11. Cellometer image cytometry as a complementary tool to flow cytometry for verifying gated cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kuksin, Dmitry; Kuksin, Christina Arieta; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-15

    Traditionally, many cell-based assays that analyze cell populations and functionalities have been performed using flow cytometry. However, flow cytometers remain relatively expensive and require highly trained operators for routine maintenance and data analysis. Recently, an image cytometry system has been developed by Nexcelom Bioscience (Lawrence, MA, USA) for automated cell concentration and viability measurement using bright-field and fluorescent imaging methods. Image cytometry is analogous to flow cytometry in that gating operations can be performed on the cell population based on size and fluorescent intensity. In addition, the image cytometer is capable of capturing bright-field and fluorescent images, allowing for the measurement of cellular size and fluorescence intensity data. In this study, we labeled a population of cells with an enzymatic vitality stain (calcein-AM) and a cell viability dye (propidium iodide) and compared the data generated by flow and image cytometry. We report that measuring vitality and viability using the image cytometer is as effective as flow cytometric assays and allows for visual confirmation of the sample to exclude cellular debris. Image cytometry offers a direct method for performing fluorescent cell-based assays but also may be used as a complementary tool to flow cytometers for aiding the analysis of more complex samples. PMID:27033005

  12. Visualization of DNA replicons by image cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gratzner, H.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Replication of DNA in eukaryotic organisms proceeds bidirectionally along the double helix in replicon substructures. The process can be visualized by autoradiography of spreads of genomic DNA from lysed, whole cells which have been incubated with radioactive DNA precursors. The objective of the present study was to develop techniques to measure DNA strand initiation and elongation using immunofluorescence and image cytometry. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for 3 days with PHA and then pulsed for 5 or 15 minutes with iododeoxyuridine. Chromatin spreads were then produced on microscope slides by lysing with detergent and slides were immunofluorescently stained by an indirect anti-BrdU technique. Individual replicons of mammalian cells were visualized by immunofluorescence at high resolution and digital images were analyzed to determine the rates of elongation as well as initiation parameters. Elongation rates by the method were approximately 1 [mu]M/min. The methods are applicable to visualization and quantitation of the effects of radiation or other agents on DNA damage or repair.

  13. Comparison study of five different display modalities for whole slide images in surgical pathology and cytopathology in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Haene, Nicky; Maris, Calliope; Rorive, Sandrine; Moles Lopez, Xavier; Rostang, Johan; Marchessoux, Cédric; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil V.; Salmon, Isabelle

    2013-03-01

    User experience with viewing images in pathology is crucial for accurate interpretation and diagnosis. With digital pathology, images are being read on a display system, and this poses new types of questions: such as what is the difference in terms of pixelation, refresh lag or obscured features compared to an optical microscope. Is there a resultant change in user performance in terms of speed of slide review, perception of adequacy and quality or in diagnostic confidence? A prior psychophysical study was carried out comparing various display modalities on whole slide imaging (WSI) in pathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) in the USA. This prior study compared professional and non-professional grade display modalities and highlighted the importance of using a medical grade display to view pathological digital images. This study was duplicated in Europe at the Department of Pathology in Erasme Hospital (Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB)) in an attempt to corroborate these findings. Digital WSI with corresponding glass slides of 58 cases including surgical pathology and cytopathology slides of varying difficulty were employed. Similar non-professional and professional grade display modalities were compared to an optical microscope (Olympus BX51). Displays ranged from a laptop (DELL Latitude D620), to a consumer grade display (DELL E248WFPb), to two professional grade monitors (Eizo CG245W and Barco MDCC-6130). Three pathologists were selected from the Department of Pathology in Erasme Hospital (ULB) in Belgium to view and interpret the pathological images on these different displays. The results show that non-professional grade displays (laptop and consumer) have inferior user experience compared to professional grade monitors and the optical microscope.

  14. Optofluidic Fluorescent Imaging Cytometry on a Cell Phone

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongying; Mavandadi, Sam; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical sciences. Cost-effective translation of these technologies to remote and resource-limited environments could create new opportunities especially for telemedicine applications. Toward this direction, here we demonstrate the integration of imaging cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using a compact, lightweight, and cost-effective optofluidic attachment. In this cell-phone-based optofluidic imaging cytometry platform, fluorescently labeled particles or cells of interest are continuously delivered to our imaging volume through a disposable microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. The same microfluidic device also acts as a multilayered optofluidic waveguide and efficiently guides our excitation light, which is butt-coupled from the side facets of our microfluidic channel using inexpensive light-emitting diodes. Since the excitation of the sample volume occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to the detection path, our cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the specimens as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the target solution of interest. We tested the performance of our cell-phone-based imaging cytometer by measuring the density of white blood cells in human blood samples, which provided a decent match to a commercially available hematology analyzer. We further characterized the imaging quality of the same platform to demonstrate a spatial resolution of ~2 μm. This cell-phone-enabled optofluidic imaging flow cytometer could especially be useful for rapid and sensitive imaging of bodily fluids for conducting various cell counts (e.g., toward monitoring of HIV+ patients) or rare cell analysis as well as for screening of water quality in

  15. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization in Suspension by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Orla; Wallace, Paul K; Minderman, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of imaging flow cytometry (IFC) has brought novel applications exploiting its advantages over conventional flow cytometry and microscopy. One of the new applications is fluorescence in situ hybridization in suspension (FISH-IS). Conventional FISH is a slide-based approach in which the spotlike imagery resulting from hybridization with fluorescently tagged probes is evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. The FISH-IS approach evaluated by IFC enables the evaluation of tens to hundreds of thousands of cells in suspension and the analysis can be automated and standardized diminishing operator bias from the analysis. The high cell number throughput of FISH-IS improves the detection of rare events compared to conventional FISH. The applicability of FISH-IS is currently limited to detection of abnormal quantitative differences of hybridization targets such as occur in numerical chromosome abnormalities, deletions and amplifications.Here, we describe a protocol for FISH-IS using chromosome enumeration probes as an example. PMID:27460240

  16. Ultrafast quantitative time-stretch imaging flow cytometry of phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Queenie T. K.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive quantification of phytoplankton abundance, sizes and other parameters, e.g. biomasses, has been an important, yet daunting task in aquatic sciences and biofuel research. It is primarily because of the lack of effective tool to image and thus accurately profile individual microalgae in a large population. The phytoplankton species are highly diversified and heterogeneous in terms of their sizes and the richness in morphological complexity. This fact makes time-stretch imaging, a new ultrafast real-time optical imaging technology, particularly suitable for ultralarge-scale taxonomic classification of phytoplankton together with quantitative image recognition and analysis. We here demonstrate quantitative imaging flow cytometry of single phytoplankton based on quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) - a new time-stretch imaging modality for label-free quantitative phase imaging without interferometric implementations. Sharing the similar concept of Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM accesses multiple phase-gradient contrasts of each single phytoplankton, from which the quantitative phase profile is computed. We employ such system to capture, at an imaging line-scan rate of 11.6 MHz, high-resolution images of two phytoplankton populations (scenedesmus and chlamydomonas) in ultrafast microfluidic flow (3 m/s). We further perform quantitative taxonomic screening analysis enabled by this technique. More importantly, the system can also generate quantitative phase images of single phytoplankton. This is especially useful for label-free quantification of biomasses (e.g. lipid droplets) of the particular species of interest - an important task adopted in biofuel applications. Combining machine learning for automated classification, Q-ATOM could be an attractive platform for continuous and real-time ultralarge-scale single-phytoplankton analysis.

  17. Highly multiplexed imaging of tumor tissues with subcellular resolution by mass cytometry.

    PubMed

    Giesen, Charlotte; Wang, Hao A O; Schapiro, Denis; Zivanovic, Nevena; Jacobs, Andrea; Hattendorf, Bodo; Schüffler, Peter J; Grolimund, Daniel; Buhmann, Joachim M; Brandt, Simone; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Wild, Peter J; Günther, Detlef; Bodenmiller, Bernd

    2014-04-01

    Mass cytometry enables high-dimensional, single-cell analysis of cell type and state. In mass cytometry, rare earth metals are used as reporters on antibodies. Analysis of metal abundances using the mass cytometer allows determination of marker expression in individual cells. Mass cytometry has previously been applied only to cell suspensions. To gain spatial information, we have coupled immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical methods with high-resolution laser ablation to CyTOF mass cytometry. This approach enables the simultaneous imaging of 32 proteins and protein modifications at subcellular resolution; with the availability of additional isotopes, measurement of over 100 markers will be possible. We applied imaging mass cytometry to human breast cancer samples, allowing delineation of cell subpopulations and cell-cell interactions and highlighting tumor heterogeneity. Imaging mass cytometry complements existing imaging approaches. It will enable basic studies of tissue heterogeneity and function and support the transition of medicine toward individualized molecularly targeted diagnosis and therapies. PMID:24584193

  18. [A plea for cytopathology].

    PubMed

    Dalquen, P

    2012-07-01

    Compared to other European and non-European countries the benefits of cytopathology for the diagnosis of many tumors is still underestimated in Germany for traditional reasons. Cytological methods provide excellent material from many organs for morphological, immunochemical and molecular examinations so that a definitive diagnosis is cytologically possible in many cases and the number of exploratory surgical operations could therefore be reduced. Improvements in this deplorable situation will only be possible if a standardized training period in cytology is consistently included in the training of general pathologists. This requires organizational and infrastructural changes within the institutes of pathology. In this respect, the university institutes as important training institutions should lead the way. PMID:22711371

  19. Flow cytometry using Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-11-01

    A novel concept of Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements is introduced for flow cytometry applications. The system affords robust, maintenance-free and high-speed elasticity-sensitive measurements. PMID:26347908

  20. Biospecimen repositories and cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Savitri

    2015-03-01

    Biospecimen repositories are important for the advancement of biomedical research. Literature on the potential for biobanking of fine-needle aspiration, gynecologic, and nongynecologic cytology specimens is very limited. The potential for biobanking of these specimens as valuable additional resources to surgically excised tissues appears to be excellent. The cervicovaginal specimens that can be used for biobanking include Papanicolaou-stained monolayer preparations and residual material from liquid-based cytology preparations. Different types of specimen preparations of fine-needle aspiration and nongynecologic specimens, including Papanicolaou-stained and Diff-Quik-stained smears, cell blocks. and dedicated passes/residual material from fine-needle aspiration stored frozen in a variety of solutions, can be used for biobanking. Because of several gaps in knowledge regarding the standard of operative procedures for the procurement, storage, and quality assessment of cytology specimens, further studies as well as national conferences and workshops are needed not only to create awareness but also to facilitate the use of cytopathology specimens for biobanking. PMID:25524469

  1. Quantitative Assessment of Pap Smear Cells by PC-Based Cytopathologic Image Analysis System and Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Chi; Chan, Yung-Kuan; Chan, Po-Chou; Chen, Yung-Fu; Chen, Rung-Ching; Huang, Yu-Ruei

    Cytologic screening has been widely used for controlling the prevalence of cervical cancer. Errors from sampling, screening and interpretation, still concealed some unpleasant results. This study aims at designing a cellular image analysis system based on feasible and available software and hardware for a routine cytologic laboratory. Totally 1814 cellular images from the liquid-based cervical smears with Papanicolaou stain in 100x, 200x, and 400x magnification were captured by a digital camera. Cell images were reviewed by pathologic experts with peer agreement and only 503 images were selected for further study. The images were divided into 4 diagnostic categories. A PC-based cellular image analysis system (PCCIA) was developed for computing morphometric parameters. Then support vector machine (SVM) was used to classify signature patterns. The results show that the selected 13 morphometric parameters can be used to correctly differentiate the dysplastic cells from the normal cells (p<0.001). Additionally, SVM classifier has been demonstrated to be able to achieve a high accuracy for cellular classification. In conclusion, the proposed system provides a feasible and effective tool for the evaluation of gynecologic cytologic specimens.

  2. Quantitative tissue cytometry (Tissomics): multimodal slide-based cytometry, confocal imaging, and volume rendering is the key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja; Kuska, Jens-Peer; Braumann, Ulf-Dietrich; Mosch, Birgit; Arendt, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Multiplexed high-content cytometric analysis of cells is a prerequisite for Cytomics and Systems Biology. Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) analysis yields quantitative cell related data on various cell constituents. It allows to measure and identify in high-throughput hundred-thousands of objects and obtain cytometric data on light absorption, scatter and fluorescence signals. Selected cells of interest can be rescanned and morphologically evaluated. To be cytometric SBC measurement needs high focal depth in order to acquire the fluorescence of the whole cell. For tissue analysis section thickness of >30μm is needed to reduce cell sectioning leading in multiple labelled specimens to an overestimation of multiple stained cells due to stereology, mimicking co-expression or elevated expression that is in fact due to coincidences in the z-axis direction. By confocal sectioning and 3D-reconstruction these overlays could be eliminated but confocal 3D imaging is slow and the resulting data are not cytometric. To overcome this obstacle, we combined SBC analysis with confocal imaging using a Laser Scanning Cytometer (iCys, Compucyte Corp., MA). Single to triple labelled 30-120μm thick human brain sections were scanned cytometrically (up to three laser 405nm, 488nm, 633nm) and double and triple labeled cells were identified. In the second step these objects were relocated, scanned confocally and 3D-reconstructed (Mathematica®, MathGL3d). This combination of high-throughput SBC and high-resolution confocal imaging enables for unequivocal identification of multiple labelled objects and is a prerequisite for Cytomic tissue analysis, Tissomics. (Support: HBFG 036/379-1)

  3. Multimodality Molecular Imaging (FDG-PET/CT, US Elastography, and DWI-MRI) as Complimentary Adjunct for Enhancing Diagnostic Confidence in Reported Intermediate Risk Category Thyroid Nodules on Bethesda Thyroid Cytopathology Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip; Mahajan, Abhishek; Arya, Supreeta

    2016-01-01

    The potential complimentary role of various molecular imaging modalities [fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT), ultrasound (US)-elastography, and diffusion weighted imaging-magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI)] in characterizing thyroid nodules, which have been designated as “intermediate risk category” on the Bethesda thyroid cytopathology reporting system (BTCRS), is illustrated in this communication. The clinical cases described (category III thyroid nodules on BTCRS) show the imaging features and the final diagnostic impressions rendered by the interpreting physicians with the modalities that have been independently compared in a tabular format at the end; of particular note is the high negative predictive value of these (specifically FDG-PET/CT), which could aid in enhancing the diagnostic confidence in the reported “intermediate risk category” thyroid nodules, a “gray zone” from the patient management viewpoint. PMID:27134564

  4. Label-free cell cycle analysis for high-throughput imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, Thomas; Hennig, Holger; Summers, Huw D.; Theis, Fabian J.; Cerveira, Joana; Patterson, James O.; Davies, Derek; Filby, Andrew; Carpenter, Anne E.; Rees, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Imaging flow cytometry combines the high-throughput capabilities of conventional flow cytometry with single-cell imaging. Here we demonstrate label-free prediction of DNA content and quantification of the mitotic cell cycle phases by applying supervised machine learning to morphological features extracted from brightfield and the typically ignored darkfield images of cells from an imaging flow cytometer. This method facilitates non-destructive monitoring of cells avoiding potentially confounding effects of fluorescent stains while maximizing available fluorescence channels. The method is effective in cell cycle analysis for mammalian cells, both fixed and live, and accurately assesses the impact of a cell cycle mitotic phase blocking agent. As the same method is effective in predicting the DNA content of fission yeast, it is likely to have a broad application to other cell types. PMID:26739115

  5. Image cytometry of estrogen receptors in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cohen, O; Brugal, G; Seigneurin, D; Demongeot, J

    1988-11-01

    A significant level of estrogen receptors (ER) in breast cancer cells is an indication of tumor differentiation and suggests that a homeostatic control of cell growth may persist in these cancers. In medical practice, the Dextran-coated charcoal assays (DCCA) are still the most frequently used test to characterize patients having ER-positive malignant breast tumors and for whom hormonal therapy is justified. Nevertheless, this routine biochemical technique is not satisfactory because it is a broad method unsuitable for revealing receptor tissue heterogeneity. However, immunocytochemical labeling, such as the ER-ICA method, which involves a monoclonal antibody linked to peroxidase, is a specific reaction for this purpose but which until now was not quantitative. The present study uses an original cell preparation technique combining the PAP reaction with toluidine blue counterstain for image analysis on the SAMBA system. Special software has been developed for the quantitative analysis of immunocytochemistry in cancers. Results obtained showed a high correlation between the DCCA values and the score derived from the mean ER concentration per positive tumor cell and the labeling index. In addition, intracell and intratumor heterogeneity can be displayed according to several parameters and were shown to vary according to tumor and to antiestrogen (Tamoxifen) presurgical therapy. PMID:2463134

  6. Image cytometry of duct cells from benign and malignant breast disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Gadenne, C.; King, E.B.; Chew, K.L.; Duarte, L.A.; Petrakis, N.L.

    1987-01-22

    We used image cytometry to classify benign and malignant breast lesions, to identify parameters that classify premalignant lesions, and to assess these parameters for a biological association that may be linked with malignancy. Results suggest that quantitative image analysis is able to discriminate ''normal'' from ''abnormal'' breast lesions. Thus image cytometry may provide an objective approach for early detection of malignant changes in the breast. The parameters selected by stepwise discriminant and regression analyses as being most useful for discriminating among breast lesions relate to nuclear size, shape and DNA content. These parameters are robust and easily measured and are similar to those used by others for discriminating benign from malignant lesions. Significantly, no parameter based on nuclear chromatin distribution ranked as highly in this study, unlike our experience with studies of other premalignant lesions. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Cutting-Edge Analysis of Extracellular Microparticles using ImageStreamX Imaging Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Headland, Sarah E.; Jones, Hefin R.; D'Sa, Adelina S. V.; Perretti, Mauro; Norling, Lucy V.

    2014-01-01

    Interest in extracellular vesicle biology has exploded in the past decade, since these microstructures seem endowed with multiple roles, from blood coagulation to inter-cellular communication in pathophysiology. In order for microparticle research to evolve as a preclinical and clinical tool, accurate quantification of microparticle levels is a fundamental requirement, but their size and the complexity of sample fluids present major technical challenges. Flow cytometry is commonly used, but suffers from low sensitivity and accuracy. Use of Amnis ImageStreamX Mk II imaging flow cytometer afforded accurate analysis of calibration beads ranging from 1 μm to 20 nm; and microparticles, which could be observed and quantified in whole blood, platelet-rich and platelet-free plasma and in leukocyte supernatants. Another advantage was the minimal sample preparation and volume required. Use of this high throughput analyzer allowed simultaneous phenotypic definition of the parent cells and offspring microparticles along with real time microparticle generation kinetics. With the current paucity of reliable techniques for the analysis of microparticles, we propose that the ImageStreamX could be used effectively to advance this scientific field. PMID:24913598

  8. Cutting-edge analysis of extracellular microparticles using ImageStream(X) imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Headland, Sarah E; Jones, Hefin R; D'Sa, Adelina S V; Perretti, Mauro; Norling, Lucy V

    2014-01-01

    Interest in extracellular vesicle biology has exploded in the past decade, since these microstructures seem endowed with multiple roles, from blood coagulation to inter-cellular communication in pathophysiology. In order for microparticle research to evolve as a preclinical and clinical tool, accurate quantification of microparticle levels is a fundamental requirement, but their size and the complexity of sample fluids present major technical challenges. Flow cytometry is commonly used, but suffers from low sensitivity and accuracy. Use of Amnis ImageStream(X) Mk II imaging flow cytometer afforded accurate analysis of calibration beads ranging from 1 μm to 20 nm; and microparticles, which could be observed and quantified in whole blood, platelet-rich and platelet-free plasma and in leukocyte supernatants. Another advantage was the minimal sample preparation and volume required. Use of this high throughput analyzer allowed simultaneous phenotypic definition of the parent cells and offspring microparticles along with real time microparticle generation kinetics. With the current paucity of reliable techniques for the analysis of microparticles, we propose that the ImageStream(X) could be used effectively to advance this scientific field. PMID:24913598

  9. An improved method for differentiating cell-bound from internalized particles by imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Asya; Solga, Michael D; Lannigan, Joanne; Criss, Alison K

    2015-01-01

    Recognition, binding, internalization, and elimination of pathogens and cell debris are important functions of professional as well as non-professional phagocytes. However, high-throughput methods for quantifying cell-associated particles and discriminating bound from internalized particles have been lacking. Here we describe a protocol for using imaging flow cytometry to quantify the attached and phagocytosed particles that are associated with a population of cells. Cells were exposed to fluorescent particles, fixed, and exposed to an antibody of a different fluorophore that recognizes the particles. The antibody is added without cell permeabilization, such that the antibody only binds extracellular particles. Cells with and without associated particles were identified by imaging flow cytometry. For each cell with associated particles, a spot count algorithm was employed to quantify the number of extracellular (double fluorescent) and intracellular (single fluorescent) particles per cell, from which the percent particle internalization was determined. The spot count algorithm was empirically validated by examining the fluorescence and phase contrast images acquired by the flow cytometer. We used this protocol to measure binding and internalization of the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae by primary human neutrophils, using different bacterial variants and under different cellular conditions. The results acquired using imaging flow cytometry agreed with findings that were previously obtained using conventional immunofluorescence microscopy. This protocol provides a rapid, powerful method for measuring the association and internalization of any particle by any cell type. PMID:25967947

  10. A deep semantic mobile application for thyroid cytopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Edward; Corte-Real, Miguel; Baloch, Zubair

    2016-03-01

    Cytopathology is the study of disease at the cellular level and often used as a screening tool for cancer. Thyroid cytopathology is a branch of pathology that studies the diagnosis of thyroid lesions and diseases. A pathologist views cell images that may have high visual variance due to different anatomical structures and pathological characteristics. To assist the physician with identifying and searching through images, we propose a deep semantic mobile application. Our work augments recent advances in the digitization of pathology and machine learning techniques, where there are transformative opportunities for computers to assist pathologists. Our system uses a custom thyroid ontology that can be augmented with multimedia metadata extracted from images using deep machine learning techniques. We describe the utilization of a particular methodology, deep convolutional neural networks, to the application of cytopathology classification. Our method is able to leverage networks that have been trained on millions of generic images, to medical scenarios where only hundreds or thousands of images exist. We demonstrate the benefits of our framework through both quantitative and qualitative results.

  11. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water. PMID:23603893

  12. Wide-field Fluorescent Microscopy and Fluorescent Imaging Flow Cytometry on a Cell-phone

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. ~ 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of ~ 81 mm2. This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water. PMID:23603893

  13. Cytopathology of Follicular Cell Nodules.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Domenico; Suciu, Voichita; Vielh, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    This article corresponds to a lecture delivered during the Endocrine Pathology Society symposium held in Boston on 21 March 2015 (104th USCAP meeting, March 21-27). It focuses on the importance of cytopathology in endocrine thyroid pathology and the limits and pitfalls of diagnosis in follicular cell lesions. Lights and shadows are present in each diagnostic technique: Fine needle aspiration has imposed itself as a gold standard in thyroid nodules thanks to its easiness of execution and high cost-effectiveness ratio. A milestone in this field is represented by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) State of the State of the Science Conference hosted in October 22-23, 2007 by the NCI, followed by a series of documents published in Diagnostic Cytopathology and Cytojournal (2008) as well as in an atlas entitled: The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology (TBSRTC): terminology and criteria (2010, Springer). "Gray" zones still remain, causing difficulties and anxiety to the cytopathologist when facing challenging cases. Each diagnostic category of TBSRTC is analyzed and discussed in a concise fashion with special emphasis on challenging cases such as atypia of undetermined significance (AUS), suspicion for follicular neoplasms (SFNs), diagnoses of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in Hashimoto thyroiditis and follicular variant of papillary carcinoma (FVPTC). Our aim was to better define and clarify the spectrum of follicular cell lesions in thyroid nodule samplings and to underline the diagnostic limits in order to avoid pitfalls. New emerging molecular biology techniques may represent useful tools in selected morphological challenging cases and lead to new therapeutic approaches in line with drug-tailored therapy and personalized medicine. PMID:26227345

  14. A comparative study of quantitative stains for DNA in image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Mikel, U V; Becker, R L

    1991-08-01

    In this study we examined the reproducibility of several stains used to measure nuclear DNA by image cytometry. The specimens were touch preparations of liver and testis from mouse and liver, intestine and brain from rat, fixed in either neutral formalin or Carnoy's solution. The tested stains included four Feulgen methods (pararosaniline, azure-A, thionin and acriflavine), the gallocyanine-chromalum stain and two fluorescent stains (acridine orange and propidium iodide). Absorbance measurements employed a video image analysis system; fluorescence measurements were from a scanning microspectrophotometer. The acriflavine-Feulgen stain was analyzed for both absorbance and fluorescence. All seven stains were quantitative for DNA and gave reproducible results. The absorbance measurements had a lower coefficient of variation (CV) than the fluorescence values. In a nested analysis of variance of the pararosaniline Feulgen stains, cell-to-cell variability accounted for 67% of the total variance; slide-to-slide, 9%; and batch-to-batch, 24%. These values did not change significantly when the staining was performed in an automatic staining machine. For DNA analysis using image cytometry, we conclude that the Feulgen staining technique is the most useful. In particular, acriflavine-Feulgen-stained cells fixed in Carnoy's fluid give the least variation between measurement values and the most accurate ratios between the separate ploidy groups. For fluorescence cytometry we recommend Carnoy's fixation and the acriflavine-Feulgen stain because of its narrow CV as compared to acridine orange and propidium iodide. PMID:1718295

  15. A Telepathology Based Virtual Reference and Certification Centre for DNA Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Haroske, G.; Giroud, Francoise; Kunze, K. D.; Meyer, W.

    2000-01-01

    An increasing need for flexible consultation between pathologists, including the application of fast evolving supplementary technologies, has been identified during the last years. Although pathology is already one of the most advanced application of telemedicine there is more to come from the fast evolution towards computerized microscope image analysis: A reproducible quantification of measurable descriptors of the lesions in cells and tissues (so‐called biological markers) is an indispensable adjunct to routine diagnostic application. Among such quantitative methods DNA image cytometry is increasingly applied by pathologists for assistance in diagnostics. As for other pathological issues, too, a reference center for the clinical application of DNA image cytometry might be therefore of utmost value for pathologists using that method. Based on advanced telematic technologies, a Virtual Reference and Certification Center (VRCC) could be installed for certifying the cytometry hardware and software, the analytical procedures, and the basic interpretation of the results. It will be designed to be operated as a non‐attended service, based on quantification servers accessible via Internet round the clock. The VRCC will supply appropriate standardization and normalization materials and run a GroupWare platform for consensus making by experts. PMID:11339562

  16. A telepathology based Virtual Reference and Certification Centre for DNA image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Haroske, G; Giroud, F; Kunze, K D; Meyer, W

    2000-01-01

    An increasing need for flexible consultation between pathologists, including the application of fast evolving supplementary technologies, has been identified during the last years. Although pathology is already one of the most advanced application of telemedicine there is more to come from the fast evolution towards computerized microscope image analysis: A reproducible quantification of measurable descriptors of the lesions in cells and tissues (so-called biological markers) is an indispensable adjunct to routine diagnostic application. Among such quantitative methods DNA image cytometry is increasingly applied by pathologists for assistance in diagnostics. As for other pathological issues, too, a reference center for the clinical application of DNA image cytometry might be therefore of utmost value for pathologists using that method. Based on advanced telematic technologies, a Virtual Reference and Certification Center (VRCC) could be installed for certifying the cytometry hardware and software, the analytical procedures, and the basic interpretation of the results. It will be designed to be operated as a non-attended service, based on quantification servers accessible via Internet round the clock. The VRCC will supply appropriate standardization and normalization materials and run a GroupWare platform for consensus making by experts. PMID:11339562

  17. A Novel Method for Assessment of Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity Using Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Somanchi, Srinivas S.; McCulley, Kelsey J.; Somanchi, Anitha; Chan, Leo L.; Lee, Dean A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate arm of the immune system and though activated NK cells can modulate immune responses through the secretion of cytokines, their primary effector function is through target cell lysis. Accordingly, cytotoxicity assays are central to studying NK cell function. The 51Chromium release assay, is the “gold standard” for cytotoxicity assay, however, due to concerns over toxicity associated with the use and disposal of radioactive compounds there is a significant interest in non-radioactive methods. We have previously used the calcein release assay as a non-radioactive alternative for studying NK cell cytotoxicity. In this study, we show that the calcein release assay varies in its dynamic range for different tumor targets, and that the entrapped calcein could remain unreleased within apoptotic bodies of lysed tumor targets or incompletely released resulting in underestimation of percent specific lysis. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel cytotoxicity assay using the Cellometer Vision Image Cytometer and compared this method to standard calcein release assay for measuring NK cell cytotoxicity. Using tumor lines K562, 721.221, and Jurkat, we demonstrate here that image cytometry shows significantly higher percent specific lysis of the target cells compared to the standard calcein release assay within the same experimental setup. Image cytometry is able to accurately analyze live target cells by excluding dimmer cells and smaller apoptotic bodies from viable target cell counts. The image cytometry-based cytotoxicity assay is a simple, direct and sensitive method and is an appealing option for routine cytotoxicity assay. PMID:26492577

  18. Triggering of leukocytes by phase contrast in imaging cytometry with scanning fluorescence microscope (SFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, József; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Marecka, Monika; Malkusch, Wolf; Tárnok, Attila

    2009-02-01

    Slide-based cytometry (SBC) leads to breakthrough in cytometry of cells in tissues, culture and suspension. Carl Zeiss Imaging Solutions' new automated SFM combines imaging with cytometry. A critical step in image analysis is selection of appropriate triggering signal to detect all objects. Without correct target cell definition analysis is hampered. DNA-staining is among the most common triggering signals. However, the majority of DNA-dyes yield massive spillover into other fluorescence channels limiting their application. By microscopy objects of >5μm diameter can be easily detected by phase-contrast signal (PCS) without any staining. Aim was to establish PCS - triggering for cell identification. Axio Imager.Z1 motorized SFM was used (high-resolution digital camera, AxioCam MRm; AxioVision software: automatic multi-channel scanning, analysis). Leukocytes were stained with FITC (CD4, CD8) and APC (CD3) labelled antibodies in combinations using whole blood method. Samples were scanned in three channels (PCS/FITC/APC). Exposition-times for PCS were set as low as possible; the detection efficiency was verified by fluorescence. CD45-stained leukocytes were counted and compared to the number of PCS detected events. Leukocyte subtyping was compared with other cytometers. In focus the PCS of cells showed ring-form that was not optimal for cell definition. Out of focus PCS allows more effective qualitative and quantitative cell analyses. PCS was an accurate triggering signal for leukocytes enabling cell counting and discrimination of leukocytes from platelets. Leukocyte subpopulation frequencies were comparable to those obtained by other cytometers. In conclusion PCS is a suitable trigger-signal not interfering with fluorescence detection.

  19. Quantitative morphometric measurements using site selective image cytometry of intact tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Nam, Yoon Sung; Wiktor-Brown, Dominika M.; Engelward, Bevin P.; So, Peter T.C.

    2008-01-01

    Site selective two-photon tissue image cytometry has previously been successfully applied to measure the number of rare cells in three-dimensional tissue specimens up to cubic millimetres in size. However, the extension of this approach for high-throughput quantification of cellular morphological states has not been demonstrated. In this paper, we report the use of site-selective tissue image cytometry for the study of homologous recombination (HR) events during cell division in the pancreas of transgenic mice. Since HRs are rare events, recombinant cells distribute sparsely inside the organ. A detailed measurement throughout the whole tissue is thus not practical. Instead, the site selective two-photon tissue cytometer incorporates a low magnification, wide field, one-photon imaging subsystem that rapidly identifies regions of interest containing recombinant cell clusters. Subsequently, high-resolution three-dimensional assays based on two-photon microscopy can be performed only in these regions of interest. We further show that three-dimensional morphology extraction algorithms can be used to analyse the resultant high-resolution two-photon image stacks providing information not only on the frequency and the distribution of these recombinant cell clusters and their constituent cells, but also on their morphology. PMID:19049958

  20. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Powless, Amy J.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-09-01

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min-1 with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels-1.

  1. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Joshua A; Majid, Aneeka A; Powless, Amy J; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2015-09-01

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min(-1) with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels(-1). PMID:26429450

  2. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Powless, Amy J.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-09-15

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min{sup −1} with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels{sup −1}.

  3. High-throughput detection of DNA double-strand breaks using image cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Tyler L.; Bailey, Alison M.; Bednarz, Bryan P.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of γH2AX expression for studying DNA double-strand break formation is often performed by manual counting of foci using immunofluorescence microscopy, an approach that is laborious and subject to significant foci selection bias. Here we present a novel high-throughput method for detecting DNA double-strand breaks using automated image cytometry assessment of cell average γH2AX immunofluorescence. Our technique provides an expedient, high-throughput, objective, and cost-effective method for γH2AX analysis. PMID:25605579

  4. High-throughput detection of DNA double-strand breaks using image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Tyler L; Bailey, Alison M; Bednarz, Bryan P; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of γH2AX expression for studying DNA double-strand break formation is often performed by manual counting of foci using immunofluorescence microscopy, an approach that is laborious and subject to significant foci selection bias. Here we present a novel high-throughput method for detecting DNA double-strand breaks using automated image cytometry assessment of cell average γH2AX immunofluorescence. Our technique provides an expedient, high-throughput, objective, and cost-effective method for γH2AX analysis. PMID:25605579

  5. Application of image cytometry to characterize heterologous lipid flippases in yeast.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maria S; Costa, Sara R; Theorin, Lisa; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Pomorski, Thomas Günther; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-07-01

    Lipid flippases are integral membrane proteins that play a central role in moving lipids across cellular membranes. Some of these transporters are ATPases that couple lipid translocation to ATP hydrolysis, whereas others function without any discernible metabolic energy input. A growing number of lipid flippases has been identified but key features of their activity remain to be elucidated. A well-established method to characterize ATP-driven flippases is based on their heterologous expression in yeast, followed by incubation of the cells with fluorescent lipids. Internalization of these probes is typically monitored by flow cytometry, a costly and maintenance-intensive method. Here, we have optimized a protocol to use an automated image-based cell counter to accurately measure lipid uptake by heterologous lipid flippases expressed in yeast. The method was validated by comparison with the classical flow cytometric evaluation of lipid-labeled cells. In addition, we demonstrated that expression of fluorescently tagged flippase complexes can be directly co-related with fluorescent lipid uptake using the image-based cell counter system. The method extends the number of techniques available for characterization of lipid flippase activity, and should be readily adaptable to analyze a variety of other transport systems in yeast, parasites, and mammalian cells. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27272389

  6. FlowCam: Quantification and Classification of Phytoplankton by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Nicole J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to enumerate, classify, and determine biomass of phytoplankton from environmental samples is essential for determining ecosystem function and their role in the aquatic community and microbial food web. Traditional micro-phytoplankton quantification methods using microscopic techniques require preservation and are slow, tedious and very laborious. The availability of more automated imaging microscopy platforms has revolutionized the way particles and cells are detected within their natural environment. The ability to examine cells unaltered and without preservation is key to providing more accurate cell concentration estimates and overall phytoplankton biomass. The FlowCam(®) is an imaging cytometry tool that was originally developed for use in aquatic sciences and provides a more rapid and unbiased method for enumerating and classifying phytoplankton within diverse aquatic environments. PMID:27460250

  7. Analysis of Individual Molecular Events of DNA Damage Response by Flow and Image Assisted Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Traganos, Frank; Zhao, Hong; Halicka, H. Dorota; Skommer, Joanna; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes molecular mechanisms of DNA damage response (DDR) and presents flow- and image-assisted cytometric approaches to assess these mechanisms and measure the extent of DDR in individual cells. DNA damage was induced by cell treatment with oxidizing agents, UV light, DNA topoisomerase I or II inhibitors, cisplatin, tobacco smoke, and by exogenous and endogenous oxidants. Chromatin relaxation (decondensation) is an early event of DDR chromatin that involves modification of high mobility group proteins (HMGs) and histone H1 and was detected by cytometry by analysis of the susceptibility of DNA in situ to denaturation using the metachromatic fluorochrome acridine orange. Translocation of the MRN complex consisting of Meiotic Recombination 11 Homolog A (Mre11), Rad50 homolog and Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome 1 (NMR1) into DNA damage sites was assessed by laser scanning cytometry as the increase in the intensity of maximal pixel as well as integral value of Mre11 immunofluorescence. Examples of cytometric detection of activation of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), and Check 2 (Chk2) protein kinases using phospho-specific Abs targeting Ser1981 and Thr68 of these proteins, respectively are also presented. We also discuss approaches to correlate activation of ATM and Chk2 with phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15 and histone H2AX on Ser139 as well as with cell cycle position and DNA replication. The capability of laser scanning cytometry to quantify individual foci of phosphorylated H2AX and/or ATM that provides more dependable assessment of the presence of DNA double-strand breaks is outlined. The new microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip platforms for interrogation of individual cells offer a novel approach for DDR cytometric analysis. PMID:21722802

  8. High resolution light-sheet based high-throughput imaging cytometry system enables visualization of intra-cellular organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Raju; Mohan, Kavya; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-09-01

    Visualization of intracellular organelles is achieved using a newly developed high throughput imaging cytometry system. This system interrogates the microfluidic channel using a sheet of light rather than the existing point-based scanning techniques. The advantages of the developed system are many, including, single-shot scanning of specimens flowing through the microfluidic channel at flow rate ranging from micro- to nano- lit./min. Moreover, this opens-up in-vivo imaging of sub-cellular structures and simultaneous cell counting in an imaging cytometry system. We recorded a maximum count of 2400 cells/min at a flow-rate of 700 nl/min, and simultaneous visualization of fluorescently-labeled mitochondrial network in HeLa cells during flow. The developed imaging cytometry system may find immediate application in biotechnology, fluorescence microscopy and nano-medicine.

  9. High-throughput label-free image cytometry and image-based classification of live Euglena gracilis

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Cheng; Ito, Takuro; Ugawa, Masashi; Nozawa, Taisuke; Iwata, Osamu; Maki, Masanori; Okada, Genki; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Sun, Xinlei; Tiamsak, Pimsiri; Tsumura, Norimichi; Suzuki, Kengo; Di Carlo, Dino; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate high-throughput label-free single-cell image cytometry and image-based classification of Euglena gracilis (a microalgal species) under different culture conditions. We perform it with our high-throughput optofluidic image cytometer composed of a time-stretch microscope with 780-nm resolution and 75-Hz line rate, and an inertial-focusing microfluidic device. By analyzing a large number of single-cell images from the image cytometer, we identify differences in morphological and intracellular phenotypes between E. gracilis cell groups and statistically classify them under various culture conditions including nitrogen deficiency for lipid induction. Our method holds promise for real-time evaluation of culture techniques for E. gracilis and possibly other microalgae in a non-invasive manner. PMID:27446699

  10. High-throughput label-free image cytometry and image-based classification of live Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Lei, Cheng; Ito, Takuro; Ugawa, Masashi; Nozawa, Taisuke; Iwata, Osamu; Maki, Masanori; Okada, Genki; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Sun, Xinlei; Tiamsak, Pimsiri; Tsumura, Norimichi; Suzuki, Kengo; Di Carlo, Dino; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate high-throughput label-free single-cell image cytometry and image-based classification of Euglena gracilis (a microalgal species) under different culture conditions. We perform it with our high-throughput optofluidic image cytometer composed of a time-stretch microscope with 780-nm resolution and 75-Hz line rate, and an inertial-focusing microfluidic device. By analyzing a large number of single-cell images from the image cytometer, we identify differences in morphological and intracellular phenotypes between E. gracilis cell groups and statistically classify them under various culture conditions including nitrogen deficiency for lipid induction. Our method holds promise for real-time evaluation of culture techniques for E. gracilis and possibly other microalgae in a non-invasive manner. PMID:27446699

  11. Quantification of heterotypic granule fusion in human neutrophils by imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Björnsdottir, Halla; Welin, Amanda; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophils are filled with intracellular storage organelles, called granules and secretory vesicles, which differ in their content of soluble matrix proteins and membrane-bound molecules. To date, at least four distinct granule/vesicle subsets have been identified. These organelles may secrete their content extracellularly following mobilization to and fusion with the plasma membrane, but some of them may also fuse with internal membrane-enclosed organelles, typically a plasma membrane-derived phagosome. There are also instances where different granules appear to fuse with one another, a process that would enable mixing of their matrix and membrane components. Such granule fusion enables e.g., myeloperoxidase-processing of intragranular oxygen radicals, a key event in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (Björnsdottir et al., 2015) [1]. Described herein are data that show the quantification of such heterotypic granule–granule fusion by the use of imaging flow cytometry, a technique that combines flow cytometry with microscopy. The analysis described is based on immunofluorescent staining of established granule markers (lactoferrin and/or NGAL for one granule subset; the specific granules, and CD63 for another granule subset, the azurophil granules) and calculation of a colocalization score for resting and PMA-stimulated neutrophils. PMID:26862586

  12. The Analysis of Cell Cycle, Proliferation, and Asymmetric Cell Division by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Filby, Andrew; Day, William; Purewal, Sukhveer; Martinez-Martin, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Measuring cellular DNA content by conventional flow cytometry (CFC) and fluorescent DNA-binding dyes is a highly robust method for analysing cell cycle distributions within heterogeneous populations. However, any conclusions drawn from single-parameter DNA analysis alone can often be confounded by the asynchronous nature of cell proliferation. We have shown that by combining fluorescent DNA stains with proliferation tracking dyes and antigenic staining for mitotic cells one can elucidate the division history and cell cycle position of any cell within an asynchronously dividing population. Furthermore if one applies this panel to an imaging flow cytometry (IFC) system then the spatial information allows resolution of the four main mitotic phases and the ability to study molecular distributions within these populations. We have employed such an approach to study the prevalence of asymmetric cell division (ACD) within activated immune cells by measuring the distribution of key fate determining molecules across the plane of cytokinesis in a high-throughput, objective, and internally controlled manner. Moreover the ability to perform high-resolution, temporal dissection of the cell division process lends itself perfectly to investigating the influence chemotherapeutic agents exert on the proliferative capacity of transformed cell lines. Here we describe the method in detail and its application to both ACD and general cell cycle analysis. PMID:27460238

  13. Using multispectral imaging flow cytometry to assess an in vitro intracellular Burkholderia thailandensis infection model.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Dominic; Ducker, Catherine; Clark, Graeme; Prior, Jo; Rowland, Caroline A

    2016-04-01

    The use of in vitro models to understand the interaction of bacteria with host cells is well established. In vitro bacterial infection models are often used to quantify intracellular bacterial load by lysing cell populations and subsequently enumerating the bacteria. Modern established techniques employ the use of fluorescence technologies such as flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy, and/or confocal microscopy. However, these techniques often lack either the quantification of large data sets (microscopy) or use of gross fluorescence signal which lacks the visual confirmation that can provide additional confidence in data sets. Multispectral imaging flow cytometry (MIFC) is a novel emerging field of technology. This technology captures a bright field and fluorescence image of cells in a flow using a charged coupled device camera. It allows the analysis of tens of thousands of single cell images, making it an extremely powerful technology. Here MIFC was used as an alternative method of analyzing intracellular bacterial infection using Burkholderia thailandensis E555 as a model organism. It has been demonstrated that the data produced using traditional enumeration is comparable to data analyzed using MIFC. It has also been shown that by using MIFC it is possible to generate other data on the dynamics of the infection model rather than viable counts alone. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to inhibit the uptake of bacteria into mammalian cells and identify differences between treated and untreated cell populations. The authors believe this to be the first use of MIFC to analyze a Burkholderia bacterial species during intracellular infection. © 2016 Crown copyright. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of ISAC. PMID:26841315

  14. Quantitating MHC class II trafficking in primary dendritic cells using imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Hennies, Cassandra M.; Lehn, Maria A.; Janssen, Edith M.

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptides in MHC class II (MHCII) on dendritic cells (DCs) is the first step in the activation of antigen-specific CD4+T cells. The expression of surface MHCII-peptide complexes is tightly regulated as the frequency of MHCII-peptide complexes can affect the magnitude, as well as the phenotype of the ensuing CD4+T cell response. The surface MHCII-peptide levels are determined by the balance between expression of newly generated complexes, complex internalization, and their subsequent re-emergence or degradation. However, the molecular mechanisms that underpin these processes are still poorly understood. Here we describe a multispectral imaging flow cytometry assay to visualize MHCII trafficking that can be used as a tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms that regulate MHCII homeostasis in primary mouse and human DCs. PMID:25967952

  15. Photothermal Multispectral Image Cytometry for Quantitative Histology of Nanoparticles and Micrometastasis in Intact, Stained and Laser Burned Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Shashkov, Evgeny V.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Hennings, Leah; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    There is a rapidly growing interest in the advanced analysis of histological data and the development of appropriate detection technologies, including mapping of nanoparticle distributions in tissue in nanomedicine applications. We evaluated photothermal (PT) scanning cytometry for color-coded imaging, spectral identification, and quantitative detection of individual nanoparticles and abnormal cells in histological samples with and without staining. Using this tool, individual carbon nanotubes, gold nanorods, and melanoma cells with intrinsic melanin markers were identified in unstained (e.g. sentinel lymph nodes) and conventionally-stained tissues. In addition, we introduced a spectral burning technique for histology through selective laser bleaching areas with nondesired absorption background and nanobubble-based PT signal amplification. The obtained data demonstrated the promise of PT cytometry in the analysis of low-absorption samples and mapping of various individual nanoparticles' distribution that would be impossible with existing assays. Comparison of PT cytometry and photoacoustic (PA) cytometry previously, developed by us, revealed that these methods supplement each other with a sensitivity advantage (up to 10-fold) of contactless PT technique in assessment of thin (≤100 μm) histological samples, while PA imaging provides characterization of thicker samples which, however, requires an acoustic contact with transducers. A potential of high-speed integrated PT–PA cytometry for rapid examination of both intact and stained heterogeneous tissues with high sensitivity at the zepromolar concentration level is further highlighted. PMID:20949577

  16. Optofluidic time-stretch imaging - an emerging tool for high-throughput imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lau, Andy K S; Shum, Ho Cheung; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2016-05-10

    Optical imaging is arguably the most effective tool to visualize living cells with high spatiotemporal resolution and in a nearly noninvasive manner. Driven by this capability, state-of-the-art cellular assay techniques have increasingly been adopting optical imaging for classifying different cell types/stages, and thus dissecting the respective cellular functions. However, it is still a daunting task to image and characterize cell-to-cell variability within an enormous and heterogeneous population - an unmet need in single-cell analysis, which is now widely advocated in modern biology and clinical diagnostics. The challenge stems from the fact that current optical imaging technologies still lack the practical speed and sensitivity for measuring thousands to millions of cells down to the single-cell precision. Adopting the wisdom in high-speed fiber-optics communication, optical time-stretch imaging has emerged as a completely new optical imaging concept which is now proven for ultrahigh-throughput optofluidic single-cell imaging, at least 1-2 orders-of-magnitude higher (up to ∼100 000 cells per second) compared to the existing imaging flow cytometers. It also uniquely enables quantification of intrinsic biophysical markers of individual cells - a largely unexploited class of single-cell signatures that is known to be correlated with the overwhelmingly investigated biochemical markers. With the aim of reaching a wider spectrum of experts specializing in cellular assay developments and applications, this paper highlights the essential basics of optical time-stretch imaging, followed by reviewing the recent developments and applications of optofluidic time-stretch imaging. We will also discuss the current challenges of this technology, in terms of providing new insights in basic biology and enriching the clinical diagnostic toolsets. PMID:27099993

  17. Population-based study of DNA image cytometry as screening method for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin; Wei, Wen-Qiang; Zhao, De-Li; Hao, Chang-Qing; Lin, Dong-Mei; Pan, Qin-Jing; Li, Xin-Qing; Lei, Fu-Hua; Wang, Jin-Wu; Wang, Guo-Qing; Shang, Qi; Qiao, You-Lin

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore the DNA image cytometry (DNA-ICM) technique as a primary screening method for esophageal squamous precancerous lesions. METHODS: This study was designed as a population-based screening study. A total of 582 local residents aged 40 years-69 years were recruited from Linzhou in Henan and Feicheng in Shandong. However, only 452 subjects had results of liquid-based cytology, DNA-ICM and pathology. The sensitivity and specificity of DNA-ICM were calculated and compared with liquid-based cytology in moderate dysplasia or worse. RESULTS: Sensitivities of DNA-ICM ranging from at least 1 to 4 aneuploid cells were 90.91%, 86.36%, 79.55% and 77.27%, respectively, which were better than that of liquid-based cytology (75%). Specificities of DNA-ICM were 70.83%, 84.07%, 92.65% and 96.81%, but the specificity of liquid-based cytology was 91.91%. The sensitivity and specificity of a combination of liquid-based cytology and DNA-ICM were 84.09% and 85.78%, respectively. CONCLUSION: It is possible to use DNA-ICM technique as a primary screening method for esophageal squamous precancerous lesions. PMID:22294844

  18. Automated enumeration and viability measurement of canine stromal vascular fraction cells using fluorescence-based image cytometry method.

    PubMed

    Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Cohen, Donald A; Kuksin, Dmitry; Paradis, Benjamin D; Qiu, Jean

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, the lipoaspirate collected from adipose tissue has been seen as a valuable source of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for autologous cellular therapy. For multiple applications, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells are isolated from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. Because the fresh stromal vascular fraction typically contains a heterogeneous mixture of cells, determining cell concentration and viability is a crucial step in preparing fraction samples for downstream processing. Due to a large amount of cellular debris contained in the SVF sample, as well as counting irregularities standard manual counting can lead to inconsistent results. Advancements in imaging and optics technologies have significantly improved the image-based cytometric analysis method. In this work, we validated the use of fluorescence-based image cytometry for SVF concentration and viability measurement, by comparing to standard flow cytometry and manual hemocytometer. The concentration and viability of freshly collected canine SVF samples are analyzed, and the results highly correlated between all three methods, which validated the image cytometry method for canine SVF analysis, and potentially for SVF from other species. PMID:24740550

  19. Measurement of Low-Abundance Intracellular mRNA Using Amplified FISH Staining and Image-Based Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Henning, Andrea L; Sampson, Jill N Best; McFarlin, Brian Keith

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in instrument design and reagent development have enabled the rapid progression in available measurement techniques in the field of flow cytometry. In particular, image-based flow cytometry extends the analysis capacity found in traditional flow cytometry. Until recently, it was not possible to measure intracellular mRNA in specific phenotypes of cells by flow cytometry. In this protocol, a method of completing simultaneous intracellular measurement of mRNA and protein for PPAR-gamma in peripheral blood monocytes, which have been exposed in vitro to modified LDL, is described. The process of PPAR-gamma activation following uptake of modified LDL is believed to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. PPAR-gamma mRNA measurement was made possible using an amplified FISH technique (PrimeFlow RNA Assay) that allowed for detection of low-abundant intracellular mRNA expression. This protocol represents a continued effort by the authors' laboratory to establish and validate new techniques to assess the role of the immune system in chronic disease. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27037579

  20. Rapid Patterning of 1-D Collagenous Topography as an ECM Protein Fibril Platform for Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Niannan; Li, Xia; Bertulli, Cristina; Li, Zhaoying; Patharagulpong, Atipat; Sadok, Amine; Huang, Yan Yan Shery

    2014-01-01

    Cellular behavior is strongly influenced by the architecture and pattern of its interfacing extracellular matrix (ECM). For an artificial culture system which could eventually benefit the translation of scientific findings into therapeutic development, the system should capture the key characteristics of a physiological microenvironment. At the same time, it should also enable standardized, high throughput data acquisition. Since an ECM is composed of different fibrous proteins, studying cellular interaction with individual fibrils will be of physiological relevance. In this study, we employ near-field electrospinning to create ordered patterns of collagenous fibrils of gelatin, based on an acetic acid and ethyl acetate aqueous co-solvent system. Tunable conformations of micro-fibrils were directly deposited onto soft polymeric substrates in a single step. We observe that global topographical features of straight lines, beads-on-strings, and curls are dictated by solution conductivity; whereas the finer details such as the fiber cross-sectional profile are tuned by solution viscosity. Using these fibril constructs as cellular assays, we study EA.hy926 endothelial cells' response to ROCK inhibition, because of ROCK's key role in the regulation of cell shape. The fibril array was shown to modulate the cellular morphology towards a pre-capillary cord-like phenotype, which was otherwise not observed on a flat 2-D substrate. Further facilitated by quantitative analysis of morphological parameters, the fibril platform also provides better dissection in the cells' response to a H1152 ROCK inhibitor. In conclusion, the near-field electrospun fibril constructs provide a more physiologically-relevant platform compared to a featureless 2-D surface, and simultaneously permit statistical single-cell image cytometry using conventional microscopy systems. The patterning approach described here is also expected to form the basics for depositing other protein fibrils, seen among

  1. Hyperspectral cytometry.

    PubMed

    Grégori, Gérald; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Jones, James; Furuki, Motohiro; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Paul Robinson, J

    2014-01-01

    Hyperspectral cytometry is an emerging technology for single-cell analysis that combines ultrafast optical spectroscopy and flow cytometry. Spectral cytometry systems utilize diffraction gratings or prism-based monochromators to disperse fluorescence signals from multiple labels (organic dyes, nanoparticles, or fluorescent proteins) present in each analyzed bioparticle onto linear detector arrays such as multianode photomultipliers or charge-coupled device sensors. The resultant data, consisting of a series of characterizing every analyzed cell, are not compensated by employing the traditional cytometry approach, but rather are spectrally unmixed utilizing algorithms such as constrained Poisson regression or non-negative matrix factorization. Although implementations of spectral cytometry were envisioned as early as the 1980s, only recently has the development of highly sensitive photomultiplier tube arrays led to design and construction of functional prototypes and subsequently to introduction of commercially available systems. This chapter summarizes the historical efforts and work in the field of spectral cytometry performed at Purdue University Cytometry Laboratories and describes the technology developed by Sony Corporation that resulted in release of the first commercial spectral cytometry system-the Sony SP6800. A brief introduction to spectral data analysis is also provided, with emphasis on the differences between traditional polychromatic and spectral cytometry approaches. PMID:24271566

  2. High-throughput detection and quantification of mitochondrial fusion through imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Aldo; Lannigan, Joanne; Kashatus, David

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles whose fusion and fission play an increasingly important role in a number of both normal and pathological cellular functions. Despite the increased interest in mitochondrial dynamics, robust, and quantitative methods to analyze mitochondrial fusion and fission activity in intact cells have not been developed. The current state-of-the art method to measure mitochondrial fusion activity is the polyethylene glycol (PEG) fusion assay in which cells expressing distinct mitochondrially-targeted fluorescent proteins (FPs) are fused together and mitochondrial fusion activity is determined by the rate at which color mixing occurs. Although this assay is useful, cell-cell fusion events are rare, and finding the number of fused cells required to generate statistically rigorous data is both tedious and time-consuming. Furthermore, the data-collection methods available for fluorescence microscopy lead to inherent selection biases that are difficult to control for. To that end, we have developed an unbiased and high-throughput method to detect, image, and analyze fused cells using the Amnis ImagestreamX™ MKII. With IDEAS™ software, we developed algorithms for identifying the fused cells (two nuclei within a single cell), distinguishing them from cell aggregates. Additionally, using the fluorescence localization of the mitochondrially-targeted fluorescent proteins (YFP and DsRed), we applied a modified co-localization algorithm to identify those cells that had a high co-localization score indicating mitochondrial fusion activity. These algorithms were tested using negative controls (FPs associated with fusion deficient mitochondria) and positive controls (cells expressing both FPs in the same mitochondria). Once validated these algorithms could be applied to test samples to evaluate the degree of mitochondrial fusion in cells with various genetic mutations. Ultimately, this new method is the first robust, high-throughput way to

  3. QUANTITATIVE IMAGE CYTOMETRY OF HEPATOCYTES EXPRESSING GAMMA-GLUTAMYL TRANSPEPTIDASE AND GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE IN DIETHYLNITROSAMINE-INITIATED RATS TREATED WITH PHENOBARBITAL AND/OR PHTHALATE ESTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Image cytometry was used to quantify the volume of liver tissue expressing two widely accepted biochemical markers of neoplasia, gammaglutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and the placental isozyme of glutathione s-transferase (GST-P). ats were treated with hepatocarcinogen, diethylnitro...

  4. In vivo imaging flow cytometry based on laser scanning two-photon microscopy at kHz cross-sectional frame rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    In vivo flow cytometry has found numerous applications in biology and pharmacology. However, conventional cytometry does not provide the detailed morphological information that is needed to fully determine the phenotype of individual circulating cells. Imaging cytometry, capable of visualizing the morphology and dynamics of the circulating cells at high spatiotemporal resolution, is highly desired. Current wide-field based image cytometers are limited in the imaging depth and provide only two-dimensional resolution. For deep tissue imaging, laser scanning two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) is widely adopted. However, for applications in flow cytometry, the axial scanning speed of current TPMs is inadequate to provide high-speed cross-sectional imaging of vasculature. We have integrated an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens into a standard TPM and achieved microsecond-scale axial scanning. With a galvo scanner for transverse scanning, we achieved kHz cross-sectional frame rate. Here we report its applications for in vivo deformability cytometry and in vivo imaging flow cytometry, and demonstrate the capability of imaging dynamical morphologies of flowing cells, distinguishing cells and cellular clusters, and simultaneously quantifying different cell populations based on their fluorescent labels.

  5. Identification of a Murine Erythroblast Subpopulation Enriched in Enucleating Events by Multi-spectral Imaging Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, Diamantis G.; Pushkaran, Suvarnamala; Giger, Katie; Manganaris, Stefanos; Zheng, Yi; Kalfa, Theodosia A.

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoiesis in mammals concludes with the dramatic process of enucleation that results in reticulocyte formation. The mechanism of enucleation has not yet been fully elucidated. A common problem encountered when studying the localization of key proteins and structures within enucleating erythroblasts by microscopy is the difficulty to observe a sufficient number of cells undergoing enucleation. We have developed a novel analysis protocol using multiparameter high-speed cell imaging in flow (Multi-Spectral Imaging Flow Cytometry), a method that combines immunofluorescent microscopy with flow cytometry, in order to identify efficiently a significant number of enucleating events, that allows to obtain measurements and perform statistical analysis. We first describe here two in vitro erythropoiesis culture methods used in order to synchronize murine erythroblasts and increase the probability of capturing enucleation at the time of evaluation. Then, we describe in detail the staining of erythroblasts after fixation and permeabilization in order to study the localization of intracellular proteins or lipid rafts during enucleation by multi-spectral imaging flow cytometry. Along with size and DNA/Ter119 staining which are used to identify the orthochromatic erythroblasts, we utilize the parameters “aspect ratio” of a cell in the bright-field channel that aids in the recognition of elongated cells and “delta centroid XY Ter119/Draq5” that allows the identification of cellular events in which the center of Ter119 staining (nascent reticulocyte) is far apart from the center of Draq5 staining (nucleus undergoing extrusion), thus indicating a cell about to enucleate. The subset of the orthochromatic erythroblast population with high delta centroid and low aspect ratio is highly enriched in enucleating cells. PMID:24962543

  6. Cytometry standards continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Spidlen, Josef; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: The International Society for Analytical Cytology, ISAC, is developing a new combined flow and image Analytical Cytometry Standard (ACS). This standard needs to serve both the research and clinical communities. The clinical medicine and clinical research communities have a need to exchange information with hospital and other clinical information systems. Methods: 1) Prototype the standard by creating CytometryML and a RAW format for binary data. 2) Join the ISAC Data Standards Task Force. 3) Create essential project documentation. 4) Cooperate with other groups by assisting in the preparation of the DICOM Supplement 122: Specimen Module and Pathology Service-Object Pair Classes. Results: CytometryML has been created and serves as a prototype and source of experience for the following: the Analytical Cytometry Standard (ACS) 1.0, the ACS container, Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt), and Requirements for a Data File Standard Format to Describe Flow Cytometry and Related Analytical Cytology Data. These requirements provide a means to judge the appropriateness of design elements and to develop tests for the final ACS. The requirements include providing the information required for understanding and reproducing a cytometry experiment or clinical measurement, and for a single standard for both flow and digital microscopic cytometry. Schemas proposed by other members of the ISAC Data Standards Task Force (e.g, Gating-ML) have been independently validated and have been integrated with CytometryML. The use of netCDF as an element of the ACS container has been proposed by others and a suggested method of its use is proposed.

  7. Cytometry metadata in XML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: The International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) has created a standard for the Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt 1.0). CytometryML will serve as a common metadata standard for flow and image cytometry (digital microscopy). Methods: The MIFlowCyt data-types were created, as is the rest of CytometryML, in the XML Schema Definition Language (XSD1.1). The datatypes are primarily based on the Flow Cytometry and the Digital Imaging and Communication (DICOM) standards. A small section of the code was formatted with standard HTML formatting elements (p, h1, h2, etc.). Results:1) The part of MIFlowCyt that describes the Experimental Overview including the specimen and substantial parts of several other major elements has been implemented as CytometryML XML schemas (www.cytometryml.org). 2) The feasibility of using MIFlowCyt to provide the combination of an overview, table of contents, and/or an index of a scientific paper or a report has been demonstrated. Previously, a sample electronic publication, EPUB, was created that could contain both MIFlowCyt metadata as well as the binary data. Conclusions: The use of CytometryML technology together with XHTML5 and CSS permits the metadata to be directly formatted and together with the binary data to be stored in an EPUB container. This will facilitate: formatting, data- mining, presentation, data verification, and inclusion in structured research, clinical, and regulatory documents, as well as demonstrate a publication's adherence to the MIFlowCyt standard, promote interoperability and should also result in the textual and numeric data being published using web technology without any change in composition.

  8. Imaging flow cytometry for automated detection of hypoxia-induced erythrocyte shape change in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    van Beers, Eduard J; Samsel, Leigh; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Saiyed, Rehan; Fertrin, Kleber Y; Brantner, Christine A; Daniels, Mathew P; Nichols, James; McCoy, J Philip; Kato, Gregory J

    2014-06-01

    In preclinical and early phase pharmacologic trials in sickle cell disease, the percentage of sickled erythrocytes after deoxygenation, an ex vivo functional sickling assay, has been used as a measure of a patient's disease outcome. We developed a new sickle imaging flow cytometry assay (SIFCA) and investigated its application. To perform the SIFCA, peripheral blood was diluted, deoxygenated (2% oxygen) for 2 hr, fixed, and analyzed using imaging flow cytometry. We developed a software algorithm that correctly classified investigator tagged "sickled" and "normal" erythrocyte morphology with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.1%. The percentage of sickled cells as measured by SIFCA correlated strongly with the percentage of sickle cell anemia blood in experimentally admixed samples (R = 0.98, P ≤ 0.001), negatively with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (R = -0.558, P = 0.027), negatively with pH (R = -0.688, P = 0.026), negatively with pretreatment with the antisickling agent, Aes-103 (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural) (R = -0.766, P = 0.002), and positively with the presence of long intracellular fibers as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (R = 0.799, P = 0.002). This study shows proof of principle that the automated, operator-independent SIFCA is associated with predictable physiologic and clinical parameters and is altered by the putative antisickling agent, Aes-103. SIFCA is a new method that may be useful in sickle cell drug development. PMID:24585634

  9. A quantitative method for measurement of HL-60 cell apoptosis based on diffraction imaging flow cytometry technique

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Yahui; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative method for measurement of apoptosis in HL-60 cells based on polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry technique is presented in this paper. Through comparative study with existing methods and the analysis of diffraction images by a gray level co-occurrence matrix algorithm (GLCM), we found 4 GLCM parameters of contrast (CON), cluster shade (CLS), correlation (COR) and dissimilarity (DIS) exhibit high sensitivities as the apoptotic rates. It was further demonstrated that the CLS parameter correlates significantly (R2 = 0.899) with the degree of nuclear fragmentation and other three parameters showed a very good correlations (R2 ranges from 0.69 to 0.90). These results demonstrated that the new method has the capability for rapid and accurate extraction of morphological features to quantify cellular apoptosis without the need for cell staining. PMID:25071957

  10. Cytopathology of parasitic dermatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sood, N K; Mekkib, Berhanu; Singla, L D; Gupta, K

    2012-04-01

    Out of 44 cases of dermatitis in dogs, 11 cases of parasitic origin were analyzed by cytopathology. Histopathologic examination of punch biopsies was also done for correlation with cytologic findings. Sarcoptic dermatitis was recorded in six cases, wherein, besides sarcoptic mites, neutrophils, macrophages, and plasma cells and keratinizing epithelial cells were also seen. Hematology revealed a relative neutrophilia and mild eosinophilia. Four cases of severe and generalized demodicosis complicated with bacteria and/or Malassezia sp. infection were also recorded. Histopathologically numerous Demodex sp. mites in varying stage of maturation were found damaging the hair follicles along with associated pathological changes and foreign body granulomas in one case. In addition, flea allergy dermatitis was also observed in one dog. In nutshell, cytology was found to be unequivocally effective in diagnosing parasitic dermatitis. PMID:23543297

  11. Nanobarcoded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for nanomedicine: Quantitative studies of cell-nanoparticle interactions by scanning image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Eustaquio, Trisha; Leary, James F

    2016-02-01

    Oligonucleotide-functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) are promising agents for nanomedicine, but the potential in vitro nanotoxicity that may arise from such conjugates has yet to be evaluated in a dose response manner. Since nanomedicine functions on the single-cell level, measurements of nanotoxicity should also be performed as such. In vitro single-cell nanotoxicity assays based on scanning image cytometry are used to study a specific type of oligo-functionalized NP, "nanobarcoded" superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (NB-SPIONs). The selected panel of single-cell assays measures well-known modes of nanotoxicity-apoptosis, necrosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell number. Using these assays, the cytotoxicity of two sizes of NB-SPIONs (10 nm and 30 nm core size) was compared to the parent NP, carboxylated SPIONs (COOH-SPIONs). The results suggest that the conjugated NB confers a biocompatible coating that protects against cytotoxicity at very high SPION doses, but both NB- and COOH-SPIONs of either size generally have low in vitro cytotoxicity at physiologically relevant doses. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:26013098

  12. An Automated Cytopathology System in an Integrated Hospital Information System

    PubMed Central

    Shafarman, M.; Miller, T.; Simborg, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    At University of California, San Francisco, an automated cytopathology system has been developed to meet two main objectives: the information processing needs of the cytopathology department, and the integration of the cytopathology system into both the surgical pathology system, and the hospital information system. The cytopathology system has been in operation since March 1,1982. Benefits to the department include automatic SNOMED coding of diagnoses, online retrieval of diagnoses, automatic billing, faster turnaround between accession and signout, improved management, and reduced paperflow. Current interactions with the hospital information system include access to the centralized patient demographic file, access to medical data from other systems such as the clinical lab, medical records, radiology, and surgical pathology. Planned extensions include online signout of cases, and transmittal of cytology diagnoses to other clinical systems.

