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Sample records for cytosolic calcium oscillations

  1. Circadian oscillations of cytosolic and chloroplastic free calcium in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Knight, M. R.; Kondo, T.; Masson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Haley, A.; Trewavas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco and Arabidopsis plants, expressing a transgene for the calcium-sensitive luminescent protein apoaequorin, revealed circadian oscillations in free cytosolic calcium that can be phase-shifted by light-dark signals. When apoaequorin was targeted to the chloroplast, circadian chloroplast calcium rhythms were likewise observed after transfer of the seedlings to constant darkness. Circadian oscillations in free calcium concentrations can be expected to control many calcium-dependent enzymes and processes accounting for circadian outputs. Regulation of calcium flux is therefore fundamental to the organization of circadian systems.

  2. Electric pulses: a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations and generate spontaneous-like calcium oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    de Menorval, Marie-Amelie; Andre, Franck M.; Silve, Aude; Dalmay, Claire; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Mir, Lluis M.

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells of great interest in regenerative medicine or oncology. They present spontaneous calcium oscillations related to cell cycle progression or differentiation but the correlation between these events is still unclear. Indeed, it is difficult to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations with chemical means. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) can permeabilise plasma and/or organelles membranes depending on the applied pulses and therefore generate cytosolic calcium peaks by recruiting calcium from the external medium or from internal stores. We show that it is possible to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations (same amplitude, duration and shape) using 100 μs PEFs or 10 ns PEFs. We propose a model that explains the experimental situations reported. PEFs can therefore be a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations. This tool, that can be switched on and off instantaneously, contrary to chemicals agents, can be very useful to investigate the role of calcium oscillations in cell physiology and/or to manipulate cell fate. PMID:27561994

  3. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  4. Veratridine-induced oscillations of cytosolic calcium and membrane potential in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    López, M G; Artalejo, A R; García, A G; Neher, E; García-Sancho, J

    1995-01-01

    1. Veratridine (VTD) induced large oscillations of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the membrane potential (Vm) in otherwise silent bovine chromaffin cells loaded with fura-2. 2. Depletion of the intracellular Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin or ryanodine did not affect these oscillations. Caffeine had a complex effect, decreasing them in cells with high activity but increasing them in cells with low activity. 3. The [Ca2+]i oscillations required extracellular Ca2+ and Na+ and were blocked by Ni2+ or tetrodotoxin. They were antagonized by high external concentrations of Mg2+ and/or Ca2+. 4. The oscillations of Vm had three phases: (i) slow depolarization (20 mV in 10-40 s); (ii) further fast depolarization (30 mV in 1 s); and (iii) rapid (5 s) repolarization. [Ca2+]i decreased during (i), increased quickly during (ii) with a 1 s delay with regard to the peak depolarization, and decreased during (iii). 5. Slight depolarizations increased the frequency of the oscillations whereas large depolarizations decreased it. 6. The Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channel blocker apamin increased the duration and decreased the frequency of the oscillations. 7. We propose the following mechanism for the oscillations: (i) the membrane depolarizes slowly by a decrease of potassium conductance (gK), perhaps due to a gradual decrease of [Ca2+]i; (ii) the threshold for activation of Na+ channels (decreased by VTD) is reached, producing further depolarization and recruiting Ca2+ channels, and inactivation of both Ca2+ and VTD-poisoned Na+ channels is slow; and (iii) gK increases, aided by activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels by the increased [Ca2+]i, and the membrane repolarizes. The contribution of the Na+ channels seems essential for the generation of the oscillations. 8. Bovine chromaffin cells have the machinery required for [Ca2+]i oscillations even though the more physiological stimulus tested here (high K+, field electrical stimulation, nicotinic or muscarinic agonists

  5. Integrated Luminal and Cytosolic Aspects of the Calcium Release Control

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Irina

    2003-01-01

    We propose here a unitary approach to the luminal and cytosolic control of calcium release. A minimal number of model elements that realistically describe different data sets are combined and adapted to correctly respond to various physiological constraints. We couple the kinetic properties of the inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor/calcium channel with the dynamics of Ca2+ and K+ in both the lumen and cytosol, and by using a detailed simulation approach, we propose that local (on a radial distance ∼2 μm) calcium oscillations in permeabilized cells are driven by the slow inactivation of channels organized in discrete clusters composed of between six and 15 channels. Moreover, the character of these oscillations is found to be extremely sensitive to K+, so that the cytosolic and luminal calcium variations are in or out of phase if the store at equilibrium has tens or hundreds μM Ca2+, respectively, depending on the K+ gradient across the reticulum membrane. Different patterns of calcium signals can be reproduced through variation of only a few parameters. PMID:12609854

  6. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed.

  7. Nuclear and cytosolic calcium are regulated independently

    PubMed Central

    Leite, M. F.; Thrower, E. C.; Echevarria, W.; Koulen, P.; Hirata, K.; Bennett, A. M.; Ehrlich, B. E.; Nathanson, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear calcium (Ca2+) regulates a number of important cellular processes, including gene transcription, growth, and apoptosis. However, it is unclear whether Ca2+ signaling is regulated differently in the nucleus and cytosol. To investigate this possibility, we examined subcellular mechanisms of Ca2+ release in the HepG2 liver cell line. The type II isoform of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) was expressed to a similar extent in the endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus, whereas the type III InsP3R was concentrated in the endoplasmic reticulum, and the type I isoform was not expressed. Ca2+ signals induced by low InsP3 concentrations started earlier or were larger in the nucleus than in the cytosol, indicating higher sensitivity of nuclear Ca2+ stores for InsP3. Nuclear InsP3R channels were active at lower InsP3 concentrations than InsP3R from cytosol. Enriched expression of type II InsP3R in the nucleus results in greater sensitivity of the nucleus to InsP3, thus providing a mechanism for independent regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes in this cellular compartment. PMID:12606721

  8. Sodium induces simultaneous changes in cytosolic calcium and pH in salt-tolerant quince protoplasts.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Cladio; Lindberg, Sylvia

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments with salt-resistant quince BA29 (Cydonia oblonga cv. Mill.) have shown that this cultivar takes up sodium transiently into the cytosol of shoot protoplasts only in the absence of calcium chloride, or at <1mM calcium chloride. Addition of NaCl > or =100mM to single protoplasts from in vitro-cultivated quince in the presence of 1.0mM calcium induced instant changes in the cytosolic concentrations of calcium and protons. These changes were investigated by use of tetra [acetoxymethyl] esters of the fluorescent stilbene chromophores Fura 2 and bis-carboxyethyl-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), respectively. The cytosolic Ca(2+) dynamics in the protoplasts were dependent on the concentration of NaCl added. The changes in calcium differed in amplitude and final concentration and were correlated in time mainly with changes in pH. Addition of 100-400mM NaCl to the protoplasts caused an oscillating increase in the cytosolic level of calcium, and then a decrease. Addition of mannitol, of equiosmolar concentration to NaCl, did not increase the cytosolic calcium concentration. Moreover, there was no increase in cytosolic calcium when NaCl was added in the presence of calcium binding ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (EGTA), or lantan or verapamil, two inhibitors of plasma membrane calcium channels. Therefore, we conclude that, in salt-resistant quince, sodium induces an influx of calcium into the cytosol by plasma membrane calcium channels, and a simultaneous increase in cytosolic pH. Because these changes were obtained in the presence of 1mM calcium in the medium, they were not due to sodium uptake into the cytosol. PMID:19556023

  9. Oscillations of cytosolic free calcium concentration in the presence of intracellular antibodies to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in voltage-clamped guinea-pig hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, J; Fukami, K; Hill, A M; Capiod, T

    1992-01-01

    In liver cells, the stimulation of alpha 1-adrenoceptors by noradrenaline induces the production of Ins(1,4,5)P3 through the degradation of membrane polyphosphoinositides [PtdIns(4,5)P2]. InsP3 evokes in turn the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. Our results show that the internal perfusion of single guinea-pig hepatocytes with monoclonal anti-PtdInsP2 antibody blocks the rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ concn. ([Ca2+]i) evoked by noradrenaline, an InsP3-dependent agonist, but not by the monohydroxylated bile acid taurolithocholate 3-sulphate, which is known to permeabilize the endoplasmic reticulum. In these conditions, the bile acid elicited either fast or slow fluctuations of [Ca2+]i independently of any InsP3 production. The responses to the bile acid were also observed in the absence of external Ca2+. The presence of intracellular anti-PtdInsP2 antibody does not affect the response to a photolytic release of InsP3 (1.5 microM final concn.) from a caged precursor. PMID:1334405

  10. Wind-induced plant motion immediately increases cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, M R; Smith, S M; Trewavas, A J

    1992-01-01

    Wind is one of the most unusual and more dramatic of the environmental signals to modify plant development. Wind-stimulated crops are also known to experience considerable reductions in growth and subsequent yield. There is at present no experimental data to suggest how wind signals are perceived and transduced by plant cells. We have genetically transformed Nicotiana plumbaginifolia to express aequorin and thus produced luminous plants that directly report cytosolic calcium by emitting blue light. With these plants we have found wind stimulation to cause immediate increases in cytosolic calcium and our evidence, based on the use of specific inhibitors, suggests that this calcium is mobilized from organelle sources. Our data further suggest that wind-induced movement of tissues, by mechanically stimulating and stressing constituent plant cells, is responsible for the immediate elevation of cytosolic calcium; increases occur only when the plant tissue is actually in motion. Repeated wind stimulation renders the cells refractory to further calcium signaling but responsiveness is rapidly recovered when stimulation is subsequently diminished. Our data suggest that mechanoperception in plant cells may possibly be transduced through intracellular calcium. Since mechanoperception and transduction are considered crucial to plant morphogenesis, our observations suggest that calcium could be central in the control and generation of plant form. Images PMID:11536497

  11. A theoretical model of cytosolic calcium elevation following wounding in urothelial cell monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Peter A.; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer; Walker, Dawn

    2013-02-01

    Scratch wounding of a urothelial cell monolayer triggers a number of events including the release of soluble, diffusible signalling factors and mechanical stimulation of cells at the wound edge. These events cause a sustained elevation in cytosolic calcium concentration in the cells surrounding the wound and a transient rise in those further away. The precise form of this calcium transient is believed to play a central role in determining the subsequent response of individual cells and ultimately leads to a co-ordinated, population-level response that rapidly closes the wound. Here we present a framework for modelling the initial phases of this process. We combine a PDE model of diffusion in the extracellular medium and an ODE model of calcium signalling that has been tailored to represent urothelial cells. The ODE model is capable of generating a wide range of calcium transients, including spikes, bursts, oscillations and sustained elevations in the cytosolic calcium concentration. In multi-cell simulations of scratch wounding in a perfusion flow we find that the spatial position of the cells relative to the wound site leads to distinct classes of calcium response, with cells proximal to the wound exhibiting a sustained elevation and cells distal to the wound exhibiting a more transient elevation. We compare these results to existing experimental data and generate a number of novel predictions that could be used to test the model experimentally.

  12. Role of Cytosolic Calcium Diffusion in Murine Cardiac Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Limbu, Bijay; Shah, Kushal; Weinberg, Seth H.; Deo, Makarand

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Purkinje cells (PCs) are morphologically and electrophysiologically different from ventricular myocytes and, importantly, exhibit distinct calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that PCs are more susceptible to action potential (AP) abnormalities than ventricular myocytes; however, the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we utilized a detailed biophysical mathematical model of a murine PC to systematically examine the role of cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion in shaping the AP in PCs. A biphasic spatiotemporal Ca2+ diffusion process, as recorded experimentally, was implemented in the model. In this study, we investigated the role of cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics on AP and ionic current properties by varying the effective Ca2+ diffusion rate. It was observed that AP morphology, specifically the plateau, was affected due to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. Elevated Ca2+ concentration in the sarcolemmal region activated inward sodium–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) current, resulting in a prolongation of the AP plateau at faster diffusion rates. Artificially clamping the NCX current to control values completely reversed the alterations in the AP plateau, thus confirming the role of NCX in modifying the AP morphology. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion waves play a significant role in shaping APs of PCs and could provide mechanistic insights in the increased arrhythmogeneity of PCs. PMID:27478391

  13. Src Dependent Pancreatic Acinar Injury Can Be Initiated Independent of an Increase in Cytosolic Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vivek; Cline, Rachel; Noel, Pawan; Karlsson, Jenny; Baty, Catherine J.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram Narayan; Husain, Sohail Z.; Acharya, Chathur; Durgampudi, Chandra; Stolz, Donna B.; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2013-01-01

    Several deleterious intra-acinar phenomena are simultaneously triggered on initiating acute pancreatitis. These culminate in acinar injury or inflammatory mediator generation in vitro and parenchymal damage in vivo. Supraphysiologic caerulein is one such initiator which simultaneously activates numerous signaling pathways including non-receptor tyrosine kinases such as of the Src family. It also causes a sustained increase in cytosolic calcium- a player thought to be crucial in regulating deleterious phenomena. We have shown Src to be involved in caerulein induced actin remodeling, and caerulein induced changes in the Golgi and post-Golgi trafficking to be involved in trypsinogen activation, which initiates acinar cell injury. However, it remains unclear whether an increase in cytosolic calcium is necessary to initiate acinar injury or if injury can be initiated at basal cytosolic calcium levels by an alternate pathway. To study the interplay between tyrosine kinase signaling and calcium, we treated mouse pancreatic acinar cells with the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate. We studied the effect of the clinically used Src inhibitor Dasatinib (BMS-354825) on pervanadate or caerulein induced changes in Src activation, trypsinogen activation, cell injury, upstream cytosolic calcium, actin and Golgi morphology. Pervanadate, like supraphysiologic caerulein, induced Src activation, redistribution of the F-actin from its normal location in the sub-apical area to the basolateral areas, and caused antegrade fragmentation of the Golgi. These changes, like those induced by supraphysiologic caerulein, were associated with trypsinogen activation and acinar injury, all of which were prevented by Dasatinib. Interestingly, however, pervanadate did not cause an increase in cytosolic calcium, and the caerulein induced increase in cytosolic calcium was not affected by Dasatinib. These findings suggest that intra-acinar deleterious phenomena may be initiated independent of an

  14. Cytosolic calcium homeostasis in fungi: Roles of plasma membrane transport and intracellular sequestration of calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.J.; Vogg, G.; Sanders, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Cytosolic free calcium ((Ca{sup 2+}){sub c}) has been measured in the mycelial fungus Neurospora crassa with Ca{sup 2+} - selective microelectrodes. The mean value of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub c} is 92 {plus minus} 15 nM and it is insensitive to external pH values between 5.8 and 8.4. Simultaneous measurement of membrane potential enables the electrochemical potential difference for Ca{sup 2+} across the plasma membrane to be estimated as about {minus}60 kJmol{sup {minus}1} - a value that cannot be sustained either by a simple Ca{sup 2+} - ATPase, or, in alkaline conditions, by straightforward H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange with a stoichiometric ratio of {lt}5 H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}. The authors propose that the most likely alternative mechanism of Ca{sup 2+} efflux is ATP-driven H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange, with a stoichiometric ratio of at least 2 H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}. The increase in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub c} in the presence of CN{sup {minus}} at pH 8.4 is compared with {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} influx under the same conditions. The proportion of entering Ca{sup 2+} remaining free in the cytosol is only 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, and since the concentration of available chelation sites on Ca{sup 2+} binding proteins is unlikely to exceed 100 {mu}M, a major role for the fungal vacuole in short-term Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis is indicated. This notion is supported by the observation that cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis is disrupted by a protonophore, which rapidly abolishes the driving force for Ca{sup 2+} uptake into fungal vacuoles.

  15. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  16. An overview of techniques for the measurement of calcium distribution, calcium fluxes, and cytosolic free calcium in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Borle, A B

    1990-01-01

    An array of techniques can be used to study cell calcium metabolism that comprises several calcium compartments and many types of transport systems such as ion channels, ATP-dependent pumps, and antiporters. The measurement of total cell calcium brings little information of value since 60 to 80% of total cell calcium is actually bound to the extracellular glycocalyx. Cell fractionation and differential centrifugation have been used to study intracellular Ca2+ compartmentalization, but the methods suffer from the possibility of Ca2+ loss or redistribution among cell fractions. Steady-state kinetic analyses of 45Ca uptake or desaturation curves have been used to study the distribution of Ca2+ among various kinetic pools in living cells and their rate of Ca2+ exchange, but the analyses are constrained by many limitations. Nonsteady-state tracer studies can provide information about rapid changes in calcium influx or efflux in and out of the cell. Zero-time kinetics of 45Ca uptake can detect instantaneous changes in calcium influx, while 45Ca fractional efflux ratio, can detect rapid stimulations or inhibitions of calcium efflux out of cells. Permeabilized cells have been successfully used to gauge the relative role of intracellular organelles in controlling [Ca2+]i. The measurement of the cytosolic ionized calcium ([Ca2+]i) is undoubtedly the most important and, physiologically, the most relevant method available. The choice of the appropriate calcium indicator, fluorescent, bioluminescent, metallochromic, or Ca2(+)-sensitive microelectrodes depends on the cell type and the magnitude and time constant of the event under study. Each probe has specific assets and drawbacks. The study of plasma membrane vesicles derived from baso-lateral or apical plasmalemma can also bring important information on the (Ca2(+)-Mg2+) ATPase-dependent calcium pump and on the kinetics and stoichiometry of the Na(+)-Ca2+ antiporter. The best strategy to study cell calcium metabolism is to

  17. Cytosolic organelles shape calcium signals and exo-endocytotic responses of chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    García, Antonio G; Padín, Fernando; Fernández-Morales, José C; Maroto, Marcos; García-Sancho, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The concept of stimulus-secretion coupling was born from experiments performed in chromaffin cells 50 years ago. Stimulation of these cells with acetylcholine enhances calcium (Ca(2+)) entry and this generates a transient elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) that triggers the exocytotic release of catecholamines. The control of the [Ca(2+)](c) signal is complex and depends on various classes of plasmalemmal calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the uptake and release of Ca(2+) from cytoplasmic organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, chromaffin vesicles and the nucleus, and Ca(2+) extrusion mechanisms, such as the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase, and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Computation of the rates of Ca(2+) fluxes between the different cell compartments support the proposal that the chromaffin cell has developed functional calcium tetrads formed by calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria nearby the exocytotic plasmalemmal sites. These tetrads shape the Ca(2+) transients occurring during cell activation to regulate early and late steps of exocytosis, and the ensuing endocytotic responses. The different patterns of catecholamine secretion in response to stress may thus depend on such local [Ca(2+)](c) transients occurring at different cell compartments, and generated by redistribution and release of Ca(2+) by cytoplasmic organelles. In this manner, the calcium tetrads serve to couple the variable energy demands due to exo-endocytotic activities with energy production and protein synthesis. PMID:22209033

  18. Monitoring Calcium Oscillations in Fertilized Mouse Eggs.

    PubMed

    Halet, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian species, including human, fertilization is characterized by the triggering of long-lasting calcium (Ca(2+)) oscillations in the egg cytoplasm. The monitoring of these Ca(2+) oscillations is a valuable technique to demonstrate that fertilization has occurred, to study egg activation events elicited downstream of the Ca(2+) signal, as well as to evaluate sperm quality. This chapter describes our protocol to monitor sperm-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in mouse eggs, using fluorescence microscopy techniques and the Fura-2-AM ratiometric Ca(2+) indicator. PMID:27557585

  19. Phosphocitrate inhibits mitochondrial and cytosolic accumulation of calcium in kidney cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tew, W P; Malis, C D; Howard, J E; Lehninger, A L

    1981-09-01

    Synthetic 3-phosphocitrate, an extremely potent inhibitor of calcium phosphate crystallization as determined in a nonbiological physical-chemical assay, has many similarities to a mitochondrial factor that inhibits crystallization of nondiffracting amorphous calcium phosphate. In order to determine whether phosphocitrate can prevent uptake and crystallization of calcium phosphate in mitochondria in vivo, it was administered intraperitoneally to animals given large daily doses of calcium gluconate or parathyroid hormone, a regimen that causes massive accumulation and crystallization of calcium phosphate in the mitochondria and cytosol of renal tubule cells in vivo. Administration of phosphocitrate greatly reduced the net uptake of Ca2+ by the kidneys and prevented the appearance of apatite-like crystalline structures within the mitochondrial matrix and cytosol of renal tubule cells. Phosphocitrate, which is a poor chelator of Ca2+, did not reduce the hypercalcemia induced by either agent. These in vivo observations therefore indicate that phosphocitrate acts primarily at the cellular level to prevent the extensive accumulation of calcium phosphate in kidney cells by inhibiting the mitochondrial accumulation or crystallization of calcium phosphate. PMID:6946490

  20. Lithium prevents early cytosolic calcium increase and secondary injurious calcium overload in glycolytically inhibited endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bosche, Bert; Schäfer, Matthias; Graf, Rudolf; Härtel, Frauke V.; Schäfer, Ute; Noll, Thomas

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We investigate free calcium as a central signalling element in endothelial cells. •Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose reduces cellular ATP. •This manoeuvre leads to a biphasic increase and overload of free calcium. •Pre-treatment with lithium for 24 h abolishes both phases of the calcium increase. •This provides a new strategy to protect endothelial calcium homeostasis and barrier function. -- Abstract: Cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is a central signalling element for the maintenance of endothelial barrier function. Under physiological conditions, it is controlled within narrow limits. Metabolic inhibition during ischemia/reperfusion, however, induces [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload, which results in barrier failure. In a model of cultured porcine aortic endothelial monolayers (EC), we addressed the question of whether [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload can be prevented by lithium treatment. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and ATP were analysed using Fura-2 and HPLC, respectively. The combined inhibition of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP synthesis by 2-desoxy-D-glucose (5 mM; 2-DG) plus sodium cyanide (5 mM; NaCN) caused a significant decrease in cellular ATP content (14 ± 1 nmol/mg protein vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg protein in the control, n = 6 culture dishes, P < 0.05), an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (278 ± 24 nM vs. 71 ± 2 nM in the control, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05), and the formation of gaps between adjacent EC. These observations indicate that there is impaired barrier function at an early state of metabolic inhibition. Glycolytic inhibition alone by 10 mM 2-DG led to a similar decrease in ATP content (14 ± 2 nmol/mg vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg in the control, P < 0.05) with a delay of 5 min. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} response of EC was biphasic with a peak after 1 min (183 ± 6 nM vs. 71 ± 1 nM, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05) followed by a sustained increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. A 24-h pre-treatment with 10 mM of lithium

  1. Effects of mechanical signaling on plant cell cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Haley, A; Russell, A J; Wood, N; Allan, A C; Knight, M; Campbell, A K; Trewavas, A J

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical signals are important influences on the development and morphology of higher plants. Using tobacco transformed with the Ca(2+)-sensitive luminescent protein aequorin, we recently reported the effects of mechanical signals of touch and wind on the luminescence and thus intracellular calcium of young seedlings. When mesophyll protoplasts are isolated from these transgenic tobacco plants and mechanically stimulated by swirling them in solution, cytoplasmic Ca2+ increases immediately and transiently up to 10 microM, and these transients are unaffected by an excess of EGTA in the medium. The size of the transient effect is related to the strength of swirling. Epidermal strips isolated from transgenic tobacco leaves and containing only viable guard cells and trichomes also respond to the strength of swirling in solution and can increase their cytoplasmic Ca2+ transiently up to 10 microM. Finally, the moss Physcomitrella patens containing recombinant aequorin exhibits transient increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+ up to 5 microM when swirled in solution. This effect is strongly inhibited by ruthenium red. Our data indicate that the effect of mechanical stimulation can be found in a number of different cell types and in a lower plant as well as tobacco and suggest that mechanoperception and the resulting increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ may be widespread. PMID:11536690

  2. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  3. Effects of adrenalectomy on the control and adrenergic regulation of cytosolic free calcium in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenrich, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of adrenalectomy on the control and ..cap alpha..-adrenergic regulation of the concentration of cytosolic free calcium (Ca/sub i/) in hepatocytes. In hepatocytes isolated from adrenalectomized (adx) and sham-operated male rats 7-1 days after surgery, Ca/sub i/ at rest and in response to epinephrine (EPI) was measured with the calcium-sensitive photoprotein aequorin, /sup 45/Ca efflux was measured, and Ca/sup 2 +/ release from intracellular stores in response to inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) was measured in saponin-permeabilized cells. Liver calmodulin content was also assayed by radioimmunoassay. It was found in adx rats that the resting Ca/sub i/ was elevated, the rise in Ca/sub i/ during EPI stimulation was reduced at physiological EPI concentrations, and the rise in calcium efflux evoked by EPI was reduced. Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between Ca/sub i/ and calcium efflux was reduced 60% in adx. Adx did not alter the characteristics of Ca/sup 2 +/ release from intracellular calcium pools in response to IP/sub 3/ in permeabilized cells. Finally, the liver calmodulin contents were not significantly different between the 2 groups.

  4. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Pataki, Csilla; Okina, Elena; Xian, Xiaojie; Pedersen, Mikael E.; Stevens, Troy; Griesbeck, Oliver; Park, Pyong Woo; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, but the molecular basis of their signaling is unresolved. The major family of transmembrane proteoglycans is the syndecans, present in virtually all nucleated cells, but with mostly unknown functions. Here, we show that syndecans regulate transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels to control cytosolic calcium equilibria and consequent cell behavior. In fibroblasts, ligand interactions with heparan sulfate of syndecan-4 recruit cytoplasmic protein kinase C to target serine714 of TRPC7 with subsequent control of the cytoskeleton and the myofibroblast phenotype. In epidermal keratinocytes a syndecan–TRPC4 complex controls adhesion, adherens junction composition, and early differentiation in vivo and in vitro. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the TRPC orthologues TRP-1 and -2 genetically complement the loss of syndecan by suppressing neuronal guidance and locomotory defects related to increases in neuronal calcium levels. The widespread and conserved syndecan–TRPC axis therefore fine tunes cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior. PMID:26391658

  5. Effects of adrenalectomy on the alpha-adrenergic regulation of cytosolic free calcium in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenrich, C.C.; Borle, A.B.

    1988-06-25

    We have previously published that bilateral adrenalectomy in the rat reduces the Ca2+-mediated alpha-adrenergic activation of hepatic glycogenolysis, while it increases the cellular calcium content of hepatocytes. In the experiments presented here, the concentration of cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+i) at rest and in response to epinephrine was measured in aequorin-loaded hepatocytes isolated from sham and adrenalectomized male rats. We found that in adrenalectomized rats the resting Ca2+i was elevated, the rise in Ca2+i evoked by epinephrine was reduced, and the rise in /sup 45/Ca efflux that follows such stimulation was depressed. Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between Ca2+i and calcium efflux was decreased 60% in adrenalectomized. Adrenalectomy did not change Ca2+ release from intracellular calcium pools in response to IP3 in saponin-permeabilized hepatocytes. The EC50 for inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and the maximal Ca2+ released were similar in both sham and adrenalectomized animals. Finally, the liver calmodulin content determined by radioimmunoassay was not significantly different between sham and adrenalectomized rats. These results suggest that 1) adrenalectomy reduces calcium efflux from the hepatocyte, probably by an effect on the plasma membrane (Ca2+-Mg2+)-ATPase-dependent Ca2+ pump and thus alters cellular calcium homeostasis; 2) adrenalectomy decreases the rise in Ca2+i in response to epinephrine; 3) this decreased rise in Ca2+i is not due to defects in the intracellular Ca2+ storage and mobilization processes; and 4) the effects of adrenalectomy on cellular calcium metabolism and on alpha-adrenergic activation of glycogenolysis are not caused by a reduction in soluble calmodulin.

  6. Glucose-induced alterations of cytosolic free calcium in cultured rat tail artery vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, M; Shan, J; Pang, P K; Resnick, L M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously suggested that hyperglycemia per se may contribute to diabetic hypertensive and vascular disease by altering cellular ion content. To more directly investigate the potential role of glucose in this process, we measured cytosolic free calcium in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from Sprague-Dawley rat tail artery before and after incubation with 5 (basal), 10, 15, and 20 mM glucose. Glucose significantly elevated cytosolic free calcium in a dose- and time-dependent manner, from 110.0 +/- 5.4 to 124.5 +/- 9.0, 192.7 +/- 20.4, and 228.4 +/- 21.9 nM at 5, 10, 15, and 20 mM glucose concentrations, respectively. This glucose-induced cytosolic free calcium elevation was also specific, no change being observed after incubation with equivalent concentrations of L-glucose or mannitol. This glucose effect was also dependent on extracellular calcium and pH, since these calcium changes were inhibited in an acidotic or a calcium-free medium, or by the competitive calcium antagonist lanthanum. We conclude that ambient glucose concentrations within clinically observed limits may alter cellular calcium ion homeostasis in vascular smooth muscle cells. We suggest that these cellular ionic effects of hyperglycemia may underlie the predisposition to hypertension and vascular diseases among diabetic subjects and/or those with impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:7860758

  7. Systematical bifurcation analysis of an intracellular calcium oscillation model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xijun; Li, Xiang

    2016-07-01

    As a very important second messenger, Ca(2+) plays the role of adjusting various cellular physiological processes through calcium oscillations. In this paper, a further theoretical study is conducted to explore the kinetic behavior of the calcium signals based on a mathematical model. At first, the causes behind the appearance and disappearance of calcium oscillations are strictly verified from the theoretical level and a comparative analysis between the improved model and the original model is also made. Then, it is found that with the increase of relaxation time, the second bifurcation point of the system moves towards the increasing direction of the stimulus intensity and the oscillation interval displays gradual increase. It is also found that under given stimulus intensity, with the relaxation time getting longer, both the peak value and the period of the calcium oscillations display significant increase. Combining the results from the comparative analysis between the improved model and the original model with the results from the analysis of the relaxation time, it shows that the calcium pump activity exerts a direct impact on the calcium oscillation interval. Finally, the calcium leakage item is introduced into the improved model and it is found that as the calcium leakage increases, the two Hopf bifurcation points of the system both move towards the decreasing direction of the stimulus intensity and the oscillation interval gradually narrows down. The study also shows that under given stimulus intensity, as the calcium leakage increases, the peak value of the calcium oscillations displays slow increase and the oscillation period displays gradual decline. PMID:27172874

  8. Transient elevations of cytosolic free calcium retard subsequent apoptosis in neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, M K; Hardwick, S J; Meagher, L C; Savill, J S; Haslett, C

    1993-01-01

    Elevation of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) has been reported to induce apoptosis in a number of cell types. However, in the neutrophil, which undergoes apoptosis constitutively during aging in vitro, activation by inflammatory mediators elevates [Ca2+]i and prolongs lifespan via inhibition of apoptosis. To examine this paradox, we investigated the effects of modulation of [Ca2+]i upon apoptosis of neutrophils in vitro. Calcium ionophores (A23187, ionomycin) retarded apoptosis in neutrophil populations after 20 h (P < 0.001). Conversely, intracellular Ca(2+)-chelation, using bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) acetoxymethyl ester (AM) promoted apoptosis (P < 0.02). W-7 (an inhibitor of calmodulin) also promoted apoptosis (P < 0.05). Measurements of [Ca2+]i, using fura-2, showed (a) increased apoptosis in neutrophil populations was not associated with elevated [Ca2+]i, (b) neutrophils cultured with ionophore at concentrations inhibiting apoptosis exhibited transient (< 1 h) elevations of [Ca2+]i, to levels previously reported with receptor-mediated stimuli, and (c) BAPTA was able to prevent the elevation of [Ca2+]i and the inhibition of apoptosis produced by ionophore. Modulation of apoptosis occurred without alterations in intracellular pH. Thus, in the neutrophil, unlike lymphoid cells, elevation of [Ca2+]i exerts an inhibitory effect upon apoptosis. Furthermore, these data suggest that transient elevation of [Ca2+]i elicits signaling events leading to prolonged inhibition of apoptosis. Images PMID:8392090

  9. Evidence for role of cytosolic free calcium in hypoxia-induced proximal tubule injury.

    PubMed Central

    Kribben, A; Wieder, E D; Wetzels, J F; Yu, L; Gengaro, P E; Burke, T J; Schrier, R W

    1994-01-01

    The role of cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in hypoxic injury was investigated in rat proximal tubules. [Ca2+]i was measured using fura-2 and cell injury was estimated with propidium iodide (PI) in individual tubules using video imaging fluorescence microscopy. [Ca2+]i increased from approximately 170 to approximately 390 nM during 5 min of hypoxia. This increase preceded detectable cell injury as assessed by PI and was reversible with reoxygenation. 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA; 100 microM) reduced [Ca2+]i under basal conditions (approximately 80 nM) and during hypoxia (approximately 120 nM) and significantly attenuated hypoxic injury. When [Ca2+]i and hypoxic cell injury were studied concurrently in the same individual tubules, the 10 min [Ca2+]i rise correlated significantly with subsequent cell damage observed at 20 min. 2 mM glycine did not block the rise in [Ca2+]i, yet protected the tubules from hypoxic injury. These results indicate that in rat proximal tubules, hypoxia induces an increase of [Ca2+]i which occurs before cell damage. The protective effect of BAPTA supports a role for [Ca2+]i in the initiation of hypoxic proximal tubule injury. The glycine results, however, implicate calcium-independent mechanisms of injury and/or blockade of calcium-mediated processes of injury such as activation of phospholipases or proteases. Images PMID:8182125

  10. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots. PMID:26720810

  11. Calcium-actin waves and oscillations of cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Veksler, Alex; Gov, Nir S

    2009-09-16

    We propose a mechanism for the formation of membrane oscillations and traveling waves, which arise due to the coupling between the actin cytoskeleton and the calcium flux through the membrane. In our model, the fluid cell membrane has a mobile but constant population of proteins with a convex spontaneous curvature, which act as nucleators of actin polymerization and adhesion. Such a continuum model couples the forces of cell-substrate adhesion, actin polymerization, membrane curvature, and the flux of calcium through the membrane. Linear stability analysis shows that sufficiently strong coupling among the calcium, membrane, and protein dynamics may induce robust traveling waves on the membrane. This result was checked for a reduced feedback scheme and is compared to the results without the effects of calcium, where permanent phase separation without waves or oscillations is obtained. The model results are compared to the published observations of calcium waves in cell membranes, and a number of testable predictions are proposed. PMID:19751660

  12. Nitric oxide triggers specific and dose-dependent cytosolic calcium transients in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Aboul-Enein, Ahmed M; Loake, Gary J

    2009-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) transients have been shown to take place in response to diverse developmental and physiological cues. Also, it is involved in biotic and abiotic stress signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule that plays a crucial role in plant growth and development, starting from germination to flowering, ripening of fruit and senescence of organs. Moreover, it plays a pivotal role in several biotic and abiotic stress signaling processes. In the present work, the ability of NO to trigger increases in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) was investigated. For this purpose, transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings constitutively expressing the luminescent Ca2+-sensitive protein apoaequorin (35S::APOAEQUORIN) was employed. In chemiluminescence and in vivo Ca2+ imaging assays, the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) triggered a strong, instantaneous, reproducible, and dose-dependent rise in [Ca2+]cyt. Moreover, the observed rise in [Ca2+]cyt was shown to be NO-specific and not associated with decomposition products of SNP, as the NO-scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3 oxide (C-PTIO) significantly blunted the observed NO-mediated spike in [Ca2+]cyt. Interestingly, preincubation of 35S::APOAEQUORIN Arabidopsis seedlings with the plasma membrane channel blocker lanthanum chloride resulted in partial concentration-dependent blocking of the NO-specific Ca2+ transient. This observation indicates that, in addition to the mobilization of [Ca2+]cyt, as an external source in response to NO treatment, there also exists an appreciable contribution of an as yet unidentified internal pool. PMID:19721746

