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Sample records for d-t graphite tiles

  1. Thermal contact conductance measurements on Doublet III armor tile graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, D.W.; Reis, E.

    1983-12-01

    Several tests were performed on the Doublet III wall armor tiles to determine the cool-down rate and to evaluate improvements made by changing the conditions at the interface between the graphite tile and the stainless steel backing plate. Thermal diffusivity tests were performed in vacuum on both TiC coated and bare graphite tiles with and without 0.13 mm (.005'') thick silver foil at the interface. The results of the armor tile cool-down tests showed improvement when a 0.13 mm (0.005'') silver foil is used at the interface. At 2.1 x 10/sup 5/ Pa (30 psi) contact pressure, the e-folding cool-down times for a TiC coated tile, bare graphite and bare graphite with a 0.06 mm (0.0035'') silver shim were 10 min., 5.0 min., and 4.1 min., respectively. Tests using high contact pressures showed that the cool-down rates converged to approx. 4.0 min. At this limit, the conduction path along the backing plate to the two cooling tubes controls the heat flow, and no further improvement could be expected. Thermal diffusivity measurements confirmed the results of the cool-down test showing that by introducing a silver foil at the interface, the contact conductance between Poco AXF-5Q graphite and 316 stainless steel could be improved by a factor of three to eight. The tests showed an increasing improvement over a range of temperatures from 25/sup 0/C to 400/sup 0/C. The data provides a technical basis for further applications of graphite tiles to cooled backing plates.

  2. On residual gas analysis during high temperature baking of graphite tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, A. A.; Chaudhuri, P.; Khirwadkar, S.; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.; Reddy, D. Chenna; Saxena, Y. C.

    2008-05-01

    Steady-state Super-conducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. It is designed for plasma discharge duration of 1000 seconds to obtain fully steady-state plasma operation. Plasma Facing Components (PFC), consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and poloidal limiters are also designed to be UHV compatible for steady state operation. All PFC are made up of graphite tiles mechanically attached to the copper alloy substrate. Graphite is one of the preferred first wall armour material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number of carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. High temperature vacuum baking of graphite tiles is the standard process to remove the impurities. Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used for qualitative and quantitative measurements of released gases from graphite tiles during baking. Surface Analysis of graphite tiles has also been done before and after baking. This paper describes the residual gas analysis during baking and surface analysis of graphite tiles.

  3. Induced radioactivity of commercial isotropic graphites for high heat flux tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikama, T.; Kayano, H.; Fujitsuka, M.; Tanabe, T.

    1991-03-01

    It used as the plasma-facing material in the next-generation fusion devices, graphite will induce radioactivity in impurities in the graphite. This study was carried out to evaluate the amount of radiologically significant impurities in commercial isotropic graphite tiles. Special attention is given to the benefits of purification by halogen treatment. Graphite tiles from seven Japanese companies were irradiated in JMTR to neutron fluences up to 7.7 × 10 24 n/m 2 fast ( E > 0.1 MeV) and 1 × 10 25 n/m 2 thermal ( E < 0.683 eV) at about 450 K. Subsequent γ-ray spectroscopy revealed that major impurities contributing to the induced radioactivity are the IIId, IVa, Va elements and rare earth elements. The origins of these impurities are suggested and the effects of halogen treatment on the reduction of these impurities are analyzed.

  4. Preload Analysis of Screw Bolt Joints on the First Wall Graphite Tiles in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lei; Song, Yuntao

    2012-09-01

    The first wall in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) used graphite tiles to withstand high thermal energy. The graphite tiles are mounted on the heat sink using screw bolts which have been preloaded to produce a clamp force. The clamp force is very important to keep the graphite tiles tightly on the surface of the heat sink so that the heat flux crosses this contacting surface in a small thermal resistor. Without the clamp force, the small gap between the graphite tiles and the heat sink will make it impossible for thermal power to be carried away by cooling water. Some bolts may even fall off with the loss of clamp force. From the mathematical models, the loss process of the clamp force has been studied. Research results explain how the different thermal expansions of three members of the screw joint makes the clamp force decrease to zero under temperature rise and external force, and how the stiffness affects the relation between the clamp force and temperature. The research also gives the critical temperature at which the clamp force can remain above zero. Analysis results indicate that the current screw joints are almost destined to lose their clamp force during the running time of EAST, so the bolt joints should be redesigned in order to improve its reliability.

  5. Surface characterization of TFTR first wall graphite tiles used during DT operations

    SciTech Connect

    Paffett, M. T.; Willms, R. S.; Gentile, C.; Skinner, C.

    2001-01-01

    Surface characterization studies were performed on graphite tiles used as first wall materials during DT operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. These ex situ analysis studies revealed a number of interesting and unexpected features. In this work we examined the spatial and (where possible) the depth distribution of impurity species deposited onto the plasma facing surfaces using Xray Photo-electron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS).

  6. Spectroscopic study of energetic helium-ion irradiation effects on nuclear graphite tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Wan; Lee, K. W.; Choi, D. M.; Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-02-01

    Helium ion-irradiation effects on the nuclear graphite tiles were studied in order to understand the structural modifications and damages that can be produced by fusion reaction in tokamaks. The surface morphological changes due to increasing dose of the irradiation were examined by the field-effect scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy elucidated the changes in the shallow surface bonding configurations caused by the energetic irradiation. Raman spectroscopy revealed the structural defects and diamond-like carbon sites that increased with increasing irradiation dose, and the average inter-defect distance was found from the Raman peak intensities as a function of the irradiation dose.

  7. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from graphite cylinders irradiated with D-T neutrons for validation of evaluated nuclear data.

    PubMed

    Luo, F; Han, R; Chen, Z; Nie, Y; Shi, F; Zhang, S; Lin, W; Ren, P; Tian, G; Sun, Q; Gou, B; Ruan, X; Ren, J; Ye, M

    2016-10-01

    A benchmark experiment for validation of graphite data evaluated from nuclear data libraries was conducted for 14MeV neutrons irradiated on graphite cylinder samples. The experiments were performed using the benchmark experimental facility at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from the surface of graphite (Φ13cm×20cm) at 60° and 120° and graphite (Φ13cm×2cm) at 60° were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. The obtained results were compared with the measurements made by the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with the ENDF/B-VII.1, CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. The results obtained from a 20cm-thick sample revealed that the calculation results with CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries showed good agreements with the experiments conducted in the whole energy region. However, a large discrepancy of approximately 40% was observed below the 3MeV energy region with the ENDF/B-VII.1 library. For the 2cm-thick sample, the calculated results obtained from the abovementioned three libraries could not reproduce the experimental data in the energy range of 5-7MeV. The graphite data in CENDL-3.1 were verified for the first time and were proved to be reliable. PMID:27620063

  8. Molecular random tilings as glasses

    PubMed Central

    Garrahan, Juan P.; Stannard, Andrew; Blunt, Matthew O.; Beton, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that p-terphenyl-3,5,3′,5′-tetracarboxylic acid adsorbed on graphite self-assembles into a two-dimensional rhombus random tiling. This tiling is close to ideal, displaying long-range correlations punctuated by sparse localized tiling defects. In this article we explore the analogy between dynamic arrest in this type of random tilings and that of structural glasses. We show that the structural relaxation of these systems is via the propagation–reaction of tiling defects, giving rise to dynamic heterogeneity. We study the scaling properties of the dynamics and discuss connections with kinetically constrained models of glasses. PMID:19720990

  9. Efficient Tiled Loop Generation: D-Tiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daegon; Rajopadhye, Sanjay

    Tiling is an important loop optimization for exposing coarse-grained parallelism and enhancing data locality. Tiled loop generation from an arbitrarily shaped polyhedron is a well studied problem. Except for the special case of a rectangular iteration space, the tiled loop generation problem has been long believed to require heavy machinery such as Fourier-Motzkin elimination and projection, and hence to have an exponential complexity. In this paper we propose a simple and efficient tiled loop generation technique similar to that for a rectangular iteration space. In our technique, each loop bound is adjusted only once, syntactically and independently. Therefore, our algorithm runs linearly with the number of loop bounds. Despite its simplicity, we retain several advantages of recent tiled code generation schemes - unified generation for fixed, parameterized and hybrid tiled loops, scalability for multi-level tiled loop generation with the ability to separate full tiles at any levels, and compact code. We also explore various schemes for multi-level tiled loop generation. We formally prove the correctness of our scheme and experimentally validate that the efficiency of our technique is comparable to existing parameterized tiled loop generation approaches. Our experimental results also show that multi-level tiled loop generation schemes have an impact on performance of generated code. The fact that our scheme can be implemented without sophisticated machinery makes it well suited for autotuners and production compilers.

  10. Preassembly Of Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izu, Y. D.; Yoshioka, E. N.; Rosario, T.

    1988-01-01

    Concept for preassembling high-temperature insulating tiles speeds and simplifies installation and repair and reduces damage from handling. Preassembly concept facilitates placement of tiles on gently contoured surfaces as well as on flat ones. Tiles bonded to nylon mesh with room-temperature-vulcanizing silicon rubber. Spacing between tiles is 0.03 in. Applications include boilers, kilns, and furnaces.

  11. Interlocking wettable ceramic tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Tabereaux, Jr., Alton T.; Fredrickson, Guy L.; Groat, Eric; Mroz, Thomas; Ulicny, Alan; Walker, Mark F.

    2005-03-08

    An electrolytic cell for the reduction of aluminum having a layer of interlocking cathode tiles positioned on a cathode block. Each tile includes a main body and a vertical restraining member to prevent movement of the tiles away from the cathode block during operation of the cell. The anode of the electrolytic cell may be positioned about 1 inch from the interlocking cathode tiles.

  12. Brazing graphite to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, George R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of virtually graphite.

  13. Handmade Tile Mosaics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Just like the classroom, children's outdoor environments should be filled with artistic creations that add sparkle and imagination to the space. One of the author's favorite ways to add art to the outdoors is by installing a mosaic mural of child-made tiles. The process of making the tiles is fun for all; each tile is a charming work of art in…

  14. Rewaterproofing Silica Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lleger, L. J.; Wade, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Waterproofing agent, vaporized in bubbler transported by gas flowing in system and deposits in pores of tiles. Vapor carried through hole of approximately 1/16 inch (1.6.mm) diameter made in tile coating. Technique used to waterproof buildups (concrete and brick) and possibly fabrics.

  15. Penrose tilings as model sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutov, A. V.; Maleev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The Baake construction, based on generating a set of vertices of Penrose tilings as a model set, is refined. An algorithm and a corresponding computer program for constructing an uncountable set of locally indistinguishable Penrose tilings are developed proceeding from this refined construction. Based on an analysis of the parameters of tiling vertices, 62 versions of rhomb combinations at the tiling center are determined. The combinatorial structure of Penrose tiling worms is established. A concept of flip transformations of tilings is introduced that makes it possible to construct Penrose tilings that cannot be implemented in the Baake construction.

  16. Voronoi spiral tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshikazu; Sushida, Takamichi; Hizume, Akio

    2015-04-01

    The parameter set of Voronoi spiral tilings gives a dual of van Iterson's bifurcation diagram for phyllotactic spirals. We study the Voronoi tilings for the Bernoulli spiral site sets, as the simplest spirals in the centric representation with similarity symmetry. Their parameter set is composed of a family of real algebraic curves in the complex plane, with the Farey sequence structure. This naturally extends to the parameter set for multiple tilings, i.e., the tilings of the covering spaces of the punctured plane. We show the denseness of the parameters z = reiθ for quadrilateral Voronoi spiral multiple tilings. The techniques of dynamical systems are applied to the group of similarity symmetry. The parastichy numbers and the distortion of the Voronoi regions depend on the rational approximations of θ/2π. We consider the limit set of the shapes of the quadrilateral tiles by taking the limit as r → 1, with θ fixed. If θ/2π is a quadratic irrational number, then the limit set is a finite set of rectangles. In particular, if θ/2π is linearly equivalent to the golden section, then the limit is the square.