  13. MXS-Chaining: A Highly Efficient Cloning Platform for Imaging and Flow Cytometry Approaches in Mammalian Systems.

    PubMed

    Sladitschek, Hanna L; Neveu, Pierre A

    2015-01-01

    The continuous improvement of imaging technologies has driven the development of sophisticated reporters to monitor biological processes. Such constructs should ideally be assembled in a flexible enough way to allow for their optimization. Here we describe a highly reliable cloning method to efficiently assemble constructs for imaging or flow cytometry applications in mammalian cell culture systems. We bioinformatically identified a list of restriction enzymes whose sites are rarely found in human and mouse cDNA libraries. From the best candidates, we chose an enzyme combination (MluI, XhoI and SalI: MXS) that enables iterative chaining of individual building blocks. The ligation scar resulting from the compatible XhoI- and SalI-sticky ends can be translated and hence enables easy in-frame cloning of coding sequences. The robustness of the MXS-chaining approach was validated by assembling constructs up to 20 kb long and comprising up to 34 individual building blocks. By assessing the success rate of 400 ligation reactions, we determined cloning efficiency to be 90% on average. Large polycistronic constructs for single-cell imaging or flow cytometry applications were generated to demonstrate the versatility of the MXS-chaining approach. We devised several constructs that fluorescently label subcellular structures, an adapted version of FUCCI (fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) optimized to visualize cell cycle progression in mouse embryonic stem cells and an array of artificial promoters enabling dosage of doxycyline-inducible transgene expression. We made publicly available through the Addgene repository a comprehensive set of MXS-building blocks comprising custom vectors, a set of fluorescent proteins, constitutive promoters, polyadenylation signals, selection cassettes and tools for inducible gene expression. Finally, detailed guidelines describe how to chain together prebuilt MXS-building blocks and how to generate new customized MXS

  14. Imaging flow cytometry for automated detection of hypoxia-induced erythrocyte shape change in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    van Beers, Eduard J.; Samsel, Leigh; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Saiyed, Rehan; Fertrin, Kleber Y.; Brantner, Christine A.; Daniels, Mathew P.; Nichols, James; McCoy, J. Philip; Kato, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    In preclinical and early phase pharmacologic trials in sickle cell disease, the percentage of sickled erythrocytes after deoxygenation, an ex vivo functional sickling assay, has been used as a measure of a patient’s disease outcome. We developed a new sickle imaging flow cytometry assay (SIFCA) and investigated its application. To perform the SIFCA, peripheral blood was diluted, deoxygenated (2% oxygen) for 2 hr, fixed, and analyzed using imaging flow cytometry. We developed a software algorithm that correctly classified investigator tagged “sickled” and “normal” erythrocyte morphology with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.1%. The percentage of sickled cells as measured by SIFCA correlated strongly with the percentage of sickle cell anemia blood in experimentally admixed samples (R = 0.98, P ≤ 0.001), negatively with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (R = −0.558, P = 0.027), negatively with pH (R = −0.688, P = 0.026), negatively with pretreatment with the antisickling agent, Aes-103 (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural) (R = −0.766, P = 0.002), and positively with the presence of long intracellular fibers as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (R = 0.799, P = 0.002). This study shows proof of principle that the automated, operator-independent SIFCA is associated with predictable physiologic and clinical parameters and is altered by the putative antisickling agent, Aes-103. SIFCA is a new method that may be useful in sickle cell drug development. PMID:24585634

  15. Fluorophore-NanoLuc BRET Reporters Enable Sensitive In Vivo Optical Imaging and Flow Cytometry for Monitoring Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Franz X; Reza, Md Shamim; Flaveny, Colin A; Li, Weimin; Musicant, Adele M; Hoxha, Sany; Guo, Min; Cleveland, John L; Amelio, Antonio L

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent proteins are widely used to study molecular and cellular events, yet this traditionally relies on delivery of excitation light, which can trigger autofluorescence, photoxicity, and photobleaching, impairing their use in vivo. Accordingly, chemiluminescent light sources such as those generated by luciferases have emerged, as they do not require excitation light. However, current luciferase reporters lack the brightness needed to visualize events in deep tissues. We report the creation of chimeric eGFP-NanoLuc (GpNLuc) and LSSmOrange-NanoLuc (OgNLuc) fusion reporter proteins coined LumiFluors, which combine the benefits of eGFP or LSSmOrange fluorescent proteins with the bright, glow-type bioluminescent light generated by an enhanced small luciferase subunit (NanoLuc) of the deep-sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris. The intramolecular bioluminescence resonance energy transfer that occurs between NanoLuc and the fused fluorophore generates the brightest bioluminescent signal known to date, including improved intensity, sensitivity, and durable spectral properties, thereby dramatically reducing image acquisition times and permitting highly sensitive in vivo imaging. Notably, the self-illuminating and bifunctional nature of these LumiFluor reporters enables greatly improved spatiotemporal monitoring of very small numbers of tumor cells via in vivo optical imaging and also allows the isolation and analyses of single cells by flow cytometry. Thus, LumiFluor reporters are inexpensive, robust, noninvasive tools that allow for markedly improved in vivo optical imaging of tumorigenic processes. PMID:26424696

  16. Localization and relative quantification of carbon nanotubes in cells with multispectral imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Iris; Boggetto, Nicole; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Luciani, Nathalie; Wilhelm, Claire; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials, like carbon nanotubes (CNTs), belong to this type of nanoparticles which are very difficult to discriminate from carbon-rich cell structures and de facto there is still no quantitative method to assess their distribution at cell and tissue levels. What we propose here is an innovative method allowing the detection and quantification of CNTs in cells using a multispectral imaging flow cytometer (ImageStream, Amnis). This newly developed device integrates both a high-throughput of cells and high resolution imaging, providing thus images for each cell directly in flow and therefore statistically relevant image analysis. Each cell image is acquired on bright-field (BF), dark-field (DF), and fluorescent channels, giving access respectively to the level and the distribution of light absorption, light scattered and fluorescence for each cell. The analysis consists then in a pixel-by-pixel comparison of each image, of the 7,000-10,000 cells acquired for each condition of the experiment. Localization and quantification of CNTs is made possible thanks to some particular intrinsic properties of CNTs: strong light absorbance and scattering; indeed CNTs appear as strongly absorbed dark spots on BF and bright spots on DF with a precise colocalization. This methodology could have a considerable impact on studies about interactions between nanomaterials and cells given that this protocol is applicable for a large range of nanomaterials, insofar as they are capable of absorbing (and/or scattering) strongly enough the light. PMID:24378540

  17. Subnuclear foci quantification using high-throughput 3D image cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadduwage, Dushan N.; Parrish, Marcus; Choi, Heejin; Engelward, Bevin P.; Matsudaira, Paul; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-07-01

    Ionising radiation causes various types of DNA damages including double strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs are often recognized by DNA repair protein ATM which forms gamma-H2AX foci at the site of the DSBs that can be visualized using immunohistochemistry. However most of such experiments are of low throughput in terms of imaging and image analysis techniques. Most of the studies still use manual counting or classification. Hence they are limited to counting a low number of foci per cell (5 foci per nucleus) as the quantification process is extremely labour intensive. Therefore we have developed a high throughput instrumentation and computational pipeline specialized for gamma-H2AX foci quantification. A population of cells with highly clustered foci inside nuclei were imaged, in 3D with submicron resolution, using an in-house developed high throughput image cytometer. Imaging speeds as high as 800 cells/second in 3D were achieved by using HiLo wide-field depth resolved imaging and a remote z-scanning technique. Then the number of foci per cell nucleus were quantified using a 3D extended maxima transform based algorithm. Our results suggests that while most of the other 2D imaging and manual quantification studies can count only up to about 5 foci per nucleus our method is capable of counting more than 100. Moreover we show that 3D analysis is significantly superior compared to the 2D techniques.

  18. Quantitative image cytometry measurements of lipids, DNA, CD45 and cytokeratin for circulating tumor cell identification in a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futia, Gregory L.; Qamar, Lubna; Behbakht, Kian; Gibson, Emily A.

    2016-04-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) identification has applications in both early detection and monitoring of solid cancers. The rarity of CTCs, expected at ~1-50 CTCs per million nucleated blood cells (WBCs), requires identifying methods based on biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity for accurate identification. Discovery of biomarkers with ever higher sensitivity and specificity to CTCs is always desirable to potentially find more CTCs in cancer patients thus increasing their clinical utility. Here, we investigate quantitative image cytometry measurements of lipids with the biomarker panel of DNA, Cytokeratin (CK), and CD45 commonly used to identify CTCs. We engineered a device for labeling suspended cell samples with fluorescent antibodies and dyes. We used it to prepare samples for 4 channel confocal laser scanning microscopy. The total data acquired at high resolution from one sample is ~ 1.3 GB. We developed software to perform the automated segmentation of these images into regions of interest (ROIs) containing individual cells. We quantified image features of total signal, spatial second moment, spatial frequency second moment, and their product for each ROI. We performed measurements on pure WBCs, cancer cell line MCF7 and mixed samples. Multivariable regressions and feature selection were used to determine combination features that are more sensitive and specific than any individual feature separately. We also demonstrate that computation of spatial characteristics provides higher sensitivity and specificity than intensity alone. Statistical models allowed quantification of the required sensitivity and specificity for detecting small levels of CTCs in a human blood sample.

  19. Screening for Drugs Against the Plasmodium falciparum Digestive Vacuole by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yan Quan; Hall, Brian E; Tan, Kevin S W

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic assays are increasingly employed to provide clues about drug mechanisms. In antimalarial drug screening, however, the majority of assays are designed to only measure parasite-killing activity. We describe here a high-content assay to detect drug-mediated perturbation of the digestive vacuole integrity in the trophozoite stage of Plasmodium falciparum, using the ImageStream imaging flow cytometer. PMID:27460247

  20. Review of HIV-Related Cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Tee U.; Khalbuss, Walid E.; Monaco, Sara E.; Michelow, Pam; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    Exfoliative and aspiration cytologies play a major role in the management of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Common cytology samples include cervicovaginal and anal Papanicolaou tests, fine needle aspirations, respiratory specimens, body fluids, Tzanck preparations, and touch preparations from brain specimens. While the cytopathologists need to be aware of specific infections and neoplasms likely to be encountered in this setting, they should be aware of the current shift in the pattern of human immunodeficiency virus-related diseases, as human immunodeficiency virus patients are living longer with highly active antiretroviral therapy and suffering fewer opportunistic infections with better antimicrobial prophylaxis. There is a rise in nonhuman immunodeficiency virus-defining cancers (e.g., anal cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma) and entities (e.g., gynecomastia) from drug-related side effects. Given that fine needle aspiration is a valuable, noninvasive, and cost-effective tool, it is frequently employed in the evaluation and diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus-related diseases. Anal Papanicolaou tests are also increasing as a result of enhanced screening of human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients for cancer. This paper covers the broad spectrum of disease entities likely to be encountered with human immunodeficiency virus-related cytopathology. PMID:21559199

  1. Interfacing Lab-on-a-Chip Embryo Technology with High-Definition Imaging Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Hall, Christopher J; Crosier, Philip S; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-08-01

    To spearhead deployment of zebrafish embryo biotests in large-scale drug discovery studies, automated platforms are needed to integrate embryo in-test positioning and immobilization (suitable for high-content imaging) with fluidic modules for continuous drug and medium delivery under microperfusion to developing embryos. In this work, we present an innovative design of a high-throughput three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip-based device for automated immobilization and culture and time-lapse imaging of developing zebrafish embryos under continuous microperfusion. The 3D Lab-on-a-Chip array was fabricated in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining, while the off-chip interfaces were fabricated using additive manufacturing processes (fused deposition modelling and stereolithography). The system's design facilitated rapid loading and immobilization of a large number of embryos in predefined clusters of traps during continuous microperfusion of drugs/toxins. It was conceptually designed to seamlessly interface with both upright and inverted fluorescent imaging systems and also to directly interface with conventional microtiter plate readers that accept 96-well plates. Compared with the conventional Petri dish assays, the chip-based bioassay was much more convenient and efficient as only small amounts of drug solutions were required for the whole perfusion system running continuously over 72 h. Embryos were spatially separated in the traps that assisted tracing single embryos, preventing interembryo contamination and improving imaging accessibility. PMID:26132783

  2. A light sheet confocal microscope for image cytometry with a variable linear slit detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Khan, Foysal Z.; Powless, Amy J.; Benson, Devin; Hunter, Courtney; Fritsch, Ingrid; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    We present a light sheet confocal microscope (LSCM) capable of high-resolution imaging of cell suspensions in a microfluidic environment. In lieu of conventional pressure-driven flow or mechanical translation of the samples, we have employed a novel method of fluid transport, redox-magnetohydrodynamics (redox-MHD). This method achieves fluid motion by inducing a small current into the suspension in the presence of a magnetic field via electrodes patterned onto a silicon chip. This on-chip transportation requires no moving parts, and is coupled to the remainder of the imaging system. The microscopy system comprises a 450 nm diode 20 mW laser coupled to a single mode fiber and a cylindrical lens that converges the light sheet into the back aperture of a 10x, 0.3 NA objective lens in an epi-illumination configuration. The emission pathway contains a 150 mm tube lens that focuses the light onto the linear sensor at the conjugate image plane. The linear sensor (ELiiXA+ 8k/4k) has three lateral binning modes which enables variable detection aperture widths between 5, 10, or 20 μm, which can be used to vary axial resolution. We have demonstrated redox-MHD-enabled light sheet microscopy in suspension of fluorescent polystyrene beads. This approach has potential as a high-throughput image cytometer with myriad cellular diagnostic applications.

  3. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  4. MEMS-based flow cytometry: microfluidics-based cell identification system by fluorescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, W K; Liang, C K; Huang, J Z

    2004-01-01

    This study utilizes MEMS technology to realize a novel low-cost microfluidics-based biochip system for flow-type cell handling. Powered by vacuum pump, the microfluidic driving system enables cells to move in order one by one in the biochip by an effect of sheath flow prefocus. Then, cells are guided to a fluorescent inspection region where two detection tasks such as cell image identification and cell counting are conducted. Currently, the glass-based biochip has been manufactured and all the related devices have been well set up in our laboratory. With this proposed prototype system, typical results about cell separation of yeast cell and PC-3 cell are available and their separated images are also presented, respectively. PMID:17270801

  5. Flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.

    1984-09-01

    Flow cytometry instrumentation developed from early efforts to count cells and particles in liquid suspension as they passed through a sensing device. Since the mid-1960's sophisticated instruments have been designed for analyzing cells based on various cytological, biochemical, and functional properties. These instruments have revolutionized automated cell analysis methods in that measurements are made at high speed, multiparameter data is correlated on each cell, statistical precision is high, and cells are separated in high purity from heterogeneous mixtures for identification and functional analysis. Advanced instruments capable of measuring cell volume, surface area, multicolor fluorescence, fluorescence polarization, light scatter within various angular regions, and axial light loss (extinction) at different wavelengths are being used in biomedical research for analyzing and sorting normal and abnormal cell populations. This article reviews the development of flow cytometers, the conceptual basis of flow measurements, and discusses some of the numerous applications of the technology in biology and medicine.

  6. Characterization of extracellular vesicles in whole blood: Influence of pre-analytical parameters and visualization of vesicle-cell interactions using imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fendl, Birgit; Weiss, René; Fischer, Michael B; Spittler, Andreas; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles are central players in intercellular communication and are released from the plasma membrane under tightly regulated conditions, depending on the physiological and pathophysiological state of the producing cell. Their heterogeneity requires a spectrum of methods for isolation and characterization, where pre-analytical parameters have profound impact on vesicle analysis, particularly in blood, since sampling, addition of anticoagulants, as well as post-sampling vesicle generation may influence the outcome. Here, we characterized microvesicles directly in whole blood using a combination of flow cytometry and imaging flow cytometry. We assessed the influence of sample agitation, anticoagulation, and temperature on post-sampling vesicle generation, and show that vesicle counts remained stable over time in samples stored without agitation. Storage with gentle rolling mimicking agitation, in contrast, resulted in strong release of platelet-derived vesicles in blood anticoagulated with citrate or heparin, whereas vesicle counts remained stable upon anticoagulation with EDTA. Using imaging flow cytometry, we could visualize microvesicles adhering to blood cells and revealed an anticoagulant-dependent increase in vesicle-cell aggregates over time. We demonstrate that vesicles adhere preferentially to monocytes and granulocytes in whole blood, while no microvesicles could be visualized on lymphocytes. Our data underscore the relevance of pre-analytical parameters in vesicle analysis and demonstrate that imaging flow cytometry is a suitable tool to study the interaction of extracellular vesicles with their target cells. PMID:27444383

  7. Image-based Flow Cytometry Technique to Evaluate Changes in Granulocyte Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    McFarlin, Brian K.; Venable, Adam S.; Prado, Eric A.; Henning, Andrea L.; Williams, Randall R.

    2014-01-01

    Granulocytes play a key role in the body’s innate immune response to bacterial and viral infections. While methods exist to measure granulocyte function, in general these are limited in terms of the information they can provide. For example, most existing assays merely provide a percentage of how many granulocytes are activated following a single, fixed length incubation. Complicating matters, most assays focus on only one aspect of function due to limitations in detection technology. This report demonstrates a technique for simultaneous measurement of granulocyte phagocytosis of bacteria and oxidative burst. By measuring both of these functions at the same time, three unique phenotypes of activated granulocytes were identified: 1) Low Activation (minimal phagocytosis, no oxidative burst), 2) Moderate Activation (moderate phagocytosis, some oxidative burst, but no co-localization of the two functional events), and 3) High Activation (high phagocytosis, high oxidative burst, co-localization of phagocytosis and oxidative burst). A fourth population that consisted of inactivated granulocytes was also identified. Using assay incubations of 10, 20, and 40-min the effect of assay incubation duration on the redistribution of activated granulocyte phenotypes was assessed. A fourth incubation was completed on ice as a control. By using serial time incubations, the assay may be able to able to detect how a treatment spatially affects granulocyte function. All samples were measured using an image-based flow cytometer equipped with a quantitative imaging (QI) option, autosampler, and multiple lasers (488, 642, and 785 nm). PMID:25591001

  8. In situ label-free static cytometry by monitoring spatiotemporal fluctuations of image gray values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ishay; Zurgil, Naomi; Hakuk, Yaron; Sobolev, Maria; Galmidi, Moti; Deutsch, Mordechai

    2015-10-01

    Spatiotemporal fluctuation of homogeneity and randomness of gray values within an image was explored and utilized as a label-free means for cell examination. This was done by utilizing a user-friendly combination of simple bright field microscope and Cytocapture dish, wherein cells are individually held, each within a picoliter optical chamber, forming an array of cells to be repeatedly measured over time and biomanipulated in situ at single-cell resolution. First, the measured gray level information entropy (GLIE) was used and, based on the fact that living cells are not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium but rather in a metastable state, two fluctuation-sensitive measures were proposed and examined: ASDE-the spatial average of temporal standard deviation (SD) of GLIE, and AA-the average time autocorrelation of GLIE. System performance was validated on cell-free solutions. This was followed by examining the performance of the measures AGLIE, ASDE, and AA to distinguish among individual live-still, dead and live cells from various cell lines, as well as between cells which were and were not induced to differentiate. Results, which were obtained on four types of cells, indicate advantages of the proposed measures which are believed to be significant additions to the microscope-based probe-free toolbox.

  9. Using image-based flow cytometry to measure monocyte oxidized LDL phagocytosis: A potential risk factor for CVD?

    PubMed

    Henning, Andrea L; Venable, Adam S; Prado, Eric A; Best Sampson, Jill N; McFarlin, Brian K

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and cardiovascular disease is a worldwide health concern that has been a major focus in research for several decades. Among these diseases, atherosclerosis is one of the leading causes of death and disability nationwide. Circulating monocytes are believed to be primary cells responsible for foam cell formation. The present report describes a novel method for measuring monocyte oxLDL phagocytosis capacity using image-based flow cytometry. Human venous blood monocytes were incubated with different concentrations of oxLDL for different lengths of time to optimize the assay. High (post-meal) and low (pre-meal) responder samples were generated by feeding human subjects a high-fat (~85% of daily fat allowance), high-calorie (~65% of daily calorie needs) meal. This is a relevant model with respect to obesity and risk of developing atherogenesis. After the functional assay, classic (CD14+/CD16-) and pro-inflammatory (CD14+/CD16+) monocytes were assessed for oxLDL uptake, adhesion molecule expression (CD11b and CD18), and scavenger receptor expression (CD36) using an image-based flow cytometer (FlowSight). The present method represents a novel advance in methods available to detect the propensity of circulating monocytes to become intima foam cells. We found the assay to be most effective at separating high from low responder samples when using a fixed oxLDL concentration (120 μL/mL) and incubation length (1-h). In a clinical application, this method demonstrated that consuming a single high-fat meal causes an increase in the proportion of monocyte oxLDL phagocytosis and their adhesion capacity, suggesting a higher propensity to become foam cells. PMID:25858228

  10. Cytopathological Analysis of Cyst Fluid Enhances Diagnostic Accuracy of Mucinous Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Utomo, Wesley K.; Braat, Henri; Bruno, Marco J.; van Eijck, Casper H.J.; Koerkamp, Bas Groot; Krak, Nanda C.; van de Vreede, Adriaan; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Biermann, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Widespread use of cross-sectional imaging and increasing age of the general population has increased the number of detected pancreatic cystic lesions. However, several pathological entities with a variety in malignant potential have to be discriminated to allow clinical decision making. Discrimination between mucinous pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs) and nonmucinous pancreatic lesions is the primary step in the clinical work-up, as malignant transformation is mostly associated with mucinous PCN. We performed a retrospective analysis of all resected PCN in our tertiary center from 2000 to 2014, to evaluate preoperative diagnostic performance and the results of implementation of the consensus guidelines over time. This was followed by a prospective cohort study of patients with an undefined pancreatic cyst, where the added value of cytopathological mucin evaluation to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in cyst fluid for the discrimination of mucinous PCN and nonmucinous cysts was investigated. Retrospective analysis showed 115 patients operated for a PCN, with a correct preoperative classification in 96.2% of the patients. High-grade dysplasia or invasive carcinoma was observed in only 32.3% of mucinous PCN. In our prospective cohort (n = 71), 57.7% of patients were classified as having a mucinous PCN. CEA ≥192 ng/mL had an accuracy of 63.4%, and cytopathological mucin evaluation an accuracy of 73.0%. Combining these 2 tests further improved diagnostic accuracy of a mucinous PCN to 76.8%. CEA level and mucin evaluation were not predictive of the degree of dysplasia. These findings show that adding cytopathology to cyst fluid biochemistry improves discrimination between mucinous PCN and nonmucinous cysts.

  11. Microfluidic devices and methods for integrated flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-08-16

    Microfluidic devices and methods for flow cytometry are described. In described examples, various sample handling and preparation steps may be carried out within a same microfluidic device as flow cytometry steps. A combination of imaging and flow cytometry is described. In some examples, spiral microchannels serve as incubation chambers. Examples of automated sample handling and flow cytometry are described.

  12. Quantifying nuclear p65 as a parameter for NF-κB activation: Correlation between ImageStream cytometry, microscopy, and Western blot.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Orla; Collins, Christine; O'Loughlin, Kieran; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey; Minderman, Hans

    2011-06-01

    The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, which regulates many cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, and survival, has emerged as an important therapeutic target in cancer. Activation of the NF-κB transcription factor is associated with nuclear translocation of the p65 component of the complex. Conventional methods employed to determine nuclear translocation of NF-κB either lack statistical robustness (microscopy) or the ability to discern heterogeneity within the sampled populations (Western blotting and Gel Shift assays). The ImageStream platform combines the high image content information of microscopy with the high throughput and multiparameter analysis of flow cytometry which overcomes the aforementioned limitations of conventional assays. It is demonstrated that ImageStream assessment of receptor-mediated (TNFα) and drug (Daunorubicin, DNR)-induced NF-κB translocation in leukemic cell lines correlates well with microscopy analysis and Western blot analysis. It is further demonstrated that ImageStream cytometry enables quantitative assessment of p65 translocation in immunophenotypically defined subpopulations; and that this assessment is highly reproducible. It is also demonstrated that, quantitatively, the DNR-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB correlates well with a biological response (apoptosis). We conclude that the ImageStream has the potential to be a powerful tool to evaluate NF-κB /p65 activity as a determinant of response to therapies designed to target aberrant NF-κB signaling activities. PMID:21520400

  13. Morphological observation and analysis using automated image cytometry for the comparison of trypan blue and fluorescence-based viability detection method.

    PubMed

    Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Kuksin, Dmitry; Laverty, Daniel J; Saldi, Stephanie; Qiu, Jean

    2015-05-01

    The ability to accurately determine cell viability is essential to performing a well-controlled biological experiment. Typical experiments range from standard cell culturing to advanced cell-based assays that may require cell viability measurement for downstream experiments. The traditional cell viability measurement method has been the trypan blue (TB) exclusion assay. However, since the introduction of fluorescence-based dyes for cell viability measurement using flow or image-based cytometry systems, there have been numerous publications comparing the two detection methods. Although previous studies have shown discrepancies between TB exclusion and fluorescence-based viability measurements, image-based morphological analysis was not performed in order to examine the viability discrepancies. In this work, we compared TB exclusion and fluorescence-based viability detection methods using image cytometry to observe morphological changes due to the effect of TB on dead cells. Imaging results showed that as the viability of a naturally-dying Jurkat cell sample decreased below 70 %, many TB-stained cells began to exhibit non-uniform morphological characteristics. Dead cells with these characteristics may be difficult to count under light microscopy, thus generating an artificially higher viability measurement compared to fluorescence-based method. These morphological observations can potentially explain the differences in viability measurement between the two methods. PMID:24643390

  14. Archival Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytopathology (FNAC) Samples

    PubMed Central

    Killian, J. Keith; Walker, Robert L.; Suuriniemi, Miia; Jones, Laura; Scurci, Stephanie; Singh, Parvati; Cornelison, Robert; Harmon, Shannon; Boisvert, Nichole; Zhu, Jack; Wang, Yonghong; Bilke, Sven; Davis, Sean; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Smith, William I.; Meltzer, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    Microarray technologies provide high-resolution maps of chromosome imbalances and epigenomic aberrations in the cancer cell genome. Such assays are often sensitive to sample DNA integrity, voiding the utility of many archival pathology specimens and necessitating the special handling of prospective clinical specimens. We have identified the remarkable preservation of higher-molecular weight DNA in archival fine-needle aspiration cytopathology specimens from patients greater than 10 years of age. We further demonstrate the outstanding technical performance of 57 fine-needle aspiration cytopathology samples for aberration detection on high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization array, DNA methylation, and single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping platforms. Forty-four of 46 malignant aspirates in this study manifested unequivocal genomic aberrations. Importantly, matched Papanicolaou and Diff-Quik fine-needle aspiration cytopathology samples showed critical differences in DNA preservation and DNA integrity. Overall, this study identifies a largely untapped reserve of human pathology specimens for molecular profiling studies, with ramifications for the prospective collection of clinical biospecimens. PMID:20959611

  15. Diagnostic value of AgNOR method in thyroid cytopathology: correlation with morphometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Solymosi, T; Tóth, V; Sápi, Z; Bodó, M; Gál, I; Csanádi, L

    1996-03-01

    A silver staining technique was applied to 51 thyroid smears. The numbers of silver-stained nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were counted, and the mean AgNOR and nuclear area per cell were determined with an image analyzer. The mean AgNOR count per cell was significantly higher in malignant than in benign lesions, but there was a considerable overlap. The mean AgNOR area and the mean SD of the AgNOR area per cell were significantly higher in carcinomas than in benign lesions (P = 10-9 and P = 5 x 10-10, respectively) and there were only two and one benign cases, respectively, of overlap. A strong correlation was observed between the mean AgNOR area and the mean nuclear area (r = 0.88), the former being a better discriminator between benign and malignant lesions. The AgNOR technique may contribute to routine thyroid cytopathology. PMID:8964170

  16. Outcomes of cytopathology studies presented at national pathology meetings.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, M C; Wojcik, E M

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what factors influence the final publication status of cytopathology studies presented at national meetings. Abstracts involving cytopathology material were obtained from the following journals: Modern Pathology (volume 11, 1998), Acta Cytologica (volume 42, 1998), and the American Journal of Clinical Pathology (volumes 109 and 110, 1998). Using the National Library of Medicine Website, each abstract was searched by author and topic to determine if the study was published as a peer-reviewed article. The following parameters were evaluated: meeting where the abstract was presented, type of institution where the research was based, type of material used in the study, and application of ancillary techniques used in the study. The subsequent published articles were evaluated for journal and time to publication. Out of 257 studies presented in 1998, 85 (33%) were published in peer-reviewed journals by May 2000. The majority of papers were published in Diagnostic Cytopathology (n = 21), Acta Cytologica (n = 15), and Cancer (n = 18). The mean time for publication was 12.8 mo. The highest percentage of published studies was presented at the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP) meeting (50% of presented abstracts), followed by American Society of Cytopathology (ASC) (28%) and American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) (17%) meetings. Ancillary techniques were applied in 40 of 85 (47%) published studies, 27 of 85 (32%) articles focused on morphology, and 18 of 85 (21%) papers covered other topics (e.g., quality assurance (QA), cost, and role of cytology). In nonpublished studies (n = 172), special techniques were the main focus in 40%, morphology in 25%, and other topics in 35% of abstracts. The great majority (97%) of published studies were from academic institutions. Gynecological and nongynecological material were roughly equally covered in published and nonpublished studies. Only a relatively small

  17. Cytopathologic diagnosis of fine needle aspiration biopsies of thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Misiakos, Evangelos P; Margari, Niki; Meristoudis, Christos; Machairas, Nickolas; Schizas, Dimitrios; Petropoulos, Konstantinos; Spathis, Aris; Karakitsos, Petros; Machairas, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is an important diagnostic tool in patients with thyroid lesions. Several systems have been proposed for the cyropathologic diagnosis of the thyroid nodules. However cases with indeterminate cytological findings still remain a matter of debate. In this review we analyze all literature regarding Thyroid Cytopathology Reporting systems trying to identify the most suitable methodology to use in clinical practice for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid nodules. A review of the English literature was conducted, and data were analyzed and summarized and integrated from the authors’ perspective. The main purpose of thyroid FNA is to identify patients with higher risk for malignancy, and to prevent unnecessary surgeries for benign conditions. The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology is the most widely used system for the diagnosis of thyroid FNA specimens. This system also contains guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of indeterminate or suspicious for malignancy cases. In conclusion, patients who require repeated FNAs for indeterminate diagnoses will be resolved by repeat FNA in a percentage of 72%-80%. PMID:26881190

  18. Cytopathologic diagnosis of fine needle aspiration biopsies of thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Misiakos, Evangelos P; Margari, Niki; Meristoudis, Christos; Machairas, Nickolas; Schizas, Dimitrios; Petropoulos, Konstantinos; Spathis, Aris; Karakitsos, Petros; Machairas, Anastasios

    2016-02-16

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is an important diagnostic tool in patients with thyroid lesions. Several systems have been proposed for the cyropathologic diagnosis of the thyroid nodules. However cases with indeterminate cytological findings still remain a matter of debate. In this review we analyze all literature regarding Thyroid Cytopathology Reporting systems trying to identify the most suitable methodology to use in clinical practice for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid nodules. A review of the English literature was conducted, and data were analyzed and summarized and integrated from the authors' perspective. The main purpose of thyroid FNA is to identify patients with higher risk for malignancy, and to prevent unnecessary surgeries for benign conditions. The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology is the most widely used system for the diagnosis of thyroid FNA specimens. This system also contains guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of indeterminate or suspicious for malignancy cases. In conclusion, patients who require repeated FNAs for indeterminate diagnoses will be resolved by repeat FNA in a percentage of 72%-80%. PMID:26881190

  19. The use of the decision tree technique and image cytometry to characterize aggressiveness in World Health Organization (WHO) grade II superficial transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Decaestecker, C; van Velthoven, R; Petein, M; Janssen, T; Salmon, I; Pasteels, J L; van Ham, P; Schulman, C; Kiss, R

    1996-03-01

    The aggressiveness of human bladder tumours can be assessed by means of various classification systems, including the one proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO). According to the WHO classification, three levels of malignancy are identified as grades I (low), II (intermediate), and III (high). This classification system operates satisfactorily for two of the three grades in forecasting clinical progression, most grade I tumours being associated with good prognoses and most grade III with bad. In contrast, the grade II group is very heterogeneous in terms of their clinical behaviour. The present study used two computer-assisted methods to investigate whether it is possible to sub-classify grade II tumours: computer-assisted microscope analysis (image cytometry) of Feulgen-stained nuclei and the Decision Tree Technique. This latter technique belongs to the Supervised Learning Algorithm and enables an objective assessment to be made of the diagnostic value associated with a given parameter. The combined use of these two methods in a series of 292 superficial transitional cell carcinomas shows that it is possible to identify one subgroup of grade II tumours which behave clinically like grade I tumours and a second subgroup which behaves clinically like grade III tumours. Of the nine ploidy-related parameters computed by means of image cytometry [the DNA index (DI), DNA histogram type (DHT), and the percentages of diploid, hyperdiploid, triploid, hypertriploid, tetraploid, hypertetraploid, and polyploid cell nuclei], it was the percentage of hyperdiploid and hypertetraploid cell nuclei which enabled identification, rather than conventional parameters such as the DI or the DHT. PMID:8778332

  20. Application of low vacuum scanning electron microscopy for Papanicolaou-stained slides for cytopathology examinations.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tetsuya; Soejima, Yurie; Sawabe, Motoji

    2016-06-01

    Papanicolaou (Pap)-stained slides are usually observed using a transmitted light microscope for cytopathology. However, progress in pathological examinations has created a need for new diagnostic tools, because cytopathological preparations do not allow additional examinations without a loss of specimen, unlike histopathology. Low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) can reveal the surface topography at an ultrastructual resolution without metal coating. The aim of this study was to determine the conditions required for observing Pap-stained slides of oral smears using LVSEM without any loss of specimen and to reexamine the same slides again using light microscopy, while preserving the cytopathological information. PMID:26957591

  1. A shared standard for cytometry and pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.

    2013-02-01

    Introduction: The development of cytometry standards is complicated by their being relevant to pathology and biological science, which already have standards. CytometryML, the cytometry markup language, is an XML standard for flow and image cytometry, which includes both objects and their relationships, and is based upon existing standards: the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry ( ISAC) FCS, Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine ( DICOM), and International Digital Publishing Forum (EPUB). Methods: The CytometryML schemas are written in XML Schema Definition (XSD1.1). Object-oriented methodology was employed to create the CytometryML schemas, which were tested by translating specific XSD elements into XML and filling in the values. The attribute based syntax description of relationships in the Resource Description Framework (RDF) has been replaced by an XSD element based implementation. The ISAC Archival Cytometry Standard (ACS) concept of a zipped data container file was further refined to be a EPUB file. Since Table of Contents information is present in an EPUB container, it was minimized in the Relations schema, which replaced the ToC schema of the ACS and includes a modified and extended version of the ToC RDF capabilities. Results: An XML based system that includes the DICOM specified separation of series and instances and includes relationships has been created. Conclusions: CytometryML and EPUB could be used for the transmission of research and medical data and be extension some of the pathology part of DICOM. The CytometryML version of RDF in XSD could be extended to provide XSD with full RDF capabilities.

  2. CytometryML and other data formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.

    2006-02-01

    Cytology automation and research will be enhanced by the creation of a common data format. This data format would provide the pathology and research communities with a uniform way for annotating and exchanging images, flow cytometry, and associated data. This specification and/or standard will include descriptions of the acquisition device, staining, the binary representations of the image and list-mode data, the measurements derived from the image and/or the list-mode data, and descriptors for clinical/pathology and research. An international, vendor-supported, non-proprietary specification will allow pathologists, researchers, and companies to develop and use image capture/analysis software, as well as list-mode analysis software, without worrying about incompatibilities between proprietary vendor formats. Presently, efforts to create specifications and/or descriptions of these formats include the Laboratory Digital Imaging Project (LDIP) Data Exchange Specification; extensions to the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM); Open Microscopy Environment (OME); Flowcyt, an extension to the present Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS); and CytometryML. The feasibility of creating a common data specification for digital microscopy and flow cytometry in a manner consistent with its use for medical devices and interoperability with both hospital information and picture archiving systems has been demonstrated by the creation of the CytometryML schemas. The feasibility of creating a software system for digital microscopy has been demonstrated by the OME. CytometryML consists of schemas that describe instruments and their measurements. These instruments include digital microscopes and flow cytometers. Optical components including the instruments' excitation and emission parts are described. The description of the measurements made by these instruments includes the tagged molecule, data acquisition subsystem, and the format of the list-mode and/or image data. Many

  3. In vivo micro-vascular imaging and flow cytometry in zebrafish using two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; He, Sicong; Jiang, Jun; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish has rapidly evolved as a powerful vertebrate model organism for studying human diseases. Here we first demonstrate a new label-free approach for in vivo imaging of microvasculature, based on the recent discovery and detailed characterization of the two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence in the blood plasma of zebrafish. In particular, three-dimensional reconstruction of the microvascular networks was achieved with the depth-resolved two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging. Secondly, the blood flow images, obtained by perpendicularly scanning the focal point across the blood vessel, provided accurate information for characterizing the hemodynamics of the circulatory system. The endogenous fluorescent signals of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) enabled visualization of the circulating granulocytes (neutrophils) in the blood vessel. The development of acute sterile inflammation could be detected by the quantitative counting of circulating neutrophils. Finally, we found that by utilizing a short wavelength excitation at 650 nm, the commonly used fluorescent proteins, such as GFP and DsRed, could be efficiently excited together with the endogenous fluorophores to achieve four-color TPEF imaging of the vascular structures and blood cells. The results demonstrated that the multi-color imaging could potentially yield multiple view angles of important processes in living biological systems. PMID:24688803

  4. Microfluidic CARS cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Wei; Bao, Ning; Le, Thuc T.; Lu, Chang; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) flow cytometry was demonstrated by combining a laser-scanning CARS microscope with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic device. Line-scanning across the hydrodynamically focused core stream was performed for detection of flowing objects. Parameters were optimized by utilizing polystyrene beads as flowing particles. Population measurements of adipocytes isolated from mouse fat tissues demonstrated the viability of microfluidic CARS cytometry for quantitation of adipocyte size distribution. CARS cytometry could be a new modality for quantitative analysis with vibrational selectivity. PMID:18542688

  5. Diagnostic Thyroidectomy May Be Preferable in Patients With Suspicious Ultrasonography Features After Cytopathology Diagnosis of AUS/FLUS in the Bethesda System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Sang; Kim, Hyeung Kyoo; Chang, Hojin; Kim, Seok Mo; Kim, Bup-Woo; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2015-12-01

    Atypia/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (AUS/FLUS) is a new category in the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology (BSRTC) for which repeat fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is recommended. The aim of this study was to identify specific ultrasonography and clinical predictors of malignancy in a subset of thyroid nodules associated with cytology diagnoses of AUS/FLUS.Between January 2011 and December 2102, 5440 patients underwent thyroid surgery at our institution. Of these, 213 patients were diagnosed AUS/FLUS at the preoperative cytopathology diagnosis. The frequency of FNAC and ultrasonography images was compared between patients with cancerous and benign tumors based on their final pathology.Of the 213 patients, 158 (74.2%) were diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma in their final pathology reports. In univariate and multivariate analyses, the frequency of FNAC was not significantly correlated with the cancer diagnosis. Hypoechogenicity (odds ratio 2.521, P = 0.007) and microcalcification (odds ratio 3.247, P = 0.005) were statistically correlated with cancer risk.Although AUS/FLUS in cytopathology is recommended for repeating FNAC in BSRTC, we proposed that thyroid nodules with ultrasonography findings that suggest the possibility of cancer should undergo thyroidectomy with diagnostic intent. PMID:26705204

  6. High-content screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity using quantitative single cell imaging cytometry on microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Su Chul; Pal, Sukdeb; Han, Eunyoung; Song, Joon Myong

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced cardiotoxicity or cytotoxicity followed by cell death in cardiac muscle is one of the major concerns in drug development. Herein, we report a high-content quantitative multicolor single cell imaging tool for automatic screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity in an intact cell. A tunable multicolor imaging system coupled with a miniaturized sample platform was destined to elucidate drug-induced cardiotoxicity via simultaneous quantitative monitoring of intracellular sodium ion concentration, potassium ion channel permeability and apoptosis/necrosis in H9c2(2-1) cell line. Cells were treated with cisapride (a human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel blocker), digoxin (Na(+)/K(+)-pump blocker), camptothecin (anticancer agent) and a newly synthesized anti-cancer drug candidate (SH-03). Decrease in potassium channel permeability in cisapride-treated cells indicated that it can also inhibit the trafficking of the hERG channel. Digoxin treatment resulted in an increase of intracellular [Na(+)]. However, it did not affect potassium channel permeability. Camptothecin and SH-03 did not show any cytotoxic effect at normal use (≤300 nM and 10 μM, respectively). This result clearly indicates the potential of SH-03 as a new anticancer drug candidate. The developed method was also used to correlate the cell death pathway with alterations in intracellular [Na(+)]. The developed protocol can directly depict and quantitate targeted cellular responses, subsequently enabling an automated, easy to operate tool that is applicable to drug-induced cytotoxicity monitoring with special reference to next generation drug discovery screening. This multicolor imaging based system has great potential as a complementary system to the conventional patch clamp technique and flow cytometric measurement for the screening of drug cardiotoxicity. PMID:21060932

  7. High throughput measurement of Ca²⁺ dynamics for drug risk assessment in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes by kinetic image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cerignoli, Fabio; Charlot, David; Whittaker, Ross; Ingermanson, Randy; Gehalot, Piyush; Savchenko, Alex; Gallacher, David J; Towart, Rob; Price, Jeffrey H; McDonough, Patrick M; Mercola, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Current methods to measure physiological properties of cardiomyocytes and predict fatal arrhythmias that can cause sudden death, such as Torsade de Pointes, lack either the automation and throughput needed for early-stage drug discovery and/or have poor predictive value. To increase throughput and predictive power of in vitro assays, we developed kinetic imaging cytometry (KIC) for automated cell-by-cell analyses via intracellular fluorescence Ca²⁺ indicators. The KIC instrument simultaneously records and analyzes intracellular calcium concentration [Ca²⁺](i) at 30-ms resolution from hundreds of individual cells/well of 96-well plates in seconds, providing kinetic details not previously possible with well averaging technologies such as plate readers. Analyses of human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes revealed effects of known cardiotoxic and arrhythmogenic drugs on kinetic parameters of Ca²⁺ dynamics, suggesting that KIC will aid in the assessment of cardiotoxic risk and in the elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms of heart disease associated with drugs treatment and/or genetic background. PMID:22926323

  8. Spectral Cytopathology of Cervical Samples: Detecting Cellular Abnormalities in Cytologically Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Jennifer M.; Bird, Benjamin; Papamarkakis, Kostas; Miljković, Miloš; Bedrossian, Kristi; Laver, Nora; Diem, Max

    2010-01-01

    Aim Spectral Cytopathology (SCP) is a novel spectroscopic method for objective and unsupervised classification of individual exfoliated cells. The limitations of conventional cytopathology are well-recognized within the pathology community. In SCP, cellular differentiation is made by observing molecular changes in the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which may or may not produce morphological changes detectable by conventional cytopathology. This proof of concept study demonstrates SCP’s potential as an enhancing tool for cytopathologists by aiding in the accurate and reproducible diagnosis of cells in all states of disease. Method Infrared spectra are collected from cervical cells deposited onto reflectively coated glass slides. Each cell has a corresponding infrared spectrum that describes its unique biochemical composition. Spectral data are processed and analyzed by an unsupervised chemometric algorithm, Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Results In this blind study, cervical samples are classified by analyzing the spectra of morphologically normal looking squamous cells from normal samples and samples diagnosed by conventional cytopathology with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL). SCP discriminated cytopathological diagnoses amongst twelve different cervical samples with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity. SCP also correlated two samples with abnormal spectral changes: these samples had a normal cytopathological diagnosis but had a history of abnormal cervical cytology. The spectral changes observed in the morphologically normal looking cells are most likely due to an infection with human papillomavirus, HPV. HPV DNA testing was conducted on five additional samples, and SCP accurately differentiated these samples by their HPV status. Conclusions SCP tracks biochemical variations in cells that are consistent with the onset of disease. HPV has been implicated as the cause of these changes detected spectroscopically. SCP does not depend on

  9. Clinical and cytopathological aspects in phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, Anca; Popescu, Carmen Florina; Pleşea, I E; Bădulescu, Adriana; Tănase, Florentina; Mateescu, Garofiţa

    2009-01-01

    The frequency of mesenchymal breast tumors is very low, being represented mostly by tumors with biphasic proliferation (phyllodes tumors) and less by other types of non-epithelial tumors. From clinical point of view, phyllodes tumors (PT) can mimic a breast carcinoma. Therefore, the preoperative diagnosis by cytological examination on material obtained by fine needle aspiration (FNA) is very important for adequate treatment of these tumors. In current study, we assessed clinical aspects of 79 phyllodes tumors regarding patient's age and localization of the tumors. In 17 out of 79 cases, it has been performed FNA within the tumors with further cytological examination on the smears obtained. The median age of the patients was 46.07-year-old, being progressively higher with grade of the tumors with significant values between benign and borderline tumors (p=0.04954) and between benign and malignant ones (p=0.02890). The distinguish on the smears of stromal fragments and naked stromal nuclei with variable grade of atypia regarding the tumoral type, in detriment of epithelial elements have been conclusive for fibroepithelial lesion as cytopathological diagnosis. The preoperative differentiation between a breast phyllodes tumor and a breast carcinoma is extremely important for avoiding of a useless radical surgery for the patient. If the fine needle aspiration was correctly performed, the accuracy of the cytodiagnosis has been 82% in current study. PMID:19942954

  10. Cytopathological Features of a Severe Type of Corneal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Hideki; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Yokoi, Norihiko; Yamasaki, Kenta; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the cytopathological features of corneal intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) through the investigation of cytokeratin expression pattern, keratinization, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and epithelial mesenchymal transition. Patient and Methods Corneal tissue excised from a CIN patient was examined in this study. Cryosections of the excised CIN epithelial tissue were examined by immunostaining analysis using antibodies against cytokeratins, keratinization-related proteins, Ki-67, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins. Subcellular localization of F-actin was also analyzed using phalloidin. For the detection of apoptotic cells, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the expression level of hTERT in the CIN epithelium. Results The CIN epithelium exhibited a significantly altered cytokeratin expression pattern compared to normal corneas with an upregulated expression of keratinization-related proteins. The CIN epithelium also demonstrated an increased number of Ki-67-positive cells with an upregulated expression of hTERT, while exhibiting an increased number of apoptotic cells. EMT did not occur in the CIN epithelium. Conclusion CIN epithelium seems to be slightly dedifferentiated from the corneal epithelial lineage. The status of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the CIN epithelium was significantly altered from that of normal corneal epithelium, but its malignancy level does not appear to be as high as that of metastasis-competent malignant cancers. PMID:27462252

  11. National Flow Cytometry Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Bell-Prince, C.; Dickson, J.A.; Jett, J.H.; Stevenson, A.P.; Sklar, L.A. )

    1993-01-01

    thee National Flow Cytometry and Sorting Resource (NFCR) was established in 1982 to develop advanced flow cytometric instrumentation and methodology, to provide facilities for using the fruits of the NFCR developments in collaborative projects and to disseminate the results to the cytometry community at large. Achievements of the NFCR for 1992 include: (1) preliminary studies of DNA inactivation in preparation for the development of an optical chromosome sorter; (2) modeling of real-time cytometry data using th ISML software package on a Cray supercomputer; (3) execution of proof-of-principle experiments on a phase sensitive flow cytometer in which cellular fluorescence lifetimes were determined; (4) continued development of the DiDAC data acquisition system to include bit mapped sorting and multi-laser capabilities; (5) development of new display modalities for flow cytometric data using the high level graphics language IDL; (6) development and testing of new approaches to clustering of multivariate data; (7) novel applications of Fourier transform flow cytometry to questions of cell activation and molecular structure.

  12. Flow cytometry of sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1987-09-21

    This brief paper summarizes automated flow cytometric determination of sperm morphology and flow cytometry/sorting of sperm with application to sex preselection. In the latter context, mention is made of results of karyotypic determination of sex chromosome ratios in albumin-processed human sperm. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Lettuce infectious yellows virus-encoded P26 induces plasmalemma deposit cytopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Lucy R.; Medina, Vicente; Sudarshana, Mysore R.; Falk, Bryce W.

    2009-05-25

    Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) encodes a 26 kDa protein (P26) previously shown to associate with plasmalemma deposits (PLDs), unique LIYV-induced cytopathologies located at the plasmalemma over plasmodesmata pit fields in companion cells and phloem parenchyma. To further characterize the relationship of P26 and PLDs, we assessed localization and cytopathology induction of P26 expressed from either LIYV or a heterologous Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vector using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions, immunofluorescence microscopy, biochemical fractionation, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM analyses demonstrated that P26 not only associated with, but induced formation of PLDs in the absence of other LIYV proteins. Interestingly, PLDs induced by P26-expressing TMV were no longer confined to phloem cells. Putative P26 orthologs from two other members of the genus Crinivirus which do not induce conspicuous PLDs exhibited fractionation properties similar to LIYV P26 but were not associated with any PLD-like cytopathology.

  14. Artificial Neural Networks as Decision Support Tools in Cytopathology: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Pouliakis, Abraham; Karakitsou, Efrossyni; Margari, Niki; Bountris, Panagiotis; Haritou, Maria; Panayiotides, John; Koutsouris, Dimitrios; Karakitsos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to analyze the role of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in cytopathology. More specifically, it aims to highlight the importance of employing ANNs in existing and future applications and in identifying unexplored or poorly explored research topics. STUDY DESIGN A systematic search was conducted in scientific databases for articles related to cytopathology and ANNs with respect to anatomical places of the human body where cytopathology is performed. For each anatomic system/organ, the major outcomes described in the scientific literature are presented and the most important aspects are highlighted. RESULTS The vast majority of ANN applications are related to cervical cytopathology, specifically for the ANN-based, semiautomated commercial diagnostic system PAPNET. For cervical cytopathology, there is a plethora of studies relevant to the diagnostic accuracy; in addition, there are also efforts evaluating cost-effectiveness and applications on primary, secondary, or hybrid screening. For the rest of the anatomical sites, such as the gastrointestinal system, thyroid gland, urinary tract, and breast, there are significantly less efforts relevant to the application of ANNs. Additionally, there are still anatomical systems for which ANNs have never been applied on their cytological material. CONCLUSIONS Cytopathology is an ideal discipline to apply ANNs. In general, diagnosis is performed by experts via the light microscope. However, this approach introduces subjectivity, because this is not a universal and objective measurement process. This has resulted in the existence of a gray zone between normal and pathological cases. From the analysis of related articles, it is obvious that there is a need to perform more thorough analyses, using extensive number of cases and particularly for the nonexplored organs. Efforts to apply such systems within the laboratory test environment are required for their future uptake. PMID:26917984

  15. Photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional flow cytometry using scattering and fluorescent detection methods has been a fundamental tool of biological discoveries for many years. Invasive extraction of cells from a living organism, however, may lead to changes in cell properties and prevents the long-term study of cells in their native environment. Here, we summarize recent advances of new generation flow cytometry for in vivo noninvasive label-free or targeted detection of cells in blood, lymph, bone, cerebral and plant vasculatures using photoacoustic (PA) detection techniques, multispectral high-pulse-repetition-rate lasers, tunable ultrasharp (up to 0.8 nm) rainbow plasmonic nanoprobes, positive and negative PA contrasts, in vivo magnetic enrichment, time-of-flight cell velocity measurement, PA spectral analysis, and integration of PA, photothermal (PT), fluorescent, and Raman methods. Unique applications of this tool are reviewed with a focus on ultrasensitive detection of normal blood cells at different functional states (e.g., apoptotic and necrotic) and rare abnormal cells including circulating tumor cells (CTCs), cancer stem cells, pathogens, clots, sickle cells as well as pharmokinetics of nanoparticles, dyes, microbubbles and drug nanocarriers. Using this tool we discovered that palpation, biopsy, or surgery can enhance CTC release from primary tumors, increasing the risk of metastasis. The novel fluctuation flow cytometry provided the opportunity for the dynamic study of blood rheology including red blood cell aggregation and clot formation in different medical conditions (e.g., blood disorders, cancer, or surgery). Theranostics, as a combination of PA diagnosis and PT nanobubble-amplified multiplex therapy, was used for eradication of CTCs, purging of infected blood, and thrombolysis of clots using PA guidance to control therapy efficiency. In vivo flow cytometry using a portable fiber-based devices can provide a breakthrough platform for early diagnosis of cancer, infection and

  16. Flow cytometry-based apoptosis detection

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    An apoptosing cell demonstrates multitude of characteristic morphological and biochemical features, which vary depending on the stimuli and cell type. The gross majority of classical apoptotic hallmarks can be rapidly examined by flow and image cytometry. Cytometry thus became a technology of choice in diverse studies of cellular demise. A large variety of cytometric methods designed to identify apoptotic cells and probe mechanisms associated with this mode of cell demise have been developed during the past two decades. In the present chapter we outline a handful of commonly used methods that are based on the assessment of: mitochondrial transmembrane potential, activation of caspases, plasma membrane alterations and DNA fragmentation. PMID:19609746

  17. CytometryML: a markup language for analytical cytology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.; Leif, Suzanne B.

    2003-06-01

    Cytometry Markup Language, CytometryML, is a proposed new analytical cytology data standard. CytometryML is a set of XML schemas for encoding both flow cytometry and digital microscopy text based data types. CytometryML schemas reference both DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) codes and FCS keywords. These schemas provide representations for the keywords in FCS 3.0 and will soon include DICOM microscopic image data. Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS) list-mode has been mapped to the DICOM Waveform Information Object. A preliminary version of a list mode binary data type, which does not presently exist in DICOM, has been designed. This binary type is required to enhance the storage and transmission of flow cytometry and digital microscopy data. Index files based on Waveform indices will be used to rapidly locate the cells present in individual subsets. DICOM has the advantage of employing standard file types, TIF and JPEG, for Digital Microscopy. Using an XML schema based representation means that standard commercial software packages such as Excel and MathCad can be used to analyze, display, and store analytical cytometry data. Furthermore, by providing one standard for both DICOM data and analytical cytology data, it eliminates the need to create and maintain special purpose interfaces for analytical cytology data thereby integrating the data into the larger DICOM and other clinical communities. A draft version of CytometryML is available at www.newportinstruments.com.

  18. The Salmonella virulence plasmid spv genes are required for cytopathology in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Libby, S J; Lesnick, M; Hasegawa, P; Weidenhammer, E; Guiney, D G

    2000-02-01

    The pathogenesis of serious systemic Salmonella infections is characterized by survival and proliferation of bacteria inside macrophages. Infection of human monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro with S. typhimurium or S. dublin produces cytopathology characterized by detachment of cells that contain large numbers of proliferating bacteria. This cytopathology is dependent on the expression of the bacterial spv genes, a virulence locus previously shown to markedly enhance the ability of Salmonella to produce systemic disease. After 24 h of infection, macrophage cultures contain two populations of bacteria: (i) proliferating organisms present in a detached cell fraction; and (ii) a static bacterial population in macrophages remaining attached to the culture well. Mutations in either the essential transcriptional activator SpvR or the key SpvB protein markedly reduce the cytopathic effect of Salmonella infection. The spv-dependent cytopathology in macrophages exhibits characteristics of apoptosis, with release of nucleosomes into the cytoplasm, nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The current findings suggest that the mechanism of the spv effect is through induction of increased cytopathology in host macrophages. PMID:11207562

  19. LETTUCE INFECTIOUS YELLOWS VIRUS-ENCODED P26 INDUCES PLASMALEMMA DEPOSIT CYTOPATHOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) encodes a 26 kDa protein (P26) previously shown to associate with plasmalemma deposits (PLDs), unique LIYV-induced cytopathologies located at the plasmalemma over plasmodesmata pit fields in companion cells and phloem parenchyma. To further characterize the re...

  20. CytometryML binary data standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.

    2005-03-01

    CytometryML is a proposed new Analytical Cytology (Cytomics) data standard, which is based on a common set of XML schemas for encoding flow cytometry and digital microscopy text based data types (metadata). CytometryML schemas reference both DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) codes and FCS keywords. Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS) list-mode has been mapped to the DICOM Waveform Information Object. The separation of the large binary data objects (list mode and image data) from the XML description of the metadata permits the metadata to be directly displayed, analyzed, and reported with standard commercial software packages; the direct use of XML languages; and direct interfacing with clinical information systems. The separation of the binary data into its own files simplifies parsing because all extraneous header data has been eliminated. The storage of images as two-dimensional arrays without any extraneous data, such as in the Adobe Photoshop RAW format, facilitates the development by scientists of their own analysis and visualization software. Adobe Photoshop provided the display infrastructure and the translation facility to interconvert between the image data from commercial formats and RAW format. Similarly, the storage and parsing of list mode binary data type with a group of parameters that are specified at compilation time is straight forward. However when the user is permitted at run-time to select a subset of the parameters and/or specify results of mathematical manipulations, the development of special software was required. The use of CytometryML will permit investigators to be able to create their own interoperable data analysis software and to employ commercially available software to disseminate their data.

  1. Flow cytometry: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Givan, Alice L

    2011-01-01

    A flow cytometer is an instrument that illuminates cells (or other particles) as they flow individually in front of a light source and then detects and correlates the signals from those cells that result from the illumination. In this chapter, each of the aspects of that definition will be described: the characteristics of cells suitable for flow cytometry, methods to illuminate cells, the use of fluidics to guide the cells individually past the illuminating beam, the types of signals emitted by the cells and the detection of those signals, the conversion of light signals to digital data, and the use of computers to correlate and analyze the data after they are stored in a data file. The final section of the chapter will discuss the use of a flow cytometer to sort cells. This chapter can be read as a brief, self-contained survey. It can also be read as a gateway with signposts into the field. Other chapters in this book will provide more details, more references, and even an intriguing view of the future of cytometry. PMID:21116976

  2. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-11

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples.

  3. Observations on the application of the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology standardised terminology and nomenclature for pancreaticobiliary cytology.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Madeleine; Newman, Marsali

    2016-06-01

    In 2014 the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology (PSC) published a system of standardised terminology and nomenclature for pancreaticobiliary cytology (STNPC). In the present study, 232 previously reported pancreaticobiliary cytology specimens were categorised according to this set of guidelines in order to identify potential challenges to implementation of the PSC system into routine practice. Overall, 207 (89%) of the cases were found to comply with the PSC scheme in their original form. Twenty-five cases (11%) demonstrated that the application of the PSC system would result in a change of category. In the majority of these cases, the change was related to the method of categorising low grade and premalignant neoplasms, using the categories of 'Neoplastic: other' (a new category unique to STNPC classification scheme) and 'Atypical', for specimens deemed to be diagnostic of or suspicious for these lesions, respectively. The study also highlighted the emphasis on the inclusion of imaging context and cyst fluid analysis in the interpretation of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration specimens in the guidelines. The STNPC offers an approach to pancreaticobiliary cytology that reflects the considerable variation in the nature and treatment of the entities that may be encountered in these specimens. Challenges in utilisation of the scheme include awareness of the unique approach to the categorisation of premalignant and low grade neoplasms, and the amount and quality of available clinical and imaging information. PMID:27114371

  4. Triage of patients with AUS/FLUS on thyroid cytopathology: effectiveness of the multimodal diagnostic techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyuk; Jeong, Dae Joon; Hahn, Soo Yeon; Shin, Jung Hee; Oh, Young Lyun; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Jong-Won; Jang, Ju Young; Cho, Yoon Young; Chung, Jae Hoon; Kim, Sun Wook

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with thyroid cytopathologic diagnosis of atypia (or follicular lesion) of undetermined significance (AUS/FLUS) is a complex clinical problem. The purpose of this study was to develop a practical triage scheme based on multiple diagnostic tests in general use. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving 15,335 consecutive patients with a referral diagnosis of thyroid nodule between April 2011 and March 2015 using an institutional database. We obtained 904 patients with an initial cytopathologic diagnosis of AUS/FLUS who underwent repeat fine-needle aspiration or core needle biopsy, 388 of whom had a corresponding histopathological diagnosis for excised index lesions. The diagnostic performance of ultrasound (US) findings, repeat biopsy, and BRAF(V) (600E) mutation in cytopathologic specimens were evaluated individually or as a set. Of the 388 resected AUS/FLUS cases, 338 (87.1%) were thyroid cancer. The positive likelihood ratios (LRs) for BRAF(V) (600E) mutation and repeat biopsy result of suspicious for malignant cell (SMC) or worse were 11.6 (95% CI = 1.7-77.8) and 13.7 (95% CI = 4.6-41.0), respectively. The absence of suspicious findings on US combined with cytologic result of less than SMC or negative BRAF(V) (600E) mutation produced negative LRs ranging from 0.06 to 0.15, corresponding to negative predictive values of over 90% in both primary and referral settings. For patients with AUS/FLUS cytopathology, clinical decision making can be guided by a simple triage scheme based on US findings, repeat biopsy, or BRAF(V) (600E) mutation. PMID:26775803

  5. Archival fine-needle aspiration cytopathology (FNAC) samples: untapped resource for clinical molecular profiling.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Walker, Robert L; Suuriniemi, Miia; Jones, Laura; Scurci, Stephanie; Singh, Parvati; Cornelison, Robert; Harmon, Shannon; Boisvert, Nichole; Zhu, Jack; Wang, Yonghong; Bilke, Sven; Davis, Sean; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Smith, William I; Meltzer, Paul S

    2010-11-01

    Microarray technologies provide high-resolution maps of chromosome imbalances and epigenomic aberrations in the cancer cell genome. Such assays are often sensitive to sample DNA integrity, voiding the utility of many archival pathology specimens and necessitating the special handling of prospective clinical specimens. We have identified the remarkable preservation of higher-molecular weight DNA in archival fine-needle aspiration cytopathology specimens from patients greater than 10 years of age. We further demonstrate the outstanding technical performance of 57 fine-needle aspiration cytopathology samples for aberration detection on high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization array, DNA methylation, and single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping platforms. Forty-four of 46 malignant aspirates in this study manifested unequivocal genomic aberrations. Importantly, matched Papanicolaou and Diff-Quik fine-needle aspiration cytopathology samples showed critical differences in DNA preservation and DNA integrity. Overall, this study identifies a largely untapped reserve of human pathology specimens for molecular profiling studies, with ramifications for the prospective collection of clinical biospecimens. PMID:20959611

  6. Chemical Cytometry: Fluorescence-Based Single-Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Daniella; Dickerson, Jane A.; Whitmore, Colin D.; Turner, Emily H.; Palcic, Monica M.; Hindsgaul, Ole; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2008-07-01

    Cytometry deals with the analysis of the composition of single cells. Flow and image cytometry employ antibody-based stains to characterize a handful of components in single cells. Chemical cytometry, in contrast, employs a suite of powerful analytical tools to characterize a large number of components. Tools have been developed to characterize nucleic acids, proteins, and metabolites in single cells. Whereas nucleic acid analysis employs powerful polymerase chain reaction-based amplification techniques, protein and metabolite analysis tends to employ capillary electrophoresis separation and ultrasensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection. It is now possible to detect yoctomole amounts of many analytes in single cells.

  7. Sputum cytopathology: use and potential in monitoring the workplace environment by screening for biological effects of exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.K.; Ball, W.C. Jr.; Levin, M.L.; Tockman, M.S.; Erozan, Y.S.; Gupta, P.K.; Eggleston, J.C.; Pressman, N.J.; Donithan, M.P.; Kimball, A.W. Jr.