  13. Oxethazaine inhibits hepatitis B virus capsid assembly by blocking the cytosolic calcium-signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Chunlan; Xiao, Yu; Chen, Xulin

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious public health problem and may progress to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. It is currently treated with PEGylated IFN-α2a and nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NAs). However, PEGylated IFN treatment has problems of high cost, low efficiency and side effects. Long-term administration of NAs is necessary to avoid virus relapse, which can cause drug resistance and side effects. New efforts are now being directed to develop novel anti-HBV drugs targeting either additional viral targets other than viral DNA polymerase or host targets to improve the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. In this study, we discovered that oxethazaine, approved for clinic use in a few countries such as Japan, India, South Africa and Brazil, can dose-dependently reduce the levels of HBV envelope antigen, extracellular HBV DNA in supernatants and intracellular HBV total DNA. However, the levels of HBV cccDNA and HBV RNAs were not affected by oxethazaine treatment. Further study confirmed that oxethazaine acts on the virus assembly stage of the HBV life cycle. A study of the mechanisms of oxethazaine suggested that this drug inhibits HBV replication and capsid assembly by blocking the cytosolic calcium-signalling pathway. Moreover, oxethazaine could inhibit the replication of lamivudine/entecavir-dual-resistant and adefovir-resistant HBV mutants. In conclusion, our study suggests that oxethazaine may serve as a promising drug, or could be used as a starting point for anti-HBV drug discovery. PMID:26838678

  14. Cytosolic calcium and myofilaments in single rat cardiac myocytes achieve a dynamic equilibrium during twitch relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, H A; duBell, W H; Stern, M D; Sollott, S J; Ziman, B D; Silverman, H S; Capogrossi, M C; Talo, A; Lakatta, E G

    1992-01-01

    1. Single isolated rat cardiac myocytes were loaded with either the pentapotassium salt form or the acetoxymethyl ester (AM) form of the calcium-sensitive fluorescent probe, Indo-1. The relationship of the Indo-1 fluorescence transient, an index of the change in cytosolic calcium [Ca2+]i concentration, to the simultaneously measured cell length during the electrically stimulated twitch originating from slack length at 23 degrees C was evaluated. It was demonstrated that even if the Ca2+ dissociation rate from Indo-1 was assumed to be as slow as 10 s-1, the descending limb ('relaxation phase') of the Indo-1 fluorescence transient induced by excitation under these conditions is in equilibrium with the [Ca2+]i transient. Additionally, the extent of Indo-1 loading employed did not substantially alter the twitch characteristics. 2. A unique relationship between the fluorescence transient and cell length was observed during relaxation of contractions that varied in amplitude. This was manifest as a common trajectory in the cell length vs. [Ca2+]i phase-plane diagrams beginning at the time of cell relengthening. The common trajectory could also be demonstrated in Indo-1 AM-loaded cells. The Indo-1 fluorescence-length relation defined by this common trajectory is steeper than that described by the relation of peak contraction amplitude and peak fluorescence during the twitch contractions. 3. The trajectory of the [Ca2+]i-length relation elicited via an abrupt, rapid, brief (200 ms) pulse of caffeine directly onto the cell surface or by 'tetanization' of cells in the presence of ryanodine is identical to the common [Ca2+]i-length trajectory formed by electrically stimulated contractions of different magnitudes. As the [Ca2+]i and length transients induced by caffeine application or during tetanization in the presence of ryanodine develop with a much slower time course than those elicited by electrical stimulation, the common trajectory is not fortuitous, i.e. it cannot be

  15. Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Activates CaMMKβ to Initiate Autophagy in PK-15 Cells by Increasing Cytosolic Calcium.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuanxing; Qi, Baozhu; Zhou, Yingshan; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) induces autophagy via the 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in pig kidney PK-15 cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of AMPK activation in autophagy induction remain unknown. With specific inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi), we show that PCV2 infection upregulated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKβ) by increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). Elevation of cytosolic calcium ion (Ca(2+)) did not seem to involve inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) release from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by phosphoinositide phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-γ). CaMKKβ then activated both AMPK and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI). PCV2 employed CaMKI and Trp-Asp (WD) repeat domain phosphoinositide-interacting protein 1 (WIPI1) as another pathway additional to AMPK signaling in autophagy initiation. Our findings could help better understanding of the signaling pathways of autophagy induction as part of PCV2 pathogenesis. Further research is warranted to study if PCV2 interacts directly with IP3R or indirectly with the molecules that antagonize IP3R activity responsible for increased cytosolic Ca(2+) both in PK-15 cells and PCV2-targeted primary cells from pigs. PMID:27213427

  16. Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Activates CaMMKβ to Initiate Autophagy in PK-15 Cells by Increasing Cytosolic Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuanxing; Qi, Baozhu; Zhou, Yingshan; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) induces autophagy via the 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in pig kidney PK-15 cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of AMPK activation in autophagy induction remain unknown. With specific inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi), we show that PCV2 infection upregulated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKβ) by increasing cytosolic Ca2+ via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). Elevation of cytosolic calcium ion (Ca2+) did not seem to involve inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) release from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by phosphoinositide phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-γ). CaMKKβ then activated both AMPK and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI). PCV2 employed CaMKI and Trp-Asp (WD) repeat domain phosphoinositide-interacting protein 1 (WIPI1) as another pathway additional to AMPK signaling in autophagy initiation. Our findings could help better understanding of the signaling pathways of autophagy induction as part of PCV2 pathogenesis. Further research is warranted to study if PCV2 interacts directly with IP3R or indirectly with the molecules that antagonize IP3R activity responsible for increased cytosolic Ca2+ both in PK-15 cells and PCV2-targeted primary cells from pigs. PMID:27213427

  17. Measurement of free cytosolic calcium in single cells: method and application.

    PubMed

    Raue, F; Zink, A

    1992-05-01

    Intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i acts as an important intracellular messenger system for secretion and synthesis, cell growth and differentiation. In order to demonstrate definitively that a change in [Ca2+]i is responsible for a physiological event, one has to measure [Ca2+]i directly within intact cells and correlate the time course of any [Ca2+]i changes with the biological response. Measurement of [Ca2+]i was done in a single cell preloaded with fluorescent Ca indicator fura2 using a fluorescent unit (lonoquant) consisting of an inverted microscope (Zeiss IM 35) equipped with a mercury lamp and a rotating filter wheel containing filters at wavelengths of 340 and 380 nm. Cells were alternately excited and emission signals of fura 2-loaded cells were collected by a photomultiplier and recorded on-line on a computer screen. As a model system, the rat C-cell carcinoma cell line rMTC 6-23 secreting calcitonin was used. An acute elevation of extracellular calcium resulted in an increase in [Ca2+]i within 5 sec and rapid release of preformed calcitonin. This tight linkage between extracellular calcium and [Ca2+]i is mediated via Ca influx through voltage-dependent Ca channels. These channels are modulated by intracellular cAMP, yielding a rhythmic oscillation of [Ca2+]i, as well as by extracellular somatostatin blocking the Ca channel and the increase of [Ca2+]i via a pertussis toxin sensitive Gi protein. The change in [Ca2+]i is associated with changes in calcitonin secretion, confirming the stimulus secretion coupling via voltage-dependent Ca channels in C-cells. PMID:1354776

  18. The externally derived portion of the hyperosmotic shock-activated cytosolic calcium pulse mediates adaptation to ionic stress in suspension-cultured tobacco cells.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influx of Ca2+ into the cytosol has long been suggested to serve as a signaling intermediate in the acquisition of tolerance to hyperosmotic and/or salinity stresses. Here we use aequorin-transformed suspension-cultured tobacco cells to directly assess the role of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+cyt) si...

  19. Regulation of glomerulotubular balance. III. Implication of cytosolic calcium in flow-dependent proximal tubule transport.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhaopeng; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Weinstein, Alan M; Wang, Tong

    2015-04-15

    In the proximal tubule, axial flow (drag on brush-border microvilli) stimulates Na(+) and HCO3 (-) reabsorption by modulating both Na/H exchanger 3 (NHE3) and H-ATPase activity, a process critical to glomerulotubular balance. We have also demonstrated that blocking the angiotensin II receptor decreases baseline transport, but preserves the flow effect; dopamine leaves baseline fluxes intact, but abrogates the flow effect. In the current work, we provide evidence implicating cytosolic calcium in flow-dependent transport. Mouse proximal tubules were microperfused in vitro at perfusion rates of 5 and 20 nl/min, and reabsorption of fluid (Jv) and HCO3 (-) (JHCO3) were measured. We examined the effect of high luminal Ca(2+) (5 mM), 0 mM Ca(2+), the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), and the Ca-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin. In control tubules, increasing perfusion rate from 5 to 20 nl/min increased Jv by 62% and JHCO3 by 104%. With respect to Na(+) reabsorption, high luminal Ca(2+) decreased transport at low flow, but preserved the flow-induced increase; low luminal Ca(2+) had little impact; both BAPTA and 2-APB had no effect on baseline flux, but abrogated the flow effect; thapsigargin decreased baseline flow, leaving the flow effect intact. With respect to HCO3 (-) reabsorption, high luminal Ca(2+) decreased transport at low flow and mildly diminished the flow-induced increase; low luminal Ca(2+) had little impact; both BAPTA and 2-APB had no effect on baseline flux, but abrogated the flow effect. These data implicate IP3 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling as a critical step in transduction of microvillous drag to modulate Na(+) and HCO3 (-) transport. PMID:25651568

  20. Cytosolic calcium changes affect the incidence of early afterdepolarizations in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Balázs; Hegyi, Bence; Kistamás, Kornél; Váczi, Krisztina; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) on action potential duration (APD) and on the incidence of early afterdepolarizations (EADs) in canine ventricular cardiomyocytes. Action potentials (AP) of isolated cells were recorded using conventional sharp microelectrodes, and the concomitant [Ca(2+)]i was monitored with the fluorescent dye Fura-2. EADs were evoked at a 0.2 Hz pacing rate by inhibiting the rapid delayed rectifier K(+) current with dofetilide, by activating the late sodium current with veratridine, or by activating the L-type calcium current with BAY K8644. These interventions progressively prolonged the AP and resulted in initiation of EADs. Reducing [Ca(2+)]i by application of the cell-permeant Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM lengthened the AP at 1.0 Hz if it was applied alone, in the presence of veratridine, or in the presence of BAY K8644. However, BAPTA-AM shortened the AP if the cells were pretreated with dofetilide. The incidence of the evoked EADs was strongly reduced by BAPTA-AM in dofetilide, moderately reduced in veratridine, whereas EAD incidence was increased by BAPTA-AM in the presence of BAY K8644. Based on these experimental data, changes in [Ca(2+)]i have marked effects on APD as well as on the incidence of EADs; however, the underlying mechanisms may be different, depending on the mechanism of EAD generation. As a consequence, reduction of [Ca(2+)]i may eliminate EADs under some, but not all, experimental conditions. PMID:25928391

  1. [The role of the mitochondria in the clearance of cytosolic calcium].

    PubMed

    Foia, L

    1996-01-01

    The magnitude and space-temporal profile of the intracellular Ca2+ transients are determined both by the mechanism that decrease and increase calcium levels in the cytoplasm. By the use of cocktails with different content of specific inhibitors of the extrusion and sequester mechanisms, the ability of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport to limit the elevation in free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, following an imposed Ca2+ load was reexamined, indicating variable data with respect to various cells. In chromaffin cells, inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation with protonophore, dramatically modifies the shape of the [Ca2+]c response, indicating that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is an important mechanism for clearance of large Ca2+ loads. By contrast, using digital imaging in the presence of specific mitochondria inhibitors to investigate the [Ca2+]c responses of cerebellar granule cells in which ATP generation has been totally separated from mitochondrial Ca2+ transport, indicates surprising results: it was confirmed that mitochondria in these cells accumulate Ca2+ entering the cell in response to plasma membrane depolarization, but specific abolition of mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation without ATP depletion significantly decreases the bulk cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients generated by elevated KCl levels, whereas the response in greatly increased when protonophore are present and ATP/ADP ratios are allowed to collapse. The results suggest that nonmitochondrial ATP-dependent transport pathways are primarily responsible for removing excess Ca2+ from the cytoplasm. Far from restricting the elevation in [Ca2+]c in response to a Ca2+ load, functional mitochondria may enhance the elevation in the bulk cytoplasm. The existent conflict of data, suggests the need for a new reevaluation of the role of mitochondria in Ca2+ clearance, and the possibility that mitochondria contribute to, rather than protect against, excitoxicity has to be investigated. PMID:9455435

  2. Recombinant erythropoietin increases blood pressure in experimental hypertension and uraemia without change in vascular cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Roger, S D; Fluck, R J; McMahon, A C; Raine, A E

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of erythropoietin-induced hypertension in dialysis patients is unclear. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) may be altered in both hypertension and uraemia, and the effects of both uraemia and r-HuEPO on vascular smooth muscle [Ca2+]i and blood pressure (BP) in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were therefore studied. Male WKY and SHR underwent partial nephrectomy or sham operation. Three weeks later a 28-day period of treatment with either r-HuEPO 100 U/kg, s.c., 3 times/week or buffer was commenced (n = 10-12 for each subgroup). BP was measured weekly, by noninvasive Doppler tail-cuff assessment. [Ca2+]i was measured following loading with fura-2 in pooled, primary aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Serum urea and creatinine rose 3- to 4-fold after partial nephrectomy. Treatment with r-HuEPO did not change renal function further in either uraemic or control WKY or SHR. Haemoglobin increased in both non-uraemic WKY (16.2-20.3 g/dl) and SHR (16.4-20.5 g/dl) and uraemic animals (WKY 13.9-20.9; SHR 13.8-18.8 g/dl; p < 0.01 for all changes) following 4 weeks of r-HuEPO treatment. BP was unaffected by r-HuEPO in WKY but increased in nonuraemic SHR (210-250; p < 0.01) and in uraemic SHR (224-251 mm Hg; p < 0.001) at 4 weeks. VSMC [Ca2+]i was higher in SHR than WKY (121 vs. 83 nmol/l; MANOVA p < 0.05) but no effect of uraemia or r-HuEPO on [Ca2+]i was detected. In conclusion, the hypertensive effects of r-HuEPO are augmented both in a genetic model of hypertension and in uraemia. Although VSMC [Ca2+]i was elevated in SHR, the further increase in BP induced by r-HuEPO was not associated with alterations in VSMC cytosolic calcium. PMID:8773347

  3. Fluctuations in Cytosolic Calcium Regulate the Neuronal Malate-Aspartate NADH Shuttle: Implications for Neuronal Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Satrústegui, Jorgina; Bak, Lasse K

    2015-12-01

    The malate-aspartate NADH shuttle (MAS) operates in neurons and other cells to translocate reducing equivalents from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix, thus allowing a continued flux through the glycolytic pathway and metabolism of extracellular lactate. Recent discoveries have taught us that MAS is regulated by fluctuations in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, and that this regulation is required to maintain a tight coupling between neuronal activity and mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. At cytosolic Ca(2+) fluctuations below the threshold of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter, there is a positive correlation between Ca(2+) and MAS activity; however, if cytosolic Ca(2+) increases above the threshold, MAS activity is thought to be reduced by an intricate mechanism. The latter forces the neurons to partly rely on anaerobic glycolysis producing lactate that may be metabolized subsequently, by neurons or other cells. In this review, we will discuss the evidence for Ca(2+)-mediated regulation of MAS that have been uncovered over the last decade or so, together with the need for further verification, and examine the metabolic ramifications for neurons. PMID:26138554

  4. T-Type voltage-sensitive calcium channels mediate mechanically-induced intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes by regulating endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Genevieve N; Leong, Pui L; Guo, X Edward

    2016-07-01

    One of the earliest responses of bone cells to mechanical stimuli is a rise in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)), and osteocytes in particular exhibit robust oscillations in Ca(2+) when subjected to loading. Previous studies implicate roles for both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and T-Type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC) in these responses, but their interactions or relative contributions have not been studied. By observing Ca(2+) dynamics in the cytosol (Ca(2+)cyt) and the ER (Ca(2+)ER), the focus of this study was to explore the role of the ER and T-Type channels in Ca(2+) signaling in bone cells. We demonstrate that inhibition of T-Type VSCC in osteocytes significantly reduces the number of Ca(2+)cyt responses and affects Ca(2+)ER depletion dynamics. Simultaneous observation of Ca(2+) exchange among these spaces revealed high synchrony between rises in Ca(2+)cyt and depressions in Ca(2+)ER, and this synchrony was significantly reduced by challenging T-Type VSCC. We further confirmed that this effect was mediated directly through the ER and not through store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) pathways. Taken together, our data suggests that T-Type VSCC facilitate the recovery of Ca(2+)ER in osteocytes to sustain mechanically-induced Ca(2+) oscillations, uncovering a new mechanism underlying the behavior of osteocytes as mechanosensors. PMID:27108342

  5. Isoflurane-Induced Caspase-3 Activation Is Dependent on Cytosolic Calcium and Can Be Attenuated by Memantine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guohua; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Bin; Ichinose, Fumito; Wu, Xu; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that caspase activation and apoptosis are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. We reported that anesthetic isoflurane can induce apoptosis, alter processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and increase amyloid-β protein (Aβ) generation. However, the mechanism by which isoflurane induces apoptosis is primarily unknown. We therefore set out to assess effects of extracellular calcium concentration on isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in H4 human neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express human full-length APP (H4-APP cells). In addition, we tested effects of RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of IP3 receptor, NMDA receptor, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump, sacro-/ER calcium ATPase (SERCA1). Finally, we examined the effects of the NMDA receptor partial antagonist, memantine, in H4-APP cells and brain tissue of naive mice. EDTA (10 mm), BAPTA (10 μm), and RNAi silencing of IP3 receptor, NMDA receptor, or SERCA1 attenuated capase-3 activation. Memantine (4 μm) inhibited isoflurane-induced elevations in cytosolic calcium levels and attenuated isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation, apoptosis, and cell viability. Memantine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in brain tissue of naive mice. These results suggest that disruption of calcium homeostasis underlies isoflurane-induced caspase activation and apoptosis. We also show for the first time that the NMDA receptor partial antagonist, memantine, can prevent isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. These findings, indicating that isoflurane-induced caspase activation and apoptosis are dependent on cytosolic calcium levels, should facilitate the provision of safer anesthesia care, especially for Alzheimer's disease and elderly patients. PMID:18434534

  6. The plasma membrane protein Rch1 is a negative regulator of cytosolic calcium homeostasis and positively regulated by the calcium/calcineurin signaling pathway in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunying; Yan, Hongbo; Happeck, Ricardo; Peiter-Volk, Tina; Xu, Huihui; Zhang, Yan; Peiter, Edgar; van Oostende Triplet, Chloë; Whiteway, Malcolm; Jiang, Linghuo

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rch1 is structurally similar to both the vertebrate solute carrier SLC10A7 and Candida albicans Rch1. We show here that ScRCH1 is a functional homolog of CaRCH1. In S. cerevisiae, overexpression of ScRCH1 suppresses, but deletion of ScRCH1 does not affect, the lithium and rapamycin tolerance of pmr1 cells. Overexpression of ScRCH1 reduces expression of ENA1, prevents sustained accumulation of cytosolic calcium and reduces the activation level of calcium/calcineurin signaling in pmr1 cells. Therefore, similar to the situation in the pathogen C. albicans, ScRch1 negatively regulates the cytosolic homeostasis in response to high levels of extracellular calcium. ScRch1 proteins distribute as multiple foci in the plasma membrane prior to cell division, move toward and concentrate at the bud neck as the bud grows in size, and disperse again along the plasma membrane immediately prior to cytokinesis. Furthermore, our genetic and biochemical data also demonstrate that transcriptional expression of RCH1 is positively regulated by calcium/calcineurin signaling through the sole CDRE element in its promoter. PMID:26832117

  7. Calcium oscillations in pituitary gonadotrophs: comparison of experiment and theory.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y X; Rinzel, J; Keizer, J; Stojilković, S S

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a mathematical model that describes several aspects of agonist-induced Ca2+ signaling in single pituitary gonadotrophs. Our model is based on fast activation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor Ca2+ channels at low free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and slow inactivation at high [Ca2+]i. Previous work has shown that these gating properties, when combined with a Ca(2+)-ATPase, are sufficient to generate simulated Ca2+ oscillations. The Hodgkin-Huxley-like description we formulate here incorporates these different gating properties explicitly and renders their effects transparent and easy to modulate. We introduce regulatory mechanisms of channel opening which enable the model, both in the absence and in the presence of Ca2+ entry, to give responses to a wide range of agonist doses that are in good agreement with experimental findings, including subthreshold responses, superthreshold oscillations with frequency determined by [InsP3], and nonoscillatory "biphasic" responses followed occasionally by small-amplitude oscillations. A particular added feature of our model, enhanced channel opening by reduced concentration of Ca2+ in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, allows oscillations to continue during pool depletion. The model predicts that ionomycin and thapsigargin can induce oscillations with basal [InsP3] and zero Ca2+ entry, while Ca2+ injection cannot. Responses to specific pairings of sub- or superthreshold stimuli of agonist, ionomycin, and thapsigargin are also correctly predicted. Since this model encompasses a wide range of observed dynamic behaviors within a single framework, based on well-established mechanisms, its relevance should not be restricted to gonadotrophs. PMID:8278407

  8. Effect of cyclosporin A and analogues on cytosolic calcium and vasoconstriction: possible lack of relationship to immunosuppressive activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lo Russo, A.; Passaquin, A. C.; André, P.; Skutella, M.; Rüegg, U. T.

    1996-01-01

    1. The full therapeutic potential of the main immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporin A (CsA), is limited because of its side effects, namely nephrotoxicity and hypertension. Several lines of evidence suggest that the origin of both side effects could be CsA-induced vasoconstriction. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. 2. Diameter measurements of rat isolated mesenteric arteries showed an increase in noradrenaline- and [Arg]8vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction when arteries were pretreated with CsA. 3. Measurements in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) of either cytosolic calcium concentration or of 45Ca2+ efflux showed that CsA potentiated the calcium influx to several vasoconstrictor hormones: [Arg]8vasopressin, angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine. On the other hand, 45Ca2+ efflux in response to thapsigargin, which depletes calcium from intracellular pools, was not potentiated by CsA. 45Ca2+ uptake was not altered by CsA or by any of the analogues tested. 4. Time-course studies in cultured VSMC showed that maximal CsA-induced Ca2+ potentiation occurred after ca. 20 h and this effect was reversed over approximately the next 20 h. 5. To investigate the possible role played by the known intracellular targets of CsA, namely cyclophilin and calcineurin, CsA derivatives with variable potencies with respect to their immunosuppressive activity, were tested on the calcium influx to [Arg]8vasopressin. Derivatives devoid of immunosuppressive activity (cyclosporin H, PSC-833) potentiated calcium signalling, while the potent immunosuppressant, FK520, a close derivative of FK506, and MeVal4CsA, an antagonist of the immunosuppressive effect of CsA did not. The latter compound was unable to reverse the calcium potentiating effect of CsA. 6. Our results show that CsA increases the calcium influx to vasoconstrictor hormones in smooth muscle cells, which presumably increases vasoconstriction. Loading of the intracellular

  9. Trolox-Sensitive Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Mitochondrial Morphology, Oxidative Phosphorylation and Cytosolic Calcium Handling in Healthy Cells

    PubMed Central

    Distelmaier, Felix; Valsecchi, Federica; Forkink, Marleen; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet; Swarts, Herman G.; Rodenburg, Richard J.T.; Verwiel, Eugène T.P.; Smeitink, Jan A.M.; Willems, Peter H.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Cell regulation by signaling reactive oxygen species (sROS) is often incorrectly studied through extracellular oxidant addition. Here, we used the membrane-permeable antioxidant Trolox to examine the role of sROS in mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) handling in healthy human skin fibroblasts. Results and Innovation: Trolox treatment reduced the levels of 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein (CM-H2DCF) oxidizing ROS, lowered cellular lipid peroxidation, and induced a less oxidized mitochondrial thiol redox state. This was paralleled by increased glutathione- and mitofusin-dependent mitochondrial filamentation, increased expression of fully assembled mitochondrial complex I, elevated activity of citrate synthase and OXPHOS enzymes, and a higher cellular O2 consumption. In contrast, Trolox did not alter hydroethidium oxidation, cytosolic thiol redox state, mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels, or mitochondrial membrane potential. Whole genome expression profiling revealed that Trolox did not trigger significant changes in gene expression, suggesting that Trolox acts downstream of this process. Cytosolic Ca2+ transients, induced by the hormone bradykinin, were of a higher amplitude and decayed faster in Trolox-treated cells. These effects were dose-dependently antagonized by hydrogen peroxide. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that Trolox-sensitive sROS are upstream regulators of mitochondrial mitofusin levels, morphology, and function in healthy human skin fibroblasts. This information not only facilitates the interpretation of antioxidant effects in cell models (of oxidative-stress), but also contributes to a better understanding of ROS-related human pathologies, including mitochondrial disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1657–1669. PMID:22559215

  10. Indole-3-acetic acid-induced oxidative burst and an increase in cytosolic calcium ion concentration in rice suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T H; Umemura, Kenji; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-08-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the major natural auxin involved in the regulation of a variety of growth and developmental processes such as division, elongation, and polarity determination in growing plant cells. It has been shown that dividing and/or elongating plant cells accompanies the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a number of reports have suggested that hormonal actions can be mediated by ROS through ROS-mediated opening of ion channels. Here, we surveyed the link between the action of IAA, oxidative burst, and calcium channel activation in a transgenic cells of rice expressing aequorin in the cytosol. Application of IAA to the cells induced a rapid and transient generation of superoxide which was followed by a transient increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c). The IAA-induced [Ca(2+)]c elevation was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockers and a Ca(2+) chelator. Furthermore, ROS scavengers effectively blocked the action of IAA on [Ca(2+)]c elevation. PMID:27149194

  11. Effect of yessotoxin on cytosolic calcium levels in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    PANG, MIN; QU, PEI; GAO, CHUN-LEI; TANG, XUEXI; WANG, ZONG-LING

    2014-01-01

    Yessotoxin (YTX) and its analogs are a type of marine toxins found in marine environments in numerous coastal countries. These toxins tend to accumulate in filter-feeding molluscs and may threaten the shellfish industry and public health. Several previous studies indicated that YTX may induce apoptosis in different types of cell lines, although the exact underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to mainly focus on the effect of YTX on cytosolic Ca2+ levels in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In order to investigate the exact mechanism of YTX-evoked Ca2+ increase, laser scanning confocal microscopy was used, with the addition of the chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and nifedipine, an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, to the reaction system. The results demonstrated that YTX caused cytosolic Ca2+ level increase in Bel7402 cells and the YTX-evoked Ca2+ increase was successfully blocked by EGTA and nifedipine. Therefore, our results indicated that YTX may cause apoptosis via inducing Ca2+ entry in Bel7402 cells. PMID:24649076

  12. Palladacycle (BPC) antitumour activity against resistant and metastatic cell lines: the relationship with cytosolic calcium mobilisation and cathepsin B activity.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Alexandre; Barbosa, Christiano M V; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Garcia, Daniel M; Silva, Luís S; Matsuo, Alisson L; Nascimento, Fábio D; Rodrigues, Elaine G; Caires, Antonio C F; Smaili, Soraya S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2014-05-22

    The search for new compounds that induce p53-independent apoptosis is the focus of many studies in cancer biology because these compounds could be more specific and would overcome chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro antitumour activity of a Biphosphinic Palladacycle Complex (BPC) and extended preclinical studies to an in vivo model. Saos-2 cells, a p53-null human osteosarcoma drug-resistant cell line, were treated with BPC in the presence or absence of a cathepsin B inhibitor and a calcium chelator (CA074 and BAPTA-AM, respectively), and several parameters related to apoptosis were evaluated. Preclinical studies were performed with mice that were intravenously inoculated with murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 cells and treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with BPC (8 mg/kg/day) for ten consecutive days, when lung metastatic nodules were counted. In vitro data show that BPC induces cell death in Saos-2 cells mainly by apoptosis, which was accompanied by the effector caspase-3 activation. These events are most likely related to Bax translocation and increased cytosolic calcium mobilisation, mainly from intracellular compartments. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilisation (LMP) was also observed after 12 h of BPC exposure. Interestingly, BAPTA-AM and CA074 significantly decreased BPC cytotoxicity, suggesting that both calcium and cathepsin B are required for BPC antitumour activity. In vivo studies demonstrated that BPC protects mice against murine metastatic melanoma. In conclusion, BPC complex is an effective anticancer compound against metastatic murine melanoma. This complex is cytotoxic to the drug-resistant osteosarcoma Saos-2 human tumour cells by inducing apoptosis triggered by calcium signalling and a lysosomal-dependent pathway. PMID:24709226

  13. Cytosolic and nuclear calcium signaling in atrial myocytes: IP3-mediated calcium release and the role of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hohendanner, Felix; Maxwell, Joshua T; Blatter, Lothar A

    2015-01-01

    In rabbit atrial myocytes Ca signaling has unique features due to the lack of transverse (t) tubules, the spatial arrangement of mitochondria and the contribution of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor-induced Ca release (IICR). During excitation-contraction coupling action potential-induced elevation of cytosolic [Ca] originates in the cell periphery from Ca released from the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (j-SR) and then propagates by Ca-induced Ca release from non-junctional (nj-) SR toward the cell center. The subsarcolemmal region between j-SR and the first array of nj-SR Ca release sites is devoid of mitochondria which results in a rapid propagation of activation through this domain, whereas the subsequent propagation through the nj-SR network occurs at a velocity typical for a propagating Ca wave. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca uptake with the Ca uniporter blocker Ru360 accelerates propagation and increases the amplitude of Ca transients (CaTs) originating from nj-SR. Elevation of cytosolic IP3 levels by rapid photolysis of caged IP3 has profound effects on the magnitude of subcellular CaTs with increased Ca release from nj-SR and enhanced CaTs in the nuclear compartment. IP3 uncaging restricted to the nucleus elicites ‘mini’-Ca waves that remain confined to this compartment. Elementary IICR events (Ca puffs) preferentially originate in the nucleus in close physical association with membrane structures of the nuclear envelope and the nucleoplasmic reticulum. The data suggest that in atrial myocytes the nucleus is an autonomous Ca signaling domain where Ca dynamics are primarily governed by IICR. PMID:25891132

  14. The control of brain mitochondrial energization by cytosolic calcium: the mitochondrial gas pedal.

    PubMed

    Gellerich, Frank Norbert; Gizatullina, Zemfira; Gainutdinov, Timur; Muth, Katharina; Seppet, Enn; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vielhaber, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    This review focuses on problems of the intracellular regulation of mitochondrial function in the brain via the (i) supply of mitochondria with ADP by means of ADP shuttles and channels and (ii) the Ca(2+) control of mitochondrial substrate supply. The permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane for adenine nucleotides is low. Therefore rate dependent concentration gradients exist between the mitochondrial intermembrane space and the cytosol. The existence of dynamic ADP gradients is an important precondition for the functioning of ADP shuttles, for example CrP-shuttle. Cr at mM concentrations instead of ADP diffuses from the cytosol through the porin pores into the intermembrane space. The CrP-shuttle isoenzymes work in different directions which requires different metabolite concentrations mainly caused by dynamic ADP compartmentation. The ADP shuttle mechanisms alone cannot explain the load dependent changes in mitochondrial energization, and a complete model of mitochondrial regulation have to account the Ca(2+) -dependent substrate supply too. According to the old paradigmatic view, Ca(2+) (cyt) taken up by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter activates dehydrogenases within the matrix. However, recently it was found that Ca(2+) (cyt) at low nM concentrations exclusively activates the state 3 respiration via aralar, the mitochondrial glutamate/aspartate carrier. At higher Ca(2+) (cyt) (> 500 nM), brain mitochondria take up Ca(2+) for activation of substrate oxidation rates. Since brain mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation is only slightly influenced by Ca(2+) (cyt) , it was proposed that the cytosolic formation of pyruvate from its precursors is tightly controlled by the Ca(2+) dependent malate/aspartate shuttle. At low (50-100 nM) Ca(2+) (cyt) the pyruvate formation is suppressed, providing a substrate limitation control in neurons. This so called "gas pedal" mechanism explains why the energy metabolism of neurons in the nucleus suprachiasmaticus could be down

  15. Low-frequency calcium oscillations accompany deoxyhemoglobin oscillations in rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Du, Congwu; Volkow, Nora D; Koretsky, Alan P; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-10-28

    Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals are used to map brain functional connectivity with functional MRI, but their source is not well understood. Here we used optical imaging to assess whether LFOs from vascular signals covary with oscillatory intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)i) and with local field potentials in the rat's somatosensory cortex. We observed that the frequency of Ca(2+)i oscillations in tissue (∼0.07 Hz) was similar to the LFOs of deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) in both large blood vessels and capillaries. The HbR and HbO2 fluctuations within tissue correlated with Ca(2+)i oscillations with a lag time of ∼5-6 s. The Ca(2+)i and hemoglobin oscillations were insensitive to hypercapnia. In contrast, cerebral-blood-flow velocity (CBFv) in arteries and veins fluctuated at a higher frequency (∼0.12 Hz) and was sensitive to hypercapnia. However, in parenchymal tissue, CBFv oscillated with peaks at both ∼0.06 Hz and ∼0.12 Hz. Although the higher-frequency CBFv oscillation (∼0.12 Hz) was decreased by hypercapnia, its lower-frequency component (∼0.06 Hz) was not. The sensitivity of the higher CBFV oscillations to hypercapnia, which triggers blood vessel vasodilation, suggests its dependence on vascular effects that are distinct from the LFOs detected in HbR, HbO2, Ca(2+)i, and the lower-frequency tissue CBFv, which were insensitive to hypercapnia. Hemodynamic LFOs correlated both with Ca(2+)i and neuronal firing (local field potentials), indicating that they directly reflect neuronal activity (perhaps also glial). These findings show that HbR fluctuations (basis of BOLD oscillations) are linked to oscillatory cellular activity and detectable throughout the vascular tree (arteries, capillaries, and veins). PMID:25313035

  16. Low-frequency calcium oscillations accompany deoxyhemoglobin oscillations in rat somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Du, Congwu; Volkow, Nora D.; Koretsky, Alan P.; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals are used to map brain functional connectivity with functional MRI, but their source is not well understood. Here we used optical imaging to assess whether LFOs from vascular signals covary with oscillatory intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) and with local field potentials in the rat’s somatosensory cortex. We observed that the frequency of Ca2+i oscillations in tissue (∼0.07 Hz) was similar to the LFOs of deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) in both large blood vessels and capillaries. The HbR and HbO2 fluctuations within tissue correlated with Ca2+i oscillations with a lag time of ∼5–6 s. The Ca2+i and hemoglobin oscillations were insensitive to hypercapnia. In contrast, cerebral-blood-flow velocity (CBFv) in arteries and veins fluctuated at a higher frequency (∼0.12 Hz) and was sensitive to hypercapnia. However, in parenchymal tissue, CBFv oscillated with peaks at both ∼0.06 Hz and ∼0.12 Hz. Although the higher-frequency CBFv oscillation (∼0.12 Hz) was decreased by hypercapnia, its lower-frequency component (∼0.06 Hz) was not. The sensitivity of the higher CBFV oscillations to hypercapnia, which triggers blood vessel vasodilation, suggests its dependence on vascular effects that are distinct from the LFOs detected in HbR, HbO2, Ca2+i, and the lower-frequency tissue CBFv, which were insensitive to hypercapnia. Hemodynamic LFOs correlated both with Ca2+i and neuronal firing (local field potentials), indicating that they directly reflect neuronal activity (perhaps also glial). These findings show that HbR fluctuations (basis of BOLD oscillations) are linked to oscillatory cellular activity and detectable throughout the vascular tree (arteries, capillaries, and veins). PMID:25313035