  17. Tiling Motion Patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-05-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a non-trivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly-complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieved the level of complexity far beyond the current state-of-the-art animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions. PMID:23669532

  18. Tiling motion patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-11-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a nontrivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieve the level of interaction complexity far beyond the current state of the art that animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions. PMID:24029911

  19. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  20. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Davis Austin

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons), 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)

  1. Quasiperiodic tilings generated by matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Nagaraja S.; Suryanarayan, E. R.

    1994-02-01

    Using the inflation method, Watanabe, Ito and Soma [3], Clark and Suryanarayan [4] and Balagurusamy, Ramesh and Gopal [5] have obtained nonperiodic tilings of the plane with n-fold rotational symmetry, n = 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, using two unit prototiles. Fortunately, there is an easier way to generate a more general class of nonperiodic tilings which contains the above-mentioned tilings as special cases. We do this by specifying two matrices of order two which define the two classes of tilings; thus, our approach uses the basic techniques from linear algebra in the study of quasiperiodic tilings and the method can be generalized to obtain tilings that have more than two prototiles. The tilings generated are fractals and their dimensions and the rate of growth are determined.

  2. GRAPHITE EXTRUSIONS

    DOEpatents

    Benziger, T.M.

    1959-01-20

    A new lubricant for graphite extrusion is described. In the past, graphite extrusion mixtures have bcen composed of coke or carbon black, together with a carbonaceous binder such as coal tar pitch, and a lubricant such as petrolatum or a colloidal suspension of graphite in glycerin or oil. Sinee sueh a lubricant is not soluble in, or compatible with the biiider liquid, such mixtures were difficult to extrude, and thc formed pieees lacked strength. This patent teaches tbe use of fatty acids as graphite extrusion lubricants and definite improvemcnts are realized thereby since the fatty acids are soluble in the binder liquid.

  3. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more » 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)« less

  4. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascosa, Luis A. M.; Facio, Dario S.; Mosquera, Maria J.

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a ‘green’ product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  5. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Luis A M; Facio, Dario S; Mosquera, Maria J

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a 'green' product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating. PMID:26854839

  6. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, B.

    1995-04-11

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow there between. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow. 8 figures.

  7. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Blake

    1995-01-01

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow therebetween. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow.

  8. Covering the Plane with Rep-Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnaugh, Linda S.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use geometric figures, rep-tiles, to design a tile floor. Rep-tiles are geometric figures of which copies can fit together to form a larger similar figure. Includes reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  9. Tiles for Reo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab, Farhad; Bruni, Roberto; Clarke, Dave; Lanese, Ivan; Montanari, Ugo

    Reo is an exogenous coordination model for software components. The informal semantics of Reo has been matched by several proposals of formalization, exploiting co-algebraic techniques, constraint-automata, and coloring tables. We aim to show that the Tile Model offers a flexible and adequate semantic setting for Reo, such that: (i) it is able to capture context-aware behavior; (ii) it is equipped with a natural notion of behavioral equivalence which is compositional; (iii) it offers a uniform setting for representing not only the ordinary execution of Reo systems but also dynamic reconfiguration strategies.

  10. Kinetics of DNA tile dimerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-06-24

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile-tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency. PMID:24794259

  11. Repairing high-temperature glazed tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M.; Schomburg, C.

    1981-01-01

    Tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) mixture fills chips and cracks in glazed tile surface. Filler is made by mixing hydrolyzed TEOS, silicon tetraboride powder, and pulverized tile material. Repaired tiles survived testing by intense acoustic emissions, arc jets, and intense heat radiation. Repair is reliable and rapid, performed in 1-1 1/2 hours with tile in any or orientation.

  12. Lozenge Tilings and Hurwitz Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    We give a new proof of the fact that, near a turning point of the frozen boundary, the vertical tiles in a uniformly random lozenge tiling of a large sawtooth domain are distributed like the eigenvalues of a GUE random matrix. Our argument uses none of the standard tools of integrable probability. In their place, it uses a combinatorial interpretation of the Harish-Chandra/Itzykson-Zuber integral as a generating function for desymmetrized Hurwitz numbers.

  13. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Horton, L. D.; Challis, C. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Batistoni, P. [EURATOM Collaboration: EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-21

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ∼40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1.

  14. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Challis, C. D.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Sharapov, S. E.; Batistoni, P.; Horton, L. D.; Zastrow, K.-D.; EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-01

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ˜40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1.

  15. Image Composition Engine for Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, Kenneth

    2011-08-22

    The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. It is designed to be used in parallel applications requiring rendering. The primary purpose of IceT is to be integrated into parallel visualization applications such as ParaView to provide parallel rendering capabilities. The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. IceT uses a "sort-Iasf' approach to rendering. Each process in a parallel application independently renders a local piece of geometry. The resulting images are given to IceT, and IceT combines the images together to form a single cohesive image. Ice T is also capable of driving tiled displays, largeformat displays comprising an array of smaller displays. To this end IceT can collect the smaller tile images and organize them such that the entire tiled display can be driven. Ice T takes advantage of spatial coherence in geometry by identifying empty regions of the display and reducing the overall required work.

  16. Image Composition Engine for Tiles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-08-22

    The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. It is designed to be used in parallel applications requiring rendering. The primary purpose of IceT is to be integrated into parallel visualization applications such as ParaView to provide parallel rendering capabilities. The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. IceT uses a "sort-Iasf' approach to rendering. Each process in a parallel application independently rendersmore » a local piece of geometry. The resulting images are given to IceT, and IceT combines the images together to form a single cohesive image. Ice T is also capable of driving tiled displays, largeformat displays comprising an array of smaller displays. To this end IceT can collect the smaller tile images and organize them such that the entire tiled display can be driven. Ice T takes advantage of spatial coherence in geometry by identifying empty regions of the display and reducing the overall required work.« less

  17. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  18. Surface analysis of 1984/85 TFTR limiter tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Pontau, A.E.; Wampler, W.R.; Mills, B.E.; Doyle, B.L.; Wright, A.F.; Ulrickson, M.A.; LaMarche, P.H.; Dylla, H.F.; Fukuda, S.

    1985-01-01

    Bare POCO AXF-5Q graphite titles were installed as the plasma-facing surface of the TFTR movable limiter for a series of approx.2700 high power discharges (600 with up to 6 MW neutral beams). During this operating phase, erosion and deposition processes modified the surface of the limiter. In the regions of the most intense plasma contact, which reached temperatures over 2400C, only small amounts of metallic impurities (<5 x 10 W atoms/cmS) are observed during subsequent beta backscattering and proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Also observed in these regions are several small areas of surface crazing, and scattered droplets of metals (approx.1 mm diameter) presumed to originate from melted internal hardware. In regions more removed from direct plasma contact, thicker metallic deposits are observed (approx.2 x 10 Y atoms/cmS). Surface roughness measured outside the intense plasma contact region is much more than the original POCO AXF-5Q graphite whereas within the plasma contact region, tile surfaces are somewhat smoother than they were initially. Two of the tiles in high heat flux regions broke during operation. The resulting geometry change led to areas of enhanced erosion and nearby redeposition of carbon. 5 figs.

  19. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, James G. R.; Frame, Barbara J.

    2012-01-02

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  20. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, James G. R. [Oak Ridge, TN; Frame, Barbara J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-12-14

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  1. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  2. Coherent fluctuations in the initial TFTR D-T experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Chang, Z.Y.; Budny, R.V.

    1995-03-01

    The initial operation of TFTR with approximately equal power in the tritium and deuterium neutral beam injectors has resulted in the production of fusion power in excess of 9MW and central {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 0.25%. This {beta}{sub {alpha}} is within a factor of 2--3 of the {beta}{sub {alpha}} in projections of ITER performance. Effects of this {alpha} population on TAE modes, sawteeth and fishbone activity are being searched for. The D-T plasmas are also being studied for evidence of changes in MHD activity which might be attributed to the fast {alpha} population. This paper reports on the activity in the Alfven range of frequencies in the D-T plasmas and on detailed measurements of the MHD activity preceding major disruptions in D-D and D-T.

  3. Algebraic properties of basic isohedral marked tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Gabriele H.

    2006-05-01

    In 1977 Grünbaum and Shephard described all possible 93 types of isohedral marked tilings of the plane; 46 of them are called basic, since their induced tile group is trivial. The aim of this paper is to give an algebraic description of all basic tilings. A purely algebraic characterization of the adjacency symmetries of tiles of the 46 basic tilings is presented. Moreover, 46 related abstract definitions of two-dimensional crystallographic groups supplement and extend those of the well-known book Generators and Relations for Discrete Groups by Coxeter and Moser.

  4. Surface analysis of 1984/1985 Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor limiter tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Pontau, A.E.; Wampler, W.R.; Mills, B.E.; Doyle, B.L.; Wright, A.F.; Ulrickson, M.A.; LaMarche, P.H.; Dylla, H.F.; Fukuda, S.

    1986-05-01

    Bare POCO AXF-5Q graphite tiles were installed as the plasma-facing surface of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) movable limiter for a series of approx. 2700 high power discharges (600 with up to 6 MW neutral beams). During this operating phase, erosion and deposition processes modified the surface of the limiter. In the regions of the most intense plasma contact, which reached temperatures over 2400/sup 0/C, only small amounts of metallic impurities (<5 x 10/sup 16/ atoms/cm/sup 2/) are observed during subsequent beta backscattering and proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Also observed in these regions are several small areas of surface crazing, and scattered droplets of metals (approx. 1 mm diam) presumed to originate from melted internal hardware. In regions more removed from direct plasma contact, thicker metallic deposits are observed (approx. 2 x 10/sup 18/ atoms/cm/sup 2/). There are more of these deposits on the side facing the electron drift direction than on the ion drift side. The metallic deposits are composed of approx. 55% Ni, 25% Cr, and 20% Fe and several trace elements. Near-surface retained deuterium levels vary from 10/sup 16/ to 10/sup 18//cm/sup 2/ along one ion-side/electron-side pair of tiles. Deuterium from TFTR operations in the bulk of a tile may have been as much as 5 ppm. Hydrogen in the tile was approx.1 at. %. Surface roughness measured outside the intense plasma contact region is much more than the original POCO AXF-5Q graphite, whereas within the plasma contact region, tile surfaces are somewhat smoother than they were initially. Two of the tiles in high heat flux regions broke during operation. The resulting geometry change led to areas of enhanced erosion and nearby redeposition of carbon.

  5. Fractal tiles associated with shift radix systems.

    PubMed

    Berthé, Valérie; Siegel, Anne; Steiner, Wolfgang; Surer, Paul; Thuswaldner, Jörg M

    2011-01-15

    Shift radix systems form a collection of dynamical systems depending on a parameter r which varies in the d-dimensional real vector space. They generalize well-known numeration systems such as beta-expansions, expansions with respect to rational bases, and canonical number systems. Beta-numeration and canonical number systems are known to be intimately related to fractal shapes, such as the classical Rauzy fractal and the twin dragon. These fractals turned out to be important for studying properties of expansions in several settings. In the present paper we associate a collection of fractal tiles with shift radix systems. We show that for certain classes of parameters r these tiles coincide with affine copies of the well-known tiles associated with beta-expansions and canonical number systems. On the other hand, these tiles provide natural families of tiles for beta-expansions with (non-unit) Pisot numbers as well as canonical number systems with (non-monic) expanding polynomials. We also prove basic properties for tiles associated with shift radix systems. Indeed, we prove that under some algebraic conditions on the parameter r of the shift radix system, these tiles provide multiple tilings and even tilings of the d-dimensional real vector space. These tilings turn out to have a more complicated structure than the tilings arising from the known number systems mentioned above. Such a tiling may consist of tiles having infinitely many different shapes. Moreover, the tiles need not be self-affine (or graph directed self-affine). PMID:24068835

  6. Preparation of graphitic articles

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Nemer, Martin; Weigle, John C.

    2010-05-11

    Graphitic structures have been prepared by exposing templates (metal, metal-coated ceramic, graphite, for example) to a gaseous mixture that includes hydrocarbons and oxygen. When the template is metal, subsequent acid treatment removes the metal to yield monoliths, hollow graphitic structures, and other products. The shapes of the coated and hollow graphitic structures mimic the shapes of the templates.