    1986-08-01

    Sputum cytopathologic monitoring detects squamous cell lung cancers at an extremely early stage (x-ray negative). It holds further potential for preventing disease by detecting epithelial alterations which reflect environmental hazards. The addition of sputum cytology screening to screening by chest x-ray film does not significantly reduce mortality from all types of lung cancer, but preliminary analysis of Johns Hopkins Lung Project data suggests that mortality from squamous cell carcinoma is reduced. Quantitative automated cytopathology systems and biochemical/immunological cell markers enhance understanding of these precursors and offer great promise for increasing capacity, accuracy, and usefulness in cytopathology screening of workers. Cytological specimens collected over years of screening workers considered at risk may be important to eventually understanding development and prevention of major occupational diseases.

  8. In Vivo Flow Cytometry: A Horizon of Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Tárnok, Attila; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry has been a fundamental tool of biological discovery for many years. Invasive extraction of cells from a living organism, however, may lead to changes in cell properties and prevents studying cells in their native environment. These problems can be overcome by use of in vivo flow cytometry which provides detection and imaging of circulating normal and abnormal cells directlyin blood or lymph flow. The goal of this mini-review is to provide a brief history, features and challenges of this new generation of flow cytometry methods and instruments. Spectrum of possibilities of in vivo flow cytometry in biological science (e.g., cell metabolism, immune function, or apoptosis) and medical fields (e.g., cancer, infection, cardiovascular disorder) including integrated photoacoustic-photothermal theranostics of circulating abnormal cells are discussed with focus on recent advances of this new platform. PMID:21915991

  9. Two-Photon Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhog, Cheng Frank; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Myc, Andrzej; Cao, Zhengyl; Bielinska, Anna; Thomas, Thommey; Baker, James R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique for obtaining quantitative information from fluorescence in cells. Quantitation is achieved by assuring a high degree of uniformity in the optical excitation and detection, generally by using a highly controlled flow such as is obtained via hydrodynamic focusing. In this work, we demonstrate a two-beam, two- channel detection and two-photon excitation flow cytometry (T(sup 3)FC) system that enables multi-dye analysis to be performed very simply, with greatly relaxed requirements on the fluid flow. Two-photon excitation using a femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) laser has the advantages that it enables simultaneous excitation of multiple dyes and achieves very high signal-to-noise ratio through simplified filtering and fluorescence background reduction. By matching the excitation volume to the size of a cell, single-cell detection is ensured. Labeling of cells by targeted nanoparticles with multiple fluorophores enables normalization of the fluorescence signal and thus ratiometric measurements under nonuniform excitation. Quantitative size measurements can also be done even under conditions of nonuniform flow via a two-beam layout. This innovative detection scheme not only considerably simplifies the fluid flow system and the excitation and collection optics, it opens the way to quantitative cytometry in simple and compact microfluidics systems, or in vivo. Real-time detection of fluorescent microbeads in the vasculature of mouse ear demonstrates the ability to do flow cytometry in vivo. The conditions required to perform quantitative in vivo cytometry on labeled cells will be presented.

  10. Multiplex immunoassay for persistent organic pollutants in tilapia: Comparison of imaging- and flow cytometry-based platforms using spectrally encoded paramagnetic microspheres

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in spectrally encoded microspheres (SEMs)-based technologies provide high multiplexing possibilities. Most SEMs-based assays required a flow cytometer with sophisticated fluidics and optics. The new imaging superparamagnetic SEMs-based platform transports SEMs with considerably ...

  11. Management of Thyroid Nodular Disease: Current Cytopathology Classifications and Genetic Testing.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Lindsay E; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative diagnosis and operative planning for patients with thyroid nodules has improved over the last decade. The Bethesda criteria for cytopathologic classification of thyroid nodule aspirate has enhanced communication between pathologists and clinicians. Multiple genetic tests, including molecular markers and the Afirma gene expression classifier, have been developed and validated. The tests, along with clinical and radiologic information, are most useful in the setting of indeterminate cytology. The development of an updated diagnostic and treatment algorithm incorporating all available tests will help standardize the management of patients with nodular thyroid disease and reduce variation and inefficiencies in care. PMID:26610771

  12. Cancer screening via infrared spectral cytopathology (SCP): results for the upper respiratory and digestive tracts.

    PubMed

    Diem, Max; Miljković, Miloš; Bird, Benjamin; Mazur, Antonella I; Schubert, Jen M; Townsend, Douglas; Laver, Nora; Almond, Max; Old, Oliver

    2016-01-21

    Instrumental advances in infrared micro-spectroscopy have made possible the observation of individual human cells and even subcellular structures. The observed spectra represent a snapshot of the biochemical composition of a cell; this composition varies subtly but reproducibly with cellular effects such as progression through the cell cycle, cell maturation and differentiation, and disease. The aim of this summary is to provide a synopsis of the progress achieved in infrared spectral cytopathology (SCP) - the combination of infrared micro-spectroscopy and multivariate methods of analysis - for the detection of abnormalities in exfoliated human cells of the upper respiratory and digestive tract, namely the oral and nasopharyngeal cavities, and the esophagus. PMID:26421636

  13. The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology classification for pulmonary specimens: an overview.

    PubMed

    Layfield, L J

    2016-06-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has formulated guidelines for respiratory cytology which include a classification scheme. The recommended classification scheme is based on the expertise of the committee members, extensive review of the literature and feedback from presentations at national and international meetings. Each category of the classification system is closely defined and link to a known risk for malignancy. The classification contains six categories designated as: 1) Non-diagnostic; 2) Negative for Malignancy; 3) Atypical; 4) Neoplastic (Benign and low grade cancer); 5) Suspicious for Malignancy; and 6) Malignant. PMID:27221749

  14. Analyzing the Tumor Microenvironment by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Young, Yoon Kow; Bolt, Alicia M; Ahn, Ryuhjin; Mann, Koren K

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is an essential tool for studying the tumor microenvironment. It allows us to quickly quantify and identify multiple cell types in a heterogeneous sample. A brief overview of flow cytometry instrumentation and the appropriate considerations and steps in building a good flow cytometry staining panel are discussed. In addition, a lymphoid tissue and solid tumor leukocyte infiltrate flow cytometry staining protocol and an example of flow cytometry data analysis are presented. PMID:27581017

  15. Continuous automated imaging-in-flow cytometry for detection and early warning of Karenia brevis blooms in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lisa; Henrichs, Darren W; Olson, Robert J; Sosik, Heidi M

    2013-10-01

    Monitoring programs for harmful algal blooms (HABs) typically rely on time-consuming manual methods for identification and enumeration of phytoplankton, which make it difficult to obtain results with sufficient temporal resolution for early warning. Continuous automated imaging-in-flow by the Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB) deployed at Port Aransas, TX has provided early warnings of six HAB events. Here we describe the progress in automating this early warning system for blooms of Karenia brevis. In 2009, manual inspection of IFCB images in mid-August 2009 provided early warning for a Karenia bloom that developed in mid-September. Images from 2009 were used to develop an automated classifier that was employed in 2011. Successful implementation of automated file downloading, processing and image classification allowed results to be available within 4 h after collection and to be sent to state agency representatives by email for early warning of HABs. No human illness (neurotoxic shellfish poisoning) has resulted from these events. In contrast to the common assumption that Karenia blooms are near monospecific, post-bloom analysis of the time series revealed that Karenia cells comprised at most 60-75 % of the total microplankton. PMID:23307076

  16. Rise of the Micromachines: Microfluidics and the Future of Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has brought many innovations to the field of flow and image-based cytometry. These advancements can be seen in the current miniaturization trends and simplification of analytical components found in the conventional flow cytometers. On the other hand, the maturation of multispectral imaging cytometry in flow imaging and the slide-based laser scanning cytometers offers great hopes for improved data quality and throughput while proving new vistas for the multiparameter, real-time analysis of cells and tissues. Importantly, however, cytometry remains a viable and very dynamic field of modern engineering. Technological milestones and innovations made over the last couple of years are bringing the next generation of cytometers out of centralized core facilities while making it much more affordable and user friendly. In this context, the development of microfluidic, lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technologies is one of the most innovative and cost-effective approaches toward the advancement of cytometry. LOC devices promise new functionalities that can overcome current limitations while at the same time promise greatly reduced costs, increased sensitivity, and ultra high throughputs. We can expect that the current pace in the development of novel microfabricated cytometric systems will open up groundbreaking vistas for the field of cytometry, lead to the renaissance of cytometric techniques and most importantly greatly support the wider availability of these enabling bioanalytical technologies. PMID:21704837

  17. Flow cytometry and cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sherrif F; van den Engh, Ger

    2007-01-01

    Flow cytometry and cell sorting are well-established technologies in clinical diagnostics and biomedical research. Heterogeneous mixtures of cells are placed in suspension and passed single file across one or more laser interrogation points. Light signals emitted from the particles are collected and correlated to entities such as cell morphology, surface and intracellular protein expression, gene expression, and cellular physiology. Based on user-defined parameters, individual cells can then be diverted from the fluid stream and collected into viable, homogeneous fractions at exceptionally high speeds and a purity that approaches 100%. As such, the cell sorter becomes the launching point for numerous downstream studies. Flow cytometry is a cornerstone in clinical diagnostics, and cheaper, more versatile machines are finding their way into widespread and varied uses. In addition, advances in computing and optics have led to a new generation of flow cytometers capable of processing cells at orders of magnitudes faster than their predecessors, and with staggering degrees of complexity, making the cytometer a powerful discovery tool in biotechnology. This chapter will begin with a discussion of basic principles of flow cytometry and cell sorting, including a technical description of factors that contribute to the performance of these instruments. The remaining sections will then be divided into clinical- and research-based applications of flow cytometry and cell sorting, highlighting salient studies that illustrate the versatility of this indispensable technology. PMID:17728993

  18. Imaging flow cytometry as a sensitive tool to detect low-dose-induced DNA damage by analyzing 53BP1 and γH2AX foci in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Durdik, Matus; Kosik, Pavol; Gursky, Jan; Vokalova, Lenka; Markova, Eva; Belyaev, Igor

    2015-12-01

    Ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF) are considered the most sensitive indicator for DNA double-strand break (DSB) detection. Monitoring DSB induction by low doses of ionizing radiation is important due to the increasing exposure in the general population. γH2AX and 53BP1 are commonly used molecular markers for in situ IRIF assessment. Imaging flow cytometry (IFC) via ImageStream system provides a new opportunity in this field. We analyzed the formation of 53BP1, γH2AX foci and their co-localization induced by γ-rays (2, 5, 10, 50, 200 cGy) in human lymphocytes using ImageStream and the automated microscopic system Metafer. We observed very similar sensitivity of both systems for the detection of endogenous and low-dose-induced IRIF. Statistically significant induction of γH2AX foci was found at doses of 2 and 10 cGy using ImageStream and Metafer, respectively. Statistically significant induction of 53BP1 foci was evident at doses ≥ 5 cGy when analyzed by IFC. Analysis of the co-localizing foci by ImageStream and Metafer showed statistical significance at doses ≥ 2 cGy, suggesting that foci co-localization is a sensitive parameter for DSB quantification. Assessment of γH2AX, 53BP1 foci and their co-localization by Metafer and ImageStream showed similar linear dose responses in the low-dose range up to 10 cGy, although IFC showed slightly better resolution for IRIF in this dose range. At higher doses, IFC underestimated IRIF numbers. Using the imaging ability of ImageStream, we introduced an optimized assay by gating γH2AX foci positive (with 1 or more γH2AX foci) and negative (cells without foci) cells. This assay resulted in statistically significant IRIF induction at doses ≥ 5cGy and a linear dose response up to 50 cGy. In conclusion, we provide evidence for the use of IFC as an accurate high throughput assay for the prompt detection and enumeration of endogenous and low-dose induced IRIF. PMID:26243567

  19. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A.; Sosik, Heidi M.; Olson, Robert J.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA, USA), and from a rare A. fundyense ‘red tide’ that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase (‘2C’) A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells' nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore, we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may

  20. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A.; Sosik, Heidi M.; Olson, Robert J.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA USA), and from a rare A. fundyense ‘red tide’ that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase (‘2C’) A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells’ nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may

  1. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Michael L; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A; Sosik, Heidi M; Olson, Robert J; Anderson, Donald M

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA USA), and from a rare A. fundyense 'red tide' that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase ('2C') A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells' nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may also have

  2. Two-photon flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Cheng F.; Ye, Jing Yong; Myc, Andrzej; Thomas, Thommey P.; Bielinska, Anna; Baker, James R., Jr.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2005-03-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique for obtaining quantitative information from fluorescence in cells. Quantization is achieved by assuring a high degree of uniformity in the optical excitation and detection, generally by using a highly controlled flow such as is obtained via hydrodynamic focusing. In this work, we demonstrate a two-beam, two-channel detection and two-photon excitation flow cytometry (T3FC) system that enables multi-dye analysis to be performed very simply, with greatly relaxed requirements on the fluid flow. Two-photon excitation using a femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) laser has the advantages that it enables simultaneous excitation of multiple dyes and achieves very high signal-to-noise ratio through simplified filtering and fluorescence background reduction. By matching the excitation volume to the size of a cell, single-cell detection is ensured. Labeling of cells by targeted nanoparticles with multiple fluorophores enables normalization of the fluorescence signal and thus ratiometric measurements under nonuniform excitation. Quantitative size measurements can also be done even under conditions of nonuniform flow via a two-beam layout. This innovative detection scheme not only considerably simplifies the fluid flow system and the excitation and collection optics, it opens the way to quantitative cytometry in simple and compact microfluidics systems, or in vivo.

  3. Brevipalpus-transmitted plant virus and virus-like diseases: cytopathology and some recent cases.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, E W; Chagas, C M; Rodrigues, J C V

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of diseases transmitted by Brevipalpus mite species (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) is being identified that affect economically important plants such as citrus, coffee, passion fruit, orchids, and several ornamentals. All of these diseases are characterized by localized lesions (chlorotic, green spots, or ringspots) on leaves, stems, and fruits. Virus or virus-like agents are considered to be the causal agents, possibly transmitted in a circulative-propagative manner by Brevipalpus mites. The virus or virus-like particles are short, rod-like, or bacilliform, that induce two characteristic types of cell alteration: (1) 'Nuclear type'--nuclei of parenchyma and epidermal cells in the lesions often contain a large electron lucent inclusion. Short, naked, rod-like (40-50 nm x 100-110 nm) particles may be seen in the viroplasm or nucleoplasm and in the cytoplasm. These particles are commonly arranged perpendicularly on the membranes of the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In a very few instances, they were found to be membrane-bound, within the ER cavities. (2) 'Cytoplasmic type'--short bacilliform particles (60-70 nm x 110-120 nm) are present within the cisternae of the ER and often have electron dense viroplasm of varied shapes present in the cytoplasm. Bacilliform particles may be seen budding into the ER lumen near the viroplasm. These particles resemble those of members of the Rhabdoviridae, but are shorter. The only sequenced virus of this group, orchid fleck virus (OFV), has a negative sense (bipartite) type ssRNA genome, but its organization is similar to known rhabdoviruses, which are monopartite. Both types of cytopathological effects have been found associated with citrus leprosis. In orchids, OFV has a 'nuclear type' of cytopathology, but in some species the 'cytoplasmic type' has been found associated with ringspot symptoms. In Hibiscus and Clerodendron, green spot symptoms have been associated with the cytoplasmic type of cell

  4. Computational analysis of high-throughput flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J Paul; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Davisson, Vincent Jo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flow cytometry has been around for over 40 years, but only recently has the opportunity arisen to move into the high-throughput domain. The technology is now available and is highly competitive with imaging tools under the right conditions. Flow cytometry has, however, been a technology that has focused on its unique ability to study single cells and appropriate analytical tools are readily available to handle this traditional role of the technology. Areas covered Expansion of flow cytometry to a high-throughput (HT) and high-content technology requires both advances in hardware and analytical tools. The historical perspective of flow cytometry operation as well as how the field has changed and what the key changes have been discussed. The authors provide a background and compelling arguments for moving toward HT flow, where there are many innovative opportunities. With alternative approaches now available for flow cytometry, there will be a considerable number of new applications. These opportunities show strong capability for drug screening and functional studies with cells in suspension. Expert opinion There is no doubt that HT flow is a rich technology awaiting acceptance by the pharmaceutical community. It can provide a powerful phenotypic analytical toolset that has the capacity to change many current approaches to HT screening. The previous restrictions on the technology, based on its reduced capacity for sample throughput, are no longer a major issue. Overcoming this barrier has transformed a mature technology into one that can focus on systems biology questions not previously considered possible. PMID:22708834

  5. Phasor plotting with frequency-domain flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Peria, William; Sands, Bryan; Naivar, Mark; Brent, Roger; Houston, Jessica P

    2016-06-27

    Interest in time resolved flow cytometry is growing. In this paper, we collect time-resolved flow cytometry data and use it to create polar plots showing distributions that are a function of measured fluorescence decay rates from individual fluorescently-labeled cells and fluorescent microspheres. Phasor, or polar, graphics are commonly used in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In FLIM measurements, the plotted points on a phasor graph represent the phase-shift and demodulation of the frequency-domain fluorescence signal collected by the imaging system for each image pixel. Here, we take a flow cytometry cell counting system, introduce into it frequency-domain optoelectronics, and process the data so that each point on a phasor plot represents the phase shift and demodulation of an individual cell or particle. In order to demonstrate the value of this technique, we show that phasor graphs can be used to discriminate among populations of (i) fluorescent microspheres, which are labeled with one fluorophore type; (ii) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells labeled with one and two different fluorophore types; and (iii) Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that express combinations of fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes. The resulting phasor plots reveal differences in the fluorescence lifetimes within each sample and provide a distribution from which we can infer the number of cells expressing unique single or dual fluorescence lifetimes. These methods should facilitate analysis time resolved flow cytometry data to reveal complex fluorescence decay kinetics. PMID:27410612

  6. Levitational Image Cytometry with Temporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, Savas; Khoory, Joseph A; Tekin, Huseyin C; Thomas, Clemence; Karnoub, Antoine E; Ghiran, Ionita C; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-01

    A simple, yet powerful magnetic-levitation-based device is reported for real-time, label-free separation, as well as high-resolution monitoring of cell populations based on their unique magnetic and density signatures. This method allows a wide variety of cellular processes to be studied, accompanied by transient or permanent changes in cells' fundamental characteristics as a biological material. PMID:26058598

  7. Abstracts for the 59th Annual Scientific Meeting (November 2011) by American Society of Cytopathology (ASC) at Baltimore, MD, USA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    These are peer-reviewed poster-platform submissions finalized by the Scientific Program Committee. A total of 153 abstracts (14 Platforms [PP1 through PP14] & 139 Posters [1 through 139]) were selected from 161 submissions to be considered for presentation during November 4 – 8, 2011, at the Hilton Baltimore Hotel, to pathologists, cytopathologists, cytotechnologists, residents, fellows, students, and other members of cytopathology-related medical and scientific fields.

  8. Cytometry in Cell Necrobiology Revisited. Recent Advances and New Vistas

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Over a decade has passed since publication of the last review on “Cytometry in cell necrobiology.” During these years we have witnessed many substantial developments in the field of cell necrobiology such as remarkable advancements in cytometric technologies and improvements in analytical biochemistry. The latest innovative platforms such as laser scanning cytometry, multispectral imaging cytometry, spectroscopic cytometry, and microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip solutions rapidly emerge as highly advantageous tools in cell necrobiology studies. Furthermore, we have recently gained substantial knowledge on alternative cell demise modes such as caspase-independent apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD), autophagy, necrosis-like PCD, or mitotic catastrophe, all with profound connotations to pathogenesis and treatment. Although detection of classical, caspase-dependent apoptosis is still the major ground for the advancement of cytometric techniques, there is an increasing demand for novel analytical tools to rapidly quantify noncanonical modes of cell death. This review highlights the key developments warranting a renaissance and evolution of cytometric techniques in the field of cell necrobiology. PMID:20235235

  9. Cytopathologic characteristics of SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma: A potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Allison, Derek B; Bishop, Justin A; Ali, Syed Z

    2016-08-01

    Tumors of the head and neck are extremely diverse and a subset are poorly differentiated and difficult to classify. Recently, a new entity has been described with rhabdoid and/or plasmacytoid cytologic features and a characteristic genetic signature-inactivation of the SMARCB1 (INI-1) tumor suppressor gene. To date, only 16 cases of SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma have been described, and there are currently no reports of the cytopathologic features by fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology. A case of a 77-year-old man who presented with a posterior ethmoid sinus lesion with invasion into the skull base and bone was reported. FNA cytology of a right retropharyngeal lymph node revealed relatively monomorphic, loosely cohesive clusters of plasmacytoid cells with occasional nucleoli, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions, and mitotic figures in a background of necrosis and absence of overt squamous or glandular differentiation. A diagnosis of metastatic myoepithelial carcinoma was made; however, retrospectively, the surgical excision showed loss of the SMARCB1 (INI-1) tumor suppressor gene by immunohistochemistry. In summary, the cytomorphologic features of SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma are relatively nonspecific and overlap with other regional tumors, including myoepithelial neoplasms. As a result, this entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a plasmacytoid tumor arising in the sinonasal tract by FNA cytology. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:700-703. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27177850

  10. Guidelines for resident training in veterinary clinical pathology. III: cytopathology and surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Kidney, Beverly A; Dial, Sharon M; Christopher, Mary M

    2009-09-01

    The Education Committee of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology has identified a need for improved structure and guidance of training residents in clinical pathology. This article is the third in a series of articles that address this need. The goals of this article are to describe learning objectives and competencies in knowledge, abilities, and skills in cytopathology and surgical pathology (CSP); provide options and ideas for training activities; and identify resources in veterinary CSP for faculty, training program coordinators, and residents. Guidelines were developed in consultation with Education Committee members and peer experts and with evaluation of the literature. The primary objectives of training in CSP are: (1) to develop a thorough, extensive, and relevant knowledge base of biomedical and clinical sciences applicable to the practice of CSP in domestic animals, laboratory animals, and other nondomestic animal species; (2) to be able to reason, think critically, investigate, use scientific evidence, and communicate effectively when making diagnoses and consulting and to improve and advance the practice of pathology; and (3) to acquire selected technical skills used in CSP and pathology laboratory management. These guidelines define expected competencies that will help ensure proficiency, leadership, and the advancement of knowledge in veterinary CSP and will provide a useful framework for didactic and clinical activities in resident-training programs. PMID:19619150

  11. The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology is applicable to frozen section diagnosis in children.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michael A; Nicol, Kathleen K

    2015-01-01

    The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology (TBSRTC) offers standardized and widely understood diagnostic categories for reporting thyroid cytology diagnoses. We compared the utility of TBSRTC categories in pediatric cytology diagnoses and pediatric intraoperative frozen section diagnoses. We examined the experience of our primary and referral care center over a 20-year period. This included 182 thyroidectomy patients who underwent 64 preoperative fine-needle aspirations and 91 intraoperative frozen section evaluations, including 38 patients evaluated sequentially by each method. All diagnoses were retrospectively reclassified into TBSRTC categories and correlated with the final thyroidectomy diagnoses. For each sampling method, malignant final diagnoses were observed at similar frequencies to rates predicted by TBSRTC. Malignant final diagnoses following fine-needle aspiration or frozen section diagnoses in TBSRTC categories other than malignant or suspicious for malignancy most often resulted from difficulty in detecting papillary carcinoma, including difficulty detecting the nuclear characteristics of papillary carcinoma in frozen sections. The limitations of needle biopsy and frozen section evaluations differ, yet serial utilization of these procedures was rarely informative. Based on the experience of our institution, classification of cytology and frozen section diagnosis by TBSRTC predicts a risk of malignancy similar to the guidance offered by TBSRTC. We recommend including a TBSRTC category when reporting either thyroid cytology or frozen section diagnoses in children. PMID:25625563

  12. Update in salivary gland cytopathology: Recent molecular advances and diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Pusztaszeri, Marc P; Faquin, William C

    2015-07-01

    Salivary gland tumors (SGT) are notorious for their extraordinary diversity and for the morphological overlap that exists between many of these entities. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) has a well-established role in the evaluation of patients with a salivary gland lesion, helping to guide clinical management. However, salivary gland FNAB has several limitations and does not allow for a specific diagnosis in some cases. For these reasons, salivary gland FNAB is considered one of the most challenging areas in cytopathology. Over the last decade, new salivary gland entities have been recognized, enlarging SGT diversity and complexity even more. In addition, a subset of SGT, including common entities such as pleomorphic adenoma and uncommon new entities such as mammary analog secretory carcinoma, have been characterized cytogenetically by the presence of specific translocations. The molecular consequences of these translocations and their potential prognostic and therapeutic values are not yet well characterized. However, these translocations and their resulting fusion oncogenes and oncoproteins can be used as diagnostic clues in salivary gland FNAB material in order to overcome the limitations of cytomorphological evaluation alone. In this review, we focus on SGTs currently known to harbor translocations and fusion genes, including uncommon and recently recognized entities, and discuss their potential application to salivary gland FNAB. PMID:25613003

  13. Mass Cytometry: Single Cells, Many Features.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Matthew H; Nolan, Garry P

    2016-05-01

    Technology development in biological research often aims to either increase the number of cellular features that can be surveyed simultaneously or enhance the resolution at which such observations are possible. For decades, flow cytometry has balanced these goals to fill a critical need by enabling the measurement of multiple features in single cells, commonly to examine complex or hierarchical cellular systems. Recently, a format for flow cytometry has been developed that leverages the precision of mass spectrometry. This fusion of the two technologies, termed mass cytometry, provides measurement of over 40 simultaneous cellular parameters at single-cell resolution, significantly augmenting the ability of cytometry to evaluate complex cellular systems and processes. In this Primer, we review the current state of mass cytometry, providing an overview of the instrumentation, its present capabilities, and methods of data analysis, as well as thoughts on future developments and applications. PMID:27153492

  14. CytometryML: a data standard which has been designed to interface with other standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.

    2007-02-01

    Because of the differences in the requirements, needs, and past histories including existing standards of the creating organizations, a single encompassing cytology-pathology standard will not, in the near future, replace the multiple existing or under development standards. Except for DICOM and FCS, these standardization efforts are all based on XML. CytometryML is a collection of XML schemas, which are based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS) datatypes. The CytometryML schemas contain attributes that link them to the DICOM standard and FCS. Interoperability with DICOM has been facilitated by, wherever reasonable, limiting the difference between CytometryML and the previous standards to syntax. In order to permit the Resource Description Framework, RDF, to reference the CytometryML datatypes, id attributes have been added to many CytometryML elements. The Laboratory Digital Imaging Project (LDIP) Data Exchange Specification and the Flowcyt standards development effort employ RDF syntax. Documentation from DICOM has been reused in CytometryML. The unity of analytical cytology was demonstrated by deriving a microscope type and a flow cytometer type from a generic cytometry instrument type. The feasibility of incorporating the Flowcyt gating schemas into CytometryML has been demonstrated. CytometryML is being extended to include many of the new DICOM Working Group 26 datatypes, which describe patients, specimens, and analytes. In situations where multiple standards are being created, interoperability can be facilitated by employing datatypes based on a common set of semantics and building in links to standards that employ different syntax.

  15. GenePattern flow cytometry suite

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional flow cytometry data analysis is largely based on interactive and time consuming analysis of series two dimensional representations of up to 20 dimensional data. Recent technological advances have increased the amount of data generated by the technology and outpaced the development of data analysis approaches. While there are advanced tools available, including many R/BioConductor packages, these are only accessible programmatically and therefore out of reach for most experimentalists. GenePattern is a powerful genomic analysis platform with over 200 tools for analysis of gene expression, proteomics, and other data. A web-based interface provides easy access to these tools and allows the creation of automated analysis pipelines enabling reproducible research. Results In order to bring advanced flow cytometry data analysis tools to experimentalists without programmatic skills, we developed the GenePattern Flow Cytometry Suite. It contains 34 open source GenePattern flow cytometry modules covering methods from basic processing of flow cytometry standard (i.e., FCS) files to advanced algorithms for automated identification of cell populations, normalization and quality assessment. Internally, these modules leverage from functionality developed in R/BioConductor. Using the GenePattern web-based interface, they can be connected to build analytical pipelines. Conclusions GenePattern Flow Cytometry Suite brings advanced flow cytometry data analysis capabilities to users with minimal computer skills. Functionality previously available only to skilled bioinformaticians is now easily accessible from a web browser. PMID:23822732

  16. Flow Cytometry: Impact On Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Modern flow cytometers can make optical measurements of 10 or more parameters per cell at tens-of-thousands of cells per second and over five orders of magnitude dynamic range. Although flow cytometry is used in most drug discovery stages, “sip-and-spit” sampling technology has restricted it to low sample throughput applications. The advent of HyperCyt sampling technology has recently made possible primary screening applications in which tens-of-thousands of compounds are analyzed per day. Target-multiplexing methodologies in combination with extended multi-parameter analyses enable profiling of lead candidates early in the discovery process, when the greatest numbers of candidates are available for evaluation. The ability to sample small volumes with negligible waste reduces reagent costs, compound usage and consumption of cells. Improved compound library formatting strategies can further extend primary screening opportunities when samples are scarce. Dozens of targets have been screened in 384- and 1536-well assay formats, predominantly in academic screening lab settings. In concert with commercial platform evolution and trending drug discovery strategies, HyperCyt-based systems are now finding their way into mainstream screening labs. Recent advances in flow-based imaging, mass spectrometry and parallel sample processing promise dramatically expanded single cell profiling capabilities to bolster systems level approaches to drug discovery. PMID:25805180

  17. Flow Cytometry: Impact on Early Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A

    2015-07-01

    Modern flow cytometers can make optical measurements of 10 or more parameters per cell at tens of thousands of cells per second and more than five orders of magnitude dynamic range. Although flow cytometry is used in most drug discovery stages, "sip-and-spit" sampling technology has restricted it to low-sample-throughput applications. The advent of HyperCyt sampling technology has recently made possible primary screening applications in which tens of thousands of compounds are analyzed per day. Target-multiplexing methodologies in combination with extended multiparameter analyses enable profiling of lead candidates early in the discovery process, when the greatest numbers of candidates are available for evaluation. The ability to sample small volumes with negligible waste reduces reagent costs, compound usage, and consumption of cells. Improved compound library formatting strategies can further extend primary screening opportunities when samples are scarce. Dozens of targets have been screened in 384- and 1536-well assay formats, predominantly in academic screening lab settings. In concert with commercial platform evolution and trending drug discovery strategies, HyperCyt-based systems are now finding their way into mainstream screening labs. Recent advances in flow-based imaging, mass spectrometry, and parallel sample processing promise dramatically expanded single-cell profiling capabilities to bolster systems-level approaches to drug discovery. PMID:25805180

  18. Use of a laboratory information system driven tool for pre-signout quality assurance of random cytopathology reports

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Sonal; Parwani, Anil V.; Khalbuss, Walid E.; Monaco, Sara E.; Kelly, Susan M.; Wiehagen, Luke T.; Piccoli, Anthony L.; Lassige, Karen M.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    Background: Quality assurance (QA) programs in cytopathology laboratories in the USA currently primarily involve the review of Pap tests per clinical laboratory improvement amendments of 1988 federal regulations. A pre-signout quality assurance tool (PQAT) at our institution allows the laboratory information system (LIS) to also automatically and randomly select an adjustable percentage of non-gynecological cytopathology cases for review before release of the final report. The aim of this study was to review our experience and the effectiveness of this novel PQAT tool in cytology. Materials and Methods: Software modifications in the existing LIS application (CoPathPlus, Cerner) allow for the random QA of 8% of cases prior to signout. Selected cases are assigned to a second QA cytopathologist for review and all agreement and disagreements tracked. Detected errors are rectified before the case is signed out. Data from cases selected for PQAT over an 18-month period were collected and analyzed. Results: The total number of non-gynecological cases selected for QA review was 1339 (7.45%) out of 17,967 cases signed out during this time period. Most (1304) cases (97.4%) had an agreement in diagnosis. In 2.6% of cases, there were disagreements, including 34 minor and only 1 major disagreement. Average turnaround time of cases selected for review was not significantly altered. Conclusion: The PQAT provides a prospective QA mechanism in non-gynecological cytopathology to prevent diagnostic errors from occurring. This LIS-driven tool allows for peer review and corrective action to be taken prior to reporting without delaying turnaround time, thereby improving patient safety. PMID:21969923

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration with on-site cytopathology versus core biopsy: a comparison of both techniques performed at the same endoscopic session

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michael; Hair, Clark D.; Green, Linda K.; Vela, Stacie A.; Patel, Kalpesh K.; Qureshi, Waqar A.; Shaib, Yasser H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) with bedside cytopathology is the gold standard for assessment of pancreatic, subepithelial, and other lesions in close proximity to the gastrointestinal tract, but it is time-consuming, has certain diagnostic limitations, and bedside cytopathology is not widely available. Aims: The goal of this study is to compare the diagnostic yield of EUS-guided FNA with on-site cytopathology and EUS-guided core biopsy. Methods: Twenty-six patients with gastrointestinal mass lesions requiring biopsy at a tertiary medical center were included in this retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort. Two core biopsies were taken using a 22 gauge needle followed by FNA guided by a bedside cytopathologist at the same endoscopic session. The diagnostic yield and test characteristics of EUS core biopsy and EUS FNA with bedside cytopathology were examined. Results: The mean number of passes was 3.2 for FNA, and the mean procedure time was 39.4 minutes. The final diagnosis was malignant in 92.3 %. Sensitivity and specificity were 83 % and 100 %, respectively, for FNA, and 91.7 % and 100 %, respectively, for core biopsy. Diagnostic accuracy was 92.3 % for FNA and 84.6 % for core biopsy. The two approaches were in agreement in 88.4 % with a kappa statistic of 0.66 (95 % confidence interval 0.33 – 0.99). Conclusions: An approach using two passes with a core biopsy needle is comparable to the current gold standard of FNA with bedside cytopathology. The performance of two core biopsies is time-efficient and could represent a good alternative to FNA with bedside cytopathology. PMID:26135096

  20. Convention on nomenclature for DNA cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hiddemann, W.; Schumann, J.; Andreeff, M.; Barlogie, B.; Herman, C.J.; Leif, R.C.; Mayall, B.H.; Murphy, R.F.; Sandberg, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Committee on Nomenclature of the Society for Analytical Cytology presents guidelines for the analysis of DNA content by cytometry. These guidelines cover: staining of DNA; cytogenetic and cytometric terminology; DNA index; resolution of measurements; and cytometric standards.

  1. DNA polymorphism identity determination using flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott; Cai, Hong

    2001-01-01

    DNA polymorphism identity determination using flow cytometry. Primers designed to be immobilized on microspheres are allowed to anneal to the DNA strand under investigation, and are extended by either DNA polymerase using fluorescent dideoxynucleotides or ligated by DNA ligase to fluorescent reporter oligonucleotides. The fluorescence of either the dideoxynucleotide or the reporter oligonucleotide attached to the immobilized primer is measured by flow cytometry, thereby identifying the nucleotide polymorphism on the DNA strand.

  2. Cell blocks in cytopathology: a review of preparative methods, utility in diagnosis and role in ancillary studies.

    PubMed

    Jain, D; Mathur, S R; Iyer, V K

    2014-12-01

    The cell block (CB) is a routine procedure in cytopathology that has gained importance because of its pivotal role in diagnosis and ancillary studies. There is no precise review in the published literature that deals with the various methods of preparation of CB, its utility in diagnosis, immunocytochemistry (ICC) or molecular testing, and its drawbacks. An extensive literature search on CB in cytology using internet search engines was performed for this review employing the following keywords: cell block, cytoblock, cytology, cytopathology, methods, preparation, fixatives, diagnostic yield, ancillary and molecular studies. Ever since its introduction more than a century ago, the CB technique has undergone numerous modifications to improve the quality of the procedure; however, the overall principle remains the same in each method. CBs can be prepared from virtually all varieties of cytological samples. In today's era of personalized medicine, cytological specimens, including CBs, augment the utility of cytological samples in analysing the molecular alterations as effectively as surgical biopsies or resection specimens. With the availability of molecular targeted therapy for many cancers, a large number of recent studies have used cytological material or CBs for molecular characterization. The various techniques of CB preparation with different fixatives, their advantages and limitations, and issues of diagnostic yield are discussed in this review. PMID:25113785

  3. The Intersection of Flow Cytometry with Microfluidics and Microfabrication

    PubMed Central

    Piyasena, Menake E.; Graves, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    A modern flow cytometer can analyze and sort particles on a one by one basis at rates of 50,000 particles per second. Flow cytometers can also measure as many as 17 channels of fluorescence, several angles of scattered light, and other non-optical parameters such as particle impedance. More specialized flow cytometers can provide even greater analysis power, such as single molecule detection, imaging, and full spectral collection, at reduced rates. These capabilities have made flow cytometers an invaluable tool for numerous applications including cellular immunophenotyping, CD4+ T-cell counting, multiplex microsphere analysis, high-throughput screening, and rare cell analysis and sorting. Many bio-analytical techniques have been influenced by the advent of microfluidics as a component in analytical tools and flow cytometry is no exception. Here we detail the functions and uses of a modern flow cytometer, review the recent and historical contributions of microfluidics and microfabricated devices to field of flow cytometry, examine current application areas, and suggest opportunities for the synergistic application of microfabrication approaches to modern flow cytometry. PMID:24488050

  4. New flow cytometry approaches in equine andrology.

    PubMed

    Peña, Fernando J; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Martín Muñoz, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Flow cytometry is currently recognized as a robust tool for the evaluation of sperm quality and function. However, within equine reproduction, this technique has not reached the sophistication of other areas of biology and medicine. In recent years, more sophisticated flow cytometers have been introduced in andrology laboratories, and the number of tests that can be potentially used in the evaluation of sperm physiology has increased accordingly. In this review, recent advances in the evaluation of stallion spermatozoa will be discussed. These new techniques in flow cytometry are able to simultaneously measure damage to different sperm regions and/or changes in functionality. PMID:27160445

  5. Spaceflight Flow Cytometry: Design Challenges and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, Dimitri; Kao, Shih-Hsin; Jeevarajan, Antony S.

    2004-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will require analytical technology capable of providing both autonomous medical care to the crew and investigative capabilities to researchers. While several promising candidate technologies exist for further development, flow cytometry is an attractive technology as it offers both crew health and a wide array of biochemistry and immunology assays. While flow cytometry has been widely used for cellular analysis in both clinical and research settings, the requirements for proper operation in spaceflight impose constraints on any instrument designs. The challenges of designing a spaceflight-ready flow cytometer are discussed, as well as some preliminary results using a prototype system.

  6. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H G; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ≈150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level. PMID:27216436

  7. In vitro confirmation of newly established lung cancer cell lines using flow cytometry and multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Takaoka, K; Endo, T; Mizuno, S; Ogawa, Y; Yoshida, M; Ohnuma, T

    1997-05-01

    We report on a simplified method of cytomorphological in vitro confirmation of newly established lung cancer cell lines by using multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and flow cytometry (FCM). Eleven cell lines were established from 11 patients with lung cancer. The MTS were produced by culturing cells in agar-coated dish. Cytomorphological studies were made using smears of crushed MTS and frozen sections of MTS. The MTS were fixed doubly with paraformaldehyde and osmic acid for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Bivariate fluorescence of fluorescein isothyocyanate (FITC, tumor associated antigen, TAA) and propidium iodide (DNA) were measured by FCM. The MTS grew anchorage-independently. Cytopathological and electron microscopic findings of MTS were similar to those of the original clinical specimens. The DNA index and TAA were useful in evaluating the presence or absence of contamination by cells of non-tumor origin. The new cell lines satisfied a minimum of four conditions to confirm their establishment: (a) they originated from humans, (b) they were cytomorphologically identified with specimens from primary lesions, (c) they showed tumorigenicity, and (d) they were free from contamination by cells of different origin. From these findings, the establishment of new cell lines can be confirmed in vitro by using MTS and FCM. PMID:9194029

  8. Dissociation of the vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology from the cytotoxicity induced by the lipophilic local anesthetic bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Morissette, Guillaume; Bawolak, Marie-Thérèse; Marceau, François

    2011-07-01

    Local anesthetics, like many other cationic drugs, induce a vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology that has been observed in vivo and in various cell types; some also induce cytotoxicity of mitochondrial origin (apoptosis and necrosis) and it is not known whether the 2 types of toxicity overlap or interact. We compared bupivacaine with a more hydrophilic agent, lidocaine, for morphological, functional, and toxicological responses in a previously exploited nonneuronal system, primary smooth muscle cells. Bupivacaine induced little vacuolization (≥2.5 mmol/L, 4 h), but elicited autophagic accumulation (≥0.5 mmol/L, 4 h) and was massively cytotoxic at 2.5-5 mmol/L (4-24 h), the latter effect being unabated by the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Lidocaine exerted little cytotoxicity at and below 5 mmol/L for 24 h, but intensely induced the V-ATPase-dependent vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. Bupivacaine was more potent than lidocaine in disrupting mitochondrial potential, as judged by Mitotracker staining (significant proportions of cells affected in the 1-5 and 5-10 mmol/L concentration ranges, respectively). The addition of mitochondrial-inactivating toxins antimycin A and oligomycin to lidocaine (2.5 mmol/L) reproduced the profile of bupivacaine action (low intensity of vacuolization and retained autophagic accumulation). The high potency of bupivacaine as a mitochondrial toxicant eclipses the benign vacuolar and autophagic response seen with more hydrophilic local anesthetics. PMID:21812528

  9. A clinical flow cytometry data analysis assistant

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C. ); Stewart, C.C. ); Duque, R.E. ); Braylan, R.C. . Coll. of Medicine)

    1990-01-01

    A rule-based expert system is being developed to assist clinicians in the analysis of multivariate flow cytometry data for patients with leukemias or lymphomas. The cells are stained with fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies and the cell fluorescence is measured with a flow cytometer. Cluster analysis is used to isolate subpopulations in the data on which the clinical decisions are made. Symbolic facts for the expert system are instantiated using these numerical data and the knowledge of the clinicians and experts in flow cytometry. The first prototype used a decision tree and rigid rules. Is successfully classified only nine of eleven leukemia cases. A second prototype incorporating certainty factors into the rules is now being developed that should remove the need for a rigid decision tree. 9 refs.

  10. Assaying Cell Cycle Status Using Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Ho; Sederstrom, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    In this unit, two protocols are described for analyzing cell cycle status using flow cytometry. The first is based on the simultaneous analysis of proliferation-specific marker (Ki-67) and cellular DNA content, which discriminate resting/quiescent cell populations (G0 cell) and quantify cell cycle distribution (G1, S, or G2/M), respectively. The second is based on differential staining of DNA and RNA through co-staining of Hoechst 33342 and Pyronin Y, which is also useful to identify G0 cells from G1 cells. Along with these methods for analyzing cell cycle status, two additional methods for cell proliferation assays with recent updates of newly developed fluorophores, which allow multiplex analysis of cell cycle status, cell proliferation, and a gene of interest using flow cytometry, are outlined. PMID:26131851

  11. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-07-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread. PMID:24668857

  12. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread. PMID:24668857

  13. Coaxial-Flow System for Chemical Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Paul J.; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, chemical cytometry performed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) has become increasingly valuable as a bio-analytical tool to quantify analytes from single cells. However, extensive use of CE-based chemical cytometry has been hindered by the relatively low throughput for the analysis of single adherent cells. In order to overcome the low throughput of CE-based analysis of adherent cells and increase its utility in evaluating cellular attributes, new higher throughput methods are needed. Integration of a coaxial buffer exchange system with CE-based chemical cytometry increased the rate of serial analyses of cells. In the designed system, fluid flow through a tube coaxial to the separation capillary was used to supply electrophoretic buffer to the capillary. This sheath or coaxial fluid was turned off between analysis of cells and on during cell sampling and electrophoresis. Thus, living cells were not exposed to the nonphysiologic electrophoretic buffer prior to lysis. Key parameters of the system such as the relative capillary-sheath positions, buffer flow velocities, and the cell chamber design were optimized. To demonstrate the utility of the system, rat basophilic leukemic cells loaded with Oregon Green and fluorescein were serially lysed and loaded into a capillary. Separation of the contents of 20 cells at a rate of 0.5 cells/min was demonstrated. PMID:17979298

  14. Confocal Microscopy and Flow Cytometry System Performance: Assessment of QA Parameters that affect data Quanitification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow and image cytometers can provide useful quantitative fluorescence data. We have devised QA tests to be used on both a flow cytometer and a confocal microscope to assure that the data is accurate, reproducible and precise. Flow Cytometry: We have provided two simple perform...

  15. In vivo distribution and cytopathology of variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 showing restricted sequence variability in the V3 loop.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Y K; Bell, J E; Holmes, E C; Hughes, E S; Brown, H K; Simmonds, P

    1994-01-01

    The distribution, cell tropism, and cytopathology in vivo of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was investigated in postmortem tissue samples from a series of HIV-infected individuals who died either of complications associated with AIDS or for unrelated reasons while they were asymptomatic. Proviral sequences were detected at a high copy number in lymphoid tissue of both presymptomatic patients and patients with AIDS, whereas significant infection of nonlymphoid tissue such as that from brains, spinal cords, and lungs were confined to those with AIDS. V3 loop sequences from both groups showed highly restricted sequence variability and a low overall positive charge of the encoded amino acid sequence compared with those of standard laboratory isolates of HIV type 1 (HIV-1). The low charge and the restriction in sequence variability were comparable to those observed with isolates showing a non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) and macrophage-tropic phenotype in vitro. All patients were either exclusively infected (six of seven cases) or predominantly infected (one case) with variants with a predicted NSI/macrophage-tropic phenotype, irrespective of the degree of disease progression. p24 antigen was detected by immunocytochemical staining of paraffin-fixed sections in the germinal centers within lymphoid tissue, although little or no antigen was found in areas of lymph node or spleen containing T lymphocytes from either presymptomatic patients or patients with AIDS. The predominant p24 antigen-expressing cells in the lungs and brains of the patients with AIDS were macrophages and microglia (in brains), frequently forming multinucleated giant cells (syncytia) even though the V3 loop sequences of these variants resembled those of NSI isolates in vitro. These studies indicate that lack of syncytium-forming ability in established T-cell lines does not necessarily predict syncytium-forming ability in primary target cells in vivo. Furthermore, variants of HIV with V3 sequences

  16. Guidelines for cytopathologic diagnosis of epithelioid and mixed type malignant mesothelioma. Complementary statement from the International Mesothelioma Interest Group, also endorsed by the International Academy of Cytology and the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Hjerpe, Anders; Ascoli, Valeria; Bedrossian, Carlos; Boon, Mathilde; Creaney, Jenette; Davidson, Ben; Dejmek, Annika; Dobra, Katalin; Fassina, Ambrogio; Field, Andrew; Firat, Pinar; Kamei, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Tadao; Michael, Claire W.; Önder, Sevgen; Segal, Amanda; Vielh, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    To provide practical guidelines for the cytopathologic diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Cytopathologists involved in the International Mesothelioma Interest Group (IMIG) and the International Academy of Cytology (IAC), who have an interest in the field contributed to this update. Reference material includes peer-reviewed publications and textbooks. This article is the result of discussions during and after the IMIG 2012 conference in Boston, followed by thorough discussions during the 2013 IAC meeting in Paris. Additional contributions have been obtained from cytopathologists and scientists, who could not attend these meetings, with final discussions and input during the IMIG 2014 conference in cape town. During the previous IMIG biennial meetings, thorough discussions have resulted in published guidelines for the pathologic diagnosis of MM. However, previous recommendations have stated that the diagnosis of MM should be based on histological material only.[12] Accumulating evidence now indicates that the cytological diagnosis of MM supported by ancillary techniques is as reliable as that based on histopathology, although the sensitivity with cytology may be somewhat lower.[345] Recognizing that noninvasive diagnostic modalities benefit both the patient and the health system, future recommendations should include cytology as an accepted method for the diagnosis of this malignancy.[67] The article describes the consensus of opinions of the authors on how cytology together with ancillary testing can be used to establish a reliable diagnosis of MM. PMID:26681974

  17. Optimized flow cytometry isolation of murine spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaysinskaya, Valeriya; Soh, Ina Y; van der Heijden, Godfried W; Bortvin, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Meiotic prophase I (MPI), is an initial stage of meiosis characterized by intricate homologous chromosome interactions, synapsis, and DNA recombination. These processes depend on the complex, but poorly understood early MPI events of homologous chromosome search, alignment, and pairing. Detailed molecular investigation of these early events requires isolation of individual MPI substages. Enrichment for Pachytene (P) and Diplotene (D) substages of late MPI was previously accomplished using flow cytometry. However, separation of early MPI spermatocytes, specifically, of Leptotene (L) and Zygotene (Z) substages, has been a challenge due to these cells' similar characteristics. In this report, we describe an optimized Hoechst-33342 (Hoechst)-based flow cytometry approach for isolating individual MPI populations from adult mouse testis. We get significant enrichment for individual L and Z spermatocytes, previously inseparable from each other, and optimize the isolation of other MPI substages. Our flow cytometry approach is a combination of three optimized strategies. The first is optimization of testis dissociation protocol that yields more consistent and reproducible testicular single cell suspension. The second involves optimization of flow cytometric gating protocol where a critical addition to the standard protocol for cell discrimination based on Hoechst fluorescence, involves a back-gating technique based on light scattering parameters. This step specifies selection of individual MPI substages. The third, is an addition of DNA content restriction to the gating protocol to minimize contamination from non-meiotic cells. Finally, we confirm significant enrichment of high-purity Preleptotene (PreL), L, Z, P, and D MPI spermatocytes using stage-specific marker distribution. The technique will facilitate understanding of the molecular events underlying MPI. PMID:24664803

  18. CYTOMETRY OF APOPTOSIS. HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND NEW ADVANCES

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, D.; Skommer, J.; Darzynkiewicz, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Characteristic changes in cell morphology paralleled by the appearance of a multitude of molecular and biochemical markers occur during apoptosis. These changes vary depending on the cell type, mechanism of induction of apoptosis, and the time-window at which the process of apoptosis is analyzed. By virtue of the capability of rapid measurement of individual cells the flow- and imaging-cytometry become preferred technologies to detect, identify and record incidence of apoptosis in large cell populations. It also provided a valuable tool to investigate molecular mechanisms in field of necrobiology. This review outlines the progress in development of the most commonly used cytometric methods probing cells death based on analysis of fragmentation of DNA, activation of caspases, analysis of mitochondrial potential, alterations in plasma membrane structure and other features that characterize programmed cell death. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Apoptosis: Four Decades Later”. PMID:23070010

  19. Multiparameter Flow Cytometry For Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Carleton C.

    1989-06-01

    Flow Cytometry facilities are well established and provide immunophenotyping and DNA content measurement services. The application of immunophenotyping has been primarily in monitoring therapy and in providing further information to aid in the definitive diagnosis of immunological and neoplastic disease such as: immunodeficiency disease, auto immune disease, organ transplantation, and leukemia and lymphoma. DNA content measurements have been particularly important in determining the fraction of cycling cells and presence of aneuploid cells in neoplasia. This information has been useful in the management of patients with solid tumors.

  20. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ~150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level.Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of

  1. Honey Bee Hemocyte Profiling by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Marringa, William J.; Krueger, Michael J.; Burritt, Nancy L.; Burritt, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple stress factors in honey bees are causing loss of bee colonies worldwide. Several infectious agents of bees are believed to contribute to this problem. The mechanisms of honey bee immunity are not completely understood, in part due to limited information about the types and abundances of hemocytes that help bees resist disease. Our study utilized flow cytometry and microscopy to examine populations of hemolymph particulates in honey bees. We found bee hemolymph includes permeabilized cells, plasmatocytes, and acellular objects that resemble microparticles, listed in order of increasing abundance. The permeabilized cells and plasmatocytes showed unexpected differences with respect to properties of the plasma membrane and labeling with annexin V. Both permeabilized cells and plasmatocytes failed to show measurable mitochondrial membrane potential by flow cytometry using the JC-1 probe. Our results suggest hemolymph particulate populations are dynamic, revealing significant differences when comparing individual hive members, and when comparing colonies exposed to diverse conditions. Shifts in hemocyte populations in bees likely represent changing conditions or metabolic differences of colony members. A better understanding of hemocyte profiles may provide insight into physiological responses of honey bees to stress factors, some of which may be related to colony failure. PMID:25285798

  2. Cosmetic fat augmentation following breast reconstruction: sonographic appearance with cytopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Saleh, Marwa; Schwartz, Mark H; Eisen, Carolyn Sharyn

    2014-01-01

    This series presents the history and imaging of patients who had cosmetic fat augmentation following mastectomy and reconstruction. The cases provide the useful reminder that a complete surgical history is essential when assessing the imaging of a post-operative breast patient and that speaking directly with patients can be a critical step in putting together a complete clinical picture and adding value to their care. PMID:25128090

  3. Optical clearing in photoacoustic flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Menyaev, Yulian A; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Juratli, Mazen A; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Clinical applications of photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for detection of circulating tumor cells in deep blood vessels are hindered by laser beam scattering, that result in loss of PAFC sensitivity and resolution. We demonstrate biocompatible and rapid optical clearing (OC) of skin to minimize light scattering and thus, increase optical resolution and sensitivity of PAFC. OC effect was achieved in 20 min by sequent skin cleaning, microdermabrasion, and glycerol application enhanced by massage and sonophoresis. Using 0.8 mm mouse skin layer over a blood vessel in vitro phantom we demonstrated 1.6-fold decrease in laser spot blurring accompanied by 1.6-fold increase in PA signal amplitude from blood background. As a result, peak rate for B16F10 melanoma cells in blood flow increased 1.7-fold. By using OC we also demonstrated the feasibility of PA contrast improvement for human hand veins. PMID:24409398

  4. Optical clearing in photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Menyaev, Yulian A.; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical applications of photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for detection of circulating tumor cells in deep blood vessels are hindered by laser beam scattering, that result in loss of PAFC sensitivity and resolution. We demonstrate biocompatible and rapid optical clearing (OC) of skin to minimize light scattering and thus, increase optical resolution and sensitivity of PAFC. OC effect was achieved in 20 min by sequent skin cleaning, microdermabrasion, and glycerol application enhanced by massage and sonophoresis. Using 0.8 mm mouse skin layer over a blood vessel in vitro phantom we demonstrated 1.6-fold decrease in laser spot blurring accompanied by 1.6-fold increase in PA signal amplitude from blood background. As a result, peak rate for B16F10 melanoma cells in blood flow increased 1.7-fold. By using OC we also demonstrated the feasibility of PA contrast improvement for human hand veins. PMID:24409398

  5. Blood screening using diffraction phase cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Mustafa; Ding, Huafeng; Wang, Zhuo; Reedy, Jason; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2010-03-01

    Blood smear analysis has remained a crucial diagnostic tool for pathologists despite the advent of automatic analyzers such as flow cytometers and impedance counters. Though these current methods have proven to be indispensible tools for physicians and researchers alike, they provide limited information on the detailed morphology of individual cells, and merely alert the operator to manually examine a blood smear by raising flags when abnormalities are detected. We demonstrate an automatic interferometry-based smear analysis technique known as diffraction phase cytometry (DPC), which is capable of providing the same information on red blood cells as is provided by current clinical analyzers, while rendering additional, currently unavailable parameters on the 2-D and 3-D morphology of individual red blood cells. To validate the utility of our technique in a clinical setting, we present a comparison between tests generated from 32 patients by a state of the art clinical impedance counter and DPC.

  6. Flow cytometry for health monitoring in space

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.; Martin, J.C.; Saunders, G.C.; Stewart, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Monitoring the health of space station or lunar base residents will be necessary to provide knowledge of the physiological status of astronauts. Flow cytometric techniques are uniquely capable of providing cellular, chromosome, hormone level and enzyme level information. The use of dyes provides the basis for fluorescently labeling specific cellular components. Laser induced fluorescence from stained cells is quantitated in a flow cytometer to measure cellular components such as DNA, RNA and protein. One major application of a flow cytometer will be to perform a complete blood count including hematocrit, hemoglobin content, and numbers of platelets, erythrocytes, granulocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes. A newly developed flow cytometry based fluoroimmunoassay will be able to measure levels of serum enzymes and hormones. It will also be possible to quantitate radiation exposure and some forms of chromosome damage with flow cytometric measurements. With relatively simple modifications to existing technology, it will be possible to construct a flight rated cytometer. 11 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Multiparameter Phenotyping of Human PBMCs Using Mass Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Leipold, Michael D; Newell, Evan W; Maecker, Holden T

    2015-01-01

    The standard for single-cell analysis of phenotype and function in recent decades has been fluorescence flow cytometry. Mass cytometry is a newer technology that uses heavy metal ions, rather than fluorochromes, as labels for probes such as antibodies. The binding of these ion-labeled probes to cells is quantitated by mass spectrometry. This greatly increases the number of phenotypic and functional markers that can be probed simultaneously. Here, we review topics that must be considered when adapting existing flow cytometry panels to mass cytometry analysis. We present a protocol and representative panels for surface phenotyping and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays. PMID:26420710

  8. Multiparameter Phenotyping of Human PBMCs Using Mass Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Leipold, Michael D.; Newell, Evan W.; Maecker, Holden T.

    2016-01-01

    The standard for single-cell analysis of phenotype and function in recent decades has been fluorescence flow cytometry. Mass cytometry is a newer technology that uses heavy metal ions, rather than fluorochromes, as labels for probes such as antibodies. The binding of these ion-labeled probes to cells is quantitated by mass spectrometry. This greatly increases the number of phenotypic and functional markers that can be probed simultaneously. Here, we review topics that must be considered when adapting existing flow cytometry panels to mass cytometry analysis. We present a protocol and representative panels for surface phenotyping and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays. PMID:26420710

  9. Simultaneous quantification of DNA and RNA in tissue sections. A comparative analysis of the methyl green-pyronin technique with the gallocyanin chromalum and Feulgen procedures using image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schulte, E K; Lyon, H O; Hoyer, P E

    1992-06-01

    For simultaneous cytophotometric measurement of DNA and RNA, the standardized Methyl Green-Pyronin Y technique is an obvious choice. It is, however, first necessary to correlate the uptake of Pyronin Y to the staining intensity of RNA. The material consisted of paraffin sections of formalin- or Carnoy-fixed rat liver. The sections were pretreated with water, buffer, deoxyribonuclease, ribonuclease, or both enzymes in sequence, and stained with the standardized Methyl Green-Pyronin Y procedure, Gallocyanin chromalum, or the Feulgen reaction. Sections stained directly without pretreatment served as controls. Staining intensities were measured with an image analyser for cell nuclei, nucleoli and cytoplasm. After deoxyribonuclease treatment, nuclear staining intensity with Methyl Green, Gallocyanin chromalum, and Schiff's reagent dropped nearly to zero. The same was seen for both nucleoli and cytoplasm with Pyronin Y and Gallocyanin chromalum after ribonuclease treatment. Staining intensity of Pyronin Y correlated directly with that of Gallocyanin chromalum for nucleoli and cytoplasm. After ribonuclease treatment, a direct correlation was found between the nuclear staining intensity of Methyl Green and nuclear absorption of Gallocyanin chromalum. We conclude that the standardized Methyl Green-Pyronin Y stain is reliable for the simultaneous quantitative assessment of both RNA and DNA. The simplicity of this technique makes it a valuable tool even for daily routine. PMID:1378824

  10. The impact of category, cytopathology and cytogenetics on development and progression of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation in inherited bone marrow failure syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cada, Michaela; Segbefia, Catherin I.; Klaassen, Robert; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Yanofsky, Rochelle A.; Wu, John; Pastore, Yves; Silva, Mariana; Lipton, Jeffrey H.; Brossard, Josee; Michon, Bruno; Abish, Sharon; Steele, MacGregor; Sinha, Roona; Belletrutti, Mark; Breakey, Vicky; Jardine, Lawrence; Goodyear, Lisa; Sung, Lillian; Shago, Mary; Beyene, Joseph; Sharma, Preeti; Zlateska, Bozana; Dror, Yigal

    2015-01-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are a group of rare, heterogeneous genetic disorders with a risk of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation including clonal marrow cytogenetic abnormalities, myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. The clinical characteristics, risk classification, prognostic factors and outcome of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation associated with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are largely unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the impact of category, cytopathology and cytogenetics, the three components of the “Category Cytology Cytogenetics” classification of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, on the outcome of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation associated with inherited bone marrow failure. We used data from the Canadian Inherited Marrow Failure Registry. Among 327 patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndrome enrolled in the registry, the estimated risk of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation by the age of 18 years was 37%. The risk of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation varied according to the type of inherited bone marrow failure syndrome but was highest in Fanconi anemia. The development of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation significantly affected overall survival. Mortality varied based on cytopathological group. The largest group of patients had refractory cytopenia. Clonal marrow cytogenetic abnormalities were identified in 87% of patients with clonal and malignant myeloid transformation, and different cytogenetic groups had different impacts on disease progression. We conclude that category, cytopathology and cytogenetics in cases of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation associated with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes have an important impact on outcome and that the classification of such cases should incorporate these factors. PMID:25682607

  11. Human CD4+ lymphocytes for antigen quantification: characterization using conventional flow cytometry and mass cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Abbasi, Fatima; Ornatsky, Olga; Cole, Kenneth D; Misakian, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; He, Hua-Jun; Marti, Gerald E; Tanner, Scott; Stebbings, Richard

    2012-07-01

    To transform the linear fluorescence intensity scale obtained with fluorescent microspheres to an antibody bound per cell (ABC) scale, a biological cell reference material is needed. Optimally, this material should have a reproducible and tight ABC value for the expression of a known clinical reference biomarker. In this study, we characterized commercially available cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and two lyophilized PBMC preparations, Cyto-Trol and PBMC-National Institute for Biological Standard and Control (NIBSC) relative to freshly prepared PBMC and whole blood samples. It was found that the ABC values for CD4 expression on cryopreserved PBMC were consistent with those of freshly obtained PBMC and whole blood samples. By comparison, the ABC value for CD4 expression on Cyto-Trol is lower and the value on PBMC-NIBSC is much lower than those of freshly prepared cell samples using both conventional flow cytometry and CyTOF™ mass cytometry. By performing simultaneous surface and intracellular staining measurements on these two cell samples, we found that both cell membranes are mostly intact. Moreover, CD4(+) cell diameters from both lyophilized cell preparations are smaller than those of PBMC and whole blood. This could result in steric interference in antibody binding to the lyophilized cells. Further investigation of the fixation effect on the detected CD4 expression suggests that the very low ABC value obtained for CD4(+) cells from lyophilized PBMC-NIBSC is largely due to paraformaldehyde fixation; this significantly decreases available antibody binding sites. This study provides confirmation that the results obtained from the newly developed mass cytometry are directly comparable to the results from conventional flow cytometry when both methods are standardized using the same ABC approach. PMID:22539147

  12. Spectrum of cytopathologic features of epithelioid sarcoma in a series of 7 uncommon cases with immunohistochemical results, including loss of INI1/SMARCB1 in two test cases.

    PubMed

    Rekhi, Bharat; Singh, Neha

    2016-07-01

    Diagnosis of an epithelioid sarcoma (ES) is challenging on fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) smears. There are few documented series describing cytopathologic features and immunostaining results of ESs. The present study describes cytopathologic features of seven cases of ES. All seven tumors occurred in males within age-range of 22-61 years; in sites, such as forearm (n = 3), hand (n = 2), thigh (n = 1), and inguinal region (n = 1). FNAC was performed for metastatic lesions (n = 5), recurrent lesions (n = 4), as well as for a primary diagnosis (n = 1). FNAC smears in most cases were moderate to hypercellular, composed of polygonal cells(seven cases) and spindle cells(three cases), arranged in loosely cohesive groups, non-overlapping clusters, and scattered singly, containing moderate to abundant cytoplasm, defined cell borders, vesicular nuclei, and discernible nucleoli. Variable cytopathologic features identified in certain cases were "rhabdoid-like" intracytoplasmic inclusions (n = 5), giant cells (n = 3), and interspersed scanty, metachromatic stroma (n = 4). Histopathologic examination revealed two cases of conventional-type ES, three of proximal/large cell-type ES, and two cases of mixed-type ES, displaying features of conventional and proximal subtypes. By immunohistochemistry (IHC), tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin (CK)(4/5), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) (6/6), panCK (1/1), vimentin (3/3), and CD34 (7/7). Tumor cells were completely negative for INI1/SMARCB1 (0/2) and CD31 (0/5). In our settings, FNAC was mostly performed in recurrent and/or metastatic cases of ES, and rarely for a primary diagnosis of ES. Important cytopathologic features of ESs include loosely cohesive, non-overlapping clusters of polygonal cells with variable "rhabdoid-like" and spindle cells. Optimal diagnostic IHC markers in such cases include CK, EMA, AE1AE3, CD34, and INI1/SMARCB1. Clinical correlation is imperative in all

  13. Use of CCD sensors in flow cytometry for nonimaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang

    1997-05-01

    The use of charge coupled devices (CCDs) as non-imaging sensors in flow cytometric systems to replace the classical photomultplier tubes (PMTs) is very advantageous: the quantum efficiency of the CCDs is about 5 to 10 times higher as for PMTs, the charge storage capability of CCDs avoids analogue processing of the fluorescence signals, the dynamic range is up to 18 bits and the fluorescence intensity at different wavelengths can be recorded on the same chip. In this report a full frame CCD imager is used in a thermoelectrically cooled environment. The output signal for the CCD is digitized with a 12-bit ADC and the data are sorted as list-mode data typically used in flow cytometric work. The performance of the system is demonstrated with DNA staining of mammalian cells with acridine-orange, propidium iodide and ethidium bromide. DNA histograms comparable with standard flow cytometry are recorded. From the same data set pulse-widths histograms can be processed and used for doublet discrimination. The high quantum efficiency of the CCD sensors is of special interest for fluorescing dyes in the dark red or near IR wavelength range.