  17. Interplay Between Cytosolic Dopamine, Calcium and α-Synuclein Causes Selective Death of Substantia Nigra Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mosharov, Eugene V.; Larsen, Kristin E.; Kanter, Ellen; Phillips, Kester A.; Wilson, Krystal; Schmitz, Yvonne; Krantz, David E.; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Edwards, Robert H.; Sulzer, David

    2009-01-01

    Summary The basis for selective death of specific neuronal populations in neurodegenerative diseases remains unclear. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a synucleinopathy characterized by a preferential loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), whereas neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are spared. Using intracellular patch electrochemistry to directly measure cytosolic dopamine (DAcyt) in cultured midbrain neurons, we confirm that elevated DAcyt and its metabolites are neurotoxic and that genetic and pharmacological interventions that decrease DAcyt provide neuroprotection. L-DOPA increased DAcyt in SN neurons to levels 2-3-fold higher than in VTA neurons, a response dependent on dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, resulting in greater susceptibility of SN neurons to L-DOPA-induced neurotoxicity. DAcyt was not altered by α-synuclein deletion, although dopaminergic neurons lacking α-synuclein were resistant to L-DOPA-induced cell death. Thus, an interaction between Ca2+, DAcyt and α-synuclein may underlie the susceptibility of SN neurons in PD, suggesting multiple therapeutic targets. PMID:19409267

  18. Evaluation of Cisplatin Neurotoxicity in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia via Cytosolic Calcium Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Erol, Kevser; Yiğitaslan, Semra; Ünel, Çiğdem; Kaygısız, Bilgin; Yıldırım, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Calcium homeostasis is considered to be important in antineoplastic as well as in neurotoxic adverse effects of cisplatin. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the role of Ca2+ in cisplatin neurotoxicity in cultured rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Study Design: Cell culture study. Methods: DRG cells prepared from 1-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were used to determine the role of Ca2+ in the cisplatin (10–600 μM) neurotoxicity. The cells were incubated with cisplatin plus nimodipine (1–3 μM), dizocilpine (MK-801) (1–3 μM) or thapsigargin (100–300 nM). Toxicity of cisplatinon DRG cells was determined by the MTT assay. Results: The neurotoxicity of cisplatin was significant when used in high concentrations (100–600 μM). Nimodipine (1 μM) but not MK-801 or thapsigargin prevented the neurotoxic effects of 200 μM of cisplatin. Conclusion: Voltage-dependent calcium channels may play a role in cisplatin neurotoxicity. PMID:27403382

  19. Extracellular ATP has a potent effect to enhance cytosolic calcium and contractility in single ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Danziger, R S; Raffaeli, S; Moreno-Sanchez, R; Sakai, M; Capogrossi, M C; Spurgeon, H A; Hansford, R G; Lakatta, E G

    1988-08-01

    The effect of extracellular ATP on the contraction of single rat cardiac myocytes was investigated, together with the effect on the transient change in cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai) elicited by excitation and on the relationship between these two parameters. In unstimulated single myocytes, ATP caused a small increase in Cai (measured as the ratio of fluorescence of Indo-1 at 410 to that at 490 nm. In myocytes bathed in a medium containing 1.0 mM [Ca2+] at 23 degrees C and stimulated at 1 Hz, ATP (1 microM) resulted in a two-threefold increase in amplitude of contraction, as measured by video cinemicrographic techniques. The duration of the Cai-transient was not altered but its amplitude was markedly enhanced, as was the amplitude of contraction. The relation between Cai and contraction-amplitude was not altered by ATP, when measured over a range of extracellular [Ca2+], suggesting that ATP does not affect the myofilament-Ca2+ interaction. The primary site of action of ATP in increasing Cai is at the sarcolemma since the addition to suspensions of myocytes of caffeine (10 mM), which depletes the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, does not prevent the subsequent increase of Cai due to ATP. Further, lowering of the extracellular [Ca2+] to less than 1 microM with EGTA abolishes the response of Cai to ATP, though not the response to caffeine. Thus in rat cardiac myocytes ATP stimulates trans-sarcolemmal influx of Ca2+: ADP, AMP and adenosine are ineffective. ATP markedly augments the amplitude of the Cai transient elicited by electrical stimulation thus rendering it a potent inotropic agent. PMID:3191528

  20. Milrinone enhances cytosolic calcium transient and contraction in rat cardiac myocytes during beta-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Raffaeli, S; Ferroni, C; Spurgeon, H A; Capogrossi, M C

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism that underlies the absence of a positive inotropic effect of milrinone on rat myocardium. The twitch characteristics of enzymatically dissociated left ventricular myocytes from the adult rat and guinea pig were assessed by edge tracking during field stimulation. In some rat myocytes loaded with the ester derivative of the Ca2+ probe Indo-1 we simultaneously measured changes in cell length and in the associated cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai) transient. Our results show that in guinea pig myocytes bathed in 0.5 mM [Ca2+] and field stimulated at 1 Hz, milrinone (10 microM) had a positive inotropic effect. In contrast milrinone had no effect on the contractile properties of rat myocytes studied under similar conditions and field stimulated at 0.2 Hz. In rat myocytes bathed in 0.5 mM [Ca2+] and stimulated at 0.2 Hz isoproterenol (1 nM) increased the amplitude and shortened the duration of the contraction and of the associated Cai transient; these effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation were further enhanced by the addition of milrinone (10 microM) in the presence of isoproterenol. Under conditions of higher cell Ca2+ loading achieved by raising bathing [Ca2+] to 1 mM and isoproterenol to 3 nM the positive inotropic effect of milrinone (10 microM) in rat myocytes saturated when spontaneous oscillatory Ca2+ release appeared in the diastolic intervals between electrically stimulated twitches. Our results suggest that an enhancement in the baseline beta-adrenergic stimulation is required for milrinone to exercise a positive inotropic action on rat myocardial tissue. PMID:2576017

  1. Changes in Stomatal Behavior and Guard Cell Cytosolic Free Calcium in Response to Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed Central

    McAinsh, M. R.; Clayton, H.; Mansfield, T. A.; Hetherington, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the cellular basis for the effects of oxidative stress on stomatal behavior using stomatal bioassay and ratio photometric techniques. Two oxidative treatments were employed in this study: (a) methyl viologen, which generates superoxide radicals, and (b) H2O2. Both methyl viologen and H2O2 inhibited stomatal opening and promoted stomatal closure. At concentrations [less than or equal to]10-5 M, the effects of methyl viologen and H2O2 on stomatal behavior were reversible and were abolished by 2 mM EGTA or 10 [mu]M verapamil. In addition, at 10-5 M, i.e. the maximum concentration at which the effects of the treatments were prevented by EGTA or verapamil, methyl viologen and H2O2 caused an increase in guard cell cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), which was abolished in the presence of EGTA. Therefore, at low concentrations of methyl viologen and H2O2, removal of extracellular Ca2+ prevented both the oxidative stress-induced changes in stomatal aperture and the associated increases in [Ca2+]i. This suggests that in this concentration range the effects of the treatments are Ca2+-dependent and are mediated by changes in [Ca2+]i. In contrast, at concentrations of methyl viologan and H2O2 > 10-5 M, EGTA and verapamil had no effect. However, in this concentration range the effects of the treatments were irreversible and correlated with a marked reduction in membrane integrity and guard cell viability. This suggests that at high concentrations the effects of methyl viologen and H2O2 may be due to changes in membrane integrity. The implications of oxidative stress-induced increases in [Ca2+]i and the possible disruption of guard-cell Ca2+ homeostasis are discussed in relation to the processes of Ca2+-based signal transduction in stomatal guard cells and the control of stomatal aperture. PMID:12226345

  2. The cytosolic calcium transient modulates the action potential of rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    duBell, W H; Boyett, M R; Spurgeon, H A; Talo, A; Stern, M D; Lakatta, E G

    1991-01-01

    1. The modulation of the action potential by the cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai2+) transient was studied in single isolated rat ventricular myocytes loaded with the acetoxymethyl ester form of the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye Indo-1. Stimulation following rest and exposure to ryanodine were used to change the amount of Ca2+ released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and thus the size of the Cai2+ transient. The Cai2+ transient was measured as the change, upon stimulation, in the ratio of Indo-1 fluorescence at 410 nm to that at 490 nm (410/490) and action potentials or membrane currents were recorded using patch-type microelectrodes. 2. When stimulation was initiated following rest, the magnitude of the Cai2+ transient decreased in a beat-dependent manner until a steady state was reached. The negative staircase in the Cai2+ transient was accompanied by a similar beat-dependent decrease in the duration of the action potential, manifested primarily as a gradual loss of the action potential plateau (approximately -45 mV). A slow terminal phase of repolarization of a few millivolts in amplitude was found to parallel the terminal decay of the Cai2+ transient. 3. The terminal portion of phase-plane loops of membrane potential (Vm) vs. Indo-1 ratio from all of the beats of a stimulus train followed a common linear trajectory even though the individual beats differed markedly in the duration and amplitude of the action potential and Cai2+ transient. 4. When the stimulation dependence of the Cai2+ transient was titrated away with submaximal exposure to ryanodine, the stimulation-dependent changes in the action potential plateau and terminal phase of repolarization were also eliminated. The same effect was noted in cells which, fortuitously, did not show a staircase in the Cai2+ transient following a period of rest. 5. When action potentials were triggered immediately following spontaneous release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which results in a small depolarization at the

  3. Fura-2 measurement of cytosolic calcium in HgCl/sub 2/-treated rabbit renal turbular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, B.F.; Smith, M.W.

    1986-05-01

    This abstract reports the effect of HgCl/sub 2/ on cytosolic ionized calcium (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/, measured by the fluorescent chelator Fura-2, in trypsinized rabbit renal tubular cells at 37/sup 0/C in Hanks salt solution, pH 7.2, containing 1.37 mM CaCl/sub 2/. Viability measured fluorometrically with propidium iodide correlated well with that determined using trypan blue. HgCl/sub 2/ (1-10 ..mu..M) induced rapid and dose-dependent increases up to 5-fold normal (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/. After 1-3 min the rate of increase slowed or stopped. At higher doses of HgCl/sub 2/ (20-100 ..mu..M) an unexpected pattern of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ changes occurred. After an initial 5-6-fold increase by 1 min, (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ decreased in the next 2-3 min to 2-3-fold normal levels. This change was followed by a second increase of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ at a much slower rate which did appear to be dose-related. Calcium channel blockers and calmodulin inhibitors had little or no effect. Inhibitors of mitochondrial function, antimycin and 2,4-dinitrophenol, interfered with the fluorescent assay; KCN totally inhibited HgCl/sub 2/-induced (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ changes while hypoxia had no apparent effect. The -SH group binding compound N-ethyl maleimide increased (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ 4-5 fold; addition of 25 ..mu..M Hg caused faster peaking and recovery of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/. The mechanism of Ca/sup 2 +/ buffering triggered by higher HgCl/sub 2/ concentrations is as yet unknown.

  4. Reorientation of Seedlings in the Earth's Gravitational Field Induces Cytosolic Calcium Transients1

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Trewavas, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    The gravitational field controls plant growth, morphology, and development. However, the underlying transduction mechanisms are not well understood. Much indirect evidence has implicated the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c) as an important factor, but direct evidence for changes in [Ca2+]c is currently lacking. We now have made measurements of [Ca2+]c in groups of young seedlings of Arabidopsis expressing aequorin in the cytoplasm and reconstituted in vivo with cp-coelenterazine, a synthetic high-affinity luminophore. Distinct [Ca2+]c signaling occurs in response to gravistimulation with kinetics very different from [Ca2+]c transients evoked by other mechanical stimuli (e.g. movement and wind). [Ca2+]c changes produced in response to gravistimulation are transient but with a duration of many minutes and dependent on stimulus strength (i.e. the angle of displacement). The auxin transport blockers 2,3,5-tri-iodo benzoic acid and N-(1-naphthyl) phthalamic acid interfere with gravi-induced [Ca2+]c responses and addition of methyl indole-3-acetic acid to whole seedlings induces long-lived [Ca2+]c transients, suggesting that changes in auxin transport may interact with [Ca2+]c. Permanent nonaxial rotation of seedlings on a two-dimensional clinostat, however, produced a sustained elevation of the [Ca2+]c level. This probably reflects permanent displacement of gravity-sensing cellular components and/or disturbance of cytoskeletal tension. It is concluded that [Ca2+]c is part of the gravity transduction mechanism in young Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:12068119

  5. Neurotransmitter release from bradykinin-stimulated PC12 cells. Stimulation of cytosolic calcium and neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed Central

    Appell, K C; Barefoot, D S

    1989-01-01

    The effect of bradykinin on intracellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter secretion was investigated in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12. Bradykinin was shown to induce a rapid, but transient, increase in intracellular free Ca2+ which could be separated into an intracellular Ca2+ release component and an extracellular Ca2+ influx component. The bradykinin-induced stimulation of intracellular free Ca2+ displayed a similar time course, concentration dependencies and extracellular Ca2+ dependence as that found for neurotransmitter release, indicating an association between intracellular free Ca2+ levels and neurotransmitter secretion. The selective BK1-receptor antagonist des-Arg9,[Leu8]BK (where BK is bradykinin) did not significantly affect the stimulation of intracellular free Ca2+ or neurotransmitter release. In contrast, these effects of bradykinin were effectively blocked by the selective BK2-receptor antagonist [Thi5,8,D-Phe7]BK, and mimicked by the BK2 partial agonist [D-Phe7]BK in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulation of intracellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter release induced by bradykinin was shown not to involve voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, since calcium antagonists had no effect on either response at concentrations which effectively inhibit depolarization-induced responses. These results indicate that bradykinin, acting through the interaction with the BK2 receptor, stimulates an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ leading to neurotransmitter secretion. Furthermore, bradykinin-induced responses involve the release of intracellular Ca2+ and the influx of extracellular Ca2+ that is not associated with the activation of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. PMID:2574973

  6. Prostaglandin F2 alpha-induced calcium transient in ovine large luteal cells: II. Modulation of the transient and resting cytosolic free calcium alters progesterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Wegner, J A; Martinez-Zaguilan, R; Gillies, R J; Hoyer, P B

    1991-02-01

    A previous study demonstrated that prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) stimulates a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ levels [( Ca2+]i) in ovine large luteal cells. In the present study, the magnitude of the PGF2 alpha (0.5 microM)-induced calcium transient in Hanks' medium (87 +/- 2 nM increase above resting levels) was reduced (P less than 0.05) but not completely eliminated in fura-2 loaded large luteal cells incubated in Ca2(+)-free or phosphate- and carbonate-free medium (10 +/- 1 nM, 32 +/- 6 nM, above resting levels; respectively). Preincubation for 2 min with 1 mM LaCl3 (calcium antagonist) eliminated the PGF2 alpha-induced calcium transient. The inhibitory effect of PGF2 alpha on secretion of progesterone was reduced in Ca2(+)-free medium or medium plus LaCl3. Resting [Ca2+]i levels and basal secretion of progesterone were both reduced (P less than 0.05) in large cells incubated in Ca2(+)-free medium (27 +/- 4 nM; 70 +/- 6% control, respectively) or with 5 microM 5,5'-dimethyl bis-(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (40 +/- 2 nM; 49 +/- 1% control; respectively). In addition, secretion of progesterone was inhibited (P less than 0.05) by conditions that increased (P less than 0.05) [Ca2+]i; that is LaCl3 ([Ca2+]i, 120 +/- 17 nM; progesterone, 82 +/- 8% control) and PGF2 alpha ([Ca2+]i, 102 +/- 10 nM; progesterone, 82 +/- 3% control). In small luteal cells, resting [Ca2+]i levels and secretion of progesterone were reduced by incubation in Ca2(+)-free Hanks ([Ca2+]i, 28 +/- 2 nM; progesterone, 71 +/- 6% control), however, neither LaCl3 nor PGF2 alpha increased [Ca2+]i levels or inhibited secretion of progesterone. The findings presented here provide evidence that extracellular as well as intracellular calcium contribute to the PGF2 alpha-induced [Ca2+]i transient in large cells. Furthermore, whereas an adequate level of [Ca2+]i is required to support progesterone production in both small and large cells, optimal progesterone production in

  7. Magnesium Sensitizes Slow Vacuolar Channels to Physiological Cytosolic Calcium and Inhibits Fast Vacuolar Channels in Fava Bean Guard Cell Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Pei; Ward; Schroeder

    1999-11-01

    Vacuolar ion channels in guard cells play important roles during stomatal movement and are regulated by many factors including Ca(2+), calmodulin, protein kinases, and phosphatases. We report that physiological cytosolic and luminal Mg(2+) levels strongly regulate vacuolar ion channels in fava bean (Vicia faba) guard cells. Luminal Mg(2+) inhibited fast vacuolar (FV) currents with a K(i) of approximately 0.23 mM in a voltage-dependent manner at positive potentials on the cytoplasmic side. Cytosolic Mg(2+) at 1 mM also inhibited FV currents. Furthermore, in the absence of cytosolic Mg(2+), cytosolic Ca(2+) at less than 10 µM did not activate slow vacuolar (SV) currents. However, when cytosolic Mg(2+) was present, submicromolar concentrations of cytosolic Ca(2+) activated SV currents with a K(d) of approximately 227 nM, suggesting a synergistic Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) effect. The activation potential of SV currents was shifted toward physiological potentials in the presence of cytosolic Mg(2+) concentrations. The direction of SV currents could also be changed from outward to both outward and inward currents. Our data predict a model for SV channel regulation, including a cytosolic binding site for Ca(2+) with an affinity in the submicromolar range and a cytosolic low-affinity Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) binding site. SV channels are predicted to contain a third binding site on the vacuolar luminal side, which binds Ca(2+) and is inhibitory. In conclusion, cytosolic Mg(2+) sensitizes SV channels to physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Furthermore, we propose that cytosolic and vacuolar Mg(2+) concentrations ensure that FV channels do not function as a continuous vacuolar K(+) leak, which would prohibit stomatal opening. PMID:10557247

  8. Dissociation of the effects of the antitumour ether lipid ET-18-OCH3 on cytosolic calcium and on apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Teresa Alonso, Maria; Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino; Modolell, Manuel; Alvarez, Javier; García-Sancho, Javier

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the effects of 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3) on the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and on apoptosis in several normal and leukaemia cells, including human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), U937 cells, and undifferentiated as well as dimethylsulphoxide-differentiated HL60 cells (uHL60 and dHL60, respectively). ET-18-OCH3 produced apoptosis, as evidenced by DNA degradation into oligonucleosome-size fragments, in U937 and uHL60 cells, but not in dHL60 cells or PMNs. ET-18-OCH3 induced an increase in [Ca2+]i mediated through the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor in U937, dHL60 cells and PMNs, as shown by cross-desensitization experiments and by prevention of the [Ca2+]i changes by the PAF antagonist WEB-2170. The EC50 values for the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by PAF and ET-18-OCH3 were 5×10−11 and 2.5×10−7 M, respectively. In uHL60 cells the effect of ET-18-OCH3 on [Ca2+]i was very small and was not affected by WEB-2170. PAF did not produce apoptosis in any of the cell types tested. WEB-2170 did not prevent the apoptosis induced by ET-18-OCH3. The uptake of [3H]-ET-18-OCH3 was much larger in U937 and uHL60 cells than in dHL60 cells and PMNs. Our results indicate that the apoptotic effect of ET-18-OCH3 is not related to the changes in [Ca2+]i, effected by interaction with plasma membrane PAF receptors, but to other actions which are associated with the uptake of this drug into the cells. PMID:9257915

  9. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin; Zhou, Zhansong; Ji, Guangju

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  10. Cytosolic free calcium dynamics as related to hyphal and colony growth in the filamentous fungal pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Lange, Mario; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-06-01

    Tip growth of pollen tubes and root hairs of plants is oscillatory and orchestrated by tip-focussed variations of cytosolic free calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt). Hyphae of filamentous fungi are also tubular tip-growing cells, and components of the Ca(2+) signalling machinery, such as Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) sensors, are known to be important for fungal growth. In this study, we addressed the questions if tip-focussed [Ca(2+)]cyt transients govern hyphal and whole-colony growth in the maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola, and whether colony-wide [Ca(2+)]cyt dynamics rely on external Ca(2+) or internal Ca(2+) stores. Ratiometric fluorescence microscopy of individual hyphae expressing the Ca(2+) reporter Yellow Cameleon 3.6 revealed that Ca(2+) spikes in hyphal tips precede the re-initiation of growth after wounding. Tip-focussed [Ca(2+)]cyt spikes were also observed in undisturbed growing hyphae. They occurred not regularly and at a higher rate in hyphae growing at a medium-glass interface than in those growing on an agar surface. Hyphal tip growth was non-pulsatile, and growth speed was not correlated with the rate of spike occurrence. A possible relationship of [Ca(2+)]cyt spike generation and growth of whole colonies was assessed by using a codon-optimized version of the luminescent Ca(2+) reporter Aequorin. Depletion of extracellular free Ca(2+) abolished [Ca(2+)]cyt spikes nearly completely, but had only a modest effect on colony growth. In a pharmacological survey, some inhibitors targeting Ca(2+) influx or release from internal stores repressed growth strongly. However, although some of those inhibitors also affected [Ca(2+)]cyt spike generation, the effects on both parameters were not correlated. Collectively, the results indicate that tip growth of C. graminicola is non-pulsatile and not mechanistically linked to tip-focused or global [Ca(2+)]cyt spikes, which are likely a response to micro-environmental parameters, such as the physical properties of the

  11. Calcium participates in feedback regulation of the oscillating ROP1 Rho GTPase in pollen tubes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, An; Xu, Guanshui; Yang, Zhen-Biao

    2009-01-01

    Biological oscillation occurs at various levels, from cellular signaling to organismal behaviors. Mathematical modeling has allowed a quantitative understanding of slow oscillators requiring changes in gene expression (e.g., circadian rhythms), but few theoretical studies have focused on the rapid oscillation of cellular signaling. The tobacco pollen tube, which exhibits growth bursts every 80 s or so, is an excellent system for investigating signaling oscillation. Pollen tube growth is controlled by a tip-localized ROP1 GTPase, whose activity oscillates in a phase about 90 degrees ahead of growth. We constructed a mathematical model of ROP1 activity oscillation consisting of interlinking positive and negative feedback loops involving F-actin and calcium, ROP1-signaling targets that oscillate in a phase about 20 degrees and 110 degrees behind ROP1 activity, respectively. The model simulates the observed changes in ROP1 activity caused by F-actin disruption and predicts a role for calcium in the negative feedback regulation of the ROP1 activity. Our experimental data strongly support this role of calcium in tip growth. Thus, our findings provide insight into the mechanism of pollen tube growth and the oscillation of cellular signaling. PMID:19955439

  12. Homocysteine and cytosolic GSH depletion induce apoptosis and oxidative toxicity through cytosolic calcium overload in the hippocampus of aged mice: involvement of TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Övey, I S; Naziroğlu, M

    2015-01-22

    Oxidative stress and apoptosis were induced in neuronal cultures by inhibition of glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis with d,l-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO). Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channels are gated by oxidative stress. The oxidant effects of homocysteine (Hcy) may induce activation of TRPV1 and TRPM2 channels in aged mice as a model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We tested the effects of Hcy, BSO and GSH on oxidative stress, apoptosis and Ca2+ and influx via TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels in the hippocampus of mice. Native mice hippocampal neurons were divided into five groups as follows; control, Hcy, BSO, Hcy+BSO and Hcy+BSO+GSH groups. The neurons in TRPM2 and TRPV1 experiments were stimulated by hydrogen peroxide and capsaicin, respectively. BSO and Hcy incubations increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, mitochondrial depolarization, and levels of caspase 3 and 9. All of these increases were reduced by GSH treatments. Treatment with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid (ACA) as potent inhibitors of TRPM2, capsazepine as a potent inhibitor of TRPV1, verapamil+diltiazem (V+D) as inhibitors of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) and MK-801 as a N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) channel antagonist indicated that GSH depletion and Hcy elevation activated Ca2+ entry into the neurons through TRPM2, TRPV1, VGCC and NMDA channels. Inhibitor roles of 2-APB and capsazepine on the Ca2+ entry higher than in V+D and MK-801 antagonists. In conclusion, these findings support the idea that GSH depletion and Hcy elevation can have damaging effects on hippocampal neurons by perturbing calcium homeostasis, mainly through TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels. GSH treatment can partially reverse these effects. PMID:25305668

  13. A G-protein subunit translocation embedded network motif underlies GPCR regulation of calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Giri, Lopamudra; Patel, Anilkumar K; Karunarathne, W K Ajith; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Venkatesh, K V; Gautam, N

    2014-07-01

    G-protein βγ subunits translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes on receptor activation. Translocation rates differ depending on the γ subunit type. There is limited understanding of the role of the differential rates of Gβγ translocation in modulating signaling dynamics in a cell. Bifurcation analysis of the calcium oscillatory network structure predicts that the translocation rate of a signaling protein can regulate the damping of system oscillation. Here, we examined whether the Gβγ translocation rate regulates calcium oscillations induced by G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Oscillations in HeLa cells expressing γ subunit types with different translocation rates were imaged and quantitated. The results show that differential Gβγ translocation rates can underlie the diversity in damping characteristics of calcium oscillations among cells. Mathematical modeling shows that a translocation embedded motif regulates damping of G-protein-mediated calcium oscillations consistent with experimental data. The current study indicates that such a motif may act as a tuning mechanism to design oscillations with varying damping patterns by using intracellular translocation of a signaling component. PMID:24988358

  14. Hypoxia-induced cytosolic calcium decrease is mediated primarily by the forward mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in smooth muscle cells of fetal ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haifa; Chen, Huiwen; Gao, Wei; Cai, Xiaoman; Sun, Yanjuan; Yin, Meng; Liu, Jinfen

    2009-10-01

    Closure of the ductus arteriosus (DA) after birth, essential for postnatal adaptation, is initiated by the transition from hypoxia to normoxia. The current study investigated how hypoxia affects the level of cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in fetal lamb DA smooth muscle cells (DASMCs) and the role of calcium pumps in this process. The [Ca(2+)](i) variation in response to acute hypoxia was determined spectrofluorometrically with fura-3-AM in cultured fetal DASMCs. Interventions using chemicals or solutions including thapsigargin, vanadate, KB-R7943, alkaline PH9.0 solution, or Na(+)-free medium were administered when samples were exposed to acute hypoxia. The results show that [Ca(2+)](i) decreased dramatically under acute hypoxia. This decrease was not attenuated completely by an inhibitor of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) (SERCA), a blocker of plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA), or an inhibitor and activator of the reserve mode of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). In contrast, KT-R9743, an inhibitor of the forward mode of NCX at a high concentration (30 microm), greatly diminished the hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)](i) decrease in fetal DASMCs. These results suggest that a hypoxia-induced Ca(2+) decrease in fetal DASMCs results from cytosolic Ca(2+) efflux mediated primarily by the forward mode of NCX. PMID:19495847

  15. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  16. Characterization of oscillations in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and measurement of cytosolic Na+ concentration changes evoked by angiotensin II and vasopressin in individual rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Use of microfluorometry and digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E M; Theler, J M; Capponi, A M; Vallotton, M B

    1991-07-01

    Dual wavelength microfluorometry was used to characterize the changes in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration [( Ca2+]i) in individual cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Angiotensin II (ANG II) at 10(-8) M induced a transient rise in [Ca2+]i from 43 +/- 2 to 245 +/- 23 nM, lasting for approximately 60 s (n = 42). In half of the population, discrete oscillations in [Ca2+]i of smaller amplitude occurred after the initial [Ca2+]i peak, with a period of 58 +/- 8 s and a maximum height of 132 +/- 24 nM. A similar oscillatory pattern was observed with arginine vasopressin (AVP). The oscillations depended upon the presence of extracellular Ca2+. Cytosolic free Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) in VSMC was also measured using the fluorescent Na+ probe sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate. ANG II induced a gradual and sustained elevation of [Na+]i, from 24.0 +/- 6.2 to 36 +/- 9.7 mM. In response to AVP, [Na+]i rose to 41.0 +/- 11.6 mM. Video imaging of individual VSMC, with on-line ratio calibration of [Ca2+]i, revealed an inhomogeneous distribution of Ca2+ within the cell. [Ca2+] in the nucleus was invariably lower than in the cytoplasm in resting cells. In the cytoplasm, there were small regions in which [Ca2+] was elevated, or "hot spots." In Ca(2+)-containing medium, the initial rise in [Ca2+]i triggered by ANG II and AVP appeared to emanate from the hot spots and to spread evenly throughout the cytoplasm. Between [Ca2+]i oscillations, Ca2+ retreated back to the original hot spots. This study demonstrates the cellular and subcellular heterogeneity of [Ca2+]i both in resting VSMC and during stimulation by ANG II and AVP and reports the direct measurement of [Na+]i in VSMC. The results suggest an action of Ca2+ in both the initial and sustained phases of the response in VSMC and a link between changes in [Ca2+]i and [Na+]i. PMID:2061331

  17. Thromboxane-induced phosphatidate formation in human platelets. Relationship to receptor occupancy and to changes in cytosolic free calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, W K; Armstrong, R A; Brydon, L J; Jones, R L; MacIntyre, D E

    1984-01-01

    The inter-relationships between receptor occupancy, inositol phospholipid metabolism and elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+ in thromboxane A2-induced human platelet activation were investigated by using the stable thromboxane A2 mimetic, 9,11-epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2, and the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, EPO45. 9,11-Epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2 stimulated platelet phosphatidylinositol metabolism as indicated by the rapid accumulation of [32P]phosphatidate and later accumulation of [32P]phosphatidylinositol in platelets pre-labelled with [32P]Pi. These effects of 9,11-epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2 were concentration-dependent and half-maximal [32P]phosphatidate formation occurred at an agonist concentration of 54 +/- 8 nM. With platelets labelled with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator quin 2, resting cytosolic free Ca2+ was 86 +/- 12 nM. 9,11-Epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2 induced a rapid, concentration-dependent elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+ to a maximum of 300-700 nM. Half-maximal stimulation was observed at an agonist concentration of 80 +/- 23 nM. The thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist EPO45 selectively inhibited 9,11-epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2-induced [32P]phosphatidate formation and elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+, indicating that both events are sequelae of receptor occupancy. Human platelets contain a single class of stereospecific, saturable, high affinity (KD = 70 +/- 13 nM) binding sites for 9,11-epoxymethano[3H]prostaglandin H2. The concentration-response curve for receptor occupancy (9,11-epoxymethano-[3H]prostaglandin H2 binding) is similar to that for 9,11-epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2-induced [32P]phosphatidate formation and for elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+. These observations indicate that human platelet thromboxane A2 receptor occupation is closely linked to inositol phospholipid metabolism and to elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+. Both such events may be necessary for thromboxane A2-induced human platelet activation. PMID:6234886

  18. The Novel PMCA2 Pump Mutation Tommy Impairs Cytosolic Calcium Clearance in Hair Cells and Links to Deafness in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Bortolozzi, Mario; Brini, Marisa; Parkinson, Nick; Crispino, Giulia; Scimemi, Pietro; De Siati, Romolo Daniele; Di Leva, Francesca; Parker, Andrew; Ortolano, Saida; Arslan, Edoardo; Brown, Steve D.; Carafoli, Ernesto; Mammano, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    The mechanotransduction process in hair cells in the inner ear is associated with the influx of calcium from the endolymph. Calcium is exported back to the endolymph via the splice variant w/a of the PMCA2 of the stereocilia membrane. To further investigate the role of the pump, we have identified and characterized a novel ENU-induced mouse mutation, Tommy, in the PMCA2 gene. The mutation causes a non-conservative E629K change in the second intracellular loop of the pump that harbors the active site. Tommy mice show profound hearing impairment from P18, with significant differences in hearing thresholds between wild type and heterozygotes. Expression of mutant PMCA2 in CHO cells shows calcium extrusion impairment; specifically, the long term, non-stimulated calcium extrusion activity of the pump is inhibited. Calcium extrusion was investigated directly in neonatal organotypic cultures of the utricle sensory epithelium in Tommy mice. Confocal imaging combined with flash photolysis of caged calcium showed impairment of calcium export in both Tommy heterozygotes and homozygotes. Immunofluorescence studies of the organ of Corti in homozygous Tommy mice showed a progressive base to apex degeneration of hair cells after P40. Our results on the Tommy mutation along with previously observed interactions between cadherin-23 and PMCA2 mutations in mouse and humans underline the importance of maintaining the appropriate calcium concentrations in the endolymph to control the rigidity of cadherin and ensure the function of interstereocilia links, including tip links, of the stereocilia bundle. PMID:20826782

  19. Mechanisms underlying angiotensin II-induced calcium oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Aurélie; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms that underlie angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]cyt) oscillations in medullary pericytes, we expanded a prior model of ion fluxes. ANG II stimulation was simulated by doubling maximal inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production and imposing a 90% blockade of K+ channels. We investigated two configurations, one in which ryanodine receptors (RyR) and IP3 receptors (IP3R) occupy a common store and a second in which they reside on separate stores. Our results suggest that Ca2+ release from stores and import from the extracellular space are key determinants of oscillations because both raise [Ca] in subplasmalemmal spaces near RyR. When the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) threshold of RyR is exceeded, the ensuing Ca2+ release is limited by Ca2+ reuptake into stores and export across the plasmalemma. If sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pumps do not remain saturated and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores are replenished, that phase is followed by a resumption of leak from internal stores that leads either to [Ca]cyt elevation below the CICR threshold (no oscillations) or to elevation above it (oscillations). Our model predicts that oscillations are more prone to occur when IP3R and RyR stores are separate because, in that case, Ca2+ released by RyR during CICR can enhance filling of adjacent IP3 stores to favor a high subsequent leak that generates further CICR events. Moreover, the existence or absence of oscillations depends on the set points of several parameters, so that biological variation might well explain the presence or absence of oscillations in individual pericytes. PMID:18562632

  20. Cytosolic calcium transients are a determinant of contraction-induced HSP72 transcription in single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Stary, Creed M; Hogan, Michael C

    2016-05-15

    The intrinsic activating factors that induce transcription of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle following exercise remain unclear. We hypothesized that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with depolarization is a determinant. We utilized intact, single skeletal muscle fibers from Xenopus laevis to test the role of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient and several other exercise-related factors (fatigue, hypoxia, AMP kinase, and cross-bridge cycling) on the activation of HSP72 transcription. HSP72 and HSP60 mRNA levels were assessed with real-time quantitative PCR; cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was assessed with fura-2. Both fatiguing and nonfatiguing contractions resulted in a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. As expected, peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained tightly coupled with peak developed tension in contracting fibers. Pretreatment with N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) resulted in depressed peak developed tension with stimulation, while peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained largely unchanged from control values. Despite excitation-contraction uncoupling, BTS-treated fibers displayed a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. Treatment of fibers with hypoxia (Po2: <3 mmHg) or AMP kinase activation had no effect on HSP72 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the intermittent cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with skeletal muscle depolarization provides a sufficient activating stimulus for HSP72 transcription. Metabolic or mechanical factors associated with fatigue development and cross-bridge cycling likely play a more limited role. PMID:26869714