  7. Beautiful math, part 2: aesthetic patterns based on fractal tilings.

    PubMed

    Peichang Ouyang; Fathauer, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    A fractal tiling (f-tiling) is a tiling whose boundary is fractal. This article presents two families of rare, infinitely many f-tilings. Each f-tiling is constructed by reducing tiles by a fixed scaling factor, using a single prototile, which is a segment of a regular polygon. The authors designed invariant mappings to automatically produce appealing seamless, colored patterns from such tilings. PMID:24808170

  8. Developing tiled projection display systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Paris, J.; Stevens, R. L.

    2000-06-08

    Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing high-resolution semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation [EVL, PowerWall]. In this way, they complement other technologies such as the CAVE [Cruz-Niera92] or ImmersaDesk, [Czernuszenko97], which by design give up pure resolution in favor of width of view and stereo. However, the largest impact may well be in using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building ''information'' or ''active'' spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows [IPSI, Childers00, Raskar98, ROME, Stanford, UNC]. These environments may prove to be the ultimate successor of the desktop metaphor for information technology work.

  9. Geometrical tile design for complex neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Czeizler, Eugen; Kari, Lila

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has showed that tile systems are one of the most suitable theoretical frameworks for the spatial study and modeling of self-assembly processes, such as the formation of DNA and protein oligomeric structures. A Wang tile is a unit square, with glues on its edges, attaching to other tiles and forming larger and larger structures. Although quite intuitive, the idea of glues placed on the edges of a tile is not always natural for simulating the interactions occurring in some real systems. For example, when considering protein self-assembly, the shape of a protein is the main determinant of its functions and its interactions with other proteins. Our goal is to use geometric tiles, i.e., square tiles with geometrical protrusions on their edges, for simulating tiled paths (zippers) with complex neighborhoods, by ribbons of geometric tiles with simple, local neighborhoods. This paper is a step toward solving the general case of an arbitrary neighborhood, by proposing geometric tile designs that solve the case of a "tall" von Neumann neighborhood, the case of the f-shaped neighborhood, and the case of a 3 x 5 "filled" rectangular neighborhood. The techniques can be combined and generalized to solve the problem in the case of any neighborhood, centered at the tile of reference, and included in a 3 x (2k + 1) rectangle. PMID:19956398

  10. Geometrical Tile Design for Complex Neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Czeizler, Eugen; Kari, Lila

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has showed that tile systems are one of the most suitable theoretical frameworks for the spatial study and modeling of self-assembly processes, such as the formation of DNA and protein oligomeric structures. A Wang tile is a unit square, with glues on its edges, attaching to other tiles and forming larger and larger structures. Although quite intuitive, the idea of glues placed on the edges of a tile is not always natural for simulating the interactions occurring in some real systems. For example, when considering protein self-assembly, the shape of a protein is the main determinant of its functions and its interactions with other proteins. Our goal is to use geometric tiles, i.e., square tiles with geometrical protrusions on their edges, for simulating tiled paths (zippers) with complex neighborhoods, by ribbons of geometric tiles with simple, local neighborhoods. This paper is a step toward solving the general case of an arbitrary neighborhood, by proposing geometric tile designs that solve the case of a “tall” von Neumann neighborhood, the case of the f-shaped neighborhood, and the case of a 3 × 5 “filled” rectangular neighborhood. The techniques can be combined and generalized to solve the problem in the case of any neighborhood, centered at the tile of reference, and included in a 3 × (2k + 1) rectangle. PMID:19956398

  11. Shuttle Upgrade Program: Tile TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Stewart, David A.; DiFiore, Robert; Irby, Ed; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the areas where the thermal protection system on the Space Shuttle Orbiter could be improved is the RSI (Reusable Surface Insulation) tile. The improvement would be in damage resistance that would reduce the resultant maintenance and inspection required. It has performed very well in every other aspect. Improving the system's damage resistance has been the subject of much research over the past several years. One of the results of that research was a new system developed for damage prone areas on the orbiter (i.e., base heat shield). That system, designated as TUFI, Toughened Uni-Piece Fibrous Insulation, was successfully demonstrated as an experiment on the Orbiter and is now baselined for the base heat shield. This paper describes the results of a current research program to further improve the TUFI tile system, thus making it applicable to more areas on the orbiter. The way to remove the current limitations of the TUFI system (i.e., weight or thermal conductivity differences between it and the baseline tile (LI-900)) is to improve the characteristics of LI-900 or AETB-8. Specifically this paper describes the results of two efforts. The first shows performance data of an improved LI-900 system involving the application of TUFI and the second describes data that shows a reduced difference in thermal conductivity between the advanced TUFI substrate (AETB-8) now used on the orbiter and LI-900.

  12. Development of a nondestructive vibration technique for bond assessment of Space Shuttle tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moslehy, Faissal A.

    1994-01-01

    This final report describes the achievements of the above titled project. The project is funded by NASA-KSC (Grant No. NAG 10-0117) for the period of 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1993. The purpose of this project was to develop a nondestructive, noncontact technique based on 'vibration signature' of tile systems to quantify the bond conditions of the thermal protection system) tiles of Space Shuttle orbiters. The technique uses a laser rapid scan system, modal measurements, and finite element modeling. Finite element models were developed for tiles bonded to both clamped and deformable integrated skin-stringer orbiter mid-fuselage. Results showed that the size and location of a disbonded tile can be determined from frequency and mode shape information. Moreover, a frequency response survey was used to quickly identify the disbonded tiles. The finite element results were compared with experimentally determined frequency responses of a 17-tile test panel, where a rapidscan laser system was employed. An excellent degree of correlation between the mathematical simulation and experimental results was realized. An inverse solution for single-tile assemblies was also derived and is being implemented into a computer program that can interact with the modal testing software. The output of the program displays the size and location of disbond. This program has been tested with simulated input (i.e., finite element data), and excellent agreement between predicted and simulated disbonds was shown. Finally, laser vibration imaging and acoustic emission techniques were shown to be well suited for detecting and monitoring the progressive damage in Graphite/Epoxy composite materials.

  13. Development of a nondestructive vibration technique for bond assessment of Space Shuttle tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehy, Faissal A.

    1994-02-01

    This final report describes the achievements of the above titled project. The project is funded by NASA-KSC (Grant No. NAG 10-0117) for the period of 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1993. The purpose of this project was to develop a nondestructive, noncontact technique based on 'vibration signature' of tile systems to quantify the bond conditions of the thermal protection system) tiles of Space Shuttle orbiters. The technique uses a laser rapid scan system, modal measurements, and finite element modeling. Finite element models were developed for tiles bonded to both clamped and deformable integrated skin-stringer orbiter mid-fuselage. Results showed that the size and location of a disbonded tile can be determined from frequency and mode shape information. Moreover, a frequency response survey was used to quickly identify the disbonded tiles. The finite element results were compared with experimentally determined frequency responses of a 17-tile test panel, where a rapidscan laser system was employed. An excellent degree of correlation between the mathematical simulation and experimental results was realized. An inverse solution for single-tile assemblies was also derived and is being implemented into a computer program that can interact with the modal testing software. The output of the program displays the size and location of disbond. This program has been tested with simulated input (i.e., finite element data), and excellent agreement between predicted and simulated disbonds was shown. Finally, laser vibration imaging and acoustic emission techniques were shown to be well suited for detecting and monitoring the progressive damage in Graphite/Epoxy composite materials.

  14. Programmable DNA tile self-assembly using a hierarchical sub-tile strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Lu, Wei; Wang, Zhiyu; Pan, Linqiang; Cui, Guangzhao; Xu, Jin; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2014-02-01

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides a bottom-up approach to construct desired nanostructures. DNA tiles have been directly constructed from ssDNA and readily self-assembled into 2D lattices and 3D superstructures. However, for more complex lattice designs including algorithmic assemblies requiring larger tile sets, a more modular approach could prove useful. This paper reports a new DNA ‘sub-tile’ strategy to easily create whole families of programmable tiles. Here, we demonstrate the stability and flexibility of our sub-tile structures by constructing 3-, 4- and 6-arm DNA tiles that are subsequently assembled into 2D lattices and 3D nanotubes according to a hierarchical design. Assembly of sub-tiles, tiles, and superstructures was analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. DNA tile self-assembly methods provide a bottom-up approach to create desired nanostructures; the sub-tile strategy adds a useful new layer to this technique. Complex units can be made from simple parts. The sub-tile approach enables the rapid redesign and prototyping of complex DNA tile sets and tiles with asymmetric designs.

  15. D-T Neutron Skyshine Experiments at JAERI/FNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Ochiai, Kentaro; Yoshida, Shigeo; Tanaka, Ryohei; Wakisaka, Masashi; Nakao, Makoto; Sato, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Michinori; Hori, Jun-Ichi; Takahashi, Akito; Kaneko, Jun-Ichi; Sawamura, Teruko

    The D-T neutron skyshine experiments have been carried out at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) of JAERI with the neutron yield of ˜1.7×1011n/s. The concrete thickness of the roof and the wall of a FNS target room are 1.15 and 2 m, respectively. The FNS skyshine port with a size of 0.9 × 0.9 m2 was open during the experimental period.The radiation dose rate outside the target room was measured as far as about 550 m away from the D-T target point with a spherical rem-counter. The highest neutron dose was about 0.5 μSv/hr at a distance of 30 m from the D-T target point and the dose rate was attenuated to 0.002 μSv/hr at a distance of 550 m. The measured neutron dose distribution was analyzed with Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B and a simple line source model. The MCNP calculation overestimates the neutron dose in the distance range larger than 250 m. The neutron spectra were evaluated with a 3He detector with different thickness of polyethylene neutron moderators. Secondary gamma-rays were measured with high purity Ge detectors and NaI scintillation detectors.

  16. Optimizing Tile Concentrations to Minimize Errors and Time for DNA Tile Self-assembly Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ho-Lin; Kao, Ming-Yang

    DNA tile self-assembly has emerged as a rich and promising primitive for nano-technology. This paper studies the problems of minimizing assembly time and error rate by changing the tile concentrations because changing the tile concentrations is easy to implement in actual lab experiments. We prove that setting the concentration of tile T i proportional to the square root of N i where N i is the number of times T i appears outside the seed structure in the final assembled shape minimizes the rate of growth errors for rectilinear tile systems. We also show that the same concentrations minimize the expected assembly time for a feasible class of tile systems. Moreover, for general tile systems, given tile concentrations, we can approximate the expected assembly time with high accuracy and probability by running only a polynomial number of simulations in the size of the target shape.

  17. Fast Glazing of Alumina/Silica Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creedon, J. F.; Gzowski, E. R.; Wheeler, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for applying ceramic coating to fibrous silica/alumina insulation tiles prevents cracks and substantially reduces firing time. To reduce thermal stresses in tile being coated, high-temperature, shorttime firing schedule implemented. Such schedule allows coating to mature while substrate remains at relatively low temperature, reducing stress differential between coating and substrate. Technique used to repair tiles with damaged coatings and possibly used in heat-treating objects made of materials having different thermal-expansion coefficients.

  18. Multilayer Impregnated Fibrous Thermal Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Szalai, Christine e.; Hsu, Ming-ta; Carroll, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    The term "secondary polymer layered impregnated tile" ("SPLIT") denotes a type of ablative composite-material thermal- insulation tiles having engineered, spatially non-uniform compositions. The term "secondary" refers to the fact that each tile contains at least two polymer layers wherein endothermic reactions absorb considerable amounts of heat, thereby helping to prevent overheating of an underlying structure. These tiles were invented to afford lighter-weight alternatives to the reusable thermal-insulation materials heretofore variously used or considered for use in protecting the space shuttles and other spacecraft from intense atmospheric-entry heating.

  19. C∗-algebras of Penrose hyperbolic tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyono-Oyono, Hervé; Petite, Samuel

    2011-02-01

    Penrose hyperbolic tilings are tilings of the hyperbolic plane which admit, up to affine transformations a finite number of prototiles. In this paper, we give a complete description of the C∗-algebras and of the K-theory for such tilings. Since the continuous hull of these tilings have no transversally invariant measure, these C∗-algebras are traceless. Nevertheless, harmonic currents give rise to 3-cyclic cocycles and we discuss in this setting a higher-order version of the gap-labeling.