  14. Evolution of flow cytometry standard, FCS3.0, into a DICOM-compatible format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Suzanne B.

    1997-05-01

    The International Society for Analytical Cytology, ISAC, has developed a flow cytometry standard (FCS) to permit data interchange, ISAC will soon replace FCS 2.0 with FCS 3.0. Unfortunately, the proposed FCS 3.0 is still fraught with problems, which are of sufficient magnitude as to warrant its early replacement. The most reasonable replacement is as a supplement to the digital imaging and communications in medicine, DICOM 3.0, standard. The recent digital microscopy extension of DICOM can be extended and modified to include flow cytometry data. DICOM includes: image graphics objects, specifications for describing: studies, reports, the acquisition of the data and the individuals involved, physician, patient, etc. Storing the present FCS data in a database, which has already been accomplished with the QC tracker software, will facilitate the transition of FCS to DICOM.

  15. Flow cytometry: A powerful technology for measuring biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    A broad definition of a biomarker is that it is a measurable characteristic of a biological system that changes upon exposure to a physical or chemical insult. While the definition can be further refined, it is sufficient for the purposes of demonstrating the advantages of flow cytometry for making quantitative measurements of biomarkers. Flow cytometry and cell sorting technologies have emerged during the past 25 years to take their place alongside other essential tools used in biology such as optical and electron microscopy. This paper describes the basics of flow cytometry technology, provides illustrative examples of applications of the technology in the field of biomarkers, describes recent developments in flow cytometry that have not yet been applied to biomarker measurements, and projects future developments of the technology. The examples of uses of flow cytometry for biomarker quantification cited in this paper are meant to be illustrative and not exhaustive in the sense of providing a review of the field.

  16. [Flow cytometry: applications in transfusion medicine].

    PubMed

    Boval, B

    2000-06-01

    In transfusion medicine, flow cytometry (FCM) is a methodology combining laser radiation, optics and a computerized treatment of numerous results. We can measure size, cellularity and fluorescence intensity of cells or particles in suspension after the binding of appropriate fluorescent antibodies or fluorescent dyes. The main utilisation of FCM in transfusion medicine is for quality control of the process of leukocyte reduction in red cell concentrates or in platelet units, using commercial kits. In addition, it is used for the enumeration of CD 34 positive cells before bone marrow transplantation and for control of platelet function in platelet units. For clinical investigations, FCM may be used for red cell phenotyping, essentially to detect minor populations (chimerism), for the estimation of red cell survival, or for the detection of fetal erythrocytes. In the field of platelet immunology, FCM is an essential tool for detecting platelet antibodies (auto or allo), for platelet phenotyping or for cross-matching. In the future perhaps, FCM will permit us to detect bacterial contamination or prion protein in transfused blood cells. PMID:10919227

  17. Bioaerosol characterization by flow cytometry with fluorochrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Shih; Li, Chih-Shan

    2005-10-01

    Traditional culture and microscopy methods for evaluation of bioaerosols are slow, tedious, and rather imprecise. In this study, the application of flow cytometry that was combined with a fluorescent technique (FCM/FL) was evaluated as a technique to quickly and accurately determine and quantify the total concentration and viability of bioaerosols. The optimal conditions of five fluorescent dyes [acridine orange (AO), SYTO-13, propidium iodide (PI), YOPRO-1, and 5-cyano-2,3-ditolytetrazolium chloride (CTC)] used in FCM/FL were determined for laboratory samples of bacterial aerosols (Escherichia coli, and endospores of Bacillus subtilis) and fungal aerosols (Candida famata and Penicillium citrinum spores). Based on the measured cell concentration, fluorescence intensity, and staining efficiency as indicators for dye performance evaluation, SYTO-13 was found to be the most suitable fluorescent dye for determining the total concentration of the bioaerosols, as well as YOPRO-1 was the most suitable for determining viability. Moreover, the established optimal FCM/FL with dyes was validated for characterizing microorganism profiles from both air and water samples from the aeration tank of hospital wastewater treatment plant. In conclusion, the FCM/FL successfully assessed the total concentration and viability for bacterial and fungal microorganisms in environmental field samples. PMID:16193165

  18. Flow-cytometry techniques in radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.F.; Hale, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence exists that all blood cells are derived from HSC. These cells are of interest to radiobiologists because they are highly sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are present in the marrow at a concentration of approximately 2-3 HSC per 1000 nucleated marrow cells. In the past, only clonogenic assays requiring 8-13 days and ten irradiated recipient rodents were available for assaying HSC. Because of the importance of HSC in the post-irradiation syndrome, the authors developed a new rapid method based on flow cytometry not only to assay but also to purify and characterize HSC. This new method makes extensive use of non-clonal antibodies conjugated to fluorescent phycobiliproteins through the sulfhydryls of the hinge region of the IgG molecule. An optical bench arrangement with a dye laser and an argon laser was used for dual excitation of the phycobiliprotein-monoclonal antibody conjugates and various cellular and DNA probes. Using 4', 6-diamidino 2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAP) exclusion to identify viable cells, it was possible to follow regeneration of post-irradiated rat marrow HSC.

  19. New Horizons in Platelets Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Saboor, Muhammad; Moinuddin, Moinuddin; Ilyas, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Platelet flow cytometry is an emerging tool in diagnostic and therapeutic hematology. It is eminently suited to study the expression of platelet surface receptors both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. It can serve as a useful marker for the documentation of in vivo platelet activation, and thus, fore-warn the risk of thromboembolism in patients with diabetes mellitus, coronary syndromes, peripheral vascular diseases, and pre-eclampsia. This technique can also be extended to study and compare the effect of various antiplatelet drugs on the level of activation of platelets and to establish any dose-effect relationship of these drugs. Topographical localization of platelet granules and study of platelet-platelet and platelet-leukocyte interaction is also possible by this procedure. All these parameters serve as pointers towards the presence of activated platelets in the circulation with its thromboembolic consequences. This is a simple reliable and cost effective technique which has a wide application in the diagnosis of various inherited and acquired platelet disorders. Study of platelet cluster of differentiation (CD) markers in various inherited disorders i.e. Bernard Soulier’s disease, von Willebrand disease, Glanzman’s disease, and Grey platelet syndrome may help categories the molecular lesions in these oft under-studied disorders. PMID:23983579

  20. Applications of Flow Cytometry to Clinical Microbiology†

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Arroyo, Javier; Cantón, Rafael; Nombela, César; Sánchez-Pérez, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    Classical microbiology techniques are relatively slow in comparison to other analytical techniques, in many cases due to the need to culture the microorganisms. Furthermore, classical approaches are difficult with unculturable microorganisms. More recently, the emergence of molecular biology techniques, particularly those on antibodies and nucleic acid probes combined with amplification techniques, has provided speediness and specificity to microbiological diagnosis. Flow cytometry (FCM) allows single- or multiple-microbe detection in clinical samples in an easy, reliable, and fast way. Microbes can be identified on the basis of their peculiar cytometric parameters or by means of certain fluorochromes that can be used either independently or bound to specific antibodies or oligonucleotides. FCM has permitted the development of quantitative procedures to assess antimicrobial susceptibility and drug cytotoxicity in a rapid, accurate, and highly reproducible way. Furthermore, this technique allows the monitoring of in vitro antimicrobial activity and of antimicrobial treatments ex vivo. The most outstanding contribution of FCM is the possibility of detecting the presence of heterogeneous populations with different responses to antimicrobial treatments. Despite these advantages, the application of FCM in clinical microbiology is not yet widespread, probably due to the lack of access to flow cytometers or the lack of knowledge about the potential of this technique. One of the goals of this review is to attempt to mitigate this latter circumstance. We are convinced that in the near future, the availability of commercial kits should increase the use of this technique in the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:10755996

  1. Advances in small animal mesentery models for in vivo flow cytometry, dynamic microscopy, and drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2007-01-01

    Using animal mesentery with intravital optical microscopy is a well-established experimental model for studying blood and lymph microcirculation in vivo. Recent advances in cell biology and optical techniques provide the basis for extending this model for new applications, which should generate significantly improved experimental data. This review summarizes the achievements in this specific area, including in vivo label-free blood and lymph photothermal flow cytometry, super-sensitive fluorescence image cytometry, light scattering and speckle flow cytometry, microvessel dynamic microscopy, infrared (IR) angiography, and high-speed imaging of individual cells in fast flow. The capabilities of these techniques, using the rat mesentery model, were demonstrated in various studies; e.g., real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells, studies on vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics under normal conditions and under different interventions (e.g. lasers, drugs, nicotine), assessment of lymphatic disturbances from experimental lymphedema, monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems, and high-speed imaging of cell transient deformability in flow. In particular, the obtained results demonstrated that individual cell transportation in living organisms depends on cell type (e.g., normal blood or leukemic cells), the cell’s functional state (e.g., live, apoptotic, or necrotic), and the functional status of the organism. Possible future applications, including in vivo early diagnosis and prevention of disease, monitoring immune response and apoptosis, chemo- and radio-sensitivity tests, and drug screening, are also discussed. PMID:17226898

  2. Opto-fluidics based microscopy and flow cytometry on a cell phone for blood analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    Blood analysis is one of the most important clinical tests for medical diagnosis. Flow cytometry and optical microscopy are widely used techniques to perform blood analysis and therefore cost-effective translation of these technologies to resource limited settings is critical for various global health as well as telemedicine applications. In this chapter, we review our recent progress on the integration of imaging flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using compact, light-weight and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments integrated onto the camera module of a smartphone. In our cell-phone based opto-fluidic imaging cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are delivered into the imaging area using a disposable micro-fluidic chip that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the sides of this micro-fluidic chip without any lenses, which effectively acts as a multimode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to excite the fluorescent targets within the micro-fluidic chip. Since the excitation light propagates perpendicular to the detection path, an inexpensive plastic absorption filter is able to reject most of the scattered light and create a decent dark-field background for fluorescent imaging. With this excitation geometry, the cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the particles/cells as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the solution under test. With a similar opto-fluidic design, we have recently demonstrated imaging and automated counting of stationary blood cells (e.g., labeled white blood cells or unlabeled red blood cells) loaded within a disposable cell counting chamber. We tested the performance of this cell-phone based imaging cytometry and blood analysis platform

  3. Metastatic mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas to the liver: a cytopathology case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lili; Bajor-Dattilo, Ewa B; Das, Kasturi

    2013-02-01

    A case of metastatic mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) of the pancreas to the liver is reported. A diagnostic percutaneous US-guided FNA and core biopsy of a liver nodule was performed. The FNA smears were cellular and showed neoplastic cells in clusters with acinar formation, isolated single cells, and scattered naked nuclei. The cytoplasm was finely granular. The nuclei were relatively uniform, some with speckled chromatin and prominent nucleoli. The immunohistochemistry performed on the cell block showed strong positivity for cytokeratin AE1/AE3, chromogranin, and synaptophysin. Furthermore, the tumor cells were weakly positive for α1-antichymotrypsin. The Ki-67 mitotic index was up to 50%. Based on the morphology and supporting immunohistochemical stains, the final cytopathologic diagnosis rendered was "Positive for malignant cells. Carcinoma with mixed acinar and endocrine features." To our knowledge, this is the first report of a metastatic MANEC to the liver diagnosed based on cytology with confirmatory histology. The difficulties in the cytopathologic diagnosis and differential diagnosis of MANEC are discussed in this article. PMID:22903971

  4. Accelerated heavy ions and the lens. IV. Biomicroscopic and cytopathological analyses of the lenses of mice irradiated with 600 MeV/amu sup 56 Fe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Worgul, B.V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E. )

    1989-11-01

    The lenses of mice exposed to 600 MeV/amu iron ions were evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and cytopathological analyses. The doses ranged from 0.05 to 1.6 Gy, and the lenses were assessed at several intervals postirradiation. Cataract, the development of which is dependent on both time and dose, is significantly more advanced in all of the exposed mice when compared to the unirradiated controls. The great difference between the severity of the cataracts caused by 0.05 Gy (the lowest dose used) and those that developed spontaneously in the control animals is an indication that 0.05 Gy may far exceed the threshold dose for the production of cataracts by accelerated iron ions. Cytopathologically, a similar dose dependence was observed for a number of end points including micronucleation, interphase death, and meridional row disorganization. In addition the exposure to the 56Fe ions produced a long-term effect on the mitotic population and a pronounced focal loss of epithelial cytoarchitecture. The microscopic changes support the view that the mechanism of heavy-ion-induced cataractogenesis is the same as that for cataracts caused by low-LET radiation.

  5. Enveloped double-stranded DNA insect virus with novel structure and cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Brian A.

    1983-01-01

    An unusual type of virus has been isolated from larvae of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Lepidoptera; Noctuidae). The virus infects a variety of tissues, including fat body, epidermis, and tracheal matrix, causing a chronic, fatal disease. Viral replication begins in the nucleus and is accompanied by invagination of the nuclear envelope and extensive nuclear and cellular hypertrophy. The nuclear envelope eventually ruptures and fragments, after which viral-induced membranes are assembled along planes through the cell and around its periphery. Subsequently, these membranes coalesce, partitioning most of the cell, including viroplasms and virions in various stages of assembly, among a cluster of vesicles. The vesicles dissociate and are liberated into the hemolymph where they accumulate in large numbers (>108 vesicles per ml), causing the blood to become opaque white. The virus has been isolated from T. ni and transmitted per os and by injection to T. ni and several other species of the family Noctuidae. The virions produced by this virus are large (ca. 130 × 400 nm), enveloped, and allantoid in shape with complex symmetry and contain apparently linear, double-stranded DNA of Mr of ≈ 1.00 × 108. The envelope contains subunits arranged in a hexagonal pattern that impart a distinctive reticular appearance to virions in negatively stained preparations. The unique structural and developmental properties of this virus indicate that it is a member of a group of enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses not observed previously. Images PMID:16593397

  6. Deep profiling of multitube flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Kieran; Aghaeepour, Nima; Parker, Jeremy; Hogge, Donna; Karsan, Aly; Dalal, Bakul; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Deep profiling the phenotypic landscape of tissues using high-throughput flow cytometry (FCM) can provide important new insights into the interplay of cells in both healthy and diseased tissue. But often, especially in clinical settings, the cytometer cannot measure all the desired markers in a single aliquot. In these cases, tissue is separated into independently analysed samples, leaving a need to electronically recombine these to increase dimensionality. Nearest-neighbour (NN) based imputation fulfils this need but can produce artificial subpopulations. Clustering-based NNs can reduce these, but requires prior domain knowledge to be able to parameterize the clustering, so is unsuited to discovery settings. Results: We present flowBin, a parameterization-free method for combining multitube FCM data into a higher-dimensional form suitable for deep profiling and discovery. FlowBin allocates cells to bins defined by the common markers across tubes in a multitube experiment, then computes aggregate expression for each bin within each tube, to create a matrix of expression of all markers assayed in each tube. We show, using simulated multitube data, that flowType analysis of flowBin output reproduces the results of that same analysis on the original data for cell types of >10% abundance. We used flowBin in conjunction with classifiers to distinguish normal from cancerous cells. We used flowBin together with flowType and RchyOptimyx to profile the immunophenotypic landscape of NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia, and present a series of novel cell types associated with that mutation. Availability and implementation: FlowBin is available in Bioconductor under the Artistic 2.0 free open source license. All data used are available in FlowRepository under accessions: FR-FCM-ZZYA, FR-FCM-ZZZK and FR-FCM-ZZES. Contact: rbrinkman@bccrc.ca. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25600947

  7. Apoptosis and Beyond: Cytometry in Studies of Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Telford, William; Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    A cell undergoing apoptosis demonstrates multitude of characteristic morphological and biochemical features, which vary depending on the inducer of apoptosis, cell type and the “time window” at which the process of apoptosis is observed. Because the gross majority of apoptotic hallmarks can be revealed by flow and image cytometry, the cytometric methods become a technology of choice in diverse studies of cellular demise. Variety of cytometric methods designed to identify apoptotic cells, detect particular events of apoptosis and probe mechanisms associated with this mode of cell death have been developed during the past two decades. In the present review, we outline commonly used methods that are based on the assessment of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, activation of caspases, DNA fragmentation, and plasma membrane alterations. We also present novel developments in the field such as the use of cyanine SYTO and TO-PRO family of probes. Strategies of selecting the optimal multiparameter approaches, as well as potential difficulties in the experimental procedures, are thoroughly summarized. PMID:21722800

  8. Improving the signal analysis for in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhenyu; Yang, Ping; Wei, Dan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    At early stage of cancer, a small number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) appear in the blood circulation. Thus, early detection of malignant circulating tumor cells has great significance for timely treatment to reduce the cancer death rate. We have developed an in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC) to monitor the metastatic process of CTCs and record the signals from target cells. Information of target cells which is helpful to the early therapy would be obtained through analyzing and processing the signals. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The PAFC technique can detect signals from circulating tumor cells or other particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly.

  9. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  10. Peripancreatic paraganglioma: a potential diagnostic challenge in cytopathology and surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Aatur D; Hruban, Ralph H; Fabre, Monique; Imura, Johji; Schulick, Richard; Wolfgang, Christopher; Ali, Syed Z

    2011-10-01

    Paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine neoplasms arising in extra-adrenal chromaffin cells of the autonomic nervous system. In rare instances, paragangliomas present around and involve the pancreas, thereby mimicking one of the more common primary pancreatic lesions. These neoplasms present considerable diagnostic difficulty not only for the clinician and radiologist but also for the pathologist. We have collected a series of 9 peripancreatic paragangliomas clinically simulating a primary pancreatic lesion. The paragangliomas were diagnosed in 4 men and 5 women with an age range of 37 to 78 years (mean, 50 y). Patients presented clinically either with diffuse epigastric and abdominal pain (7 of 9, 78%) or with an incidental mass (2 of 9, 22%) discovered on routine radiographic imaging. All patients were found to have mass lesions suspicious for a primary pancreatic neoplasm on radiographic examination. The lesions were predominantly located in the body of the pancreas (5 of 9, 56%) and ranged in size from 5.5 to 17.0 cm (mean, 10.0 cm). Five of 9 (56%) neoplasms also demonstrated cystic change. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was performed on 6 cases; however, the diagnostic accuracy was low, with 3 of 6 (50%) neoplasms misdiagnosed as pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PanNET) (n=1), spindle cell neoplasm (n=1), or pseudocyst (n=1). In addition, 2 of 8 (25%) surgically resected tumors were misdiagnosed by the referring pathologist as a PanNET. Immunohistochemistry was performed on all cases, confirming the characteristic 2-cell populations: chief cells (synaptophysin positive and chromogranin A positive) and sustentacular cells (S-100 protein positive). Follow-up information was available for all patients and ranged from 2 months to 11.6 years (mean, 2.7 y). Three of 9 (33%) patients developed metastatic disease, and 2 of these 3 died of their disease at 2.8 and 4.6 years after diagnosis. In summary, in unsuspected cases, interpretation of FNA and surgical pathology

  11. Immunophenotyping by slide-based cytometry and by flow cytometry are comparable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstner, Andreas O.; Laffers, Wiebke; Mittag, Anja; Daehnert, Ingo; Lenz, Domnik; Bootz, Friedrich; Bocsi, Jozsef; Tarnok, Attila

    2005-03-01

    Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) is performed by flow cytometry (FCM) as the golden standard. Slide based cytometry systems for example laser scanning cytometer (LSC) can give additional information (repeated staining and scanning, morphology). In order to adequately judge on the clinical usefulness of immunophenotyping by LSC it is obligatory to compare it with the long established FCM assays. We performed this study to systematically compare the two methods, FCM and LSC for immunophenotyping and to test the correlation of the results. Leucocytes were stained with directly labeled monoclonal antibodies with whole blood staining method. Aliquots of the same paraformaldehyde fixed specimens were analyzed in a FACScan (BD-Biosciences) using standard protocols and parallel with LSC (CompuCyte) after placing to glass slide, drying and fixation by aceton and 7-AAD staining. Calculating the percentage distribution of PBLs obtained by LSC and by FCM shows very good correlation with regression coefficients close to 1.0 for the major populations (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes), as well as for the lymphocyte sub-populations (T-helper-, T-cytotoxic-, B-, NK-cells). LSC can be recommended for immunophenotyping of PBLs especially in cases where only very limited sample volumes are available or where additional analysis of the cells" morphology is important. There are limitations in the detection of rare leucocytes or weak antigens where appropriate amplification steps for immunofluorescence should be engaged.

  12. Authors attain comparable or slightly higher rates of citation publishing in an open access journal (CytoJournal) compared to traditional cytopathology journals - A five year (2007-2011) experience

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Nora K.; Nathan, Romil; Ahmed, Yasin K.; Shidham, Vinod B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The era of Open Access (OA) publication, a platform which serves to better disseminate scientific knowledge, is upon us, as more OA journals are in existence than ever before. The idea that peer-reviewed OA publication leads to higher rates of citation has been put forth and shown to be true in several publications. This is a significant benefit to authors and is in addition to another relatively less obvious but highly critical component of the OA charter, i.e. retention of the copyright by the authors in the public domain. In this study, we analyzed the citation rates of OA and traditional non-OA publications specifically for authors in the field of cytopathology. Design: We compared the citation patterns for authors who had published in both OA and traditional non-OA peer-reviewed, scientific, cytopathology journals. Citations in an OA publication (CytoJournal) were analyzed comparatively with traditional non-OA cytopathology journals (Acta Cytologica, Cancer Cytopathology, Cytopathology, and Diagnostic Cytopathology) using the data from web of science citation analysis site (based on which the impact factors (IF) are calculated). After comparing citations per publication, as well as a time adjusted citation quotient (which takes into account the time since publication), we also analyzed the statistics after excluding the data for meeting abstracts. Results: Total 28 authors published 314 publications as articles and meeting abstracts (25 authors after excluding the abstracts). The rate of citation and time adjusted citation quotient were higher for OA in the group where abstracts were included (P < 0.05 for both). The rates were also slightly higher for OA than non-OA when the meeting abstracts were excluded, but the difference was statistically insignificant (P = 0.57 and P = 0.45). Conclusion We observed that for the same author, the publications in the OA journal attained a higher rate of citation than the publications in the traditional non

  13. New fluorogenic dyes for analysis of cellular processes by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Kalina; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Stoitsova, Stoyanka; Chausheva, Stela; Vasilev, Aleksey; Lesev, Nedyalko; Dimitrova, Petya; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging by flow cytometry are two of the fastest growing areas in the medical and biological research. Innovations in fluorescent chemistry and synthesis of new dye probes are closely related to the development of service equipment such as light sources, and detection techniques. Among compounds known as fluorescent labels, the cyanine-based dyes have become widely used since they have high excitation coefficients, narrow emission bands and high fluorescence upon binding to nucleic acids. The key methods for evaluation of apoptosis and cell cycle allow measuring DNA content by several flow cytometric techniques. We have synthesized new monomethine cyanine dyes and have characterized their applicability for staining of live and/or apoptotic cells. Imaging experiments by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have been also performed. Two of the dyes have shown high-affinity binding to the nuclei at high dilutions, up to 10(-9)M. Flow cytometry and CLSM have confirmed that these dyes labeled selectively non-living, e.g. ethanol-fixed cells that makes them appropriate for estimations of cell viability and apoptosis. The novel structures proved to be appropriate also for analysis of the cell cycle. PMID:24231377

  14. The early fluidic and optical physics of cytometry.

    PubMed

    Watson, J V

    1999-02-15

    All forms of cytometry, depend on the basic laws of physics, including those of fluidics, optics, and electronics, most of which were established centuries ago. Flow cytometry depends critically on the fluidics presenting each individual cell with precision to the sensing volume. This is intersected by a high-intensity light source, and light scattering and fluorescence from suitably stained constituents in each cell are captured by the light-collecting optics and measured. The works and observations of Bernoulli and Euler in the 18th century, Reynolds in the 19th century, and Crosland-Taylor in the 20th century in the field of fluid dynamics laid the foundations for hydrodynamic focussing, which is the primary prerequisite for presenting individual cells to the sensing volume. In addition, electrostatic cell sorters must have the ability to generate stable droplet formation in the jet-stream issuing from the flow chamber nozzle. The origins here can be traced to work carried out in the early to mid-19th century by Savart, Magnus, and Thomson. Flow, image, and confocal cytometry are all dependent on the laws of optics, including those of reflection and refraction as well as numerous other optical principles. The observations and works of Socrates, Ptolemy, Snel, and Descartes between about BC 370 and 1637 were of seminal importance in developing the laws of reflection and refraction. In the mid-17th century Hooke illustrated the power of magnifying glasses and microscopy in his Micrographia and Newton was responsible for explaining colours in the spectrum. Huygens, toward the end of the 17th century, put forward the concept of point source light propagation contributing to a wave front. Finally, Thomas Young, early in the 19th century, established the wave form of light from interference patterns. Most people will be familiar with some of these discoveries and the investigators who carried out the work; some people will be familiar with all of these. However, very

  15. Laser scanning cytometry as a tool for biomarker validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittag, Anja; Füldner, Christiane; Lehmann, Jörg; Tarnok, Attila

    2013-03-01

    Biomarkers are essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. As diverse is the range of diseases the broad is the range of biomarkers and the material used for analysis. Whereas body fluids can be relatively easily obtained and analyzed, the investigation of tissue is in most cases more complicated. The same applies for the screening and the evaluation of new biomarkers and the estimation of the binding of biomarkers found in animal models which need to be transferred into applications in humans. The latter in particular is difficult if it recognizes proteins or cells in tissue. A better way to find suitable cellular biomarkers for immunoscintigraphy or PET analyses may be therefore the in situ analysis of the cells in the respective tissue. In this study we present a method for biomarker validation using Laser Scanning Cytometry which allows the emulation of future in vivo analysis. The biomarker validation is exemplarily shown for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on synovial membrane. Cryosections were scanned and analyzed by phantom contouring. Adequate statistical methods allowed the identification of suitable markers and combinations. The fluorescence analysis of the phantoms allowed the discrimination between synovial membrane of RA patients and non-RA control sections by using median fluorescence intensity and the "affected area". As intensity and area are relevant parameters of in vivo imaging (e.g. PET scan) too, the presented method allows emulation of a probable outcome of in vivo imaging, i.e. the binding of the target protein and hence, the validation of the potential of the respective biomarker.

  16. Web-Based Analysis and Publication of Flow Cytometry Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Nikesh; Krutzik, Peter O.; Irish, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Cytobank is a web-based application for storage, analysis, and sharing of flow cytometry experiments. Researchers use a web browser to log in and use a wide range of tools developed for basic and advanced flow cytometry. In addition to providing access to standard cytometry tools from any computer, Cytobank creates a platform and community for developing new analysis and publication tools. Figure layouts created on Cytobank are designed to allow transparent access to the underlying experiment annotation and data processing steps. Since all flow cytometry files and analysis data are stored on a central server, experiments and figures can be viewed or edited by anyone with the proper permissions from any computer with Internet access. Once a primary researcher has performed the initial analysis of the data, collaborators can engage in experiment analysis and make their own figure layouts using the gated, compensated experiment files. Cytobank is available to the scientific community at www.cytobank.org PMID:20578106

  17. The application of flow cytometry to histocompatibility testing.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, T; Martin, S; Robson, A J

    2000-03-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique that enables the sensitive and quantitative detection of both cellular antigens and bound biological moieties. This article reviews how flow cytometry is increasingly being used as histocompatibility laboratories for the analysis of antibody specificity and HLA antigen expression. A basic description of flow cytometry principles and standardisation is given, together with an outline of clinical application in the areas of pre-transplant cross-matching, antibody screening, post-transplant antibody monitoring and HLA-B27 detection. It is concluded that flow cytometry is a useful multi-parametric analytical tool, yielding clinical benefit especially in the identification of patients at risk of early transplant rejection. PMID:10834606

  18. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula. PMID:27068992

  19. Visible and Near Infrared Fluorescence Spectral Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, John P.; Condello, Danilo; Duggan, Erika; Naivar, Mark; Novo, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a long standing interest in measuring complete emission spectra from individual cells in flow cytometry. We have developed flow cytometry instruments and analysis approaches to enable this to be done routinely and robustly. Our spectral flow cytometers use a holographic grating to disperse light from single cells onto a CCD for high speed, wavelength-resolved detection. Customized software allows the single cell spectral data to be displayed and analyzed to produce new spectra-derived parameters. We show that familiar reference and calibration beads can be employed to quantitatively assess instrument performance. We use microspheres stained with six different quantum dots to compare a virtual bandpass filter approach with classic least squares (CLS) spectral unmixing, and then use antibody capture beads and CLS unmixing to demonstrate immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells using spectral flow cytometry. Finally, we characterize and evaluate several near infrared (NIR) emitting fluorophores for use in spectral flow cytometry. Spectral flow cytometry offers a number of attractive features for single cell analysis, including a simplified optical path, high spectral resolution, and streamlined approaches to quantitative multiparameter measurements. The availability of robust instrumentation, software, and analysis approaches will facilitate the development of spectral flow cytometry applications. PMID:23225549

  20. Postbrushing and fine-needle aspiration biopsy follow-up and treatment options for patients with pancreatobiliary lesions: the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kurtycz, Daniel; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Michaels, Claire; Young, Nancy; Schmidt, C Max; Farrell, James; Gopal, Deepak; Simeone, Diane; Merchant, Nipun B; Field, Andrew; Pitman, Martha Bishop

    2014-04-01

    The papanicolaou society of cytopathology (PSC) has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology, ancillary testing, and postprocedure management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the PSC web site [www.papsociety.org]. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on the follow-up and treatment options for patients after procedures performed for obtaining cytology samples for the evaluation of biliary strictures and solid and cystic masses in the pancreas. These recommendations follow the six-tiered terminology and nomenclature scheme proposed by Committee III. PMID:24639399

  1. Flow Cytometry Enables Multiplexed Measurements of Genetically Encoded Intramolecular FRET Sensors Suitable for Screening.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Jaimee; Zhao, Ziyan; Geyer, Rory J; Barra, Melanie M; Balunas, Marcy J; Zweifach, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Genetically encoded sensors based on intramolecular FRET between CFP and YFP are used extensively in cell biology research. Flow cytometry has been shown to offer a means to measure CFP-YFP FRET; we suspected it would provide a unique way to conduct multiplexed measurements from cells expressing different FRET sensors, which is difficult to do with microscopy, and that this could be used for screening. We confirmed that flow cytometry accurately measures FRET signals using cells transiently transfected with an ERK activity reporter, comparing responses measured with imaging and cytometry. We created polyclonal long-term transfectant lines, each expressing a different intramolecular FRET sensor, and devised a way to bar-code four distinct populations of cells. We demonstrated the feasibility of multiplexed measurements and determined that robust multiplexed measurements can be conducted in plate format. To validate the suitability of the method for screening, we measured responses from a plate of bacterial extracts that in unrelated experiments we had determined contained the protein kinase C (PKC)-activating compound teleocidin A-1. The multiplexed assay correctly identifying the teleocidin A-1-containing well. We propose that multiplexed cytometric FRET measurements will be useful for analyzing cellular function and for screening compound collections. PMID:26908592

  2. Flow cytometry and single nucleus sorting for Cre-based analysis of changes in transcriptional states.

    PubMed

    Samadder, Partha; Weng, Ning; Doetschman, Thomas; Heimark, Ronald L; Galbraith, David W

    2016-05-01

    The organs of eukaryotic organisms comprise complex interspersions of cell types, whose different molecular activities, and corresponding cellular states, cooperate during development to produce the final, functional organ. Dysfunction of organs in disease, particularly oncogenesis, initiates with changes of state of a minor subset of cells. It therefore is hard to detect early molecular indicators of disease within an overwhelming background of normal cells. Flow cytometry and sorting provides a convenient way to purify minority subpopulations, if a specific fluorophore can be unambiguously and exclusively associated with this subpopulation. We have generated a number of transgenic mouse lines expressing a nuclear-localized version of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), within which the production of a chimeric histone 2B-GFP protein occurs under the control of a constitutively-active, actin-derived promoter, separated by a Floxed-STOP sequence. In the presence of Cre recombinase, within F1 progeny of these mouse lines, excision of the STOP sequence activates transcription which results in the emergence of cells containing green fluorescent nuclei. We describe the characterization of these lines using a combination of microscopic imaging, flow cytometry and sorting, and Reverse-Transcription polymerase chain reaction of transcripts within single sorted nuclei isolated from tissue homogenates. These lines should be particularly useful for analysis of transcriptional changes in oncogenesis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27003621

  3. Algorithmic tools for mining high-dimensional cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Cariad; Maecker, Holden T.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of mass cytometry has lead to an unprecedented increase in the number of analytes measured in individual cells, thereby increasing the complexity and information content of cytometric data. While this technology is ideally suited to detailed examination of the immune system, the applicability of the different methods for analyzing such complex data are less clear. Conventional data analysis by ‘manual’ gating of cells in biaxial dotplots is often subjective, time consuming, and neglectful of much of the information contained in a highly dimensional cytometric dataset. Algorithmic data mining has the promise to eliminate these concerns and several such tools have been recently applied to mass cytometry data. Herein, we review computational data mining tools that have been used to analyze mass cytometry data, outline their differences, and comment on their strengths and limitations. This review will help immunologists identify suitable algorithmic tools for their particular projects. PMID:26188071

  4. Application of Flow Cytometry in the Evaluation of Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Thomas A; Madkaikar, Manisha; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2016-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of the immune system. Currently more than 250 different PIDDs with a known genetic defect have been recognized. The diagnosis of many of these disorders is supported strongly by a wide variety of flow cytometry applications. Flow cytometry offers a rapid and sensitive tool for diagnosis and classification of PIDDs. It is applicable in the initial workup and subsequent management of several primary immunodeficiency diseases. As our understanding of the pathogenesis and management of these diseases increases, the majority of these tests can be easily established in the diagnostic laboratory. Thus, the focus of this article is on the application of flow cytometry in the diagnosis and/or evaluation of PIDDs. PMID:26865168

  5. Flow cytometry measurements of human chromosome kinetochore labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Malloy, P.; Sumner, A.T.

    1989-03-01

    A method for the preparation and measurement of immunofluorescent human chromosome centromeres in suspension is described using CREST antibodies, which bind to the centromeric region of chromosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated antihuman antibodies provide the fluorescent label. Labeled chromosomes are examined on microscope slides and by flow cytometry. In both cases a dye which binds to DNA is added to provide identification of the chromosome groups. Sera from different CREST patients vary in their ability to bind to chromosome arms in addition to the centromeric region. Flow cytometry and microfluorimetry measurements have shown that with a given CREST serum the differences in kinetochore fluorescence between chromosomes are only minor. Flow cytometry experiments to relate the number of dicentric chromosomes, induced by in vitro radiation of peripheral blood cells to the slightly increased number of chromosomes with above-average kinetochore fluorescence did not produce decisive radiation dosimetry results.

  6. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium in dairy products with flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, R G; Pinder, A C

    1994-01-01

    Flow cytometry, combined with fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies, offers advantages of speed and sensitivity for the detection of specific pathogenic bacteria in foods. We investigated the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in eggs and milk. Using a sample clearing procedure, we determined that the detection limit was on the order of 10(3) cells per ml after a total analysis time of 40 min. After 6 h of nonselective enrichment, the detection limits were 10 cells per ml for milk and 1 cell per ml for eggs, even in the presence of a 10,000-fold excess of Escherichia coli cells. Images PMID:7811064

  7. Platinum-conjugated antibodies for application in mass cytometry.

    PubMed

    Mei, Henrik E; Leipold, Michael D; Maecker, Holden T

    2016-03-01

    Mass cytometry has overcome limitations of fluorescent single cell cytometry by allowing for the measurement of up to currently ∼40 different parameters on a single cell level. However, the cellular proteome comprises many more potential analytes, and current mass cytometry instrumentation allows for theoretically up to 121 different mass detection channels. The labeling of specific probes with appropriate metal ions is a significant hurdle for exploiting more of mass cytometry's analytical capacity. To this end, we here describe the labeling of antibody with natural abundance or isotopically purified platinum as formulated in cisplatin and circumventing the use of chelator-loaded polymers. We confirm the utility of cisplatin-antibody-conjugates for surface, intracellular, and phosphoepitope-specific immunophenotyping, as well as for application in cell surface CD45-based barcoding. Cisplatin-labeling of antibody increases the analytical capacity of the CyTOF(®) platform by two channels based on available reagents, and has the potential to add a total of six channels for detection of specific probes, thus helping to better extend the analytical mass range of mass cytometers. PMID:26355391

  8. Deep Profiling Human T Cell Heterogeneity by Mass Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Newell, E W

    2016-01-01

    Advances of mass cytometry and high-dimensional single-cell data analysis have brought cellular immunological research into a new generation. By coupling these two powerful technology platforms, immunologists now have more tools to resolve the tremendous diversity of immune cell subsets, and their heterogeneous functionality. Since the first introduction of mass cytometry, many reports have been published using this novel technology to study a range of cell types. At the outset, studies of human hematopoietic stem cell and peripheral CD8(+) T cells using mass cytometry have shad the light of future experimental approach in interrogating immune cell phenotypic and functional diversity. Here, we briefly revisit the past and present understanding of T cell heterogeneity, and the technologies that facilitate this knowledge. In addition, we review the current progress of mass cytometry and high-dimensional cytometric analysis, including the methodology, panel design, experimental procedure, and choice of computational algorithms with a special focus on their utility in exploration of human T cell immunology. PMID:27235682

  9. Per-channel basis normalization methods for flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Florian; Khodabakhshi, Alireza Hadj; Bashashati, Ali; Wong, Chao-Jen; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Weng, Andrew P.; Seifert-Margolis, Vicky; Bourcier, Katarzyna; Asare, Adam; Lumley, Thomas; Gentleman, Robert; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Between-sample variation in high throughput flow cytometry data poses a significant challenge for analysis of large scale data sets, such as those derived from multi-center clinical trials. It is often hard to match biologically relevant cell populations across samples due to technical variation in sample acquisition and instrumentation differences. Thus normalization of data is a critical step prior to analysis, particularly in large-scale data sets from clinical trials, where group specific differences may be subtle and patient-to-patient variation common. We have developed two normalization methods that remove technical between-sample variation by aligning prominent features (landmarks) in the raw data on a per-channel basis. These algorithms were tested on two independent flow cytometry data sets by comparing manually gated data, either individually for each sample or using static gating templates, before and after normalization. Our results show a marked improvement in the overlap between manual and static gating when the data are normalized, thereby facilitating the use of automated analyses on large flow cytometry data sets. Such automated analyses are essential for high throughput flow cytometry. PMID:19899135

  10. An Active, Collaborative Approach to Learning Skills in Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D.; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N.; Röhrig, Kimberley J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow…

  11. Flow: Statistics, visualization and informatics for flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Frelinger, Jacob; Kepler, Thomas B; Chan, Cliburn

    2008-01-01

    Flow is an open source software application for clinical and experimental researchers to perform exploratory data analysis, clustering and annotation of flow cytometric data. Flow is an extensible system that offers the ease of use commonly found in commercial flow cytometry software packages and the statistical power of academic packages like the R BioConductor project. PMID:18559108

  12. Novel Methods of Determining Urinary Calculi Composition: Petrographic Thin Sectioning of Calculi and Nanoscale Flow Cytometry Urinalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Carson T; Ali, Sohrab N; Tailly, Thomas; Olvera-Posada, Daniel; Alenezi, Husain; Power, Nicholas E; Hou, Jinqiang; St. Amant, Andre H; Luyt, Leonard G; Wood, Stephen; Wu, Charles; Razvi, Hassan; Leong, Hon S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate determination of urinary stone composition has significant bearing on understanding pathophysiology, choosing treatment modalities and preventing recurrence. A need exists for improved methods to determine stone composition. Urine of 31 patients with known renal calculi was examined with nanoscale flow cytometry and the calculi collected during surgery subsequently underwent petrographic thin sectioning with polarized and fluorescent microscopy. Fluorescently labeled bisphosphonate probes (Alendronate-fluorescein/Alendronate-Cy5) were developed for nanoscale flow cytometry to enumerate nanocrystals that bound the fluorescent probes. Petrographic sections of stones were also imaged by fluorescent and polarized light microscopy with composition analysis correlated to alendronate +ve nanocrystal counts in corresponding urine samples. Urine samples from patients with Ca2+ and Mg2+ based calculi exhibited the highest alendronate +ve nanocrystal counts, ranging from 100–1000 nm in diameter. This novel urine based assay was in agreement with composition determined by petrographic thin sections with Alendronate probes. In some cases, high alendronate +ve nanocrystal counts indicated a Ca2+ or Mg2+ composition, as confirmed by petrographic analysis, overturning initial spectrophotometric diagnosis of stone composition. The combination of nanoscale flow cytometry and petrographic thin sections offer an alternative means for determining stone composition. Nanoscale flow cytometry of alendronate +ve nanocrystals alone may provide a high-throughput means of evaluating stone burden. PMID:26771074

  13. Nanocrystal-based biomimetic system for quantitative flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Peter; Dobrovolskaia, Marina; Kang, HyeongGon; Clarke, Matthew; Patri, Anil K.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2007-02-01

    Flow cytometry has been instrumental in rapid analysis of single cells since the 1970s. One of the common approaches is the immunofluorescence study involving labeling of cells with antibodies conjugated to organic fluorophores. More recently, as the application of flow cytometry extended from simple cell detection to single-cell proteomic analysis, the need of determining the actual number of antigens in a single cell has driven the flow cytomery technique towards a quantitative methodology. However, organic fluorophores are challenging to use as probes for quantitative detection due to the lack of photostability and of quantitative fluorescence standards. National Institute of Standards and Technologies (NIST) provides a set of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled beads, RM 8640, which is the only nationally recognized fluorescent particle standard. On the other hand, optical characteristics of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots or QDs are superior to traditional dye molecules for the use as tags for biological and chemical fluorescent sensors and detectors. Compelling advantages of QDs include long photostability, broad spectral coverage, easy excitation, and suitability for multiplexed sensing. Recently, novel surface coatings have been developed to render QDs water soluble and bio-conjugation ready, leading to their use as fluorescent tags and sensors for a variety of biological applications including immunolabeling of cells. Here, we describe our approach of using fluorescent semiconductor QDs as a novel tool for quantitative flow cytometry detection. Our strategy involves the development of immuno-labeled QD-conjugated silica beads as "biomimetic cells." In addition to flow cytometry, the QD-conjugated silica beads were characterized by fluorescence microscopy to quantitate the number of QDs attached to a single silica bead. Our approach enables flow cytometry analysis to be highly sensitive, quantitative, and encompass a wide dynamic range of

  14. Multiparametric cytometry for exploration of complex cellular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gondois-Rey, Françoise; Granjeaud, Samuel; Kieu, Suong Le Thi; Herrera, Diana; Hirsch, Ivan; Olive, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    The development of polychromatic cytometry has contributed to significant progress in the field of human immunology. Although numerous functional studies of rare cell populations have been performed using this technology, here we used polychromatic cytometry to explore the dynamics of complex cellular systems implicated in innate immunity. We used PBMC stimulated with live influenza virus as an experimental model. We studied the time course of activation of PBMC, which contain DC, monocytes, and NK cells, all of which are, in addition to their innate immune properties, susceptible to Flu infection. We developed 12 color panels to investigate intracellular expression of IFN-α, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, IFN-γ, CD107, and influenza virus nucleoprotein simultaneously in these cell populations. These panels allowed reproducible determination of activation markers induced in DC after their direct exposure to various stimulations or in NK cells by indirect DC-mediated activation within the complex cellular environment. The ability to use a low number of cells and reduced quantities of reagents permitted us to perform kinetic experiments. The power of polychromatic cytometry associated with bioinformatic tools allowed us to analyze the multiple functional data generated as dynamic clustering maps. These maps present a readily understandable view of activation events induced in different populations of PBMC. In addition, it reveals new information on the coordination of the complex pathways induced and on the cellular interactions that sustained indirect DC-mediated NK cell activation. Our work shows that polychromatic cytometry is a tool for discoveries in unexplored complex cell systems, at the crossroads of immunology and virology. © 2012 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:22278900

  15. In vivo flow cytometry and time-resolved near-IR angiography and lymphography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Brock, Robert W.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2007-05-01

    Integration of photoacoustic and photothermal techniques with high-speed, high-resolution transmission and fluorescence microscopy shows great potential for in vivo flow cytometry and indocyanine green (ICG) near-infrared (IR) angiography of blood and lymph microvessels. In particular, the capabilities of in vivo flow cytometry using rat mesentery and nude mouse ear models are demonstrated for real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells in skin, mesentery, lymph nodes, liver, kidney; studying vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics; monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems; high-speed imaging of cell deformability in flow; and label-free real-time monitoring of single cell extravasation from blood vessel lumen into tissue. As presented, the advantages of ICG IR-angiography include estimation of time resolved dye dynamics (appearance and clearance) in blood and lymph microvessels using fluorescent and photoacoustic modules of the integrated technique. These new approaches are important for monitoring and quantifying metastatic and apoptotic cells; comparative measurements of plasma and cell velocities; analysis of immune responses; monitoring of circulating macromolecules, chylomicrons, bacteria, viruses and nanoparticles; molecular imaging. In the future, we believe that the integrated technique presented will have great potential for translation to early disease diagnoses (e.g. cancer) or assessment of innovative therapeutic interventions in humans.

  16. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications. PMID:25938973

  17. Preparation of cells from paraffin-embedded tissue for cytometry and cytomorphologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    van Driel-Kulker, A M; Mesker, W E; van der Burg, M J; Ploem, J S

    1987-06-01

    A method is described for the preparation of monolayer smears from paraffin-embedded tissue. The smears are suitable for automated image analysis and DNA measurements while still allowing interpretation of nuclear morphology. The proposed technique uses enzyme treatment and syringing for cell dispersal. The preparation of cell monolayers is performed by cytocentrifugation. After staining the specimens with gallocyanin, nuclear DNA can be measured. Automated DNA measurements using the Leyden Television Analysis System (LEYTAS) showed coefficients of variation of 4.5% for the diploid cell population of suspended benign tissue. After DNA measurements, the specimens are counterstained using orange G and eosin. Since gallocyanin has spectral properties similar to those of hematoxylin, the obtained end product is comparable to specimens stained according to the routinely used Papanicolaou procedure. Using this technique, image cytometry can be applied to paraffin-embedded tissue in combination with conventional cytomorphologic study of the cells. PMID:3304329

  18. Barrett's esophagus. Correlation between mucin histochemistry, flow cytometry, and histologic diagnosis for predicting increased cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Haggitt, R. C.; Reid, B. J.; Rabinovitch, P. S.; Rubin, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    A predominance of sulfated mucin in the nongoblet columnar cells of Barrett's specialized metaplastic epithelium has been postulated to be a form of mild dysplasia and to indicate an increased risk of adenocarcinoma. Flow cytometry for the analysis of nuclear DNA content and cell cycle parameters has also been postulated to be an objective aid in the diagnosis of dysplasia and carcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. The authors investigated the relationship among sulfated mucin, flow cytometric data, and histologic diagnosis in each of 152 biopsies from 42 patients who had Barrett's specialized metaplastic epithelium. Sulfated mucin, as detected by the high iron diamine-Alcian blue stain, was present in biopsies from 8 of 11 (73%) patients with the histologic diagnosis of dysplasia or carcinoma, in 7 of 9 (78%) patients whose biopsies were indefinite for dysplasia, and in 12 of 22 (55%) patients whose biopsies were negative for dysplasia (P = 0.37). Sulfated mucins predominated in 9%, 22%, and 9% of the patients, respectively (P = 0.56). Abnormal flow cytometry (aneuploidy or increased G2/tetraploid fraction) was found in all patients with the histologic diagnosis of dysplasia or carcinoma, in 3 of 9 (33%) indefinite for dysplasia, and in 1 of 22 (5%) negative for dysplasia (P = less than 0.0001). Neither the presence nor the predominance of sulfated mucin in the specialized metaplastic epithelium of Barrett's esophagus has sufficiently high sensitivity or specificity for dysplasia or carcinoma to be of value in managing patients. Abnormal flow cytometry shows excellent correlation with the histologic diagnosis of dysplasia and carcinoma; it detects a subset of patients whose biopsies are histologically indefinite or negative for dysplasia, but who have flow cytometric abnormalities similar to those otherwise seen only in dysplasia and carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3354644

  19. Cytometry: The Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology, Supplement 6, 1993: Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Landay, A.L.; Shapiro, H.M.; Visser, J.W.M.

    1993-12-31

    This contains the 465 presentation and poster abstracts for the XVI Congress of the International Society for Analytical Cytology, March 1993. Plenary Sessions included the following: Industrial Cytometry; Clinical Issues (in Cytology); Molecular Pathology; biotechnology; new biology; temporal cytometry.

  20. Heparin reduces nonspecific eosinophil staining artifacts in mass cytometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Adeeb H; Tordesillas, Leticia; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of heterogeneous cell samples by mass cytometry (CyTOF) relies on the assumption that metal labeled antibodies accurately bind to their target antigens. We report a previously unappreciated experimental artifact of non-specific antibody binding by eosinophils during intracellular CyTOF analysis of human whole blood samples. We hypothesized that this non-specific binding results from a charge-based interaction between the metal-labeled antibodies and highly cationic proteins found in eosinophillic granules and found that this non-specific staining artifact could be reduced to background levels with a simple blocking protocol using heparin as a competing anionic protein. This protocol eliminates a potential source of erroneous data interpretation in all experiments involving intracellular staining of human whole blood samples, and allows accurate assessment of dynamic changes in intracellular proteins in eosinophils by CyTOF. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27061608

  1. CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF AUTOMATED FLOW CYTOMETRY DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Finak, Greg; Hoos, Holger; Mosmann, Tim R.; Gottardo, Raphael; Brinkman, Ryan; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods for flow cytometry (FCM) data processing rely on subjective manual gating. Recently, several groups have developed computational methods for identifying cell populations in multidimensional FCM data. The Flow Cytometry: Critical Assessment of Population Identification Methods (FlowCAP) challenges were established to compare the performance of these methods on two tasks – mammalian cell population identification to determine if automated algorithms can reproduce expert manual gating, and sample classification to determine if analysis pipelines can identify characteristics that correlate with external variables (e.g., clinical outcome). This analysis presents the results of the first of these challenges. Several methods performed well compared to manual gating or external variables using statistical performance measures, suggesting that automated methods have reached a sufficient level of maturity and accuracy for reliable use in FCM data analysis. PMID:23396282

  2. Analyzing Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA Content by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Boye, Erik; Anda, Silje; Rothe, Christiane; Stokke, Trond; Grallert, Beáta

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry can be used to measure the DNA content of individual cells. The data are usually presented as DNA histograms that can be used to examine the cells' progression through the cell cycle. Under standard growth conditions, fission yeast cells do not complete cytokinesis until after G1 phase; therefore, DNA histograms show one major peak representing cells in G1 (2×1C DNA) and G2 phase (1×2C DNA). By analysis of the duration of the fluorescence signal as well as the intensity of the DNA-related signal, it is possible to discriminate between cells in M/G1, S, and G2 This protocol describes how to prepare cells for flow cytometry and analyze them. We also describe the application of barcoding for more accurate comparison of samples. PMID:27250946

  3. Critical assessment of automated flow cytometry data analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Finak, Greg; Hoos, Holger; Mosmann, Tim R; Brinkman, Ryan; Gottardo, Raphael; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    Traditional methods for flow cytometry (FCM) data processing rely on subjective manual gating. Recently, several groups have developed computational methods for identifying cell populations in multidimensional FCM data. The Flow Cytometry: Critical Assessment of Population Identification Methods (FlowCAP) challenges were established to compare the performance of these methods on two tasks: (i) mammalian cell population identification, to determine whether automated algorithms can reproduce expert manual gating and (ii) sample classification, to determine whether analysis pipelines can identify characteristics that correlate with external variables (such as clinical outcome). This analysis presents the results of the first FlowCAP challenges. Several methods performed well as compared to manual gating or external variables using statistical performance measures, which suggests that automated methods have reached a sufficient level of maturity and accuracy for reliable use in FCM data analysis. PMID:23396282

  4. A CLIPS expert system for clinical flow cytometry data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, G. C.; Duque, R. E.; Braylan, R. C.; Stewart, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    An expert system is being developed using CLIPS to assist clinicians in the analysis of multivariate flow cytometry data from cancer patients. Cluster analysis is used to find subpopulations representing various cell types in multiple datasets each consisting of four to five measurements on each of 5000 cells. CLIPS facts are derived from results of the clustering. CLIPS rules are based on the expertise of Drs. Stewart, Duque, and Braylan. The rules incorporate certainty factors based on case histories.

  5. Managing Multi-center Flow Cytometry Data for Immune Monitoring.

    PubMed

    White, Scott; Laske, Karoline; Welters, Marij Jp; Bidmon, Nicole; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Britten, Cedrik M; Enzor, Jennifer; Staats, Janet; Weinhold, Kent J; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-01-01

    With the recent results of promising cancer vaccines and immunotherapy1-5, immune monitoring has become increasingly relevant for measuring treatment-induced effects on T cells, and an essential tool for shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for a successful treatment. Flow cytometry is the canonical multi-parameter assay for the fine characterization of single cells in solution, and is ubiquitously used in pre-clinical tumor immunology and in cancer immunotherapy trials. Current state-of-the-art polychromatic flow cytometry involves multi-step, multi-reagent assays followed by sample acquisition on sophisticated instruments capable of capturing up to 20 parameters per cell at a rate of tens of thousands of cells per second. Given the complexity of flow cytometry assays, reproducibility is a major concern, especially for multi-center studies. A promising approach for improving reproducibility is the use of automated analysis borrowing from statistics, machine learning and information visualization21-23, as these methods directly address the subjectivity, operator-dependence, labor-intensive and low fidelity of manual analysis. However, it is quite time-consuming to investigate and test new automated analysis techniques on large data sets without some centralized information management system. For large-scale automated analysis to be practical, the presence of consistent and high-quality data linked to the raw FCS files is indispensable. In particular, the use of machine-readable standard vocabularies to characterize channel metadata is essential when constructing analytic pipelines to avoid errors in processing, analysis and interpretation of results. For automation, this high-quality metadata needs to be programmatically accessible, implying the need for a consistent Application Programming Interface (API). In this manuscript, we propose that upfront time spent normalizing flow cytometry data to conform to carefully designed data models enables automated

  6. Managing Multi-center Flow Cytometry Data for Immune Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    White, Scott; Laske, Karoline; Welters, Marij JP; Bidmon, Nicole; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Britten, Cedrik M; Enzor, Jennifer; Staats, Janet; Weinhold, Kent J; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-01-01

    With the recent results of promising cancer vaccines and immunotherapy1–5, immune monitoring has become increasingly relevant for measuring treatment-induced effects on T cells, and an essential tool for shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for a successful treatment. Flow cytometry is the canonical multi-parameter assay for the fine characterization of single cells in solution, and is ubiquitously used in pre-clinical tumor immunology and in cancer immunotherapy trials. Current state-of-the-art polychromatic flow cytometry involves multi-step, multi-reagent assays followed by sample acquisition on sophisticated instruments capable of capturing up to 20 parameters per cell at a rate of tens of thousands of cells per second. Given the complexity of flow cytometry assays, reproducibility is a major concern, especially for multi-center studies. A promising approach for improving reproducibility is the use of automated analysis borrowing from statistics, machine learning and information visualization21–23, as these methods directly address the subjectivity, operator-dependence, labor-intensive and low fidelity of manual analysis. However, it is quite time-consuming to investigate and test new automated analysis techniques on large data sets without some centralized information management system. For large-scale automated analysis to be practical, the presence of consistent and high-quality data linked to the raw FCS files is indispensable. In particular, the use of machine-readable standard vocabularies to characterize channel metadata is essential when constructing analytic pipelines to avoid errors in processing, analysis and interpretation of results. For automation, this high-quality metadata needs to be programmatically accessible, implying the need for a consistent Application Programming Interface (API). In this manuscript, we propose that upfront time spent normalizing flow cytometry data to conform to carefully designed data models enables

  7. Does DNA cytometry have a place in the clinical laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B. ); Waldman, F.; Chew, K.; Christov, K.; Goodson, W.; Ljung, B.M. . Lab. for Cell Analysis); Smith, H.S. )

    1990-01-24

    We are investigating the potential utility of cellular markers, including cellular proliferation and DNA cytometry, as independent diagnostic and prognostic markers in human breast cancer. However, as the clinical laboratory is responsible for providing physicians with data relevant to the patient, it is essential first to establish the validity of such markers before their use is recommended. Prospective validation is time-consuming and costly for tests of human malignancies, such as breast cancer, which may follow a lengthy and indolent course requiring patients to be followed for a decade or more before their clinical outcome is known. Therefore, retrospective studies on archival material are used whenever possible. Cell proliferation is recognized as an important diagnostic and prognostic marker for human breast cancer and a tritiated thymidine DNA labeling index greater than 5% is associated with a markedly less favorable outcome. Incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) into the DNA of S phase cells gives a similar labeling index. Unfortunately, paraffin-embedded archival material is rarely pre-labeled, and so DNA cytometry of either whole nuclei disaggregated from thick sections or partial nuclei in thin sections must be used as an indirect approach to estimate cellular proliferative activity. We are particularly interested in validating the DNA cytometry of thin sections and in relating the DNA histogram to in vivo BrdUrd labeling index, which is our standard for cellular proliferation. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Barcoding of live human PBMC for multiplexed mass cytometry*

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Henrik E.; Leipold, Michael D.; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Chester, Cariad; Maecker, Holden T.

    2014-01-01

    Mass cytometry is developing as a means of multiparametric single cell analysis. Here, we present an approach to barcoding separate live human PBMC samples for combined preparation and acquisition on a CyTOF® instrument. Using six different anti-CD45 antibody (Ab) conjugates labeled with Pd104, Pd106, Pd108, Pd110, In113, and In115, respectively, we barcoded up to 20 samples with unique combinations of exactly three different CD45 Ab tags. Cell events carrying more than or less than three different tags were excluded from analyses during Boolean data deconvolution, allowing for precise sample assignment and the electronic removal of cell aggregates. Data from barcoded samples matched data from corresponding individually stained and acquired samples, at cell event recoveries similar to individual sample analyses. The approach greatly reduced technical noise and minimizes unwanted cell doublet events in mass cytometry data, and reduces wet work and antibody consumption. It also eliminates sample-to-sample carryover and the requirement of instrument cleaning between samples, thereby effectively reducing overall instrument runtime. Hence, CD45-barcoding facilitates accuracy of mass cytometric immunophenotyping studies, thus supporting biomarker discovery efforts, and should be applicable to fluorescence flow cytometry as well. PMID:25609839

  9. Discriminating cellular heterogeneity using microwell-based RNA cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Dimov, Ivan K.; Lu, Rong; Lee, Eric P.; Seita, Jun; Sahoo, Debashis; Park, Seung-min; Weissman, Irving L.; Lee, Luke P.

    2014-01-01

    Discriminating cellular heterogeneity is important for understanding cellular physiology. However, it is limited by the technical difficulties of single-cell measurements. Here, we develop a two-stage system to determine cellular heterogeneity. In the first stage, we perform multiplex single-cell RNA-cytometry in a microwell array containing over 60,000 reaction chambers. In the second stage, we use the RNA-cytometry data to determine cellular heterogeneity by providing a heterogeneity likelihood score. Moreover, we use Monte-Carlo simulation and RNA-cytometry data to calculate the minimum number of cells required for detecting heterogeneity. We applied this system to characterize the RNA distributions of aging related genes in a highly purified mouse hematopoietic stem cell population. We identified genes that reveal novel heterogeneity of these cells. We also show that changes in expression of genes such as Birc6 during aging can be attributed to the shift of relative portions of cells in the high-expressing subgroup versus low-expressing subgroup. PMID:24667995

  10. Flow cytometry applications in the study of immunological lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Gudarzi, Hoda; Tabarsi, Payam; M Adcock, Ian; Masjedi, Mohamad Reza; Jamaati, Hamid Reza; Garssen, Johan; Velayati, Ali Akbar; A Redegeld, Frank

    2015-02-01

    The use of flow cytometry in the clinical laboratory has grown substantially in the past decade. Flow cytometric analysis provides a rapid qualitative and quantitative description of multiple characteristics of individual cells. For example, it is possible to detect the cell size and granularity, aspects of DNA and RNA content and the presence of cell surface and nuclear markers which are used to characterize the phenotype of single cells. Flow cytometry has been used for the immunophenotyping of a variety of specimens including whole blood, bone marrow, serous cavity fluids, (cerebrospinal fluid) CSF, urine and all types of body fluids. The technique has also been applied to human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, peritoneal fluids and blood. In this review, we describe the current status of the application of flow cytometry as a diagnostic tool in various lung diseases. We focus on the analysis of BAL cell composition in chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), asthma, lung cancer, sarcoidosis, tuberculosis and idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia (IEP). PMID:25530134

  11. Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytometry Part A Special Section: Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range. The current Cytometry Part A Special Section presents three studies that utilize cytometers to study sub-micron particles. The three studies involve the 1...

  12. Multiparametric Flow Cytometry Using Near-Infrared Fluorescent Proteins Engineered from Bacterial Phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Telford, William G.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Buschke, David; Hawley, Teresa S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Engineering of fluorescent proteins (FPs) has followed a trend of achieving longer fluorescence wavelengths, with the ultimate goal of producing proteins with both excitation and emission in the near-infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum. Flow cytometers are now almost universally equipped with red lasers, and can now be equipped with NIR lasers as well. Most red-shifted FPs of the GFP-like family are maximally excited by orange lasers (590 to 610 nm) not commonly found on cytometers. This has changed with the development of the iRFP series of NIR FPs from the protein family of bacterial phytochromes. The shortest wavelength variants of this series, iRFP670 and iRFP682 showed maximal excitation with visible red lasers. The longer wavelength variants iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720 could be optimally excited by NIR lasers ranging from 685 to 730 nm. Pairs of iRFPs could be detected simultaneously by using red and NIR lasers. Moreover, a novel spectral cytometry technique, which relies on spectral deconvolution rather than optical filters, allowed spectra of all five iRFPs to be analyzed simultaneously with no spectral overlap. Together, the combination of iRFPs with the advanced flow cytometry will allow to first image tissues expressing iRFPs deep in live animals and then quantify individual cell intensities and sort out the distinct primary cell subpopulations ex vivo. PMID:25811854

  13. In vivo flow cytometry of circulating clots using negative phototothermal and photoacoustic contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Keyrouz, Salah G.; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional photothermal (PT) and photoacousic (PA) imaging, spectroscopy, and cytometry are preferentially based on positive PT/PA effects, when signals are above background. Here, we introduce PT/PA technique based on detection of negative signals below background. Among various new applications, we propose label-free in vivo flow cytometry of circulating clots. No method has been developed for the early detection of clots of different compositions as a source of severe thromboembolisms including ischemia at strokes and myocardial dysfunction at heart attack. When a low-absorbing, platelet-rich clot passes a laser-irradiated vessel volume, a transient decrease in local absorption results in an ultrasharp negative PA hole in blood background. Using this phenomenon alone or in combination with positive contrasts, we demonstrated identification of white, red and mixed clots on a mouse model of myocardial infarction and human blood. The concentration and size of clots were measured with threshold down to few clots in the entire circulation with size as low as 20 µm. This multiparameter diagnostic platform using portable personal high-speed flow cytometer with negative dynamic contrast mode has potential to real-time defining risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and for prognosis and prevention of stroke or use clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy. Possibility for label-free detection of platelets, leukocytes, tumor cells or targeting them by negative PA probes (e.g., nonabsorbing beads or bubbles) is also highlighted. PMID:21976458

  14. Performance of computer vision in vivo flow cytometry with low fluorescence contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Stacey; Li, Siyuan; Niedre, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Detection and enumeration of circulating cells in the bloodstream of small animals are important in many areas of preclinical biomedical research, including cancer metastasis, immunology, and reproductive medicine. Optical in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) represents a class of technologies that allow noninvasive and continuous enumeration of circulating cells without drawing blood samples. We recently developed a technique termed computer vision in vivo flow cytometry (CV-IVFC) that uses a high-sensitivity fluorescence camera and an automated computer vision algorithm to interrogate relatively large circulating blood volumes in the ear of a mouse. We detected circulating cells at concentrations as low as 20 cells/mL. In the present work, we characterized the performance of CV-IVFC with low-contrast imaging conditions with (1) weak cell fluorescent labeling using cell-simulating fluorescent microspheres with varying brightness and (2) high background tissue autofluorescence by varying autofluorescence properties of optical phantoms. Our analysis indicates that CV-IVFC can robustly track and enumerate circulating cells with at least 50% sensitivity even in conditions with two orders of magnitude degraded contrast than our previous in vivo work. These results support the significant potential utility of CV-IVFC in a wide range of in vivo biological models.