  1. A deterministic model predicts the properties of stochastic calcium oscillations in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Pengxing; Tan, Xiahui; Donovan, Graham; Sanderson, Michael J; Sneyd, James

    2014-08-01

    The inositol trisphosphate receptor ([Formula: see text]) is one of the most important cellular components responsible for oscillations in the cytoplasmic calcium concentration. Over the past decade, two major questions about the [Formula: see text] have arisen. Firstly, how best should the [Formula: see text] be modeled? In other words, what fundamental properties of the [Formula: see text] allow it to perform its function, and what are their quantitative properties? Secondly, although calcium oscillations are caused by the stochastic opening and closing of small numbers of [Formula: see text], is it possible for a deterministic model to be a reliable predictor of calcium behavior? Here, we answer these two questions, using airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) as a specific example. Firstly, we show that periodic calcium waves in ASMC, as well as the statistics of calcium puffs in other cell types, can be quantitatively reproduced by a two-state model of the [Formula: see text], and thus the behavior of the [Formula: see text] is essentially determined by its modal structure. The structure within each mode is irrelevant for function. Secondly, we show that, although calcium waves in ASMC are generated by a stochastic mechanism, [Formula: see text] stochasticity is not essential for a qualitative prediction of how oscillation frequency depends on model parameters, and thus deterministic [Formula: see text] models demonstrate the same level of predictive capability as do stochastic models. We conclude that, firstly, calcium dynamics can be accurately modeled using simplified [Formula: see text] models, and, secondly, to obtain qualitative predictions of how oscillation frequency depends on parameters it is sufficient to use a deterministic model. PMID:25121766

  2. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis and increased cytosolic calcium are both necessary but not sufficient for activity-dependent bulk endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Andrew; Marland, Jamie R K; Cousin, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. By definition this mode is triggered by neuronal activity; however, key questions regarding its mechanism of activation remain unaddressed. To determine the basic requirements for ADBE triggering in central nerve terminals, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. ADBE was monitored both optically and morphologically by observing uptake of the fluid phase markers tetramethylrhodamine-dextran and horse radish peroxidase respectively. Ablation of SV fusion with tetanus toxin resulted in the arrest of ADBE, but had no effect on other calcium-dependent events such as activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation, indicating that SV exocytosis is necessary for triggering. Furthermore, the calcium chelator EGTA abolished ADBE while leaving SV exocytosis intact, demonstrating that ADBE is triggered by intracellular free calcium increases outside the active zone. Activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation was also arrested in EGTA-treated neurons, consistent with its proposed role in triggering ADBE. Thus, SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient individually to trigger ADBE. Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. To determine the minimal requirements for ADBE triggering, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. We found that SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient to trigger ADBE. PMID:25913068

  3. Apoptosis induction-related cytosolic calcium responses revealed by the dual FRET imaging of calcium signals and caspase-3 activation in a single cell.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Miyauchi, Hiroshi; Kogure, Takako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-04-24

    Stimulus-induced changes in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration control cell fate decision, including apoptosis. However, the precise patterns of the cytosolic Ca(2+) signals that are associated with apoptotic induction remain unknown. We have developed a novel genetically encoded sensor of activated caspase-3 that can be applied in combination with a genetically encoded sensor of the Ca(2+) concentration and have established a dual imaging system that enables the imaging of both cytosolic Ca(2+) signals and caspase-3 activation, which is an indicator of apoptosis, in the same cell. Using this system, we identified differences in the cytosolic Ca(2+) signals of apoptotic and surviving DT40 B lymphocytes after B cell receptor (BCR) stimulation. In surviving cells, BCR stimulation evoked larger initial Ca(2+) spikes followed by a larger sustained elevation of the Ca(2+) concentration than those in apoptotic cells; BCR stimulation also resulted in repetitive transient Ca(2+) spikes, which were mediated by the influx of Ca(2+) from the extracellular space. Our results indicate that the observation of both Ca(2+) signals and cells fate in same cell is crucial to gain an accurate understanding of the function of intracellular Ca(2+) signals in apoptotic induction. PMID:25998736

  4. Evidence that cytosolic calcium increases are not sufficient to stimulate phospholipid scrambling in human T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wurth, Georjeana A; Zweifach, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Phospholipid scrambling, the disruption of normal plasma-membrane asymmetry, occurs during apoptotic and necrotic cell death and during the activation of platelets and neutrophils. It is currently believed that phospholipid scrambling is triggered simply by increases in bulk cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. We have presented evidence previously that the styryl dye FM1-43 is sensitive to phospholipid scrambling in Jurkat human leukaemic T-lymphocytes. Here we have used FM1-43, in combination with fura 2 and the Ca(2+)-elevating agents ionomycin and thapsigargin, in imaging experiments to test the idea that increases in bulk cytosolic [Ca(2+)] stimulate scrambling. Intracellular Ca(2+) increases of approximately 2 microM accompanied ionomycin-stimulated scrambling in approximately 50% of cells, and scrambling occurred in >99% of cells in which intracellular Ca(2+) rose to 4 microM. Chelating intracellular Ca(2+) with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid or EGTA suppressed both ionomycin-stimulated intra cellular Ca(2+) increases and scrambling, demonstrating that intracellular Ca(2+) increases are necessary for ionomycin-stimulated scrambling. However, elevating intracellular Ca(2+) to 2-4 microM with thapsigargin, a drug that depletes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and triggers Ca(2+) entry via Ca(2+)-release-activated Ca(2+) channels, did not trigger scrambling, as assessed with either FM1-43 or FITC-labelled annexin V. These results suggest that increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] are necessary but not sufficient to stimulate scrambling in lymphoyctes, and indicate that ionomycin has an additional effect that is required to stimulate scrambling. PMID:11879198

  5. High-affinity cholecystokinin type A receptor/cytosolic phospholipase A2 pathways mediate Ca2+ oscillations via a positive feedback regulation by calmodulin kinase in pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Lankisch, T O; Nozu, F; Owyang, C; Tsunoda, Y

    1999-09-01

    In rat pancreatic acini, we previously demonstrated that depending on the agonist used, activation of cholecystokinin type A (CCKA) receptor (CCK-AR) results in the differential involvement of the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), phospholipase Cbeta1 (PLCbeta1) and Src/protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) pathways. The high-affinity CCK-AR appears to be coupled to the Gbeta/cPLA2/arachidonic acid (AA) cascade in mediating Ca2+ oscillations. The low-affinity CCK-AR is coupled to both the Galphaq/11/PLCbeta1/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to evoke intracellular Ca2+ release and the Src/PTK pathway to mediate extracellular Ca2+ influx. The objectives of this study were to provide evidence that cPLA2 is present in pancreatic acini and to evaluate the possibility that its activation results in Ca2+ oscillations and amylase secretion. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism of Ca2+ oscillations mediated by the high-affinity CCK-AR. In rat pancreatic acini, immunoprecipitation studies using an anti-cPLA2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated a cPLA2 band at the location of 110 kDa. A selective inhibitor of cPLA2, AACOCF3 (100 microM), inhibited production of AA metabolites, Ca2+ oscillations and amylase secretion elicited by the high-affinity CCK-AR agonist, CCK-OPE (10-1000 nM). In addition, through the repetitive release of intracellular Ca2+, CCK-OPE enhanced phosphotransferase activities of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CaMK IV), which were inhibited by AACOCF3. The CaMK inhibitor, K252-a (1-3 microM), also abolished basal and CCK-OPE-stimulated CaMK IV activities. The CaM inhibitor, W-7 (100 microM), and K252-a inhibited Ca2+ oscillations and amylase secretion evoked by CCK-OPE without affecting the AA formation. Therefore, it appears that Ca2+ oscillations elicited by the high-affinity CCK-AR/Gbeta/cPLA2/AA pathway activate CaMK IV. Activated CaMK, in turn, regulates Ca2+ oscillations through a positive feedback mechanism to mediate pancreatic

  6. Nonlinear Time Series Analysis of Nodulation Factor Induced Calcium Oscillations: Evidence for Deterministic Chaos?

    PubMed Central

    Hazledine, Saul; Sun, Jongho; Wysham, Derin; Downie, J. Allan; Oldroyd, Giles E. D.; Morris, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Legume plants form beneficial symbiotic interactions with nitrogen fixing bacteria (called rhizobia), with the rhizobia being accommodated in unique structures on the roots of the host plant. The legume/rhizobial symbiosis is responsible for a significant proportion of the global biologically available nitrogen. The initiation of this symbiosis is governed by a characteristic calcium oscillation within the plant root hair cells and this signal is activated by the rhizobia. Recent analyses on calcium time series data have suggested that stochastic effects have a large role to play in defining the nature of the oscillations. The use of multiple nonlinear time series techniques, however, suggests an alternative interpretation, namely deterministic chaos. We provide an extensive, nonlinear time series analysis on the nature of this calcium oscillation response. We build up evidence through a series of techniques that test for determinism, quantify linear and nonlinear components, and measure the local divergence of the system. Chaos is common in nature and it seems plausible that properties of chaotic dynamics might be exploited by biological systems to control processes within the cell. Systems possessing chaotic control mechanisms are more robust in the sense that the enhanced flexibility allows more rapid response to environmental changes with less energetic costs. The desired behaviour could be most efficiently targeted in this manner, supporting some intriguing speculations about nonlinear mechanisms in biological signaling. PMID:19675679

  7. [Nongenomic action and mechanism of 17β-estradiol in cytosolic calcium concentration in delayed implantation mouse endometrial stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Yue, Li-Min; Zhang, Jin-Hu; Tian, Ji-Mei; He, Ya-Ping

    2008-04-25

    To investigate the existence of nongenomic action of 17β-estradiol (E(2)) in the delayed implantation mouse endometrial stromal cells, the changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and the upstream of calcium signal in vitro were detected. The experiment was composed of two parts. Firstly, the change in [Ca(2+)](i) in endometrial stromal cells induced by E(2) under different conditions was detected. The mice were divided into 6 groups as follows: 0.1% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) control group, 1×10(-8) mol/L bovine serum albumin (BSA) control group, 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) group, 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) conjugated with BSA (E(2)-BSA) group, 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) + calcium-free medium group, 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) + 5 mg/mL tamoxifen group, with 4 mice in each group. The endometrial tissue was obtained from delayed implantation mice at pregnant day 7, and digested by incubation of tissue minces in Hankos balanced salts (HBSS, pH 7.2), which contained glucose (1 g/L), and collagenase I (0.125%), for 1 h at 37 degrees C. The stromal cells were preloaded with 2.5 mmol/L Fluo-3/AM, a fluorescent probe of calcium, for 30 min. A confocal laser scanning microscope, which fixed the wave length of excitation and emission at 488 nm and 526 nm, respectively, was used to detect the change in [Ca(2+)](i). Secondly, the mechanism of E(2) effects in endometrial stromal cells was investigated. Immunofluorescent method was used to detect the change in phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) before and after the stromal cells were treated with E(2) for 5 min, 15 min, and 30 min. Seven delayed implantation mice were used. The results were as follows. [Ca(2+)](i) increased immediately and reached the maximum at 15 min after the stromal cells were treated with 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) and returned to the normal level at 30 min. In E(2)-BSA group and E(2) + calcium-free medium group the same results were obtained as that in E(2) group, but there was no increase of [Ca(2+)](i) in

  8. Glutamate-induced intracellular calcium oscillations in astrocytes with confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Xiuli; Zhu, Geng; Wu, Yuxiang; Luo, Qingming

    2006-02-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+]i) play a crucial role involved in the modulation of signal transduction, development, and plasticity in the CNS. Glial cells can respond to various stimuli with an increase in [Ca 2+]i. In this paper, we used confocal microscopy to study calcium transient induced by glutamate in cultured astrocytes. Firstly, 100 μM glutamate induced long-time intracellular calcium oscillations in astrocytes and only a single spike under calcium-free solution. When the concentration of glutamate decreased to 1 μM, only a single spike could be induced. It shows that intracellular calcium oscillations depend on agonist concentration and extracellular Ca 2+. Secondly, we investigated amplitude of responses under different stimulation. The amplitude of initial peak induced by 100 μM glutamate decreased in Ca 2+-free condition, whereas the duration of kinetics was prolonged. But both the amplitude and area of a single spike induced by 1 μM Glu decreased in Ca 2+-free condition. The results show that areaof peak is more accurate than amplitude to display transients of [Ca 2+]i. All results above suggest that astrocytes are not passive, they display diverse temporal and spatial increases in [Ca 2+]i in response to a variety of stimuli. These [Ca 2+]i increases provide a possible means for information coding.

  9. Respiratory calcium fluctuations in low-frequency oscillating astrocytes in the pre-Bötzinger complex.

    PubMed

    Oku, Yoshitaka; Fresemann, Jens; Miwakeichi, Fumikazu; Hülsmann, Swen

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes have been found to modulate neuronal activity through calcium-dependent signaling in various brain regions. However, whether astrocytes of the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) exhibit respiratory rhythmic fluctuations is still controversial. Here we evaluated calcium-imaging experiments within preBötC in rhythmically active medullary slices from TgN(hGFAP-EGFP) mice using advanced analyses. 13.8% of EGFP-negative cells, putative neurons, showed rhythmic fluorescent changes that were highly correlated to the respiratory rhythmic fluctuation (cross-correlation coefficient>0.5 and dF/F>0.2%). In contrast, a considerable number of astrocyte somata exhibited synchronized low-frequency (<0.03Hz) calcium oscillations. After band-pass filtering, signals that irregularly preceded the calcium signal of EGFP-negative cells were observed in 10.2% of astrocytes, indicating a functional coupling between astrocytes and neurons in preBötC. A model simulation confirmed that such preinspiratory astrocytic signals can arise from coupled neuronal and astrocytic oscillators, supporting a concept that slow oscillatory changes of astrocytic functions modulate neighboring neuronal activity to add variability in respiratory rhythm. PMID:25747384

  10. Endocytosis of secretory granules in mouse pancreatic beta-cells evoked by transient elevation of cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Eliasson, L; Proks, P; Ammälä, C; Ashcroft, F M; Bokvist, K; Renström, E; Rorsman, P; Smith, P A

    1996-01-01

    1. To investigate the mechanisms regulating the reuptake of secretory granule membranes following regulated exocytosis, we have monitored changes in cell capacitance in single pancreatic beta-cells. 2. Membrane retrieval (endocytosis) occurred both in a continuous manner and in abrupt steps, corresponding to the simultaneous retrieval of 50-100 granules. The large endocytotic steps were associated with a conductance change of about 1 nS which we attribute to the formation of a fission pore with a pore radius of approximately 1 nm. 3. In some cells, we observed large amplitude capacitance fluctuations, suggesting that aggregates of granules are connected to the plasma membrane by a single pore and are subsequently retrieved as a single unit. 4. Endocytosis was evoked by elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+]i, but once initiated, a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i was not required for endocytosis to continue. 5. The [Ca2+]i dependence of exo- and endocytosis was studied by photorelease of Ca2+ from the 'caged' precursor Ca(2+)-nitrophenyl-EGTA (Ca(2+)-NP-EGTA). Both exo- and endocytosis were initiated at between 0.5 and 2 microM Cai(2+). The rate of endocytosis saturated above 2 microM Cai(2+), whereas exocytosis continued to increase up to 4 microM Cai(2+). The maximum rate of endocytosis was < 25% of that of exocytosis. 6. Unlike exocytosis, endocytosis proceeded equally well in the presence or absence of Mg-ATP. 7. Our data indicate that in the pancreatic beta-cell, exocytosis and endocytosis are regulated by different mechanisms. Images Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8799897

  11. Diospyrin derivative, an anticancer quinonoid, regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondria by modulating cytosolic calcium in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Binod; Kumar, Amit; Ghosh, Subhalakshmi; Pandey, Badri N.; Mishra, Kaushala P.; Hazra, Banasri

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diospyrin diethylether (D7) caused oxidative stress-dependent activation of PC-PLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated PC-PLC induced a sustained-release of Ca{sup 2+} from endoplasmic reticulum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The elevated cytosolic Ca{sup +2} led to the calpain-caspase12 dependent apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D7-Induced Ca{sup +2} also found to accentuate the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Diospyrin diethylether (D7), a bisnaphthoquinonoid derivative, exhibited an oxidative stress-dependent apoptosis in several human cancer cells and tumor models. The present study was aimed at evaluation of the increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} leading to the apoptotic cell death triggered by D7 in MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells. A phosphotidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) inhibitor, viz. U73122, and an antioxidant, viz. N-acetylcysteine, could significantly prevent the D7-induced rise in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} and PC-PLC activity. Using an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Ca{sup 2+} mobilizer (thapsigargin) and an ER-IP3R antagonist (heparin), results revealed ER as a major source of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} which led to the activation of calpain and caspase12, and cleavage of fodrin. These effects including apoptosis were significantly inhibited by the pretreatment of Bapta-AM (a cell permeable Ca{sup 2+}-specific chelator), or calpeptin (a calpain inhibitor). Furthermore, D7-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} was found to alter mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by either Bapta-AM or ruthenium red (an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter). Thus, these results provided a deeper insight into the D7-induced redox signaling which eventually integrated the calcium-dependent calpain/caspase12 activation and mitochondrial alterations to accentuate the induction of apoptotic cell death.

  12. Nuclear-localized cyclic nucleotide-gated channels mediate symbiotic calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Myriam; Sun, Jongho; Vaz Martins, Teresa; Radhakrishnan, Guru V; Findlay, Kim; Soumpourou, Eleni; Thouin, Julien; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Sanders, Dale; Morris, Richard J; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2016-05-27

    Nuclear-associated Ca(2+) oscillations mediate plant responses to beneficial microbial partners--namely, nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that colonize roots of legumes and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that colonize roots of the majority of plant species. A potassium-permeable channel is known to be required for symbiotic Ca(2+) oscillations, but the calcium channels themselves have been unknown until now. We show that three cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in Medicago truncatula are required for nuclear Ca(2+) oscillations and subsequent symbiotic responses. These cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are located at the nuclear envelope and are permeable to Ca(2+) We demonstrate that the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels form a complex with the postassium-permeable channel, which modulates nuclear Ca(2+) release. These channels, like their counterparts in animal cells, might regulate multiple nuclear Ca(2+) responses to developmental and environmental conditions. PMID:27230377

  13. Leptin activates cytosolic calcium responses through protein kinase-C dependent mechanism in immortalized RFamide-related peptide-3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Saatci, Tugrul; Ayar, Ahmet; Canpolat, Sinan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2015-03-19

    RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3), a mammalian ortholog of avian gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), seems to be an important regulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) reproductive axis. Leptin, a permissive hormonal regulator of fertility, provides energy signal to brain. According to current view, leptin does not act directly on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. RFRP-3 neurons have been shown to express leptin receptors. The goal of the present study was to examine whether leptin acts through RFRP-3 neurons to modulate activity of the GnRH neurons. For this aim, the effects of leptin on intracellular free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in RFRP-3 neurons were investigated by using in vitro calcium imaging system. In the present study, rHypoE-7 cell line was used as a model to explore the effects of leptin on RFRP-3 neurons. rHypoE-7 cells were placed on glass coverslip and loaded with 1 μM Fura-2 AM. [Ca(2+)]i responses were quantified by the changes in 340/380 ratio. Leptin (0.1-10 μM) caused increases in [Ca(2+)]i in a dose-dependent manner. The changes in [Ca(2+)]i were significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with protein kinase C inhibitor. These results demonstrate that leptin activates intracellular calcium signaling in RFRP-3 neurons through PKC-dependent pathway, and thus leptin may exert its effect on GnRH neurons by means of RFRP-3 cells. PMID:25575434

  14. Cytosolic calcium concentration is reduced by photolysis of a nitrosyl ruthenium complex in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, C N; Cacciari, A L; Silva, R S; Bendhack, L M

    2006-11-01

    The effect of the NO donors cis-[RuCl(bpy)(2)(NO)](PF(6)) (RUNOCL) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) was studied in cells isolated from the rat aorta smooth muscle of cells isolated from the rat aorta smooth muscle. SNP is a metal nitrosyl complex made up of iron, cyanide groups, and a nitro moiety; the RUNOCL complex is made up of ruthenium and bipyridine ligands, with chloride and nitrosyl groups in the ruthenium axial positions. Rat aorta smooth muscle cells were loaded with fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (Fluo-3 AM) and imaged by a confocal scanning laser microscope excited with the 488 nm line of the argon ion laser. Fluorescence emission was measured at 510 nm. One of the NO donors, RUNOCL (100 micromol/L) or SNP (100 micromol/L), was then added to the cell chamber and the fluorescent intensity percentage (%IF) was measured after 240 s. RUNOCL reduced the %IF to 60.0+/-10.0% of the initial value. After treatment with the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10 micromol/L), the measurement of %IF was 81.0+/-5.0% (n=4). In the presence of tetraethylammonium (TEA) (1 mmol/L) the %IF was 79.0+/-6.4% (n=4). A combination of ODQ and TEA increased the %IF to 97.0+/-3.5% (n=4). As for SNP, it reduced the %IF to 81.4+/-4.7% (n=4), but this effect was inhibited by ODQ (%IF 94.0+/-3.6%; n=4) and TEA (%IF 88.0+/-2.1%; n=4). The combination of ODQ and TEA increased (%IF 92.0+/-2.8%; n=4). Taken together, these results indicate that both the new NO donor RUNOCL and SNP reduce [Ca(2+)](c). Our data also give evidence that soluble guanylyl cyclase and K(+) channels sensitive to TEA are involved in the mechanisms responsible for the reduction in [Ca(2+)](c) of the rat aorta smooth muscle cells. PMID:16564714

  15. Bitter tasting compounds dilate airways by inhibiting airway smooth muscle calcium oscillations and calcium sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiahui; Sanderson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose While selective, bitter tasting, TAS2R agonists can relax agonist-contracted airway smooth muscle (ASM), their mechanism of action is unclear. However, ASM contraction is regulated by Ca2+ signalling and Ca2+ sensitivity. We have therefore investigated how the TAS2R10 agonists chloroquine, quinine and denotonium regulate contractile agonist-induced Ca2+ signalling and sensitivity. Experimental Approach Airways in mouse lung slices were contracted with either methacholine (MCh) or 5HT and bronchodilation assessed using phase-contrast microscopy. Ca2+ signalling was measured with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of ASM cells loaded with Oregon Green, a Ca2+-sensitive indicator (with or without caged-IP3). Effects on Ca2+ sensitivity were assessed on lung slices treated with caffeine and ryanodine to permeabilize ASM cells to Ca2+. Key Results The TAS2R10 agonists dilated airways constricted by either MCh or 5HT, accompanied by inhibition of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations. However, in non-contracted airways, TAS2R10 agonists, at concentrations that maximally dilated constricted airways, did not evoke Ca2+ signals in ASM cells. Ca2+ increases mediated by the photolysis of caged-IP3 were also attenuated by chloroquine, quinine and denotonium. In Ca2+-permeabilized ASM cells, the TAS2R10 agonists dilated MCh- and 5HT-constricted airways. Conclusions and Implications TAS2R10 agonists reversed bronchoconstriction by inhibiting agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations while simultaneously reducing the Ca2+ sensitivity of ASM cells. Reduction of Ca2+ oscillations may be due to inhibition of Ca2+ release through IP3 receptors. Further characterization of bronchodilatory TAS2R agonists may lead to the development of novel therapies for the treatment of bronchoconstrictive conditions. PMID:24117140

  16. New In Vitro Phenotypic Assay for Epilepsy: Fluorescent Measurement of Synchronized Neuronal Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pacico, Nathalie; Mingorance-Le Meur, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Research in the epilepsy field is moving from a primary focus on controlling seizures to addressing disease pathophysiology. This requires the adoption of resource- and time-consuming animal models of chronic epilepsy which are no longer able to sustain the testing of even moderate numbers of compounds. Therefore, new in vitro functional assays of epilepsy are needed that are able to provide a medium throughput while still preserving sufficient biological context to allow for the identification of compounds with new modes of action. Here we describe a robust and simple fluorescence-based calcium assay to measure epileptiform network activity using rat primary cortical cultures in a 96-well format. The assay measures synchronized intracellular calcium oscillations occurring in the population of primary neurons and is amenable to medium throughput screening. We have adapted this assay format to the low magnesium and the 4-aminopyridine epilepsy models and confirmed the contribution of voltage-gated ion channels and AMPA, NMDA and GABA receptors to epileptiform activity in both models. We have also evaluated its translatability using a panel of antiepileptic drugs with a variety of modes of action. Given its throughput and translatability, the calcium oscillations assay bridges the gap between simplified target-based screenings and compound testing in animal models of epilepsy. This phenotypic assay also has the potential to be used directly as a functional screen to help identify novel antiepileptic compounds with new modes of action, as well as pathways with previously unknown contribution to disease pathophysiology. PMID:24416277

  17. The frequency of calcium oscillations in mouse eggs at fertilization is modulated by the number of fused sperm.

    PubMed

    Faure, J E; Myles, D G; Primakoff, P

    1999-09-15

    In a variety of calcium signaling systems, the frequency of intracellular calcium oscillations is physiologically important. Probably multiple factors control the frequency of calcium oscillations in the egg after fertilization and many of these remain to be identified. In this study, we present the first rigorous set of data showing that monospermic fertilization is important for setting the physiological calcium oscillation frequency. Recordings in 152 zona-free eggs show that the general pattern of the calcium oscillations is identical in monospermic and polyspermic eggs; however, the oscillation frequency is higher in polyspermic eggs (P < 10(-6)). The frequency of the late oscillations increases with the number of sperm heads incorporated: 5.2 +/- 0.3 spikes per hour (mean +/- SEM; n = 55) in monospermic eggs, 6.6 +/- 0.3 (n = 62) in dispermic eggs, 8.7 +/- 0.7 (n = 23) in trispermic eggs, and 8.9 +/- 0.9 (n = 12) in eggs with four or more sperm heads. The frequency of the early oscillations is also increased in polyspermic eggs. Seventy-eight additional eggs were divided into two groups and inseminated with two different sperm concentrations ("low" and "high") to obtain one group mainly monospermic and the other mainly polyspermic. The two groups of eggs oscillated at different frequencies (P < 10(-5)). These data rule out the possibility of an egg effect in which some eggs would have the dual properties of oscillating faster and of being able to fuse with several sperm cells. These data instead suggest that the sperm modulates the frequency of the oscillations in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:10479454

  18. Thapsigargin-induced grp78 expression is mediated by the increase of cytosolic free calcium in 9L rat brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, L Y; Chiang, A S; Hung, J J; Hung, H I; Lai, Y K

    2000-06-01

    Exposure of 9L rat brain tumor cells to 300 nM thapsigargin (TG), a sarcoendoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPases inhibitor, leads to an immediate suppression of general protein synthesis followed by an enhanced synthesis of the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein, GRP78. Synthesis of GRP78 increases significantly and continues to rise after 4 h of treatment, and this process coincides with the accumulation of grp78 mRNA. TG-induced grp78 expression can be suppressed by the cytosolic free calcium ([Ca(2+)](c)) chelator dibromo-1, 2-bis(aminophenoxy)ethane N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) in a concentration-dependent manner. Induction of grp78 is completely abolished in the presence of 20 microM BAPTA under which the TG-induced increase of [Ca(2+)](c) is also completely prevented. By adding ethyleneglycol bis(beta-aminoethyl)ether-N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid in the foregoing experiments, in a condition such that endoplasmic reticulum calcium ([Ca(2+)](ER)) is depleted and calcium influx from outside is prevented, TG-induced grp78 expression is also abolished. These data lead us to conclude that increase in [Ca(2+)](c), together with the depletion of [Ca(2+)](ER), are the major causes of TG-induced grp78 expression in 9L rat brain tumor cells. By using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), we found that the nuclear extracts prepared from TG-treated cells exhibit an increase in binding activity toward the extended grp78 promoter as well as the individual cis-acting regulatory elements, CRE and CORE. Moreover, this increase in binding activity is also reduced by BAPTA. By competitory assays using the cis-acting regulatory elements as the competitors as well as the EMSA probes, we further show that all of the tested cis elements-CRE, CORE, and C1-are involved in the basal as well as in the TG-induced expression of grp78 and that the protein factor(s) that binds to the C1 region plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of the transcription complex. PMID:10861839

  19. Cytosolic free Ca2+ during operation of sodium-calcium exchange in guinea-pig heart cells.

    PubMed Central

    Noma, A; Shioya, T; Paver, L F; Twist, V W; Powell, T

    1991-01-01

    1. Membrane current generated by the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange mechanism was recorded in single guinea-pig ventricular myocytes using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique and the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored using the fluorescent probe Indo-1, applied intracellularly through a perfused patch pipette. The reversal potential of the exchanger (ENa, Ca) was measured from records of the 2 mM-Ni(2+)-sensitive current and used in an attempt to clamp [Ca2+]i at a level determined by the ionic compositions of the external and pipette solutions. 2. Measurements of ENa, Ca indicated that [Ca2+]i was close to that in the pipette solution when the holding potential was set at the ENa, Ca expected for a 3Na+:1Ca2+ exchanger. The measured value of ENa, Ca was more positive than the theoretical value when the membrane potential was held positive to ENa, Ca and the opposite was true when the holding potential was more negative than the expected ENa, Ca. 3. As Indo-1 diffused into the cell from the whole-cell clamp electrode, the intensities of the fluorescent signals measured at 405 and 480 nm increased with time, with no obvious saturation over a 10-45 min recording period. However, the ratio of these two signals reached a steady level within 5 min after rupture of the patch membrane, when the holding potential was set at the expected ENa, Ca of the exchanger. The intensity ratios measured using pipette solutions containing 600 and 803 nM [Ca2+] were almost equal to the ratios obtained extracellularly from internal solutions of identical compositions, but in experiments using pipette solutions having lower [Ca2+] the intensity ratios measured in myocytes were higher than those obtained extracellularly. 4. If the membrane was depolarized or hyperpolarized, the fluorescence ratio either increased or decreased, respectively. These changes in the fluorescence ratio were virtually blocked by the extracellular application of 2 mM-Ni2+. 5. When the

  20. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  1. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Zhou, Bin; Lai, Xiaohan; Wang, Liyun; Luo, Erping; Guo, X. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes have been hypothesized to be the major mechanosensors in bone. How in situ osteocytes respond to mechanical stimuli is still unclear because of technical difficulties. In vitro studies have shown that osteocytes exhibited unique calcium (Ca2+) oscillations to fluid shear. However, whether this mechanotransduction phenomenon holds for in situ osteocytes embedded within a mineralized bone matrix under dynamic loading remains unknown. Using a novel synchronized loading/imaging technique, we successfully visualized in real time and quantified Ca2+ responses in osteocytes and bone surface cells in situ under controlled dynamic loading on intact mouse tibia. The resultant fluid-induced shear stress on the osteocyte in the lacunocanalicular system (LCS) was also quantified. Osteocytes, but not surface cells, displayed repetitive Ca2+ spikes in response to dynamic loading, with spike frequency and magnitude dependent on load magnitude, tissue strain, and shear stress in the LCS. The Ca2+ oscillations were significantly reduced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) depletion and P2 purinergic receptor (P2R)/phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. This study provides direct evidence that osteocytes respond to in situ mechanical loading by Ca2+ oscillations, which are dependent on the P2R/PLC/inositol trisphosphate/ER pathway. This study develops a novel approach in skeletal mechanobiology and also advances our fundamental knowledge of bone mechanotransduction.—Jing, D., Baik, A. D., Lu, X. L., Zhou, B., Lai, X., Wang, L., Luo, E., Guo, X. E. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading. PMID:24347610

  2. Phototropins Function in High-Intensity Blue Light-Induced Hypocotyl Phototropism in Arabidopsis by Altering Cytosolic Calcium1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Wang, Yan-Liang; Qiao, Xin-Rong; Wang, Jin; Wang, Lin-Dan; Xu, Chang-Shui; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2), the blue light receptors in plants, regulate hypocotyl phototropism in a fluence-dependent manner. Especially under high fluence rates of blue light (HBL), the redundant function mediated by both phot1 and phot2 drastically restricts the understanding of the roles of phot2. Here, systematic analysis of phototropin-related mutants and overexpression transgenic lines revealed that HBL specifically induced a transient increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hypocotyls and that the increase in [Ca2+]cyt was primarily attributed to phot2. Pharmacological and genetic experiments illustrated that HBL-induced Ca2+ increases were modulated differently by phot1 and phot2. Phot2 mediated the HBL-induced increase in [Ca2+]cyt mainly by an inner store-dependent Ca2+-release pathway, not by activating plasma membrane Ca2+ channels. Further analysis showed that the increase in [Ca2+]cyt was possibly responsible for HBL-induced hypocotyl phototropism. An inhibitor of auxin efflux carrier exhibited significant inhibitions of both phototropism and increases in [Ca2+]cyt, which indicates that polar auxin transport is possibly involved in HBL-induced responses. Moreover, PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 (PKS1), the phototropin-related signaling element identified, interacted physically with phototropins, auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED1 and calcium-binding protein CALMODULIN4, in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and HBL-induced phototropism was impaired in pks multiple mutants, indicating the role of the PKS family in HBL-induced phototropism. Together, these results provide new insights into the functions of phototropins and highlight a potential integration point through which Ca2+ signaling-related HBL modulates hypocotyl phototropic responses. PMID:23674105

  3. Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, M.S.; Lim, Priscilla L.K.; Gupta, Rashi; Boelsterli, Urs A. . E-mail: phcbua@nus.edu.sg

    2006-12-15

    Diclofenac is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been associated with rare but serious hepatotoxicity. Experimental evidence indicates that diclofenac targets mitochondria and induces the permeability transition (mPT) which leads to apoptotic cell death in hepatocytes. While the downstream effector mechanisms have been well characterized, the more proximal pathways leading to the mPT are not known. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of free cytosolic calcium (Ca{sup 2+} {sub c}) in diclofenac-induced cell injury in immortalized human hepatocytes. We show that exposure to diclofenac caused time- and concentration-dependent cell injury, which was prevented by the specific mPT inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA, 5 {mu}M). At 8 h, diclofenac caused increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} (Fluo-4 fluorescence), which was unaffected by CsA. Combined exposure to diclofenac/BAPTA (Ca{sup 2+} chelator) inhibited cell injury, indicating that Ca{sup 2+} plays a critical role in precipitating mPT. Diclofenac decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, {delta}{psi}{sub m} (JC-1 fluorescence), even in the presence of CsA or BAPTA, indicating that mitochondrial depolarization was not a consequence of the mPT or elevated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. The CYP2C9 inhibitor sulphaphenazole (10 {mu}M) protected from diclofenac-induced cell injury and prevented increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, while it had no effect on the dissipation of the {delta}{psi}{sub m}. Finally, diclofenac exposure greatly increased the mitochondria-selective superoxide levels secondary to the increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that diclofenac has direct depolarizing effects on mitochondria which does not lead to cell injury, while CYP2C9-mediated bioactivation causes increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, triggering the mPT and precipitating cell death.