  20. Global Swath and Gridded Data Tiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Charles K.

    2012-01-01

    This software generates cylindrically projected tiles of swath-based or gridded satellite data for the purpose of dynamically generating high-resolution global images covering various time periods, scaling ranges, and colors called "tiles." It reconstructs a global image given a set of tiles covering a particular time range, scaling values, and a color table. The program is configurable in terms of tile size, spatial resolution, format of input data, location of input data (local or distributed), number of processes run in parallel, and data conditioning.

  1. Castellated tiles as the beam-facing components for the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzo, S.; Cervaro, V.; Dalla Palma, M.; Delogu, R.; De Muri, M.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pimazzoni, A.; Rizzolo, A.; Tollin, M.; Zampieri, L.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations and experimental tests carried out to assess the feasibility and suitability of graphite castellated tiles as beam-facing component in the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from Radio frequency plasma). The results indicate that this concept could be a reliable, although less performing, alternative for the present design based on carbon fiber composite tiles, as it provides thermal measurements on the required spatial scale.

  2. Castellated tiles as the beam-facing components for the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, S; Cervaro, V; Dalla Palma, M; Delogu, R; De Muri, M; Fasolo, D; Franchin, L; Pasqualotto, R; Pimazzoni, A; Rizzolo, A; Tollin, M; Zampieri, L; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations and experimental tests carried out to assess the feasibility and suitability of graphite castellated tiles as beam-facing component in the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from Radio frequency plasma). The results indicate that this concept could be a reliable, although less performing, alternative for the present design based on carbon fiber composite tiles, as it provides thermal measurements on the required spatial scale. PMID:26932097

  3. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  4. Parametric Multi-Level Tiling of Imperfectly Nested Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, Albert; Baskaran, Muthu M.; Bastoul, Cedric; Cohen, Albert; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Norris, Boyana; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-05-18

    Tiling is a critical loop transformation for generating high-performance code on modern architectures. Efficient generation of multilevel tiled code is essential to exploit several levels of parallelism and/or to maximize data reuse in deep memory hierarchies. Tiled loops with parameterized tile sizes (not compile time constants) facilitate runtime feedback and dynamic optimizations used in iterative compilation and automatic tuning. The existing parametric multilevel tiling approach has focused on transformation for perfectly nested loops, where all assignment statements are contained inside the innermost loop of a loop nest. Previous solutions to tiling for imperfect loop nests are limited to the case where tile sizes are fixed. In this paper, we present an approach to parameterized multilevel tiling for imperfectly nested loops. Our tiling algorithm generates loops that iterate over full rectangular tiles that are amenable for potential compiler optimizations such as register tiling. Experimental results using a number of computational benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of our tiling approach.

  5. Thermal Characterization of TPS Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kacmar, C. J.; LaCivita, K. J.; Jata, K. V.; Sathish, S.

    2006-03-06

    The Thermal Protection System (TPS) used on space shuttles protects the metallic structure from the large amounts of heat created during travel through the atmosphere, both on takeoff and reentry. The shuttle experiences high thermo-acoustic loading and impact damage from micro-meteorites, which can cause disbonds, delaminations, chips, cracks, and other defects to the TPS system. To enhance durability and damage tolerance, new TPS tiles with an added protective ceramic-matrix-composite layer are being developed. This paper explores the use of pulsed thermography as a quick, diverse, non-destructive technique, to characterize the TPS system. The pulsed thermography images obtained are presented and analyzed.

  6. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  7. Overview of D-T results from TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; McGuire, K.M.; Arunasalam, V.

    1995-10-01

    Experiments with plasmas having nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. To date, the maximum fusion power has been 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-{beta}{sub p} discharge following a current ramp-down. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma has reached 2.8 MWm{sup {minus}3}, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITTER). The energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, is observed to increase in D-T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the n{sub i}(O){center_dot}{tau}{sub E} product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-{beta}{sub p} discharges. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP simulations assuming classical confinement. Measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from helium gas puffing experiments. The loss of energetic alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed. ICRF heating of a D-T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. D-T experiments on TFTR will continue both to explore the physics underlying the ITER design and to examine some of the physics issues associated with an advanced tokamak reactor.

  8. Shaving Ceramic Tiles To Final Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Ernest

    1992-01-01

    Combination of template and routing tool cuts ceramic tiles to final dimensions. Template guides router along precisely defined planes to accurately and uniformly shave chamfers on edge of tiles. Legs of template temporarily bonded to workpiece by double-backed adhesive tape. Adaptable to in-situ final machining of other nominally flat, narrow surfaces.

  9. Bonding Heat-Resistant Fabric to Tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Smiser, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Acid etching, densification, and silica cement ensure strong bond. Key step in preparation for bonding to glazed tile is etching quartz fabric and tile with acid. This increases adhesion of silica cement used to form bond. Procedures use high-temperature materials exclusively and therefore suitable for securing flexible seals and heat barriers around doors and viewing ports in furnaces and kilns.

  10. Wind-Resistant Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellavia, J.; Quigley, I. A.; Callahan, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    Filler developed for gaps between insulating tiles on Space Shuttle finds application in industries that use tiles for thermal or environmental protection. Filler consists of tight-fitting ceramic tubes and fibrous alumina. Combination resists high wind loads while providing requisite heat protection. Quartz-thread stitching holds envelope together.

  11. Fibonacci words, hyperbolic tilings and grossone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margenstern, Maurice

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we study the contribution of the theory of grossone to the study of infinite Fibonacci words, combining this tool with the help of a particular tiling of the hyperbolic plane: the tiling { 7, 3 } , called the heptagrid. With the help of the numeral system based on grossone, we obtain a richer family of infinite Fibonacci words compared with the traditional approach.

  12. The Sad Case of the Columbine Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes free-speech challenge to school district's guidelines for acceptable expressions on ceramic tiles painted by Columbine High School students to express their feelings about the massacre. Tenth Circuit found that tile painting constituted school-sponsored speech and thus district had the constitutional authority under "Hazelwood School…

  13. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Moreno, P.; Valero, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Demonstrator project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived to receive and process the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as to configure it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  14. Consistency and derangements in brane tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Jejjala, Vishnu; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2016-09-01

    Brane tilings describe Lagrangians (vector multiplets, chiral multiplets, and the superpotential) of four-dimensional { N }=1 supersymmetric gauge theories. These theories, written in terms of a bipartite graph on a torus, correspond to worldvolume theories on N D3-branes probing a toric Calabi–Yau threefold singularity. A pair of permutations compactly encapsulates the data necessary to specify a brane tiling. We show that geometric consistency for brane tilings, which ensures that the corresponding quantum field theories are well behaved, imposes constraints on the pair of permutations, restricting certain products constructed from the pair to have no one-cycles. Permutations without one-cycles are known as derangements. We illustrate this formulation of consistency with known brane tilings. Counting formulas for consistent brane tilings with an arbitrary number of chiral bifundamental fields are written down in terms of delta functions over symmetric groups.

  15. Emittance measurements of RCG coated Shuttle tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouslog, Stanley A.; Cunnington, George R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral and total normal emittance of the Reaction Cured Glass (RCG) coating used on Shuttle tiles has been measured for surface temperatures of 300 to 1905 K. These measurements were made on two virgin and two flown Shuttle tile samples. Room temperature directional emittance data were also obtained and used to determine the total hemispherical emittance of RCG as a function of temperature. The data obtained from this calculation indicate that the total hemispherical emittance decreases from a room temperature value of 0.83 to a value of 0.76 at 1905 K. The flown Shuttle tiles exhibited a change in the spectral distribution of emittance compared to that of the virgin tile, but no significant trends in the total emittance from a virgin to a flown tile could be established.

  16. Penrose Tilings as Jammed Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenull, Olaf; Lubensky, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    Penrose tilings form lattices, exhibiting fivefold symmetry and isotropic elasticity, with inhomogeneous coordination much like that of the force networks in jammed systems. Under periodic boundary conditions, their average coordination is exactly four. We study the elastic and vibrational properties of rational approximants to these lattices as a function of unit-cell size NS and find that they have of order √NS zero modes and states of self-stress and yet all their elastic moduli vanish. In their generic form, obtained by randomizing site positions, their elastic and vibrational properties are similar to those of particulate systems at jamming with a nonzero bulk modulus, vanishing shear modulus, and a flat density of states.

  17. On the structure of quadrilateral brane tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Brane tilings provide the most general framework in string and M-theory for matching toric Calabi-Yau singularities probed by branes with superconformal fixed points of quiver gauge theories. The brane tiling data consists of a bipartite tiling of the torus which encodes both the classical superpotential and gauge-matter couplings for the quiver gauge theory. We consider the class of tilings which contain only tiles bounded by exactly four edges and present a method for generating any tiling within this class by iterating combinations of certain graph-theoretic moves. In the context of D3-branes in IIB string theory, we consider the effect of these generating moves within the corresponding class of supersymmetric quiver gauge theories in four dimensions. Of particular interest are their effect on the superpotential, the vacuum moduli space and the conditions necessary for the theory to reach a superconformal fixed point in the infrared. We discuss the general structure of physically admissible quadrilateral brane tilings and Seiberg duality in terms of certain composite moves within this class.

  18. High-Yield D-T Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Wells, R.P.; Reijonen, J.

    2006-11-15

    A high-yield D-T neutron generator has been developed for neutron interrogation in homeland security applications such as cargo screening. The generator has been designed as a sealed tube with a performance goal of producing 5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} n/s over a long lifetime. The key generator components developed are a radio-frequency (RF) driven ion source and a beam-loaded neutron production target that can handle a beam power of 10 kW. The ion source can provide a 100 mA D{sup +}/T{sup +} beam current with a high fraction of atomic species and can be pulsed up to frequencies of several kHz for pulsed neutron generator operation. Testing in D-D operation has been started.

  19. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  20. Seamless stitching of tile scan microscope images.

    PubMed

    Legesse, F B; Chernavskaia, O; Heuke, S; Bocklitz, T; Meyer, T; Popp, J; Heintzmann, R

    2015-06-01

    For diagnostic purposes, optical imaging techniques need to obtain high-resolution images of extended biological specimens in reasonable time. The field of view of an objective lens, however, is often smaller than the sample size. To image the whole sample, laser scanning microscopes acquire tile scans that are stitched into larger mosaics. The appearance of such image mosaics is affected by visible edge artefacts that arise from various optical aberrations which manifest in grey level jumps across tile boundaries. In this contribution, a technique for stitching tiles into a seamless mosaic is presented. The stitching algorithm operates by equilibrating neighbouring edges and forcing the brightness at corners to a common value. The corrected image mosaics appear to be free from stitching artefacts and are, therefore, suited for further image analysis procedures. The contribution presents a novel method to seamlessly stitch tiles captured by a laser scanning microscope into a large mosaic. The motivation for the work is the failure of currently existing methods for stitching nonlinear, multimodal images captured by our microscopic setups. Our method eliminates the visible edge artefacts that appear between neighbouring tiles by taking into account the overall illumination differences among tiles in such mosaics. The algorithm first corrects the nonuniform brightness that exists within each of the tiles. It then compensates for grey level differences across tile boundaries by equilibrating neighbouring edges and forcing the brightness at the corners to a common value. After these artefacts have been removed further image analysis procedures can be applied on the microscopic images. Even though the solution presented here is tailored for the aforementioned specific case, it could be easily adapted to other contexts where image tiles are assembled into mosaics such as in astronomical or satellite photos. PMID:25787148

  1. Tritium Removal from Codeposits on Carbon Tiles by a Scanning Laser

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; A. Carpe; G. Guttadora; S. Langish; K.M. Young; W.M. Shu; and H. Nakamura

    2001-09-28

    A novel method for tritium release has been demonstrated on codeposited layers on graphite and carbon-fiber-composite tiles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A scanning continuous wave Nd laser beam heated the codeposits to a temperature of 1200-2300 degrees C for 10 to 200 milliseconds in an argon atmosphere. The temperature rise of the codeposit was significantly higher than that of the manufactured tile material (e.g., 1770 degrees C cf. 1080 degrees C). A major fraction of tritium was thermally desorbed with minimal change to the surface appearance at a laser intensity of 8 kW/cm(superscript ''2''), peak temperatures above 1230 degrees C and heating duration 10-20 milliseconds. In two experiments, 46% and 84% of the total tritium was released during the laser scan. The application of this method for tritium removal from a tokamak reactor appears promising and has significant advantages over oxidative techniques.