  15. Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Lectin Analysis of the Surface of the Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Yagoda-Shagam, Janet; Barton, Larry L.; Reed, William P.; Chiovetti, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface of Azospirillum brasilense was probed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectins, with binding determined by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry. Cells from nitrogen-fixing or ammonium-assimilating cultures reacted similarly to FITC-labeled lectins, with lectin binding in the following order: Griffonia simplicifolia II agglutinin > Griffonia simplicifolia I agglutinin > Triticum vulgaris agglutinin > Glycine max agglutinin > Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin > Limax flavus agglutinin > Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin. The fluorescence intensity of cells labeled with FITC-labeled G. simplicifolia I, C. ensiformis, T. vulgaris, and G. max agglutinins was influenced by lectin concentration. Flow cytometry measurements of lectin binding to cells was consistent with measurements of agglutination resulting from lectin-cell interaction. Capsules surrounding nitrogen-fixing and ammonium-assimilating cells were readily demonstrated by light and transmission electron microscopies. Images PMID:16347693

  16. Imaging Immunosenescence

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Feng; Montgomery, Ruth R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary To demonstrate effects of aging visually requires a robust technique that can reproducibly detect small differences in efficiency or kinetics between groups. Investigators of aging will greatly appreciate the benefits of Amnis ImageStream technology (www.amnis.com/), which combines quantitative flow cytometry with simultaneous high-resolution digital imaging. Imagestream is quantitative, reproducible, feasible with limited samples, and it facilitates in-depth examination of cellular mechanisms between cohorts of samples. PMID:26420711

  17. Stochastic Measurement Models for Quantifying Lymphocyte Responses Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Andrey; Pavlyshyn, Damian; Markham, John F.; Dowling, Mark R.; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses are complex dynamic processes whereby B and T cells undergo division and differentiation triggered by pathogenic stimuli. Deregulation of the response can lead to severe consequences for the host organism ranging from immune deficiencies to autoimmunity. Tracking cell division and differentiation by flow cytometry using fluorescent probes is a major method for measuring progression of lymphocyte responses, both in vitro and in vivo. In turn, mathematical modeling of cell numbers derived from such measurements has led to significant biological discoveries, and plays an increasingly important role in lymphocyte research. Fitting an appropriate parameterized model to such data is the goal of these studies but significant challenges are presented by the variability in measurements. This variation results from the sum of experimental noise and intrinsic probabilistic differences in cells and is difficult to characterize analytically. Current model fitting methods adopt different simplifying assumptions to describe the distribution of such measurements and these assumptions have not been tested directly. To help inform the choice and application of appropriate methods of model fitting to such data we studied the errors associated with flow cytometry measurements from a wide variety of experiments. We found that the mean and variance of the noise were related by a power law with an exponent between 1.3 and 1.8 for different datasets. This violated the assumptions inherent to commonly used least squares, linear variance scaling and log-transformation based methods. As a result of these findings we propose a new measurement model that we justify both theoretically, from the maximum entropy standpoint, and empirically using collected data. Our evaluation suggests that the new model can be reliably used for model fitting across a variety of conditions. Our work provides a foundation for modeling measurements in flow cytometry experiments thus

  18. In vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry for early malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chengzhong; Carey, Kai A; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Menyaev, Yulian A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Stumhofer, Jason S; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    In vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) has already demonstrated a great potential for the diagnosis of deadly diseases through ultrasensitive detection of rare disease-associated circulating markers in whole blood volume. Here, we demonstrate the first application of this powerful technique for early diagnosis of malaria through label-free detection of malaria parasite-produced hemozoin in infected red blood cells (iRBCs) as high-contrast PA agent. The existing malaria tests using blood smears can detect the disease at 0.001-0.1% of parasitemia. On the contrary, linear PAFC showed a potential for noninvasive malaria diagnosis at an extremely low level of parasitemia of 0.0000001%, which is ∼10(3) times better than the existing tests. Multicolor time-of-flight PAFC with high-pulse repetition rate lasers at wavelengths of 532, 671, and 820 nm demonstrated rapid spectral and spatial identification and quantitative enumeration of individual iRBCs. Integration of PAFC with fluorescence flow cytometry (FFC) provided real-time simultaneous detection of single iRBCs and parasites expressing green fluorescence proteins, respectively. A combination of linear and nonlinear nanobubble-based multicolor PAFC showed capability to real-time control therapy efficiency by counting of iRBCs before, during, and after treatment. Our results suggest that high-sensitivity, high-resolution ultrafast PAFC-FFC platform represents a powerful research tool to provide the insight on malaria progression through dynamic study of parasite-cell interactions directly in bloodstream, whereas portable hand-worn PAFC device could be broadly used in humans for early malaria diagnosis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27078044

  19. Identification of contact and respiratory sensitizers using flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goutet, Michele . E-mail: michele.goutet@inrs.fr; Pepin, Elsa; Langonne, Isabelle; Huguet, Nelly; Ban, Masarin

    2005-06-15

    Identification of the chemicals responsible for respiratory and contact allergies in the industrial area is an important occupational safety issue. This study was conducted in mice to determine whether flow cytometry is an appropriate method to analyze and differentiate the specific immune responses to the respiratory sensitizer trimellitic anhydride (TMA) and to the contact sensitizer dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) used at concentrations with comparable immunogenic potential. Mice were exposed twice on the flanks (days 0, 5) to 10% TMA or 1% DNCB and challenged three times on the ears (days 10, 11, 12) with 2.5% TMA or 0.25% DNCB. Flow cytometry analyses were conducted on draining lymph node cells harvested on days 13 and 18. Comparing TMA and DNCB immune responses on day 13, we found obvious differences that persisted for most of them on day 18. An increased proportion of IgE+ cells correlated to total serum IgE level and an enhancement of MHC II molecule expression were observed in the lymph node B lymphocytes from TMA-treated mice. The percentage of IL-4-producing CD4+ lymphocytes and the IL-4 receptor expression were clearly higher following TMA exposure. In contrast, higher proportions of IL-2-producing cells were detected in CD4+ and CD8+ cells from DNCB-treated mice. Both chemicals induced a significant increase in the percentage of IFN-{gamma}-producing cells among CD8+ lymphocytes but to a greater proportion following TMA treatment. In conclusion, this study encourages the use of flow cytometry to discriminate between contact and respiratory sensitizers by identifying divergent expression of immune response parameters.

  20. Stochastic Measurement Models for Quantifying Lymphocyte Responses Using Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kan, Andrey; Pavlyshyn, Damian; Markham, John F; Dowling, Mark R; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H S; Marchingo, Julia M; Hodgkin, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses are complex dynamic processes whereby B and T cells undergo division and differentiation triggered by pathogenic stimuli. Deregulation of the response can lead to severe consequences for the host organism ranging from immune deficiencies to autoimmunity. Tracking cell division and differentiation by flow cytometry using fluorescent probes is a major method for measuring progression of lymphocyte responses, both in vitro and in vivo. In turn, mathematical modeling of cell numbers derived from such measurements has led to significant biological discoveries, and plays an increasingly important role in lymphocyte research. Fitting an appropriate parameterized model to such data is the goal of these studies but significant challenges are presented by the variability in measurements. This variation results from the sum of experimental noise and intrinsic probabilistic differences in cells and is difficult to characterize analytically. Current model fitting methods adopt different simplifying assumptions to describe the distribution of such measurements and these assumptions have not been tested directly. To help inform the choice and application of appropriate methods of model fitting to such data we studied the errors associated with flow cytometry measurements from a wide variety of experiments. We found that the mean and variance of the noise were related by a power law with an exponent between 1.3 and 1.8 for different datasets. This violated the assumptions inherent to commonly used least squares, linear variance scaling and log-transformation based methods. As a result of these findings we propose a new measurement model that we justify both theoretically, from the maximum entropy standpoint, and empirically using collected data. Our evaluation suggests that the new model can be reliably used for model fitting across a variety of conditions. Our work provides a foundation for modeling measurements in flow cytometry experiments thus

  1. Clinico-cytopathological spectrum of hepatocellular carcinoma, its correlation with serum alpha-fetoprotein level, and hepatitis B and C viral markers.

    PubMed

    Radhika, Nitin Shriniwas; Duseja, Ajay; Rajwanshi, Arwind; Gupta, Subhash Kumari; Sehgal, Shobha; Suri, Sudha; Chawla, Yogesh

    2004-01-01

    Fine-needle aspirationbiopsy (FNAB) is now widely accepted as a diagnostic modality for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The most common diagnostic problem in HCC is distinguishing it from a metastatic carcinoma. The literature from India on HCC is scanty. Hence, we studied the cytomorphological features of HCC and metastatic carcinoma. The study included 37 cases of space-occupying lesions (SOLs) of the liver as demonstrated by ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scan. Cytomorphological features of these SOLs were analyzed in all subsequent to FNAB. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-hepatitis C virus antibody (anti-HCV) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were determined in all the cases by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cytopathological diagnosis was HCC in 22 and metastatic carcinoma of the liver in 15. The individual cytomorphological features and which helped to make a definite diagnosis of HCC were: a high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio (81.8%), predominantly trabecular pattern (63.6%) and atypical naked nuclei (100%). Other features were prominent multiple nucleoli (63.3%), hyperchromasia (100%) and moderate anisonucleosis (59%). AFP was elevated in 81.8% of the cases with a mean of 634.8+812.7 ng/ml. HBsAg by ELISA was found to be positive in 72.7% of cases while only 1 case (4.5%) was positive for anti-HCV. In 1 case (4.5%), there was dual infection due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HCV. No viral cause was found in 18.3% of cases. PMID:15682657

  2. Waveguide detection of right-angle-scattered light in flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2000-01-01

    A transparent flow cell is used as an index-guided optical waveguide. A detector for the flow cell but not the liquid stream detects the Right-Angle-Scattered (RAS) Light exiting from one end of the flow cell. The detector(s) could view the trapped RAS light from the flow cell either directly or through intermediate optical light guides. If the light exits one end of the flow cell, then the other end of the flow cell can be given a high-reflectivity coating to approximately double the amount of light collected. This system is more robust in its alignment than the traditional flow cytometry systems which use imaging optics, such as microscope objectives.

  3. High-resolution analysis of human peripheral lymphocyte chromosomes by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Young, B D; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Sillar, R; Boyd, E

    1981-01-01

    A method for high-resolution analysis of the human karyotype by flow cytometry has been developed. Metaphase chromosomes are prepared from short-term peripheral blood cultures, stained with ethidium bromide, and analyzed on a standard fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS-II). Flow karyotypes with up to 20 peaks can be obtained with coefficients of variation in the range 1-2%. At this level of resolution the contribution of many of the human chromosomes can be evaluated separately. Significant and reproducible differences between normal individuals have been detected and have been correlated with differences in the centric heterochromatin of certain chromosomes as revealed in their C-banded karyotypes. Images PMID:6950411

  4. Laser rastering flow cytometry: fast cell counting and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacca, G.; Junnarkar, M. R.; Goldblatt, N. R.; Yee, M. W.; Van Slyke, B. M.; Briese, T. C.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the concept of laser rastering flow cytometry, where a rapidly scanning laser beam allows counting and classification of cells at much higher rates than currently possible. Modifications to existing flow cytometers to implement the concept include an acousto-optic deflector, fast analog-to-digital conversion, and a two-step digital-signal-processing scheme that handles the high data rates and provides key assay information. Results are shown that prove the concept, demonstrating the ability to resolve closely spaced cells and to measure cells at rates more than an order of magnitude faster than on conventional flow-cytometer-based hematology analyzers.

  5. Fluorescent protein-based cellular assays analyzed by laser-scanning microplate cytometry in 1536-well plate format.

    PubMed

    Auld, Douglas S; Johnson, Ronald L; Zhang, Ya-qin; Veith, Henrike; Jadhav, Ajit; Yasgar, Adam; Simeonov, Anton; Zheng, Wei; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Westwick, John K; Austin, Christopher P; Inglese, James

    2006-01-01

    Microtiter plate readers have evolved from photomultiplier and charged-coupled device-based readers, where a population-averaged signal is detected from each well, to microscope-based imaging systems, where cellular characteristics from individual cells are measured. For these systems, speed and ease of data analysis are inversely proportional to the amount of data collected from each well. Microplate laser cytometry is a technology compatible with a 1536-well plate format and capable of population distribution analysis. Microplate cytometers such as the Acumen Explorer can monitor up to four fluorescent signals from single objects in microtiter plates with densities as high as 1536 wells. These instruments can measure changes in fluorescent protein expression, cell shape, or simple cellular redistribution events such as cytoplasmic to nuclear translocation. To develop high-throughput screening applications using laser-scanning microplate cytometry, we used green fluorescent protein- and yellow fluorescent protein-expressing cell lines designed to measure diverse biological functions such as nuclear translocation, epigenetic signaling, and G protein-coupled receptor activation. This chapter illustrates the application of microplate laser cytometry to these assays in a manner that is suitable for screening large compound collections in high throughput. PMID:17110211

  6. Expert systems for flow cytometry data analysis: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C. ); Stewart, C.C. . Lab. of Flow Cytometry); Duque, R.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Flow Cytometry has become an accepted technique in the clinical laboratory for rapid immunophenotyping of patient blood samples. Multiple, fluorescent labeled monoclonal antibodies are used to tag the cells, which are then analyzed one at a time at rates of several thousand cells a second. Patient samples are processed through the flow cytometer at more than one a minute. Clinicians are being overwhelmed by the large amount of data that must be analyzed to provide the information needed to assist in disease diagnosis. An expert system is being developed to assist clinicians in analyzing this multivariate flow cytometry data. The data from each sample are processed by a clustering algorithm, which finds the means of the distinct cell subpopulations in a sample. These mean values of fluorescence are translated into words such as negative,'' dim'' and bright'' and the words are combined into patterns that are matched against the premises on the left hand side of the rules used to identify the disease categories. This is a report of work in progress. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-09-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3-7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  8. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3–7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  9. Probing transmembrane mechanical coupling and cytomechanics using magnetic twisting cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    We recently developed a magnetic twisting cytometry technique that allows us to apply controlled mechanical stresses to specific cell surface receptors using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads and to simultaneously measure the mechanical response in living cells. Using this technique, we have previously shown the following: (i) beta 1 integrin receptors mediate mechanical force transfer across the cell surface and to the cytoskeleton, whereas other transmembrane receptors (e.g., scavenger receptors) do not; (ii) cytoskeletal stiffness increases in direct proportion to the level of stress applied to integrins; and (iii) the slope of this linear stiffening response differs depending on the shape of the cell. We now show that different integrins (beta 1, alpha V beta 3, alpha V, alpha 5, alpha 2) and other transmembrane receptors (scavenger receptor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) differ in their ability to mediate force transfer across the cell surface. In addition, the linear stiffening behavior previously observed in endothelial cells was found to be shared by other cell types. Finally, we demonstrate that dynamic changes in cell shape that occur during both cell spreading and retraction are accompanied by coordinate changes in cytoskeletal stiffness. Taken together, these results suggest that the magnetic twisting cytometry technique may be a powerful and versatile tool for studies analyzing the molecular basis of transmembrane mechanical coupling to the cytoskeleton as well as dynamic relations between changes in cytoskeletal structure and alterations in cell form and function.

  10. Clinical applications of slide-based cytometry (SBC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taernok, Attila; Gerstner, Andreas O. H.

    2003-07-01

    Slide-based cytometry (SBC) is a promising new development in clinical diagnostics. The Laser Scanning Cytometer (LSC) was the first such system that became commercially available. Over the years methods have been developed that can be applied in a broad variety of clinical diagnostic settings. The principle of SBC is that fluorochrome labeled specimens are immobilized on microscopic slides which are placed on a conventional epi-fluorescence microscope. Specimens are analyzed by one or two lasers. Data comparable to flow cytometry are generated. But in addition, the position of each individual event is recorded, a feature that allows to re-localize and to visualize each event that has been measured. The major advantage of LSC compared with other cytometric methods is the combination of two features: a) the minimal clinical sample volume needed, and b) the connection of fluorescence data and morphological information about the measured event. We have developed and will present examples of different techniques for application in clinical diagnosis: (1) Immunophenotyping using up to six different fluorochromes at a time, (2) analysis of minimal sample volumes using fine needle aspirate biopsies, and (3) analysis of cells in tissue sections. With these assays and assays developed by others, SBC has proven its wide spectrum of clinical applicability and can be introduced as a standard technology for multiple clinical settings.

  11. Technical issues: flow cytometry and rare event analysis.

    PubMed

    Hedley, B D; Keeney, M

    2013-06-01

    Flow cytometry has become an essential tool for identification and characterization of hematological cancers and now, due to technological improvements, allows the identification and rapid enumeration of small tumor populations that may be present after induction therapy (minimal residual disease, MRD). The quantitation of MRD has been shown to correlate with relapse and survival rates in numerous diseases and in certain cases, and evidence of MRD is used to alter treatment protocols. Recent improvements in hardware allow for high data rate collection. Improved fluorochromes take advantage of violet laser excitation and maximize signal-to-noise ratio allowing the population of interest to be isolated in multiparameter space. This isolation, together with a low background rate, permits for detection of residual tumor populations in a background of normal cells. When counting such rare events, the distribution is governed by Poisson statistics, with precision increasing with higher numbers of cells collected. In several hematological malignancies, identification of populations at frequencies of 0.01% and lower has been attained. The choice of antibodies used in MRD detection facilitates the definition of a fingerprint to identify abnormal populations throughout treatment. Tumor populations can change phenotype, and an approach that relies on 'different from normal' has proven useful, particularly in the acute leukemias. Flow cytometry can and is used for detection of MRD in many hematological diseases; however, standardized approaches for specific diseases must be developed to ensure precise identification and enumeration that may alter the course of patient treatment. PMID:23590661

  12. Metal-Containing Polystyrene Beads as Standards for Mass Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed I.; Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Kinach, Robert; Dai, Sheng; Thickett, Stuart C.; Tanner, Scott

    2010-01-01

    We examine the suitability of metal-containing polystyrene beads for the calibration of a mass cytometer instrument, a single particle analyser based on an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a time of flight mass spectrometer. These metal-containing beads are also verified for their use as internal standards for this instrument. These beads were synthesized by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization with acrylic acid as a comonomer. Acrylic acid acts as a ligand to anchor the metal ions within the interior of the beads. Mass cytometry enabled the bead-by-bead measurement of the metal-content and determination of the metal-content distribution. Beads synthesized by dispersion polymerization that involved three stages were shown to have narrower bead-to-bead variation in their lanthanide content than beads synthesized by 2-stage dispersion polymerization. The beads exhibited insignificant release of their lanthanide content to aqueous solutions of different pHs over a period of six months. When mixed with KG1a or U937 cell lines, metal-containing polymer beads were shown not to affect the mass cytometry response to the metal content of element-tagged antibodies specifically attached to these cells. PMID:20390041

  13. Sample handling for kinetics and molecular assembly in flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sklar, L.A. |; Seamer, L.C.; Kuckuck, F.; Prossnitz, E.; Edwards, B.; Posner, G.

    1998-07-01

    Flow cytometry discriminates particle associated fluorescence from the fluorescence of the surrounding medium. It permits assemblies of macromolecular complexes on beads or cells to be detected in real-time with precision and specificity. The authors have investigated two types of robust sample handling systems which provide sub-second resolution and high throughput: (1) mixers which use stepper-motor driven syringes to initiate chemical reactions in msec time frames; and (2) flow injection controllers with valves and automated syringes used in chemical process control. In the former system, the authors used fast valves to overcome the disparity between mixing 100 {micro}ls of sample in 100 msecs and delivering sample to a flow cytometer at 1 {micro}l/sec. Particles were detected within 100 msec after mixing, but turbulence was created which lasted for 1 sec after injection of the sample into the flow cytometer. They used optical criteria to discriminate particles which were out of alignment due to the turbulent flow. Complex sample handling protocols involving multiple mixing steps and sample dilution have also been achieved. With the latter system they were able to automate sample handling and delivery with intervals of a few seconds. The authors used a fluidic approach to defeat turbulence caused by sample introduction. By controlling both sheath and sample with individual syringes, the period of turbulence was reduced to {approximately} 200 msecs. Automated sample handling and sub-second resolution should permit broad analytical and diagnostic applications of flow cytometry.

  14. Measurement and Characterization of Apoptosis by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William; Tamul, Karen; Bradford, Jolene

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism in cell biology, playing a critical regulatory role in virtually every organ system. It has been particularly well characterized in the immune system, with roles ranging from immature immune cell development and selection to down-regulation of the mature immune response. Apoptosis is also the primary mechanism of action of anti-cancer drugs. Flow cytometry has been the method of choice for analyzing apoptosis in suspension cells for more than 25 years. Numerous assays have been devised to measure both the earliest and latest steps in the apoptotic process, from the earliest signal-transduction events to the late morphological changes in cell shape and granularity, proteolysis, and chromatin condensation. These assays are particularly powerful when combined into multicolor assays determining several apoptotic characteristics simultaneously. The multiparametric nature of flow cytometry makes this technology particularly suited to measuring apoptosis. In this unit, we will describe the four main techniques for analyzing caspase activity in apoptotic cells, combined with annexin V and cell permeability analysis. These relatively simple multiparametric assays are powerful techniques for assessing cell death. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367289

  15. Measurement of microvesicle levels in human blood using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Wayne L

    2016-07-01

    Microvesicles are fragments of cells released when the cells are activated, injured, or apoptotic. Analysis of microvesicle levels in blood has the potential to shed new light on the pathophysiology of many diseases. Flow cytometry is currently the only method that can simultaneously separate true lipid microvesicles from other microparticles in blood, determine the cell of origin and other microvesicle characteristics, and handle large numbers of clinical samples with a reasonable effort, but expanded use of flow cytometric measurement of microvesicle levels as a clinical and research tool requires improved, standardized assays. The goal of this review is to aid investigators in applying current best practices to microvesicle measurements. First pre-analytical factors are evaluated and data summarized for anticoagulant effects, sample transport and centrifugation. Next flow cytometer optimization is reviewed including interference from background in buffers and reagents, accurate microvesicle counting, swarm interference, and other types of coincidence errors, size calibration, and detection limits using light scattering, impedance and fluorescence. Finally current progress on method standardization is discussed and a summary of current best practices provided. © 2016 Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:26606416

  16. Diagnostic Utility of Flow Cytometry in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana; Picot, Tiphanie; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Guyotat, Denis; Campos Catafal, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are clonal disorders of hematopoiesis that exhibit heterogeneous clinical presentation and morphological findings, which complicates diagnosis, especially in early stages. Recently, refined definitions and standards in the diagnosis and treatment of MDS were proposed, but numerous questions remain. Multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) is a helpful tool for the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected MDS, and various scores using MFC data have been developed. However, none of these methods have achieved the sensitivity that is required for a reassuring diagnosis in the absence of morphological abnormalities. One reason may be that each score evaluates one or two lineages without offering a broad view of the dysplastic process. The combination of two scores (e.g., Ogata and Red Score) improved the sensitivity from 50–60 to 88%, but the positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) must be improved. There are prominent differences between study groups when these scores are tested. Further research is needed to maximize the sensitivity of flow cytometric analysis in MDS. This review focuses on the application of flow cytometry for MDS diagnosis and discusses the advantages and limitations of different approaches. PMID:27446807

  17. Virus Replication, Cytopathology, and Lysosomal Enzyme Response of Mitotic and Interphase Hep-2 Cells Infected with Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Bienz, Kurt; Egger, Denise; Wolff, David A.

    1973-01-01

    Mitotic Hep-2 cells, selected by the PEL (colloidal silica) density gradient method and held in mitosis with Colcemid, are readily infected by poliovirus type I (Mahoney). They produce and release the same amount of virus as interphase, random-growing cells. In contrast to interphase cells, mitotic cells show no detectable virus-induced cytopathic effect at the light microscopy level and only slight alterations, consisting of small clusters of vacuoles, at the electron microscopy level. Mitotic cells contain the same total amount of lysosomal enzymes per cell as interphase cells, but they display no redistribution of lysosomal enzymes during the virus infection as interphase cells do. This supports the view that lysosomal enzyme redistribution is associated with the cytopathic effect in poliovirus infection but shows that virus synthesis and release is not dependent on either the cytopathic effect or lysosomal enzyme release. The possible reasons for the lack of cytopathic effect in mitotic cells are discussed. Images PMID:4121707

  18. The College of American Pathologists guidelines for whole slide imaging validation are feasible for pediatric pathology: a pediatric pathology practice experience.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michael A; Chenever, Emily; Baker, Peter B; Boué, Daniel R; Fung, Bonita; Hammond, Sue; Hendrickson, Brett W; Kahwash, Samir B; Pierson, Christopher R; Prasad, Vinay; Nicol, Kathleen K; Barr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Whole slide imaging (WSI) is rapidly transforming educational and diagnostic pathology services. Recently, the College of American Pathologists Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center (CAP-PLQC) published recommended guidelines for validating diagnostic WSI. We prospectively evaluated the guidelines to determine their utility in validating pediatric surgical pathology and cytopathology specimens. Our validation included varied pediatric specimen types, including complex or less common diagnoses, in accordance with the guidelines. We completed WSI review of 60 surgical pathology cases and attempted WSI review of 21 cytopathology cases. For surgical pathology cases, WSI diagnoses were highly concordant with glass slide diagnoses; a discordant diagnosis was observed in 1 of 60 cases (98.3% concordance). We found that nucleated red blood cells and eosinophilic granular bodies represented specific challenges to WSI review of pediatric specimens. Cytology specimens were more frequently discordant or failed for technical reasons, with overall concordance of 66.7%. Review of pediatric cytopathology specimens will likely require image capture in multiple focal planes. This study is the first to specifically evaluate WSI review for pediatric specimens and demonstrates that specimens representing the spectrum of pediatric surgical pathology practice can be reviewed using WSI. Our application of the proposed CAP-PLQC guidelines to pediatric surgical pathology specimens is, to our knowledge, the first prospective implementation of the CAP-PLQC guidelines. PMID:25387255

  19. Preparatory methods for DNA hydrolysis, cytochemistry, immunocytochemistry and ploidy analysis. Their application to automated and routine diagnostic cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Husain, O A; Watts, K C

    1987-06-01

    A review is presented of some methods used to prepare cytologic specimens for analytical and/or automated studies, with the steps of the procedures detailed in appendices. The preparation of the cell monolayers required for optimal automated cell image analysis and classification, e.g., by the Cytoscan 110, is discussed, as is the preparation of poly-L-lysine-coated slides used in the production of monolayered specimens. These monolayers, which can be prepared from a variety of specimens, are also useful for cytochemical and immunocytochemical studies and DNA ploidy analysis. For DNA analysis, a modified gallocyanin chrome alum staining procedure is described as a stoichiometric alternative to the time-consuming Feulgen reaction. The hydrolysis technique required by the latter method is also detailed. The freeze-fracturing technique for the enhancement of monoclonal antibody immunocytochemical staining of detectable antigens is described, along with an indirect immunoalkaline phosphatase staining method. The use of enzyme cytochemical reactions for glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase and lysosomal naphthylamidase is also presented. PMID:3620061

  20. Detection of Apoptotic Versus Autophagic Cell Death by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sica, Valentina; Maiuri, M Chiara; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Different modes of regulated cell death (RCD) can be initiated by distinct molecular machineries and their morphological manifestations can be difficult to discriminate. Moreover, cells responding to stress often activate an adaptive response centered around autophagy, and whether such a response is cytoprotective or cytotoxic cannot be predicted based on morphological parameters only. Molecular definitions are therefore important to understand various RCD subroutines from a mechanistic perspective. In vitro, various forms of RCD including apoptosis and autophagic cell death can be easily discriminated from each other with assays that involve chemical or pharmacological interventions targeting key components of either pathway. Here, we detail a straightforward method to discriminate apoptosis from autophagic cell death by flow cytometry, based on the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the genetic inhibition of ATG5. PMID:27108427

  1. Functional Analysis of Human NK cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Bryceson, Yenan T.; Fauriat, Cyril; Nunes, João M.; Wood, Stephanie M.; Björkström, Niklas K.; Long, Eric O.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that contribute to innate immunity through cytokine secretion and target cell lysis. NK cell function is regulated by a multiplicity of activating and inhibitory receptors. The advance in instrumentation for multi-color flow cytometry and the generation of specific mAbs for different epitopes related to phenotypic and functional parameters have facilitated our understanding of NK cell responses. Here, we provide protocols for flow cytometric evaluation of degranulation and cytokine production by human NK cells from peripheral blood at the single cell level. In addition to offering insight into the regulation of human NK cell responses, these techniques are applicable to the assessment of various clinical conditions, including the diagnosis of immunodeficiency syndromes. PMID:20033652

  2. Recent applications of flow cytometry in aquatic microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Troussellier, M; Courties, C; Vaquer, A

    1993-01-01

    Microorganisms (unicellular algae, bacteria) constitute fundamental compartments of aquatic ecosystems because of their high concentrations and activities. The evaluation and understanding of their behavior and role raise different problems for which traditional methodologies are often inadequate, whether they refer to global or classical microscopic analyses. Flow cytometry (FCM) has been recently used to study microorganisms in aquatic environments. Although this technology is still applied on a limited scale in our field, a large number of works has been done showing that FCM seems to be a promising tool for aquatic microbial ecology. This paper summarizes, from the literature produced during the last decade and with original data obtained in our laboratory, the main questions related to the cell identification, the evaluation of cell viability, biomasses and productions and the measurements of bacterial and phytoplanktonic activities. The representatives of sampling and observation scales is also discussed within the framework of the FCM measurements. PMID:8220221

  3. Extended cavity laser enhanced two-photon flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tkaczyk, Eric R.; Tkaczyk, Alan H.; Katnik, Steve; Ye, Jing Yong; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.; Myc, Andrzej; Baker, James R.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate enhanced sensitivity in two-photon flow cytometry with an extended cavity laser excitation source. At low power, the home-built 20-MHz oscillator was able to detect a significantly larger fraction, in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or whole blood, of green fluorescent protein (GFP) –expressing MCA-207 cells cross-labeled with the membrane-binding lipophilic dye DiD. A geometrical model is used to explain unique features of the signals resulting from the different spatial distribution of DiD and GFP. These unique features include sub-square law scaling of unsaturated two-photon signal, a sigmoidal sensitivity curve for detection under varying powers for cell detection thresholds as low as a single photon, and uncorrelated signal strengths in two detection channels. PMID:19021327

  4. Analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase internalization using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hill, Kristen S; Elferink, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by endocytosis and their subsequent down regulation in lysosomes plays a critical role in regulating the duration and intensity of downstream signaling events. Uncoupling of the RTK cMet from ligand-induced degradation was recently shown to correlate with sustained receptor signaling and increased cell tumorigenicity, suggesting that the corruption of these endocytic mechanisms could contribute to increased cMet signaling in metastatic cancers. To understand how cMet signaling for normal cell growth is controlled by endocytosis and how these mechanisms are dysregulated in metastatic cancers, we developed flow cytometry-based assays to examine cMet internalization. PMID:19066037

  5. Rapid Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Nikolic, Radina; Hoos, Holger H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed flowMeans, a time-efficient and accurate method for automated identification of cell populations in flow cytometry (FCM) data based on K-means clustering. Unlike traditional K-means, flowMeans can identify concave cell populations by modelling a single population with multiple clusters. flowMeans uses a change point detection algorithm to determine the number of sub-populations, enabling the method to be used in high throughput FCM data analysis pipelines. Our approach compares favourably to manual analysis by human experts and current state-of-the-art automated gating algorithms. flowMeans is freely available as an open source R package through Bioconductor. PMID:21182178

  6. Applications of Flow Cytometry to Characterize Bacterial Physiological Responses

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Garduño, Jorge A.; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Although reports of flow cytometry (FCM) applied to bacterial analysis are increasing, studies of FCM related to human cells still vastly outnumber other reports. However, current advances in FCM combined with a new generation of cellular reporter probes have made this technique suitable for analyzing physiological responses in bacteria. We review how FCM has been applied to characterize distinct physiological conditions in bacteria including responses to antibiotics and other cytotoxic chemicals and physical factors, pathogen-host interactions, cell differentiation during biofilm formation, and the mechanisms governing development pathways such as sporulation. Since FCM is suitable for performing studies at the single-cell level, we describe how this powerful technique has yielded invaluable information about the heterogeneous distribution of differently and even specialized responding cells and how it may help to provide insights about how cell interaction takes place in complex structures, such as those that prevail in bacterial biofilms. PMID:25276788

  7. Optical analysis of nanomaterial-cell interactions: flow cytometry and digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mues, Sarah; Antunovic, Jan; Ossig, Rainer; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of engineered nanoparticles commonly involves the measurement of different endpoints like the formation of reactive oxygen species, cell viability or cell death. Usually these parameters are determined by optical readouts of enzymatically converted substrates that often interfere with the tested nanomaterials. Using cell viability (WST-8) and cell death (LDH) as parameter we have initially investigated the toxic effects of spherical (NM 300) and rod shaped (NM 302) silver nanomaterials with a matrix of four cell lines representing different functions: lung and kidney epithelial cells, macrophages and fibroblasts. In addition, we have used a label-free flow cytometer configuration to investigate interactions of particles and macrophages by side scatter signal analysis. Finally, we explored digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for multimodal label-free analysis of nanomaterial toxicity. Quantitative DHM phase images were analyzed for cell thickness, volume, density, dry mass and refractive index. We could demonstrate that silver spheres lead to more cytotoxic effects than rods in all four examined cell lines and both assay. Exemplarily a dose dependent interaction increase of cells with NM 300 and NM 302 analyzed by flow cytometry is shown. Furthermore, we found that the refractive index of cells is influenced by incubation with NM 300 in a decreasing manner. A 24 hours time-lapse measurement revealed a dose dependent decrease of dry mass and surface area development indicating reduced cell viability and cell death. Our results demonstrate digital holographic microscopy and flow cytometry as valuable label-free tools for nanomaterial toxicity and cell interaction studies.

  8. Label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Gao, Wenyuan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanoma cells have high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC), which is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. We have developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting photoacoustic signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we have constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals are detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtain the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation.

  9. RchyOptimyx: Cellular Hierarchy Optimization for Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Jalali, Adrin; O’Neill, Kieran; Chattopadhyay, Pratip K.; Roederer, Mario; Hoos, Holger H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets can reveal novel cell populations with poorly understood biology. Following discovery, characterization of these populations in terms of the critical markers involved is an important step, as this can help to both better understand the biology of these populations and aid in designing simpler marker panels to identify them on simpler instruments and with fewer reagents (i.e., in resource poor or highly regulated clinical settings). However, current tools to design panels based on the biological characteristics of the target cell populations work exclusively based on technical parameters (e.g., instrument configurations, spectral overlap, and reagent availability). To address this shortcoming, we developed RchyOptimyx (cellular hieraRCHY OPTIMization), a computational tool that constructs cellular hierarchies by combining automated gating with dynamic programming and graph theory to provide the best gating strategies to identify a target population to a desired level of purity or correlation with a clinical outcome, using the simplest possible marker panels. RchyOptimyx can assess and graphically present the trade-offs between marker choice and population specificity in high-dimensional flow or mass cytometry datasets. We present three proof-of-concept use cases for RchyOptimyx that involve 1) designing a panel of surface markers for identification of rare populations that are primarily characterized using their intracellular signature; 2) simplifying the gating strategy for identification of a target cell population; 3) identification of a non-redundant marker set to identify a target cell population. PMID:23044634

  10. Digital Analysis and Sorting of Fluorescence Lifetime by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Jessica P.; Naivar, Mark A.; Freyer, James P.

    2010-01-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal processing capabilities of the Open Reconfigurable Cytometric Acquisition System (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS’ digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5–25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 µs, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142° to 1.6°. The lowest coefficients of variation (<1%) were found for 10-MHz modulated waveforms having pulse widths of 6 µs and simulated lifetimes of 4 ns. Direct comparison of the digital analysis system to a previous analog phase-sensitive flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a radiofrequency modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to ~98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to simply and inexpensively

  11. Multiparameter analysis of stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: A comparison of mass and fluorescence cytometry.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Katherine J; Greenplate, Allison R; Flaherty, David K; Matlock, Brittany K; Juan, Juan San; Smith, Rita M; Irish, Jonathan M; Kalams, Spyros A

    2016-03-01

    Mass and fluorescence cytometry are quantitative single cell flow cytometry approaches that are powerful tools for characterizing diverse tissues and cellular systems. Here mass cytometry was directly compared with fluorescence cytometry by studying phenotypes of healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the context of superantigen stimulation. One mass cytometry panel and five fluorescence cytometry panels were used to measure 20 well-established lymphocyte markers of memory and activation. Comparable frequencies of both common and rare cell subpopulations were observed with fluorescence and mass cytometry using biaxial gating. The unsupervised high-dimensional analysis tool viSNE was then used to analyze data sets generated from both mass and fluorescence cytometry. viSNE analysis effectively characterized PBMC using eight features per cell and identified similar frequencies of activated CD4+ T cells with both technologies. These results suggest combinations of unsupervised analysis programs and extended multiparameter cytometry will be indispensable tools for detecting perturbations in protein expression in both health and disease. PMID:26599989

  12. Spectral Cytometry Has Unique Properties Allowing Multicolor Analysis of Cell Suspensions Isolated from Solid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schmutz, Sandrine; Valente, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry, initially developed to analyze surface protein expression in hematopoietic cells, has increased in analytical complexity and is now widely used to identify cells from different tissues and organisms. As a consequence, data analysis became increasingly difficult due the need of large multi-parametric compensation matrices and to the eventual auto-fluorescence frequently found in cell suspensions obtained from solid organs. In contrast with conventional flow cytometry that detects the emission peak of fluorochromes, spectral flow cytometry distinguishes the shapes of emission spectra along a large range of continuous wave lengths. The data is analyzed with an algorithm that replaces compensation matrices and treats auto-fluorescence as an independent parameter. Thus, spectral flow cytometry should be capable to discriminate fluorochromes with similar emission peaks and provide multi-parametric analysis without compensation requirements. Here we show that spectral flow cytometry achieves a 21-parametric (19 fluorescent probes) characterization and deals with auto-fluorescent cells, providing high resolution of specifically fluorescence-labeled populations. Our results showed that spectral flow cytometry has advantages in the analysis of cell populations of tissues difficult to characterize in conventional flow cytometry, such as heart and intestine. Spectral flow cytometry thus combines the multi-parametric analytical capacity of the highest performing conventional flow cytometry without the requirement for compensation and enabling auto-fluorescence management. PMID:27500930

  13. Photoacoustic and photothermal cytometry for monitoring multiple blood rheology parameters in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations of blood rheology (hemorheology) are important for the early diagnosis, prognosis, and prevention of many diseases, including myocardial infarction, stroke, sickle cell anemia, thromboembolism, trauma, inflammation, and malignancy. However, real-time in vivo monitoring of hemorheological status using multiple parameters over long periods of time has not been reported. Here we describe the capability of label-free photoacoustic (PA) and photothermal (PT) flow cytometry in detection and imaging modes for dynamic monitoring of rheological parameters in circulating blood. We show that this integrated platform can simultaneously measure the main rheological parameters and may improve their diagnostic value. Using phenomenological approaches, we analyze correlations of PT and PA signal characteristics in the dynamic modes with red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, deformability, shape (e.g., as in sickle cells), intracellular hemoglobin distribution, individual cell velocity, flux of RBCs, and likely shear rate. Proof of concept is demonstrated in ex vivo and in vivo tests, including high-speed PT imaging of RBC shape in pathological conditions and identification of sickle cells in a mouse model of human sickle cell disease. These studies revealed the potential of this new platform integrating PT, PA, and conventional optical techniques for translation to use in humans using safe, portable, laser-based medical devices for point-of-care screening of disease progression and therapy efficiency. PMID:21948731

  14. Digital analysis and sorting of fluorescence lifetime by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jessica P; Naivar, Mark A; Freyer, James P

    2010-09-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal-processing capabilities of the open reconfigurable cytometric acquisition system (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency (RF)-modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS' digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5-25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 micros, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142 degrees to 1.6 degrees. The lowest coefficients of variation (<1%) were found for 10-MHz modulated waveforms having pulse widths of 6 micros and simulated lifetimes of 4 ns. Direct comparison of the digital analysis system to a previous analog phase-sensitive flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells, and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a RF-modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to approximately 98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to

  15. Comparative analysis of whole blood lysis methods for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, X; Marti, G E; Fleisher, T A

    1997-06-15

    We performed a parallel evaluation of six whole blood lysis methods comparing light scatter and quantitative fluorescence intensity based on quantitative flow cytometry, of selected lymphocyte subsets and CD34+ cells. Leukocytes prepared with FACS Lysing Solution (BDIS), Immunolyse (Coulter) and Optilyse B (Immunotech) consistently gave lower forward scatter values than those prepared with ACK (BioWhitaker), Ortho-mune (Ortho) and ImmunoPrep (Coulter). Debris, defined as CD45 negative events with the threshold off, accounted approximately 80% of all events with ACK and Ortho-mune. The other lysing methods consistently yielded less debris (approximately 50%) with Immunolyse generating only approximately 16% debris. Optilyse and FACS lyse consistently displayed the lowest percentage of lymphoid cells (CD45+/CD14-) in the three part differential. The percentage of CD3+, CD20+, CD5+, and CD16/CD56+ cells was consistent with all methods but CD4 and CD8 determinants showed inconsistent variation with ACK and Ortho-mune. In addition, the fluorescence intensity of CD14 PE and CD8 PE staining was markedly decreased on cells prepared with ImmunoPrep. Finally, the clearest separation of CD34+ cells was observed with ACK and Ortho-mune. Our data demonstrate that the method used for red cell lysis can have definite impact on immunophenotyping and selected methods appear to be more suitable for specific applications. PMID:9222098

  16. Flow cytometry for the diagnosis of autoimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Aaron

    2006-03-01

    Autoimmune thrombocytopenia is a disorder characterized by antibody-mediated accelerated platelet destruction. Despite its clinical importance, the diagnosis of autoimmune thrombocytopenia is one of exclusion, thus inevitably associated with potential difficulties. Current clinically applicable methods used to determine antigen-specific antibodies, primarily directed to GPIIb/IIIa (CD41a) and GPIb (CD42b), include the monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen (MAIPA) assay and the radioactive immunobead assay. Neither of these assays is commonly used by clinical laboratories, however, because of methodologic and practical limitations. As a result, diagnoses are generally based on clinical impression despite patient presentations that are sometimes complex. To overcome some of these difficulties, flow cytometric techniques have been developed, employing standard methods and equipment suitable for testing a single sample or multiple samples, as may occur in cases of autoimmune thrombocytopenia. The availability of a feasible technique such as flow cytometry, with improved sensitivity and specificity, should facilitate the routine use of a diagnostic method in the evaluation of thrombo-cytopenic patients suspected of having an autoimmune disorder and permit follow-up to determine immune remission. PMID:16537048

  17. Resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, Paul L.

    1998-01-01

    A resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis. The apparatus comprises a resonant optical cavity having an analysis region within the cavity for containing one or more biological cells or dielectric particles to be analyzed. In the presence of a cell or particle, a light beam in the form of spontaneous emission or lasing is generated within the resonant optical cavity and is encoded with information about the cell or particle. An analysis means including a spectrometer and/or a pulse-height analyzer is provided within the apparatus for recovery of the information from the light beam to determine a size, shape, identification or other characteristics about the cells or particles being analyzed. The recovered information can be grouped in a multi-dimensional coordinate space for identification of particular types of cells or particles. In some embodiments of the apparatus, the resonant optical cavity can be formed, at least in part, from a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. The apparatus and method are particularly suited to the analysis of biological cells, including blood cells, and can further include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis thereof.

  18. Resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, P.L.

    1998-08-11

    A resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis is described. The apparatus comprises a resonant optical cavity having an analysis region within the cavity for containing one or more biological cells or dielectric particles to be analyzed. In the presence of a cell or particle, a light beam in the form of spontaneous emission or lasing is generated within the resonant optical cavity and is encoded with information about the cell or particle. An analysis means including a spectrometer and/or a pulse-height analyzer is provided within the apparatus for recovery of the information from the light beam to determine a size, shape, identification or other characteristics about the cells or particles being analyzed. The recovered information can be grouped in a multi-dimensional coordinate space for identification of particular types of cells or particles. In some embodiments of the apparatus, the resonant optical cavity can be formed, at least in part, from a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. The apparatus and method are particularly suited to the analysis of biological cells, including blood cells, and can further include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis. 35 figs.

  19. Monitoring circulating apoptotic cells by in-vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xunbin; Tan, Yuan; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Liu, Guangda; Wu, Bin; Wang, Chen

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapies currently constitute one main venue of cancer treatment. For a large number of adult and elderly patients, however, treatment options are poor. These patients may suffer from disease that is resistant to conventional chemotherapy or may not be candidates for curative therapies because of advanced age or poor medical conditions. To control disease in these patients, new therapies must be developed that are selectively targeted to unique characteristics of tumor cell growth and metastasis. A reliable early evaluation and prediction of response to the chemotherapy is critical to its success. Chemotherapies induce apoptosis in tumor cells and a portion of such apoptotic cancer cells may be present in the circulation. However, the fate of circulating tumor cells is difficult to assess with conventional methods that require blood sampling. We report the in situ measurement of circulating apoptotic cells in live animals using in vivo flow cytometry, a novel method that enables real-time detection and quantification of circulating cells without blood extraction. Apoptotic cells are rapidly cleared from the circulation with a half-life of ~10 minutes. Real-time monitoring of circulating apoptotic cells can be useful for detecting early changes in disease processes, as well as for monitoring response to therapeutic intervention.

  20. [Detection of anti-granulocyte antibodies using flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, T; Furihata, K; Misawa, K; Aoki, M; Kameko, M; Ichikawa, T; Okubo, Y; Ito, S; Ohto, H

    1994-03-01

    To detect anti-granulocyte antibodies (AGAs) in the sera of granulocytopenic patients is important to study the mechanism of the disease. In this report, we studied neutrophil associated immunoglobulin (NAIg) and neutrophil binding immunoglobulin (NBIg) in patients' sera using flow cytometry (FCM). We investigated the interference of circulating immune complexes (CIC) on measuring the NAIg and NBIg. No apparent effect of CIC was observed at concentrations up to 140 micrograms/ml. NAIg and NBIg were semiquantitated by determining the relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) on a flow cytometer and the normal ranges of NAIg and NBIg were less than 15 RFI and less than 10 RFI, respectively. Of 100 sera from patients with neutropenia, 5 were positive for NBIg and 3 of them were positive for granulocyte-specific antibodies. One serum of a patient with benign chronic neutropenia showed clear specificity for NA1 alloantigen but the other 4 AGAs were not specific for NA alloantigen system. Our NAIg, NBIg screening procedure, including NA specificity testing of NBIg and detection of reactivity with normal lymphocytes using FCM, is simple and useful for measuring and studying serological and immunological characteristics of AGAs. PMID:8152165

  1. Control of continuous polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis using calorimetry and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Maskow, Thomas; Müller, Susann; Lösche, Andreas; Harms, Hauke; Kemp, Richard

    2006-02-20

    The substrate-carbon flow can be controlled in continuous bioreactor cultures by the medium composition, for example, by the C/N ratio. The carbon distribution is optimal when a maximum fraction flows into the desired product and the residual is just sufficient to compensate for the dilution of the microbial catalyst. Undershooting of the latter condition is reflected immediately by changes in the Gibbs energy dissipation and cellular states. Two calorimetric measurement principles were applied to optimize the continuous synthesis of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) by Variovorax paradoxus DSM4065 during growth with constantly increasing supply rates of fructose or toxic phenol. Firstly, the changed slope of the heat production rate in a complete heat balanced bioreactor (CHB) indicated optimum carbon channeling into PHB. The extent of the alteration depended directly on the toxic properties of the substrate. Secondly, a flow through calorimeter was connected with the bioreactor as a "measurement loop." The optimum substrate carbon distribution was indicated by a sudden change in the heat production rate independent of substrate toxicity. The sudden change was explained mathematically and exploited for the long-term control of phenol conversion into PHB. LASER flow cytometry measurements distinguished between subpopulations with completely different PHB-content. Populations grown on fructose preserved a constant ratio of two subpopulations with double and quadruple sets of DNA. Cells grown on phenol comprised a third subpopulation with a single DNA set. Rising phenol concentrations caused this subpopulation to increase. It may thus be considered as an indicator of chemostress. PMID:16245347

  2. Quantification of telomere length by FISH and laser scanning cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John E.; Sahin, Ergun; Jaskelioff, Mariela; Chin, Lynda; DePinho, Ronald A.; Protopopov, Alexei I.

    2008-02-01

    Telomeres play a critical role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. Telomere erosion, coupled with loss of DNA damage checkpoint function, results in genomic instability that promotes the development of cancer. The critical role of telomere dynamics in cancer has motivated the development of technologies designed to monitor telomere reserves in a highly quantitative and high-throughput manner in humans and model organisms. To this end, we have adapted and modified two established technologies, telomere-FISH and laser scanning cytometry. Specifically, we have produced a number of enhancements to the iCys LSC (CompuCyte) package including software updates, use of 60X dry objectives, and increased spatial resolution by 0.2 um size of stage steps. In addition, the 633 nm HeNe laser was replaced with a 532 nm green diode laser to better match the viewing options. Utilization of telomere-deficient mouse cells with short dysfunctional telomeres and matched telomerase reconstituted cultures demonstrated significantly higher mean integral specific fluorescence values for mTR transfectants relative to empty vector controls: 4.485M vs. 1.362M (p<0.0001). Histograms of average telomere intensities for individual cells were obtained and demonstrated intercellular heterogeneity in telomere lengths. The validation of the approach derives from a strong correlation between iCys LSC values and Southern blotting. This validated method greatly increases our experimental throughput and objectivity.

  3. Dielectrophoresis switching with vertical sidewall electrodes for microfluidic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Lisa A.; Jeon, Noo Li; Monuki, Edwin; Lee, Abraham P.

    2012-01-01

    A novel dielectrophoresis switching with vertical electrodes in the sidewall of microchannels for multiplexed switching of objects has been designed, fabricated and tested. With appropriate electrode design, lateral DEP force can be generated so that one can dynamically position particulates along the width of the channel. A set of interdigitated electrodes in the sidewall of the microchannels is used for the generation of non-uniform electrical fields to generate negative DEP forces that repel beads/cells from the sidewalls. A countering DEP force is generated from another set of electrodes patterned on the opposing sidewall. These lateral negative DEP forces can be adjusted by the voltage and frequency applied. By manipulating the coupled DEP forces, the particles flowing through the microchannel can be positioned at different equilibrium points along the width direction and continue to flow into different outlet channels. Experimental results for switching biological cells and polystyrene microbeads to multiple outlets (up to 5) have been achieved. This novel particle switching technique can be integrated with other particle detection components to enable microfluidic flow cytometry systems. PMID:17713608

  4. Tracking Immune Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxic Potential Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tario, Joseph D.; Muirhead, Katharine A.; Pan, Dalin; Munson, Mark E.; Wallace, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    In the second edition of this series, we described the use of cell tracking dyes in combination with tetramer reagents and traditional phenotyping protocols to monitor levels of proliferation and cytokine production in antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. In particular, we illustrated how tracking dye fluorescence profiles could be used to ascertain the precursor frequencies of different subsets in the T-cell pool that are able to bind tetramer, synthesize cytokines, undergo antigen-driven proliferation, and/or carry out various combinations of these functional responses. Analysis of antigen-specific proliferative responses represents just one of many functions that can be monitored using cell tracking dyes and flow cytometry. In this third edition, we address issues to be considered when combining two different tracking dyes with other phenotypic and viability probes for the assessment of cytotoxic effector activity and regulatory T-cell functions. We summarize key characteristics of and differences between general protein- and membrane-labeling dyes, discuss determination of optimal staining concentrations, and provide detailed labeling protocols for both dye types. Examples of the advantages of two-color cell tracking are provided in the form of protocols for (a) independent enumeration of viable effector and target cells in a direct cytotoxicity assay and (b) simultaneous monitoring of proliferative responses in effector and regulatory T cells. PMID:21116982

  5. Flow cytometry reliability analysis and variations in sugarcane DNA content.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A C L; Pasqual, M; Bruzi, A T; Pio, L A S; Mendonça, P M S; Soares, J D R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of flow cytometry analysis and the use of this technique to differentiate species and varieties of sugarcane (Saccharum spp) according to their relative DNA content. We analyzed 16 varieties and three species belonging to this genus. To determine a reliable protocol, we evaluated three extraction buffers (LB01, Marie, and Tris·MgCl2), the presence and absence of RNase, six doses of propidium iodide (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 μg), four periods of exposure to propidium iodide (0, 5, 10, and 20 min), and seven external reference standards (peas, beans, corn, radish, rye, soybean, and tomato) with reference to the coefficient of variation and the DNA content. For statistical analyses, we used the programs Sisvar(®) and Xlstat(®). We recommend using the Marie extraction buffer and at least 15 μg propidium iodide. The samples should not be analyzed immediately after the addition of propidium iodide. The use of RNase is optional, and tomato should be used as an external reference standard. The results show that sugarcane has a variable genome size (8.42 to 12.12 pg/2C) and the individuals analyzed could be separated into four groups according to their DNA content with relative equality in the genome sizes of the commercial varieties. PMID:26125928

  6. The cytopathology of mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Michelow, Pamela; Omar, Tanvier; Field, Andrew; Wright, Colleen

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterial infection, tuberculosis (TB) in particular, remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases in adults and particularly in children, in low and middle income countries. The combination of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and TB is often lethal with TB accounting for 25% of deaths in the HIV population. One of the cornerstones for reducing the TB epidemic is early case detection using high quality diagnostic techniques. Cytology, especially fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is able to diagnose mycobacterial infection in a rapid and cost-effective manner without requiring surgery, thus allowing appropriate management to be quickly instituted. Confirmatory ancillary tests can effectively be performed on cytologic material. In this review, the pertinent cytomorphology of mycobacterial infection in various exfoliative and FNAB specimens is presented, in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients. In the immunosuppressed, the typical cytomorphology of caseating granulomatous inflammation may not be seen but suppurative necrotic inflammation, mycobacterial spindle pseudotumour or a specimen comprised entirely of necrosis may be seen instead. This review includes discussion of currently available ancillary tests that can be performed on cytologic specimens. PMID:26800030

  7. Regression analysis of cytopathological data

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; McLarty, J.W.; Fortson, N.; Anderson, K.

    1982-12-01

    Epithelial cells from the human body are frequently labelled according to one of several ordered levels of abnormality, ranging from normal to malignant. The label of the most abnormal cell in a specimen determines the score for the specimen. This paper presents a model for the regression of specimen scores against continuous and discrete variables, as in host exposure to carcinogens. Application to data and tests for adequacy of model fit are illustrated using sputum specimens obtained from a cohort of former asbestos workers.

  8. Differential expression of T cell antigens in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: a quantitative analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Ginaldi, L; Farahat, N; Matutes, E; De Martinis, M; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To obtain reference values of the level of expression of T cell antigens on normal lymphocyte subsets in order to disclose differences which could reflect their function or maturation stages, or both. METHODS: Peripheral blood from 15 healthy donors was processed by flow cytometry with triple colour analysis. For each sample phycoerythrin (PE) conjugated CD2, CD4, CD5, CD8, and CD56 monoclonal antibodies were combined with Cy5-R-phycoerythrin (TC) conjugated CD3 and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated CD7; CD2- and CD7-PE were also combined with CD3-TC and CD4-FITC. Standard microbeads with different capacities to bind mouse immunoglobulins were used to convert the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values of the lymphocyte subsets identified by multiparametric flow cytometry into the number of antigen molecules per cell, measured as antibody binding capacity (ABC). RESULTS: CD4+ (helper/inducer) T cells exhibit a higher CD3 antigen expression compared with CD8+ (suppressor/ cytotoxic) T lymphocytes. Within the CD4+ T cells, the CD4+CD7- subset expressed a lower level of CD3 compared with CD4+CD7+ and CD8+CD7+ cells, and higher CD2 and CD5 expression than the main CD3+CD7+ subset. Major differences in antigen expression were also detected between CD3+ T cells and CD3-CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells: NK cells exhibited higher levels of CD7 and CD56 and lower levels of CD2 and CD5 than T cells. Significantly lower CD5 expression was also detected in the small CD5+ B lymphocyte subset compared with T cells. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative flow cytometry with triple colour analysis may be used to detect antigen modulations in disease states and to increase the accuracy of diagnosis by comparison with findings in normal counterparts. Images PMID:8813949

  9. Minimally Invasive Assessment of Tumor Angiogenesis by Fine Needle Aspiration and Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Sottnik, Joseph L.; Guth, Amanda M.; Mitchell, Leah A.; Dow, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    The development of a new, less invasive, and more rapidly implemented method of quantifying endothelial cell density in tumors could facilitate experimental and clinical studies of angiogenesis. Therefore, we evaluated the utility of tumor fine needle aspiration (FNA) coupled with flow cytometry for assessment of tumor angiogenesis. Samples were obtained from cutaneous tumors of mice using FNA, then immunostained and assessed by flow cytometry to determine the number of CD31+ endothelial cells. Results of the FNA/flow cytometry technique were compared with quantification of tumor microvessel density using immunohistochemistry. The ability of the FNA/cytometry technique to quantify the effects of anti-angiogenic therapy and to monitor changes in tumor angiogenesis over time in individual tumors was also determined. We found that endothelial cell percentages determined in tumor tissue aspirates by flow cytometry correlated well with the percentages of endothelial cells determined in whole tumor digests by flow cytometry and with tumor microvessel density measurements by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we found that repeated FNA sampling of tumors did not induce endothelial cell changes. Interestingly, by employing repeated FNA sampling of the same tumors we were able to observe a sudden and marked decline in tumor angiogenesis triggered when tumors reached a certain size. Thus, we conclude that the FNA/flow cytometry technique is an efficient, reproducible, and relatively non-invasive method of rapidly assessing tumor angiogenesis, which could be readily applied to evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in clinical settings in humans. PMID:20734228

  10. Early reprogramming regulators identified by prospective isolation and mass cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Ernesto; Zunder, Eli R.; Ng, Yi Han; Goronzy, Isabel N.; Nolan, Garry P.; Wernig, Marius

    2015-01-01

    In the context of most induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming methods, heterogeneous populations of nonproductive and staggered productive intermediates arise at different reprogramming time points1–11. Despite recent reports claiming substantially increased reprogramming efficiencies using genetically modified donor cells12,13 prospectively isolating distinct reprogramming intermediates remains an important goal to decipher reprogramming mechanisms. Previous attempts to identify surface markers of intermediate cell populations were based on the assumption that during reprogramming cells progressively lose donor cell identity and gradually acquire iPS cell properties1,2,7,8,10. Here, we report that iPS cell and epithelial markers, such as SSEA1 and EpCAM, respectively, are not predictive of reprogramming during early phases. Instead, in a systematic functional surface marker screen we find that early reprogramming-prone cells express a unique set of surface markers, including CD73, CD49d and CD200 that are absent in fibroblasts and iPS cells. Single cell mass cytometry and prospective isolation show that these distinct intermediates are transient and bridge the gap between donor cell silencing and pluripotency marker acquisition during the early, presumably stochastic reprogramming phase2. Expression profiling revealed early upregulation of the transcriptional regulators Nr0b1 and Etv5 in this reprogramming state, preceding activation of key pluripotency regulators such as Rex1, Dppa2, Nanog and Sox2. Both factors are required for the generation of the early intermediate state and fully reprogrammed iPS cells, and thus mark some of the earliest known regulators of iPS cell induction. Our study deconvolutes the first steps in a hierarchical series of events that lead to pluripotency acquisition. PMID:25830878

  11. Impedance microflow cytometry for viability studies of microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Berardino, Marco; Hebeisen, Monika; Hessler, Thomas; Ziswiler, Adrian; Largiadèr, Stephanie; Schade, Grit

    2011-02-01

    Impedance-based Coulter counters and its derivatives are widely used cell analysis tools in many laboratories and use normally DC or low frequency AC to perform these electrical analyses. The emergence of micro-fabrication technologies in the last decade, however, provides a new means of measuring electrical properties of cells. Microfluidic approaches combined with impedance spectroscopy measurements in the radio frequency (RF) range increase sensitivity and information content and thus push single cell analyses beyond simple cell counting and sizing applications towards multiparametric cell characterization. Promising results have been shown already in the fields of cell differentiation and blood analysis. Here we emphasize the potential of this technology by presenting new data obtained from viability studies on microorganisms. Impedance measurements of several yeast and bacteria strains performed at frequencies around 10 MHz enable an easy discrimination between dead and viable cells. Moreover, cytotoxic effects of antibiotics and other reagents, as well as cell starvation can also be monitored easily. Control analyses performed with conventional flow cytometers using various fluorescent dyes (propidium iodide, oxonol) indicate a good correlation and further highlight the capability of this device. The label-free approach makes on the one hand the use of usually expensive fluorochromes obsolete, on the other hand practically eliminates laborious sample preparation procedures. Until now, online cell monitoring was limited to the determination of viable biomass, which provides rather poor information of a cell culture. Impedance microflow cytometry, besides other aspects, proposes a simple solution to these limitations and might become an important tool for bioprocess monitoring applications in the biotech industry.

  12. Evaluation of a green laser pointer for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Habbersett, Robert C; Naivar, Mark A; Woods, Travis A; Goddard, Gregory R; Graves, Steven W

    2007-10-01

    Flow cytometers typically incorporate expensive lasers with high-quality (TEM00) output beam structure and very stable output power, significantly increasing system cost and power requirements. Red diode lasers minimize power consumption and cost, but limit fluorophore selection. Low-cost DPSS laser pointer modules could possibly offer increased wavelength selection but presumed emission instability has limited their use. A $160 DPSS 532 nm laser pointer module was first evaluated for noise characteristics and then used as the excitation light source in a custom-built flow cytometer for the analysis of fluorescent calibration and alignment microspheres. Eight of ten modules tested were very quiet (RMS noise < or = 0.6% between 0 and 5 MHz). With a quiet laser pointer module as the light source in a slow-flow system, fluorescence measurements from alignment microspheres produced CVs of about 3.3%. Furthermore, the use of extended transit times and < or =1 mW of laser power produced both baseline resolution of all 8 peaks in a set of Rainbow microspheres, and a detection limit of <20 phycoerythrin molecules per particle. Data collected with the transit time reduced to 25 micros (in the same instrument but at 2.4 mW laser output) demonstrated a detection limit of approximately 75 phycoerythrin molecules and CVs of about 2.7%. The performance, cost, size, and power consumption of the tested laser pointer module suggests that it may be suitable for use in conventional flow cytometry, particularly if it were coupled with cytometers that support extended transit times. PMID:17712796

  13. Aequorea green fluorescent protein analysis by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ropp, J.D.; Cuthbertson, R.A.; Donahue, C.J.; Wolfgang-Kimball, D.