  4. Estrogen Receptor β-Selective Agonists Stimulate Calcium Oscillations in Human and Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Blackman, Brigitte E.; Schonemann, Marcus D.; Zogovic-Kapsalis, Tatjana; Pan, Xiaoyu; Tagliaferri, Mary; Harris, Heather A.; Cohen, Isaac; Reijo Pera, Renee A.; Mellon, Synthia H.; Weiner, Richard I.; Leitman, Dale C.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens are used extensively to treat hot flashes in menopausal women. Some of the beneficial effects of estrogens in hormone therapy on the brain might be due to nongenomic effects in neurons such as the rapid stimulation of calcium oscillations. Most studies have examined the nongenomic effects of estrogen receptors (ER) in primary neurons or brain slices from the rodent brain. However, these cells can not be maintained continuously in culture because neurons are post-mitotic. Neurons derived from embryonic stem cells could be a potential continuous, cell-based model to study nongenomic actions of estrogens in neurons if they are responsive to estrogens after differentiation. In this study ER-subtype specific estrogens were used to examine the role of ERα and ERβ on calcium oscillations in neurons derived from human (hES) and mouse embryonic stem cells. Unlike the undifferentiated hES cells the differentiated cells expressed neuronal markers, ERβ, but not ERα. The non-selective ER agonist 17β-estradiol (E2) rapidly increased [Ca2+]i oscillations and synchronizations within a few minutes. No change in calcium oscillations was observed with the selective ERα agonist 4,4′,4″-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (PPT). In contrast, the selective ERβ agonists, 2,3-bis(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN), MF101, and 2-(3-fluoro-4-hydroxyphenyl)-7-vinyl-1,3 benzoxazol-5-ol (ERB-041; WAY-202041) stimulated calcium oscillations similar to E2. The ERβ agonists also increased calcium oscillations and phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK1/2 in neurons derived from mouse ES cells, which was inhibited by nifedipine demonstrating that ERβ activates L-type voltage gated calcium channels to regulate neuronal activity. Our results demonstrate that ERβ signaling regulates nongenomic pathways in neurons derived from ES cells, and suggest that these cells might be useful to study the nongenomic mechanisms of estrogenic compounds. PMID:20668547

  5. Computational biology analysis of platelet signaling reveals roles of feedbacks through phospholipase C and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase in controlling amplitude and duration of calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Balabin, Fedor A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N

    2016-06-01

    Blood platelet activation is required to allow their participation in hemostasis and thrombosis. It is regulated by a complicated signaling network, whose functioning has been recently attracting attention for basic research and pharmacological purposes. Phospholipase С (PLC) is an enzyme playing an important role in platelet calcium signaling and responsible for release of inositol triphosphate (IP3) into platelet cytoplasm thus controlling intracellular calcium concentration. Using a comprehensive computational model of platelet calcium signaling, we studied the influence of the positive feedback executed by cytosolic calcium on the PLC isoform β2 during platelet activation. With the positive feedback, the model predicted hyperintensive response to platelet activation by thrombin, where non-physiologically high calcium concentrations arose. However, if one took into account a negative feedback determined by IP3 3-kinase (IP3K), combination of the feedback resulted in the formation of a stepped response (with a stable oscillation amplitude and activation-dependent duration). Stochastic simulations confirmed that PLC and IP3K should act in pair to ensure platelet's "all-or-none" response to activation, when the activation level sets the probability of platelet activation, but not its intensity. PMID:27018448

  6. Melatonin prevents cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial damage and cell death due to toxically high doses of dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Suwanjang, Wilasinee; Abramov, Andrey Y; Charngkaew, Komgrid; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2016-07-01

    Stressor exposure activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes elevations in the levels of glucocorticoids (GC) from the adrenal glands. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that prolonged exposure to high GC levels can lead to oxidative stress, calcium deregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in a number of cell types. However, melatonin, via its antioxidant activity, exhibits a neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Therefore, in the present study, we explored the protective effect of melatonin in GC-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Cellular treatment with the toxically high doses of the synthetic GC receptor agonist, dexamethasone (DEX) elicited marked decreases in the levels of glutathione and increases in ROS production, lipid peroxidation and cell death. DEX toxicity also induced increases in the levels of cytosolic calcium and mitochondrial fusion proteins (Mfn1 and Opa1) but decreases in the levels of mitochondrial fission proteins (Fis1 and Drp1). Mitochondrial damage was observed in large proportions of the DEX-treated cells. Pretreatment of the cells with melatonin substantially prevented the DEX-induced toxicity. These results suggest that melatonin might exert protective effects against oxidative stress, cytosolic calcium overload and mitochondrial damage in DEX-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27155536

  7. Bacterial-induced calcium oscillations are common to nitrogen-fixing associations of nodulating legumes and nonlegumes.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Emma; Sun, Jongho; Op den Camp, Rik; Pujic, Petar; Hill, Lionel; Normand, Philippe; Morris, Richard J; Downie, J Allan; Geurts, Rene; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2015-08-01

    Plants that form root-nodule symbioses are within a monophyletic 'nitrogen-fixing' clade and associated signalling processes are shared with the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Central to symbiotic signalling are nuclear-associated oscillations in calcium ions (Ca(2+) ), occurring in the root hairs of several legume species in response to the rhizobial Nod factor signal. In this study we expanded the species analysed for activation of Ca(2+) oscillations, including nonleguminous species within the nitrogen-fixing clade. We showed that Ca(2+) oscillations are a common feature of legumes in their association with rhizobia, while Cercis, a non-nodulating legume, does not show Ca(2+) oscillations in response to Nod factors from Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234. Parasponia andersonii, a nonlegume that can associate with rhizobia, showed Nod factor-induced calcium oscillations to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors, but its non-nodulating sister species, Trema tomentosa, did not. Also within the nitrogen-fixing clade are actinorhizal species that associate with Frankia bacteria and we showed that Alnus glutinosa induces Ca(2+) oscillations in root hairs in response to exudates from Frankia alni, but not to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors. We conclude that the ability to mount Ca(2+) oscillations in response to symbiotic bacteria is a common feature of nodulating species within the nitrogen-fixing clade. PMID:26010117

  8. Sperm-derived WW domain-binding protein, PAWP, elicits calcium oscillations and oocyte activation in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Mahmoud; Balakier, Hanna; Bashar, Siamak; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Sutovsky, Peter; Librach, Clifford L; Oko, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Mammalian zygotic development is initiated by sperm-mediated intracellular calcium oscillations, followed by activation of metaphase II-arrested oocytes. Sperm postacrosomal WW binding protein (PAWP) fulfils the criteria set for an oocyte-activating factor by inducing oocyte activation and being stored in the perinuclear theca, the sperm compartment whose content is first released into oocyte cytoplasm during fertilization. However, proof that PAWP initiates mammalian zygotic development relies on demonstration that it acts upstream of oocyte calcium oscillations. Here, we show that PAWP triggers calcium oscillations and pronuclear formation in human and mouse oocytes similar to what is observed during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Most important, sperm-induced calcium oscillations are blocked by coinjection of a competitive inhibitor, derived from the WWI domain-binding motif of PAWP, implying the requirement of sperm PAWP and an oocyte-derived WWI domain protein substrate of PAWP for successful fertilization. Sperm-delivered PAWP is, therefore, a unique protein with a nonredundant role during human and mouse fertilization, required to trigger zygotic development. Presented data confirm our previous findings in nonmammalian models and suggest potential applications of PAWP in the diagnosis and treatment of infertility.- PMID:24970390

  9. Formyl peptide-induced chemotaxis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes does not require either marked changes in cytosolic calcium or specific granule discharge. Role of formyl peptide receptor reexpression (or recycling).

    PubMed Central

    Perez, H D; Elfman, F; Marder, S; Lobo, E; Ives, H E

    1989-01-01

    We examined the role of intracellular and extracellular calcium on the ability of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes to migrate chemotactically and reexpress (or recycle) formyl peptide receptors when challenged with the synthetic chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). Extracellular calcium was not required for either optimal chemotactic responses or receptor reexpression. Depletion and chelation of intracellular calcium resulted in significant diminution in the ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to release the specific granule constituents lactoferrin and vitamin B12-binding protein during the process of chemotaxis, but had no effect on the capability of these cells to respond chemotactically. Similarly, chelation of intracellular calcium did not affect the ability of these cells to reexpress a population of formyl peptide receptors. Inhibition of receptor reexpression, by a nonagglutinating derivative of wheat-germ agglutinin, was associated with inhibition of chemotactic responses to FMLP. Thus, it appears that large changes in cytosolic free calcium are not necessary for formyl peptide-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis. In contrast, continuous reexpression (or recycling) of formyl peptide receptors is required for polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotactic responses to FMLP, a process that appears to be independent from specific granule fusion with plasma membrane. PMID:2723068

  10. Dopamine-induced oscillations of the pyloric pacemaker neuron rely on release of calcium from intracellular stores.

    PubMed

    Kadiri, Lolahon R; Kwan, Alex C; Webb, Watt W; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2011-09-01

    Endogenously bursting neurons play central roles in many aspects of nervous system function, ranging from motor control to perception. The properties and bursting patterns generated by these neurons are subject to neuromodulation, which can alter cycle frequency and amplitude by modifying the properties of the neuron's ionic currents. In the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, the anterior burster (AB) neuron is a conditional oscillator in the presence of dopamine (DA) and other neuromodulators and serves as the pacemaker to drive rhythmic output from the pyloric network. We analyzed the mechanisms by which DA evokes bursting in the AB neuron. Previous work showed that DA-evoked bursting is critically dependent on external calcium (Harris-Warrick RM, Flamm RE. J Neurosci 7: 2113-2128, 1987). Using two-photon microscopy and calcium imaging, we show that DA evokes the release of calcium from intracellular stores well before the emergence of voltage oscillations. When this release from intracellular stores is blocked by antagonists of ryanodine or inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor channels, DA fails to evoke AB bursting. We further demonstrate that DA enhances the calcium-activated inward current, I(CAN), despite the fact that it significantly reduces voltage-activated calcium currents. This suggests that DA-induced release of calcium from intracellular stores activates I(CAN), which provides a depolarizing ramp current that underlies endogenous bursting in the AB neuron. PMID:21676929

  11. Paclitaxel accelerates spontaneous calcium oscillations in cardiomyocytes by interacting with NCS-1 and the InsP3R

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Heidrich, Felix M.; DeGray, Brenda; Boehmerle, Wolfgang; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol) is a microtubule-stabilizing compound that is used for cancer chemotherapy. However, Taxol administration is limited by serious side effects including cardiac arrhythmia, which cannot be explained by its microtubule-stabilizing effect. Recently, neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS-1), a calcium binding protein that modulates the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R), was described as a binding partner of Taxol and as a substrate of calpain. We examined calcium signaling processes in cardiomyocytes after treatment with Taxol to investigate the basis of Taxol-induced cardiac arrhythmia. After treating isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with a therapeutic concentration of Taxol for several hours live cell imaging experiments showed that the frequency of spontaneous calcium oscillations significantly increased. This effect was not mimicked by other tubulin-stabilizing agents. However, it was prevented by inhibiting the InsP3R. Taxol treated cells had increased expression of NCS-1, an effect also detectable after Taxol administration in vivo. Short hairpin RNA mediated knock down of NCS-1 decreased InsP3R dependent intracellular calcium release, whereas Taxol treatment, that increased NCS-1 levels, increased InsP3R dependent calcium release. The effects of Taxol were ryanodine receptor independent. At the single channel level Taxol and NCS-1 mediated an increase in InsP3R activity. Calpain activity was not affected by Taxol in cardiomyocytes suggesting a calpain independent signaling pathway. In short, our study shows that Taxol impacts calcium signaling and calcium oscillations in cardiomyocytes through NCS-1 and the InsP3R. PMID:20801127

  12. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  13. Investigation of the effects of distance from sources on apoptosis, oxidative stress and cytosolic calcium accumulation via TRPV1 channels induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Çiğ, Bilal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1 is a Ca2+ permeable channel and gated by noxious heat, oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP). Some reports have indicated that non-ionized electromagnetic radiation (EMR)-induces heat and oxidative stress effects. We aimed to investigate the effects of distance from sources on calcium signaling, cytosolic ROS production, cell viability, apoptosis, plus caspase-3 and -9 values induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines were divided into A, B, C and D groups as control, 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz groups, respectively. Cells in Group A were used as control and were kept in cell culture conditions without EMR exposure. Groups B, C and D were exposed to the EMR frequencies at different distances (0 cm, 1 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm and 25 cm) for 1h before CAP stimulation. The cytosolic ROS production, Ca2+ concentrations, apoptosis, caspase-3 and caspase-9 values were higher in groups B, C and D than in A group at 0 cm, 1 cm and 5 cm distances although cell viability (MTT) values were increased by the distances. There was no statistically significant difference in the values between control, 20 and 25 cm. Wi-Fi and mobile phone EMR placed within 10 cm of the cells induced excessive oxidative responses and apoptosis via TRPV1-induced cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in the cancer cells. Using cell phones and Wi-Fi sources which are farther away than 10 cm may provide useful protection against oxidative stress, apoptosis and overload of intracellular Ca2+. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25703814

  14. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  15. Mouse neuroblastoma cell based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhwan; Baek, Juyeong; Jung, Unsang; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-05-01

    Recently, Mouse neuroblastoma cells are considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and intensively used as a model system in different areas. Among those areas, differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor mediated ion current, and glutamate induced physiological response are actively investigated. The reason for the interest to mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells is that they have a fast growing rate than other cells in neural origin with a few another advantages. This study evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spikes recording of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in mouse N2A cell with our proposed imaging modality, we report that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells can be an important model related to epileptic activity studies. It is concluded that the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce the epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as produced by the neurons or the astrocytes. This evidence advocates the increased and strong level of neurotransmitters release by enhancement in free calcium using the 4-aminopyridine which causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce the epileptic spikes and calcium oscillation.

  16. Mouse neuroblastoma cell-based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhwan; Jung, Unsang; Baek, Juyoung; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mouse neuroblastoma cells have been considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and they have been intensively used as a model system in different areas. For example, the differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor-mediated ion current, and glutamate-induced physiological responses have been actively investigated with these cells. These mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells are of interest because they grow faster than other cells of neural origin and have a number of other advantages. The calcium oscillations and neural spikes of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in epileptic conditions are evaluated. Based on our observations of neural spikes in these cells with our proposed imaging modality, we reported that they can be an important model in epileptic activity studies. We concluded that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as those produced by neurons or astrocytes. This evidence suggests that increased levels of neurotransmitter release due to the enhancement of free calcium from 4-aminopyridine causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce epileptic spikes and calcium oscillations.

  17. Modulation of gamma oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus by neuronal calcium sensor protein-1: relevance to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Onofrio, Stasia; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James R.; Luster, Brennon; Messias, Erick; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced levels of gamma-band activity are present in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. In the same disorders, increased neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1) expression was reported in a series of postmortem studies. These disorders are also characterized by sleep dysregulation, suggesting a role for the reticular activating system (RAS). The discovery of gamma-band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the cholinergic arm of the RAS, revealed that such activity was mediated by high-threshold calcium channels that are regulated by NCS-1. We hypothesized that NCS-1 normally regulates gamma-band oscillations through these calcium channels and that excessive levels of NCS-1, such as would be expected with overexpression, decrease gamma-band activity. We found that PPN neurons in rat brain slices manifested gamma-band oscillations that were increased by low levels of NCS-1 but suppressed by high levels of NCS-1. Our results suggest that NCS-1 overexpression may be responsible for the decrease in gamma-band activity present in at least some schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. PMID:25376789

  18. Role of cytosolic and calcium independent phospholipases A(2) in insulin secretion impairment of INS-1E cells infected by S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Caporarello, N; Salmeri, M; Scalia, M; Motta, C; Parrino, C; Frittitta, L; Olivieri, M; Toscano, M A; Anfuso, C D; Lupo, G

    2015-12-21

    Cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2) and Ca(2+)-independent PLA2 (iPLA2) play a significant role in insulin β-cells secretion. Bacterial infections may be responsible of the onset of diabetes. The mechanism by which Staphylococcus aureus infection of INS-1 cells alters glucose-induced insulin secretion has been examined. After acute infection, insulin secretion and PLA2 activities significantly increased. Moreover, increased expressions of phospho-cPLA2, phospho-PKCα and phospho-ERK 1/2 were observed. Chronic infection causes a decrease in insulin release and a significant increase of iPLA2 and COX-2 protein expression. Moreover, insulin secretion in infected cells could be restored using specific siRNAs against iPLA2 isoform and specific COX-2 inhibitor. PMID:26632509

  19. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  20. NOS inhibition synchronizes calcium oscillations in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells by increasing gap-junctional coupling.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Heinrich; Sharifpanah, Fatemeh; Hatry, Myriam; Steffen, Paul; Bartsch, Caroline; Heller, Regine; Padmasekar, Manju; Howaldt, Hans-Peter; Bein, Gregor; Wartenberg, Maria

    2011-06-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are a promising stem cell source for cell transplantation. We demonstrate that undifferentiated ASCs display robust oscillations of intracellular calcium [Ca(2+) ](i) which may be associated with stem cell maintenance since oscillations were absent in endothelial cell differentiation medium supplemented with FGF-2. [Ca(2+) ](i) oscillations were dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores since they were abolished in Ca(2+) -free medium and in the presence of the store-depleting agent thapsigargin. They were inhibited by the phospholipase C antagonist U73,122, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3) ) receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) as well as by the gap-junction uncouplers 1-heptanol and carbenoxolone, indicating regulation by the InsP(3) pathway and dependence on gap-junctional coupling. Cells endogenously generated nitric oxide (NO), expressed NO synthase 1 (NOS 1) and connexin 43 (Cx 43). The nitric oxide NOS inhibitors NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea, and diphenylene iodonium as well as si-RNA-mediated down-regulation of NOS 1 synchronized [Ca(2+) ](i) oscillations between individual cells, whereas the NO-donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) as well as the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) were without effects. The synchronization of [Ca(2+) ](i) oscillations was due to an improvement of intracellular coupling since fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) revealed increased reflow of fluorescent calcein into the bleached area in the presence of the NOS inhibitors DPI and L-NAME. In summary our data demonstrate that intracellular NO levels regulate synchronization of [Ca(2+) ](i) oscillations in undifferentiated ASCs by controlling gap-junctional coupling. PMID:21413022

  1. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  2. Cytosolic Calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and related gene expression and protein modulation in Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures respond immediately to altered gravitation: Parabolic flight data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Ruediger; Hausmann, Niklas; Neef, Maren; Fengler, Svenja

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights in order to assess molecular short-term responses to altered gravity fields. Using transgenic cell lines, hydrogen peroxide and cytosolic Ca2+ were continuously monitored. In parallel, the metabolism of samples was chemically quenched (RNAlater, Ambion, for RNA; acid/base for NADPH, NADP) at typical stages of a parabola (1g before pull up; end of pull up (1.8 g), end of microgravity (µg, 20 sec), and end of pull out (1.8 g)). Cells exhibited an increase of both Ca2+ and hydrogen peroxide with the onset of µg, and a decline thereafter. This behaviour was accompanied by a decrease of the NADPH/NADP redox ratio, indicating a Ca2+-dependent activation of a NADPH oxidase. Microarray analyses revealed concomitant expression profiles. At the end of the microgravity phase, 396 transcripts were specifically up-, while 485 were down-regulated. Up-regulation was dominated by Ca2+- and ROS(reactive oxygen species)-related gene products. The same material was also used for the analysis of phosphopeptides by 2D SDS PAGE. Relevant spots were identified by liquid chromatography-MS. With the exception of a chaperone (HSP 70-3), hypergravity (1.8 g) and microgravity modified different sets of proteins. These are partly involved in primary metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citrate cycle) and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these data show that both gene expression and protein modulation jointly respond within seconds to alterations in the gravity field, with a focus on metabolic adaptation, signalling and control of ROS.

  3. Multiple cellular roles of Neurospora crassa plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 in regulation of cytosolic free calcium, carotenoid accumulation, stress responses, and acquisition of thermotolerance.

    PubMed

    Barman, Ananya; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase C1 (PLC1), secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) and Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger proteins regulate calcium signaling and homeostasis in eukaryotes. In this study, we investigate functions for phospholipase C1 (plc-1), sPLA2 (splA2) and a Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger (cpe-1) in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. The Δplc-1, ΔsplA2, and Δcpe-1 mutants exhibited a growth defect on medium supplemented with the divalent ionophore A23187, suggesting that these genes might play a role in regulation of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in N. crassa. The strains lacking plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 possessed higher carotenoid content than wild type at 8°C, 22°C, and 30°C, and showed increased ultraviolet (UV)-survival under conditions that induced carotenoid accumulation. Moreover, Δplc-1, ΔsplA2, and Δcpe-1 mutants showed reduced survival rate under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and induced thermotolerance after exposure to heat shock temperatures. Thus, this study revealed multiple cellular roles for plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 genes in regulation of [Ca(2+)](c), carotenoid accumulation, survival under stress conditions, and acquisition of thermotolerance induced by heat shock. PMID:25636422

  4. Membrane associated complexes in calcium dynamics modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Piotr; Dyzma, Michał; Kaźmierczak, Bogdan

    2013-06-01

    Mitochondria not only govern energy production, but are also involved in crucial cellular signalling processes. They are one of the most important organelles determining the Ca2+ regulatory pathway in the cell. Several mathematical models explaining these mechanisms were constructed, but only few of them describe interplay between calcium concentrations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasm and mitochondria. Experiments measuring calcium concentrations in mitochondria and ER suggested the existence of cytosolic microdomains with locally elevated calcium concentration in the nearest vicinity of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These intermediate physical connections between ER and mitochondria are called MAM (mitochondria-associated ER membrane) complexes. We propose a model with a direct calcium flow from ER to mitochondria, which may be justified by the existence of MAMs, and perform detailed numerical analysis of the effect of this flow on the type and shape of calcium oscillations. The model is partially based on the Marhl et al model. We have numerically found that the stable oscillations exist for a considerable set of parameter values. However, for some parameter sets the oscillations disappear and the trajectories of the model tend to a steady state with very high calcium level in mitochondria. This can be interpreted as an early step in an apoptotic pathway.

  5. Switch of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel Expression in the Plasma Membrane of Chondrogenic Cells Affects Cytosolic Ca2+-Oscillations and Cartilage Formation

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Fodor, János; Katona, Éva; Bartok, Adam; Oláh, Tamás; Sebe, Attila; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Zákány, Róza

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the key elements of signaling of chondroprogenitor cells at the earliest steps of differentiation may substantially improve our opportunities for the application of mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering, which is a promising approach of regenerative therapy of joint diseases. Ion channels, membrane potential and Ca2+-signaling are important regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. Our aim was to identify such plasma membrane ion channels involved in signaling during chondrogenesis, which may serve as specific molecular targets for influencing chondrogenic differentiation and ultimately cartilage formation. Methodology/Principal Findings Using patch-clamp, RT-PCR and Western-blot experiments, we found that chondrogenic cells in primary micromass cell cultures obtained from embryonic chicken limb buds expressed voltage-gated NaV1.4, KV1.1, KV1.3 and KV4.1 channels, although KV1.3 was not detectable in the plasma membrane. Tetrodotoxin (TTX), the inhibitor of NaV1.4 channels, had no effect on cartilage formation. In contrast, presence of 20 mM of the K+ channel blocker tetraethyl-ammonium (TEA) during the time-window of the final commitment of chondrogenic cells reduced KV currents (to 27±3% of control), cell proliferation (thymidine incorporation: to 39±4.4% of control), expression of cartilage-specific genes and consequently, cartilage formation (metachromasia: to 18.0±6.4% of control) and also depolarized the membrane potential (by 9.3±2.1 mV). High-frequency Ca2+-oscillations were also suppressed by 10 mM TEA (confocal microscopy: frequency to 8.5±2.6% of the control). Peak expression of TEA-sensitive KV1.1 in the plasma membrane overlapped with this period. Application of TEA to differentiated chondrocytes, mainly expressing the TEA-insensitive KV4.1 did not affect cartilage formation. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that the differentiation and proliferation of chondrogenic cells depend

  6. Role of an aprotinin-sensitive protease in protein kinase Calpha-mediated activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 by calcium ionophore (A23187) in pulmonary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Sajal; Michael, John R; Chakraborti, Tapati

    2004-06-01

    Treatment of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells with the calcium ionophore, A23187, stimulates the cell membrane associated protease activity, phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, and arachidonic acid (AA) release from the cells. Pretreatment of the cells with arachidonyl-trifluomethylketone (AACOCF3), a cPLA2 inhibitor, but not bromoenollactone (BEL), a iPLA2 inhibitor, prevents A23187 stimulated PLA2 activity and AA release without producing an appreciable alteration of the protease activity. Pretreatment of the cells with aprotinin, an ambient protease inhibitor, prevents the increase in the protease activity and cPLA2 activity in the membrane and AA release from the cells caused by both low and high doses of A23187, and also inhibits protein kinase C (PKC) activity caused by high doses of A23187. Immunoblot study of the endothelial cell membrane isolated from A23187 (10 microM)-treated cells with polyclonal PKCalpha antibody elicited an increase in the 80 kDa immunoreactive protein band along with an additional 47 kDa immunoreactive fragment. Pretreatment of the cells with aprotinin abolished the 47 kDa immunoreactive fragment in the immunoblot. Immunoblot study of the endothelial membrane with polyclonal cPLA2 antibody revealed that treatment of the cells with A23187 dose-dependently increases cPLA2 immunoreactive protein profile in the membrane. It therefore appears from the present study that treatment of the cells with a low dose of A23187 (1 microM) causes a small increase in an aprotinin-sensitive protease activity and that stimulates cPLA2 activity in the cell membrane without an involvement of PKC. By contrast, treatment of the cells with a high dose of 10 microM of A23187 causes optimum increase in the protease activity and that plays an important role in activating PKCalpha, which subsequently stimulates cPLA2 activity in the cell membrane. Although pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin caused ADP ribosylation of a 41 kDa protein in the

  7. Calcium phosphate growth beneath a polycationic monolayer at the air-water interface: effects of oscillating surface pressure on mineralization.

    PubMed

    Junginger, Mathias; Bleek, Katrin; Kita-Tokarczyk, Katarzyna; Reiche, Jürgen; Shkilnyy, Andriy; Schacher, Felix; Müller, Axel H E; Taubert, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    The self-assembly of the amphiphilic block copolymer poly(butadiene)-block-poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] at the air-water interface and the mineralization of the monolayers with calcium phosphate was investigated at different pH values. As expected for polyelectrolytes, the subphase pH strongly affects the monolayer properties. The focus of the current study, however, is on the effect of an oscillating (instead of a static) polymer monolayer on calcium phosphate mineralization. Monitoring of the surface pressure vs. mineralization time shows that the monolayer is quite stable if the mineralization is performed at pH 8. In contrast, the monolayer at pH 5 shows a measurable decrease of the surface pressure already after ca. 2 h of mineralization. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that mineralization at low pH under constant oscillation leads to small particles, which are arranged in circular features and larger entities with holes of ca. 200 nm. The larger features with the holes disappear as the mineralization is continued in favor of the smaller particles. These grow with time and form necklace-like architectures of spherical particles with a uniform diameter. In contrast, mineralization at pH 8 leads to very uniform particle morphologies already after 2 h. The mineralization products consist of a circular feature with a dark dot in the center. The increasing contrast of the precipitates in the electron micrographs with mineralization time indicates an increasing degree of mineralization vs. reaction time. The study therefore shows that mechanical effects on mineralization at interfaces are quite complex. PMID:20835481

  8. Calcium phosphate growth beneath a polycationic monolayer at the air-water interface: effects of oscillating surface pressure on mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junginger, Mathias; Bleek, Katrin; Kita-Tokarczyk, Katarzyna; Reiche, Jürgen; Shkilnyy, Andriy; Schacher, Felix; Müller, Axel H. E.; Taubert, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    The self-assembly of the amphiphilic block copolymer poly(butadiene)-block-poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] at the air-water interface and the mineralization of the monolayers with calcium phosphate was investigated at different pH values. As expected for polyelectrolytes, the subphase pH strongly affects the monolayer properties. The focus of the current study, however, is on the effect of an oscillating (instead of a static) polymer monolayer on calcium phosphate mineralization. Monitoring of the surface pressure vs. mineralization time shows that the monolayer is quite stable if the mineralization is performed at pH 8. In contrast, the monolayer at pH 5 shows a measurable decrease of the surface pressure already after ca. 2 h of mineralization. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that mineralization at low pH under constant oscillation leads to small particles, which are arranged in circular features and larger entities with holes of ca. 200 nm. The larger features with the holes disappear as the mineralization is continued in favor of the smaller particles. These grow with time and form necklace-like architectures of spherical particles with a uniform diameter. In contrast, mineralization at pH 8 leads to very uniform particle morphologies already after 2 h. The mineralization products consist of a circular feature with a dark dot in the center. The increasing contrast of the precipitates in the electron micrographs with mineralization time indicates an increasing degree of mineralization vs. reaction time. The study therefore shows that mechanical effects on mineralization at interfaces are quite complex.

  9. Model for calcium dependent oscillatory growth in pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Jens H; Geitmann, Anja; Grant, Martin

    2008-07-21

    Experiments have shown that pollen tubes grow in an oscillatory mode, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. We propose a theoretical growth model of pollen tubes exhibiting such oscillatory behaviour. The pollen tube and the surrounding medium are represented by two immiscible fluids separated by an interface. The physical variables are pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, which depend on relevant biological quantities, namely calcium concentration and thickness of the cell wall. The essential features generally believed to control oscillating growth are included in the model, namely a turgor pressure, a viscous cell wall which yields under pressure, stretch-activated calcium channels which transport calcium ions into the cytoplasm and an exocytosis rate dependent on the cytosolic calcium concentration in the apex of the cell. We find that a calcium dependent vesicle recycling mechanism is necessary to obtain an oscillating growth rate in our model. We study the variation in the frequency of the growth rate by changing the extracellular calcium concentration and the density of ion channels in the membrane. We compare the predictions of our model with experimental data on the frequency of oscillation versus growth speed, calcium concentration and density of calcium channels. PMID:18471831

  10. Oscillating activity of a calcium-activated K+ channel in normal and cancerous mammary cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, K; Furuya, K; Maeno, T; Edwards, C; Oka, T

    1991-01-01

    Calcium-activated potassium channels were the channels most frequently observed in primary cultured normal mammary cell and in the established mammary tumor cell, MMT060562. In both cells, single-channel and whole-cell clamp recordings sometimes showed slow oscillations of the Ca2(+)-gated K+ current. The characteristics of the Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels in normal and cancerous mammary cells were quite similar. The slope conductances changed from 8 to 70 pS depending on the mode of recording and the ionic composition in the patch electrode. The open probability of this channel increased between 0.1 to 1 microM of the intracellular Ca2+, but it was independent of the membrane potential. Charybdotoxin reduced the activity of the Ca2(+)-activated K+ channel and the oscillation of the membrane current, but apamin had no apparent effect. The application of tetraethylammonium (TEA) from outside and BaCl2 from inside of the cell diminished the activity of the channel. The properties of this channel were different from those of both the large conductance (BK or MAXI K) and small conductance (SK) type Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels. PMID:1710671

  11. Calcium oscillations and T-wave lability precede ventricular arrhythmias in acquired long QT type 2

    PubMed Central

    Němec, Jan; Kim, Jong J.; Gabris, Beth; Salama, Guy

    2010-01-01

    Background Alternans of intracellular Ca2+ (Cai) underlies T-wave alternans, a predictor of cardiac arrhythmias. A related phenomenon, T-Wave Lability (TWL), precedes Torsade de Pointes (TdP) in patients and animal models with impaired repolarization. However, the role of Cai in TWL remains unexplored. Methods Action potentials (APs) and Cai transients, (CaTs) were mapped optically from paced Langendorff female rabbit hearts (n=8) at 1.2s cycle length, after AV node ablation. Hearts were perfused with normal Tyrode's solution then with dofetilide (0.5 μM) and reduced [K+] (2 mM) and [Mg2+] (0.5 mM) to elicit long QT type 2 (LQT2). Lability of EKG, voltage and Cai signals were evaluated during regular paced rhythm, before and after dofetilide perfusion. Results In LQT2, lability of Cai, voltage and EKG signals increased during paced rhythm, before the appearance of early afterdepolarizations (EADs). LQT2 resulted in AP prolongation and multiple (1-3) additional Cai upstrokes, while APs remained monophasic. When EADs appeared, Cai rose before voltage upstrokes at the origins of propagating EADs. Interventions (i.e. ryanodine and thapsigargin, n=3 or low [Ca]o and nifedipine, n=4) that suppressed Cai oscillations also abolished EADs. Conclusions In LQT2, Cai oscillations (CaiO) precede EADs by minutes, indicating that they result from spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release rather than spontaneous ICaL reactivation. CaiO likely produce oscillations of Na/Ca exchange current, INCX. Depolarizing INCX during the AP plateau contributes to the generation of EADs by re-activating Ca2+-channels that have recovered from inactivation. TWL reflects CaTs and APs lability that occur before EADs and TdP. PMID:20599524

  12. Calcium Signaling throughout the Toxoplasma gondii Lytic Cycle: A STUDY USING GENETICALLY ENCODED CALCIUM INDICATORS.

    PubMed

    Borges-Pereira, Lucas; Budu, Alexandre; McKnight, Ciara A; Moore, Christina A; Vella, Stephen A; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Liu, Jing; Garcia, Celia R S; Pace, Douglas A; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that invades host cells, creating a parasitophorous vacuole where it communicates with the host cell cytosol through the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. The lytic cycle of the parasite starts with its exit from the host cell followed by gliding motility, conoid extrusion, attachment, and invasion of another host cell. Here, we report that Ca(2+) oscillations occur in the cytosol of the parasite during egress, gliding, and invasion, which are critical steps of the lytic cycle. Extracellular Ca(2+) enhances each one of these processes. We used tachyzoite clonal lines expressing genetically encoded calcium indicators combined with host cells expressing transiently expressed calcium indicators of different colors, and we measured Ca(2+) changes in both parasites and host simultaneously during egress. We demonstrated a link between cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations in the host and in the parasite. Our approach also allowed us to measure two new features of motile parasites, which were enhanced by Ca(2+) influx. This is the first study showing, in real time, Ca(2+) signals preceding egress and their direct link with motility, an essential virulence trait. PMID:26374900

  13. Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in inferior olive neurons are dynamically regulated by P/Q- and T-type calcium channels: a study in mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Daesoo; Urbano, Francisco J; Makarenko, Vladimir; Shin, Hee-Sup; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2010-01-01

    The role of P/Q- and T-type calcium channels in the rhythmic oscillatory behaviour of inferior olive (IO) neurons was investigated in mutant mice. Mice lacking either the CaV2.1 gene of the pore-forming α1A subunit for P/Q-type calcium channel, or the CaV3.1 gene of the pore-forming α1G subunit for T-type calcium channel were used. In vitro intracellular recording from IO neurons reveals that the amplitude and frequency of sinusoidal subthreshold oscillations (SSTOs) were reduced in the CaV2.1−/− mice. In the CaV3.1−/− mice, IO neurons also showed altered patterns of SSTOs and the probability of SSTO generation was significantly lower (15%, 5 of 34 neurons) than that of wild-type (78%, 31 of 40 neurons) or CaV2.1−/− mice (73%, 22 of 30 neurons). In addition, the low-threshold calcium spike and the sustained endogenous oscillation following rebound potentials were absent in IO neurons from CaV3.1−/− mice. Moreover, the phase-reset dynamics of oscillatory properties of single neurons and neuronal clusters in IO were remarkably altered in both CaV2.1−/− and CaV3.1−/− mice. These results suggest that both α1A P/Q- and α1G T-type calcium channels are required for the dynamic control of neuronal oscillations in the IO. These findings were supported by results from a mathematical IO neuronal model that incorporated T and P/Q channel kinetics. PMID:20547676

  14. Inhibition of NAADP signalling on reperfusion protects the heart by preventing lethal calcium oscillations via two-pore channel 1 and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Sean M.; Foote, Kirsty; Kunuthur, Suma; Gosain, Raj; Tan, Noah; Tyser, Richard; Zhao, Yong Juan; Graeff, Richard; Ganesan, A.; Duchen, Michael R.; Patel, Sandip; Yellon, Derek M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In the heart, a period of ischaemia followed by reperfusion evokes powerful cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations that can cause lethal cell injury. These signals represent attractive cardioprotective targets, but the underlying mechanisms of genesis are ill-defined. Here, we investigated the role of the second messenger nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), which is known in several cell types to induce Ca2+ oscillations that initiate from acidic stores such as lysosomes, likely via two-pore channels (TPCs, TPC1 and 2). Methods and results An NAADP antagonist called Ned-K was developed by rational design based on a previously existing scaffold. Ned-K suppressed Ca2+ oscillations and dramatically protected cardiomyocytes from cell death in vitro after ischaemia and reoxygenation, preventing opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Ned-K profoundly decreased infarct size in mice in vivo. Transgenic mice lacking the endo-lysosomal TPC1 were also protected from injury. Conclusion NAADP signalling plays a major role in reperfusion-induced cell death and represents a potent pathway for protection against reperfusion injury. PMID:26395965

  15. The irradiation of hepatocytes with He-Ne laser causes an increase of cytosolic free calcium concentration and an increase of cell membrane potential, correlated with it, both increases taking place in an oscillatory manner.