  2. Adhesives for bonding RSI tile to GrPI structure for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, K. E.; Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    A system was developed for bonding RSI tiles to a graphite/polymide composite substrate which would withstand the full range of environmental conditions. The bonding system, designated RA59, consists of a mixture of glass (sesquisiloxane) resin in RTV 560 silicone. A significant number of data points for the RA59 are in the 65-psi failure range both when tested, and after exposure to 700 F. This is over two times the best shear and tensile values obtained with RV60 at this temperature. It is concluded that with a thorough understanding of the critical parameters involved, the higher values should be obtained consistently with the RA59. This is of particular significance if higher strength tiles were to be used in a hard-bonded configuration.

  3. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices like those used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  4. The TileCal Laser Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangiobbe, Vincent; On Behalf Of The Atlas Tile Calorimeter Group

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector operating at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter whose active material is made of scintillating plastic tiles. Scintillation light is read by photomultipliers. A Laser system is used to monitor their gain stability. During dedicated calibration runs the Laser system sends via long optical fibers, a monitored amount of light simultaneously to all the ≈10000 photomultipliers of TileCal. This note describes two complementary methods to measure the stability of the photomultipliers gain using the Laser calibration runs. The results of validation tests are presented for both methods and theirrespective performances and limitations are discussed.

  5. Remotely replaceable tokamak plasma limiter tiles

    DOEpatents

    Gallix, R.

    1987-12-09

    U-shaped tiles placed end-to-end over a pair of parallel runners have two rods which engage L-shaped slots. A sliding bar between the runners has grooves with clips to retain the rods pressed into receiving legs of the L-shaped slots in the runners. Sliding the bar in the direction of retaining legs of the L-shaped slots latches the tiles in place over the wall. Resilient contact strips under the parallel sides of the U-shaped tile assure thermal and electrical contact with the wall. 6 figs.

  6. The challenging scales of the bird: Shuttle tile structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, W. C.; Miller, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The principal design issues, tests, and analyses required to solve the tile integrity problem on the space shuttle orbiters are addressed. Proof testing of installed tiles is discussed along with an airflow test of special tiles. Orbiter windshield tiles are considered in terms of changes necessary to ensure acceptable margins of safety for flight.

  7. High-Strength, Low-Shrinkage Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Addition of refractory fibers and whiskers to insulating tiles composed primarily of fibrous silica, such as those used on the skin of Space Shuttle orbiter, greatly improves properties. New composition suitable for lightweight, thermally-stable mirror blanks and as furnace and kiln insulation. Improved tiles made with current tile-fabrication processes. For given density, tiles containing silicon carbide and boron additives stronger in flexure than tiles made from silica alone. In addition, tiles with additives nearly immune to heat distortion, whereas pure-silica tiles shrink and become severely distorted.

  8. Directed enzymatic activation of 1-D DNA tiles.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sudhanshu; Chandran, Harish; Gopalkrishnan, Nikhil; LaBean, Thomas H; Reif, John

    2015-02-24

    The tile assembly model is a Turing universal model of self-assembly where a set of square shaped tiles with programmable sticky sides undergo coordinated self-assembly to form arbitrary shapes, thereby computing arbitrary functions. Activatable tiles are a theoretical extension to the Tile assembly model that enhances its robustness by protecting the sticky sides of tiles until a tile is partially incorporated into a growing assembly. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate a simplified version of the Activatable tile assembly model. In particular, we demonstrate the simultaneous assembly of protected DNA tiles where a set of inert tiles are activated via a DNA polymerase to undergo linear assembly. We then demonstrate stepwise activated assembly where a set of inert tiles are activated sequentially one after another as a result of attachment to a growing 1-D assembly. We hope that these results will pave the way for more sophisticated demonstrations of activated assemblies. PMID:25625898

  9. Radiation Effects in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The requirements for a solid moderator are reviewed and the reasons that graphite has become the solid moderator of choice discussed. The manufacture and properties of some currently available near-isotropic and isotropic grades are described. The major features of a graphite moderated reactors are briefly outlined. Displacement damage and the induced structural and dimensional changes in graphite are described. Recent characterization work on nano-carbons and oriented pyrolytic graphites that have shed new light on graphite defect structures are reviewed, and the effect of irradiation temperature on the defect structures is highlighted. Changes in the physical properties of nuclear graphite caused by neutron irradiation are reported. Finally, the importance of irradiation induced creep is presented, along with current models and their deficiencies.

  10. Producing graphite with desired properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. M.; Imprescia, R. J.; Reiswig, R. D.; Smith, M. C.

    1971-01-01

    Isotropic or anisotropic graphite is synthesized with precise control of particle size, distribution, and shape. The isotropic graphites are nearly perfectly isotropic, with thermal expansion coefficients two or three times those of ordinary graphites. The anisotropic graphites approach the anisotropy of pyrolytic graphite.

  11. A family of ternary decagonal tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Nobuhisa

    2010-04-01

    A new family of decagonal quasiperiodic tilings are constructed by the use of generalized point substitution processes, which is a new substitution formalism developed by the author [N. Fujita, Acta Cryst. A 65, 342 (2009)]. These tilings are composed of three prototiles: an acute rhombus, a regular pentagon and a barrel shaped hexagon. In the perpendicular space, these tilings have windows with fractal boundaries, and the windows are analytically derived as the fixed sets of the conjugate maps associated with the relevant substitution rules. It is shown that the family contains an infinite number of local isomorphism classes which can be grouped into several symmetry classes (e.g., C10, D5, etc.). The member tilings are transformed into one another through collective simpleton flips, which are associated with the reorganization in the window boundaries.

  12. Radioactivity in zircon and building tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Deng; Kaizhen Tian; Daifu Chen; Yiyun Zhang

    1997-08-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) is commonly used in The manufacture of glazed tiles. In this study we found high concentrations of the radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}tH, {sup 40}k in zircon sand. The average radium equivalent (A{sub Ra} + 1.26 A{sub Th} + 0.086 A{sub k}) in zircon sand is 17,500 Bq kg{sup -1}, which is 106 times as much as that in ordinary building materials. The external radiation ({gamma} + {beta}) dose rates from 1.1 to 4.9 x 10{sup -2} mGy h{sup -1} with an average of 2.1 x 10{sup -2} mGy h{sup -1}. Although no elevated {gamma}-ray radiation or radon exhalation rate was detected in rooms decorated with glazed tiles, which is characteristic of combined {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} emitting thin materials, the average {gamma} radiation dose rate at the surface of the tile stacks in shops is 1.5 times as much as the indoor background level. The average area density of total {beta} emitting radionuclides in glazed floor tiles and glazed wall tiles is 0.30 Bq cm{sup -2} and 0.28 Bq cm{sup -2}, respectively. It was estimated that the average {beta} dose rates in tissue at a depth 7 mg cm{sup -2} with a distance 20-100 cm from the floor tiles were 3.2 to 0.9 x 10{sup -7} Gy h{sup -1}. The study indicates that the {beta}-rays from glazed tiles might be one of the main factors leading to an increase in ionizing radiation received by the general public. Workers in glazed tile manufacturing factories and in tile shops or stores may be exposed to elevated levels of both {beta}-rays and {gamma}-rays from zircon sand or glazed tile stacks. No elevated radiation from unglazed tiles was detected. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  14. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  15. Cutting Symmetrical Recesses In Soft Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesotas, Tony C.; Tyler, Brent

    1989-01-01

    Simple tool cuts hemispherical recesses in soft ceramic tiles. Designed to expose wires of thermocouples embedded in tiles without damaging leads. Creates neat, precise holes around wires. End mill includes axial hole to accommodate thermocouple wires embedded in material to be cut. Wires pass into hole without being bent or broken. Dimensions in inches. Used in place of such tools as dental picks, tweezers, spatulas, and putty knives.

  16. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, James G.; Mathur, Akshay; Simpson, James C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  17. Heating and ablation of tokamak graphite by pulsed nanosecond Nd-YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Semerok, A.; Fomichev, S. V.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Brygo, F.; Thro, P.-Y.; Grisolia, C.

    2007-04-15

    The results on laser heating and ablation of graphite tiles of thermonuclear tokamaks are presented. Two pulsed Nd-YAG lasers (20 Hz repetition rate, 5 ns pulse duration and 10 kHz repetition rate, 100 ns pulse duration) were applied for ablation measurements. The ablation thresholds (1.0{+-}0.5 J/cm{sup 2} for 5 ns and 2.5{+-}0.5 J/cm{sup 2} for 100 ns laser pulses) were determined for the Tore Supra tokamak graphite tiles (backside) nonexposed to plasma. The high repetition rate Nd-YAG laser (10 kHz, 100 ns pulse duration) and the developed pyrometer system were applied for graphite heating measurements. Some unexpected features of laser heating of the graphite surface were observed. They were explained by the presence of a thin surface layer with the properties different from those of the bulk graphite. The theoretical models of laser heating and near-threshold ablation of graphite with imperfectly adhered layer were developed to interpret the experimental results.

  18. Estimation of partial pressure during graphite conditioning by matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, P.; Prakash, A.; Reddy, D. C.

    2008-05-01

    Plasma Facing Components (PFC) of SST-1 tokamak are designed to be compatible for UHV as it is kept in the main vacuum vessel. Graphite is the most widely used plasma facing material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. However, graphite is porous and absorbs gases, which may be released during plasma operation. Graphite tiles are baked at high temperature of about 1000 °C in high vacuum (10-5 Torr) for several hours before installing them in the tokamak to remove the impurities (mainly water vapour and metal impurities), which may have been deposited during machining of the tiles‥ The measurements of the released gas (such as H2, H2O, CO, CO2, Hydrocarbons, etc.) from graphite tiles during baking are accomplished with the help of a Quadrupole Mass Analyzer (QMA). Since, the output of this measurement is a mass spectrum and not the partial pressures of the residual gases, one needs to adopt some procedure to convert the spectrum to obtain the partial pressures. The conventional method of analysis is tedious and time consuming. We propose a new approach based on constructing a set of linear equations and solving them using matrix operations. This is a simple method compared to the conventional one and also eliminates the limitations of the conventional method. A Fortran program has been developed which identifies the likely gases present in the vacuum system and calculates their partial pressures from the data of the residual gas analyzers. Application of this method of calculating partial pressures from mass spectra data will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  19. Coating method for graphite

    DOEpatents

    Banker, John G.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided comprising coating the graphite surface with a suspension of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4% by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  20. Coating method for graphite

    DOEpatents

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  1. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    DOEpatents

    Pappano, Peter J; Rogers, Michael R

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  2. Tile drainage as karst: Conduit flow and diffuse flow in a tile-drained watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Keith E.; Helmers, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    SummaryThe similarity of tiled-drained watersheds to karst drainage basins can be used to improve understanding of watershed-scale nutrient losses from subsurface tile drainage networks. In this study, short-term variations in discharge and chemistry were examined from a tile outlet collecting subsurface tile flow from a 963 ha agricultural watershed. Study objectives were to apply analytical techniques from karst springs to tile discharge to evaluate water sources and estimate the loads of agricultural pollutants discharged from the tile with conduit, intermediate and diffuse flow regimes. A two-member mixing model using nitrate, chloride and specific conductance was used to distinguish rainwater versus groundwater inputs. Results indicated that groundwater comprised 75% of the discharge for a three-day storm period and rainwater was primarily concentrated during the hydrograph peak. A contrasting pattern of solute concentrations and export loads was observed in tile flow. During base flow periods, tile flow consisted of diffuse flow from groundwater sources and contained elevated levels of nitrate, chloride and specific conductance. During storm events, suspended solids and pollutants adhered to soil surfaces (phosphorus, ammonium and organic nitrogen) were concentrated and discharged during the rapid, conduit flow portion of the hydrograph. During a three-day period, conduit flow occurred for 5.6% of the time but accounted for 16.5% of the total flow. Nitrate and chloride were delivered primarily with diffuse flow (more than 70%), whereas 80-94% of total suspended sediment, phosphorus and ammonium were exported with conduit and intermediate flow regimes. Understanding the water sources contributing to tile drainage and the manner by which pollutant discharge occurs from these systems (conduit, intermediate or diffuse flow) may be useful for designing, implementing and evaluating non-point source reduction strategies in tile-drained landscapes.