    1995-12-01

    The isolation and expression of the cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria has highlighted its potential use as a marker for gene expression in a variety of cell types. The longer wavelength peak (470 nm) of GFP`s bimodal absorption spectrum better matches standard fluorescein filter sets; however, it has a considerably lower amplitude than the major absorption peak at 395. In an effort to increase the sensitivity of GFP with routinely available instrumentation, Heim et al. have generated a GFP mutant (serine-65 to threonine; S65T-GFP) which possesses a single absorption peak centered at 490 nm. We have constructed this mutant in order to determine whether it or wild-type GFP (wt-GFP) afforded greater sensitivity when excited near their respective absorption maxima. Using the conventionally available 488 nm and ultraviolet (UV) laser lines from the argon ion laser as well as the 407 nm line from a krypton ion laser with enhanced violet emission, we were able to closely match the absorption maxima of both the S65T and wild-type forms of Aequorea GFP and analyze differences in fluorescence intensity of transiently transfected 293 cells with flow cytometry. The highest fluorescence signal was observed with 488 nm excitation of S65T-GFP relative to all other laser line/GFP pairs. The wt-GFP fluorescence intensity, in contrast, was significantly higher at 407 nm relative to either 488 nm or UV. These results were consistent with parallel spectrofluorometric analysis of the emission spectrum for wt-GFP and S65T- GFP. The relative contribution of cellular autofluorescence at each wavelength was also investigated and shown to be significantly reduced at 407 nm relative to either UV or 488 nm. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Characterization, detection, and counting of metal nanoparticles using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Robert M; Ortenzio, Jayna N R; Boyes, William K

    2016-02-01

    There is a need to accurately detect, characterize, and quantify nanoparticles in suspensions. This study helps to understand the complex interactions between similar types of nanoparticles. Before initiating a study of metal nanoparticles, five submicron PS beads with sizes between 200 nm and 1 µm were used to derive a reference scale that was useful in evaluating the flow cytometer for functionality, sensitivity, resolution, and reproducibility. Side scatter intensity (SSC) from metal nanoparticles was obtained simultaneously from 405 nm and 488 nm lasers. The 405 nm laser generally yielded histogram distributions with smaller CVs, less side scatter intensity, better separation indices between beads and decreased scatter differences between different sized particles compared with the 488 nm laser. Submicron particles must be diluted to 10(6) and 10(7) particles/mL before flow cytometer analysis to avoid coincidence counting artifacts. When particles were too concentrated the following occurred: swarm, electronic overload, coincidence counting, activation of doublet discrimination and rejection circuitry, increase of mean SSC histogram distributions, alterations of SSC and pulse width histogram shape, decrease and fluctuations in counting rate and decrease or elimination of particulate water noise and 1 µm reference bead. To insure that the concentrations were in the proper counting range, the nanoparticle samples were mixed with a known concentration of 1µm counting beads. Sequential dilutions of metal nanoparticles in a 1 µm counting bead suspension helped determine the diluted concentration needed for flow cytometer analysis. It was found that the original concentrated nanoparticle samples had to be diluted, between 1:10,000 and 1:100,000, before characterization by flow cytometry. The concentration of silver or gold nanoparticles in the undiluted sample were determined by comparing them with a known concentration (1.9 × 10(6) beads/mL) of 1 µm

  15. Understanding microbial/DOM interactions using fluorescence and flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Bethany; Rushworth, Cathy; Attridge, John; Anesio, Alexandre; Cox, Tim; Reynolds, Darren

    2015-04-01

    The transformation and movement of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within freshwater aquatic systems is an important factor in the global cycling of carbon. DOC within aquatic systems is known to underpin the microbial food web and therefore plays an essential role in supporting and maintaining the aquatic ecosystem. Despite this the interactions between bacteria and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are not well understood, although the literature indicates that the microbial processing of bioavailable DOM is essential during the production of autochthonous, labile, DOM. DOM can be broadly characterised by its fluorescing properties and Coble et al. (2014) define terrestrially derived DOM as exhibiting "peak C" fluorescence, whilst labile microbially derived DOM is defined as showing "peak T" fluorescence. Our work explores the microbial/DOM interactions by analysing aquatic samples using fluorescence excitation and emission matrices (EEMs) in conjunction with microbial consumption of dissolved oxygen. Environmental and synthetic water samples were subjected to fluorescence characterisation using both fluorescence spectroscopy and in situ fluorescence sensors (Chelsea Technologies Group Ltd.). PARAFAC analysis and peak picking were performed on EEMs and compared with flow cytometry data, used to quantify bacterial numbers present within samples. Synthetic samples were created using glucose, glutamic acid, nutrient-rich water and a standard bacterial seed. Synthetic samples were provided with terrestrially derived DOM via the addition of an aliquot of environmental water. Using a closed system approach, samples were incubated over time (up to a maximum of 20 days) and analysed at pre-defined intervals. The main focus of our work is to improve our understanding of microbial/DOM interactions and how these interactions affect both the DOM characteristics and microbial food web in freshwater aquatic systems. The information gained, in relation to the origin, microbial

  16. Setting objective thresholds for rare event detection in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Richards, Adam J; Staats, Janet; Enzor, Jennifer; McKinnon, Katherine; Frelinger, Jacob; Denny, Thomas N; Weinhold, Kent J; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-07-01

    The accurate identification of rare antigen-specific cytokine positive cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after antigenic stimulation in an intracellular staining (ICS) flow cytometry assay is challenging, as cytokine positive events may be fairly diffusely distributed and lack an obvious separation from the negative population. Traditionally, the approach by flow operators has been to manually set a positivity threshold to partition events into cytokine-positive and cytokine-negative. This approach suffers from subjectivity and inconsistency across different flow operators. The use of statistical clustering methods does not remove the need to find an objective threshold between between positive and negative events since consistent identification of rare event subsets is highly challenging for automated algorithms, especially when there is distributional overlap between the positive and negative events ("smear"). We present a new approach, based on the Fβ measure, that is similar to manual thresholding in providing a hard cutoff, but has the advantage of being determined objectively. The performance of this algorithm is compared with results obtained by expert visual gating. Several ICS data sets from the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL) proficiency program were used to make the comparisons. We first show that visually determined thresholds are difficult to reproduce and pose a problem when comparing results across operators or laboratories, as well as problems that occur with the use of commonly employed clustering algorithms. In contrast, a single parameterization for the Fβ method performs consistently across different centers, samples, and instruments because it optimizes the precision/recall tradeoff by using both negative and positive controls. PMID:24727143

  17. Performance of calibration standards for antigen quantitation with flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lenkei, R; Gratama, J W; Rothe, G; Schmitz, G; D'hautcourt, J L; Arekrans, A; Mandy, F; Marti, G

    1998-10-01

    In the frame of the activities initiated by the Task Force for Antigen Quantitation of the European Working Group on Clinical Cell Analysis (EWGCCA), an experiment was conducted to evaluate microbead standards used for quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM). An unified window of analysis (UWA) was established on three different instruments (EPICS XL [Coulter Corporation, Miami, FL], FACScan and FACS Calibur [Becton Dickinson, San Jose, CA]) with QC3 microbeads (FCSC, PR). By using this defined fluorescence intensity scale, the performance of several monoclonal antibodies directed to CD3, CD4, and CD8 (conjugated and unconjugated), from three manufacturers (BDIS, Coulter [Immunotech], and DAKO) was tested. In addition, the QIFI system (DAKO) and QuantiBRITE (BDIS), and a method of relative fluorescence intensity (RFI, method of Giorgi), were compared. mAbs reacting with three more antigens, CD16, CD19, and CD38 were tested on the FACScan instrument. Quantitation was carried out using a single batch of cryopreserved peripheral blood leukocytes, and all tests were performed as single color analyses. Significant correlations were observed between the antibody-binding capacity (ABC) values of the same CD antigen measured with various calibrators and with antibodies differing in respect to vendor, labeling and possible epitope recognition. Despite the significant correlations, the ABC values of most monoclonal antibodies differed by 20-40% when determined by the different fluorochrome conjugates and different calibrators. The results of this study indicate that, at the present stage of QFCM consistent ABC values may be attained between laboratories provided that a specific calibration system is used including specific calibrators, reagents, and protocols. PMID:9773879

  18. Mass cytometry: a highly multiplexed single-cell technology for advancing drug development.

    PubMed

    Atkuri, Kondala R; Stevens, Jeffrey C; Neubert, Hendrik

    2015-02-01

    Advanced single-cell analysis technologies (e.g., mass cytometry) that help in multiplexing cellular measurements in limited-volume primary samples are critical in bridging discovery efforts to successful drug approval. Mass cytometry is the state-of-the-art technology in multiparametric single-cell analysis. Mass cytometers (also known as cytometry by time-of-flight or CyTOF) combine the cellular analysis principles of traditional fluorescence-based flow cytometry with the selectivity and quantitative power of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Standard flow cytometry is limited in the number of parameters that can be measured owing to the overlap in signal when detecting fluorescently labeled antibodies. Mass cytometry uses antibodies tagged to stable isotopes of rare earth metals, which requires minimal signal compensation between the different metal tags. This unique feature enables researchers to seamlessly multiplex up to 40 independent measurements on single cells. In this overview we first present an overview of mass cytometry and compare it with traditional flow cytometry. We then discuss the emerging and potential applications of CyTOF technology in the pharmaceutical industry, including quantitative and qualitative deep profiling of immune cells and their applications in assessing drug immunogenicity, extensive mapping of signaling networks in single cells, cell surface receptor quantification and multiplexed internalization kinetics, multiplexing sample analysis by barcoding, and establishing cell ontologies on the basis of phenotype and/or function. We end with a discussion of the anticipated impact of this technology on drug development lifecycle with special emphasis on the utility of mass cytometry in deciphering a drug's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics relationship. PMID:25349123

  19. In vivo quantitation of rare circulating tumor cells by multiphoton intravital flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Wang, Haifeng; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Low, Philip S.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) constitutes an emerging tool for the diagnosis and staging of cancer, assessment of response to therapy, and evaluation of residual disease after surgery. Unfortunately, no existing technology has the sensitivity to measure the low numbers of tumor cells (<1 CTC per ml of whole blood) that characterize minimal levels of disease. We present a method, intravital flow cytometry, that noninvasively counts rare CTCs in vivo as they flow through the peripheral vasculature. The method involves i.v. injection of a tumor-specific fluorescent ligand followed by multiphoton fluorescence imaging of superficial blood vessels to quantitate the flowing CTCs. Studies in mice with metastatic tumors demonstrate that CTCs can be quantitated weeks before metastatic disease is detected by other means. Analysis of whole blood samples from cancer patients further establishes that human CTCs can be selectively labeled and quantitated when present at ≈2 CTCs per ml, opening opportunities for earlier assessment of metastatic disease. PMID:17601776

  20. Computational flow cytometry: helping to make sense of high-dimensional immunology data.

    PubMed

    Saeys, Yvan; Gassen, Sofie Van; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in flow cytometry allow scientists to measure an increasing number of parameters per cell, generating huge and high-dimensional datasets. To analyse, visualize and interpret these data, newly available computational techniques should be adopted, evaluated and improved upon by the immunological community. Computational flow cytometry is emerging as an important new field at the intersection of immunology and computational biology; it allows new biological knowledge to be extracted from high-throughput single-cell data. This Review provides non-experts with a broad and practical overview of the many recent developments in computational flow cytometry. PMID:27320317

  1. Vesicles tethered to microbubbles by hybridized DNA oligonucleotides: Flow cytometry analysis of this new drug delivery vehicle design

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Monica M.; Starkel, Cambrie D.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2010-01-01

    Hybridization of complementary lipid-linked DNA oligonucleotides was used to tether small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) to the lipid monolayer shells of air-microbubbles, a new attachment design for a drug delivery vehicle to be used in tandem with ultrasound imaging. Flow cytometry was used and a novel analysis was developed, based upon light scattering and fluorescence intensity, to quantify the fraction of microbubbles of chosen size-ranges with oligonucleotide-tethered fluorescently labeled SUVs. Fluorescence microscopy was used to verify that our methodology results in successful high-density SUV tethering to a similar fraction of the microbubbles when compared to the flow cytometry statistics. The fraction of successful tetherings increased with the concentration of the complementary lipid-linked oligonucleotide as expected and decreased with the time that microbubbles were incubated with SUVs, which was not expected. Also unexpected, a large fraction of microbubbles had only background fluorescence levels while a much smaller fraction (at most one-eighth, for the shortest incubation and highest concentration of lipid-linked oligonucleotide) had oligonucleotide-tethered fluorescently labeled SUVs and, according to our fluorescence microscopy, that small fraction was densely covered with SUVs. Ejection of the lipid-linked oligonucleotide during high surface pressure compression of the monolayer shells of actively shrinking microbubbles subjected to the Laplace overpressure is speculated as a qualitatively explanation for the statistics. PMID:20229988

  2. Examination of Thymic Positive and Negative Selection by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Troy A.

    2012-01-01

    premature negative selection. Our lab has developed the HYcd4 model, in which the transgenic HY TCRα is conditionally expressed at the DP stage, allowing negative selection to occur during the DP to SP transition as occurs in wildtype mice10. Here, we describe a flow cytometry-based protocol to examine thymic positive and negative selection in the HYcd4 mouse model. While negative selection in HYcd4 mice is highly physiological, these methods can also be applied to other TCR transgenic models. We will also present general strategies for analyzing positive selection in a polyclonal repertoire applicable to any genetically manipulated mice. PMID:23093039

  3. Rapid Flow Cytometry Test for Identification of Different Carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana P; Faria-Ramos, Isabel; Ricardo, Elisabete; Miranda, Isabel M; Espinar, Maria J; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Cantón, Rafael; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2016-06-01

    A flow cytometry test was developed to identify carbapenemase production by Enterobacteriaceae and to discriminate between the different types of carbapenemases (classes A, B, and D). It is based on the detection of meropenem activity against bacteria, coupled with different carbapenemase inhibitors, which is assessed by flow cytometry. It represents a convenient, fast, and reliable approach (100% sensitivity and 100% specificity) for the detection and characterization of different carbapenemases. PMID:27021318

  4. The emergence of flow cytometry for sensitive, real-time measurements of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.P.; Sklar, L.A. |

    1998-07-01

    The analysis of macromolecular interactions is an essential element of biomedical research. Flow cytometry is uniquely capable of making sensitive and quantitative measurements of molecular interactions. These measurements can be made in real time with subsecond kinetic resolution using purified biomolecules or living cells. Combined with automated sample handling, these features make flow cytometry a versatile and robust technology for the analysis of molecular interactions.

  5. The end of gating? An introduction to automated analysis of high dimensional cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Mair, Florian; Hartmann, Felix J; Mrdjen, Dunja; Tosevski, Vinko; Krieg, Carsten; Becher, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Ever since its invention half a century ago, flow cytometry has been a major tool for single-cell analysis, fueling advances in our understanding of a variety of complex cellular systems, in particular the immune system. The last decade has witnessed significant technical improvements in available cytometry platforms, such that more than 20 parameters can be analyzed on a single-cell level by fluorescence-based flow cytometry. The advent of mass cytometry has pushed this limit up to, currently, 50 parameters. However, traditional analysis approaches for the resulting high-dimensional datasets, such as gating on bivariate dot plots, have proven to be inefficient. Although a variety of novel computational analysis approaches to interpret these datasets are already available, they have not yet made it into the mainstream and remain largely unknown to many immunologists. Therefore, this review aims at providing a practical overview of novel analysis techniques for high-dimensional cytometry data including SPADE, t-SNE, Wanderlust, Citrus, and PhenoGraph, and how these applications can be used advantageously not only for the most complex datasets, but also for standard 14-parameter cytometry datasets. PMID:26548301

  6. Single Cell Mass Cytometry Adapted to Measurements of the Cell Cycle1

    PubMed Central

    Behbehani, Gregory K.; Bendall, Sean C.; Clutter, Matthew R.; Fantl, Wendy J.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2013-01-01

    Mass cytometry is a recently introduced technology that utilizes transition element isotope-tagged antibodies for protein detection on a single-cell basis. By circumventing the limitations of emission spectral overlap associated with fluorochromes utilized in traditional flow cytometry, mass cytometry currently allows measurement of up to 40 parameters per cell. Recently a comprehensive mass cytometry analysis was described for the hematopoietic differentiation program in human bone marrow from a healthy donor. The present study describes approaches to delineate cell cycle stages utilizing iododeoxyuridine (IdU) to mark cells in S phase, simultaneously with antibodies against cyclin B1, cyclin A, and phosphorylated histone H3 (S28) that characterize the other cell cycle phases. Protocols were developed in which an antibody against phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (Rb) at serines 807 and 811 was used to separate cells in G0 and G1 phases of the cell cycle. This mass cytometry method yielded cell cycle distributions of both normal and cancer cell populations that were equivalent to those obtained by traditional fluorescence cytometry techniques. We applied this to map the cell cycle phases of cells spanning the hematopoietic hierarchy in healthy human bone marrow as a prelude to later studies with cancers and other disorders of this lineage. PMID:22693166

  7. On-Chip Cytometry using Plasmonic Nanoparticle Enhanced Lensfree Holography

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qingshan; McLeod, Euan; Qi, Hangfei; Wan, Zhe; Sun, Ren; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Computational microscopy tools, in particular lensfree on-chip imaging, provide a large field-of-view along with a long depth-of-field, which makes it feasible to rapidly analyze large volumes of specimen using a compact and light-weight on-chip imaging architecture. To bring molecular specificity to this high-throughput platform, here we demonstrate the use of plasmon-resonant metallic nanoparticles to automatically recognize different cell types based on their plasmon-enhanced lensfree holograms, detected and reconstructed over a large field-of-view of e.g., ~24 mm2. PMID:23608952

  8. Time-Domain Microfluidic Fluorescence Lifetime Flow Cytometry for High-Throughput Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5–5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving

  9. Image

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-08-31

    The computer side of the IMAGE project consists of a collection of Perl scripts that perform a variety of tasks; scripts are available to insert, update and delete data from the underlying Oracle database, download data from NCBI's Genbank and other sources, and generate data files for download by interested parties. Web scripts make up the tracking interface, and various tools available on the project web-site (image.llnl.gov) that provide a search interface to the database.

  10. FuGEFlow: data model and markup language for flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yu; Tchuvatkina, Olga; Spidlen, Josef; Wilkinson, Peter; Gasparetto, Maura; Jones, Andrew R; Manion, Frank J; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2009-01-01

    Background Flow cytometry technology is widely used in both health care and research. The rapid expansion of flow cytometry applications has outpaced the development of data storage and analysis tools. Collaborative efforts being taken to eliminate this gap include building common vocabularies and ontologies, designing generic data models, and defining data exchange formats. The Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) standard was recently adopted by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. This standard guides researchers on the information that should be included in peer reviewed publications, but it is insufficient for data exchange and integration between computational systems. The Functional Genomics Experiment (FuGE) formalizes common aspects of comprehensive and high throughput experiments across different biological technologies. We have extended FuGE object model to accommodate flow cytometry data and metadata. Methods We used the MagicDraw modelling tool to design a UML model (Flow-OM) according to the FuGE extension guidelines and the AndroMDA toolkit to transform the model to a markup language (Flow-ML). We mapped each MIFlowCyt term to either an existing FuGE class or to a new FuGEFlow class. The development environment was validated by comparing the official FuGE XSD to the schema we generated from the FuGE object model using our configuration. After the Flow-OM model was completed, the final version of the Flow-ML was generated and validated against an example MIFlowCyt compliant experiment description. Results The extension of FuGE for flow cytometry has resulted in a generic FuGE-compliant data model (FuGEFlow), which accommodates and links together all information required by MIFlowCyt. The FuGEFlow model can be used to build software and databases using FuGE software toolkits to facilitate automated exchange and manipulation of potentially large flow cytometry experimental data sets. Additional project

  11. Enumeration and Biomass Estimation of Bacteria in Aquifer Microcosm Studies by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    DeLeo, P. C.; Baveye, P.

    1996-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and characterize bacteria from a sand column microcosm simulating aquifer conditions. Pure cultures of a species of Bacillus isolated from subsurface sediments or Bacillus megaterium were first evaluated to identify these organisms' characteristic histograms. Counting was then carried out with samples from the aquifer microcosms. Enumeration by flow cytometry was compared with more-traditional acridine orange direct counting. These two techniques gave statistically similar results. However, counting by flow cytometry, in this case, surveyed a sample size 700 times greater than did acridine orange direct counting (25 (mu)l versus 0.034 (mu)l) and required 1/10 the time (2 h versus 20 h). Flow cytometry was able to distinguish the same species of bacteria grown under different nutrient conditions, and it could distinguish changes in cell growth patterns, specifically single cell growth versus chained cell growth in different regions of an aquifer microcosm. A biomass estimate was calculated by calibrating the total fluorescence of a sample from a pure culture with the dry weight of a freeze-dried volume from the original pure culture. Growth conditions significantly affected histograms and biomass estimates, so the calibration was carried out with cells grown under conditions similar to those in the aquifer microcosm. Costs associated with using flow cytometry were minimal compared with the amount of time saved in counting cells and estimating biomass. PMID:16535470

  12. MIFlowCyt: The Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jamie A.; Spidlen, Josef; Boyce, Keith; Cai, Jennifer; Crosbie, Nicholas; Dalphin, Mark; Furlong, Jeff; Gasparetto, Maura; Goldberg, Michael; Goralczyk, Elizabeth M.; Hyun, Bill; Jansen, Kirstin; Kollmann, Tobias; Kong, Megan; Leif, Robert; McWeeney, Shannon; Moloshok, Thomas D.; Moore, Wayne; Nolan, Garry; Nolan, John; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Parrish, David; Purcell, Barclay; Qian, Yu; Selvaraj, Biruntha; Smith, Clayton; Tchuvatkina, Olga; Wertheimer, Anne; Wilkinson, Peter; Wilson, Christopher; Wood, James; Zigon, Robert; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background A fundamental tenet of scientific research is that published results are open to independent validation and refutation. Minimum data standards aid data providers, users and publishers by providing a specification of what is required to unambiguously interpret experimental findings. Here, we present the Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) standard, stating the minimum information required to report flow cytometry (FCM) experiments. Methods We brought together a cross-disciplinary international collaborative group of bioinformaticians, computational statisticians, software developers, instrument manufacturers, and clinical and basic research scientists to develop the standard. The standard was subsequently vetted by the International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) Data Standards Task Force, Standards Committee, membership and Council. Results The MIFlowCyt standard includes recommendations about descriptions of the specimens and reagents included in the FCM experiment, the configuration of the instrument used to perform the assays and the data processing approaches used to interpret the primary output data. MIFlowCyt has been adopted as a standard by ISAC, representing the flow cytometry scientific community including scientists as well as software and hardware manufactures. Conclusions MIFlowCyt’s adoption by the scientific and publishing communities will facilitate third-party understanding and reuse of flow cytometry data. PMID:18752282

  13. Single Cell Mass Cytometry for Analysis of Immune System Functional States

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, Zach B.; Nolan, Garry P.; Fantl, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    Single cell mass cytometry facilitates high-dimensional, quantitative analysis of the effects of bioactive molecules on cell populations at single-cell resolution. Datasets are generated with antibody panels (upwards of 40) in which each antibody is conjugated to a polymer chelated with a stable metal isotope, usually in the Lanthanide series of the periodic table. Isotope labelled antibodies recognize surface markers to delineate cell types and intracellular signaling molecules to provide a measure of the network state—and thereby demarcating multiple cell state functions such as apoptosis, DNA damage and cell cycle. By measuring all these parameters simultaneously, the signaling state of an individual cell can be measured at its network state. This review will cover the basics of mass cytometry as well as outline steps already taken to allow it to stand aside traditional fluorescence based cytometry in the immunologist’s analytical arsenal in their study of immune states during infection. PMID:23999316

  14. Beyond conventional cell analysis: the latest science and technology in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wright, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    Combining powerful performance and innovative design and technology, it is possible to deliver a compact, easy-to-use flow cytometry system. Pushing the 'norms' of conventional flow cytometry, today's--and tomorrow's--systems enable complex research into high-content applications in cell biology, as well as a deeper understanding of the advantages gained from the emerging nanoparticle frontier. Flow cytometry is a powerful tool for interrogating complex biological questions at the forefront of biomedical and life science research and increasingly for clinical laboratory applications. Today's investigators want to harness that power and are demanding smaller and more powerful instruments that are more affordable and easier to use. Using innovation, engineers are able to deliver solutions to meet the challenge. PMID:26887094

  15. Matching of flow-cytometry histograms using information theory in feature space.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing; Wand, Matthew; Young, Alan J.; Rawn, James; Milford, Edgar L.; Mentzer, Steven J.; Greenes, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a widely available technique for analyzing cell-surface protein expression. Data obtained from flow cytometry is frequently used to produce fluorescence intensity histograms. Comparison of histograms can be useful in the identification of unknown molecules and in the analysis of protein expression. In this study, we examined the combination of a new smoothing technique called SiZer with information theory to measure the difference between cytometry histograms. SiZer provides cross-bandwidth smoothing and allowed analysis in feature space. The new methods were tested on a panel of monoclonal antibodies raised against proteins expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes and compared with previous methods. The findings suggest that comparing information content of histograms in feature space is effective and efficient for identifying antibodies with similar cell-surface binding patterns. PMID:12463961

  16. The Bethesda system for reporting thyroid cytopathology: An experience of 1,382 cases in a community practice setting with the implication for risk of neoplasm and risk of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Howard Her-Juing; Rose, Crystal; Elsheikh, Tarik M

    2012-05-01

    The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology (TBSRTC) has provided a set of uniform diagnostic terminology including benign (B), atypia of undetermined significance (AUS), follicular neoplasm (FN), suspicious for malignancy (SM), malignancy (M), and nondiagnostic (ND) for the interpretation of thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA). We applied this terminology on our 1,382 thyroid aspirates in a community practice setting, which included 539 cases of B (39%), 376 cases of AUS (27.2%), 116 cases of FN (8.4%), 37 cases of malignant (2.7%), 36 cases of SM (2.6%), and 278 cases of ND (20.1%). Two hundred twenty-one cases (16%) of thyroid FNA had corresponding follow-up thyroidectomies. Each diagnostic category represented a unique association with risk of malignancy and risk of neoplasm. Based on histologic follow-up, the risk of neoplasm (including benign and malignant neoplasm) was B 14%, AUS 44%, FN 67%, SM 77%, and M 100% and the risk of malignancy was B 3%, AUS 6%, FN 22%, SM 56%, and M 100%. The classification and follow-up recommendation of TBSRTC are appropriate for each category. Both B and AUS are low-risk lesions with low probability of malignancy. FN predicts a higher rate for neoplasm but an intermediate rate for malignancy while SM carries a high risk for malignancy. PMID:21681976

  17. High-throughput autofluorescence flow cytometry of breast cancer metabolism (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Amy T.; Cannon, Taylor M.; Higginbotham, Jim N.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-02-01

    Tumor heterogeneity poses challenges for devising optimal treatment regimens for cancer patients. In particular, subpopulations of cells can escape treatment and cause relapse. There is a need for methods to characterize tumor heterogeneity of treatment response. Cell metabolism is altered in cancer (Warburg effect), and cells use the autofluorescent cofactor NADH in numerous metabolic reactions. Previous studies have shown that microscopy measurements of NADH autofluorescence are sensitive to treatment response in breast cancer, and these techniques typically assess hundreds of cells per group. An alternative approach is flow cytometry, which measures fluorescence on a single-cell level and is attractive for characterizing tumor heterogeneity because it achieves high-throughput analysis and cell sorting in millions of cells per group. Current applications for flow cytometry rely on staining with fluorophores. This study characterizes flow cytometry measurements of NADH autofluorescence in breast cancer cells. Preliminary results indicate flow cytometry of NADH is sensitive to cyanide perturbation, which inhibits oxidative phosphorylation, in nonmalignant MCF10A cells. Additionally, flow cytometry is sensitive to higher NADH intensity for HER2-positive SKBr3 cells compared with triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. These results agree with previous microscopy studies. Finally, a mixture of SKBr3 and MDA-MB-231 cells were sorted into each cell type using NADH intensity. Sorted cells were cultured, and microscopy validation showed the expected morphology for each cell type. Ultimately, flow cytometry could be applied to characterize tumor heterogeneity based on treatment response and sort cell subpopulations based on metabolic profile. These achievements could enable individualized treatment strategies and improved patient outcomes.

  18. Detection of cyclin D1 in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Jain, P; Giustolisi, G M; Atkinson, S; Elnenaei, M O; Morilla, R; Owusu-Ankomah, K; Rafiq-Mohammed, F; Matutes, E; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To describe and revise a flow cytometric assay for evaluating cyclin D1 overexpression in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders (B-LPDs). Methods: Cyclin D1 expression was evaluated in 11 healthy controls and 51 patients with B-LPD by flow cytometry using the 5D4 monoclonal antibody. In 25 cases, experiments were repeated up to four times with mononuclear cells (MNC) fixed in ethanol for 1–120 days to evaluate the consistency of cyclin D1 expression. Flow cytometry results were compared with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for the t(11;14) translocation in 19 patients and with immunohistochemistry (IHC) using the DCS-6 monoclonal antibody in nine patients. Results: A mean fluorescence intensity ratio (MFIR) of 4.8 was defined as the cut off point for positivity based on cyclin D1 expression in healthy controls (mean + 3 SD). Ten patients overexpressed cyclin D1 by flow cytometry. These included five of eight patients with mantle cell lymphoma, four of 19 with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and one with follicular lymphoma. MFIR in the repeat experiments differed less than 25% in 20 of 25 patients and in no cases did it cross the cut off point. There was a good correlation between cyclin D1 expression by flow cytometry and FISH for t(11;14) in 15 of 19 patients and six of nine had concordant results with flow cytometry, FISH, and IHC. Conclusion: Cyclin D1 expression remains fairly stable once MNC are fixed in ethanol and the flow cytometric assay can be used for the routine screening of B-LPD. Further comparisons between flow cytometry, IHC, and FISH may be needed to ascertain the diagnostic value of the flow cytometric assay. PMID:12461064

  19. Flow cytometry as an improved method for the titration of Chlamydiaceae and other intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Käser, T; Pasternak, J A; Hamonic, G; Rieder, M; Lai, K; Delgado-Ortega, M; Gerdts, V; Meurens, F

    2016-05-01

    Chlamydiaceae is a family of intracellular bacteria causing a range of diverse pathological outcomes. The most devastating human diseases are ocular infections with C. trachomatis leading to blindness and genital infections causing pelvic inflammatory disease with long-term sequelae including infertility and chronic pelvic pain. In order to enable the comparison of experiments between laboratories investigating host-chlamydia interactions, the infectious titer has to be determined. Titer determination of chlamydia is most commonly performed via microscopy of host cells infected with a serial dilution of chlamydia. However, other methods including fluorescent ELISpot (Fluorospot) and DNA Chip Scanning Technology have also been proposed to enumerate chlamydia-infected cells. For viruses, flow cytometry has been suggested as a superior alternative to standard titration methods. In this study we compared the use of flow cytometry with microscopy and Fluorospot for the titration of C. suis as a representative of other intracellular bacteria. Titer determination via Fluorospot was unreliable, while titration via microscopy led to a linear read-out range of 16 - 64 dilutions and moderate reproducibility with acceptable standard deviations within and between investigators. In contrast, flow cytometry had a vast linear read-out range of 1,024 dilutions and the lowest standard deviations given a basic training in these methods. In addition, flow cytometry was faster and material costs were lower compared to microscopy. Flow cytometry offers a fast, cheap, precise, and reproducible alternative for the titration of intracellular bacteria like C. suis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:26849001

  20. High throughput image cytometry for detection of suspicious lesions in the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine F.; Guillaud, Martial; Michele Williams, Pamela; Laronde, Denise M.; Zhang, Lewei; Rosin, Miriam P.

    2012-08-01

    The successful management of oral cancer depends upon early detection, which relies heavily on the clinician's ability to discriminate sometimes subtle alterations of the infrequent premalignant lesions from the more common reactive and inflammatory conditions in the oral mucosa. Even among experienced oral specialists this can be challenging, particularly when using new wide field-of-view direct fluorescence visualization devices clinically introduced for the recognition of at-risk tissue. The objective of this study is to examine if quantitative cytometric analysis of oral brushing samples could facilitate the assessment of the risk of visually ambiguous lesions. About 369 cytological samples were collected and analyzed: (1) 148 samples from pathology-proven sites of SCC, carcinoma in situ or severe dysplasia; (2) 77 samples from sites with inflammation, infection, or trauma, and (3) 144 samples from normal sites. These were randomly separated into training and test sets. The best algorithm correctly recognized 92.5% of the normal samples, 89.4% of the abnormal samples, 86.2% of the confounders in the training set as well as 100% of the normal samples, and 94.4% of the abnormal samples in the test set. These data suggest that quantitative cytology could reduce by more than 85% the number of visually suspect lesions requiring further assessment by biopsy.

  1. Role of Flow Cytometry in the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Plasma Cell Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Olteanu, Horatiu

    2016-03-01

    This article provides an overview of the role of flow cytometry in the diagnosis and follow-up of plasma cell myeloma. A brief introduction to the general immunophenotypic features of normal and myeloma plasma cells is provided, followed by a discussion of technical issues as they relate to the application of flow cytometry in this entity. The prognostic and therapeutic utility of flow cytometric immunophenotyping in myeloma is also analyzed, with an emphasis on the growing role of minimal residual analysis as potential biomarker for evaluating treatment efficacy and for tailoring risk-adapted treatment, in prospective clinical trials. PMID:26940271

  2. The use of flow cytometry to monitor chitin synthesis in regenerating protoplasts of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hector, R F; Braun, P C; Hart, J T; Kamarck, M E

    1990-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to monitor chitin synthesis in regenerating protoplasts of the yeast Candida albicans. Comparisons of cells stained with Calcofluor White, a fluorochrome with known affinity for chitin, and cells incubated in the presence of N-[3H]-acetylglucosamine, the precursor substrate for chitin, showed a linear relationship between fluorescence and incorporation of label over time. Changes in both the fluorescence and light scatter of regenerating protoplasts treated with inhibitors of fungal chitin synthase were also quantitated by flow cytometry. PMID:2194018

  3. Microbial flow cytometry: An ideal tool for prospective antimicrobial drug development.

    PubMed

    Muthirulan, Pushpanathan; Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    2016-09-15

    Flow cytometry has tremendous applications in qualitative and quantitative analysis of characteristics of single microbial cells. Its ability to efficiently discriminate and quantify multiple parameters of microbial cells has made it a powerful tool to catalog the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) on target cells. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview and strategic design on how multi-parametric analysis of flow cytometry is unsurpassed in studying the antimicrobial process of AMPs in an accurate and rapid way. This strategy provides a conceptual framework for understanding distinct classes of AMPs and getting insights into antimicrobial mechanisms of novel AMPs. PMID:27288557

  4. CytoSPADE: high-performance analysis and visualization of high-dimensional cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Linderman, Michael D.; Simonds, Erin F.; Qiu, Peng; Bruggner, Robert V.; Sheode, Ketaki; Meng, Teresa H.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Recent advances in flow cytometry enable simultaneous single-cell measurement of 30+ surface and intracellular proteins. CytoSPADE is a high-performance implementation of an interface for the Spanning-tree Progression Analysis of Density-normalized Events algorithm for tree-based analysis and visualization of this high-dimensional cytometry data. Availability: Source code and binaries are freely available at http://cytospade.org and via Bioconductor version 2.10 onwards for Linux, OSX and Windows. CytoSPADE is implemented in R, C++ and Java. Contact: michael.linderman@mssm.edu Supplementary Information: Additional documentation available at http://cytospade.org. PMID:22782546

  5. Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  6. Circulation times of cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, with approximately 1,000,000 cases reported every year. Hepatocellular carcinoma may metastasize to lung, bones, kidney, and many other organs. Surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current HCC therapies. However the outcomes are poor: the survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" combined with real-time confocal fluorescence imaging are used to assess spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. The in vivo flow cytometer has the capability to detect and quantify continuously the number and flow characteristics of fluorescently labeled cells in vivo in real time without extracting blood sample. We have measured the depletion kinetics of two related human HCC cell lines, high-metastatic HCCLM3 cells and low-metastatic HepG2 cells, which were from the same origin and obtained by repetitive screenings in mice. >60% HCCLM3 cells are depleted within the first hour. Interestingly, the low-metastatic HepG2 cells possess noticeably slower depletion kinetics. In comparison, <40% HepG2 cells are depleted within the first hour. The differences in depletion kinetics might provide insights into early metastasis processes.

  7. Characterizing Phenotypes and Signaling Networks of Single Human Cells by Mass Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Leelatian, Nalin; Diggins, Kirsten E; Irish, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Single cell mass cytometry is revolutionizing our ability to quantitatively characterize cellular biomarkers and signaling networks. Mass cytometry experiments routinely measure 25-35 features of each cell in primary human tissue samples. The relative ease with which a novice user can generate a large amount of high quality data and the novelty of the approach have created a need for example protocols, analysis strategies, and datasets. In this chapter, we present detailed protocols for two mass cytometry experiments designed as training tools. The first protocol describes detection of 26 features on the surface of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the second protocol, a mass cytometry signaling network profile measures 25 node states comprised of five key signaling effectors (AKT, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT5, and p38) quantified under five conditions (Basal, FLT3L, SCF, IL-3, and IFNγ). This chapter compares manual and unsupervised data analysis approaches, including bivariate plots, heatmaps, histogram overlays, SPADE, and viSNE. Data files in this chapter have been shared online using Cytobank ( http://www.cytobank.org/irishlab/ ). PMID:26542718

  8. Characterizing Phenotypes and Signaling Networks of Single Human Cells by Mass Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Leelatian, Nalin; Diggins, Kirsten E.; Irish, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Single cell mass cytometry is revolutionizing our ability to quantitatively characterize cellular biomarkers and signaling networks. Mass cytometry experiments routinely measure 25–35 features of each cell in primary human tissue samples. The relative ease with which a novice user can generate a large amount of high quality data and the novelty of the approach have created a need for example protocols, analysis strategies, and datasets. In this chapter, we present detailed protocols for two mass cytometry experiments designed as training tools. The first protocol describes detection of 26 features on the surface of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the second protocol, a mass cytometry signaling network profile measures 25 node states comprised of five key signaling effectors (AKT, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT5, and p38) quantified under five conditions (Basal, FLT3L, SCF, IL-3, and IFNγ). This chapter compares manual and unsupervised data analysis approaches, including bivariate plots, heatmaps, histogram overlays, SPADE, and viSNE. Data files in this chapter have been shared online using Cytobank (http://www.cytobank.org/irishlab/). PMID:26542718

  9. In vivo plant flow cytometry: A first proof-of-concept

    PubMed Central

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Wang, Daoyuan; Xu, Yang; Villagarcia, Hector; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo flow cytometry has facilitated advances in the ultrasensitive detection of tumor cells, bacteria, nanoparticles, dyes, and other normal and abnormal objects directly in blood and lymph circulatory systems. Here, we propose in vivo plant flow cytometry for the real-time noninvasive study of nanomaterial transport in xylem and phloem plant vascular systems. As a proof of this concept, we demonstrate in vivo real-time photoacoustic monitoring of quantum dot-carbon nanotube conjugate uptake and uptake by roots and spreading through stem to leaves in a tomato plant. In addition, in vivo scanning cytometry using multimodal photoacoustic, photothermal, and fluorescent detection schematics provided multiplex detection and identification of nanoparticles accumulated in plant leaves in the presence of intensive absorption, scattering, and autofluorescent backgrounds. The use of a portable fiber-based photoacoustic flow cytometer for studies of plant vasculature was demonstrated. These integrated cytometry modalities using both endogenous and exogenous contrast agents have a potential to open new avenues of in vivo study of the nutrients, products of photosynthesis and metabolism, nanoparticles, infectious agents, and other objects transported through plant vasculature. PMID:21905208

  10. Enhanced multiplexing in mass cytometry using osmium and ruthenium tetroxide species.

    PubMed

    Catena, Raúl; Özcan, Alaz; Zivanovic, Nevena; Bodenmiller, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Mass cytometry facilitates high-dimensional, quantitative, single-cell analysis. The method for sample multiplexing in mass cytometry, called mass-tag cellular barcoding (MCB), relies on the covalent reaction of bifunctional metal chelators with intracellular proteins. Here, we describe the use of osmium and ruthenium tetroxides (OsO4 and RuO4 ) that bind covalently with fatty acids in the cellular membranes and aromatic amino acids in proteins. Both OsO4 and RuO4 rapidly reacted and allowed for MCB with live cells, crosslinked cells, and permeabilized cells. Given the covalent nature of the labeling reaction, isotope leaching was not observed. OsO4 and RuO4 were used in a 20-sample barcoding protocol together with palladium isotopes. As mass channels occupied by osmium and ruthenium are not used for antibody detection the number of masses effectively utilized in a single experiment is expanded. OsO4 and RuO4 can therefore be used as MCB reagents for a wide range of mass cytometry workflows. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27018769

  11. SETTLING AND COAGULATION CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUORESCENT PARTICLES DETERMINED BY FLOW CYTOMETRY AND FLUOROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new technique for detecting particles in natural waters relies upon analysis of fluorescent emission by flow cytometry. luorescent pigment particles ranging in radius from 0.1 to 5 um are available in sufficient quantity to be useful as model particles. aboratory coagulation an...

  12. Flow Cytometry To Assess Cerebrospinal Fluid Fungal Burden in Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Lisa M.; Schutz, Charlotte; Scriba, Thomas J.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Boulware, David R.; Meintjes, Graeme; Lalloo, David G.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal burden in the cerebrospinal fluid is an important determinant of mortality in cryptococcal meningitis, but its use in aiding clinical decision making is hampered by the time involved to perform quantitative cultures. Here, we demonstrate the potential of flow cytometry as a novel and rapid technique to address this issue. PMID:26719441

  13. Ploidy of USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) world pear germplasm collection determined by flow cytometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Living germplasm collections representing world diversity of pear (Pyrus L.) are maintained by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Corvallis, Oregon, USA. Flow cytometry was performed on young leaf tissue from 1,284 genebank accessions to assess p...

  14. Teaching the Microbial Growth Curve Concept Using Microalgal Cultures and Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forget, Nathalie; Belzile, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Nozais, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The microbial growth curve is widely studied within microbiology classes and bacteria are usually the microbial model used. Here, we describe a novel laboratory protocol involving flow cytometry to assess the growth dynamics of the unicellular microalgae "Isochrysis galbana." The algal model represents an appropriate alternative to bacteria…

  15. Data File Standard for Flow Cytometry, Version FCS 3.1

    SciTech Connect

    Spidlen, Josef; Moore, Wayne; Parks, David; Goldberg, Michael; Bray, Chris; Gorombey, Peter; Hyun, Bill; Hubbard, Mark; Lange, Simon; Lefebvre, Ray; Leif, Robert; Novo, David; Ostruszka, Leo; Treister, Adam; Wood, James; Murphy, Robert F.; Roederer, Mario; Sudar, Damir; Zigon, Robert; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Brierre, Pierre

    2009-11-10

    The flow cytometry data file standard provides the specifications needed to completely describe flow cytometry data sets within the confines of the file containing the experimental data. In 1984, the first Flow Cytometry Standard format for data files was adopted as FCS 1.0. This standard was modified in 1990 as FCS 2.0 and again in 1997 as FCS 3.0. We report here on the next generation flow cytometry standard data file format. FCS 3.1 is a minor revision based on suggested improvements from the community. The unchanged goal of the standard is to provide a uniform file format that allows files created by one type of acquisition hardware and software to be analyzed by any other type. The FCS 3.1 standard retains the basic FCS file structure and most features of previous versions of the standard. Changes included in FCS 3.1 address potential ambiguities in the previous versions and provide a more robust standard. The major changes include simplified support for international characters and improved support for storing compensation. The major additions are support for preferred display scale, a standardized way of capturing the sample volume, information about originality of the data file, and support for plate and well identification in high throughput, plate based experiments. Please see the normative version of the FCS 3.1 specification in Supporting Information for this manuscript (or at http://www.isac-net.org/ in the Current standards section) for a complete list of changes.

  16. Report of the European Myeloma Network on multiparametric flow cytometry in multiple myeloma and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, Andy C; Orfao, Alberto; Beksac, Meral; Bezdickova, Ludmila; Brooimans, Rik A; Bumbea, Horia; Dalva, Klara; Fuhler, Gwenny; Gratama, Jan; Hose, Dirk; Kovarova, Lucie; Lioznov, Michael; Mateo, Gema; Morilla, Ricardo; Mylin, Anne K; Omedé, Paola; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Perez Andres, Martin; Petrucci, Maria; Ruggeri, Marina; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schmitz, Alexander; Schreder, Martin; Seynaeve, Carine; Spacek, Martin; de Tute, Ruth M; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Weston-Bell, Nicky; Owen, Roger G; San Miguel, Jesús F; Sonneveld, Pieter; Johnsen, Hans E

    2008-03-01

    The European Myeloma Network (EMN) organized two flow cytometry workshops. The first aimed to identify specific indications for flow cytometry in patients with monoclonal gammopathies, and consensus technical approaches through a questionnaire-based review of current practice in participating laboratories. The second aimed to resolve outstanding technical issues and develop a consensus approach to analysis of plasma cells. The primary clinical applications identified were: differential diagnosis of neoplastic plasma cell disorders from reactive plasmacytosis; identifying risk of progression in patients with MGUS and detecting minimal residual disease. A range of technical recommendations were identified, including: 1) CD38, CD138 and CD45 should all be included in at least one tube for plasma cell identification and enumeration. The primary gate should be based on CD38 vs. CD138 expression; 2) after treatment, clonality assessment is only likely to be informative when combined with immunophenotype to detect abnormal cells. Flow cytometry is suitable for demonstrating a stringent complete remission; 3) for detection of abnormal plasma cells, a minimal panel should include CD19 and CD56. A preferred panel would also include CD20, CD117, CD28 and CD27; 4) discrepancies between the percentage of plasma cells detected by flow cytometry and morphology are primarily related to sample quality and it is, therefore, important to determine that marrow elements are present in follow-up samples, particularly normal plasma cells in MRD negative cases. PMID:18268286

  17. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348 PMID:26001791

  18. High-resolution microbiota flow cytometry reveals dynamic colitis-associated changes in fecal bacterial composition.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Jakob; Hübschmann, Thomas; Schattenberg, Florian; Schumann, Joachim; Durek, Pawel; Riedel, René; Friedrich, Marie; Glauben, Rainer; Siegmund, Britta; Radbruch, Andreas; Müller, Susann; Chang, Hyun-Dong

    2016-05-01

    Using high-resolution flow cytometry of bacterial shape (forward scatter) and DNA content (DAPI staining), we detected dramatic differences in the fecal microbiota composition during murine colitis that were validated using 16S rDNA sequencing. This innovative method provides a fast and inexpensive tool to interrogate the microbiota on the single-cell level. PMID:26909672

  19. Application of flow cytometry and cell sorting to the bacterial analysis of environmental aerosol samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow cytometry (FCM) combined with viability staining is a useful tool in discerning viable bacteria in environmental samples where traditional culture methods may fail. Contamination of aerosol samples with dust and other non-biological particles can interfere with accurate sample analysis and ther...

  20. Improved Method for Bacterial Cell Capture after Flow Cytometry Cell Sorting ▿

    PubMed Central

    Guillebault, D.; Laghdass, M.; Catala, P.; Obernosterer, I.; Lebaron, P.

    2010-01-01

    Fixed cells with different nucleic acid contents and scatter properties (low nucleic acid [LNA], high nucleic acid 1 [HNA1], and HNA2) were sorted by flow cytometry (FCM). For each sort, 10,000 cells were efficiently captured on poly-l-lysine-coated microplates, resulting in efficient and reproducible PCR amplification. PMID:20817799

  1. Flow cytometry for the assessment of animal sperm integrity and functionality: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Sharoare; Johannisson, Anders; Wallgren, Margareta; Nagy, Szabolcs; Siqueira, Amanda Pimenta; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto

    2011-01-01

    Flow cytometry is now a recognized methodology within animal spermatology, and has moved from being a research tool to become routine in the assessment of animal semen destined to breeding. The availability of ‘bench-top' flow cytometers and of newer and versatile markers for cell structure and function had allowed the instrumentation to measure more sperm parameters, from viability to reactiveness when exposed to exogenous stimuli, and to increase our capabilities to sort spermatozoa for potential fertilizing capacity, or chromosomal sex. The present review summarizes the state of the art regarding flow cytometry applied to animal andrology, albeit keeping an open comparative intent. It critically evaluates the present and future capabilities of flow cytometry for the diagnostics of potential fertility and for the development of current reproductive technologies such as sperm freezing, sperm selection and sperm sorting. The flow cytometry methods will probably further revolutionize our understanding of the sperm physiology and their functionality, and will undoubtedly extend its application in isolating many uncharacterized features of spermatozoa. However, continuous follow-up of the methods is a necessity owing to technical developments and the complexity of mapping spermatozoa. PMID:21478895

  2. Application of flow cytometry and fluorescent in situ hybridization for assessment of exposures to airborne bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, J L; Thorne, P S; Lynch, N

    1997-01-01

    Current limitations in the methodology for enumeration and identification of airborne bacteria compromise the precision and accuracy of bioaerosol exposure assessment. In this study, flow cytometry and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were evaluated for the assessment of exposures to airborne bacteria. Laboratory-generated two-component bioaerosols in exposures chambers and complex native bioaerosols in swine barns were sampled with two types of liquid impingers (all-glass impinger-30 and May 3-stage impinger). Aliquots of collection media were processed and enumerated by a standard culture technique, microscopy, or flow cytometry after nucleic acid staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and identified taxonomically by FISH. DAPI-labeled impinger samples yielded comparable estimates of bioaerosol concentrations when enumerated by microscopy or flow cytometry. The standard culture method underestimated bioaerosol concentrations by 2 orders of magnitude when compared to microscopy or flow cytometry. In the FISH method, aliquots of collection media were incubated with a probe universally complementary to eubacteria, a probe specific for several Pseudomonas species, and a probe complementary to eubacteria for detection of nonspecific binding. With these probes, FISH allowed quantitative identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bioaerosols in the exposure chamber without measurable nonspecific binding. Impinger samples from the swine barn demonstrated the efficacy of the FISH method for the identification of eubacteria in a complex organic dust. This work demonstrates the potential of emerging molecular techniques to complement traditional methods of bioaerosol exposure assessment. PMID:9097451

  3. A flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter binding assay using antagonist-conjugated quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtun, Oleg; Ross, Emily; Tomlinson, Ian; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the development and validation of a flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter (DAT) binding assay that uses antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (QDs).We anticipate that our QD-based assay is of immediate value to the high throughput screening of novel DAT modulators.

  4. Generalized Unmixing Model for Multispectral Flow Cytometry Utilizing Nonsquare Compensation Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Novo, David; Grégori, Gérald; Rajwa, Bartek

    2014-01-01

    Multispectral and hyperspectral flow cytometry (FC) instruments allow measurement of fluorescence or Raman spectra from single cells in flow. As with conventional FC, spectral overlap results in the measured signal in any given detector being a mixture of signals from multiple labels present in the analyzed cells. In contrast to traditional polychromatic FC, these devices utilize a number of detectors (or channels in multispectral detector arrays) that is larger than the number of labels, and no particular detector is a priori dedicated to the measurement of any particular label. This data-acquisition modality requires a rigorous study and understanding of signal formation as well as unmixing procedures that are employed to estimate labels abundance. The simplest extension of the traditional compensation procedure to multispectral data sets is equivalent to an ordinary least-square (LS) solution for estimating abundance of labels in individual cells. This process is identical to the technique employed for unmixing spectral data in various imaging fields. The present study shows that multispectral FC data violate key assumptions of the LS process, and use of the LS method may lead to unmixing artifacts, such as population distortion (spreading) and the presence of negative values in biomarker abundances. Various alternative unmixing techniques were investigated, including relative-error minimization and variance-stabilization transformations. The most promising results were obtained by performing unmixing using Poisson regression with an identity-link function within a generalized linear model framework. This formulation accounts for the presence of Poisson noise in the model of signal formation and subsequently leads to superior unmixing results, particularly for dim fluorescent populations. The proposed Poisson unmixing technique is demonstrated using simulated 8-channel, 2-fluorochrome data and real 32-channel, 6-fluorochrome data. The quality of unmixing is

  5. National flow cytometry and sorting research resource. Annual progress report, July, 1, 1994--June 30, 1995, Year 12

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.

    1995-04-27

    Research progress utilizing flow cytometry is described. Topics include: rapid kinetics flow cytometry; characterization of size determinations for small DNA fragments; statistical analysis; energy transfer measurements of molecular confirmation in micelles; and enrichment of Mus spretus chromosomes by dual parameter flow sorting and identification of sorted fractions by fluorescence in-situ hybridization onto G-banded mouse metaphase spreads.

  6. Electromagnetic field interactions with micro channels, particles and cells: Application to advanced cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatapathi, Murugesan

    This thesis involves a study of the interaction of laser beams with micro channels and micro particles/cells using the electromagnetic field approach. This problem is relevant to the next generation cytometry, in particular to model based design of flow cytometers. The field approach is applied to study light scatter from particles/cells and also internal and scattered fields of cylindrical micro channels that are important for optical interrogation of particles and cells flowing through. Though current flow cytometers use qualitative fluorescence measurements for biological analysis, other viable optical interrogation techniques like light scatter, quantitative fluorescence and Coherent anti-stokes Raman scatter (CARS) are being studied for application to flow cytometry. The light scatter from particles and cells in a flow cytometer has been studied with the objective of extracting useful information about the particles using scatter measurements. First, the correlation between the size of particles and the current forward scatter measurements was both analytically modeled and experimentally determined. These results indicated that integrated scatter measurements currently used in flow cytometry (forward and side scatter) cannot be used to unambiguously estimate size, shape or refractive index of particles for classification. It is shown that multi-angle scatter measurements can be used to classify micro spheres of different sizes/refractive indices and different bacteria species, provided the scatter measurements are designed based on numerical scatter models. The numerical scatter models were then also used to do a preliminary study of correlation of scatter with internal structure of simple cells like stem cells. A few multivariate statistical methods have been applied for the classification of such particles in flow cytometry using scatter and multi-spectral fluorescence measurements. Typically the micro channels used in flow cytometry have square or circular

  7. Multi-parameter flow cytometry for discovery of disease mechanisms in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Soloski, Mark J.; Chrest, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Flow cytometry has emerged as an essential tool for investigators in the study of the complexity of the immune system and the examination of its role in human health and disease. This technology has developed to the point where one can readily generate a large descriptive data set that details the levels of important immune cell subsets and defines an individual immune cell signature or “Immune-cellome”. This immune cell signature would clearly display individual variation but also would change in a manner reflective of disease state. Analysis of the “immune-cellome” may provide novel insight into disease pathophysiology, provide new biomarkers of disease activity and perhaps identify therapeutic targets. In this brief review we will cover current advances in complex flow cytometry and suggest ways this may be applied to the study of rheumatic diseases. PMID:23334929

  8. AutoGate: A Macintosh cluster analysis program for flow cytometry data

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C.; Parson, J.D.; Beckman, R.J. ); Stewart, S.J.; Stewart, C.C. )

    1993-01-01

    AutoGate, a cluster analysis program for Flow Cytometry Standard Data, has been developed for use on the Macintosh computer. AutoGate reads FCS format list mode files. It partitions the list mode events into a user-selected number of populations using K-means cluster analysis. One or more of the populations can be displayed as colored, bivariate dot plots. Eight variate data and up to twelve clusters can be analyzed. The dot plots can be saved as PICT format files. Data for individual clusters can be saved as FCS or ASCII format files. AutoGate is available from the authors through the National Flow Cytometry and Sorting Research Resource at Los Alamos.

  9. Monitoring of microbial communities by flow cytometry and rRNA-targeted hybridization probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Guenter; Amann, Rudolf

    1995-10-01

    Flow cytometry in combination with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) based fluorescence in situ hybridization is a new technique for the analysis of microbial communities. Oligonucleotide probes directed against ribosomal RNA allow the identification of species or groups of micro- organisms. Combined with flow cytometry, up to several thousand cells per second can be classified. In addition to the identification and specific enumeration of micro-organisms, further information on the distribution of cell size, DNA and ribosome content -- and therefore an assessment of activity -- within the entire community or subpopulations can be obtained. This technique is much more accurate, informative, and rapid than classical culture-dependent methods. Data of activated sludge samples hybridized with fluorescein labeled oligonucleotides and counterstained with the DNA-specific dye Hoechst 33342 are presented as examples for its applicability to complex microbial communities.

  10. Sources of error in screening by cytometry for the effects of environmental mutagens

    SciTech Connect

    Tiersch, T.R. ); Wachtel, S.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Flow cytometry is often used to detect DNA aneuploidy and mosaicism associated with malignancy or genetic damage. Yet DNA aneuploidy and mosaicism detected by flow cytometry may be more apparent than real. In contrast to the DNA mass observed for blood, the authors consistently found markedly different values and higher variability for DNA mass among other tissues collected from the same animal. Prepared mixtures of blood and other cells generated multiple fluorescence peaks identical to those that might be expected for aneuploid mosaicism. Moreover, analysis of tissues such as feather pulp, which contains a combination of cell types, yielded multiple fluorescence peaks that were not observed when blood alone was analyzed. Thus care should be exercised in classifying DNA values from different tissues as normal or abnormal, because the appearance of supernumerary fluorescence peaks might not always indicate the presence of abnormal cell populations.

  11. FlowSOM: Using self-organizing maps for visualization and interpretation of cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Van Gassen, Sofie; Callebaut, Britt; Van Helden, Mary J; Lambrecht, Bart N; Demeester, Piet; Dhaene, Tom; Saeys, Yvan

    2015-07-01

    The number of markers measured in both flow and mass cytometry keeps increasing steadily. Although this provides a wealth of information, it becomes infeasible to analyze these datasets manually. When using 2D scatter plots, the number of possible plots increases exponentially with the number of markers and therefore, relevant information that is present in the data might be missed. In this article, we introduce a new visualization technique, called FlowSOM, which analyzes Flow or mass cytometry data using a Self-Organizing Map. Using a two-level clustering and star charts, our algorithm helps to obtain a clear overview of how all markers are behaving on all cells, and to detect subsets that might be missed otherwise. R code is available at https://github.com/SofieVG/FlowSOM and will be made available at Bioconductor. PMID:25573116

  12. Non-Linear Optical Flow Cytometry Using a Scanned, Bessel Beam Light-Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Bradley B.; Awasthi, Samir; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chan, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Modern flow cytometry instruments have become vital tools for high-throughput analysis of single cells. However, as issues with the cellular labeling techniques often used in flow cytometry have become more of a concern, the development of label-free modalities for cellular analysis is increasingly desired. Non-linear optical phenomena (NLO) are of growing interest for label-free analysis because of the ability to measure the intrinsic optical response of biomolecules found in cells. We demonstrate that a light-sheet consisting of a scanned Bessel beam is an optimal excitation geometry for efficiently generating NLO signals in a microfluidic environment. The balance of photon density and cross-sectional area provided by the light-sheet allowed significantly larger two-photon fluorescence intensities to be measured in a model polystyrene microparticle system compared to measurements made using other excitation focal geometries, including a relaxed Gaussian excitation beam often used in conventional flow cytometers. PMID:26021750

  13. Acoustic tweezing cytometry for live-cell subcellular modulation of intracellular cytoskeleton contractility

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhenzhen; Sun, Yubing; Di Chen; Tay, Donald; Chen, Weiqiang; Deng, Cheri X.; Fu, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical forces are critical to modulate cell spreading, contractility, gene expression, and even stem cell differentiation. Yet, existing tools that can apply controllable subcellular forces to a large number of single cells simultaneously are still limited. Here we report a novel ultrasound tweezing cytometry utilizing ultrasound pulses to actuate functionalized lipid microbubbles covalently attached to single live cells to exert mechanical forces in the pN - nN range. Ultrasonic excitation of microbubbles could elicit a rapid and sustained reactive intracellular cytoskeleton contractile force increase in different adherent mechanosensitive cells. Further, ultrasound-mediated intracellular cytoskeleton contractility enhancement was dose-dependent and required an intact actin cytoskeleton as well as RhoA/ROCK signaling. Our results demonstrated the great potential of ultrasound tweezing cytometry technique using functionalized microbubbles as an actuatable, biocompatible, and multifunctional agent for biomechanical stimulations of cells. PMID:23846290

  14. Antimicrobial properties of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles studied by flow cytometry and related techniques.

    PubMed

    Railean-Plugaru, Viorica; Pomastowski, Pawel; Rafinska, Katarzyna; Wypij, Magdalena; Kupczyk, Wojciech; Dahm, Hanna; Jackowski, Marek; Buszewski, Boguslaw

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the effect of silver bionanoparticles (Bio(AgNPs) synthesized by Actinobacteria CGG 11n on selected Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria. Flow cytometry, classical antibiogram method and fluorescent microscopy approach was used for evaluation of antimicrobial activity of Bio(AgNPs) and their combination with antibiotics. Furthermore, the performed research specified the capacity of flow cytometry method as an alternative to the standard ones and as a complementary method to electromigration techniques. The study showed antibacterial activity of both BioAgNPs and the combination of antibiotics/BioAgNPs against all the tested bacteria strains in comparison with a diffusion, dilution and bioautographic methods. The synergistic effect of antibiotics/BioAgNPs combination (e.g. kanamycin, ampicillin, neomycin and streptomycin) was found to be more notable against Pseudomonas aeruginosa representing a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbugs" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. PMID:26763104

  15. In Vivo Monitoring of Multiple Circulating Cell Populations Using Two-photon Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tkaczyk, Eric R.; Zhong, Cheng Frank; Ye, Jing Yong; Myc, Andrzej; Thomas, Thommey; Cao, Zhengyi; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, James R.

    2008-01-01

    To detect and quantify multiple distinct populations of cells circulating simultaneously in the blood of living animals, we developed a novel optical system for two-channel, two-photon flow cytometry in vivo. We used this system to investigate the circulation dynamics in live animals of breast cancer cells with low (MCF-7) and high (MDA-MB-435) metastatic potential, showing for the first time that two different populations of circulating cells can be quantified simultaneously in the vasculature of a single live mouse. We also non-invasively monitored a population of labeled, circulating red blood cells for more than two weeks, demonstrating that this technique can also quantify the dynamics of abundant cells in the vascular system for prolonged periods of time. These data are the first in vivo application of multichannel flow cytometry utilizing two-photon excitation, which will greatly enhance our capability to study circulating cells in cancer and other disease processes. PMID:19221581

  16. MPQ-cytometry: a magnetism-based method for quantification of nanoparticle-cell interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipunova, V. O.; Nikitin, M. P.; Nikitin, P. I.; Deyev, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method called MPQ-cytometry is developed, which measures the integral non-linear response produced by magnetically labeled nanoparticles in a cell sample with an original magnetic particle quantification (MPQ) technique. MPQ-cytometry provides a sensitivity limit 0.33 ng of nanoparticles and is devoid of a background signal present in many label-based assays. Each measurement takes only a few seconds, and no complicated sample preparation or data processing is required. The capabilities of the method have been demonstrated by quantification of interactions of iron oxide nanoparticles with eukaryotic cells. The total amount of targeted nanoparticles that specifically recognized the HER2/neu oncomarker on the human cancer cell surface was successfully measured, the specificity of interaction permitting the detection of HER2/neu positive cells in a cell mixture. Moreover, it has been shown that MPQ-cytometry analysis of a HER2/neu-specific iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with six cell lines of different tissue origins quantitatively reflects the HER2/neu status of the cells. High correlation of MPQ-cytometry data with those obtained by three other commonly used in molecular and cell biology methods supports consideration of this method as a prospective alternative for both quantifying cell-bound nanoparticles and estimating the expression level of cell surface antigens. The proposed method does not require expensive sophisticated equipment or highly skilled personnel and it can be easily applied for rapid diagnostics, especially under field conditions.Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method

  17. Application of flow cytometry in diagnosing lymphomas in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Aniołek, Olga; Gajewski, Zdzisław; Giziński, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Classification of types of lymphomas is done by interpreting cell morphology results obtained in cytological and/or histological examinations. In recent years, additional methods like immunocytochemistry (ICC), immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for antigen receptor rearrangements (PARR), have been used to diagnose and classify lymphomas. Unfortunately, none of these methods is completely specific and sensitive. Thus, a combination of several diagnostic methods or use of all available techniques allows for evaluation of morphological properties of cells like their maturity and diversification. Owing to the use of sets of antibodies it is possible to identify the phenotype of hyperplastic cells as well as their origin. Combination of results obtained through phenotypical analysis with flow cytometry examination with morphological, histological and genetic testing enables a detailed analysis of, in this case, lymphoproliferative diseases including reaction changes, primary and secondary immunological deficits as well as autoimmune diseases. PMID:26155143

  18. Non-linear optical flow cytometry using a scanned, Bessel beam light-sheet.

    PubMed

    Collier, Bradley B; Awasthi, Samir; Lieu, Deborah K; Chan, James W

    2015-01-01

    Modern flow cytometry instruments have become vital tools for high-throughput analysis of single cells. However, as issues with the cellular labeling techniques often used in flow cytometry have become more of a concern, the development of label-free modalities for cellular analysis is increasingly desired. Non-linear optical phenomena (NLO) are of growing interest for label-free analysis because of the ability to measure the intrinsic optical response of biomolecules found in cells. We demonstrate that a light-sheet consisting of a scanned Bessel beam is an optimal excitation geometry for efficiently generating NLO signals in a microfluidic environment. The balance of photon density and cross-sectional area provided by the light-sheet allowed significantly larger two-photon fluorescence intensities to be measured in a model polystyrene microparticle system compared to measurements made using other excitation focal geometries, including a relaxed Gaussian excitation beam often used in conventional flow cytometers. PMID:26021750

  19. Use of Flow Cytometry to Measure Biogeochemical Rates and Processes in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomas, Michael W.; Bronk, Deborah A.; van den Engh, Ger

    2011-01-01

    An important goal of marine biogeochemists is to quantify the rates at which elements cycle through the ocean's diverse microbial assemblage, as well as to determine how these rates vary in time and space. The traditional view that phytoplankton are producers and bacteria are consumers has been found to be overly simplistic, and environmental metagenomics is discovering new and important microbial metabolisms at an accelerating rate. Many nutritional strategies previously attributed to one microorganism or functional group are also or instead carried out by other groups. To tease apart which organism is doing what will require new analytical approaches. Flow cytometry, when combined with other techniques, has great potential for expanding our understanding of microbial interactions because groups can be distinguished optically, sorted, and then collected for subsequent analyses. Herein, we review the advances in our understanding of marine biogeochemistry that have arisen from the use of flow cytometry.

  20. A comparative study of frozen-section immunoperoxidase and flow cytometry for immunophenotypic analysis of lymph node biopsies.