    PubMed

    Vacca, R A; Moro, L; Petragallo, V A; Greco, M; Fontana, F; Passarella, S

    1997-12-01

    Isolated hepatocytes were irradiated with Helium-Neon laser (fluence: 0.24 Joules x cm-2, fluence rate: 12 mW x cm-2) and changes of both cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and cell membrane potential were checked by measuring fura-2 and bis-oxonol fluorescence respectively. Irradiation resulted in an enhancement in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration that requires the presence of Ca2+ in the phase outside hepatocytes; consistently an increase in cell membrane potential was measured correlated with it. Interestingly, the rate of increase of both cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and cell membrane potential shows special time dependent features similar to those peculiar of oscillatory processes. PMID:9415809

  16. GENERAL: Bursting Ca2+ Oscillations and Synchronization in Coupled Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Quan-Bao; Lu, Qi-Shao; Yang, Zhuo-Qin; Duan, Li-Xia

    2008-11-01

    A mathematical model proposed by Grubelnk et al. [Biophys. Chew,. 94 (2001) 59] is employed to study the physiological role of mitochondria and the cytosolic proteins in generating complex Ca2+ oscillations. Intracel-lular bursting calcium oscillations of point-point, point-cycle and two-folded limit cycle types are observed and explanations are given based on the fast/slow dynamical analysis, especially for point-cycle and two-folded limit cycle types, which have not been reported before. Furthermore, synchronization of coupled bursters of Ca2+ oscillations via gap junctions and the effect of bursting types on synchronization of coupled cells are studied. It is argued that bursting oscillations of point-point type may be superior to achieve synchronization than that of point-cycle type.

  17. High-power continuous-wave tunable 544- and 272-nm beams based on a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier for calcium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Kim, Yonghee; Park, Hyunmin; Cha, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Lim; Lim, Gwon; Han, Jaemin; Ko, Kwang-Hee; Jeong, Do-Young

    2015-08-01

    Continuous-wave single-frequency tunable 544- and 272-nm beams have been demonstrated by the second- and fourth-harmonic conversions of a 1088-nm fundamental beam from a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier. The single-pass second-harmonic generation with a MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal and the external-cavity frequency-doubling technique with a bulk BBO crystal were employed to achieve an approximately 6-W 544-nm beam and a 1.5-W 272-nm beam, respectively. We characterized the second- and fourth-harmonic generations and discussed their applications to calcium spectroscopy.

  18. Calcium-dependent physiologic and pathologic stimulus-metabolic response coupling in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaspers, Lawrence D; Mémin, Elisabeth; Thomas, Andrew P

    2012-07-01

    A recurrent paradigm in calcium signaling is the coordination of the target response of the calcium signal with activation of metabolic energy production to support that response. This occurs in many tissues, including cardiac and skeletal muscle where contractile activity and ATP production are coordinately regulated by the frequency and amplitude of calcium transients, endocrine and exocrine cells that use calcium to drive the secretory process, and hepatocytes where the downstream targets of calcium include both catabolic and anabolic processes. The primary mechanism by which calcium enhances the capacity for energy production is through calcium-dependent stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, achieved by increasing NADH production and respiratory chain flux. Although this enhances energy supply, it also has the potential for deleterious consequences resulting from increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The negative consequences of calcium-dependent mitochondrial activation can be ameliorated when the underlying cytosolic calcium signals occur as brief calcium spikes or oscillations, with signal strength encoded through the spike frequency (frequency modulation). Frequency modulation increases signal fidelity, and reduces pathological effects of calcium, including excess mitochondrial ROS production and apoptotic or necrotic outcomes. The present article reviews these issues using data obtained in hepatocytes under physiologic and pathologic conditions. PMID:22564906

  19. Calcium-Dependent Physiologic and Pathologic Stimulus-Metabolic Response Coupling in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gaspers, Lawrence D.; Mémin, Elisabeth; Thomas, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent paradigm in calcium signaling is the coordination of the target response of the calcium signal with activation of metabolic energy production to support that response. This occurs in many tissues, including cardiac and skeletal muscle where contractile activity and ATP production are coordinately regulated by the frequency and amplitude of calcium transients, endocrine and exocrine cells that use calcium to drive the secretory process, and hepatocytes where the downstream targets of calcium include both catabolic and anabolic processes. The primary mechanism by which calcium enhances the capacity for energy production is through calcium-dependent stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, achieved by increasing NADH production and respiratory chain flux. Although this enhances energy supply, it also has the potential for deleterious consequences resulting from increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The negative consequences of calcium-dependent mitochondrial activation can be ameliorated when the underlying cytosolic calcium signals occur as brief calcium spikes or oscillations, with signal strength encoded through the spike frequency (frequency modulation). Frequency modulation increases signal fidelity, and reduces pathological effects of calcium, including excess mitochondrial ROS production and apoptotic or necrotic outcomes. The present article reviews these issues using data obtained in hepatocytes under physiologic and pathologic conditions. PMID:22564906

  20. Extrinsic periodic information interpolates between monostable and bistable states in intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling; Duan, Wei-Long

    2015-06-01

    Extrinsic periodic information including physiological cyclical and circadian replacement would affect inevitably a real cell, in this paper we investigate the effect of extrinsic periodic information on intracellular calcium dynamics by means of second-order algorithm for stochastic simulation colored noises. By simulating time evolutions and stationary probability distribution of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, the results show: (i) intracellular calcium oscillation between cytosol and calcium store shows synchronous and anti-synchronous oscillation as intensity and frequency of extrinsic periodic information vary; (ii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from bistable state → monostable state → bistable state → monostable state as frequency of extrinsic periodic information increases; (iii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from monostable state → bistable state as intensity of extrinsic periodic information increases.

  1. Studies on the mechanism of sulofenur and LY295501 toxicity: effect on the regulation of cytosolic calcium in relation to cytotoxicity in normal and tumorigenic rat kidney cell lines.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P C; Best, C J; Berezesky, I K; Merriman, R L; Tanzer, L R; Boder, G B; Trump, B F

    1995-10-20

    Treatment of NRK-52E (normal) and H/1.2-NRK-52E (Harvey-ras transfected NRK-52E) rat kidney epithelial-like cells with two Eli Lilly antitumor compounds, sulofenur and LY295501 (15.6 microM-1000 microM) resulted in concentration- and time-dependent cell killing. Cytosolic Ca2+ became elevated in both cell lines in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but only minimally in its absence. Both drugs were more toxic to the tumorigenic cells than to the normal cells, but LY295501 was significantly more toxic to both cells. The similarity in toxic response by both cell lines suggests a similar mechanism of toxic action for both drugs. Since LY295501 is highly toxic to tumorigenic cells but has a manageable dose-limiting toxicity it shows excellent potential for use in chemotherapy. PMID:7585481

  2. The behaviour of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate in the presence of magnesium(II) and calcium(II): protein-free soluble InsP6 is limited to 49 microM under cytosolic/nuclear conditions.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Nicolás; Torres, Julia; Domínguez, Sixto; Mederos, Alfredo; Irvine, Robin F; Díaz, Alvaro; Kremer, Carlos

    2006-11-01

    Progress in the biology of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) has been delayed by the lack of a quantitative description of its multiple interactions with divalent cations. Our recent initial description of these [J. Torres, S. Dominguez, M.F. Cerda, G. Obal, A. Mederos, R.F. Irvine, A. Diaz, C. Kremer, J. Inorg. Biochem. 99 (2005) 828-840] predicted that under cytosolic/nuclear conditions, protein-free soluble InsP(6) occurs as Mg(5)(H(2)L), a neutral complex that exists thanks to a significant, but undefined, window of solubility displayed by solid Mg(5)(H(2)L).22H(2)O (L is fully deprotonated InsP(6)). Here we complete the description of the InsP(6)-Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) system, defining the solubilities of the Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) (Ca(5)(H(2)L).16H(2)O) solids in terms of K(s0)=[M(2+)](5)[H(2)L(10-)], with pK(s0)=32.93 for M=Mg and pK(s0)=39.3 for M=Ca. The concentration of soluble Mg(5)(H(2)L) at 37 degrees C and I=0.15M NaClO(4) is limited to 49muM, yet InsP(6) in mammalian cells may reach 100muM. Any cytosolic/nuclear InsP(6) in excess of 49muM must be protein- or membrane-bound, or as solid Mg(5)(H(2)L).22H(2)O, and any extracellular InsP(6) (e.g. in plasma) is surely protein-bound. PMID:16920196

  3. The behaviour of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate in the presence of magnesium(II) and calcium(II): Protein-free soluble InsP6 is limited to 49 μM under cytosolic/nuclear conditions

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, Nicolás; Torres, Julia; Domínguez, Sixto; Mederos, Alfredo; Irvine, Robin F.; Díaz, Alvaro; Kremer, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Progress in the biology of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) has been delayed by the lack of a quantitative description of its multiple interactions with divalent cations. Our recent initial description of these [J. Torres, S. Dominguez, M.F. Cerda, G. Obal, A. Mederos, R.F. Irvine, A. Diaz, C. Kremer, J. Inorg. Biochem. 99 (2005) 828–840] predicted that under cytosolic/nuclear conditions, protein-free soluble InsP6 occurs as Mg5(H2L), a neutral complex that exists thanks to a significant, but undefined, window of solubility displayed by solid Mg5(H2L) · 22H2O (L is fully deprotonated InsP6). Here we complete the description of the InsP6–Mg2+–Ca2+ system, defining the solubilities of the Mg2+ and Ca2+ (Ca5(H2L) · 16H2O) solids in terms of Ks0 = [M2+]5[H2L10−], with pKs0 = 32.93 for M = Mg and pKs0 = 39.3 for M = Ca. The concentration of soluble Mg5(H2L) at 37 °C and I = 0.15 M NaClO4 is limited to 49 μM, yet InsP6 in mammalian cells may reach 100 μM. Any cytosolic/nuclear InsP6 in excess of 49 μM must be protein- or membrane-bound, or as solid Mg5(H2L) · 22H2O, and any extracellular InsP6 (e.g. in plasma) is surely protein-bound. PMID:16920196

  4. Genetically targeted single-channel optical recording reveals multiple Orai1 gating states and oscillations in calcium influx

    PubMed Central

    Dynes, Joseph L.; Amcheslavsky, Anna; Cahalan, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Orai1 comprises the pore-forming subunit of the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel. When bound and activated by stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium sensor, Orai1 channels possess high selectivity for calcium but extremely small conductance that has precluded direct recording of single-channel currents. We have developed an approach to visualize Orai1 activity by fusing Orai1 to fluorescent, genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). The GECI–Orai1 probes reveal local Ca2+ influx at STIM1–Orai1 puncta. By whole cell recording, these fusions are fully functional as CRAC channels. When GECI–Orai1 and the CRAC-activating domain (CAD) of STIM1 were coexpressed at low levels and imaged using a total internal reflectance fluorescence microscope, cells exhibited sporadic fluorescence transients the size of diffraction-limited spots and the brightness of a few activated GECI proteins. Transients typically rose rapidly and fell into two classes according to duration: briefer “flickers” lasting only a few hundred milliseconds, and longer “pulses” lasting one to several seconds. The size, intensity, trace shape, frequency, distribution, physiological characteristics, and association with CAD binding together demonstrate that GECI–Orai1 fluorescence transients correspond to single-channel Orai1 responses. Single Orai1 channels gated by CAD, and small Orai1 puncta gated by STIM1, exhibit repetitive fluctuations in single-channel output. CAD binding supports a role in open state maintenance and reveals a second phase of CAD/STIM1 binding after channel opening. These first recordings of single-channel Orai1 currents reveal unexpected dynamics, and when paired with CAD association, support multiple single-channel states. PMID:26712003

  5. Genetically targeted single-channel optical recording reveals multiple Orai1 gating states and oscillations in calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Dynes, Joseph L; Amcheslavsky, Anna; Cahalan, Michael D

    2016-01-12

    Orai1 comprises the pore-forming subunit of the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel. When bound and activated by stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium sensor, Orai1 channels possess high selectivity for calcium but extremely small conductance that has precluded direct recording of single-channel currents. We have developed an approach to visualize Orai1 activity by fusing Orai1 to fluorescent, genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). The GECI-Orai1 probes reveal local Ca(2+) influx at STIM1-Orai1 puncta. By whole cell recording, these fusions are fully functional as CRAC channels. When GECI-Orai1 and the CRAC-activating domain (CAD) of STIM1 were coexpressed at low levels and imaged using a total internal reflectance fluorescence microscope, cells exhibited sporadic fluorescence transients the size of diffraction-limited spots and the brightness of a few activated GECI proteins. Transients typically rose rapidly and fell into two classes according to duration: briefer "flickers" lasting only a few hundred milliseconds, and longer "pulses" lasting one to several seconds. The size, intensity, trace shape, frequency, distribution, physiological characteristics, and association with CAD binding together demonstrate that GECI-Orai1 fluorescence transients correspond to single-channel Orai1 responses. Single Orai1 channels gated by CAD, and small Orai1 puncta gated by STIM1, exhibit repetitive fluctuations in single-channel output. CAD binding supports a role in open state maintenance and reveals a second phase of CAD/STIM1 binding after channel opening. These first recordings of single-channel Orai1 currents reveal unexpected dynamics, and when paired with CAD association, support multiple single-channel states. PMID:26712003

  6. Modulation of membrane phospholipids, the cytosolic calcium influx and cell proliferation following treatment of B16-F10 cells with recombinant phospholipase-D from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    PubMed

    Wille, Ana Carolina Martins; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Magnoni, Mariana Gabriel; Boia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Gremski, Waldemiro; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism through which brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) cause dermonecrosis, dysregulated inflammatory responses, hemolysis and platelet aggregation, which are effects reported following spider bites, is currently attributed to the presence of phospholipase-D in the venom. In the present investigation, through two-dimensional immunoblotting, we observed immunological cross-reactivity for at least 25 spots in crude Loxosceles intermedia venom, indicating high expression levels for different isoforms of phospholipase-D. Using a recombinant phospholipase-D from the venom gland of L. intermedia (LiRecDT1) in phospholipid-degrading kinetic experiments, we determined that this phospholipase-D mainly hydrolyzes synthetic sphingomyelin in a time-dependent manner, generating ceramide 1-phosphate plus choline, as well as lysophosphatidylcholine, generating lysophosphatidic acid plus choline, but exhibits little activity against phosphatidylcholine. Through immunofluorescence assays with antibodies against LiRecDT1 and using a recombinant GFP-LiRecDT1 fusion protein, we observed direct binding of LiRecDT1 to the membrane of B16-F10 cells. We determined that LiRecDT1 hydrolyzes phospholipids in detergent extracts and from ghosts of B16-F10 cells, generating choline, indicating that the enzyme can access and modulate and has activity against membrane phospholipids. Additionally, using Fluo-4, a calcium-sensitive fluorophore, it was shown that treatment of cells with phospholipase-D induced an increase in the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, but without altering viability or causing damage to cells. Finally, based on the known endogenous activity of phospholipase-D as an inducer of cell proliferation and the fact that LiRecDT1 binds to the cell surface, hydrolyzing phospholipids to generate bioactive lipids, we employed LiRecDT1 as an exogenous source of phospholipase-D in B16-F10 cells. Treatment of the cells was effective in increasing their proliferation in a

  7. Aphanomyces euteiches cell wall fractions containing novel glucan-chitosaccharides induce defense genes and nuclear calcium oscillations in the plant host Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nars, Amaury; Lafitte, Claude; Chabaud, Mireille; Drouillard, Sophie; Mélida, Hugo; Danoun, Saïda; Le Costaouëc, Tinaig; Rey, Thomas; Benedetti, Julie; Bulone, Vincent; Barker, David George; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Dumas, Bernard; Jacquet, Christophe; Heux, Laurent; Fliegmann, Judith; Bottin, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine-based saccharides (chitosaccharides) are components of microbial cell walls and act as molecular signals during host-microbe interactions. In the legume plant Medicago truncatula, the perception of lipochitooligosaccharide signals produced by symbiotic rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi involves the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) lysin motif receptor-like protein and leads to the activation of the so-called common symbiotic pathway. In rice and Arabidopsis, lysin motif receptors are involved in the perception of chitooligosaccharides released by pathogenic fungi, resulting in the activation of plant immunity. Here we report the structural characterization of atypical chitosaccharides from the oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, and their biological activity on the host Medicago truncatula. Using a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these chitosaccharides are linked to β-1,6-glucans, and contain a β-(1,3;1,4)-glucan backbone whose β-1,3-linked glucose units are substituted on their C-6 carbon by either glucose or N-acetylglucosamine residues. This is the first description of this type of structural motif in eukaryotic cell walls. Glucan-chitosaccharide fractions of A. euteiches induced the expression of defense marker genes in Medicago truncatula seedlings independently from the presence of a functional Nod Factor Perception protein. Furthermore, one of the glucan-chitosaccharide fractions elicited calcium oscillations in the nucleus of root cells. In contrast to the asymmetric oscillatory calcium spiking induced by symbiotic lipochitooligosaccharides, this response depends neither on the Nod Factor Perception protein nor on the common symbiotic pathway. These findings open new perspectives in oomycete cell wall biology and elicitor recognition and signaling in legumes. PMID:24086432

  8. Aphanomyces euteiches Cell Wall Fractions Containing Novel Glucan-Chitosaccharides Induce Defense Genes and Nuclear Calcium Oscillations in the Plant Host Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Nars, Amaury; Lafitte, Claude; Chabaud, Mireille; Drouillard, Sophie; Mélida, Hugo; Danoun, Saïda; Le Costaouëc, Tinaig; Rey, Thomas; Benedetti, Julie; Bulone, Vincent; Barker, David George; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Dumas, Bernard; Jacquet, Christophe; Heux, Laurent; Fliegmann, Judith; Bottin, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine-based saccharides (chitosaccharides) are components of microbial cell walls and act as molecular signals during host-microbe interactions. In the legume plant Medicago truncatula, the perception of lipochitooligosaccharide signals produced by symbiotic rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi involves the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) lysin motif receptor-like protein and leads to the activation of the so-called common symbiotic pathway. In rice and Arabidopsis, lysin motif receptors are involved in the perception of chitooligosaccharides released by pathogenic fungi, resulting in the activation of plant immunity. Here we report the structural characterization of atypical chitosaccharides from the oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, and their biological activity on the host Medicago truncatula. Using a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these chitosaccharides are linked to β-1,6-glucans, and contain a β-(1,3;1,4)-glucan backbone whose β-1,3-linked glucose units are substituted on their C-6 carbon by either glucose or N-acetylglucosamine residues. This is the first description of this type of structural motif in eukaryotic cell walls. Glucan-chitosaccharide fractions of A. euteiches induced the expression of defense marker genes in Medicago truncatula seedlings independently from the presence of a functional Nod Factor Perception protein. Furthermore, one of the glucan-chitosaccharide fractions elicited calcium oscillations in the nucleus of root cells. In contrast to the asymmetric oscillatory calcium spiking induced by symbiotic lipochitooligosaccharides, this response depends neither on the Nod Factor Perception protein nor on the common symbiotic pathway. These findings open new perspectives in oomycete cell wall biology and elicitor recognition and signaling in legumes. PMID:24086432

  9. Monthly Strontium/Calcium oscillations in symbiotic coral aragonite: Biological effects limiting the precision of the paleotemperature proxy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meibom, A.; Stage, M.; Wooden, J.; Constantz, B.R.; Dunbar, R.B.; Owen, A.; Grumet, N.; Bacon, C.R.; Chamberlain, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    In thermodynamic equilibrium with sea water the Sr/Ca ratio of aragonite varies predictably with temperature and the Sr/Ca ratio in coral have thus become a frequently used proxy for past Sea Surface Temperature (SST). However, biological effects can offset the Sr/Ca ratio from its equilibrium value. We report high spatial resolution ion microprobe analyses of well defined skeletal elements in the reef-building coral Porites lutea that reveal distinct monthly oscillations in the Sr/Ca ratio, with an amplitude in excess of ten percent. The extreme Sr/Ca variations, which we propose result from metabolic changes synchronous with the lunar cycle, introduce variability in Sr/Ca measurements based on conventional sampling techniques well beyond the analytical precision. These variations can limit the accuracy of Sr/Ca paleothermometry by conventional sampling techniques to about 2??C. Our results may help explain the notorious difficulties involved in obtaining an accurate and consistent calibration of the Sr/Ca vs. SST relationship.

  10. Monthly Strontium/Calcium oscillations in symbiotic coral aragonite: Biological effects limiting the precision of the paleotemperature proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Anders; Stage, Morten; Wooden, Joseph; Constantz, Brent R.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Owen, Art; Grumet, Nancy; Bacon, Charles R.; Chamberlain, C. Page

    2003-04-01

    In thermodynamic equilibrium with sea water the Sr/Ca ratio of aragonite varies predictably with temperature and the Sr/Ca ratio in coral have thus become a frequently used proxy for past Sea Surface Temperature (SST). However, biological effects can offset the Sr/Ca ratio from its equilibrium value. We report high spatial resolution ion microprobe analyses of well defined skeletal elements in the reef-building coral Porites lutea that reveal distinct monthly oscillations in the Sr/Ca ratio, with an amplitude in excess of ten percent. The extreme Sr/Ca variations, which we propose result from metabolic changes synchronous with the lunar cycle, introduce variability in Sr/Ca measurements based on conventional sampling techniques well beyond the analytical precision. These variations can limit the accuracy of Sr/Ca paleothermometry by conventional sampling techniques to about 2°C. Our results may help explain the notorious difficulties involved in obtaining an accurate and consistent calibration of the Sr/Ca vs. SST relationship.

  11. Recent developments in intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2009-02-01

    Calcium absorption proceeds by transcellular and paracellular flux, with the latter accounting for most absorbed calcium when calcium intake is adequate. Vitamin D helps regulate transcellular calcium transport by increasing calcium uptake via a luminal calcium channel and by inducing the cytosolic calcium transporting protein, calbindinD(9k). Recent studies utilizing knockout mice have challenged the functional importance of the channel and calbindin. To integrate the new findings with many previous studies, the function of the two molecules must be evaluated in the calcium transport and economy of mice. When calcium intake is high, transcellular calcium transport contributes little to total calcium absorption. Therefore, increasing calcium intake seems the most effective nutritional approach to ensure adequate absorption and prevent bone loss. PMID:19178653

  12. When Isolated at Full Receptivity, in Vitro Fertilized Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.) Egg Cells Reveal [Ca2+]cyt Oscillation of Intracellular Origin

    PubMed Central

    Pónya, Zsolt; Corsi, Ilaria; Hoffmann, Richárd; Kovács, Melinda; Dobosy, Anikó; Kovács, Attila Zoltán; Cresti, Mauro; Barnabás, Beáta

    2014-01-01

    During in vitro fertilization of wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.) in egg cells isolated at various developmental stages, changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) were observed. The dynamics of [Ca2+]cyt elevation varied, reflecting the difference in the developmental stage of the eggs used. [Ca2+]cyt oscillation was exclusively observed in fertile, mature egg cells fused with the sperm cell. To determine how [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells is generated, egg cells were incubated in thapsigargin, which proved to be a specific inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+-ATPase in wheat egg cells. In unfertilized egg cells, the addition of thapsigargin caused an abrupt transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that an influx pathway for Ca2+ is activated by thapsigargin. The [Ca2+]cyt oscillation seemed to require the filling of an intracellular calcium store for the onset of which, calcium influx through the plasma membrane appeared essential. This was demonstrated by omitting extracellular calcium from (or adding GdCl3 to) the fusion medium, which prevented [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells fused with the sperm. Combined, these data permit the hypothesis that the first sperm-induced transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt depletes an intracellular Ca2+ store, triggering an increase in plasma membrane Ca2+ permeability, and this enhanced Ca2+ influx results in [Ca2+]cyt oscillation. PMID:25535074

  13. When isolated at full receptivity, in vitro fertilized wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.) egg cells reveal [Ca2+]cyt oscillation of intracellular origin.

    PubMed

    Pónya, Zsolt; Corsi, Ilaria; Hoffmann, Richárd; Kovács, Melinda; Dobosy, Anikó; Kovács, Attila Zoltán; Cresti, Mauro; Barnabás, Beáta

    2014-01-01

    During in vitro fertilization of wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.) in egg cells isolated at various developmental stages, changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) were observed. The dynamics of [Ca2+]cyt elevation varied, reflecting the difference in the developmental stage of the eggs used. [Ca2+]cyt oscillation was exclusively observed in fertile, mature egg cells fused with the sperm cell. To determine how [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells is generated, egg cells were incubated in thapsigargin, which proved to be a specific inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+-ATPase in wheat egg cells. In unfertilized egg cells, the addition of thapsigargin caused an abrupt transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that an influx pathway for Ca2+ is activated by thapsigargin. The [Ca2+]cyt oscillation seemed to require the filling of an intracellular calcium store for the onset of which, calcium influx through the plasma membrane appeared essential. This was demonstrated by omitting extracellular calcium from (or adding GdCl3 to) the fusion medium, which prevented [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells fused with the sperm. Combined, these data permit the hypothesis that the first sperm-induced transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt depletes an intracellular Ca2+ store, triggering an increase in plasma membrane Ca2+ permeability, and this enhanced Ca2+ influx results in [Ca2+]cyt oscillation. PMID:25535074

  14. Echinacea-induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation in HEK293

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With a traditional medical use for treatment of various ailments, herbal preparations of Echinacea are now popularly used to improve immune responses. One likely mode of action is that alkamides from Echinacea bind to cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptors and induce a transient increase in intracellular Ca2+. Here, we show that unidentified compounds from Echinacea purpurea induce cytosolic Ca2+ elevation in non-immune-related cells, which lack CB2 receptors and that the Ca2+ elevation is not influenced by alkamides. Methods A non-immune human cell line, HEK293, was chosen to evaluate E. purpurea root extracts and constituents as potential regulators of intracellular Ca2+ levels. Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ levels were monitored and visualized by intracellular calcium imaging. U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an antagonist of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, were tested to determine the mechanism of this Ca2+ signaling pathway. E. purpurea root ethanol extracts were fractionated by preparative HPLC, screened for bioactivity on HEK293 cells and by GC-MS for potential constituent(s) responsible for this bioactivity. Results A rapid transient increase in cytosolic Ca2+ levels occurs when E. purpurea extracts are applied to HEK293 cells. These stimulatory effects are phospholipase C and IP3 receptor dependent. Echinacea-evoked responses could not be blocked by SR 144528, a specific CB2 receptor antagonist, indicating that CB2 is not involved. Ca2+ elevation is sustained after the Echinacea-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores; this longer-term effect is abolished by 2-APB, indicating a possible store operated calcium entry involvement. Of 28 HPLC fractions from E. purpurea root extracts, six induce cytosolic Ca2+ increase. Interestingly, GC-MS analysis of these fractions, as well as treatment of HEK293 cells with known individual and combined chemicals, indicates the components thought to be

  15. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C; Stevens, Troy

    2015-02-15

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1. PMID:25428882

  16. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1. PMID:25428882

  17. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  18. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katie A; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Davies, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium's other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  19. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katie A.; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M.; Davies, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium’s other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  20. Sodium-calcium exchanger and R-type Ca(2+) channels mediate spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in magnocellular neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kortus, Stepan; Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Forostyak, Oksana; Zapotocky, Martin; Ueta, Yoichi; Sykova, Eva; Chvatal, Alexandr; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2016-06-01

    Isolated supraoptic neurones generate spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in isolated conditions. Here we report in depth analysis of the contribution of plasmalemmal ion channels (Ca(2+), Na(+)), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), intracellular Ca(2+) release channels (InsP3Rs and RyRs), Ca(2+) storage organelles, plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump and intracellular signal transduction cascades into spontaneous Ca(2+) activity. While removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or incubation with non-specific voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) blocker Cd(2+) suppressed the oscillations, neither Ni(2+) nor TTA-P2, the T-type VGCC blockers, had an effect. Inhibitors of VGCC nicardipine, ω-conotoxin GVIA, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, ω-agatoxin IVA (for L-, N-, P and P/Q-type channels, respectively) did not affect [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. In contrast, a specific R-type VGCC blocker SNX-482 attenuated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. Incubation with TTX had no effect, whereas removal of the extracellular Na(+) or application of an inhibitor of the reverse operation mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger KB-R7943 blocked the oscillations. The mitochondrial uncoupler CCCP irreversibly blocked spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i activity. Exposure of neurones to Ca(2+) mobilisers (thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, caffeine and ryanodine); 4-aminopyridine (A-type K(+) current blocker); phospholipase C and adenylyl cyclase pathways blockers U-73122, Rp-cAMP, SQ-22536 and H-89 had no effect. Oscillations were blocked by GABA, but not by glutamate, apamin or dynorphin. In conclusion, spontaneous oscillations in magnocellular neurones are mediated by a concerted action of R-type Ca(2+) channels and the NCX fluctuating between forward and reverse modes. PMID:27052156

  1. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  2. Functional disparity between human PAWP and PLCζ in the generation of Ca2+ oscillations for oocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Nomikos, Michail; Sanders, Jessica R; Kashir, Junaid; Sanusi, Randa; Buntwal, Luke; Love, Daniel; Ashley, Peter; Sanders, David; Knaggs, Paul; Bunkheila, Adnan; Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian oocyte activation is mediated by cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)) oscillations initiated upon delivery of a putative 'sperm factor' by the fertilizing sperm. Previous studies suggest the identity of this sperm factor as the testis-specific phospholipase C-zeta (PLCζ). Recently, a post-acrosomal sheath WW domain-binding protein (PAWP) has been proposed as an alternative sperm factor candidate, following a report that human PAWP protein and cRNA elicited Ca(2+) oscillations in mouse and human oocytes. Those Ca(2+) oscillations were inhibited by a PAWP-derived peptide corresponding to a functional PPGY binding motif. Herein, using a series of human PAWP expression constructs, we demonstrate that both human PAWP protein and cRNA are, in our experiments, unable to elicit Ca(2+) release following microinjection into mouse oocytes. Parallel experiments performed with human PLCζ elicited the characteristic Ca(2+) oscillations present at mammalian fertilization, which produced oocyte activation and embryo development. Furthermore, sperm-induced Ca(2+) oscillations were not inhibited by the PAWP-derived PPGY peptide following in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Thus, the functional disparity with PLCζ leads us to conclude that human PAWP is neither sufficient nor necessary for the Ca(2+) oscillations that initiate mammalian oocyte activation at fertilization. PMID:26116451

  3. Mechanisms of intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2003-02-01

    Calcium is absorbed in the mammalian small intestine by two general mechanisms: a transcellular active transport process, located largely in the duodenum and upper jejunum; and a paracellular, passive process that functions throughout the length of the intestine. The transcellular process involves three major steps: entry across the brush border, mediated by a molecular structure termed CaT1, intracellular diffusion, mediated largely by the cytosolic calcium-binding protein (calbindinD(9k) or CaBP); and extrusion, mediated largely by the CaATPase. Chyme travels down the intestinal lumen in approximately 3 h, spending only minutes in the duodenum, but over 2 h in the distal half of the small intestine. When calcium intake is low, transcellular calcium transport accounts for a substantial fraction of the absorbed calcium. When calcium intake is high, transcellular transport accounts for only a minor portion of the absorbed calcium, because of the short sojourn time and because CaT1 and CaBP, both rate-limiting, are downregulated when calcium intake is high. Biosynthesis of CaBP is fully and CaT1 function is approximately 90% vitamin D-dependent. At high calcium intakes CaT1 and CaBP are downregulated because 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), the active vitamin D metabolite, is downregulated. PMID:12520541

  4. Extracellular Calcium Has Multiple Targets to Control Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capiod, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channels and the two G-protein coupled receptors sensing extracellular calcium, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and GPRC6a, are the two main means by which extracellular calcium can signal to cells and regulate many cellular processes including cell proliferation, migration and invasion of tumoral cells. Many intracellular signaling pathways are sensitive to cytosolic calcium rises and conversely intracellular signaling pathways can modulate calcium channel expression and activity. Calcium channels are undoubtedly involved in the former while the CaSR and GPRC6a are most likely to interfere with the latter. As for neurotransmitters, calcium ions use plasma membrane channels and GPCR to trigger cytosolic free calcium concentration rises and intracellular signaling and regulatory pathways activation. Calcium sensing GPCR, CaSR and GPRC6a, allow a supplemental degree of control and as for metabotropic receptors, they not only modulate calcium channel expression but they may also control calcium-dependent K+ channels. The multiplicity of intracellular signaling pathways involved, their sensitivity to local and global intracellular calcium increase and to CaSR and GPRC6a stimulation, the presence of membrane signalplex, all this confers the cells the plasticity they need to convert the effects of extracellular calcium into complex physiological responses and therefore determine their fate. PMID:27161228

  5. Biochemical Oscillations and Cellular Rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbeter, Albert; Berridge, Foreword by M. J.

    1997-04-01

    1. Introduction; Part I. Glycolytic Oscillations: 2. Oscillatory enzymes: simple periodic behaviour in an allosteric model for glycolytic oscillations; Part II. From Simple to Complex Oscillatory Behaviour; 3. Birhythmicity: coexistence between two stable rhythms; 4. From simple periodic behaviour to complex oscillations, including bursting and chaos; Part III. Oscillations Of Cyclic Amo In Dictyostelium Cells: 5. Models for the periodic synthesis and relay of camp signals in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae; 6. Complex oscillations and chaos in the camp signalling system of Dictyostelium; 7. The onset of camp oscillations in Dictyostelium as a model for the ontogenesis of biological rhythms; Part IV. Pulsatile Signalling In Intercellular Communication: 8. Function of the rhythm of intercellular communication in Dictyostelium. Link with pulsatile hormone secretion; Part V. Calcium Oscillations: 9. Oscillations and waves of intracellular calcium; Part VI. The Mitotic Oscillator: 10. Modelling the mitotic oscillator driving the cell division cycle; Part VII. Circadian Rhythms: 11. Towards a model for circadian oscillations in the Drosophila period protein (PER); 12. Conclusions and perspectives; References.