  3. Tiled WMS/KML Server V2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2012-01-01

    This software is a higher-performance implementation of tiled WMS, with integral support for KML and time-varying data. This software is compliant with the Open Geospatial WMS standard, and supports KML natively as a WMS return type, including support for the time attribute. Regionated KML wrappers are generated that match the existing tiled WMS dataset. Ping and JPG formats are supported, and the software is implemented as an Apache 2.0 module that supports a threading execution model that is capable of supporting very high request rates. The module intercepts and responds to WMS requests that match certain patterns and returns the existing tiles. If a KML format that matches an existing pyramid and tile dataset is requested, regionated KML is generated and returned to the requesting application. In addition, KML requests that do not match the existing tile datasets generate a KML response that includes the corresponding JPG WMS request, effectively adding KML support to a backing WMS server.

  4. Approximation of virus structure by icosahedral tilings.

    PubMed

    Salthouse, D G; Indelicato, G; Cermelli, P; Keef, T; Twarock, R

    2015-07-01

    Viruses are remarkable examples of order at the nanoscale, exhibiting protein containers that in the vast majority of cases are organized with icosahedral symmetry. Janner used lattice theory to provide blueprints for the organization of material in viruses. An alternative approach is provided here in terms of icosahedral tilings, motivated by the fact that icosahedral symmetry is non-crystallographic in three dimensions. In particular, a numerical procedure is developed to approximate the capsid of icosahedral viruses by icosahedral tiles via projection of high-dimensional tiles based on the cut-and-project scheme for the construction of three-dimensional quasicrystals. The goodness of fit of our approximation is assessed using techniques related to the theory of polygonal approximation of curves. The approach is applied to a number of viral capsids and it is shown that detailed features of the capsid surface can indeed be satisfactorily described by icosahedral tilings. This work complements previous studies in which the geometry of the capsid is described by point sets generated as orbits of extensions of the icosahedral group, as such point sets are by construction related to the vertex sets of icosahedral tilings. The approximations of virus geometry derived here can serve as coarse-grained models of viral capsids as a basis for the study of virus assembly and structural transitions of viral capsids, and also provide a new perspective on the design of protein containers for nanotechnology applications. PMID:26131897

  5. Laser nanoablation of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. D.; Pivovarov, P. A.; Zavedeeev, E. V.; Komlenok, M. S.; Kononenko, V. V.; Konov, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data on laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite by nanosecond pulsed UV ( nm) and green ( nm) lasers are presented. It was found that below graphite vaporization threshold 1 J/cm, the nanoablation regime can be realized with material removal rates as low as 10 nm/pulse. The difference between physical (vaporization) and physical-chemical (heating + oxidation) ablation regimes is discussed. Special attention is paid to the influence of laser fluence and pulse number on ablation kinetics. Possibility of laser-induced graphite surface nanostructuring has been demonstrated. Combination of tightly focused laser beam and sharp tip of scanning probe microscope was applied to improve material nanoablation.

  6. Nematic colloidal tilings as photonic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, M.; Dontabhaktuni, J.; Cancula, M.; Zumer, S.

    2014-02-01

    Colloidal platelets are explored as elementary building blocks for the shape-controlled assembly of crystalline and quasicrystalline tilings. Using three-dimensional (3D) numerical modelling based on the minimization of Landau-de Gennes free energy for modelling of colloids combined with Finite Difference Time Domain calculations for optics, we demonstrate the self-assembly and optical (transmission) properties of triangular, square and pentagonal sub-micrometer sized platelets in a thin layer of nematic liquid crystal. Interactions between platelets are explored, providing an insight into the assembly process. Two-dimensional tilings of various-shaped colloidal platelets are demonstrated, and their use as diffraction layers is explored by using FDTD simulations. Designing symmetry-breaking surface anchoring profiles on pentagonal platelets opens also a possibility to achieve interactions that could lead to tilings with non-crystalline symmetry.

  7. Fiber-tile optical studies at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.G.; Morgan, D.J.; Proudfoot, J.

    1991-07-23

    In support of a fiber-tile calorimeter for SDC, we have done studies on a number of topics. The most basic problems were light output and uniformity of response. Using a small electron beam, we have studied fiber placement, tile preparation, wrapping and masking, fiber splicing, fiber routing, phototube response, and some degradation factors. We found two configurations which produced more light output than the others and reasonably uniform response. We have chosen one of these to go into production for the EM test module on the basis of fiber routing for ease of assembly of the calorimeter. We have also applied some of the tools we developed to CDF end plug tile uniformity, shower max testing and development for a couple of detectors, and development of better techniques for radiation damage studies. 18 figs.

  8. Remotely replaceable tokamak plasma limiter tiles

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Simon , Langford, Alison A.

    1989-01-01

    U-shaped limiter tiles placed end-to-end over a pair of parallel runners secured to a wall have two rods which engage L-shaped slots in the runners. The short receiving legs of the L-shaped slots are perpendicular to the wall and open away from the wall, while long retaining legs are parallel to and adjacent the wall. A sliding bar between the runners has grooves with clips to retain the rods pressed into receiving legs of the L-shaped slots in the runners. Sliding the bar in the direction of retaining legs of the L-shaped slots latches the tiles in place over the runners. Resilient contact strips between the parallel arms of the U-shaped tiles and the wall assure thermal and electrical contact with the wall.

  9. NEW METHOD OF GRAPHITE PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Harper, W.T.

    1961-08-29

    BS>A method is described for producing graphite objects comprising mixing coal tar pitch, carbon black, and a material selected from the class comprising raw coke, calcined coke, and graphite flour. The mixture is placed in a graphite mold, pressurized to at least 1200 psi, and baked and graphitized by heating to about 2500 deg C while maintaining such pressure. (AEC)

  10. Random and ordered phases of off-lattice rhombus tiles.

    PubMed

    Whitelam, Stephen; Tamblyn, Isaac; Beton, Peter H; Garrahan, Juan P

    2012-01-20

    We study the covering of the plane by nonoverlapping rhombus tiles, a problem well studied only in the limiting case of dimer coverings of regular lattices. We go beyond this limit by allowing tiles to take any position and orientation on the plane, to be of irregular shape, and to possess different types of attractive interactions. Using extensive numerical simulations, we show that at large tile densities there is a phase transition from a fluid of rhombus tiles to a solid packing with broken rotational symmetry. We observe self-assembly of broken-symmetry phases, even at low densities, in the presence of attractive tile-tile interactions. Depending on the tile shape and interactions, the solid phase can be random, possessing critical orientational fluctuations, or crystalline. Our results suggest strategies for controlling tiling order in experiments involving "molecular rhombi." PMID:22400760

  11. Random and ordered phases of off-lattice rhombus tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelam, Stephen; Tamblyn, Isaac; Beton, Peter; Garrahan, Juan

    2012-02-01

    We study the covering of the plane by non-overlapping rhombus tiles, a problem well-studied only in the limiting case of dimer coverings of regular lattices. We go beyond this limit by allowing tiles to take any position and orientation on the plane, to be of irregular shape, and to possess different types of attractive interactions. Using extensive numerical simulations we show that at large tile densities there is a phase transition from a fluid of rhombus tiles to a solid packing with broken rotational symmetry. We observe self-assembly of broken-symmetry phases, even at low densities, in the presence of attractive tile-tile interactions. Depending on tile shape and interactions the solid phase can be random, possessing critical orientational fluctuations, or crystalline. Our results suggest strategies for controlling tiling order in experiments involving ``molecular rhombi.''

  12. Random and Ordered Phases of Off-Lattice Rhombus Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelam, Stephen; Tamblyn, Isaac; Beton, Peter H.; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the covering of the plane by nonoverlapping rhombus tiles, a problem well studied only in the limiting case of dimer coverings of regular lattices. We go beyond this limit by allowing tiles to take any position and orientation on the plane, to be of irregular shape, and to possess different types of attractive interactions. Using extensive numerical simulations, we show that at large tile densities there is a phase transition from a fluid of rhombus tiles to a solid packing with broken rotational symmetry. We observe self-assembly of broken-symmetry phases, even at low densities, in the presence of attractive tile-tile interactions. Depending on the tile shape and interactions, the solid phase can be random, possessing critical orientational fluctuations, or crystalline. Our results suggest strategies for controlling tiling order in experiments involving “molecular rhombi.”

  13. AIRBORNE ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS DURING BUFFING OF RESILIENT FLOOR TILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although asbestos-containing resilient floor tiles are considered nonfriable, the frictional forces exerted on the tile during routine maintenance operations can generate asbestos-containing structures. tudy was conducted to determine the level of airborne asbestos concentrations...

  14. INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1. SHOWING ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN TILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1. SHOWING ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN TILE FLOOR, TILE WAINSCOT AND SHOWER SURROUND, AND CERAMIC ACCESSORIES. VIEW FACING EAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type J, 701 Beard Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  15. INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1 SHOWING THE MOSAICPATTERN TILE FLOOR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1 SHOWING THE MOSAIC-PATTERN TILE FLOOR. CERAMIC TILE WAINSCOT, AND CERAMIC ACCESSORIES. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type H, 208 Sixth Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Small form factor full parallax tiled light field display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpaslan, Zahir Y.; El-Ghoroury, Hussein S.

    2015-03-01

    With the recent introduction of Ostendo's Quantum Photonic Imager (QPI) display technology, a very small pixel pitch, emissive display with high brightness and low power consumption became available. We used QPI's to create a high performance light field display tiles with a very small form factor. Using 8 of these QPI light field displays tiled in a 4x2 array we created a tiled full parallax light field display. Each individual light field display tile combines custom designed micro lens array layers with monochrome green QPIs. Each of the light field display tiles can address 1000 x 800 pixels placed under an array of 20 x 16 lenslets with 500 μm diameters. The light field display tiles are placed with small gaps to create a tiled display of approximately 46 mm (W) x 17 mm (H) x 2 mm (D) in mechanical dimensions. The prototype tiled full parallax light field display demonstrates small form factor, high resolution and focus cues.

  17. Degenerate polygonal tilings in simple animal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziherl, Primoz; Hocevar, Ana

    2009-03-01

    We study 2D polygonal tilings as models of the en-face structure of single-layer biological tissues. Using numerical simulations, we explore the phase diagram of equilibrium tilings of equal-area, equal-perimeter convex polygons whose energy is independent of their shape. We identify 3 distinct phases, which are all observed in simple epithelial tissues: The disordered phase of polygons with 4-9 sides, the hexatic phase, and the hexagonal phase with perfect 6-fold coordination. We quantify their structure using Edwards' statistical mechanics of cellular systems.

  18. Dynamical implications of Viral Tiling Theory.

    PubMed

    ElSawy, K M; Taormina, A; Twarock, R; Vaughan, L

    2008-05-21

    The Caspar-Klug classification of viruses whose protein shell, called viral capsid, exhibits icosahedral symmetry, has recently been extended to incorporate viruses whose capsid proteins are exclusively organised in pentamers. The approach, named 'Viral Tiling Theory', is inspired by the theory of quasicrystals, where aperiodic Penrose tilings enjoy 5-fold and 10-fold local symmetries. This paper analyses the extent to which this classification approach informs dynamical properties of the viral capsids, in particular the pattern of Raman active modes of vibrations, which can be observed experimentally. PMID:18353372

  19. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  20. Graphite design handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, F.H.