    PubMed Central

    Biesemier, K W; Dent, G A; Pryzwansky, K B; Folds, J D

    1994-01-01

    Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and frozen-section immunoperoxidase was compared on 21 consecutive lymph node biopsy specimens, of which a diagnosis of lymphoma was made for 11 specimens. Samples for flow cytometry were obtained by a fine-needle aspiration technique. Concordance between frozen-section immunoperoxidase and flow cytometry for all routine markers on all specimens ranged from 76 to 100%. In general, B-cell markers showed poorer concordance than T-cell markers, with kappa and lambda light chains having the poorest concordance, at 76% each. Flow cytometry was significantly more sensitive (90 versus 30%; P < 0.006) and had a significantly higher negative predictive value (100 versus 63%; P < 0.006) than frozen-section immunoperoxidase for demonstrating light-chain restriction. There was no significant difference in the specificities (100 versus 91%) or positive predictive values (100% each) between the two methods. Both methods demonstrated characteristic immunophenotypes for intermediate cell lymphomas, small lymphocytic lymphomas, and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphomas. Frozen-section immunoperoxidase and flow cytometry appear to be significantly concordant methods for immunophenotypic analysis of lymph node biopsies. Light-chain restriction is more readily demonstrated by flow cytometry than frozen-section immunoperoxidase. We believe that ex vivo fine-needle aspiration is a simple and reliable method of obtaining cell suspensions of lymph nodes for flow cytometry. PMID:7496966

  1. Application of Mass Cytometry (CyTOF) for Functional and Phenotypic Analysis of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kay, Alexander W; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Blish, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Mass cytometry is a novel platform for high-dimensional phenotypic and functional analysis of single cells. This system uses elemental metal isotopes conjugated to monoclonal antibodies to evaluate up to 42 parameters simultaneously on individual cells with minimal overlap between channels. The platform can be customized for analysis of both phenotypic and functional markers. Here, we will describe methods to stain, collect, and analyze intracellular functional markers and surface phenotypic markers on natural killer cells. PMID:27177653

  2. Assessment of the infectivity potential of Leishmania infantum, using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis; Dokianakis, Emmanouil; Tsirigotakis, Nikolaos; Koutala, Eleni; Antoniou, Maria

    2014-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum causes leishmaniases, a sandfly-borne disease of humans and dogs, in all countries of the Mediterranean basin. The promastigote, infective stage of the parasite, once inoculated to the mammalian host by the vector, is ingested by macrophages. Leishmania lives within the lysosome of the phagocytic immune cells inactivating the enzymes contained. The ability of an isolate to survive within the macrophage and its rate of multiplication in this environment is an important factor determining the infectivity potential of the isolate and the manifestation of the disease. This capacity of the parasite is measured as the percentage of infected cells and the mean value of parasites per cell. The infectivity potential, of clinical isolates of L. infantum infecting THP-1 cells in vitro, was studied by flow cytometry and light microscopy. The percentages of cells in a sample containing a specific number of parasites, as recorded by light microscopy, were used in flow cytometry to manually gate the mean fluorescence intensity which corresponded to the percentage of cells with that number of parasites. The gating obtained, was then used as a "standard reference curve" to evaluate results by flow cytometry compared to those obtained by light microscopy. The results, of the overall percentage of infected cells and the number of parasites per cell in the culture, matched in the two methods. So, flow cytometry can be used as a rapid, cost effective, easy and reproducible method to study the infectivity potential of isolates, either in biological, epidemiological, or clinical tests, particularly for the assessment of drug efficiency trials. PMID:25045849

  3. MPQ-cytometry: a magnetism-based method for quantification of nanoparticle-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Shipunova, V O; Nikitin, M P; Nikitin, P I; Deyev, S M

    2016-07-01

    Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method called MPQ-cytometry is developed, which measures the integral non-linear response produced by magnetically labeled nanoparticles in a cell sample with an original magnetic particle quantification (MPQ) technique. MPQ-cytometry provides a sensitivity limit 0.33 ng of nanoparticles and is devoid of a background signal present in many label-based assays. Each measurement takes only a few seconds, and no complicated sample preparation or data processing is required. The capabilities of the method have been demonstrated by quantification of interactions of iron oxide nanoparticles with eukaryotic cells. The total amount of targeted nanoparticles that specifically recognized the HER2/neu oncomarker on the human cancer cell surface was successfully measured, the specificity of interaction permitting the detection of HER2/neu positive cells in a cell mixture. Moreover, it has been shown that MPQ-cytometry analysis of a HER2/neu-specific iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with six cell lines of different tissue origins quantitatively reflects the HER2/neu status of the cells. High correlation of MPQ-cytometry data with those obtained by three other commonly used in molecular and cell biology methods supports consideration of this method as a prospective alternative for both quantifying cell-bound nanoparticles and estimating the expression level of cell surface antigens. The proposed method does not require expensive sophisticated equipment or highly skilled personnel and it can be easily applied for rapid diagnostics, especially under field conditions. PMID:27279427

  4. Procoagulant and platelet-derived microvesicle absolute counts determined by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Lisa; Harrison, Paul; Kohler, Malcolm; Ferry, Berne

    2014-01-01

    Background Flow cytometry is the most commonly used technology to measure microvesicles (MVs). Despite reported limitations of this technique, MV levels obtained using conventional flow cytometry have yielded many clinically relevant findings, such as associations with disease severity and ability to predict clinical outcomes. This study aims to determine if MV enumeration by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity, as this may explain how flow cytometry generates clinically relevant results. Methods One hundred samples from healthy individuals and patients with obstructive sleep apnoea were analysed by conventional flow cytometry (FACSCalibur) and by three functional MV assays: Zymuphen MP-activity in which data were given as phosphatidylserine equivalent, STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay expressed as clotting time and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) reflecting in vitro thrombin generation. Correlations were determined by Spearman correlation. Results Absolute counts of lactadherin+ procoagulant MVs generated by flow cytometry weakly correlated with the results obtained from the Zymuphen MP-activity (r=0.5370, p<0.0001); correlated with ETP (r=0.7444, p<0.0001); negatively correlated with STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay clotting time (−0.7872, p<0.0001), reflecting a positive correlation between clotting activity and flow cytometry. Levels of Annexin V+ procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs were also associated with functional assays. Absolute counts of MVs derived from other cell types were not correlated with the functional results. Conclusions Quantitative results of procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs from conventional flow cytometry are associated with the functional capability of the MVs, as defined by three functional MV assays. Flow cytometry is a valuable technique for the quantification of MVs from different cellular origins; however, a combination of several analytical techniques may give the most comprehensive

  5. International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry cell sorter biosafety standards.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kevin L; Fontes, Benjamin; Hogarth, Philip; Konz, Richard; Monard, Simon; Pletcher, Charles H; Wadley, Robert B; Schmid, Ingrid; Perfetto, Stephen P

    2014-05-01

    Flow cytometric cell sorting of biological specimens has become prevalent in basic and clinical research laboratories. These specimens may contain known or unknown infectious agents, necessitating precautions to protect instrument operators and the environment from biohazards arising from the use of sorters. To this end the International Society of Analytical Cytology (ISAC) was proactive in establishing biosafety guidelines in 1997 (Schmid et al., Cytometry 1997;28:99-117) and subsequently published revised biosafety standards for cell sorting of unfixed samples in 2007 (Schmid et al., Cytometry Part A J Int Soc Anal Cytol 2007;71A:414-437). Since their publication, these documents have become recognized worldwide as the standard of practice and safety precautions for laboratories performing cell sorting experiments. However, the field of cytometry has progressed since 2007, and the document requires an update. The new Standards provides guidance: (1) for laboratory design for cell sorter laboratories; (2) for the creation of laboratory or instrument specific Standard Operating Procedures (SOP); and (3) on procedures for the safe operation of cell sorters, including personal protective equipment (PPE) and validation of aerosol containment. PMID:24634405

  6. Identification and visualization of multidimensional antigen-specific T-cell populations in polychromatic cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Frelinger, Jacob; Jiang, Wenxin; Finak, Greg; Seshadri, Chetan; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; McElrath, Julie; DeRosa, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    An important aspect of immune monitoring for vaccine development, clinical trials, and research is the detection, measurement, and comparison of antigen-specific T-cells from subject samples under different conditions. Antigen-specific T-cells compose a very small fraction of total T-cells. Developments in cytometry technology over the past five years have enabled the measurement of single-cells in a multivariate and high-throughput manner. This growth in both dimensionality and quantity of data continues to pose a challenge for effective identification and visualization of rare cell subsets, such as antigen-specific T-cells. Dimension reduction and feature extraction play pivotal role in both identifying and visualizing cell populations of interest in large, multi-dimensional cytometry datasets. However, the automated identification and visualization of rare, high-dimensional cell subsets remains challenging. Here we demonstrate how a systematic and integrated approach combining targeted feature extraction with dimension reduction can be used to identify and visualize biological differences in rare, antigen-specific cell populations. By using OpenCyto to perform semi-automated gating and features extraction of flow cytometry data, followed by dimensionality reduction with t-SNE we are able to identify polyfunctional sub-populations of antigen-specific T-cells and visualize treatment-specific differences between them. PMID:25908275

  7. Demonstration of cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in acute leukaemia using flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Farahat, N; van der Plas, D; Praxedes, M; Morilla, R; Matutes, E; Catovsky, D

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To detect cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens using flow cytometry in acute leukaemia and to use this technique for double marker combinations. METHODS--Cytoplasmic staining was carried out in samples from 40 cases of acute leukaemia with monoclonal antibodies against the myeloid antigen CD13, the lymphoid antigens CD3, CD22, mu chain and the enzymes terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The cells were fixed with paraformaldehyde and permeabilised with Tween 20 and Becton Dickinson's FACS lysing solution. Flow cytometry results were compared in the same cases with immunocytochemistry results using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS--The gentle permeabilisation induced by this method permitted preservation of the membrane antigens and the size and morphology of the cells. The results using flow cytometry were comparable with those obtained using immunocytochemistry, with nearly complete concordance in most cases. CONCLUSIONS--This technique is simple, rapid, sensitive and reproducible and it is suitable for double staining procedures, such as nuclear and cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane, or cytoplasmic and membrane. It therefore provides a powerful tool for extending the use of immunophenotyping for the diagnosis and follow up of acute leukaemia. It could also be used for the investigation of minimal residual disease. PMID:7962655

  8. Methods for discovery and characterization of cell subsets in high dimensional mass cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Diggins, Kirsten E; Ferrell, P Brent; Irish, Jonathan M

    2015-07-01

    The flood of high-dimensional data resulting from mass cytometry experiments that measure more than 40 features of individual cells has stimulated creation of new single cell computational biology tools. These tools draw on advances in the field of machine learning to capture multi-parametric relationships and reveal cells that are easily overlooked in traditional analysis. Here, we introduce a workflow for high dimensional mass cytometry data that emphasizes unsupervised approaches and visualizes data in both single cell and population level views. This workflow includes three central components that are common across mass cytometry analysis approaches: (1) distinguishing initial populations, (2) revealing cell subsets, and (3) characterizing subset features. In the implementation described here, viSNE, SPADE, and heatmaps were used sequentially to comprehensively characterize and compare healthy and malignant human tissue samples. The use of multiple methods helps provide a comprehensive view of results, and the largely unsupervised workflow facilitates automation and helps researchers avoid missing cell populations with unusual or unexpected phenotypes. Together, these methods develop a framework for future machine learning of cell identity. PMID:25979346

  9. International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry Cell Sorter Biosafety Standards

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Kevin L.; Fontes, Benjamin; Hogarth, Philip; Konz, Richard; Monard, Simon; Pletcher, Charles H.; Wadley, Robert B.; Schmid, Ingrid; Perfetto, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometric cell sorting of biological specimens has become prevalent in basic and clinical research laboratories. These specimens may contain known or unknown infectious agents, necessitating precautions to protect instrument operators and the environment from biohazards arising from the use of sorters. To this end the International Society of Analytical Cytology (ISAC) was proactive in establishing biosafety guidelines in 1997 (Schmid et al., Cytometry 1997;28:99–117) and subsequently published revised biosafety standards for cell sorting of unfixed samples in 2007 (Schmid et al., Cytometry Part A J Int Soc Anal Cytol 2007;71A:414–437). Since their publication, these documents have become recognized worldwide as the standard of practice and safety precautions for laboratories performing cell sorting experiments. However, the field of cytometry has progressed since 2007, and the document requires an update. The new Standards provides guidance: (1) for laboratory design for cell sorter laboratories; (2) for the creation of laboratory or instrument specific Standard Operating Procedures (SOP); and (3) on procedures for the safe operation of cell sorters, including personal protective equipment (PPE) and validation of aerosol containment. PMID:24634405

  10. In vivo, label-free, and noninvasive detection of melanoma metastasis by photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Cheng; Wang, Xueding; Wei, Xunbin

    2014-02-01

    Melanoma, a malignant tumor of melanocytes, is the most serious type of skin cancer in the world. It accounts for about 80% of deaths of all skin cancer. For cancer detection, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) serve as a marker for metastasis development, cancer recurrence, and therapeutic efficacy. Melanoma tumor cells have high content of melanin, which has high light absorption and can serve as endogenous biomarker for CTC detection without labeling. Here, we have developed an in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC) to monitor the metastatic process of melanoma cancer by counting CTCs of melanoma tumor bearing mice in vivo. To test in vivo PAFC's capability of detecting melanoma cancer, we have constructed a melanoma tumor model by subcutaneous inoculation of highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10. In order to effectively distinguish the targeting PA signals from background noise, we have used the algorithm of Wavelet denoising method to reduce the background noise. The in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) has shown a great potential for detecting circulating tumor cells quantitatively in the blood stream. Compared with fluorescence-based in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC), PAFC technique can be used for in vivo, label-free, and noninvasive detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

  11. Phenotyping of Live Human PBMC using CyTOF™ Mass Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Leipold, Michael D.; Maecker, Holden T.

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell analysis has become an method of importance in immunology. Fluorescence flow cytometry has been a major player. However, due to issues such as autofluorescence and emission spillover between different fluorophores, alternative techniques are being developed. In recent years, mass cytometry has emerged, wherein antibodies labeled with metal ions are detected by ICP-MS. In order for a cell to be seen, a metal in the mass window must be present; there is no analogous parameter to forward or side scatter. The current mass window selected is approximately AW 103-196, which includes the lanthanides used for most antibody labeling, as well as iridium and rhodium for DNA intercalators. In this protocol, we use a cocktail of antibodies labeled with MAXPAR metal-chelating polymers to surface-stain live PBMC that have been previously cryopreserved. Many of these markers were taken from a standard fluorescence phenotyping panel (Maecker et al., 2012). No intracellular antibodies are used. We use a CyTOF™ (Cytometry by Time-Of-Flight) mass cytometer to acquire the ICP-MS data. Subsequent analysis of the dual count signal data using FlowJo software allows for cell types to be analyzed based on the dual count signal in each mass channel. The percentage of each cell type is determined and reported as a percent of the parent cell type.

  12. A novel procedure of quantitation of virus based on microflow cytometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Diego; López-Vázquez, Carmen; Cutrín, Juan Manuel; Dopazo, Carlos P

    2016-03-01

    The accurate and fast titration of viruses is a critical step in research laboratories and biotechnology industries. Different approaches are commonly applied which either are time consuming (like the plaque and endpoint dilution assays) or do not ensure quantification of only infective particles (like quantitative real-time PCR). In the last decade, a methodology based on the analysis of infected cells by flow cytometry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) has been reported as a fast and reliable test for the titration of some viruses. However, this technology needs expensive equipment and expert technicians to operate it. Recently, the "lab on a chip" integrated devices have brought about the miniaturization of this equipment, turning this technology into an affordable and easy-to-use alternative to traditional flow cytometry. In the present study, we have designed a microflow cytometry (μFC) procedure for the quantitation of viruses, using the infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) as a model. The optimization of conditions and validation of the method are reported here. PMID:26728015

  13. An improved protocol for flow cytometry analysis of phytoplankton cultures and natural samples.

    PubMed

    Marie, Dominique; Rigaut-Jalabert, Fabienne; Vaulot, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Preservation of cells, choice of fixative, storage, and thawing conditions are recurrent issues for the analysis of phytoplankton by flow cytometry. We examined the effects of addition of the surfactant Pluronic F68 to glutaraldehyde-fixed photosynthetic organisms in cultures and natural samples. In particular, we examined cell losses and modifications of side scatter (a proxy of cell size) and fluorescence of natural pigments. We found that different marine phytoplankton species react differently to the action of Pluronic F68. In particular, photosynthetic prokaryotes are less sensitive than eukaryotes. Observed cell losses may result from cell lysis or from cell adhesion to the walls of plastic tubes that are commonly used for flow cytometry analysis. The addition of the surfactant, Pluronic F68, has a positive effect on cells for long-term storage. We recommend to modify current protocols for preservation of natural marine planktonic samples, by fixing them with glutaraldehyde 0.25% (final concentration) and adding Pluronic F68 at a final concentration of 0.01% in the samples before preservation. Pluronic F68 also appears effective for preserving samples without fixation for subsequent sorting, e.g. for molecular biology analyses. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:25155102

  14. Methods for discovery and characterization of cell subsets in high dimensional mass cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Diggins, Kirsten E.; Ferrell, P. Brent; Irish, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The flood of high-dimensional data resulting from mass cytometry experiments that measure more than 40 features of individual cells has stimulated creation of new single cell computational biology tools. These tools draw on advances in the field of machine learning to capture multi-parametric relationships and reveal cells that are easily overlooked in traditional analysis. Here, we introduce a workflow for high dimensional mass cytometry data that emphasizes unsupervised approaches and visualizes data in both single cell and population level views. This workflow includes three central components that are common across mass cytometry analysis approaches: 1) distinguishing initial populations, 2) revealing cell subsets, and 3) characterizing subset features. In the implementation described here, viSNE, SPADE, and heatmaps were used sequentially to comprehensively characterize and compare healthy and malignant human tissue samples. The use of multiple methods helps provide a comprehensive view of results, and the largely unsupervised workflow facilitates automation and helps researchers avoid missing cell populations with unusual or unexpected phenotypes. Together, these methods develop a framework for future machine learning of cell identity. PMID:25979346

  15. Application of flow cytometry to studies of pathogenic free-living amoebae.

    PubMed Central

    Muldrow, L L; Tyndall, R L; Fliermans, C B

    1982-01-01

    Species of small, free-living amoebae of the genera Naegleria and Acanthamoeba can cause fatal amoebic meningoencephalitis. Previous investigations have shown that pathogenic amoebae are associated with thermally altered water. Flow cytometric techniques for identifying species of pathogenic and nonpathogenic amoebae from such water have been developed, using immunofluorescence and fluorescein-bound concanavalin A. Flow cytometry is accomplished with a cytofluorograph, in which cells are dispersed in a suspended carrier liquid and passed in front of a focused argon ion laser beam. Cells are then distinguished by the degree of scattered light (size) or fluorescence. Flow cytometry techniques have proven efficient for environmental samples, as indicated by the identification of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and nonpathogenic Naegleri gruberi and Acanthamoeba castellanii isolated from the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. Cytofluorographic analysis of environmental samples has several advantages over the current methods of isolation and classification of free-living amoebae. With this system, it is possible to rapidly identify species and quantitate mixtures of pathogenic amoebae in environmental samples. Cytofluorographic analysis of amoebic isolates reduces the time presently required to screen environmental sites for pathogenic amoebae. The cytofluorograph permits detection and species identification of nonthermophilic Naegleria spp. and Acanthamoeba spp. that could not easily be isolated for species identification by conventional methods. Other advantages of flow cytometry over fluorescent microscopy include a high degree of statistical precision due to the large numbers measured, high immunofluorescent titers, and elimination of subjectivity and fluorescence fading. PMID:6186196

  16. A Simple and Robust Event-Detection Algorithm for Single-Cell Impedance Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Federica; Bisegna, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Microfluidic impedance cytometry is emerging as a powerful label-free technique for the characterization of single biological cells. In order to increase the sensitivity and the specificity of the technique, suited digital signal processing methods are required to extract meaningful information from measured impedance data. In this study, a simple and robust event-detection algorithm for impedance cytometry is presented. Since a differential measuring scheme is generally adopted, the signal recorded when a cell passes through the sensing region of the device exhibits a typical odd-symmetric pattern. This feature is exploited twice by the proposed algorithm: first, a preliminary segmentation, based on the correlation of the data stream with the simplest odd-symmetric template, is performed; then, the quality of detected events is established by evaluating their E2O index, that is, a measure of the ratio between their even and odd parts. A thorough performance analysis is reported, showing the robustness of the algorithm with respect to parameter choice and noise level. In terms of sensitivity and positive predictive value, an overall performance of 94.9% and 98.5%, respectively, was achieved on two datasets relevant to microfluidic chips with very different characteristics, considering three noise levels. The present algorithm can foster the role of impedance cytometry in single-cell analysis, which is the new frontier in "Omics." PMID:26241968

  17. Flow cytometry community fingerprinting and amplicon sequencing for the assessment of landfill leachate cellulolytic bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Kinet, R; Dzaomuho, P; Baert, J; Taminiau, B; Daube, G; Nezer, C; Brostaux, Y; Nguyen, F; Dumont, G; Thonart, P; Delvigne, F

    2016-08-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a high throughput single cell technology that is actually becoming widely used for studying phenotypic and genotypic diversity among microbial communities. This technology is considered in this work for the assessment of a bioaugmentation treatment in order to enhance cellulolytic potential of landfill leachate. The experimental results reveal the relevant increase of leachate cellulolytic potential due to bioaugmentation. Cytometric monitoring of microbial dynamics along these assays is then realized. The flow FP package is used to establish microbial samples fingerprint from initial 2D cytometry histograms. This procedure allows highlighting microbial communities' variation along the assays. Cytometric and 16S rRNA gene sequencing fingerprinting methods are then compared. The two approaches give same evidence about microbial dynamics throughout digestion assay. There are however a lack of significant correlation between cytometric and amplicon sequencing fingerprint at genus or species level. Same phenotypical profiles of microbiota during assays matched to several 16S rRNA gene sequencing ones. Flow cytometry fingerprinting can thus be considered as a promising routine on-site method suitable for the detection of stability/variation/disturbance of complex microbial communities involved in bioprocesses. PMID:27160955

  18. Quantification of mitochondrial toxicity in HIV-infected individuals by quantitative PCR compared to flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Thor A.; Lin, Chen-Han; Tobin, Nicole H.; Côté, Hélène C.F.; Sloan, Derek D.; Jerome, Keith R.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-invasive diagnostic assays to evaluate mitochondrial toxicity could have significant clinical utility for HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods This study compared the ratio of mitochondrial to nuclear DNA determined by quantitative PCR to the ratio of mitochondrial to nuclear-encoded proteins by flow cytometry, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 73 HIV-infected individuals with and without risk factors for mitochondrial toxicity. Results PCR detected similar mitochondrial/nuclear DNA in HIV-infected individuals without a history of ART, and those receiving ART with lipodystrophy, lipoatrophy or a history of suspected lactic acidosis. However, the ratio was significantly greater in ART-untreated compared to those receiving either stavudine or didanosine. In contrast, flow cytometry did not detect any differences in mitochondrial/nuclear protein (1). There was no correlation between the assays (rho = −0.05, p = 0.65). Conclusions Assessment of the mitochondrial/nuclear DNA ratio by quantitative PCR performed better than the mitochondrial/nuclear-encoded protein ratio by flow cytometry to detect adverse effects of nucleoside analogues on mitochondria. PMID:23044657

  19. Magnetic fingerprints of rolling cells for quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Reisbeck, Mathias; Helou, Michael Johannes; Richter, Lukas; Kappes, Barbara; Friedrich, Oliver; Hayden, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, flow cytometry has had a profound impact on preclinical and clinical applications requiring single cell function information for counting, sub-typing and quantification of epitope expression. At the same time, the workflow complexity and high costs of such optical systems still limit flow cytometry applications to specialized laboratories. Here, we present a quantitative magnetic flow cytometer that incorporates in situ magnetophoretic cell focusing for highly accurate and reproducible rolling of the cellular targets over giant magnetoresistance sensing elements. Time-of-flight analysis is used to unveil quantitative single cell information contained in its magnetic fingerprint. Furthermore, we used erythrocytes as a biological model to validate our methodology with respect to precise analysis of the hydrodynamic cell diameter, quantification of binding capacity of immunomagnetic labels, and discrimination of cell morphology. The extracted time-of-flight information should enable point-of-care quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood for clinical applications, such as immunology and primary hemostasis. PMID:27596736

  20. Monitoring antibacterial permeabilization in real time using time-resolved flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Freire, João Miguel; Gaspar, Diana; de la Torre, Beatriz Garcia; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Andreu, David; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-02-01

    Despite the intensive study of antibiotic-induced bacterial permeabilization, its kinetics and molecular mechanism remain largely elusive. A new methodology that extends the concept of the live-dead assay in flow cytometry to real time-resolved detection was used to overcome these limitations. The antimicrobial activity of pepR was monitored in time-resolved flow cytometry for three bacterial strains: Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), E. coli K-12 (CGSC Strain 4401) and E. coli JW3596-1 (CGSC Strain 11805). The latter strain has truncated lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the outer membrane. This new methodology provided information on the efficacy of the antibiotics and sheds light on their mode of action at membrane-level. Kinetic data regarding antibiotic binding and lytic action were retrieved. Membrane interaction and permeabilization events differ significantly among strains. The truncation of LPS moieties does not hamper AMP binding but compromises membrane disruption and bacterial killing. We demonstrated the usefulness of time-resolved flow cytometry to study antimicrobial-induced permeabilization by collecting kinetic data that contribute to characterize the action of antibiotics directly on bacteria. PMID:25445678

  1. How validated receptor occupancy flow cytometry assays can impact decisions and support drug development.

    PubMed

    Moulard, Maxime; Ozoux, Marie-Laure

    2016-03-01

    Because of the pressure of significant attrition in drug development, demonstration of target engagement after drug administration enables dose and regimen optimization, patient selection, and stratification from the earliest stages of drug development. The determination of receptor occupancy (RO) can support these efforts. Flow cytometry is one of the preferred technologies to be used based on the important advances in the technology over the last years enabling the simultaneous determination on target cells, of multi intra or surface cell parameters with adequate precision in a regulated environment. Nevertheless, compared to other platforms using the same antigen-antibody binding concept, the flow cytometry approach has faced several challenges, not only due to the technology per se and the diversity of receptor occupancy approaches, but also related to the nature of the matrix where the determination is performed. To illustrate these points, three case studies (antibody-drug conjugate and naked antibody) are provided here to highlight the importance of the choice of the right antibody pair to measure both receptor density (RD) and occupancy by the drug on cancer cells in blood and in bone marrow and the possibility to circumvent the lack of a critical reagent with an innovative approach. In addition, the use of RO data to determine the minimum anticipated biological effect level (MABEL) with translational data from preclinical to human studies, selection of starting dose for the first in man study will be discussed. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:26332593

  2. Magnetic fingerprints of rolling cells for quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Reisbeck, Mathias; Helou, Michael Johannes; Richter, Lukas; Kappes, Barbara; Friedrich, Oliver; Hayden, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, flow cytometry has had a profound impact on preclinical and clinical applications requiring single cell function information for counting, sub-typing and quantification of epitope expression. At the same time, the workflow complexity and high costs of such optical systems still limit flow cytometry applications to specialized laboratories. Here, we present a quantitative magnetic flow cytometer that incorporates in situ magnetophoretic cell focusing for highly accurate and reproducible rolling of the cellular targets over giant magnetoresistance sensing elements. Time-of-flight analysis is used to unveil quantitative single cell information contained in its magnetic fingerprint. Furthermore, we used erythrocytes as a biological model to validate our methodology with respect to precise analysis of the hydrodynamic cell diameter, quantification of binding capacity of immunomagnetic labels, and discrimination of cell morphology. The extracted time-of-flight information should enable point-of-care quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood for clinical applications, such as immunology and primary hemostasis. PMID:27596736

  3. Discovering cell types in flow cytometry data with random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Nussenblatt, Robert; Losert, Wolfgang

    Flow cytometry is a widely used experimental technique in immunology research. During the experiments, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a single patient, labeled with multiple fluorescent stains that bind to different proteins, are illuminated by a laser. The intensity of each stain on a single cell is recorded and reflects the amount of protein expressed by that cell. The data analysis focuses on identifying specific cell types related to a disease. Different cell types can be identified by the type and amount of protein they express. To date, this has most often been done manually by labelling a protein as expressed or not while ignoring the amount of expression. Using a cross correlation matrix of stain intensities, which contains both information on the proteins expressed and their amount, has been largely ignored by researchers as it suffers from measurement noise. Here we present an algorithm to identify cell types in flow cytometry data which uses random matrix theory (RMT) to reduce noise in a cross correlation matrix. We demonstrate our method using a published flow cytometry data set. Compared with previous analysis techniques, we were able to rediscover relevant cell types in an automatic way. Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742.

  4. In vivo Raman flow cytometry for real-time detection of carbon nanotube kinetics in lymph, blood, and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Li, Zhongrui; Mahmood, Meena; Xu, Yang; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are intensively being explored as contrast agents for medical diagnostics and therapies using various optical methods. We present the first demonstration of the use of time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for in vivo real-time detection of circulating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or cancer cells labeled with CNTs in the lymph, blood, and tissues of live animals with fast spectral acquisition times of down to few milliseconds. After intravenously administering CNTs in the tail vein of the rat, this technique provides the ability to detect the circulation of CNTs in the blood microvessels of the intact rat ear. The capability of Raman spectroscopy is also demonstrated to monitor, identify, and image the CNTs during their transportation by lymphatics in the rat ear and mesentery. The strong and specific Raman scattering properties of CNTs make it possible to detect in vitro and in vivo single cancer cells (HeLa) tagged with CNTs. In vivo Raman flow cytometry opens a new avenue for multiparameter analysis of circulating nanoparticles with strong Raman scattering properties and their pharmokinetics in blood and lymph systems. Moreover, this technology has the potential for molecular detection and identification of circulating tumor cells, and infections labeled with CNTs. PMID:19405719

  5. In vivo Raman flow cytometry for real-time detection of carbon nanotube kinetics in lymph, blood, and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Li, Zhongrui; Mahmood, Meena; Xu, Yang; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2009-03-01

    Nanoparticles are intensively being explored as contrast agents for medical diagnostics and therapies using various optical methods. We present the first demonstration of the use of time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for in vivo real-time detection of circulating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or cancer cells labeled with CNTs in the lymph, blood, and tissues of live animals with fast spectral acquisition times of down to few milliseconds. After intravenously administering CNTs in the tail vein of the rat, this technique provides the ability to detect the circulation of CNTs in the blood microvessels of the intact rat ear. The capability of Raman spectroscopy is also demonstrated to monitor, identify, and image the CNTs during their transportation by lymphatics in the rat ear and mesentery. The strong and specific Raman scattering properties of CNTs make it possible to detect in vitro and in vivo single cancer cells (HeLa) tagged with CNTs. In vivo Raman flow cytometry opens a new avenue for multiparameter analysis of circulating nanoparticles with strong Raman scattering properties and their pharmokinetics in blood and lymph systems. Moreover, this technology has the potential for molecular detection and identification of circulating tumor cells, and infections labeled with CNTs.

  6. Flow Cytometry with Gold Nanoparticles and their Clusters as scattering Contrast Agents: FDTD Simulation of Light-Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo; Pond, James; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    The formulation of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) approach is presented in the framework of its potential applications to in vivo flow cytometry based on light scattering. The consideration is focused on comparison of light scattering by a single biological cell alone in controlled refractive index matching conditions and by cells labeled by gold nanoparticles. The optical schematics including phase contrast (OPCM) microscopy as a prospective modality for in vivo flow cytometry is also analyzed. The validation of the FDTD approach for the simulation of flow cytometry may open a new avenue in the development of advanced cytometric techniques based on scattering effects from nanoscale targets. PMID:19670359

  7. Detection of an Abnormal Myeloid Clone by Flow Cytometry in Familial Platelet Disorder With Propensity to Myeloid Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Chi Young; Leventaki, Vasiliki; Wang, Sa A.; Dinardo, Courtney; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Konoplev, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To report aberrant myeloblasts detected by flow cytometry immunophenotypic studies in an asymptomatic patient with familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy, a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by germline heterozygous mutations in Runt-related transcription factor 1. Methods Morphologic evaluation, flow cytometry immunophenotypic studies, nanofluidics-based qualitative multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Sanger sequencing, and next-generation sequencing-based mutational hotspot analysis of 53 genes were performed on bone marrow biopsy and aspirate samples. Results Flow cytometry immunophenotypic analysis showed 0.6% CD34+ blasts with an abnormal immunophenotype: CD13 increased, CD33+, CD38 decreased, CD117 increased, and CD123 increased. Conclusions The acquisition of new phenotypic aberrancies in myeloblasts as detected by flow cytometry immunophenotypic studies might be a harbinger of impending myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia in a patient with familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy. PMID:26800764

  8. Simultaneous evaluation of plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential in bovine spermatozoa by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Chihiro; Kang, Sung-Sik; Kitade, Yasuyuki; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to develop an objective evaluation procedure to estimate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bull spermatozoa simultaneously by flow cytometry. Firstly, we used frozen-thawed semen mixed with 0, 25, 50, 75 or 100% dead spermatozoa. Semen was stained using three staining solutions: SYBR-14, propidium iodide (PI), and phycoerythrin-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PE-PNA), for the evaluation of plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity. Then, characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were compared. Characteristics of spermatozoa (viability and acrosomal integrity) evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were found to be similar. Secondly, we attempted to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and also mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa by flow cytometry using conventional staining with three dyes (SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA) combined with MitoTracker Deep Red (MTDR) staining (quadruple staining). The spermatozoon characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry using quadruple staining were then compared with those of staining using SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA and staining using SYBR-14 and MTDR. There were no significant differences in all characteristics (viability, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential) evaluated by quadruple staining and the other procedures. In conclusion, quadruple staining using SYBR-14, PI, PE-PNA, and MTDR for flow cytometry can be used to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bovine spermatozoa simultaneously. PMID:26369275

  9. A Flow Cytometry Method for Rapidly Assessing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Responses to Antibiotics with Different Modes of Action

    PubMed Central

    Hendon-Dunn, Charlotte Louise; Doris, Kathryn Sarah; Thomas, Stephen Richard; Allnutt, Jonathan Charles; Marriott, Alice Ann Neville; Hatch, Kim Alexandra; Watson, Robert James; Bottley, Graham; Marsh, Philip David; Taylor, Stephen Charles

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for assessing the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are lengthy and do not capture information about viable organisms that are not immediately culturable under standard laboratory conditions as a result of antibiotic exposure. We have developed a rapid dual-fluorescence flow cytometry method using markers for cell viability and death. We show that the fluorescent marker calcein violet with an acetoxy-methyl ester group (CV-AM) can differentiate between populations of M. tuberculosis growing at different rates, while Sytox green (SG) can differentiate between live and dead mycobacteria. M. tuberculosis was exposed to isoniazid or rifampin at different concentrations over time and either dual stained with CV-AM and SG and analyzed by flow cytometry or plated to determine the viability of the cells. Although similar trends in the loss of viability were observed when the results of flow cytometry and the plate counting methods were compared, there was a lack of correlation between these two approaches, as the flow cytometry analysis potentially captured information about cell populations that were unable to grow under standard conditions. The flow cytometry approach had an additional advantage in that it could provide insights into the mode of action of the drug: antibiotics targeting the cell wall gave a flow cytometry profile distinct from those inhibiting intracellular processes. This rapid drug susceptibility testing method could identify more effective antimycobacterials, provide information about their potential mode of action, and accelerate their progress to the clinic. PMID:26902767

  10. Leukocyte Populations in Human Preterm and Term Breast Milk Identified by Multicolour Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Trend, Stephanie; de Jong, Emma; Lloyd, Megan L.; Kok, Chooi Heen; Richmond, Peter; Doherty, Dorota A.; Simmer, Karen; Kakulas, Foteini; Strunk, Tobias; Currie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Extremely preterm infants are highly susceptible to bacterial infections but breast milk provides some protection. It is unknown if leukocyte numbers and subsets in milk differ between term and preterm breast milk. This study serially characterised leukocyte populations in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants using multicolour flow cytometry methods for extended differential leukocyte counts in blood. Methods Sixty mothers of extremely preterm (<28 weeks gestational age), very preterm (28–31 wk), and moderately preterm (32–36 wk), as well as term (37–41 wk) infants were recruited. Colostrum (d2–5), transitional (d8–12) and mature milk (d26–30) samples were collected, cells isolated, and leukocyte subsets analysed using flow cytometry. Results The major CD45+ leukocyte populations circulating in blood were also detectable in breast milk but at different frequencies. Progression of lactation was associated with decreasing CD45+ leukocyte concentration, as well as increases in the relative frequencies of neutrophils and immature granulocytes, and decreases in the relative frequencies of eosinophils, myeloid and B cell precursors, and CD16- monocytes. No differences were observed between preterm and term breast milk in leukocyte concentration, though minor differences between preterm groups in some leukocyte frequencies were observed. Conclusions Flow cytometry is a useful tool to identify and quantify leukocyte subsets in breast milk. The stage of lactation is associated with major changes in milk leukocyte composition in this population. Fresh preterm breast milk is not deficient in leukocytes, but shorter gestation may be associated with minor differences in leukocyte subset frequencies in preterm compared to term breast milk. PMID:26288195

  11. Determination of cluster composition in heteroaggregation of binary particle systems by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rollié, Sascha; Sundmacher, Kai

    2008-12-01

    Cluster composition in aggregation processes of multiple particle species can be dynamically determined by flow cytometry if particle populations are fluorescently labeled. By flow cytometric single particle analysis, aggregates can be characterized according to the exact amount of constituent particles, allowing the detailed and separate quantification of homo- and heteroaggregation. This contribution demonstrates the application of flow cytometry for the experimental detection of heteroaggregation in a binary particle mixture of oppositely charged polystyrene (PS) particles and Rhodamine-B labeled melamine-formaldehyde (MF-RhB) particles. Experiments with different particle concentration, temperature, mixing mode, ionic strength and particle mixing ratio are presented. Aggregation kinetics are enhanced with increasing particle concentration and temperature as well as by increased shear of mixing. These results represent well-known behavior published in previous investigations and validate the performance of flow cytometry for probing heteroaggregation processes. Physical insight with a novel level of detail is gained by the quantification of de- and restabilization phenomena. At low ionic strength, "raspberry"-type aggregates with PS cores are formed by primary heteroaggregation. At moderate particle number ratios, these aggregates are electrostatically destabilized and form more complex aggregates in a secondary heteroaggregation process. At high particle number ratios (> or =50:1), the raspberry-type aggregates are electrostatically restabilized and secondary heteroaggregation is prevented. The dynamic change of aggregate charge was verified by zeta-potential measurements. The elevation of salt concentration over several orders of magnitude retards aggregation dynamics, since attractive interparticle forces are diminished by an electrostatic double layer. This indicates that heteroaggregation induced by attractive interparticle forces is faster than aggregation

  12. Simplified protocol for flow cytometry analysis of fluorescently labeled exosomes and microvesicles using dedicated flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Pospichalova, Vendula; Svoboda, Jan; Dave, Zankruti; Kotrbova, Anna; Kaiser, Karol; Klemova, Dobromila; Ilkovics, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales; Crha, Igor; Jandakova, Eva; Minar, Lubos; Weinberger, Vit; Bryja, Vitezslav

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful method, which is widely used for high-throughput quantitative and qualitative analysis of cells. However, its straightforward applicability for extracellular vesicles (EVs) and mainly exosomes is hampered by several challenges, reflecting mostly the small size of these vesicles (exosomes: ~80–200 nm, microvesicles: ~200–1,000 nm), their polydispersity, and low refractive index. The current best and most widely used protocol for beads-free flow cytometry of exosomes uses ultracentrifugation (UC) coupled with floatation in sucrose gradient for their isolation, labeling with lipophilic dye PKH67 and antibodies, and an optimized version of commercial high-end cytometer for analysis. However, this approach requires an experienced flow cytometer operator capable of manual hardware adjustments and calibration of the cytometer. Here, we provide a novel and fast approach for quantification and characterization of both exosomes and microvesicles isolated from cell culture media as well as from more complex human samples (ascites of ovarian cancer patients) suitable for multiuser labs by using a flow cytometer especially designed for small particles, which can be used without adjustments prior to data acquisition. EVs can be fluorescently labeled with protein-(Carboxyfluoresceinsuccinimidyl ester, CFSE) and/or lipid- (FM) specific dyes, without the necessity of removing the unbound fluorescent dye by UC, which further facilitates and speeds up the characterization of microvesicles and exosomes using flow cytometry. In addition, double labeling with protein- and lipid-specific dyes enables separation of EVs from common contaminants of EV preparations, such as protein aggregates or micelles formed by unbound lipophilic styryl dyes, thus not leading to overestimation of EV numbers. Moreover, our protocol is compatible with antibody labeling using fluorescently conjugated primary antibodies. The presented methodology opens the possibility for

  13. Label-free Electrophysiological Cytometry for Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Frank B.; Abilez, Oscar J.; Zarins, Christopher K.; Lee, Luke P.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapies hold great promise for repairing tissues damaged due to disease or injury. However, a major obstacle facing this field is the difficulty in identifying cells of a desired phenotype from the heterogeneous population that arises during stem cell differentiation. Conventional fluorescence flow cytometry and magnetic cell purification require exogenous labeling of cell surface markers which can interfere with the performance of the cells of interest. Here, we describe a non-genetic, label-free cell cytometry method based on electrophysiological response to stimulus. As many of the cell types relevant for regenerative medicine are electrically-excitable (e.g. cardiomyocytes, neurons, smooth muscle cells), this technology is well-suited for identifying cells from heterogeneous stem cell progeny without the risk and expense associated with molecular labeling or genetic modification. Our label-free cell cytometer is capable of distinguishing clusters of undifferentiated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte (iPSC-CM) clusters. The system utilizes a microfluidic device with integrated electrodes for both electrical stimulation and recording of extracellular field potential (FP) signals from suspended cells in flow. The unique electrode configuration provides excellent rejection of field stimulus artifact while enabling sensitive detection of FPs with a noise floor of 2 μVrms. Cells are self-aligned to the recording electrodes via hydrodynamic flow focusing. Based on automated analysis of these extracellular signals, the system distinguishes cardiomyocytes from non-cardiomyocytes. This is an entirely new approach to cell cytometry, in which a cell’s functionality is assessed rather than its expression profile or physical characteristics. PMID:23207961

  14. Two New Nuclear Isolation Buffers for Plant DNA Flow Cytometry: A Test with 37 Species

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, João; Rodriguez, Eleazar; Doležel, Jaroslav; Santos, Conceição

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims After the initial boom in the application of flow cytometry in plant sciences in the late 1980s and early 1990s, which was accompanied by development of many nuclear isolation buffers, only a few efforts were made to develop new buffer formulas. In this work, recent data on the performance of nuclear isolation buffers are utilized in order to develop new buffers, general purpose buffer (GPB) and woody plant buffer (WPB), for plant DNA flow cytometry. Methods GPB and WPB were used to prepare samples for flow cytometric analysis of nuclear DNA content in a set of 37 plant species that included herbaceous and woody taxa with leaf tissues differing in structure and chemical composition. The following parameters of isolated nuclei were assessed: forward and side light scatter, propidium iodide fluorescence, coefficient of variation of DNA peaks, quantity of debris background, and the number of particles released from sample tissue. The nuclear genome size of 30 selected species was also estimated using the buffer that performed better for a given species. Key Results In unproblematic species, the use of both buffers resulted in high quality samples. The analysis of samples obtained with GPB usually resulted in histograms of DNA content with higher or similar resolution than those prepared with the WPB. In more recalcitrant tissues, such as those from woody plants, WPB performed better and GPB failed to provide acceptable results in some cases. Improved resolution of DNA content histograms in comparison with previously published buffers was achieved in most of the species analysed. Conclusions WPB is a reliable buffer which is also suitable for the analysis of problematic tissues/species. Although GPB failed with some plant species, it provided high-quality DNA histograms in species from which nuclear suspensions are easy to prepare. The results indicate that even with a broad range of species, either GPB or WPB is suitable for preparation of high

  15. Expanding the potential of standard flow cytometry by extracting fluorescence lifetimes from cytometric pulse shifts

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruofan; Naivar, Mark A; Wilder, Mark; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide information about the fluorescence relaxation, or intensity decay, of organic fluorophores, fluorescent proteins, and other inorganic molecules that fluoresce. The fluorescence lifetime is emerging in flow cytometry and is helpful in a variety of multiparametric, single cell measurements because it is not impacted by nonlinearity that can occur with fluorescence intensity measurements. Yet time-resolved cytometry systems rely on major hardware modifications making the methodology difficult to reproduce. The motivation of this work is, by taking advantage of the dynamic nature of flow cytometry sample detection and applying digital signal processing methods, to measure fluorescence lifetimes using an unmodified flow cytometer. We collect a new lifetime-dependent parameter, referred to herein as the fluorescence-pulse-delay (FPD), and prove it is a valid representation of the average fluorescence lifetime. To verify we generated cytometric pulses in simulation, with light emitting diode (LED) pulsation, and with true fluorescence measurements of cells and microspheres. Each pulse is digitized and used in algorithms to extract an average fluorescence lifetime inherent in the signal. A range of fluorescence lifetimes is measurable with this approach including standard organic fluorophore lifetimes (∼1 to 22 ns) as well as small, simulated shifts (0.1 ns) under standard conditions (reported herein). This contribution demonstrates how digital data acquisition and signal processing can reveal time-dependent information foreshadowing the exploitation of full waveform analysis for quantification of similar photo-physical events within single cells. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25274073

  16. Flow cytometry for intracellular SPION quantification: specificity and sensitivity in comparison with spectroscopic methods

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Ralf P; Janko, Christina; Poettler, Marina; Tripal, Philipp; Zaloga, Jan; Cicha, Iwona; Dürr, Stephan; Nowak, Johannes; Odenbach, Stefan; Slabu, Ioana; Liebl, Maik; Trahms, Lutz; Stapf, Marcus; Hilger, Ingrid; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Due to their special physicochemical properties, iron nanoparticles offer new promising possibilities for biomedical applications. For bench to bedside translation of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), safety issues have to be comprehensively clarified. To understand concentration-dependent nanoparticle-mediated toxicity, the exact quantification of intracellular SPIONs by reliable methods is of great importance. In the present study, we compared three different SPION quantification methods (ultraviolet spectrophotometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, atomic adsorption spectroscopy) and discussed the shortcomings and advantages of each method. Moreover, we used those results to evaluate the possibility to use flow cytometric technique to determine the cellular SPION content. For this purpose, we correlated the side scatter data received from flow cytometry with the actual cellular SPION amount. We showed that flow cytometry provides a rapid and reliable method to assess the cellular SPION content. Our data also demonstrate that internalization of iron oxide nanoparticles in human umbilical vein endothelial cells is strongly dependent to the SPION type and results in a dose-dependent increase of toxicity. Thus, treatment with lauric acid-coated SPIONs (SEONLA) resulted in a significant increase in the intensity of side scatter and toxicity, whereas SEONLA with an additional protein corona formed by bovine serum albumin (SEONLA-BSA) and commercially available Rienso® particles showed only a minimal increase in both side scatter intensity and cellular toxicity. The increase in side scatter was in accordance with the measurements for SPION content by the atomic adsorption spectroscopy reference method. In summary, our data show that flow cytometry analysis can be used for estimation of uptake of SPIONs by mammalian cells and provides a fast tool for scientists to evaluate the safety of nanoparticle products. PMID:26170658

  17. An Improved Flow Cytometry Method For Precise Quantitation Of Natural-Killer Cell Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Nehlsen-Cannarella, Sandra; Sams, Clarence

    2006-01-01

    The ability to assess NK cell cytotoxicity using flow cytometry has been previously described and can serve as a powerful tool to evaluate effector immune function in the clinical setting. Previous methods used membrane permeable dyes to identify target cells. The use of these dyes requires great care to achieve optimal staining and results in a broad spectral emission that can make multicolor cytometry difficult. Previous methods have also used negative staining (the elimination of target cells) to identify effector cells. This makes a precise quantitation of effector NK cells impossible due to the interfering presence of T and B lymphocytes, and the data highly subjective to the variable levels of NK cells normally found in human peripheral blood. In this study an improved version of the standard flow cytometry assay for NK activity is described that has several advantages of previous methods. Fluorescent antibody staining (CD45FITC) is used to positively identify target cells in place of membranepermeable dyes. Fluorescent antibody staining of target cells is less labor intensive and more easily reproducible than membrane dyes. NK cells (true effector lymphocytes) are also positively identified by fluorescent antibody staining (CD56PE) allowing a simultaneous absolute count assessment of both NK cells and target cells. Dead cells are identified by membrane disruption using the DNA intercalating dye PI. Using this method, an exact NK:target ratio may be determined for each assessment, including quantitation of NK target complexes. Backimmunoscatter gating may be used to track live vs. dead Target cells via scatter properties. If desired, NK activity may then be normalized to standardized ratios for clinical comparisons between patients, making the determination of PBMC counts or NK cell percentages prior to testing unnecessary. This method provides an exact cytometric determination of NK activity that highly reproducible and may be suitable for routine use in the

  18. Fluorogen Activating Proteins in Flow Cytometry for the Study of Surface Molecules and Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Fisher, Gregory W.; Jarvik, Jonathan W.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent proteins, particularly when genetically fused to proteins of biological interest, have greatly advanced many flow cytometry research applications. However, there remains a major limitation to this methodology in that only total cellular fluorescence is measured. Commonly used fluorescent proteins (e.g. EGFP and its variants) are fluorescent whether the fusion protein exists on the surface or in sub-cellular compartments. A flow cytometer cannot distinguish between these separate sources of fluorescence. This can be of great concern when using flow cytometry, plate readers or microscopy to quantify cell surface receptors or other surface proteins genetically fused to fluorescent proteins. Recently developed fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs) solve many of these issues by allowing the selective visualization of only those cell surface proteins that are exposed to the extra cellular milieu. FAPs are GFP-sized single chain antibodies that specifically bind to and generate fluorescence from otherwise non-fluorescent dyes (‘activate the fluorogen’). Like the fluorescent proteins, FAPs can be genetically fused to proteins of interest. When exogenously added fluorogens bind FAPs, fluorescence immediately increases by as much as 20,000 fold, rendering the FAP fusion proteins highly fluorescent. Moreover, since fluorogens can be made membrane impermeant, fluorescence can be limited to only those receptors expressed on the cell surface. Using cells expressing beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) fused at its N-terminus to a FAP, flow cytometry based receptor internalization assays have been developed and characterized. The fluorogen/FAP system is ideally suited to the study of cell surface proteins by fluorescence and avoids drawbacks of using receptor/fluorescent protein fusions, such as internal accumulation. We also briefly comment on extending FAP-based technologies to the study of events occurring inside of the cell as well. PMID:22366230

  19. Protocol for Apoptosis Assay by Flow Cytometry Using Annexin V Staining Method

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Batra, Surinder K

    2016-01-01

    This assay is used to count the number of cells that have undergone apoptosis. Apoptosis will be detected by initially staining the cells with Annexin V and propidium Iodide solution followed by flow cytometry analysis. It is based on the principle that normal cells are hydrophobic in nature as they express phosphatidyl serine in the inner membrane (side facing the cytoplasm) and when the cells undergo apoptosis, the inner membrane flips to become the outer membrane, thus exposing phosphatidyl serine. The exposed phosphatidyl serine is detected by Annexin V, and propidium iodide stains the necrotic cells, which have leaky DNA content that help to differentiate the apoptotic and necrotic cells.

  20. Using Lanthanide Nanoparticles as Isotopic Tags for Biomarker Detection by Mass Cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Pengpeng

    The development of robust, versatile, and high-throughput biosensing techniques has widespread implications for early disease detection and accurate diagnosis. An innovative technology, mass cytometry, has been developed to use isotopically-labelled antibodies to simultaneously study multiple parameters of single cells. The current detection sensitivity of mass cytometry is limited by the number of copies of a given isotope that can be attached to a given antibody. This thesis describes research on the synthesis, characterization, and bioconjugation of a new class of nanoparticle-based labelling agents to be employed for the detection of low-abundance biomarkers by mass cytometry. Hydrophobic lanthanide nanoparticles (Ln NPs) have been prepared by the Winnik group. To render the NPs water-soluble for biological applications, we coated the NP surface with a first generation of multidentate poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based ligands via ligand exchange. We measured the size, morphology, and polydispersity of these hydrophilic NPs by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The colloidal stability of the NPs was determined at various pH and in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions. Tetradentate-PEG-coated NPs (Tetra-NPs) exhibited the best stability at pH 3 to 9, and in PBS. However, when cells were treated with Tetra-NPs in preliminary in vitro studies, significant undesirable non-specific binding (NSB) was observed. In order to tackle the NSB issue presented in the Tetra-NPs, we prepared a second generation of polymer-based ligands using ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). A small library of ROMP polymers was synthesized, characterized, and used to stabilize NPs in aqueous solutions. The ROMP-NPs were found to have significantly reduced NSB to cells by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). To further modify the NPs, amine groups were introduced as functional handles to both the tetradentate-PEG and

  1. A double-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid evaluation by cytometry and genetic tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, M. L. L.; Silva, L. P.; Azevedo, R. B.; Garcia, V. A. P.; Lacava, L. M.; Grisólia, C. K.; Lucci, C. M.; Morais, P. C.; Da Silva, M. F.; Buske, N.; Curi, R.; Lacava, Z. G. M.

    2002-11-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles pre-coated with dodecanoic acid and ethoxylated alcohol (DE) were used to obtain a physiologically stable magnetic fluid (DE-MF) sample. Three different doses of DE-MF were intraperitoneally applied to mice. Blood and peritoneum cytometry and micronucleus test were performed for 1-21 days after injection to investigate the DE-MF toxicity. Changes in cell population, peritoneum inflammation, and potential DE-MF genotoxic action were all time and dose dependent. At the lowest dose (5×10 15 particles/kg), DE-MF seems to be useful as a drug precursor with both diagnostic and therapeutic values.

  2. Minimal residual disease monitoring by 8-color flow cytometry in mantle cell lymphoma: an EU-MCL and LYSA study.

    PubMed

    Cheminant, Morgane; Derrieux, Coralie; Touzart, Aurore; Schmit, Stéphanie; Grenier, Adrien; Trinquand, Amélie; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Thieblemont, Catherine; Ribrag, Vincent; Cheze, Stéphane; Sanhes, Laurence; Jardin, Fabrice; Lefrère, François; Delarue, Richard; Hoster, Eva; Dreyling, Martin; Asnafi, Vahid; Hermine, Olivier; Macintyre, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of minimal residual disease may guide therapeutic strategies in mantle cell lymphoma. While multiparameter flow cytometry is used for diagnosis, the gold standard method for minimal residual disease analysis is real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR). In this European Mantle Cell Lymphoma network (EU-MCL) pilot study, we compared flow cytometry with RQ-PCR for minimal residual disease detection. Of 113 patients with at least one minimal residual disease sample, RQ-PCR was applicable in 97 (86%). A total of 284 minimal residual disease samples from 61 patients were analyzed in parallel by flow cytometry and RQ-PCR. A single, 8-color, 10-antibody flow cytometry tube allowed specific minimal residual disease assessment in all patients, with a robust sensitivity of 0.01%. Using this cut-off level, the true-positive-rate of flow cytometry with respect to RQ-PCR was 80%, whereas the true-negative-rate was 92%. As expected, RQ-PCR frequently detected positivity below this 0.01% threshold, which is insufficiently sensitive for prognostic evaluation and would ideally be replaced with robust quantification down to a 0.001% (10-5) threshold. In 10 relapsing patients, the transition from negative to positive by RQ-PCR (median 22.5 months before relapse) nearly always preceded transition by flow cytometry (4.5 months), but transition to RQ-PCR positivity above 0.01% (5 months) was simultaneous. Pre-emptive rituximab treatment of 2 patients at minimal residual disease relapse allowed re-establishment of molecular and phenotypic complete remission. Flow cytometry minimal residual disease is a complementary approach to RQ-PCR and a promising tool in individual mantle cell lymphoma therapeutic management. (clinicaltrials identifiers: 00209209 and 00209222). PMID:26703963

  3. Minimal residual disease monitoring by 8-color flow cytometry in mantle cell lymphoma: an EU-MCL and LYSA study

    PubMed Central

    Cheminant, Morgane; Derrieux, Coralie; Touzart, Aurore; Schmit, Stéphanie; Grenier, Adrien; Trinquand, Amélie; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Thieblemont, Catherine; Ribrag, Vincent; Cheze, Stéphane; Sanhes, Laurence; Jardin, Fabrice; Lefrère, François; Delarue, Richard; Hoster, Eva; Dreyling, Martin; Asnafi, Vahid; Hermine, Olivier; Macintyre, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of minimal residual disease may guide therapeutic strategies in mantle cell lymphoma. While multiparameter flow cytometry is used for diagnosis, the gold standard method for minimal residual disease analysis is real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR). In this European Mantle Cell Lymphoma network (EU-MCL) pilot study, we compared flow cytometry with RQ-PCR for minimal residual disease detection. Of 113 patients with at least one minimal residual disease sample, RQ-PCR was applicable in 97 (86%). A total of 284 minimal residual disease samples from 61 patients were analyzed in parallel by flow cytometry and RQ-PCR. A single, 8-color, 10-antibody flow cytometry tube allowed specific minimal residual disease assessment in all patients, with a robust sensitivity of 0.01%. Using this cut-off level, the true-positive-rate of flow cytometry with respect to RQ-PCR was 80%, whereas the true-negative-rate was 92%. As expected, RQ-PCR frequently detected positivity below this 0.01% threshold, which is insufficiently sensitive for prognostic evaluation and would ideally be replaced with robust quantification down to a 0.001% (10-5) threshold. In 10 relapsing patients, the transition from negative to positive by RQ-PCR (median 22.5 months before relapse) nearly always preceded transition by flow cytometry (4.5 months), but transition to RQ-PCR positivity above 0.01% (5 months) was simultaneous. Pre-emptive rituximab treatment of 2 patients at minimal residual disease relapse allowed re-establishment of molecular and phenotypic complete remission. Flow cytometry minimal residual disease is a complementary approach to RQ-PCR and a promising tool in individual mantle cell lymphoma therapeutic management. PMID:26703963

  4. Single cell mass cytometry reveals remodeling of human T cell phenotypes by varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Sen, Nandini; Mukherjee, Gourab; Arvin, Ann M

    2015-11-15

    The recent application of mass cytometry (CyTOF) to biology provides a 'systems' approach to monitor concurrent changes in multiple host cell factors at the single cell level. We used CyTOF to evaluate T cells infected with varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, documenting virus-mediated phenotypic and functional changes caused by this T cell tropic human herpesvirus. Here we summarize our findings using two complementary panels of antibodies against surface and intracellular signaling proteins to elucidate the consequences of VZV-mediated perturbations on the surface and in signaling networks of infected T cells. CyTOF data was analyzed by several statistical, analytical and visualization tools including hierarchical clustering, orthogonal scaling, SPADE, viSNE, and SLIDE. Data from the mass cytometry studies demonstrated that VZV infection led to 'remodeling' of the surface architecture of T cells, promoting skin trafficking phenotypes and associated with concomitant activation of T-cell receptor and PI3-kinase pathways. This method offers a novel approach for understanding viral interactions with differentiated host cells important for pathogenesis. PMID:26213183

  5. Multiplexed mass cytometry profiling of cellular states perturbed by small-molecule regulators

    PubMed Central

    Bodenmiller, Bernd; Zunder, Eli R.; Finck, Rachel; Chen, Tiffany J.; Savig, Erica S.; Bruggner, Robert V.; Simonds, Erin F.; Bendall, Sean C.; Sachs, Karen; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to comprehensively explore the impact of bio-active molecules on human samples at the single-cell level can provide great insight for biomedical research. Mass cytometry enables quantitative single-cell analysis with deep dimensionality, but currently lacks high-throughput capability. Here we report a method termed mass-tag cellular barcoding (MCB) that increases mass cytometry throughput by sample multiplexing. 96-well format MCB was used to characterize human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) signaling dynamics, cell-to-cell communication, the signaling variability between 8 donors, and to define the impact of 27 inhibitors on this system. For each compound, 14 phosphorylation sites were measured in 14 PBMC types, resulting in 18,816 quantified phosphorylation levels from each multiplexed sample. This high-dimensional systems-level inquiry allowed analysis across cell-type and signaling space, reclassified inhibitors, and revealed off-target effects. MCB enables high-content, high-throughput screening, with potential applications for drug discovery, pre-clinical testing, and mechanistic investigation of human disease. PMID:22902532

  6. Discriminative variable subsets in Bayesian classification with mixture models, with application in flow cytometry studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Chan, Cliburn; West, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the evaluation of subsets of variables for the discriminative evidence they provide in multivariate mixture modeling for classification. The novel development of Bayesian classification analysis presented is partly motivated by problems of design and selection of variables in biomolecular studies, particularly involving widely used assays of large-scale single-cell data generated using flow cytometry technology. For such studies and for mixture modeling generally, we define discriminative analysis that overlays fitted mixture models using a natural measure of concordance between mixture component densities, and define an effective and computationally feasible method for assessing and prioritizing subsets of variables according to their roles in discrimination of one or more mixture components. We relate the new discriminative information measures to Bayesian classification probabilities and error rates, and exemplify their use in Bayesian analysis of Dirichlet process mixture models fitted via Markov chain Monte Carlo methods as well as using a novel Bayesian expectation-maximization algorithm. We present a series of theoretical and simulated data examples to fix concepts and exhibit the utility of the approach, and compare with prior approaches. We demonstrate application in the context of automatic classification and discriminative variable selection in high-throughput systems biology using large flow cytometry datasets. PMID:26040910

  7. Synergy of photoacoustic and fluorescence flow cytometry of circulating cells with negative and positive contrasts.

    PubMed

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Sawant, Rupa; Torchilin, Vladimir P; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H; Biris, Alexandru S; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2013-05-01

    In vivo photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence flow cytometry were previously applied separately using pulsed and continuous wave lasers respectively, and positive contrast detection mode only. This paper introduces a real-time integration of both techniques with positive and negative contrast modes using only pulsed lasers. Various applications of this new tool are summarized, including detection of liposomes loaded with Alexa-660 dye, red blood cells labeled with Indocyanine Green, B16F10 melanoma cells co-expressing melanin and green fluorescent protein (GFP), C8161-GFP melanoma cells targeted by magnetic nanoparticles, MTLn3 adenocarcinoma cells expressing novel near-infrared iRFP protein, and quantum dot-carbon nanotube conjugates. Negative contrast flow cytometry provided label-free detection of low absorbing or weakly fluorescent cells in blood absorption and autofluorescence background, respectively. The use of pulsed laser for time-resolved discrimination of objects with long fluorescence lifetime (e.g., quantum dots) from shorter autofluorescence background (e.g., blood plasma) is also highlighted in this paper. The supplementary nature of PA and fluorescence detection increased the versatility of the integrated method for simultaneous detection of probes and cells having various absorbing and fluorescent properties, and provided verification of PA data using a more established fluorescence based technique. PMID:22903924

  8. A comparison of avalanche photodiode and photomultiplier tube detectors for flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, William G.; Varadi, Gyula; Entine, Gerald; Podniesinski, Edward; Wallace, Paul K.

    2008-02-01

    Commercial flow cytometers use photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for fluorescence detection. These detectors have high linear gain and broad dynamic range, but have limited sensitivity in the red and near infrared spectral regions. We present a comparison of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and PMTs as detectors in flow cytometry instruments, and demonstrate improved sensitivity and resolution in the red and near infrared spectral regions using the APD. The relative performance of the PMT and APD were evaluated by simultaneously measuring the mean fluorescence intensity and coefficient of variation for emission from light emitting diode pulses, flow cytometry test beads, and fluorescently labeled cells. The relative signal to noise performance of the APD and PMT was evaluated over the 500 nm to 1050 nm wavelength range using pulsed light emitting diode light sources. While APDs have higher quantum efficiency but lower internal gain than PMTs, with appropriate external amplification the APD has signal to noise response that is comparable to PMTs in the 500 nm to 650 nm range and improved response in the 650 nm to 850 nm range The data demonstrates that the APD had performance comparable to the PMT in the spectral region between 500 to 650 nm and improved performance in the range of 650 to 1000 nm, where the PMT performance is quite poor. CD4 positive lymphocyte populations were easily identified in normal human blood both by APD and PMT using phycoerythrin labeled antibodies. In contrast, only the APD detector could resolve CD4 positive populations using 800 nm Quantum dot labeled antibodies.

  9. Using dual-laser flow cytometry for monitoring phytoplankton composition and integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Harald; Beisker, Wolfgang; Steinberg, Christian

    1995-10-01

    Dual laser flow cytometry can be used for determining phytoplankton populations in lakes and lowland rivers and streams. Apart from answering basic limnological questions such as the time course of algal blooms or the annual succession of phytoplankton composition further investigations can be made for estimating the integrity of a phytoplankton community using biomass distribution spectra. Thus anthropogenic influence such as eutrophication, acidification or effects of xenobiotica can be monitored. Dual laser flow cytometry with excitation wavelengths of 458 and 528 nm was used to measure photosynthesis pigment fluorescence (chlorophyll a (CHLa), Em greater than 665 nm) and phycoerythrin (PE, Em 575 nm) and cell density of phytoplankton organisms in water samples. CHLa is excited directly by 458 nm and by energy transfer from carotenoids (Ex 528 nm). The ratio of the two fluorescence parameters (CFR) allows users to identify pigment groups in the phytoplankton population (chlorophytes and euglenophytes from chrysophytes, diatoms and dinophytes). PE- containing cyanophytes and cryptophytes can be detected by their PE fluorescence (Ex 528 nm). As a result of preliminary studies for preparing biomass spectra of phytoplankton communities measurements of protein content by staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC, Ex 488 nm, Em 530 nm) are also shown.