  6. Sensing Microbial RNA in the Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Vabret, Nicolas; Blander, J. Magarian

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system faces the difficult task of keeping a fine balance between sensitive detection of microbial presence and avoidance of autoimmunity. To this aim, key mechanisms of innate responses rely on isolation of pathogens in specialized subcellular compartments, or sensing of specific microbial patterns absent from the host. Efficient detection of foreign RNA in the cytosol requires an additional layer of complexity from the immune system. In this particular case, innate sensors should be able to distinguish self and non-self molecules that share several similar properties. In this review, we discuss this interplay between cytosolic pattern recognition receptors and the microbial RNA they detect. We describe how microbial RNAs gain access to the cytosol, which receptors they activate and counter-strategies developed by microorganisms to avoid this response. PMID:24400006

  7. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... best treatment for the most common type of kidney stone , which is made of calcium. This type of ... the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production ...

  8. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  9. Acidic calcium stores open for business: expanding the potential for intracellular Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sandip; Docampo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cytosolic calcium concentration are crucial for a variety of cellular processes in all cells. It has long been appreciated that calcium is stored and released from intracellular calcium stores such as the endoplasmic reticulum. However, emerging evidence indicates that calcium is also dynamically regulated by a seemingly disparate collection of acidic organelles. Here, we review the defining features of these acidic calcium stores and highlight recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of uptake and release of calcium from these stores. We also examine the nature of calcium buffering within the stores and summarize the physiological and patho-physiological significance of these ubiquitous organelles in calcium signaling. PMID:20303271

  10. Synchronized mitochondrial and cytosolic translation programs.

    PubMed

    Couvillion, Mary T; Soto, Iliana C; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Churchman, L Stirling

    2016-05-26

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is a vital process for energy generation, and is carried out by complexes within the mitochondria. OXPHOS complexes pose a unique challenge for cells because their subunits are encoded on both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes. Genomic approaches designed to study nuclear/cytosolic and bacterial gene expression have not been broadly applied to mitochondria, so the co-regulation of OXPHOS genes remains largely unexplored. Here we monitor mitochondrial and nuclear gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during mitochondrial biogenesis, when OXPHOS complexes are synthesized. We show that nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS transcript levels do not increase concordantly. Instead, mitochondrial and cytosolic translation are rapidly, dynamically and synchronously regulated. Furthermore, cytosolic translation processes control mitochondrial translation unidirectionally. Thus, the nuclear genome coordinates mitochondrial and cytosolic translation to orchestrate the timely synthesis of OXPHOS complexes, representing an unappreciated regulatory layer shaping the mitochondrial proteome. Our whole-cell genomic profiling approach establishes a foundation for studies of global gene regulation in mitochondria. PMID:27225121

  11. Mechanisms of caffeine activation of single calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Sitsapesan, R; Williams, A J

    1990-01-01

    1. Calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum were incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers. Single-channel current fluctuations were recorded under voltage clamp conditions. 2. Channels incorporate into the bilayer with a fixed orientation and channel open probability is regulated by the calcium concentration at the cytosolic face of the membrane. 3. Addition of caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) to the cytosolic side of the membrane increased the open probability of the calcium-activated calcium-release channel by increasing the frequency of opening without significant alteration to the durations of open events. This effect was observed at both 0.1 and 10 microM-activating cytosolic calcium. 4. Caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) did not activate the channel at a subactivating cytosolic calcium concentration (80 pM). 5. At subactivating calcium concentrations, channels could be activated by higher concentrations of caffeine (greater than 5.0 mM) revealing a second, calcium-independent, mechanism for channel activation. Channel openings induced by these high concentrations of caffeine at subactivating calcium concentrations displayed different kinetics from those observed with calcium as the sole activating ligand or with combinations of calcium and low concentrations of caffeine. 6. Activation of channel opening by caffeine in the presence of calcium did not affect single-channel conductance. Channel openings produced by caffeine at subactivating cytosolic calcium concentrations had identical conductance and relative permeability to those seen on calcium activation. 7. Channels activated by caffeine at both activating and subactivating calcium concentrations were characteristically modified by ryanodine, Ruthenium Red, ATP and magnesium, implying that the same channel is involved under both conditions. PMID:2167363

  12. Delivery of antibodies to the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Andrea LJ; Zhang, Congcong; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Perez, Franck; Dübel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibodies to target their antigens in living cells is a powerful analytical tool for cell biology research. Not only can molecules be localized and visualized in living cells, but interference with cellular processes by antibodies may allow functional analysis down to the level of individual post-translational modifications and splice variants, which is not possible with genetic or RNA-based methods. To utilize the vast resource of available antibodies, an efficient system to deliver them into the cytosol from the outside is needed. Numerous strategies have been proposed, but the most robust and widely applicable procedure still remains to be identified, since a quantitative ranking of the efficiencies has not yet been done. To achieve this, we developed a novel efficiency evaluation method for antibody delivery based on a fusion protein consisting of a human IgG1 Fc and the recombination enzyme Cre (Fc-Cre). Applied to suitable GFP reporter cells, it allows the important distinction between proteins trapped in endosomes and those delivered to the cytosol. Further, it ensures viability of positive cells and is unsusceptible to fixation artifacts and misinterpretation of cellular localization in microscopy and flow cytometry. Very low cytoplasmic delivery efficiencies were found for various profection reagents and membrane penetrating peptides, leaving electroporation as the only practically useful delivery method for antibodies. This was further verified by the successful application of this method to bind antibodies to cytosolic components in living cells. PMID:24848507

  13. Impact of reconstituted cytosol on protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Mohona; Smith, Austin E.; Pielak, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein stability is usually studied in simple buffered solutions, but most proteins function inside cells, where the heterogeneous and crowded environment presents a complex, nonideal system. Proteins are expected to behave differently under cellular crowding owing to two types of contacts: hard-core repulsions and weak, chemical interactions. The effect of hard-core repulsions is purely entropic, resulting in volume exclusion owing to the mere presence of the crowders. The weak interactions can be repulsive or attractive, thus enhancing or diminishing the excluded volume, respectively. We used a reductionist approach to assess the effects of intracellular crowding. Escherichia coli cytoplasm was dialyzed, lyophilized, and resuspended at two concentrations. NMR-detected amide proton exchange was then used to quantify the stability of the globular protein chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) in these crowded solutions. The cytosol destabilizes CI2, and the destabilization increases with increasing cytosol concentration. This observation shows that the cytoplasm interacts favorably, but nonspecifically, with CI2, and these interactions overcome the stabilizing hard-core repulsions. The effects of the cytosol are even stronger than those of homogeneous protein crowders, reinforcing the biological significance of weak, nonspecific interactions. PMID:24218610

  14. Cilioplasm is a cellular compartment for calcium signaling in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xingjian; Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Muntean, Brian S.; Green, Jill A.; Shah, Jagesh V.; Mykytyn, Kirk; Nauli, Surya M.

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia with a diameter of ~200 nm have been implicated in development and disease. Calcium signaling within a primary cilium has never been directly visualized and has therefore remained a speculation. Fluid-shear stress and dopamine receptor type-5 (DR5) agonist are among the few stimuli that require cilia for intracellular calcium signal transduction. However, it is not known if these stimuli initiate calcium signaling within the cilium, or if the calcium signal originates in the cytoplasm. Using an integrated single-cell imaging technique, we demonstrate for the first time that calcium signaling triggered by fluid-shear stress initiates in the primary cilium and can be distinguished from the subsequent cytosolic calcium response through the ryanodine receptor. Importantly, this flow-induced calcium signaling depends on the ciliary polycystin-2 calcium channel. While DR5-specific agonist induces calcium signaling mainly in the cilioplasm via ciliary CaV1.2, thrombin specifically induces cytosolic calcium signaling through the IP3 receptor. Furthermore, a non-specific calcium ionophore triggers both ciliary and cytosolic calcium responses. We suggest that cilia not only act as sensory organelles but also function as calcium signaling compartments. Cilium-dependent signaling can spread to the cytoplasm or be contained within the cilioplasm. Our study also provides the first model to understand signaling within the cilioplasm of a living cell. PMID:24104765

  15. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: evolution and general principles.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-09-15

    Calcium as a divalent cation was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules handling calcium. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, neurotransmitters, second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms. PMID:24291103

  16. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production of ... Milk-alkali syndrome Proximal renal tubular acidosis Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated ...

  17. Cytosolic phospholipase A2: physiological function and role in disease

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Christina C.

    2015-01-01

    The group IV phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family is comprised of six intracellular enzymes (GIVA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F) commonly referred to as cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2)α, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε, and -ζ. They contain a Ser-Asp catalytic dyad and all except cPLA2γ have a C2 domain, but differences in their catalytic activities and subcellular localization suggest unique regulation and function. With the exception of cPLA2α, the focus of this review, little is known about the in vivo function of group IV enzymes. cPLA2α catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are precursors of numerous bioactive lipids. The regulation of cPLA2α is complex, involving transcriptional and posttranslational processes, particularly increases in calcium and phosphorylation. cPLA2α is a highly conserved widely expressed enzyme that promotes lipid mediator production in human and rodent cells from a variety of tissues. The diverse bioactive lipids produced as a result of cPLA2α activation regulate normal physiological processes and disease pathogenesis in many organ systems, as shown using cPLA2α KO mice. However, humans recently identified with cPLA2α deficiency exhibit more pronounced effects on health than observed in mice lacking cPLA2α, indicating that much remains to be learned about this interesting enzyme. PMID:25838312

  18. Interplay of channels, pumps and organelle location in calcium microdomain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peglow, Martin; Niemeyer, Barbara A.; Hoth, Markus; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the influence of Ca2+ microdomains on the global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, we consider the polarization and activation of T-cells after the formation of an immunological synapse as a model system. For T-cell proliferation and activation, a high and robust Ca2+ signal lasting from minutes up to hours is needed. This raises the intriguing question of how T-cells overcome all those mechanisms which normally remove an increased Ca2+ level as fast as possible from the cytosol. With the help of theoretical models we predict that, after the formation of a local Ca2+ influx pathway via STIM1 and Orai1, mitochondria relocation toward and accumulation of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase and sarcoplasmic/ endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pumps at the immunological synapse are sufficient to achieve a long-lasting increased global Ca2+ concentration. In addition, we also uncover new mechanisms to generate Ca2+ oscillations, which are important for efficient T-cell activation. Experimental tests and the implications of our predictions are discussed.

  19. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the human body. It helps build and protect your teeth ... absorb calcium. You can get vitamin D from sunlight exposure to your skin and from your diet. Ask your provider whether ...

  20. Calcium in Plants

    PubMed Central

    WHITE, PHILIP J.; BROADLEY, MARTIN R.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient. It is required for various structural roles in the cell wall and membranes, it is a counter‐cation for inorganic and organic anions in the vacuole, and the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) is an obligate intracellular messenger coordinating responses to numerous developmental cues and environmental challenges. This article provides an overview of the nutritional requirements of different plants for Ca, and how this impacts on natural flora and the Ca content of crops. It also reviews recent work on (a) the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport across cellular membranes, (b) understanding the origins and specificity of [Ca2+]cyt signals and (c) characterizing the cellular [Ca2+]cyt‐sensors (such as calmodulin, calcineurin B‐like proteins and calcium‐dependent protein kinases) that allow plant cells to respond appropriately to [Ca2+]cyt signals. PMID:12933363

  1. Rapid Transcriptome Changes Induced by Cytosolic Ca2+ Transients Reveal ABRE-Related Sequences as Ca2+-Responsive cis Elements in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Boaz; Davydov, Olga; Knight, Heather; Galon, Yael; Knight, Marc R.; Fluhr, Robert; Fromm, Hillel

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by cellular calcium is crucial for plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the number of genes known to respond to specific transient calcium signals is limited, and as yet there is no definition of a calcium-responsive cis element in plants. Here, we generated specific cytosolic calcium transients in intact Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and linked them to early transcriptome changes, followed by bioinformatic analysis of the responsive genes. A cytosolic calcium transient induced by calmodulin antagonists and blocked by lanthanides was characterized using aequorin-based luminometry and photon imaging. Analysis of transcriptome changes revealed 230 calcium-responsive genes, of which 162 were upregulated and 68 were downregulated. These include known early stress-responsive genes as well as genes of unknown function. Analysis of their upstream regions revealed, exclusively in the upregulated genes, a highly significant occurrence of a consensus sequence (P < 10−13) comprising two abscisic acid–specific cis elements: the abscisic acid–responsive element (ABRE; CACGTG[T/C/G]) and its coupling element ([C/A]ACGCG[T/C/A]). Finally, we show that a tetramer of the ABRE cis element is sufficient to confer transcriptional activation in response to cytosolic Ca2+ transients. Thus, at least for some specific Ca2+ transients and motif combinations, ABREs function as Ca2+-responsive cis elements. PMID:16980540

  2. Fractional oscillator.

    PubMed

    Stanislavsky, A A

    2004-11-01

    We consider a fractional oscillator which is a generalization of the conventional linear oscillator in the framework of fractional calculus. It is interpreted as an ensemble average of ordinary harmonic oscillators governed by a stochastic time arrow. The intrinsic absorption of the fractional oscillator results from the full contribution of the harmonic oscillator ensemble: these oscillators differ a little from each other in frequency so that each response is compensated by an antiphase response of another harmonic oscillator. This allows one to draw a parallel in the dispersion analysis for media described by a fractional oscillator and an ensemble of ordinary harmonic oscillators with damping. The features of this analysis are discussed. PMID:15600586

  3. Redox Regulation of Cytosolic Translation in Plants.

    PubMed

    Moore, Marten; Gossmann, Nikolaj; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-05-01

    Control of protein homeostasis is crucial for environmental acclimation of plants. In this context, translational control is receiving increasing attention, particularly since post-translational modifications of the translational apparatus allow very fast and highly effective control of protein synthesis. Reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions decisively control translation by modifying initiation, elongation, and termination of translation. This opinion article compiles information on the redox sensitivity of cytosolic translation factors and the significance of redox regulation as a key modulator of translation for efficient acclimation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:26706442

  4. Cytosolic Selection Systems To Study Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Mueller-Schickert, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe biosensors that provide readouts for protein stability in the cytosolic compartment of prokaryotes. These biosensors consist of tripartite sandwich fusions that link the in vitro stability or aggregation susceptibility of guest proteins to the in vivo resistance of host cells to the antibiotics kanamycin, spectinomycin, and nourseothricin. These selectable markers confer antibiotic resistance in a wide range of hosts and are easily quantifiable. We show that mutations within guest proteins that affect their stability alter the antibiotic resistances of the cells expressing the biosensors in a manner that is related to the in vitro stabilities of the mutant guest proteins. In addition, we find that polyglutamine tracts of increasing length are associated with an increased tendency to form amyloids in vivo and, in our sandwich fusion system, with decreased resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that our approach allows the in vivo analysis of protein stability in the cytosolic compartment without the need for prior structural and functional knowledge. PMID:25266385

  5. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus. PMID:12717445

  6. Cytosolic delivery of materials with endosome-disrupting colloids

    DOEpatents

    Helms, Brett A.; Bayles, Andrea R.

    2016-03-15

    A facile procedure to deliver nanocrystals to the cytosol of live cells that is both rapid and general. The technique employs a unique cationic core-shell polymer colloid that directs nanocrystals to the cytosol of living cells within a few hours of incubation. The present methods and compositions enable a host of advanced applications arising from efficient cytosolic delivery of nanocrystal imaging probes: from single particle tracking experiments to monitoring protein-protein interactions in live cells for extended periods.

  7. Periodic increases in elongation rate precede increases in cytosolic Ca2+ during pollen tube growth.

    PubMed

    Messerli, M A; Créton, R; Jaffe, L F; Robinson, K R

    2000-06-01

    Pollen tubes grown in vitro require an intracellular tip-high gradient of Ca2+ in order to elongate. Moreover, after about 2 h in vitro both the tip Ca2+ and the elongation rate of lily tubes begin to oscillate regularly with large amplitudes. This raises the question of the phase relation between these two oscillations. Previous studies lacked the temporal resolution to accurately establish this relationship. We have studied these oscillations with a newly developed, high temporal resolution system and the complementary use of both luminescent and fluorescent calcium reporters. We hereby show that the periodic increases in elongation rate during oscillatory growth of Lilium longiflorum pollen tubes clearly precede those in subtip calcium and do so by 4.1 +/- 0.2 s out of average periods of 38.7 +/- 1.8 s. Also, by collecting images of the light output of aequorin, we find that the magnitude of the [Ca2+] at the tip oscillates between 3 and 10 microM, which is considerably greater than that reported by fluorescent indicators. We propose an explanatory model that features cyclic growth and secretion in which growth oscillations give rise to secretion that is essential for the subsequent growth oscillation. We also critically compile data on L. longiflorum stylar growth rates, which show little variation from in vitro rates of pollen tubes grown in optimal medium. PMID:10885748

  8. Osmotically induced cytosolic free Ca(2+) changes in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Morris, M R; Doull, I J; Hallett, M B

    2001-02-01

    Cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration in neutrophils was measured by ratiometric fluorometry of intracellular fura2. Increasing the extracellular osmolarity, by either NaCl (300-600 mM) or sucrose (600-1200 mM), caused a rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) (Delta(max) approximately equal to 600 nM). This was not due to cell lysis as the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration was reversed by restoration of isotonicity and a second rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) could be provoked by repeating the change in extracellular osmolarity. Furthermore, the rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration occurred in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), demonstrating that release of intracellular fura2 into the external medium did not occur. The osmotically-induced rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) was not inhibited by either the phospholipase C-inhibitor U73122, or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, suggesting that neither signalling via inositol tris-phosphate or the cytoskeletal system were involved. However, the rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) may have resulted from a reduction in neutrophil water volume in hyperosmotic conditions. As these rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) (Delta(max) approximately equal to 600 nM) were large enough to provoke changes in neutrophil activity, we propose that conditions which removes cell water may similarly elevate cytosolic free Ca(2+) to physiologically important levels. PMID:11341979

  9. Decoding of calcium signal through calmodulin: calmodulin-binding proteins in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many abiotic and biotic stimuli such as heat, cold, drought, salt, light, wind, touch, wounding, symbionts and pathogens as well as growth, developmental and hormonal cues can quickly induce cytosolic calcium increases. Calmodulin, the most thoroughly studied calcium sensor, mediates interpretation...

  10. Plant cytosolic pyruvate kinase: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Podestá, F E; Plaxton, W C

    1992-11-20

    The kinetic properties of cytosolic pyruvate kinase (PKc) from germinating castor oil seeds (COS) have been investigated. From experiments in which the free Mg2+ concentration was varied at constant levels of either the complexed or free forms of the substrates it was determined that the true substrates are the free forms of both phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ADP. This conclusion is corroborated by the quenching of intrinsic PKC tryptophan fluorescence by free PEP and ADP. Mg2+ is bound as the free bivalent cation but is likely released as MgATP. The fluorescence data, substrate interaction kinetics, and pattern of inhibition by products and substrate analogues (adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) for ADP and phenyl phosphate for PEP) are compatible with a sequential, compulsory-ordered, Tri-Bi type kinetic reaction mechanism. PEP is the leading substrate, and pyruvate the last product to abandon the enzyme. The dissociation constant and limiting Km for free PEP (8.2 to 22 and 38 microM, respectively) and the limiting Km for free ADP (2.9 microM) are considerably lower than those reported for the non-plant enzyme. The results indicate that COS PKc exists naturally in an activated state, similar to the fructose 1,6-bisphosphate-activated yeast enzyme. This deduction is consistent with a previous study (F.E. Podestá and W.C. Plaxton (1991) Biochem. J. 279, 495-501) that failed to identify any allosteric activators for the COS PKc, but which proposed a regulatory mechanism based upon ATP levels and pH-dependent alterations in the enzyme's response to various metabolite inhibitors. As plant phosphofructokinases display potent inhibition by PEP, the overall rate of glycolytic flux from hexose 6-phosphate to pyruvate in the plant cytosol will ultimately depend upon variations in PEP levels brought about by the regulation of PKc. PMID:1445948

  11. Reduced levels of intracellular calcium releasing in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Javier; Mediero, Matías; Lozano, Graciela M; Bejarano, Ignacio; Ortiz, Águeda; García, Juan F; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthenozoospermia is one of the most common findings present in infertile males characterized by reduced or absent sperm motility, but its aetiology remains unknown in most cases. In addition, calcium is one of the most important ions regulating sperm motility. In this study we have investigated the progesterone-evoked intracellular calcium signal in ejaculated spermatozoa from men with normospermia or asthenozoospermia. Methods Human ejaculates were obtained from healthy volunteers and asthenospermic men by masturbation after 4–5 days of abstinence. For determination of cytosolic free calcium concentration, spermatozoa were loaded with the fluorescent ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2. Results Treatment of spermatozoa from normospermic men with 20 micromolar progesterone plus 1 micromolar thapsigargin in a calcium free medium induced a typical transient increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration due to calcium release from internal stores. Similar results were obtained when spermatozoa were stimulated with progesterone alone. Subsequent addition of calcium to the external medium evoked a sustained elevation in cytosolic free calcium concentration indicative of capacitative calcium entry. However, when progesterone plus thapsigargin were administered to spermatozoa from patients with asthenozoospermia, calcium signal and subsequent calcium entry was much smaller compared to normospermic patients. As expected, pretreatment of normospermic spermatozoa with both the anti-progesterone receptor c262 antibody and with progesterone receptor antagonist RU-38486 decreased the calcium release induced by progesterone. Treatment of spermatozoa with cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide decreased the calcium entry evoked by depletion of internal calcium stores in normospermic patients, whereas these treatments proved to be ineffective at modifying the calcium entry in patients with asthenozoospermia. Conclusion Our results suggest that spermatozoa from

  12. Neurodynamic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  13. Calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2004-01-01

    Calcium antagonists were introduced for the treatment of hypertension in the 1980s. Their use was subsequently expanded to additional disorders, such as angina pectoris, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Raynaud phenomenon, pulmonary hypertension, diffuse esophageal spasms, and migraine. Calcium antagonists as a group are heterogeneous and include 3 main classes--phenylalkylamines, benzothiazepines, and dihydropyridines--that differ in their molecular structure, sites and modes of action, and effects on various other cardiovascular functions. Calcium antagonists lower blood pressure mainly through vasodilation and reduction of peripheral resistance. They maintain blood flow to vital organs, and are safe in patients with renal impairment. Unlike diuretics and beta-blockers, calcium antagonists do not impair glucose metabolism or lipid profile and may even attenuate the development of arteriosclerotic lesions. In long-term follow-up, patients treated with calcium antagonists had development of less overt diabetes mellitus than those who were treated with diuretics and beta-blockers. Moreover, calcium antagonists are able to reduce left ventricular mass and are effective in improving anginal pain. Recent prospective randomized studies attested to the beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in hypertensive patients. In comparison with placebo, calcium antagonist-based therapy reduced major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death significantly in elderly hypertensive patients and in diabetic patients. In several comparative studies in hypertensive patients, treatment with calcium antagonists was equally effective as treatment with diuretics, beta-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. From these studies, it seems that a calcium antagonist-based regimen is superior to other regimens in preventing stroke, equivalent in preventing ischemic heart disease, and inferior in preventing congestive heart failure

  14. Galactic oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    Long-lived oscillations that act like normal modes are described. The total kinetic energy is found to vary with time by amounts far in excess of the fluctuations expected from the virial theorem, and the variation shows periodic patterns that suggest oscillations. Experimental results indicate that oscillation amplitudes depend on the nature of the model. It is noted that it is difficult to answer questions about likely amplitudes in real galaxies with any confidence at the present time.

  15. Combined use of UV-labile calcium chelators and calcium-sensitive dyes in a microscope with two light sources influencing different regions in a group of coordinated contracting cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarczyk, Goetz; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1997-12-01

    The coordination of excitation in a biological system of cells such as cardiac myocytes in heart tissue has crucial influence on the function of the entire organ. This coordinated behavior can be visualized in a small group of embryonic cardiac myocytes derived from the hearts of unborn chicken. Loaded with a calcium sensitive dye the excitation can be imaged via the occurring transient rise in cytosolic calcium concentration. It can be shown that in regions with physiological or morphological restrictions the transient rise in cytosolic calcium occurs with a temporal delay compared to the ordinary array of coupled myocytes. The height of the transient rise of cytosolic calcium is related to the ability of the individual cell to participate in the coordinated contraction. The free cytosolic calcium concentration is decreased with the UV-labile calcium, chelator diazo-2. Our setup allows to decrease the free cytosolic calcium in a single cell of the contracting array of cells. This allows us to introduce mismatches in selected regions of the coordinated contraction and to visualize the effects simultaneously.

  16. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  17. Intracellular calcium ions as regulators of renal tubular sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Windhager, E; Frindt, G; Yang, J M; Lee, C O

    1986-09-15

    This review addresses the putative role of intracellular calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport by renal tubules. Cytoplasmic calcium-ion activities in proximal tubules of Necturus are less than 10(-7) M and can be increased by lowering the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the peritubular cell membrane, or by addition of quinidine or ionomycin to peritubular fluid. Whereas lowering of the peritubular Na concentration increases cytosolic [Ca++] and [H+], ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, raises intracellular [Ca++] without decreasing pHi. The intracellular calcium-ion level is maintained by transport processes in the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organelles, as well as by calcium-binding proteins. Calcium ions inhibit net transport of sodium by reducing the rate of sodium entry across the luminal cell membrane. In the collecting tubule this inhibition is caused, at least in part, by an indirect reduction in the activity of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. PMID:2430134

  18. Yeast respond to hypotonic shock with a calcium pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batiza, A. F.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    We have used the transgenic AEQUORIN calcium reporter system to monitor the cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hypotonic shock. Such a shock generates an almost immediate and transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt which is eliminated by gadolinium, a blocker of stretch-activated channels. In addition, this transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt is initially insensitive to 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), an extracellular calcium chelator. However, BAPTA abruptly attenuates the maintenance of that transient rise. These data show that hypotonic shock generates a stretch-activated channel-dependent calcium pulse in yeast. They also suggest that the immediate calcium influx is primarily generated from intracellular stores, and that a sustained increase in [Ca2+]cyt depends upon extracellular calcium.

  19. Smooth muscle cell calcium activation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is controlled by the Ca2+ and Rho kinase signalling pathways. While the SMC Rho kinase system seems to be reasonably constant, there is enormous variation with regard to the mechanisms responsible for generating Ca2+ signals. One way of dealing with this diversity is to consider how this system has been adapted to control different SMC functions. Phasic SMCs (vas deferens, uterus and bladder) rely on membrane depolarization to drive Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. This depolarization can be induced by neurotransmitters or through the operation of a membrane oscillator. Many tonic SMCs (vascular, airway and corpus cavernosum) are driven by a cytosolic Ca2+ oscillator that generates periodic pulses of Ca2+. A similar oscillator is present in pacemaker cells such as the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and atypical SMCs that control other tonic SMCs (gastrointestinal, urethra, ureter). The changes in membrane potential induced by these cytosolic oscillators does not drive contraction directly but it functions to couple together individual oscillators to provide the synchronization that is a characteristic feature of many tonic SMCs. PMID:18787034

  20. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  1. Cytosolic Hsp60 Can Modulate Proteasome Activity in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Kalderon, Bella; Kogan, Gleb; Bubis, Ettel; Pines, Ophry

    2015-01-01

    Hsp60, an essential oligomeric molecular mitochondrial chaperone, has been subject to rigorous basic and clinical research. With yeast as a model system, we provide evidence for the ability of cytosolic yHsp60 to inhibit the yeast proteasome. (i) Following biological turnover of murine Bax (a proteasome substrate), we show that co-expression of cytosolic yHsp60 stabilizes Bax, enhances its association with mitochondria, and enhances its killing capacity. (ii) Expression of yHsp60 in the yeast cytosol (yHsp60c) inhibits degradation of a cytosolic protein ΔMTS-Aco1 tagged with the degron SL17 (a ubiquitin-proteasome substrate). (iii) Conditions under which Hsp60 accumulates in the cytosol (elevated Hsp60c or growth at 37 °C) correlate with reduced 20 S peptidase activity in proteasomes purified from cell extracts. (iv) Elevated yHsp60 in the cytosol correlate with accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins. (v) According to 20 S proteasome pulldown experiments, Hsp60 is physically associated with proteasomes in extracts of cells expressing Hsp60c or grown at 37 °C. Even mutant Hsp60 proteins, lacking chaperone activity, were still capable of proteasome inhibition. The results support the hypothesis that localization of Hsp60 to the cytosol may modulate proteasome activity according to cell need. PMID:25525272

  2. Quantitative Assessment of Cytosolic Salmonella in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knodler, Leigh A.; Nair, Vinod; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    Within mammalian cells, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) inhabits a membrane-bound vacuole known as the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). We have recently shown that wild type S. Typhimurium also colonizes the cytosol of epithelial cells. Here we sought to quantify the contribution of cytosolic Salmonella to the total population over a time course of infection in different epithelial cell lines and under conditions of altered vacuolar escape. We found that the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine, acts on vacuolar, but not cytosolic, Salmonella. After chloroquine treatment, vacuolar bacteria are not transcriptionally active or replicative and appear degraded. Using a chloroquine resistance assay, in addition to digitonin permeabilization, we found that S. Typhimurium lyses its nascent vacuole in numerous epithelial cell lines, albeit with different frequencies, and hyper-replication in the cytosol is also widespread. At later times post-infection, cytosolic bacteria account for half of the total population in some epithelial cell lines, namely HeLa and Caco-2 C2Bbe1. Both techniques accurately measured increased vacuole lysis in epithelial cells upon treatment with wortmannin. By chloroquine resistance assay, we also determined that Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1), but not SPI-2, the virulence plasmid nor the flagellar apparatus, was required for vacuolar escape and cytosolic replication in epithelial cells. Together, digitonin permeabilization and the chloroquine resistance assay will be useful, complementary tools for deciphering the mechanisms of SCV lysis and Salmonella replication in the epithelial cell cytosol. PMID:24400108

  3. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels. These may include abnormal blood levels of albumin or immunoglobulins. Normal Results Children: 4.8 to ... 2016:chap 245. Read More Acute kidney failure Albumin - blood (serum) test Bone tumor Calcium blood test ...

  4. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  5. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Sarcopenia Skeletal Rare Disorders Data & Publications Facts and Statistics Vitamin D map Fracture Risk Map Hip Fracture ... Training Courses Working Groups Regional Audits Reports Facts and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What ...

  6. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  7. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  8. Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana Alexandrovna; Philip Werschler, WM.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite is one of the most well-studied dermal fillers worldwide and has been extensively used for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial lines and folds and to replenish lost volume. Objectives: To mark the milestone of 10 years of use in the aesthetic field, this review will consider the evolution of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine, provide a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach, and examine how the unique properties of calcium hydroxylapatite provide it with an important place in today’s market. Methods: This article is an up-to-date review of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine along with procedures for its use, including a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach by three expert injectors. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxylapatite is a very effective agent for many areas of facial soft tissue augmentation and is associated with a high and well-established safety profile. Calcium hydroxylapatite combines high elasticity and viscosity with an ability to induce long-term collagen formation making it an ideal agent for a global facial approach. PMID:25610523

  9. Mechanism and evolution of cytosolic Hedgehog signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher W.; Chuang, Pao-Tien

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is required for embryonic patterning and postnatal physiology in invertebrates and vertebrates. With the revelation that the primary cilium is crucial for mammalian Hh signaling, the prevailing view that Hh signal transduction mechanisms are conserved across species has been challenged. However, more recent progress on elucidating the function of core Hh pathway cytosolic regulators in Drosophila, zebrafish and mice has confirmed that the essential logic of Hh transduction is similar between species. Here, we review Hh signaling events at the membrane and in the cytosol, and focus on parallel and divergent functions of cytosolic Hh regulators in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:20530542

  10. Cytosolic Innate Immune Sensing and Signaling upon Infection

    PubMed Central

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Dussurget, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic sensing of pathogens is essential to a productive immune response. Recent reports have emphasized the importance of signaling platforms emanating from organelles and cytosolic sensors, particularly during the response to intracellular pathogens. Here, we highlight recent discoveries identifying the key mediators of nucleic acid and cyclic nucleotide sensing and discuss their importance in host defense. This review will also cover strategies evolved by pathogens to manipulate these pathways. PMID:27014235

  11. Cytosolic Innate Immune Sensing and Signaling upon Infection.

    PubMed

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Dussurget, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic sensing of pathogens is essential to a productive immune response. Recent reports have emphasized the importance of signaling platforms emanating from organelles and cytosolic sensors, particularly during the response to intracellular pathogens. Here, we highlight recent discoveries identifying the key mediators of nucleic acid and cyclic nucleotide sensing and discuss their importance in host defense. This review will also cover strategies evolved by pathogens to manipulate these pathways. PMID:27014235

  12. Microelectronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1969-01-01

    Bipolar transistor operated in a grounded base configuration is used as the inductor in a microelectronic oscillator. This configuration is employed using thin-film hybrid technology and is also applicable to monolithic technology.

  13. Raindrop oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the change in shape of a raindrop is presented. Raindrops measured by two orthogonal cameras were classified by shape and orientation to determine the nature of the oscillation. A physical model based on potential energy was then developed to study the amplitude variation of oscillating drops. The model results show that oscillations occur about the equilibrium axis ratio, but the time average axis ratio if significantly more spherical for large amplitudes because of asymmetry in the surface potential energy. A generalization of the model to oscillations produced by turbulence yields average axis ratios that are consistent with the camera measurements. The model results for average axis ratios were applied to rainfall studies with a dual polarized radar.