    1988-09-01

    The objectives of the Graphite Design Handbook (GDH) are to provide and maintain a single source of graphite properties and phenomenological model of mechanical behavior to be used for design of MHTGR graphite components of the Reactor System, namely, core support, permanent side reflector, hexagonal reflector elements, and prismatic fuel elements; to provide a single source of data and material models for use in MHTGR graphite component design, performance, and safety analyses; to present properties and equations representing material models in a form which can be directly used by the designer or analyst without the need for interpretation and is compatible with analytical methods and structural criteria used in the MHTGR project, and to control the properties and material models used in the MHTGR design and analysis to proper Quality Assurance standards and project requirements. The reference graphite in the reactor internal components is the nuclear grade 2020. There are two subgrades of interest, the cylinder nuclear grade and the large rectangular nuclear grade. The large rectangular nuclear grade is molded in large rectangular blocks. It is the reference material for the permanent side reflector and the central column support structure. The cylindrical nuclear grade is isostatically pressed and is intended for use as the core support component. This report gives the design properties for both H-451 and 2020 graphite as they apply to their respective criteria. The properties are presented in a form for design, performance, and safety calculations that define or validate the component design. 103 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs.

  1. Solar-energy treatment of ceramic tile. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.N.; Clayton, M.E.

    1981-12-01

    The 400 kW Advanced Components Test Facility was used to provide a concentrated source of solar energy for firing ceramic wall tile. A domed top cylindrical cavity with a white refractory fiber lining provided diffuse reflection of the concentrated solar beam directly onto the upper surface of the unfired wall tile. The tile were placed directly on the cavity floor in a circular pattern, centered at 45/sup 0/ intervals so that eight tile could be fired at one time. The tile and cavity walls were instrumented with thermocouples, and pyrometric cones were used to determine temperature distribution within the cavity. The glazed and unglazed solar fired tiles were subjected to standard ceramic testing procedures to determine: flatness, modulus of rupture, water absorption, porosity, bulk density, apparent specific gravity, percent linear thermal expansion and crystalline phases present in the fired bodies. These data were compared with the same data for commercial fired tiles from the same batch of raw materials. The glazed tile surfaces were compared with commercially fired tile for reflectance and color match. The major problems encountered were: cracking by thermal shock, and uneven shrinkage and glaze maturity across individual tile. The cavity also failed to provide even heating at all eight tile positions. An alternate air heat exchanger system is recommended to fire the tile by convection rather than direct radiation.

  2. Production and characterization of glazed tiles containing incinerated sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Lin, D F; Chang, W C; Yuan, C; Luo, H L

    2008-01-01

    In this article, glaze with different colorants was applied to tile specimens manufactured by incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) and clay. Improvements using different amounts of colorants, and glaze components and concentrations on tile bodies were investigated. Four different proportions of clay (by weight ratio) were replaced by ISSA. Tiles of size 12 cm x 6 cm x 1 cm were made and left in an electric furnace to make biscuit tiles at 800 degrees C. Afterwards, four colorants, Fe2O3 (red), V2O5 (yellow), CoCO3 (blue), and MnO2 (purple), and four different glaze concentrations were applied on biscuit tile specimens. These specimens were later sintered into glazed tiles at 1050 degrees C. The study shows that replacement of clay by sludge ash had adverse effects on properties of tiles. Water absorption increased and bending strength reduced with increased amounts of ash. However, both water absorption and bending strength improved for glazed ash tiles. Abrasion of grazed tiles reduced noticeably from 0.001 to 0.002 g. This implies glaze can enhance abrasion resistance of tiles. Effects like lightfastness and acid-alkali resistance improved as different glazes were applied on tiles. In general, red glazed tiles showed the most stable performance, followed by blue, yellow, and purple. PMID:17433656

  3. Installation of Ceramic Tile: Residential Thin-Set Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Sam

    This curriculum guide contains materials for use in teaching a course on residential thin-set methods of tile installation. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: the tile industry; basic math; tools; measurement; safety in tile setting; installation materials and guidelines for their use; floors; counter tops and backsplashes;…

  4. 21. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF THE INDIAN HOUSE. THE RELIEF BROCADE TILES ILLUSTRATE SCENES OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE, AND THE EARLY EUROPEAN EXPLORATION OF THE NEW WORLD. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  5. 90. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF THE INDIAN HOUSE. THE RELIEF BROCADE TILES ILLUSTRATE SCENES OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE, AND THE EARLY EUROPEAN EXPLORATION OF THE NEW WORLD. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-21. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  6. Two Views of Islam: Ceramic Tile Design and Miniatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, Sara Grove

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project focusing on Islamic art that consists of two parts: (1) ceramic tile design; and (2) Islamic miniatures. Provides background information on Islamic art and step-by-step instructions for designing the Islamic tile and miniature. Includes learning objectives and resources on Islamic tile miniatures. (CMK)

  7. WATER TABLE LEVEL AS INFLUENCED BY TILING METHOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sections of the research farm were tiled in the fall of 1979. The primary reason for the tiling was to provide a good soil environment for large tillage trial plots that had been previously established. This was also used as an opportunity to install a comparison of tile installation with a conven...

  8. Yields of p, d, t formed in stopped pion absorption by intranuclear clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, B. A.; Gurov, Yu B.; Korotkova, L. Yu; Lapushkin, S. V.; Leonova, T. I.; Pritula, R. V.; Schurenkova, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    Results of the study of spectra and yields of p, d, t formed in stopped pion absorption by nuclei are presented. Data on charged particle formation have been obtained for 17 isotopes in wide atomic mass range (6 < A < 209). Empirical model was proposed to describe A- dependences of primary p, d, t yields.

  9. Jagged Tiling for Intra-tile Parallelism and Fine-Grain Multithreading

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Sunil; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Marquez, Andres; Feo, John T.; Gao, Guang R.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we have developed a novel methodology that takes into consideration multithreaded many-core designs to better utilize memory/processing resources and improve memory residence on tileable applications. It takes advantage of polyhedral analysis and transformation in the form of PLUTO, combined with a highly optimized finegrain tile runtime to exploit parallelism at all levels. The main contributions of this paper include the introduction of multi-hierarchical tiling techniques that increases intra tile parallelism; and a data-flow inspired runtime library that allows the expression of parallel tiles with an efficient synchronization registry. Our current implementation shows performance improvements on an Intel Xeon Phi board up to 32.25% against instances produced by state-of-the-art compiler frameworks for selected stencil applications.

  10. CFD-Predicted Tile Heating Bump Factors Due to Tile Overlay Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    2006-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics investigation of the Orbiter's Tile Overlay Repair (TOR) is performed to assess the aeroheating Damage Assessment Team's (DAT) existing heating correlation method for protuberance interference heating on the surrounding thermal protection system. Aerothermodynamic heating analyses are performed for TORs at the design reference damage locations body points 1800 and 1075 for a Mach 17.9 and a=39deg STS-107 flight trajectory point with laminar flow. Six different cases are considered. The computed peak heating bump factor on the surrounding tiles are below the DAT's heating bump factor values for smooth tile cases. However, for the uneven tiles cases the peak interference heating is shown to be considerably higher than the existing correlation prediction.

  11. TILE at Iowa: Adoption and Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florman, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces a University of Iowa effort to enhance and support active learning pedagogies in technology-enhanced (TILE) classrooms and three elements that proved essential to the campus-wide adoption of those pedagogies. It then describes the impact of those professional development efforts on the curricula and cultures of three…

  12. Computer-controlled optical scanning tile microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Shumyatsky, P; Zeng, F; Zevallos, M; Alfano, R R

    2006-02-20

    A new type of computer-controlled optical scanning, high-magnification imaging system with a large field of view is described that overcomes the commonly believed incompatibility of achieving both high magnification and a large field of view. The new system incorporates galvanometer scanners, a CCD camera, and a high-brightness LED source for the fast acquisition of a large number of a high-resolution segmented tile images with a magnification of 800x for each tile. The captured segmented tile images are combined to create an effective enlarged view of a target totaling 1.6 mm x 1.2 mm in area. The speed and sensitivity of the system make it suitable for high-resolution imaging and monitoring of a small segmented area of 320 microm x 240 microm with 4 microm resolution. Each tile segment of the target can be zoomed up without loss of the high resolution. This new microscope imaging system gives both high magnification and a large field of view. This microscope can be utilized in medicine, biology, semiconductor inspection, device analysis, and quality control. PMID:16523776

  13. High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

  14. L-Tromino Tiling of Multilated Chessboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    An "n" x "n" chessboard is called deficient if one square is missing from any spot on the board. Can all deficient boards with a number of cells divisible by 3 be tiled by bent (or L-shaped) trominoes? The answer is yes, with exception of the order-5 board. This paper deals with the general problem plus numerous related puzzles and proofs…

  15. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heelan, Louise; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design requirements and it has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results. In addition, the data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking are described and the outcome of the detector consolidation in the maintenance period is also presented.

  16. Chemical response of lithiated graphite with deuterium irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. N.; Heim, B.; Allain, J. P.

    2011-03-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has been found to enhance plasma performance for graphite walled fusion devices such as TFTR, CDX-U, T-11M, TJ-II and NSTX. Among observed plasma enhancements is a reduction in edge density and reduced deuterium recycling. The mechanism by which lithiated graphite retains deuterium is largely unknown. Under controlled laboratory conditions, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to observe the chemical changes that occur on ATJ graphite after lithium deposition. The chemical state of lithiated graphite is found to change upon deuterium irradiation indicating the formation Li-O-D, manifest at 532.9 {+-} 0.6 eV. Lithium-deuterium interactions are also manifest in the C 1s photoelectron energy range and show Li-C-D interactions at 291.2 {+-} 0.6 eV. Post-mortem NSTX tiles that have been exposed to air upon extraction are cleaned and examined, revealing the chemical archaeology that formed during NSTX operations. XPS spectra show strong correlation ({+-} 0.3 eV) in Li-O-D and Li-O peaks from post-mortem and control experiments, thus validating offline experiments. We report findings that show that deuterium is found to interact with lithium after lithium has already reacted with carbon and oxygen.

  17. Tile-based Level of Detail for the Parallel Age

    SciTech Connect

    Niski, K; Cohen, J D

    2007-08-15

    Today's PCs incorporate multiple CPUs and GPUs and are easily arranged in clusters for high-performance, interactive graphics. We present an approach based on hierarchical, screen-space tiles to parallelizing rendering with level of detail. Adapt tiles, render tiles, and machine tiles are associated with CPUs, GPUs, and PCs, respectively, to efficiently parallelize the workload with good resource utilization. Adaptive tile sizes provide load balancing while our level of detail system allows total and independent management of the load on CPUs and GPUs. We demonstrate our approach on parallel configurations consisting of both single PCs and a cluster of PCs.

  18. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  19. Graphite Gamma Scan Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mark W. Drigert

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the measurement and data analysis of the radio isotopic content for a series of graphite specimens irradiated in the first Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, AGC-1. This is the first of a series of six capsules planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphites. The AGC-1 capsule was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL at approximately 700 degrees C and to a peak dose of 7 dpa (displacements per atom). Details of the irradiation conditions and other characterization measurements performed on specimens in the AGC-1 capsule can be found in “AGC-1 Specimen Post Irradiation Data Report” ORNL/TM 2013/242. Two specimens from six different graphite types are analyzed here. Each specimen is 12.7 mm in diameter by 25.4 mm long. The isotope with the highest activity was 60Co. Graphite type NBG-18 had the highest content of 60Co with an activity of 142.89 µCi at a measurement distance of 47 cm.