  10. Evaluating the morphology of erythrocyte population: An approach based on atomic force microscopy and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sayari; Chakraborty, Ishita; Chakraborty, Monojit; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Mishra, Raghwendra; Sarkar, Debasish

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocyte morphology is gaining importance as a powerful pathological index in identifying the severity of any blood related disease. However, the existing technique of quantitative microscopy is highly time consuming and prone to personalized bias. On the other hand, relatively unexplored, complementary technique based on flow cytometry has not been standardized till date, particularly due to the lack of a proper morphological scoring scale. In this article, we have presented a new approach to formulate a non-empirical scoring scale based on membrane roughness (R(rms)) data obtained from atomic force microscopy. Subsequently, the respective morphological quantifier of the whole erythrocyte population, commonly known as morphological index, was expressed as a function of highest correlated statistical parameters of scattered signal profiles generated by flow cytometry. Feed forward artificial neural network model with multilayer perceptron architecture was used to develop the intended functional form. High correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.95), even for model-formulation exclusive samples, clearly indicates the universal validity of the proposed model. Moreover, a direct pathological application of the proposed model has been illustrated in relation to patients, diagnosed to be suffering from a wide variety of cancer. PMID:26824317

  11. Innovative Flow Cytometry Allows Accurate Identification of Rare Circulating Cells Involved in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boraldi, Federica; Bartolomeo, Angelica; De Biasi, Sara; Orlando, Stefania; Costa, Sonia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Quaglino, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although rare, circulating endothelial and progenitor cells could be considered as markers of endothelial damage and repair potential, possibly predicting the severity of cardiovascular manifestations. A number of studies highlighted the role of these cells in age-related diseases, including those characterized by ectopic calcification. Nevertheless, their use in clinical practice is still controversial, mainly due to difficulties in finding reproducible and accurate methods for their determination. Methods Circulating mature cells (CMC, CD45-, CD34+, CD133-) and circulating progenitor cells (CPC, CD45dim, CD34bright, CD133+) were investigated by polychromatic high-speed flow cytometry to detect the expression of endothelial (CD309+) or osteogenic (BAP+) differentiation markers in healthy subjects and in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations associated with ectopic calcification. Results This study shows that: 1) polychromatic flow cytometry represents a valuable tool to accurately identify rare cells; 2) the balance of CD309+ on CMC/CD309+ on CPC is altered in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations, suggesting the occurrence of vascular damage and low repair potential; 3) the increase of circulating cells exhibiting a shift towards an osteoblast-like phenotype (BAP+) is observed in the presence of ectopic calcification. Conclusion Differences between healthy subjects and patients with ectopic calcification indicate that this approach may be useful to better evaluate endothelial dysfunction in a clinical context. PMID:27560136

  12. A Simple and Efficient Method to Detect Nuclear Factor Activation in Human Neutrophils by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Erick; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in peripheral blood. These cells are the first to appear at sites of inflammation and infection, thus becoming the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils possess important antimicrobial functions such as phagocytosis, release of lytic enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species. In addition to these important defense functions, neutrophils perform other tasks in response to infection such as production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibition of apoptosis. Cytokines recruit other leukocytes that help clear the infection, and inhibition of apoptosis allows the neutrophil to live longer at the site of infection. These functions are regulated at the level of transcription. However, because neutrophils are short-lived cells, the study of transcriptionally regulated responses in these cells cannot be performed with conventional reporter gene methods since there are no efficient techniques for neutrophil transfection. Here, we present a simple and efficient method that allows detection and quantification of nuclear factors in isolated and immunolabeled nuclei by flow cytometry. We describe techniques to isolate pure neutrophils from human peripheral blood, stimulate these cells with anti-receptor antibodies, isolate and immunolabel nuclei, and analyze nuclei by flow cytometry. The method has been successfully used to detect NF-κB and Elk-1 nuclear factors in nuclei from neutrophils and other cell types. Thus, this method represents an option for analyzing activation of transcription factors in isolated nuclei from a variety of cell types. PMID:23603868

  13. Peripheral blood biomarkers of solid tumor angiogenesis in dogs: a polychromatic flow cytometry pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bentley, R Timothy; Mund, Julie A; Pollok, Karen E; Childress, Michael O; Case, Jamie

    2013-05-01

    A subset of peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells of bone marrow origin is elevated in humans with solid cancers before treatment and declines with therapy. This biomarker of angiogenesis is not specific to tumor type and has great potential in the objective assessment of treatment response in clinical trials. This pilot study was designed to develop a biomarker of neoangiogenesis in dogs for the diagnosis of cancer, the measurement of treatment response, and the provision of objective data in clinical trials. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to quantify two subsets of circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in dogs with spontaneous solid tumors before (n = 8) and after (n = 3) treatment, and normal controls (n = 6). Pro-angiogenic peripheral blood cells of bone marrow origin were detected in all eight cases and the six normal controls; however, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Interestingly, an apparent decline in pro-angiogenic cells was observed after treatment. Bone marrow derived hematopoietic cells appear to contribute to tumor angiogenesis in dogs, as has been previously reported in humans. While the methodology for pro-angiogenic cell quantification in a small number of dogs in the current study did not result in a significant difference from normal controls, an optimized canine polychromatic flow cytometry protocol holds great promise in the development of a canine cancer model and for the objective measurements of treatment response in clinical trials. PMID:23063489

  14. Flow Cytometry Analysis Reveals That Only a Subpopulation of Mouse Sperm Undergoes Hyperpolarization During Capacitation1

    PubMed Central

    Escoffier, Jessica; Navarrete, Felipe; Haddad, Doug; Santi, Celia M.; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2015-01-01

    To gain fertilizing capacity, mammalian sperm should reside in the female tract for a period of time. The physiological changes that render the sperm able to fertilize are known as capacitation. Capacitation is associated with an increase in intracellular pH, an increase in intracellular calcium, and phosphorylation of different proteins. This process is also accompanied by the hyperpolarization of the sperm plasma membrane potential (Em). In the present work, we used flow cytometry to analyze changes in sperm Em during capacitation in individual cells. Our results indicate that a subpopulation of hyperpolarized mouse sperm can be clearly distinguished by sperm flow cytometry analysis. Using sperm bearing green fluorescent protein in their acrosomes, we found that this hyperpolarized subpopulation is composed of sperm with intact acrosomes. In addition, we show that the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization is blocked by high extracellular K+, by PKA inhibitors, and by SLO3 inhibitors in CD1 mouse sperm, and undetectable in Slo3 knockout mouse sperm. On the other hand, in sperm incubated in conditions that do not support capacitation, sperm membrane hyperpolarization can be induced by amiloride, high extracellular NaHCO3, and cAMP agonists. Altogether, our observations are consistent with a model in which sperm Em hyperpolarization is downstream of a cAMP-dependent pathway and is mediated by the activation of SLO3 K+ channels. PMID:25855261

  15. Bead-Based Assays for Biodetection: From Flow-Cytometry to Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby J.

    2009-05-04

    ABSTRACT The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for detection of biological species will be described: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. The methods and automated fluidic systems used for trapping functionalized microbeads will be described. This approach allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive assays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in assay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical assays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based assays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (> 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100’s of picomolar range (10’s of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach. Video taping magnetic nanoparticle capture and release was used to improve understanding of the process and revealed interesting behavior.

  16. Analysis of High-Throughput Flow Cytometry Data Using plateCore

    PubMed Central

    Strain, Errol; Hahne, Florian; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Haaland, Perry

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) software packages from R/Bioconductor, such as flowCore and flowViz, serve as an open platform for development of new analysis tools and methods. We created plateCore, a new package that extends the functionality in these core packages to enable automated negative control-based gating and make the processing and analysis of plate-based data sets from high-throughput FCM screening experiments easier. plateCore was used to analyze data from a BD FACS CAP screening experiment where five Peripheral Blood Mononucleocyte Cell (PBMC) samples were assayed for 189 different human cell surface markers. This same data set was also manually analyzed by a cytometry expert using the FlowJo data analysis software package (TreeStar, USA). We show that the expression values for markers characterized using the automated approach in plateCore are in good agreement with those from FlowJo, and that using plateCore allows for more reproducible analyses of FCM screening data. PMID:19956418

  17. flowCore: a Bioconductor package for high throughput flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Florian; LeMeur, Nolwenn; Brinkman, Ryan R; Ellis, Byron; Haaland, Perry; Sarkar, Deepayan; Spidlen, Josef; Strain, Errol; Gentleman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent advances in automation technologies have enabled the use of flow cytometry for high throughput screening, generating large complex data sets often in clinical trials or drug discovery settings. However, data management and data analysis methods have not advanced sufficiently far from the initial small-scale studies to support modeling in the presence of multiple covariates. Results We developed a set of flexible open source computational tools in the R package flowCore to facilitate the analysis of these complex data. A key component of which is having suitable data structures that support the application of similar operations to a collection of samples or a clinical cohort. In addition, our software constitutes a shared and extensible research platform that enables collaboration between bioinformaticians, computer scientists, statisticians, biologists and clinicians. This platform will foster the development of novel analytic methods for flow cytometry. Conclusion The software has been applied in the analysis of various data sets and its data structures have proven to be highly efficient in capturing and organizing the analytic work flow. Finally, a number of additional Bioconductor packages successfully build on the infrastructure provided by flowCore, open new avenues for flow data analysis. PMID:19358741

  18. Alternative flow cytometry strategies to analyze stem cells and cell death in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Tanuja Harshani; García‐Ojeda, Marcos E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Planarians possess remarkable stem cell populations that continuously support cellular turnover and are instrumental in the regeneration of tissues upon injury. Cellular turnover and tissue regeneration in planarians rely on the proper integration of local and systemic signals that regulate cell proliferation and cell death. Thus, understanding the signals controlling cellular proliferation and cell death in planarians could provide valuable insights for maintenance of adult body homeostasis and the biology of regeneration. Flow cytometry techniques have been utilized widely to identify, isolate, and characterize planarian stem cell populations. We developed alternative flow cytometry strategies that reduce the number of reagents and the time of sample preparation to analyze stem cells and cell death in planarians. The sensitivity of these methods is validated with functional studies using RNA interference and treatment with  γ irradiation or stressful conditions that are known to trigger cell death. Altogether, we provide a community resource intended to minimize adverse effects during ex vivo studies of stem cells and cell death in planarians. PMID:27307993

  19. Improved flow cytometry based cytotoxicity and binding assay for clinical antibody HLA crossmatching.

    PubMed

    Alheim, Mats; Paul, Prashanta Kumer; Hauzenberger, Dan-Mikael; Wikström, Ann-Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    The presence of preformed donor-specific HLA antibodies leads to early antibody mediated kidney allograft rejection. Therefore, detection and avoidance of donor reactive HLA antibodies prior to transplantation is of outmost importance in order to minimize the risk of rejection. Detection of pre-formed HLA antibodies is currently performed using complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay alone or together with a flow cytometry based crossmatch (FCXM). This study was initiated to further evaluate our recently developed flow cytometry based procedure for determination of both cytotoxicity of and IgG binding to donor-derived lymphocytes by HLA antibodies. Highly enriched immuno-magnetic bead purified T and B lymphocytes were used as target cells for patient sera using 96-well plates. Importantly, the assay shows high sensitivity and specificity as determined by HLA typed donor cells and serum with defined HLA antibody IgG and C1q. Based on this and additional data generated in this paper, such as evaluation of appropriate serum and complements incubation times and assay reproducibility and stability, will enable us to more rapidly implement this assay in our clinical laboratory routines. In addition, we demonstrate that FCtox crossmatching of deceased donor cells has superior specificity compared to conventional CDC assay especially regarding high frequencies of false-positive reactions. PMID:26429307

  20. Flow cytometry protocols for surface and intracellular antigen analyses of neural cell types.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vishal; Thomas, Ria; Ghale, Arun R; Reinhard, Christina; Pruszak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometry has been extensively used to define cell populations in immunology, hematology and oncology. Here, we provide a detailed description of protocols for flow cytometric analysis of the cluster of differentiation (CD) surface antigens and intracellular antigens in neural cell types. Our step-by-step description of the methodological procedures include: the harvesting of neural in vitro cultures, an optional carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-labeling step, followed by surface antigen staining with conjugated CD antibodies (e.g., CD24, CD54), and subsequent intracellar antigen detection via primary/secondary antibodies or fluorescently labeled Fab fragments (Zenon labeling). The video demonstrates the most critical steps. Moreover, principles of experimental planning, the inclusion of critical controls, and fundamentals of flow cytometric analysis (identification of target population and exclusion of debris; gating strategy; compensation for spectral overlap) are briefly explained in order to enable neurobiologists with limited prior knowledge or specific training in flow cytometry to assess its utility and to better exploit this powerful methodology. PMID:25549236

  1. Recent Advances on Multi-Parameter Flow Cytometry to Characterize Antimicrobial Treatments.

    PubMed

    Léonard, Lucie; Bouarab Chibane, Lynda; Ouled Bouhedda, Balkis; Degraeve, Pascal; Oulahal, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The investigation on antimicrobial mechanisms is a challenging and crucial issue in the fields of food or clinical microbiology, as it constitutes a prerequisite to the development of new antimicrobial processes or compounds, as well as to anticipate phenomenon of microbial resistance. Nowadays it is accepted that a cells population exposed to a stress can cause the appearance of different cell populations and in particular sub-lethally compromised cells which could be defined as viable but non-culturable (VBNC). Recent advances on flow cytometry (FCM) and especially on multi-parameter flow cytometry (MP-FCM) provide the opportunity to obtain high-speed information at real time on damage at single-cell level. This review gathers MP-FCM methodologies based on individual and simultaneous staining of microbial cells employed to investigate their physiological state following different physical and chemical antimicrobial treatments. Special attention will be paid to recent studies exploiting the possibility to corroborate MP-FCM results with additional techniques (plate counting, microscopy, spectroscopy, molecular biology techniques, membrane modeling) in order to elucidate the antimicrobial mechanism of action of a given antimicrobial treatment or compound. The combination of MP-FCM methodologies with these additional methods is namely a promising and increasingly used approach to give further insight in differences in microbial sub-population evolutions in response to antimicrobial treatments. PMID:27551279

  2. Alternative flow cytometry strategies to analyze stem cells and cell death in planarians.

    PubMed

    Peiris, Tanuja Harshani; García-Ojeda, Marcos E; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2016-04-01

    Planarians possess remarkable stem cell populations that continuously support cellular turnover and are instrumental in the regeneration of tissues upon injury. Cellular turnover and tissue regeneration in planarians rely on the proper integration of local and systemic signals that regulate cell proliferation and cell death. Thus, understanding the signals controlling cellular proliferation and cell death in planarians could provide valuable insights for maintenance of adult body homeostasis and the biology of regeneration. Flow cytometry techniques have been utilized widely to identify, isolate, and characterize planarian stem cell populations. We developed alternative flow cytometry strategies that reduce the number of reagents and the time of sample preparation to analyze stem cells and cell death in planarians. The sensitivity of these methods is validated with functional studies using RNA interference and treatment with  γ irradiation or stressful conditions that are known to trigger cell death. Altogether, we provide a community resource intended to minimize adverse effects during ex vivo studies of stem cells and cell death in planarians. PMID:27307993

  3. The potential of flow cytometry in the study of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Cronin, U P; Wilkinson, M G

    2010-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a rapid method allowing the acquisition of multiparametric data from thousands of individual cells within a sample. As well as measuring the intrinsic light scattering properties of cells, a plethora of fluorescent dyes may be employed to yield information on macromolecule content, surface antigens present or physiological status. Despite FCM's indispensability within other fields e.g. immunology, it is underutilized within microbiological research. In this review, a strong case is presented for the potential of FCM in the study of Gram-positive spore-former, Bacillus cereus. Previous reports where FCM was successfully used in the study of B. cereus are reviewed along with relevant studies involving other members of the genus. Under headings reflecting common research themes associated with B. cereus, specific instances where FCM has generated novel data, providing a unique insight into the organism, are discussed. Further applications are posited, based on the authors' own research with FCM and B. cereus and work extant in the broader field of microbial cytometry. The authors conclude that, while the expense of equipment and reagents is an undeniable disadvantage, FCM is a technique capable of generating significantly novel data and allows the design and execution of experiments that are not possible with any other technique. PMID:19486207

  4. Noninvasive and label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Circulating melanoma cell has high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC). PAFC is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. In our research, we developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting PA signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals were detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtained the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation. Our PAFC system is an efficient tool to monitor melanoma metastases, cancer recurrence and therapeutic efficacy.

  5. In vitro flow cytometry-based screening platform for cellulase engineering

    PubMed Central

    Körfer, Georgette; Pitzler, Christian; Vojcic, Ljubica; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh throughput screening (uHTS) plays an essential role in directed evolution for tailoring biocatalysts for industrial applications. Flow cytometry-based uHTS provides an efficient coverage of the generated protein sequence space by analysis of up to 107 events per hour. Cell-free enzyme production overcomes the challenge of diversity loss during the transformation of mutant libraries into expression hosts, enables directed evolution of toxic enzymes, and holds the promise to efficiently design enzymes of human or animal origin. The developed uHTS cell-free compartmentalization platform (InVitroFlow) is the first report in which a flow cytometry-based screened system has been combined with compartmentalized cell-free expression for directed cellulase enzyme evolution. InVitroFlow was validated by screening of a random cellulase mutant library employing a novel screening system (based on the substrate fluorescein-di-β-D-cellobioside), and yielded significantly improved cellulase variants (e.g. CelA2-H288F-M1 (N273D/H288F/N468S) with 13.3-fold increased specific activity (220.60 U/mg) compared to CelA2 wildtype: 16.57 U/mg). PMID:27184298

  6. Recent Advances on Multi-Parameter Flow Cytometry to Characterize Antimicrobial Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Léonard, Lucie; Bouarab Chibane, Lynda; Ouled Bouhedda, Balkis; Degraeve, Pascal; Oulahal, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The investigation on antimicrobial mechanisms is a challenging and crucial issue in the fields of food or clinical microbiology, as it constitutes a prerequisite to the development of new antimicrobial processes or compounds, as well as to anticipate phenomenon of microbial resistance. Nowadays it is accepted that a cells population exposed to a stress can cause the appearance of different cell populations and in particular sub-lethally compromised cells which could be defined as viable but non-culturable (VBNC). Recent advances on flow cytometry (FCM) and especially on multi-parameter flow cytometry (MP-FCM) provide the opportunity to obtain high-speed information at real time on damage at single-cell level. This review gathers MP-FCM methodologies based on individual and simultaneous staining of microbial cells employed to investigate their physiological state following different physical and chemical antimicrobial treatments. Special attention will be paid to recent studies exploiting the possibility to corroborate MP-FCM results with additional techniques (plate counting, microscopy, spectroscopy, molecular biology techniques, membrane modeling) in order to elucidate the antimicrobial mechanism of action of a given antimicrobial treatment or compound. The combination of MP-FCM methodologies with these additional methods is namely a promising and increasingly used approach to give further insight in differences in microbial sub-population evolutions in response to antimicrobial treatments. PMID:27551279

  7. A high-throughput method for detection of DNA in chloroplasts using flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Beth A; Oldenburg, Delene J; Bendich, Arnold J

    2007-01-01

    Background The amount of DNA in the chloroplasts of some plant species has been shown recently to decline dramatically during leaf development. A high-throughput method of DNA detection in chloroplasts is now needed in order to facilitate the further investigation of this process using large numbers of tissue samples. Results The DNA-binding fluorophores 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), SYBR Green I (SG), SYTO 42, and SYTO 45 were assessed for their utility in flow cytometric analysis of DNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Fluorescence microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) were used to validate flow cytometry data. We found neither DAPI nor SYTO 45 suitable for flow cytometric analysis of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) content, but did find changes in cpDNA content during development by flow cytometry using SG and SYTO 42. The latter dye provided more sensitive detection, and the results were similar to those from the fluorescence microscopic analysis. Differences in SYTO 42 fluorescence were found to correlate with differences in cpDNA content as determined by qPCR using three primer sets widely spaced across the chloroplast genome, suggesting that the whole genome undergoes copy number reduction during development, rather than selective reduction/degradation of subgenomic regions. Conclusion Flow cytometric analysis of chloroplasts stained with SYTO 42 is a high-throughput method suitable for determining changes in cpDNA content during development and for sorting chloroplasts on the basis of DNA content. PMID:17381841

  8. Bead-based assays for biodetection: from flow-cytometry to microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozanich, Richard M., Jr.; Antolick, Kathryn; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2009-05-01

    The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for antibody-based detection of biological species are described in this paper: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. These approaches both involve the use of automated fluidic systems for trapping antibody-functionalized microbeads, which allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive immunoassays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in immunoassay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical immunoassays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based immunoassays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (>= 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100's of picomolar range (10's of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach.

  9. Deformation of double emulsions under conditions of flow cytometry hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaohua; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Balabani, Stavroula

    2015-11-21

    Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) microfluidics double emulsions offer a new route to compartmentalise reagents into isolated aqueous microenvironments while maintaining an aqueous carrier fluid phase; this enables compatibility with commercial flow cytometry systems such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Double emulsion (inner core) deformation under hydrodynamic focusing conditions that mimic the environment double emulsions experience in flow cytometry applications is of particular importance for droplet stability and cell viability. This paper reports on an experimental study of the dynamic deformation of aqueous cores of w/o/w double emulsions under hydrodynamic focusing, with the sheath flow directed at 45° to the sample flow. A number of factors affecting the inner core deformation and recovery were examined. Deformation was found to depend significantly on the core or shell viscosity, the droplet-to-sheath flow velocity ratio, and core and shell sizes. Core deformation was found to depend more on the type of surfactant rather concentration with high molecular weight surfactant exhibiting a negligible effect on deformation whereas low molecular weight surfactant enhancing deformation at low concentrations due to their lateral mobility at the interface. PMID:26394745

  10. Using dual laser flow cytometry for monitoring phytoplankton composition and integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, H.; Beisker, W.; Steinberg, C.

    1995-12-31

    Dual laser flow cytometry can be used for determining phytoplankton populations in lakes and lowland rivers and streams. Apart from answering basic limnological questions such as the time course of algal blooms or the annual succession of phytoplankton composition further investigations can be made for estimating the integrity of phytoplankton community using biomass distribution spectra. Thus anthropogenic influence such as eutrophication, acidification or effects of xenobiotica can be monitored. Dual laser flow cytometry with excitation wavelengths of 458 and 528 nm was used to measure photosynthesis pigment fluorescence (chlorophyll a (CHLa), Em>665 nm) and phycoerythrin (PE, Em 575 nm) and cell density of phytoplankton organisms in water samples. CHLa is excited directly by 458 nm and by energy transfer from carotenoids (Ex 528 nm). The ratio of the two fluorescence parameters (CFR) allows to identify pigment groups in the phytoplankton population (chlorophytes and euglenophytes from chrysophytes, diatoms and dinophytes). PE-containing cyanophytes and cryptophytes can be detected by their PE fluorescence (Ex 528 nm). As a result of preliminary studies for preparing biomass spectra of phytoplankton communities measurements of protein content by staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC, ex 488 nm, Em 530 nm) are also shown.

  11. In vitro flow cytometry-based screening platform for cellulase engineering.

    PubMed

    Körfer, Georgette; Pitzler, Christian; Vojcic, Ljubica; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh throughput screening (uHTS) plays an essential role in directed evolution for tailoring biocatalysts for industrial applications. Flow cytometry-based uHTS provides an efficient coverage of the generated protein sequence space by analysis of up to 10(7) events per hour. Cell-free enzyme production overcomes the challenge of diversity loss during the transformation of mutant libraries into expression hosts, enables directed evolution of toxic enzymes, and holds the promise to efficiently design enzymes of human or animal origin. The developed uHTS cell-free compartmentalization platform (InVitroFlow) is the first report in which a flow cytometry-based screened system has been combined with compartmentalized cell-free expression for directed cellulase enzyme evolution. InVitroFlow was validated by screening of a random cellulase mutant library employing a novel screening system (based on the substrate fluorescein-di-β-D-cellobioside), and yielded significantly improved cellulase variants (e.g. CelA2-H288F-M1 (N273D/H288F/N468S) with 13.3-fold increased specific activity (220.60 U/mg) compared to CelA2 wildtype: 16.57 U/mg). PMID:27184298

  12. Plastid 16S rRNA Gene Diversity among Eukaryotic Picophytoplankton Sorted by Flow Cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J.; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image. PMID:21552558

  13. Novel Fluorescent Antagonist as a Molecular Probe in A3 Adenosine Receptor Binding Assays Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Federico, Stephanie; Phan, Khai; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the A3 adenosine receptor (AR) was explored in cardiac ischaemia, inflammatory diseases and cancer. We report a new fluorophore-conjugated human (h) A3AR antagonist for application to cell-based assays in ligand discovery and for receptor imaging. Fluorescent pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-ylamine (pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine, PTP) and triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl)amine (triazolo-quinazoline, TQ) AR antagonists were compared. A chain-extended and click-conjugated Alexa Fluor-488 TQ derivative (MRS5449) displayed a radioligand binding Ki value of 6.4 ± 2.5 nM in hA3AR-expressing CHO cell membranes. MRS5449 antagonized hA3AR agonist-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (KB 4.8 nM). Using flow cytometry (FCM), MRS5449 saturated hA3ARs with very high specific-to-nonspecific binding ratio with an equilibrium binding constant 5.15 nM, comparable to the Kd value of 6.65 nM calculated from kinetic experiments. Ki values of known AR antagonists in inhibition of MRS5449 binding in whole cell FCM were consistent with radioligand binding in membranes, but agonist binding was 5–20 fold weaker than obtained with agonist radioligand [125I]I-AB-MECA. Further binding analysis of MRS5549 suggested multiple agonist binding states of the A3AR. Molecular docking predicted binding modes of these fluorescent antagonists. Thus, MRS5449 is a useful tool for hA3AR characterization. PMID:22402302

  14. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Diagnostic Cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Albert J.; Adeyiga, Oladunni B.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-01-01

    The cellular components of body fluids are routinely analyzed to identify disease and treatment approaches. While significant focus has been placed on developing cell analysis technologies, tools to automate the preparation of cellular specimens have been more limited, especially for body fluids beyond blood. Preparation steps include separating, concentrating, and exposing cells to reagents. Sample preparation continues to be routinely performed off-chip by technicians, preventing cell-based point-of-care diagnostics, increasing the cost of tests, and reducing the consistency of the final analysis following multiple manually-performed steps. Here, we review the assortment of biofluids for which suspended cells are analyzed, along with their characteristics and diagnostic value. We present an overview of the conventional sample preparation processes for cytological diagnosis. We finally discuss the challenges and opportunities in developing microfluidic devices for the purpose of automating or miniaturizing these processes, with particular emphases on preparing large or small volume samples, working with samples of high cellularity, automating multi-step processes, and obtaining high purity subpopulations of cells. We hope to convey the importance of and help identify new research directions addressing the vast biological and clinical applications in preparing and analyzing the array of available biological fluids. Successfully addressing the challenges described in this review can lead to inexpensive systems to improve diagnostic accuracy while simultaneously reducing overall systemic healthcare costs. PMID:23380972

  15. Measurement of Lipid Accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via Flow Cytometry and Liquid-State ¹H NMR Spectroscopy for Development of an NMR-Traceable Flow Cytometry Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bono Jr., Michael S.; Garcia, Ravi D.; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols. PMID:26267664

  16. Femtosecond laser pulse optimization for multiphoton cytometry and control of fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, Eric Robert

    This body of work encompasses optimization of near infrared femtosecond laser pulses both for enhancement of flow cytometry as well as adaptive pulse shaping to control fluorescence. A two-photon system for in vivo flow cytometry is demonstrated, which allows noninvasive quantification of circulating cell populations in a single live mouse. We monitor fluorescently-labeled red blood cells for more than two weeks, and are also able to noninvasively measure circulation times of two distinct populations of breast cancer cells simultaneously in a single mouse. We build a custom laser excitation source in the form of an extended cavity mode-locked oscillator, which enables superior detection in whole blood or saline of cell lines expressing fluorescent proteins including the green fluorescent protein (GFP), tdTomato and mPlum. A mathematical model explains unique features of the signals. The ability to distinguish different fluorescent species is central to simultaneous measurement of multiple molecular targets in high throughput applications including the multiphoton flow cytometer. We demonstrate that two dyes which are not distinguishable to one-photon measurements can be differentiated and in fact quantified in mixture via phase-shaped two-photon excitation pulses found by a genetic algorithm. We also selectively enhance or suppress two-photon fluorescence of numerous common dyes with tailored pulse shapes. Using a multiplicative (rather than ratiometric) fitness parameter, we are able to control the fluorescence while maintaining a strong signal. With this method, we control the two-photon fluorescence of the blue fluorescent protein (BFP), which is of particular interest in investigations of protein-protein interactions, and has frustrated previous attempts of control. Implementing an acousto-optic interferometer, we use the same experimental setup to measure two-photon excitation cross-sections of dyes and prove that photon-photon interferences are the

  17. Flow cytometry with gold nanoparticles and their clusters as scattering contrast agents: FDTD simulation of light-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo; Pond, James; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2009-09-01

    The formulation of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach is presented in the framework of its potential applications to in-vivo flow cytometry based on light scattering. The consideration is focused on comparison of light scattering by a single biological cell alone in controlled refractive-index matching conditions and by cells labeled by gold nanoparticles. The optical schematics including phase contrast (OPCM) microscopy as a prospective modality for in-vivo flow cytometry is also analyzed. The validation of the FDTD approach for the simulation of flow cytometry may open up a new avenue in the development of advanced cytometric techniques based on scattering effects from nanoscale targets. PMID:19670359

  18. Impact of recent innovations in the use of mass cytometry in support of drug development.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Ala F; Ogura, Hideki; Wisnewski, Adam V

    2015-10-01

    Cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) is a novel technology for the real-time analysis of single cells. CyTOF is a significant advance in fields including immunology, hematology, and oncology. It resolves multiple metal-conjugated probes per cell with minimal signal overlap, which maximizes the information obtained from each individual sample. CyTOF provides the ability to phenotypically and functionally profile cells from normal and diseased states. Single cell technologies enable researchers to measure the effects of a drug at the single cell level and better understand its mechanism of action. Here, we discuss novel instruments for the analysis of individual biological cells, the impact of recent innovations in support of drug development, and the important roles of CyTOF in drug profiling. PMID:26092491

  19. Impact of recent innovations in the use of mass cytometry in support of drug development

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Hideki; Wisnewski, Adam V.

    2015-01-01

    Cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) is a novel technology for the real-time analysis of single cells. CyTOF is a significant advance in fields including immunology, hematology, and oncology. It resolves multiple metal-conjugated probes per cell with minimal signal overlap, which maximizes the information obtained from each individual sample. CyTOF provides the ability to phenotypically and functionally profile cells from normal and diseased states. Single cell technologies enable researchers to measure the effects of a drug at the single cell level and better understand its mechanism of action. Here, we discuss novel instruments for the analysis of individual biological cells, the impact of recent innovations in support of drug development, and the important roles of CyTOF in drug profiling. PMID:26092491

  20. flowCL: ontology-based cell population labelling in flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Courtot, Mélanie; Meskas, Justin; Diehl, Alexander D.; Droumeva, Radina; Gottardo, Raphael; Jalali, Adrin; Taghiyar, Mohammad Jafar; Maecker, Holden T.; McCoy, J. Philip; Ruttenberg, Alan; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Finding one or more cell populations of interest, such as those correlating to a specific disease, is critical when analysing flow cytometry data. However, labelling of cell populations is not well defined, making it difficult to integrate the output of algorithms to external knowledge sources. Results: We developed flowCL, a software package that performs semantic labelling of cell populations based on their surface markers and applied it to labelling of the Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies Human Immunology Project Consortium lyoplate populations as a use case. Conclusion: By providing automated labelling of cell populations based on their immunophenotype, flowCL allows for unambiguous and reproducible identification of standardized cell types. Availability and implementation: Code, R script and documentation are available under the Artistic 2.0 license through Bioconductor (http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/devel/bioc/html/flowCL.html). Contact: rbrinkman@bccrc.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25481008

  1. A microfluidic device for uniform-sized cell spheroids formation, culture, harvesting and flow cytometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Chen, Ying-Hua; Peng, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Culture of cells as three-dimensional (3D) aggregates, named spheroids, possesses great potential to improve in vitro cell models for basic biomedical research. However, such cell spheroid models are often complicated, cumbersome, and expensive compared to conventional Petri-dish cell cultures. In this work, we developed a simple microfluidic device for cell spheroid formation, culture, and harvesting. Using this device, cells could form uniformly sized spheroids due to strong cell-cell interactions and the spatial confinement of microfluidic culture chambers. We demonstrated cell spheroid formation and culture in the designed devices using embryonic stem cells, carcinoma cells, and fibroblasts. We further scaled up the device capable of simultaneously forming and culturing 5000 spheroids in a single chip. Finally, we demonstrated harvesting of the cultured spheroids from the device with a simple setup. The harvested spheroids possess great integrity, and the cells can be exploited for further flow cytometry assays due to the ample cell numbers. PMID:24396525

  2. Bayesian Hierarchical Models for Protein Networks in Single-Cell Mass Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Riten; Müller, Peter; Qiu, Peng; Ji, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    We propose a class of hierarchical models to investigate the protein functional network of cellular markers. We consider a novel data set from single-cell proteomics. The data are generated from single-cell mass cytometry experiments, in which protein expression is measured within an individual cell for multiple markers. Tens of thousands of cells are measured serving as biological replicates. Applying the Bayesian models, we report protein functional networks under different experimental conditions and the differences between the networks, ie, differential networks. We also present the differential network in a novel fashion that allows direct observation of the links between the experimental agent and its putative targeted proteins based on posterior inference. Our method serves as a powerful tool for studying molecular interactions at cellular level. PMID:25574129

  3. Measurement and purification of human chromosomes by flow cytometry and sorting.

    PubMed Central

    Carrano, A V; Gray, J W; Langlois, R G; Burkhart-Schultz, K J; Van Dilla, M A

    1979-01-01

    The 24 human chromosome types of normal diploid fibroblast cell strain were classified into 15 groups by high-resolution flow cytometry on the basis of 33258 Hoechst fluorescence. Chromosomes associated with each group were flow sorted onto microscope slides and identified by quinacrine banding analysis. DNA cytophotometry of metaphase chromosomes from the same cell strain supported and extended this identification. Four of the groups purified were due to chromosomes of a single type--namely, chromosomes 5, 6, 13, and 17. Eight additional groups were also separated and found to contain the following chromosomes: 1 and 2; 3 and 4; 7, 8, and X; 9--12; 14 and 15; 16 and 18; 20 and Y; and 19, 21, and 22. The average purity for the 12 sorted fractions was 78%. PMID:286320

  4. Application of alkaline elution, Fast Micromethod and flow cytometry in detection of marine contamination.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Nevenka; Hamer, Bojan; Jaksić, Zeljko; Fafandel, Maja; Micić, Milena; Batel, Renato

    2002-06-01

    DNA damage is an inescapable aspect of life in the biosphere. The presented investigations were an attempt to examine the response of a DNA damage as a biomarker of environmental quality in the mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis sampled at differently contaminated areas of Istrian coast, Northern Adriatic. The investigations were performed in order to get information about the genotoxic risk for marine organisms exposed to mixed environmental pollution, as well as the information about the presence of unknown mixture of genotoxic contaminants in the marine environment. Types of DNA damage detected are alkali-labile sites and single-strand breaks measured by Fast Micromethod, interstrand cross-links and DNA protein cross-links by alkaline filter elution and cell cycle disturbation by flow cytometry. The applicability of all three methods for marine quality control is discussed. PMID:12064444

  5. Monitoring of Dynamic Microbiological Processes Using Real-Time Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldini, Markus; Heck, Tobias; Blanco-Fernández, Alfonso; Hammes, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a straightforward approach to continuously monitor a variety of highly dynamic microbiological processes in millisecond resolution with flow cytometry, using standard bench-top instrumentation. Four main experimental examples are provided, namely: (1) green fluorescent protein expression by antibiotic-stressed Escherichia coli, (2) fluorescent labeling of heat-induced membrane damage in an autochthonous freshwater bacterial community, (3) the initial growth response of late stationary E. coli cells inoculated into fresh growth media, and (4) oxidative disinfection of a mixed culture of auto-fluorescent microorganisms. These examples demonstrate the broad applicability of the method to diverse biological experiments, showing that it allows the collection of detailed, time-resolved information on complex processes. PMID:24244624

  6. Overview of clinical flow cytometry data analysis: recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, Carlos E; Costa, Elaine S; Lecrevisse, Quentin; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    Major technological advances in flow cytometry (FC), both for instrumentation and reagents, have emerged over the past few decades. These advances facilitate simultaneous evaluation of more parameters in single cells analyzed at higher speed. Consequently, larger and more complex data files that contain information about tens of parameters for millions of cells are generated. This increasing complexity has challenged pre-existing data analysis tools and promoted the development of new algorithms and tools for data analysis and visualization. Here, we review the currently available (conventional and newly developed) data analysis and visualization strategies that aim for easier, more objective, and robust interpretation of FC data both in biomedical research and clinical diagnostic laboratories. PMID:23746659

  7. Flow cytometry for bacteria: enabling metabolic engineering, synthetic biology and the elucidation of complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Bryan P; Gaida, Stefan M; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2010-02-01

    Flow cytometry (FC) and FC-based cell sorting have been established as critical tools in modern cell and developmental biology. Yet, their applications in bacteria, especially in the multiparametric mode, remain limited. We argue that FC technologies have the potential to greatly accelerate the analysis and development of microbial complex phenotypes through applications of metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering. We demonstrate the importance of FC for elucidating population heterogeneity because of developmental processes or epigenetic regulation. FC can be engaged for both synthetic and analytical applications of complex phenotypes within a single species, multispecies, and microbial-library populations. Examples include methods to identify developmental microbial stages associated with productive metabolic phenotypes, select desirable promoters from a single species or metagenomic libraries, and to screen designer riboswitches for synthetic-biology applications. PMID:20206495

  8. Characterization of aggregate load and pattern in living yeast cells by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Itahisa Hernández; Fleming, Thomas; Eckstein, Volker; Herzig, Stephan; Nawroth, Peter P; Tyedmers, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is both a hallmark of and a driving force for a number of diseases. It is therefore important to identify the nature of these aggregates and the mechanism(s) by which the cell counteracts their detrimental properties. Currently, the study of aggregation in vivo is performed primarily using fluorescently tagged versions of proteins and analyzing the aggregates by fluorescence microscopy. While this strategy is considered the gold standard, it has several limitations, particularly with respect to its suitability for high-throughput screening (HTS). Here, using a GFP fusion of the well-characterized yeast prion amyloid protein [PSI+], we demonstrate that flow cytometry, which utilizes the same physical principles as fluorescence microscopy, can be used to determine the aggregate load and pattern in live and fixed yeast cells. Furthermore, our approach can easily be applied to high-throughput analyses such as screenings with a yeast deletion library. PMID:27625208

  9. Flow cytometry for monitoring contaminant exposure in black-crowned night-herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Bickham, J.W.; Lyne, T.B.; Lewis, T.; Ruedas, L.A.; Custer, Christine M.; Melancon, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The flow cytometry method (FCM) was employed to determine cellular DNA content of black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) embryos and 10-day-old chicks collected at sites differing in types of chemical contamination. The coefficient of variation of DNA content (CV) in blood collected from embryos suggested cytogenetic damage at a site in Louisiana known to be contaminated with petroleum. Blood CV from chicks suggested genetic damage at a site in Texas also known to be contaminated with petroleum. Spleen CVs in chicks were significantly lower than respective means from the reference site. the CVs of chick blood and liver and spleen negatively correlated, suggesting recovery of spleen and liver cells after exposure to a clastogenic compound. Thus, the lower CVs may also have been indicative of genetic damage. Based on the findings of this study, FCM is a potential indicator of certain environmental contaminants in black-crowned night-herons.

  10. Flow cytometry for monitoring contaminant exposure in black-crowned night-herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Bickham, J.W.; Lyne, T.B.; Lewis, T.; Ruedas, L.A.; Custer, Christine M.; Melancon, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The flow cytometry method (FCM) was employed to determine cellular DNA content of black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) embryos and 10-day-old chicks collected at sites differing in types of chemical contamination. The coefficient of variation of DNA content (CV) in blood collected from embryos suggested cytogenetic damage at a site in Louisiana known to be contaminated with petroleum. Blood CV from chicks suggested genetic damage at a site in Texas also known to be contaminated with petroleum. Spleen CVs in chicks were significantly lower than respective means from the reference site. The CVs of chick blood and liver and spleen negatively correlated, suggesting recovery of spleen and liver cells after exposure to a clastogenic compound. Thus, the lower CVs may also have been indicative of genetic damage. Based on the findings of this study, FCM is a potential indicator of certain environmental contaminants in black-crowned night-herons.

  11. Advances in Complex Multiparameter Flow Cytometry Technology: Applications in Stem Cell Research

    PubMed Central

    Preffer, Frederic; Dombkowski, David

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometry and cell sorting are critical tools in stem cell research. Recent advances in flow cytometric hardware, reagents and software have synergized to permit the stem cell biologist to more fully identify and isolate rare cells based on their immunofluorescent and light scatter characteristics. Some of these improvements include physically smaller air-cooled lasers, new designs in optics, new fluorescent conjugate-excitation pairs, and improved software to visualize data, all which combine to open up new horizons in the study of stem cells, by enhancing the resolution and specificity of inquiry. In this review, these recent improvements in technology will be outlined and important cell surface and functional antigenic markers useful for the study of stem cells described. PMID:19492350

  12. Evaluation of Giardia duodenalis viability after metronidazole treatment by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Joana; Rodrigues, Acácio Gonçalves; Pérez, Maria José; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. lamblia; syn. intestinalis) susceptibility testing is not routinely performed because the classical culture methods are very time-consuming and laborious. We developed a novel flow cytometry (FC) assay to evaluate the susceptibility of G. duodenalis trophozoites to metronidazole (MTZ). Different concentrations of MTZ were added to cultures of trophozoites (10 5 /mL) and the cultures were incubated for different periods. The 50% inhibitory concentration was calculated and propidium iodide (PI) was used to quantify the number of dead cells. After treatment, PI-positive trophozoites increased with increasing drug concentration and exposure time. An excellent correlation was found between FC and the classical method. A novel, accurate and reliable method is now available to evaluate G. duodenalis viability. PMID:25424449

  13. Dynamic Characterization of Growth and Gene Expression Using High-throughput Automated Flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Zuleta, Ignacio A.; Aranda-Díaz, Andrés; Li, Hao; El-Samad, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Cells adjust to changes in environmental conditions using complex regulatory programs. These cellular programs are the result of an intricate interplay between gene expression, cellular growth rate, and protein degradation fluxes. New technologies that enable simultaneous and time-resolved measurements of these variables are necessary to dissect cellular homeostatic strategies. Here, we report the development of a novel automated flow-cytometry robotic setup that enables real-time measurement of precise and simultaneous relative growth and protein synthesis rates of multiplexed microbial populations across many conditions. These measurements generate quantitative profiles of dynamically-evolving protein synthesis and degradation rates. We demonstrate this setup in the context of gene regulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and uncover a dynamic and complex landscape of gene expression, growth dynamics, and proteolysis following perturbations. PMID:24608180

  14. Expression profiling. Combinatorial labeling of single cells for gene expression cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fan, H Christina; Fu, Glenn K; Fodor, Stephen P A

    2015-02-01

    We present a technically simple approach for gene expression cytometry combining next-generation sequencing with stochastic barcoding of single cells. A combinatorial library of beads bearing cell- and molecular-barcoding capture probes is used to uniquely label transcripts and reconstruct the digital gene expression profile of thousands of individual cells in a single experiment without the need for robotics or automation. We applied the technology to dissect the human hematopoietic system and to characterize heterogeneous response to in vitro stimulation. High sensitivity is demonstrated by detection of low-abundance transcripts and rare cells. Under current implementation, the technique can analyze a few thousand cells simultaneously and can readily scale to 10,000s or 100,000s of cells. PMID:25657253

  15. Flow cytometry for monitoring contaminant exposure in black-crowned night-herons.

    PubMed

    Custer, T W; Bickham, J W; Lyne, T B; Lewis, T; Ruedas, L A; Custer, C M; Melancon, M J

    1994-08-01

    The flow cytometry methods (FCM) was employed to determine cellular DNA content of black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) embryos and 10-day-old chicks collected at sites differing in types of chemical contamination. The coefficient of variation of DNA content (CV) in blood collected from embryos suggested cytogenetic damage at a side in Louisiana known to be contaminated with petroleum. Blood CV from chicks suggested genetic damage at a site in Texas also known to be contaminated with petroleum. Spleen CVs in chicks were significantly lower than respective means from the reference site. The CVs of chick blood and liver and spleen negatively correlated, suggesting recovery of spleen and liver cells after exposure to a clastogenic compound. Thus, the lower CVs may also have been indicative of genetic damage. Based on the findings of this study, FCM is a potential indicator of certain environmental contaminants in black-crowned night-herons. PMID:8060161

  16. A Rapid and Quantitative Flow Cytometry Method for the Analysis of Membrane Disruptive Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Pantarat, Namfon; Attard, Troy J.; Walsh, Katrina A.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a microbial flow cytometry method that quantifies within 3 hours antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity, termed Minimum Membrane Disruptive Concentration (MDC). Increasing peptide concentration positively correlates with the extent of bacterial membrane disruption and the calculated MDC is equivalent to its MBC. The activity of AMPs representing three different membranolytic modes of action could be determined for a range of Gram positive and negative bacteria, including the ESKAPE pathogens, E. coli and MRSA. By using the MDC50 concentration of the parent AMP, the method provides high-throughput, quantitative screening of AMP analogues. A unique feature of the MDC assay is that it directly measures peptide/bacteria interactions and lysed cell numbers rather than bacteria survival as with MIC and MBC assays. With the threat of multi-drug resistant bacteria, this high-throughput MDC assay has the potential to aid in the development of novel antimicrobials that target bacteria with improved efficacy. PMID:26986223

  17. Assessment of immune parameters of manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum in different physiological conditions using flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyung-Il; Donaghy, Ludovic; Kang, Hyun-Sil; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Kim, Young-Ok; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2012-03-01

    Cellular and humoral immune parameters are often used as biomarkers to trace environmental and physiological stresses in marine bivalves. In this study, we compared various immune parameters of Manila clams ( Ruditapes philippinarum) under normal conditions and under a high level of desiccation, using flow cytometry. The immune parameters analyzed included, total hemocyte count, hemocyte mortality, hemocyte DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and phagocytosis activity. Total hemocyte count, hemocyte DNA damage, and hemocyte mortality were significantly elevated among clams under high desiccation stress, while phagocytosis activity and spontaneous ROS production were significantly lower compared to those parameters of the control clams ( p<0.05). These data suggest that the immune parameters analyzed in this study well reflect the physiological status of clams.

  18. Intermittent blood flow in the KHT sarcoma--flow cytometry studies using Hoechst 33342.

    PubMed Central

    Minchinton, A. I.; Durand, R. E.; Chaplin, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    The administration of the fluorescent DNA stain, Hoechst 33342, to mice bearing the KHT sarcoma, combined with flow cytometry, can be used to select cells according to their proximity to functional vasculature. Different protocols of administration of Hoechst 33342 were used in order to differentiate between the presence of temporary and chronically hypoxic cells. The results show a large difference in radiosensitivity between cells close to, and distant from, functional vasculature. However, this pattern of radiosensitivity is observed only when the staining period with Hoechst 33342 is short and coincides with the period of irradiation. When the radiation treatment is temporally divorced from the staining period then the radiosensitivity and staining intensity are not related. This result can be interpreted as indicating that hypoxic cells exist within this tumour as a result of fluctuations in tumour blood flow. PMID:2386734

  19. Applications of flow cytometry in plant pathology for genome size determination, detection and physiological status.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Liesbet; Höfte, Monica; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Leus, Leen

    2011-10-01

    Flow cytometers are probably the most multipurpose laboratory devices available. They can analyse a vast and very diverse range of cell parameters. This technique has left its mark on cancer, human immunodeficiency virus and immunology research, and is indispensable in routine clinical diagnostics. Flow cytometry (FCM) is also a well-known tool for the detection and physiological status assessment of microorganisms in drinking water, marine environments, food and fermentation processes. However, flow cytometers are seldom used in plant pathology, despite FCM's major advantages as both a detection method and a research tool. Potential uses of FCM include the characterization of genome sizes of fungal and oomycete populations, multiplexed pathogen detection and the monitoring of the viability, culturability and gene expression of plant pathogens, and many others. This review provides an overview of the history, advantages and disadvantages of FCM, and focuses on the current applications and future possibilities of FCM in plant pathology. PMID:21726378

  20. Lensless Imaging and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Aydogan; McLeod, Euan

    2016-07-11

    High-resolution optical microscopy has traditionally relied on high-magnification and high-numerical aperture objective lenses. In contrast, lensless microscopy can provide high-resolution images without the use of any focusing lenses, offering the advantages of a large field of view, high resolution, cost-effectiveness, portability, and depth-resolved three-dimensional (3D) imaging. Here we review various approaches to lensless imaging, as well as its applications in biosensing, diagnostics, and cytometry. These approaches include shadow imaging, fluorescence, holography, superresolution 3D imaging, iterative phase recovery, and color imaging. These approaches share a reliance on computational techniques, which are typically necessary to reconstruct meaningful images from the raw data captured by digital image sensors. When these approaches are combined with physical innovations in sample preparation and fabrication, lensless imaging can be used to image and sense cells, viruses, nanoparticles, and biomolecules. We conclude by discussing several ways in which lensless imaging and sensing might develop in the near future. PMID:27420569

  1. Breast cancer proliferation measured on cytological samples: a study by flow cytometry of S-phase fractions and BrdU incorporation.

    PubMed Central

    Remvikos, Y.; Vielh, P.; Padoy, E.; Benyahia, B.; Voillemot, N.; Magdelénat, H.

    1991-01-01

    Cell kinetics have been shown to be an important predictor of clinical evolution of operated breast cancer. We established a method for the estimation of the proliferative activity of tumour cells obtained by fine needle sampling without aspiration (FNS), using simultaneously S-phase fractions (SPF) measured on DNA histograms and 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling index (BLI) measured by flow cytometry. Biparametric BrdU/DNA flow cytometry could be performed in 122 of 189 (65%) consecutive patients. The mean BLI of the cytologically malignant FNS (118) was of 3.0 and the median of 2.2%. One hundred and forty-eight DNA histograms (78%) were suitable for SPF analysis, of which 141 presented malignant cells, showing a mean of 4.5 and a median of 3.5%, comparable to BLIs. These results were obtained from fluorescence peak area histograms with doublet discrimination and background subtraction allowing the measurements of SPFs as low as 0.4%. An excellent correlation was thus observed between BLIs and SPFs, for the 94 cases for which both results were available (r = 0.85). Infrequent discordances (9%) were noted with SPFs considerably higher than BLIs. Seven patients had three consecutive FNS of their tumour at weekly intervals before treatment. Some variability in the proportions of multiple subpopulations of tumour cells was observed on the DNA histograms. In contrast, proliferation indices (SPF or BLI) were reproducible, suggesting homogeneous growth rates. We conclude that an estimation of the proliferative activity of breast tumours at any stage of the disease is possible routinely by SPF and/or BLI analysis of FNS. At least one quantitative proliferation index could be obtained for 91% of patients. Images Figure 1 PMID:1911191

  2. Analysis of gamma delta V region usage in normal and diseased human intestinal biopsies and peripheral blood by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Bucht, A; Söderström, K; Esin, S; Grunewald, J; Hagelberg, S; Magnusson, I; Wigzell, H; Grönberg, A; Kiessling, R

    1995-01-01

    The intestinal population of gamma delta T cell receptor (TCR)-bearing cells was characterized with regard to V delta and V gamma subtype expression. For this purpose, we utilized V gene-specific PCR of mRNA prepared from intestinal biopsies. Predominant expression of the V delta 1 subtype was demonstrated in the small intestine of patients with coeliac disease and in the inflamed colon of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) as well as in colon biopsies taken from macroscopically normal areas of colon. Although intestinal gamma delta T cells preferentially expressed V delta 1, other V delta transcripts could be detected, of which V delta 2 and V delta 5 were commonly expressed. Analysis of biopsies from mesenteric lymph nodes demonstrated a V delta repertoire similar to the mucosa. In peripheral blood on the other hand, high expression of both V delta 2 and V delta 1 was found. The predominant expression of V delta 1 transcripts in the intestinal mucosa of IBD patients correlated well with protein cell surface expression as analysed by flow cytometry using V delta 1- and V delta 2-specific antibodies. Selective expansion of gamma delta T cells could not be demonstrated within the inflamed mucosa as shown by mRNA analysis and flow cytometry. Instead, IBD patients demonstrated a decreased proportion of TCR gamma delta-carrying T cells in the inflamed mucosa compared with macroscopically normal area of colon. On the other hand, a significantly increased percentage of T cells bearing the gamma delta TCR was found in peripheral blood of patients with Crohn's disease compared with healthy individuals, indicating that local mucosal inflammation may influence the circulating gamma delta T cell population. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7813110

  3. flowClean: Automated identification and removal of fluorescence anomalies in flow cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Fletez-Brant, Kipper; Špidlen, Josef; Brinkman, Ryan R; Roederer, Mario; Chattopadhyay, Pratip K

    2016-05-01

    Modern flow cytometry systems can be coupled to plate readers for high-throughput acquisition. These systems allow hundreds of samples to be analyzed in a single day. Quality control of the data remains challenging, however, and is further complicated when a large number of parameters is measured in an experiment. Our examination of 29,228 publicly available FCS files from laboratories worldwide indicates 13.7% have a fluorescence anomaly. In particular, fluorescence measurements for a sample over the collection time may not remain stable due to fluctuations in fluid dynamics; the impact of instabilities may differ between samples and among parameters. Therefore, we hypothesized that tracking cell populations (which represent a summary of all parameters) in centered log ratio space would provide a sensitive and consistent method of quality control. Here, we present flowClean, an algorithm to track subset frequency changes within a sample during acquisition, and flag time periods with fluorescence perturbations leading to the emergence of false populations. Aberrant time periods are reported as a new parameter and added to a revised data file, allowing users to easily review and exclude those events from further analysis. We apply this method to proof-of-concept datasets and also to a subset of data from a recent vaccine trial. The algorithm flags events that are suspicious by visual inspection, as well as those showing more subtle effects that might not be consistently flagged by investigators reviewing the data manually, and out-performs the current state-of-the-art. flowClean is available as an R package on Bioconductor, as a module on the free-to-use GenePattern web server, and as a plugin for FlowJo X. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:26990501

  4. Prerequisites for the analysis and sorting of extracellular vesicle subpopulations by high-resolution flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Groot Kormelink, Tom; Arkesteijn, Ger J A; Nauwelaers, Frans A; van den Engh, Ger; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Wauben, Marca H M

    2016-02-01

    Submicron-sized vesicles released by cells are increasingly recognized for their role in intercellular communication and as biomarkers of disease. Methods for high-throughput, multi-parameter analysis of such extracellular vesicles (EVs) are crucial to further investigate their diversity and function. We recently developed a high-resolution flow cytometry-based method (using a modified BD Influx) for quantitative and qualitative analysis of EVs. The fact that the majority of EVs is <200 nm in size requires special attention with relation to specific conditions of the flow cytometer, as well as sample concentration and event rate. In this study, we investigated how (too) high particle concentrations affect high-resolution flow cytometry-based particle quantification and characterization. Increasing concentrations of submicron-sized particles (beads, liposomes, and EVs) were measured to identify coincidence and swarm effects, caused by the concurrent presence of multiple particles in the measuring spot. As a result, we demonstrate that analysis of highly concentrated samples resulted in an underestimation of the number of particles and an interdependent overestimation of light scattering and fluorescence signals. On the basis of this knowledge, and by varying nozzle size and sheath pressure, we developed a strategy for high-resolution flow cytometric sorting of submicron-sized particles. Using the adapted sort settings, subsets of EVs differentially labeled with two fluorescent antibodies could be sorted to high purity. Moreover, sufficient numbers of EVs could be sorted for subsequent analysis by western blotting. In conclusion, swarm effects that occur when measuring high particle concentrations severely hamper EV quantification and characterization. These effects can be easily overlooked without including proper controls (e.g., sample dilution series) or tools (e.g., oscilloscope). Providing that the event rate is well controlled, the sorting strategy we propose

  5. flowClust: a Bioconductor package for automated gating of flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kenneth; Hahne, Florian; Brinkman, Ryan R; Gottardo, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    Background As a high-throughput technology that offers rapid quantification of multidimensional characteristics for millions of cells, flow cytometry (FCM) is widely used in health research, medical diagnosis and treatment, and vaccine development. Nevertheless, there is an increasing concern about the lack of appropriate software tools to provide an automated analysis platform to parallelize the high-throughput data-generation platform. Currently, to a large extent, FCM data analysis relies on the manual selection of sequential regions in 2-D graphical projections to extract the cell populations of interest. This is a time-consuming task that ignores the high-dimensionality of FCM data. Results In view of the aforementioned issues, we have developed an R package called flowClust to automate FCM analysis. flowClust implements a robust model-based clustering approach based on multivariate t mixture models with the Box-Cox transformation. The package provides the functionality to identify cell populations whilst simultaneously handling the commonly encountered issues of outlier identification and data transformation. It offers various tools to summarize and visualize a wealth of features of the clustering results. In addition, to ensure its convenience of use, flowClust has been adapted for the current FCM data format, and integrated with existing Bioconductor packages dedicated to FCM analysis. Conclusion flowClust addresses the issue of a dearth of software that helps automate FCM analysis with a sound theoretical foundation. It tends to give reproducible results, and helps reduce the significant subjectivity and human time cost encountered in FCM analysis. The package contributes to the cytometry community by offering an efficient, automated analysis platform which facilitates the active, ongoing technological advancement. PMID:19442304

  6. Immunophenotype Discovery, Hierarchical Organization, and Template-Based Classification of Flow Cytometry Samples

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Ariful; Rajwa, Bartek; Pothen, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We describe algorithms for discovering immunophenotypes from large collections of flow cytometry samples and using them to organize the samples into a hierarchy based on phenotypic similarity. The hierarchical organization is helpful for effective and robust cytometry data mining, including the creation of collections of cell populations’ characteristic of different classes of samples, robust classification, and anomaly detection. We summarize a set of samples belonging to a biological class or category with a statistically derived template for the class. Whereas individual samples are represented in terms of their cell populations (clusters), a template consists of generic meta-populations (a group of homogeneous cell populations obtained from the samples in a class) that describe key phenotypes shared among all those samples. We organize an FC data collection in a hierarchical data structure that supports the identification of immunophenotypes relevant to clinical diagnosis. A robust template-based classification scheme is also developed, but our primary focus is in the discovery of phenotypic signatures and inter-sample relationships in an FC data collection. This collective analysis approach is more efficient and robust since templates describe phenotypic signatures common to cell populations in several samples while ignoring noise and small sample-specific variations. We have applied the template-based scheme to analyze several datasets, including one representing a healthy immune system and one of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples. The last task is challenging due to the phenotypic heterogeneity of the several subtypes of AML. However, we identified thirteen immunophenotypes corresponding to subtypes of AML and were able to distinguish acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) samples with the markers provided. Clinically, this is helpful since APL has a different treatment regimen from other subtypes of AML. Core algorithms used in our data analysis are

  7. Establishment of pancreatic cancer stem cells by flow cytometry and their biological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Su, Dongyue; Xue, Lei; Liu, Yang; Pang, Wuyan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the method of separating human pancreatic cancer stem cells by Hoechst 33342 labeled flow cytometry and to analyze the biological properties of pancreatic cancer stem cells. The human pancreatic cancer cell line PC-3 was divided into SP and non-SP cells by flow cytometry. The number of two cell clone spheres and nude mice tumor formation rates were compared by cultivating in serum-free medium; The expression of CD133, Nestin mRNA and protein was analyzed by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot; The expression of two cell drug resistance genes (MDR1, ABCG2, ABCA2 and MRP1) was analyzed by real time fluorescent quantitative PCR. The number of the cloned spheres in SP cells in serum-free medium was significantly higher than that of non-SP cells (P<0.05). The incidence of SP cells in the tumor of immunodeficiency nude mice was significantly higher than that of non-SP cells, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression of CD133 and Nestin mRNA in SP cells was significantly higher than those of non-SP cells, and the expression of CD133 and Nestin protein in SP cells was also significantly higher than those of non-SP cells (P<0.05). In conclusion, SP side population pancreatic cancer cells by Hoechst 33342 separation have the stem cell characteristics, higher tumor formation rate and higher drug resistance, which may be related to chemotherapy resistance. PMID:26617845

  8. Microfluidic fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry (µFlowFISH)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Meagher, Robert J.; Light, Yooli Kim; Yilmaz, Suzan; Chakraborty, Romy; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an integrated microfluidic device (µFlowFISH) capable of performing 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) followed by flow cytometric detection for identifying bacteria in natural microbial communities. The device was used for detection of species involved in bioremediation of Cr(VI) and other metals in groundwater samples from a highly-contaminated environmental site (Hanford, WA, USA). The µFlowFISH seamlessly integrates two components: a hybridization chamber formed between two photopolymerized membranes, where cells and probes are electrophoretically loaded, incubated and washed; and a downstream cross structure for electrokinetically focusing cells into a single-file flow for flow cytometry analysis. The device is capable of analyzing a wide variety of bacteria including aerobic, facultative and anaerobic bacteria and was initially tested and validated using cultured microbes, including Escherichia coli, as well as two strains isolated from Hanford site: Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1, and Pseudomonas sp. strain RCH2 that are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. Combined labeling and detection efficiencies of 74–97% were observed in experiments with simple mixtures of cultured cells confirmed specific labeling. Results obtained were in excellent agreement with those obtained by conventional flow cytometry confirming the accuracy of µFlowFISH. Finally, the device was used for analyzing water samples collected on different dates from the Hanford Site. We were able to monitor the numbers of Pseudomonas sp. with only 100–200 cells loaded into the microchip. The µFlowFISH approach provides an automated platform for quantitative detection of microbial cells from complex samples, and is ideally suited for analysis of precious samples with low cell numbers such as those found at extreme environmental niches, bioremediation sites, and the human microbiome. PMID:21755095

  9. Assessment of erythroid dysplasia by "difference from normal" in routine clinical flow cytometry work-up.

    PubMed

    Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Menssen, Andrew J; Wangen, Jamie R; Stephenson, Christine F; de Baca, Monica E; Zehentner, Barbara K; Wells, Denise A; Loken, Michael R

    2014-10-21

    Introduction: While multidimensional flow cytometry (MDF) has great utility in diagnostic work-ups of patients with suspected myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), only the myeloid lineage has demonstrated reproducible abnormalities from multiple laboratories. With the effects of ammonium chloride (NH4 Cl) lysis on erythroid progenitors previously described, we applied this protocol to a patient cohort with diagnosed MDS to investigate phenotypic abnormalities that indicate erythroid dysplasia. Method: Bone marrow specimens [39 MDS, 9 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 7 JAK2(V617F) positive myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), 5 nutritional deficiencies] were processed by NH4 Cl lysis and Ficoll preparation and evaluated by MDF using a difference from normal algorithm. Results: For the MDS cohort, phenotypic abnormalities on the mature erythroid progenitors were frequent for CD71 and CD36 (36% for each antigen); abnormalities for CD235a (8%) were observed. Among immature erythroid progenitors, abnormal maturation patterns (≤5%) and increased CD105 intensity (9%) were seen. Increased frequency of CD105 bright cells was observed (18%). While antigenic abnormalities correlated between NH4 Cl lysis and Ficoll preparation, the lysis method demonstrated the most consistent quantitative antigen intensities. Mean erythroid phenotypic abnormalities and prognostic cytogenetic subgroups correlated strongly. Morphologic and erythroid phenotypic abnormalities correlated, as did increasing FCSS and number of erythroid abnormalities, albeit without further increase for AML patients. Discussion: These data expand the understanding of erythropoiesis and define immunophenotypic abnormalities that indicate dyserythropoiesis in MDS utilizing a lysis protocol practical for routine implementation in clinical flow cytometric work-up. Preliminary studies also indicate strong correlation between phenotypic erythroid dysplasia and poor prognosis, as classified cytogenetically. © 2014 Clinical

  10. Combination of CD157 and FLAER to Detect Peripheral Blood Eosinophils by Multiparameter Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Carulli, Giovanni; Marini, Alessandra; Sammuri, Paola; Domenichini, Cristiana; Ottaviano, Virginia; Pacini, Simone; Petrini, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The identification of eosinophils by flow cytometry is difficult because most of the surface antigens expressed by eosinophils are shared with neutrophils. Some methods have been proposed, generally based on differential light scatter properties, enhanced autofluorescence, lack of CD16 or selective positivity of CD52. Such methods, however, show several limitations. In the present study we report a novel method based on the analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked molecules. The combination of CD157 and FLAER was used, since FLAER recognizes all GPI-linked molecules, while CD157 is absent on the membrane of eosinophils and expressed by neutrophils. Peripheral blood samples from normal subjects and patients with variable percentages of eosinophils (n = 31), and without any evidence for circulating immature myeloid cells, were stained with the combination of FLAER-Alexa Fluor and CD157-PE. A FascCanto II