  14. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  15. Arabidopsis Histone Methylase CAU1/PRMT5/SKB1 Acts as an Epigenetic Suppressor of the Calcium Signaling Gene CAS to Mediate Stomatal Closure in Response to Extracellular Calcium[W

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan-Lei; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Lv, Xin-Fang; Guan, Yuan; Yi, Hong-Ying; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Elevations in extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]o) are known to stimulate cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) oscillations to close stomata. However, the underlying mechanisms regulating this process remain largely to be determined. Here, through the functional characterization of the calcium underaccumulation mutant cau1, we report that the epigenetic regulation of CAS, a putative Ca2+ binding protein proposed to be an external Ca2+ sensor, is involved in this process. cau1 mutant plants display increased drought tolerance and stomatal closure. A mutation in CAU1 significantly increased the expression level of the calcium signaling gene CAS, and functional disruption of CAS abolished the enhanced drought tolerance and stomatal [Ca2+]o signaling in cau1. Map-based cloning revealed that CAU1 encodes the H4R3sme2 (for histone H4 Arg 3 with symmetric dimethylation)-type histone methylase protein arginine methytransferase5/Shk1 binding protein1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CAU1 binds to the CAS promoter and modulates the H4R3sme2-type histone methylation of the CAS chromatin. When exposed to elevated [Ca2+]o, the protein levels of CAU1 decreased and less CAU1 bound to the CAS promoter. In addition, the methylation level of H4R3sme2 decreased in the CAS chromatin. Together, these data suggest that in response to increases in [Ca2+]o, fewer CAU1 protein molecules bind to the CAS promoter, leading to decreased H4R3sme2 methylation and consequent derepression of the expression of CAS to mediate stomatal closure and drought tolerance. PMID:23943859

  16. Rearrangement of MICU1 multimers for activation of MCU is solely controlled by cytosolic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Malli, Roland; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Madreiter-Sokolowski, Corina T.; Klec, Christiane; Rost, Rene; Graier, Wolfgang F.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is a vital process that controls distinct cell and organelle functions. Mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1) was identified as key regulator of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) that together with the essential MCU regulator (EMRE) forms the mitochondrial Ca2+ channel. However, mechanisms by which MICU1 controls MCU/EMRE activity to tune mitochondrial Ca2+ signals remain ambiguous. Here we established a live-cell FRET approach and demonstrate that elevations of cytosolic Ca2+ rearranges MICU1 multimers with an EC50 of 4.4 μM, resulting in activation of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. MICU1 rearrangement essentially requires the EF-hand motifs and strictly correlates with the shape of cytosolic Ca2+ rises. We further show that rearrangements of MICU1 multimers were independent of matrix Ca2+ concentration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression levels of MCU and EMRE. Our experiments provide novel details about how MCU/EMRE is regulated by MICU1 and an original approach to investigate MCU/EMRE activation in intact cells. PMID:26489515

  17. Effects of trimebutine on cytosolic Ca2+ and force transitions in intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Kobayashi, T; Tamaki, H

    1991-04-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on cytosolic free Ca2+ and force transitions in the guinea-pig taenia cecum were studied by fura-2 fluorometry and tension recording. The addition of 80 mM K+ induced a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and tension, followed by a sustained increase. Trimebutine (10 microM) suppressed both [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development. The tonic responses were more potently inhibited than the phasic responses. Phasic components gradually increased as the added K+ increased (10-40 mM). The relationship between the peak increases in [Ca2+]i and tension was not affected by trimebutine (10 microM). This means that trimebutine does not affect the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile elements. In a high K+ and Ca(2+)-free medium, carbachol (10 microM) or caffeine (30 mM) caused transient [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development in the smooth muscle. Trimebutine (10 microM) decreased the amplitude of both responses. Trimebutine (10 microM) inhibited the spontaneous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and motility of taenia cecum in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.3 microM). These results suggest that trimebutine has two types of inhibitory actions on intestinal smooth muscle; one, the inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels, and the other, the inhibition of Ca2+ release from intracellular storage sites. PMID:1868878

  18. Rearrangement of MICU1 multimers for activation of MCU is solely controlled by cytosolic Ca(2.).

    PubMed

    Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Malli, Roland; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Madreiter-Sokolowski, Corina T; Klec, Christiane; Rost, Rene; Graier, Wolfgang F

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is a vital process that controls distinct cell and organelle functions. Mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1) was identified as key regulator of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) that together with the essential MCU regulator (EMRE) forms the mitochondrial Ca(2+) channel. However, mechanisms by which MICU1 controls MCU/EMRE activity to tune mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals remain ambiguous. Here we established a live-cell FRET approach and demonstrate that elevations of cytosolic Ca(2+) rearranges MICU1 multimers with an EC50 of 4.4 μM, resulting in activation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. MICU1 rearrangement essentially requires the EF-hand motifs and strictly correlates with the shape of cytosolic Ca(2+) rises. We further show that rearrangements of MICU1 multimers were independent of matrix Ca(2+) concentration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression levels of MCU and EMRE. Our experiments provide novel details about how MCU/EMRE is regulated by MICU1 and an original approach to investigate MCU/EMRE activation in intact cells. PMID:26489515

  19. Quantitation of cytosolic [Ca2+] in whole perfused rat hearts using Indo-1 fluorometry.

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, R; Figueredo, V M; Camacho, S A; Baker, A J; Weiner, M W

    1993-01-01

    Fluorometric determination of cytosolic calcium, [Ca2+]c, using Indo-1 in intact tissue, is limited by problems in obtaining calibration parameters for Indo-1 in vivo. Therefore, the goal of this study was to calibrate Indo-1 using in vitro constants, obtained from protein-containing reference solutions designed to produce similar Indo-1 spectral properties to those in vivo. Due to wavelength-dependent tissue light absorbance, the in vitro constants had to be absorbance-corrected using a novel method. The correction factor was calculated from the relationship between the Indo-1 fluorescence intensities at the two detection wavelengths. A mixture of proteins at approximately 28 mg/ml had a similar Indo-1 isosbestic wavelength (430 nm) to that found in vivo (427 nm), and a similar fluorescence ratio maximum with saturating Ca2+ to that found in vivo (after absorbance correction). Using calibration constants from this protein mixture, calculated [Ca2+]c in a Langendorf perfused rat heart was 187 nM during diastole, and 464 nM in systole. This new calibration method circumvented the considerable experimental problems of previous methods which required measurements with the cytosol fully depleted and fully saturated with Ca2+. PMID:8298027

  20. Prevention of bone mineral changes induced by bed rest: Modification by static compression simulating weight bearing, combined supplementation of oral calcium and phosphate, calcitonin injections, oscillating compression, the oral diophosphonatedisodium etidronate, and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, V. S.; Hulley, S. B.; Donaldson, C. L.; Vogel, J. M.; Rosen, S. N.; Hantman, D. A.; Lockwood, D. R.; Seid, D.; Hyatt, K. H.; Jacobson, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    The phenomenon of calcium loss during bed rest was found to be analogous to the loss of bone material which occurs in the hypogravic environment of space flight. Ways of preventing this occurrence are investigated. A group of healthy adult males underwent 24-30 weeks of continuous bed rest. Some of them were given an exercise program designed to resemble normal ambulatory activity; another subgroup was fed supplemental potassium phosphate. The results from a 12-week period of treatment were compared with those untreated bed rest periods. The potassium phosphate supplements prevented the hypercalciuria of bed rest, but fecal calcium tended to increase. The exercise program did not diminish the negative calcium balance. Neither treatment affected the heavy loss of mineral from the calcaneus. Several additional studies are developed to examine the problem further.

  1. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  2. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  3. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  4. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  5. The importance of calcium in the regulation of megakaryocyte function.

    PubMed

    Di Buduo, Christian Andrea; Moccia, Francesco; Battiston, Monica; De Marco, Luigi; Mazzucato, Mario; Moratti, Remigio; Tanzi, Franco; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    Platelet release by megakaryocytes is regulated by a concert of environmental and autocrine factors. We previously showed that constitutively released adenosine diphosphate by human megakaryocytes leads to platelet production. Here we show that adenosine diphosphate elicits, in human megakaryocytes, an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, followed by a plateau, which is lowered in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggesting the involvement of Store-Operated Calcium Entry. Indeed, we demonstrate that megakaryocytes express the major candidates to mediate Store-Operated Calcium Entry, stromal interaction molecule 1, Orai1 and canonical transient receptor potential 1, which are activated upon either pharmacological or physiological depletion of the intracellular calcium pool. This mechanism is inhibited by phospholipase C or inositol-3-phosphate receptor inhibitors and by a specific calcium entry blocker. Studies on megakaryocyte behavior, on extracellular matrix proteins that support proplatelet extension, show that calcium mobilization from intracellular stores activates signaling cascades that trigger megakaryocyte adhesion and proplatelet formation, and promotes extracellular calcium entry which is primarily involved in the regulation of the contractile force responsible for megakaryocyte motility. These findings provide the first evidence that both calcium mobilization from intracellular stores and extracellular calcium entry specifically regulate human megakaryocyte functions. PMID:24463213

  6. The importance of calcium in the regulation of megakaryocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Andrea Di Buduo, Christian; Moccia, Francesco; Battiston, Monica; De Marco, Luigi; Mazzucato, Mario; Moratti, Remigio; Tanzi, Franco; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Platelet release by megakaryocytes is regulated by a concert of environmental and autocrine factors. We previously showed that constitutively released adenosine diphosphate by human megakaryocytes leads to platelet production. Here we show that adenosine diphosphate elicits, in human megakaryocytes, an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, followed by a plateau, which is lowered in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggesting the involvement of Store-Operated Calcium Entry. Indeed, we demonstrate that megakaryocytes express the major candidates to mediate Store-Operated Calcium Entry, stromal interaction molecule 1, Orai1 and canonical transient receptor potential 1, which are activated upon either pharmacological or physiological depletion of the intracellular calcium pool. This mechanism is inhibited by phospholipase C or inositol-3-phosphate receptor inhibitors and by a specific calcium entry blocker. Studies on megakaryocyte behavior, on extracellular matrix proteins that support proplatelet extension, show that calcium mobilization from intracellular stores activates signaling cascades that trigger megakaryocyte adhesion and proplatelet formation, and promotes extracellular calcium entry which is primarily involved in the regulation of the contractile force responsible for megakaryocyte motility. These findings provide the first evidence that both calcium mobilization from intracellular stores and extracellular calcium entry specifically regulate human megakaryocyte functions. PMID:24463213

  7. Calcium homeostasis in barley aleurone

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.

    1990-02-21

    Under the auspices of the Department of Energy we investigated calcium homeostasis in aleurone cells of barley. This investigation was initiated to explore the role played by extracellular Ca{sup 2+} in gibberellic acid (GA)-induced synthesis and secretion of hydrolases in the aleurone layer. We have focused our attention on four topics that relate to the role of Ca{sup 2+} in regulating the synthesis of {alpha}-amylase. First, we determined the stoichiometry of Ca{sup 2+} binding to the two principal classes of barley {alpha}-amylase and examined some of the biochemical and physical properties of the native and Ca{sup 2+}-depleted forms of the enzyme. Second, since {alpha}-amylase is a Ca{sup 2+} containing metalloenzyme that binds one atom of Ca{sup 2+} per molecule, we developed methods to determine the concentration of Ca{sup 2+} in the cytosol of the aleurone cell. We developed a technique for introducing Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive dyes into aleurone protoplasts that allows the measurement of Ca{sup 2+} in both cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Third, because the results of our Ca{sup 2+} measurements showed higher levels of Ca{sup 2+} in the ER than in the cytosol, we examined Ca{sup 2+} transport into the ER of control and GA-treated aleurone tissue. And fourth, we applied the technique of patch-clamping to the barley aleurone protoplast to examine ion transport at the plasma membrane. Our results with the patch-clamp technique established the presence of K{sup +} channels in the plasma membrane of the aleurone protoplast, and they showed that this cell is ideally suited for the application of this methodology for studying ion transport. 34 refs.

  8. NP04634 prevents cell damage caused by calcium overload and mitochondrial disruption in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa; del Barrio, Laura; Egea, Javier; Cañas, Noelia; Martínez, Ana; García, Antonio G; Villarroya, Mercedes; López, Manuela G

    2009-04-01

    Marine sponges are becoming a rich source of potential new medicines. NP04634 is a synthetic derivative of 11,19 dideoxyfistularin, a natural product of the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina cavernicola. We report the cytoprotective effects of this new compound in isolated bovine chromaffin cells exposed to cytotoxic stimuli that have been related to neuronal cell death, i.e. Ca(2+) overload and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cell death was achieved by: (i) causing Ca(2+) overload through voltage-dependent calcium channels by exposing the cells to 30 mM K(+), 5 mM Ca(2+) plus 0.3 microM FPL64176 (an L-type Ca(2+)-channel activator); (ii) incubating the cells with veratridine, causing cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) oscillations and mitochondrial disruption; and (iii) blocking mitochondrial complexes I and V using a combination of 30 microM rotenone and 10 microM oligomycin. At 10 microM, NP04634 caused significant protection against 30K(+)/5Ca(2+)/FPL-induced toxicity. NP04634 caused a concentration-dependent reduction in [Ca(2+)](c) induced by 70 mM K(+) in cells loaded with Fluo-4; maximum blockade was 67% at 30 microM. Veratridine caused continuous [Ca(2+)](c) oscillations that translated into 43.4+/-2% cell death. In this model, NP04634 caused 42% and 67% protection at 3 and 10 microM, respectively. NP04634 reduced [Ca(2+)](c) oscillations and mitochondrial depolarization caused by veratridine. NP04634 at 10 microM also protected against mitochondrial disruption caused by rotenone plus oligomycin. In conclusion, NP04634 is a novel compound of marine origin with cytoprotective properties that might have potential therapeutic implications under pathological circumstances involving Ca(2+) overload and mitochondrial disruption, such as in certain neurodegenerative diseases and/or stroke. PMID:19233161

  9. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  10. Stochastic hybrid modeling of intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, TaiJung; Maurya, Mano Ram; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2010-10-01

    Deterministic models of biochemical processes at the subcellular level might become inadequate when a cascade of chemical reactions is induced by a few molecules. Inherent randomness of such phenomena calls for the use of stochastic simulations. However, being computationally intensive, such simulations become infeasible for large and complex reaction networks. To improve their computational efficiency in handling these networks, we present a hybrid approach, in which slow reactions and fluxes are handled through exact stochastic simulation and their fast counterparts are treated partially deterministically through chemical Langevin equation. The classification of reactions as fast or slow is accompanied by the assumption that in the time-scale of fast reactions, slow reactions do not occur and hence do not affect the probability of the state. Our new approach also handles reactions with complex rate expressions such as Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Fluxes which cannot be modeled explicitly through reactions, such as flux of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channels, are handled deterministically. The proposed hybrid algorithm is used to model the regulation of the dynamics of cytosolic calcium ions in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. At relatively large number of molecules, the response characteristics obtained with the stochastic and deterministic simulations coincide, which validates our approach in the limit of large numbers. At low doses, the response characteristics of some key chemical species, such as levels of cytosolic calcium, predicted with stochastic simulations, differ quantitatively from their deterministic counterparts. These observations are ubiquitous throughout dose response, sensitivity, and gene-knockdown response analyses. While the relative differences between the peak-heights of the cytosolic [Ca2+] time-courses obtained from stochastic (mean of 16 realizations) and deterministic

  11. Agonist activation of cytosolic Ca2+ in subfornical organ cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. F.; Beltz, T. G.; Sharma, R. V.; Xu, Z.; Bhatty, R. A.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is sensitive to both ANG II and ACh, and local application of these agents produces dipsogenic responses and vasopressin release. The present study examined the effects of cholinergic drugs, ANG II, and increased extracellular osmolarity on dissociated, cultured cells of the SFO that were retrogradely labeled from the supraoptic nucleus. The effects were measured as changes in cytosolic calcium in fura 2-loaded cells by using a calcium imaging system. Both ACh and carbachol increased intracellular ionic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). However, in contrast to the effects of muscarinic receptor agonists on SFO neurons, manipulation of the extracellular osmolality produced no effects, and application of ANG II produced only moderate effects on [Ca2+]i in a few retrogradely labeled cells. The cholinergic effects on [Ca2+]i could be blocked with the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and with the more selective muscarinic receptor antagonists pirenzepine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperdine methiodide (4-DAMP). In addition, the calcium in the extracellular fluid was required for the cholinergic-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. These findings indicate that ACh acts to induce a functional cellular response in SFO neurons through action on a muscarinic receptor, probably of the M1 subtype and that the increase of [Ca2+]i, at least initially, requires the entry of extracellular Ca2+. Also, consistent with a functional role of M1 receptors in the SFO are the results of immunohistochemical preparations demonstrating M1 muscarinic receptor-like protein present within this forebrain circumventricular organ.

  12. Programmable Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Lee, Clement G.; Nguyen, Huy

    2011-01-01

    A programmable oscillator is a frequency synthesizer with an output phase that tracks an arbitrary function. An offset, phase-locked loop circuit is used in combination with an error control feedback loop to precisely control the output phase of the oscillator. To down-convert the received signal, several stages of mixing may be employed with the compensation for the time-base distortion of the carrier occurring at any one of those stages. In the Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), the compensation occurs in the mixing from an intermediate frequency (IF), whose value is dependent on the station and band, to a common IF used in the final stage of down-conversion to baseband. The programmable oscillator (PO) is used in the final stage of down-conversion to generate the IF, along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier, thus removing it from the final down-converted signal.

  13. Pancreatic calcium waves and secretion.

    PubMed

    Kasai, H

    1995-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells display stereotypic Ca2+ waves resulting from Ca2+ release from internal stores during stimulation. The Ca2+ waves are initiated at the luminal pole, and, at high agonist concentrations, spread towards the basal pole. Two key mechanisms behind the generation of Ca2+ waves have been identified. First, the Ca2+ waves are composite, mediated by three distinct Ca2+ release mechanisms with a polarized distribution: high-sensitivity inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors at a small trigger zone (T zone) in the secretory granule area, Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release channels in the granular area and low-sensitivity InsP3 receptors in the basal area. Second, InsP3 can readily diffuse in the cytosol, whereas rises in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) can be confined through strong buffering and sequestration of Ca2+. InsP3 is thus used as a long-range messenger to transmit agonist signals to the T zone, and [Ca2+]i rises at the T zone are used as a local switch. These mechanisms enable preferential activation of the T zone, irrespective of localization of stimuli and agonist receptors. The secretion of enzymes and fluid is a direct consequence of [Ca2+]i rises at the T zone. The Ca2+ waves and oscillations probably boost the T zone functions. PMID:7587613

  14. Potential role of cytoplasmic calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport in renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Frindt, G; Lee, C O; Yang, J M; Windhager, E E

    1988-01-01

    Experimental maneuvers that increase intracellular calcium ion levels inhibit sodium transport by renal tubules. In the isolated perfused renal tubule, intracellular calcium ion activity (aiCa) changes in response to alterations in the magnitude of the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the basolateral cell membrane. However, a potassium-induced depolarization of this cell boundary does not cause a rise but rather a fall in intracellular calcium ion levels. Ionomycin raises aiCa without causing intracellular acidification. This observation does not support the view that high cytosolic calcium produces intracellular acidification. At least in the case of ionomycin, the inhibition of sodium transport appears to be due to ionophore-induced increases in aiCa. The changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration found in the different experimental conditions studied were consistent with the notion that cytosolic calcium ions may mediate a feedback mechanism that links the luminal entry to the peritubular extrusion of sodium ions. The mechanisms by which cytosolic calcium alters entry is not yet clear but recent experiments suggest an indirect effect on sodium channel activity. PMID:3279295

  15. Lipid Biosynthesis Coordinates a Mitochondrial-to-Cytosolic Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Eui; Grant, Ana Rodrigues; Simic, Milos S; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Nomura, Daniel K; Durieux, Jenni; Riera, Celine E; Sanchez, Melissa; Kapernick, Erik; Wolff, Suzanne; Dillin, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Defects in mitochondrial metabolism have been increasingly linked with age-onset protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's. In response to protein-folding stress, compartment-specific unfolded protein responses (UPRs) within the ER, mitochondria, and cytosol work in parallel to ensure cellular protein homeostasis. While perturbation of individual compartments can make other compartments more susceptible to protein stress, the cellular conditions that trigger cross-communication between the individual UPRs remain poorly understood. We have uncovered a conserved, robust mechanism linking mitochondrial protein homeostasis and the cytosolic folding environment through changes in lipid homeostasis. Metabolic restructuring caused by mitochondrial stress or small-molecule activators trigger changes in gene expression coordinated uniquely by both the mitochondrial and cytosolic UPRs, protecting the cell from disease-associated proteins. Our data suggest an intricate and unique system of communication between UPRs in response to metabolic changes that could unveil new targets for diseases of protein misfolding. PMID:27610574

  16. Interplay Between Intracellular Ca2+ Oscillations and Ca2+-stimulated Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wacquier, Benjamin; Combettes, Laurent; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration are a widespread mode of signalling. Oscillatory spikes rely on repetitive exchanges of Ca2+ between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the cytosol, due to the regulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Mitochondria also sequester and release Ca2+, thus affecting Ca2+ signalling. Mitochondrial Ca2+ activates key enzymes involved in ATP synthesis. We propose a new integrative model for Ca2+ signalling and mitochondrial metabolism in electrically non-excitable cells. The model accounts for (1) the phase relationship of the Ca2+ changes in the cytosol, the ER and mitochondria, (2) the dynamics of mitochondrial metabolites in response to cytosolic Ca2+ changes, and (3) the impacts of cytosol/mitochondria Ca2+ exchanges and of mitochondrial metabolism on Ca2+ oscillations. Simulations predict that as expected, oscillations are slowed down by decreasing the rate of Ca2+ efflux from mitochondria, but also by decreasing the rate of Ca2+ influx through the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU). These predictions were experimentally validated by inhibiting MCU expression. Despite the highly non-linear character of Ca2+ dynamics and mitochondrial metabolism, bioenergetics were found to be robust with respect to changes in frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ oscillations. PMID:26776859

  17. Interplay Between Intracellular Ca(2+) Oscillations and Ca(2+)-stimulated Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wacquier, Benjamin; Combettes, Laurent; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration are a widespread mode of signalling. Oscillatory spikes rely on repetitive exchanges of Ca(2+) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the cytosol, due to the regulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Mitochondria also sequester and release Ca(2+), thus affecting Ca(2+) signalling. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) activates key enzymes involved in ATP synthesis. We propose a new integrative model for Ca(2+) signalling and mitochondrial metabolism in electrically non-excitable cells. The model accounts for (1) the phase relationship of the Ca(2+) changes in the cytosol, the ER and mitochondria, (2) the dynamics of mitochondrial metabolites in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) changes, and (3) the impacts of cytosol/mitochondria Ca(2+) exchanges and of mitochondrial metabolism on Ca(2+) oscillations. Simulations predict that as expected, oscillations are slowed down by decreasing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux from mitochondria, but also by decreasing the rate of Ca(2+) influx through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). These predictions were experimentally validated by inhibiting MCU expression. Despite the highly non-linear character of Ca(2+) dynamics and mitochondrial metabolism, bioenergetics were found to be robust with respect to changes in frequency and amplitude of Ca(2+) oscillations. PMID:26776859

  18. Two-pore channels: Regulation by NAADP and customized roles in triggering calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip; Marchant, Jonathan S; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2010-06-01

    NAADP is a potent regulator of cytosolic calcium levels. Much evidence suggests that NAADP activates a novel channel located on an acidic (lysosomal-like) calcium store, the mobilisation of which results in further calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we discuss the recent identification of a family of poorly characterized ion channels (the two-pore channels) as endo-lysosomal NAADP receptors. The generation of calcium signals by these channels is likened to those evoked by depolarisation during excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. We discuss the idea that two-pore channels can mediate a trigger release of calcium which is then amplified by calcium-induced calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. This is similar to the activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and subsequent mobilisation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in cardiac tissue. We suggest that two-pore channels may physically interact with ryanodine receptors to account for more direct release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in analogy with the conformational coupling of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and ryanodine receptors in skeletal muscle. Interaction of two-pore channels with other calcium release channels likely occurs between stores "trans-chatter" and possibly within the same store "cis-chatter". We also speculate that trafficking of two-pore channels through the endo-lysosomal system facilitates interactions with calcium entry channels. Strategic placing of two-pore channels thus provides a versatile means of generating spatiotemporally complex cellular calcium signals. PMID:20621760

  19. Calmidazolium evokes high calcium fluctuations in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Budu, Alexandre; Gomes, Mayrim M; Melo, Pollyana M; El Chamy Maluf, Sarah; Bagnaresi, Piero; Azevedo, Mauro F; Carmona, Adriana K; Gazarini, Marcos L

    2016-03-01

    Calcium and calmodulin (CaM) are important players in eukaryote cell signaling. In the present study, by using a knockin approach, we demonstrated the expression and localization of CaM in all erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Under extracellular Ca(2+)-free conditions, calmidazolium (CZ), a potent CaM inhibitor, promoted a transient cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt) increase in isolated trophozoites, indicating that CZ mobilizes intracellular sources of calcium. In the same extracellular Ca(2+)-free conditions, the [Ca(2+)]cyt rise elicited by CZ treatment was ~3.5 fold higher when the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium store was previously depleted ruling out the mobilization of calcium from the ER by CZ. The effects of the Ca(2+)/H(+) ionophore ionomycin (ION) and the Na(+)/H(+) ionophore monensin (MON) suggest that the [Ca(2+)]cyt-increasing effect of CZ is driven by the removal of Ca(2+) from at least one Ca(2+)-CaM-related (CaMR) protein as well as by the mobilization of Ca(2+) from intracellular acidic calcium stores. Moreover, we showed that the mitochondrion participates in the sequestration of the cytosolic Ca(2+) elicited by CZ. Finally, the modulation of membrane Ca(2+) channels by CZ and thapsigargin (THG) was demonstrated. The opened channels were blocked by the unspecific calcium channel blocker Co(2+) but not by 2-APB (capacitative calcium entry inhibitor) or nifedipine (L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor). Taken together, the results suggested that one CaMR protein is an important modulator of calcium signaling and homeostasis during the Plasmodium intraerythrocytic cell cycle, working as a relevant intracellular Ca(2+) reservoir in the parasite. PMID:26689736

  20. Calcium-phospholipid enhanced protein phosphorylation in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Moore, R.; Cardaman, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation has not been studied in placenta. Human placental cytosol was subjected to an endogenous protein phosphorylation assay using (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP in the presence of calcium and phosphatidylserine. Protein phosphorylation was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When compared to basal levels, calcium (10/sup -6/ M) in combination with phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml) significantly enhanced (P < 100) /sup 32/P incorporation into phosphoproteins having mol wt 47,000, 43,000, and 37,000. Half-maximal /sup 22/P incorporation was observed with 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M Ca/sup 2 +/ in the presence of phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml). The effect of phosphatidylserine was biphasic. In the presence of Ca 10/sup -6/ M, /sup 32/P incorporation increased to a maximum at 70 /sup +/g/ml of phosphatidylserine. The increase was suppressed at 150 ..mu..g/ml. Tetracaine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent enhancement of the three phosphoproteins. Calcium in the absence of phospholipid enhanced the phosphorylation of a protein of 98,000 mol wt. Phosphatidylserine suppressed this enhancement. Calmodulin (10/sup -6/ M) had no detectable effect upon phosphorylation beyond that of calcium alone, but the calmodulin inhibitor R-24571 specifically inhibited the calcium-stimulated 98,000 mol wt phosphoprotein. Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent phospholipid-dependent phosphoproteins are present in human placental cytosol; whether calcium-activated, calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins also are present remains a question.

  1. Structure of Human GIVD Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Reveals Insights into Substrate Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Klein, Michael G; Snell, Gyorgy; Lane, Weston; Zou, Hua; Levin, Irena; Li, Ke; Sang, Bi-Ching

    2016-07-01

    Cytosolic phospholipases A2 (cPLA2s) consist of a family of calcium-sensitive enzymes that function to generate lipid second messengers through hydrolysis of membrane-associated glycerophospholipids. The GIVD cPLA2 (cPLA2δ) is a potential drug target for developing a selective therapeutic agent for the treatment of psoriasis. Here, we present two X-ray structures of human cPLA2δ, capturing an apo state, and in complex with a substrate-like inhibitor. Comparison of the apo and inhibitor-bound structures reveals conformational changes in a flexible cap that allows the substrate to access the relatively buried active site, providing new insight into the mechanism for substrate recognition. The cPLA2δ structure reveals an unexpected second C2 domain that was previously unrecognized from sequence alignments, placing cPLA2δ into the class of membrane-associated proteins that contain a tandem pair of C2 domains. Furthermore, our structures elucidate novel inter-domain interactions and define three potential calcium-binding sites that are likely important for regulation and activation of enzymatic activity. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing cPLA2's function in signal transduction. PMID:27220631

  2. Perspectives on mycobacterial vacuole-to-cytosol translocation: the importance of cytosolic access.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Roxane; Majlessi, Laleh; Enninga, Jost; Brosch, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the infectious agent of human tuberculosis is a master player in circumventing the defense mechanisms of the host immune system. The host-pathogen interaction in the case of an infection with M. tuberculosis is highly complex, involving dedicated mycobacterial virulence factors as well as the action of the innate and adapted immune systems, which determine the outcome of infection. Macrophages play a key role in this process through internalizing the bacterium in a phagosomal vacuole. While this action has normally the function of eliminating invading bacteria, M. tuberculosis employs efficient strategies to prevent its extermination. The question on how-and-where the bacterium succeeds in doing so has interested generations of scientists and still remains a fascinating and important research subject focused on mycobacterial lipids, secretion systems and other contributing factors. This topic is also central to the longstanding and partially controversial discussion on mycobacterial phagosomal rupture and vacuole-to-cytosol translocation, to be reviewed here in more detail. PMID:27247079

  3. Potential mechanisms of cytosolic calcium modulation in interferon-gamma treated U937 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Jon B.; Mcleish, Kenneth R.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Dean, William L.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) to alter cytoplasmic Ca(2+) content in the monocytelike cell line U937 was investigated, using a slow Ca-channel blocker, diltiazem. In addition, the Ca-ATPase and the Ca-uptake activities were measured in isolated U937 membranes, together with the effect of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) upon the Ca(2+) release from Ca-loaded membranes. The addition of 50 U/ml INF-gamma to U937 cultures was found to increase internal Ca(2+) by about 100 percent within 3 min. The increase was significantly reduced by incubation in Ca-free buffer or by the addition of diltiazem. A crude membrane preparation from U937 cells was found to contain significant amounts of Ca-ATPase activity and to sequester Ca(2+) to a level of 8 nmol/mg in 30 sec; the addition of IP3 induced release of a portion of the sequestered Ca(2+) which was then resequestered. The results suggest that IFN-gamma causes an increase of cytoplasmic Ca(2+), in part, by the IP3-induced release from the internal storage sites and, in part, from the entry of extracellular Ca through slow channels.

  4. Effect of intracellular injection of inositol trisphosphate on cytosolic calcium and membrane currents in Aplysia neurons.

    PubMed

    Levy, S

    1992-06-01

    Pacemaker cells of Aplysia californica display a regular bursting that results from a complex interplay of Ca(2+)-mediated conductances and a continuous influx and extrusion of Ca2+. The effect of the second messenger 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration (Cai) regulation and electrical properties was investigated in identified neurons of the abdominal ganglion (R15, L2-L4, L6). Double-barreled Ca-selective microelectrodes were used to pressure inject InsP3 and measure Cai at the same point. Brief injection of InsP3 resulted in an average increase of Cai of 9.2 +/- 10.0 microM (+/- SE; n = 14) that decayed in about 1 min. The InsP3-induced elevation of Cai increased in a dose-dependent manner and saturated when large amounts of InsP3 were injected. The InsP3-induced Cai increase was the result of mobilization from intracellular stores; Cai could be repeatedly mobilized by InsP3 in cells superfused with 0 Ca artificial seawater for more than 60 min. Following multiple injections of InsP3, there was no evidence of immediate inhibition or facilitation. the spatial nature of the InsP3-induced Cai increase was investigated by moving the double-barreled Ca-selective microelectrode tip in a stepwise manner relative to the membrane surface. The largest InsP3-induced Cai increases were measured in an area 0-80 microns from the membrane surface; some cells had their largest InsP3-induced Cai increase some 120-160 microns away from the membrane. Injection of InsP3 in a bursting neuron induced an immediate train of action potentials followed by membrane hyperpolarization and a decrease in the burst frequency. Injection of InsP3 in voltage-clamped cells induced a biphasic response: a rapid inward current followed by a more prolonged outward current; the temporal overlap of the currents was depth dependent. Injection of InsP3 or Ca2+ from a double-barreled injecting electrode induced currents that were different in waveform and time course, indicating that part of the conductance change induced by InsP3 is direct and not mediated by the mobilized Ca2+. In BAPTA [1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'tetra-acetic acid]-loaded cells, the InsP3-induced inward current was mostly unaffected while the Ca-induced outward current was largely attenuated. The results suggest that InsP3 mobilizes Ca2+ from discrete intracellular compartments and induces distinct changes in membrane currents that seem to be independent of the Cai increase. PMID:1607931

  5. Intracellular Calcium Dysregulation: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Simona; Castaldo, Pasqualina; Macrì, Maria Loredana; Maiolino, Marta; Matteucci, Alessandra; Bastioli, Guendalina; Gratteri, Santo; Lariccia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal loss. AD is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein, which leads to the deposition of amyloid-β plaques within the brain. Together with plaques deposition, the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubules associated protein tau and the formation of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles are a typical neuropathological feature in AD brains. Cellular dysfunctions involving specific subcellular compartments, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), are emerging as crucial players in the pathogenesis of AD, as well as increased oxidative stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Specifically, dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been suggested as a common proximal cause of neural dysfunction in AD. Aberrant calcium signaling has been considered a phenomenon mainly related to the dysfunction of intracellular calcium stores, which can occur in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. This review reports the most recent findings on cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD, with main focus on the control of calcium homeostasis at both cytosolic and mitochondrial level. PMID:27340665

  6. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  8. Pharmacological correction of obesity-induced autophagy arrest using calcium channel blockers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hwan-Woo; Park, Haeli; Semple, Ian A.; Jang, Insook; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Myungjin; Cazares, Victor A.; Stuenkel, Edward L.; Kim, Jung-Jae; Kim, Jeong Sig; Lee, Jun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy deregulation during obesity contributes to the pathogenesis of diverse metabolic disorders. However, without understanding the molecular mechanism of obesity interference in autophagy, development of therapeutic strategies for correcting such defects in obese individuals is challenging. Here we show that chronic increase of cytosolic calcium concentration in hepatocytes upon obesity and lipotoxicity attenuates autophagic flux by preventing the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. As a pharmacological approach to restore cytosolic calcium homeostasis in vivo, we administered the clinically approved calcium channel blocker verapamil to obese mice. Such treatment successfully increases autophagosome-lysosome fusion in liver, preventing accumulation of protein inclusions and lipid droplets and suppressing inflammation and insulin resistance. As calcium channel blockers have been safely used in clinics for the treatment of hypertension for more than thirty years, our results suggest they may be a safe therapeutic option for restoring autophagic flux and treating metabolic pathologies in obese patients. PMID:25189398

  9. Understanding anomalous delays in a model of intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Emily; Kirk, Vivien; Osinga, Hinke M.; Sneyd, James; Wechselberger, Martin

    2010-12-01

    In many cell types, oscillations in the concentration of free intracellular calcium ions are used to control a variety of cellular functions. It has been suggested [J. Sneyd et al., "A method for determining the dependence of calcium oscillations on inositol trisphosphate oscillations," Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 1675-1680 (2006)] that the mechanisms underlying the generation and control of such oscillations can be determined by means of a simple experiment, whereby a single exogenous pulse of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) is applied to the cell. However, more detailed mathematical investigations [M. Domijan et al., "Dynamical probing of the mechanisms underlying calcium oscillations," J. Nonlinear Sci. 16, 483-506 (2006)] have shown that this is not necessarily always true, and that the experimental data are more difficult to interpret than first thought. Here, we use geometric singular perturbation techniques to study the dynamics of models that make different assumptions about the mechanisms underlying the calcium oscillations. In particular, we show how recently developed canard theory for singularly perturbed systems with three or more slow variables [M. Wechselberger, "A propos de canards (Apropos canards)," Preprint, 2010] applies to these calcium models and how the presence of a curve of folded singularities and corresponding canards can result in anomalous delays in the response of these models to a pulse of IP3.

  10. Male–female communication triggers calcium signatures during fertilization in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Denninger, Philipp; Bleckmann, Andrea; Lausser, Andreas; Vogler, Frank; Ott, Thomas; Ehrhardt, David W.; Frommer, Wolf B.; Sprunck, Stefanie; Dresselhaus, Thomas; Grossmann, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Cell–cell communication and interaction is critical during fertilization and triggers free cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyto) as a key signal for egg activation and a polyspermy block in animal oocytes. Fertilization in flowering plants is more complex, involving interaction of a pollen tube with egg adjoining synergid cells, culminating in release of two sperm cells and their fusion with the egg and central cell, respectively. Here, we report the occurrence and role of [Ca2+]cyto signals during the entire double fertilization process in Arabidopsis. [Ca2+]cyto oscillations are initiated in synergid cells after physical contact with the pollen tube apex. In egg and central cells, a short [Ca2+]cyto transient is associated with pollen tube burst and sperm cell arrival. A second extended [Ca2+]cyto transient solely in the egg cell is correlated with successful fertilization. Thus, each female cell type involved in double fertilization displays a characteristic [Ca2+]cyto signature differing by timing and behaviour from [Ca2+]cyto waves reported in mammals. PMID:25145880