  20. Beautiful Math, Part 5: Colorful Archimedean Tilings from Dynamical Systems.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Peichang; Zhao, Weiguo; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    The art of tiling originated very early in the history of civilization. Almost every known human society has made use of tilings in some form or another. In particular, tilings using only regular polygons have great visual appeal. Decorated regular tilings with continuous and symmetrical patterns were widely used in decoration field, such as mosaics, pavements, and brick walls. In science, these tilings provide inspiration for synthetic organic chemistry. Building on previous CG&A “Beautiful Math” articles, the authors propose an invariant mapping method to create colorful patterns on Archimedean tilings (1-uniform tilings). The resulting patterns simultaneously have global crystallographic symmetry and local cyclic or dihedral symmetry. PMID:26594960

  1. D--T and D sub 2 retention in plastic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.W.; Sanchez, J.J.; Fearon, E.M. )

    1992-07-01

    We have measured the D{sub 2} and D--T gas pressure versus time inside multilayer polymer shells (polystyrene, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and plasma polymer CH{sub 1.3}) from which we calculate an effective permeability for the PVA layer. From this data, we have developed a D--T pressurization procedure for current direct drive fusion targets that increases the D--T fuel retention time an order of magnitude over previous pressurization schemes. The D--T fuel retention time will be decreased from the shells original D{sub 2} retention time ({similar to}45 h) by; (1) 50% immediately after D--T pressurization, (2) 60% after D--T pressurization and cryogenic storage for 1 day, and (3) 85% after D--T pressurization and cryogenic storage for 13 days. We have also found that heat treating the polymer shell increases the fuel retention time for D{sub 2} from 10% to 40% and that the D{sub 2} mass transfer through the composite polymer shell does not follow Fick's law. Finally, we describe an efficient target pressurization procedure for D{sub 2} fuel.

  2. Interlayer interactions in graphites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaobin; Tian, Fuyang; Persson, Clas; Duan, Wenhui; Chen, Nan-xian

    2013-01-01

    Based on ab initio calculations of both the ABC- and AB-stacked graphites, interlayer potentials (i.e., graphene-graphene interaction) are obtained as a function of the interlayer spacing using a modified Möbius inversion method, and are used to calculate basic physical properties of graphite. Excellent consistency is observed between the calculated and experimental phonon dispersions of AB-stacked graphite, showing the validity of the interlayer potentials. More importantly, layer-related properties for nonideal structures (e.g., the exfoliation energy, cleave energy, stacking fault energy, surface energy, etc.) can be easily predicted from the interlayer potentials, which promise to be extremely efficient and helpful in studying van der Waals structures. PMID:24192753

  3. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  4. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  5. Interlayer interactions in graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaobin; Tian, Fuyang; Persson, Clas; Duan, Wenhui; Chen, Nan-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Based on ab initio calculations of both the ABC- and AB-stacked graphites, interlayer potentials (i.e., graphene-graphene interaction) are obtained as a function of the interlayer spacing using a modified Möbius inversion method, and are used to calculate basic physical properties of graphite. Excellent consistency is observed between the calculated and experimental phonon dispersions of AB-stacked graphite, showing the validity of the interlayer potentials. More importantly, layer-related properties for nonideal structures (e.g., the exfoliation energy, cleave energy, stacking fault energy, surface energy, etc.) can be easily predicted from the interlayer potentials, which promise to be extremely efficient and helpful in studying van der Waals structures.

  6. Coatings for graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite fibers released from composites during burning or an explosion caused shorting of electrical and electronic equipment. Silicon carbide, silica, silicon nitride and boron nitride were coated on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistances. Resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than uncoated fiber were attained without any significant degradation of the substrate fiber. An organo-silicone approach to produce coated fibers with high electrical resistance was also used. Celion 6000 graphite fibers were coated with an organo-silicone compound, followed by hydrolysis and pyrolysis of the coating to a silica-like material. The shear and flexural strengths of composites made from high electrically resistant fibers were considerably lower than the shear and flexural strengths of composites made from the lower electrically resistant fibers. The lower shear strengths of the composites indicated that the coatings on these fibers were weaker than the coating on the fibers which were pyrolyzed at higher temperature.

  7. Optimization Of Phase-Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging Of D-T Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B

    2005-06-17

    Phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging has been demonstrated for characterization of D-T layers inside of beryllium shells. These first demonstrations used both scintillator and direct-detection imaging. This memo details tradeoffs between the two methods in order to optimize the imaging. The guiding principle for optimization is to minimize the exposure time while maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio at the D-T solid-vapor interface. Direct-detection and scintillator performance are comparable when imaging the full capsule. However, a scintillator allows for higher-resolution images necessary for studying local defects in the D-T layer.

  8. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  9. Lightweight graphite/polyimide panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poesch, J. G.; Merlette, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Panels are constructed of honeycombed polyimide/graphite core covered with thin face sheet of same material. Fabrication is based on extension of thin-gage graphite technology and modification of glass filament polyimide honeycomb techniques.

  10. Firing ceramic tiles in solar energy equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Pasichnyi, V.V.; Berezhetskaya, V.Ya.; Chop, Yu.I.; Kashket, G.I.

    1987-03-01

    In the interest of satisfying the growing demand for glazed ceramic tiles and conserving the natural gas ordinarily used to fire them, the authors assess the feasibility of using a solar kiln for the process. Their design incorporates a parabolic reflector and a tracking system to continuously focus radiant solar energy on the tile. Their energy analysis includes such factors as solar thermal input, radiant heat transfer, and heat flow, the relationship between the firing time and the heat flow density, and the surface quality of the glaze and colorizer. Their results indicate that when the heat flow density rises above a level at which the specific expenditure of heat is no longer dependent on the color of the pigment, this expenditure or input comes to a quarter of what is currently needed using existing technologies and fuels.

  11. On Some New Properties of Binary Tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviram, Ira; Kleman, Maurice

    1996-05-01

    We show that one of the binary tilings introduced by Lançon & Billard (LB1) tends asymptotically towards an “universal” random tiling of decagonal symmetry, whatever the starting tiling may be, after an infinite sequence of random decorations preserving the LB1 structural properties; the successive steps of the sequence are described in terms of random substitution matrices. The universal character of the asymptotic tiling reveals in particular in: the existence of a well-defined intensive variable α_infty which measures the proportion of pairs of nearest neighbors of atoms of different species which belong to pairs o contiguous “fat” tiles F, its very characteristic Fourier transform, and finite size fluctuations. Our results rely on a series of extensive Monte-Carlo simulations and on analytic calculations of the statistics of the tilings (e.g. α_n) at different stages n of the substitution process. All these calculations concerns the sole entropy properties, which simplification is justified by the well known fact that binary tilings are degenerate for Lennard-Jones interactions between nearest-neighbors. A direct calculation of the entropy yields a value of α_infty slightly different from the value obtained by the analytic method above, by an amount of ≈ 1%. We suggest that the difference is due to long-range correlations which are not taken into account in the direct calculation as well as some specific ergodicity properties of our “microcanonical” ensemble of tilings realizations, which reveal for example in the non-abelian properties of the finite size fluctuations, and which remain to be studied in any case. Nous montrons que l'un des pavages binaires de Lançon & Billard (LB1) a une limite asymptotique “universelle”, c'est-à-dire ne dépendant pas du pavage de départ, sous l'effet d'une séquence infinie de substitutions aléatoires (décrites par une matrice de transfert aléatoire) qui préservent son caractère LB1. Le caract

  12. Anosov Diffeomorphisms and {γ}-Tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, João P.; Pinto, Alberto A.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a toral Anosov automorphism {G_γ:{mathbb{T}}_γto{mathbb{T}}_γ} given by {G_γ(x,y)=(ax+y,x)} in the { < v,w > } base, where {ainmathbb{N} backslash\\{1\\}}, {γ=1/(a+1/(a+1/ldots))}, {v=(γ,1)} and {w=(-1,γ)} in the canonical base of {{mathbb{R}}^2} and {{mathbb{T}}_γ={mathbb{R}}^2/(v{mathbb{Z}} × w{mathbb{Z}})}. We introduce the notion of {γ}-tilings to prove the existence of a one-to-one correspondence between (i) marked smooth conjugacy classes of Anosov diffeomorphisms, with invariant measures absolutely continuous with respect to the Lebesgue measure, that are in the isotopy class of {G_γ}; (ii) affine classes of {γ}-tilings; and (iii) {γ}-solenoid functions. Solenoid functions provide a parametrization of the infinite dimensional space of the mathematical objects described in these equivalences.

  13. Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

    2002-01-01

    Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

  14. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  15. The DELPHI small angle tile calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.

    1995-08-01

    The Small angle TIle Calorimeter (STIC) provides calorimetric coverage in the very forward region for the DELPHI experiment at the CERN LEP collider. A veto system composed of two scintillator layers allows to trigger on single photon events and provides e{minus}{gamma} separation. The authors present here some results of extensive measurements performed on part of the calorimeter and the veto system in the CERN test beams prior to installation and report on the performance achieved during the 1994 LEP run.

  16. FITS Tile Compression in the NOAO DMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stobie, E.; Seaman, R.; Barg, I.

    2009-09-01

    The NOAO Data Management system (DMS) captures data from eleven NOAO and partner telescopes and transports these data from three mountaintops to replicate them between three data centers both North and South of the equator. Image files are annotated, remediated, ingested, and persisted through interfaces of the NOAO Science Archive. Wide-field optical and infrared images flow out of the archive, through the NOAO High Performance Pipeline creating several new data products that flow back into the archive. Raw, pipeline-reduced, and survey data products, both proprietary and post-proprietary, are made available through the NOAO Portal using VO standards and services. Each of these several steps requires access to both image data and metadata in the form of image header keywords. Measures of storage efficiency and throughput characterize performance, cost, schedule, and risk in a matrix across all telescopes and all subsystems. Anything that impedes access to data or metadata diminishes throughput, thus slowing schedules, increasing costs, revealing risks, and adversely affecting performance. The familiar gzip compression algorithm is often used to increase data storage efficiency. However, gzip actually reduces throughput due to initial and recurring overhead of compression and later uncompression. For example, if metadata for an image require remediation, the whole image must be compressed, uncompressed, and compressed again. By contrast, the FITS tile convention using the Rice algorithm achieves about 40% better compression than gzip in just one-third the time. Image headers remain readable such that images often need never be uncompressed at all; metadata can be simply edited in place. Further, a library such as CFITSIO can support tile compression as a native image format. The pixel tiling feature means that for applications such as a cutout service, only the tiles overlapping the desired image section need be uncompressed.

  17. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  18. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Stephe

    2013-04-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section (0 < |η| < 1.7) of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons decaying hadronically, and missing transverse energy. Because of its very good signal to noise ratio it is also useful for the identification and reconstruction of muons. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 4900 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser, and electronic charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of pp collisions acquired during 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance will be presented, including the absolute energy scale, time resolution, and associated stabilities. These results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter is performing well within the design requirements and is giving essential input to the physics results.

  19. Coatings for Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Several approaches for applying high resistance coatings continuously to graphite yarn were investigated. Two of the most promising approaches involved (1) chemically vapor depositing (CVD) SiC coatings on the surface of the fiber followed by oxidation, and (2) drawing the graphite yarn through an organo-silicone solution followed by heat treatments. In both methods, coated fibers were obtained which exhibited increased electrical resistances over untreated fibers and which were not degraded. This work was conducted in a previous program. In this program, the continuous CVD SiC coating process used on HTS fiber was extended to the coating of HMS, Celion 6000, Celion 12000 and T-300 graphite fiber. Electrical resistances three order of magnitude greater than the uncoated fiber were measured with no significant degradation of the fiber strength. Graphite fibers coated with CVD Si3N4 and BN had resistances greater than 10(exp 6) ohm/cm. Lower pyrolysis temperatures were used in preparing the silica-like coatings also resulting in resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than the uncoated fiber. The epoxy matrix composites prepared using these coated fibers had low shear strengths indicating that the coatings were weak.

  20. Graphite criteria peer review

    SciTech Connect

    1986-09-01

    This report documents a review of the stress criteria proposed for the graphite components of the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) core. The review was conducted by a panel of six independent consultants, chosen for their expertise over a range of relevant disciplines.

  1. Graphite technology development plan

    SciTech Connect

    1986-07-01

    This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

  2. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  3. GRAPHITE BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1964-02-25

    A process for bonding or joining graphite members together in which a thin platinum foil is placed between the members, heated in an inert atmosphere to a temperature of 1800 deg C, and then cooled to room temperature is described. (AEC)

  4. Structural graphitic carbon foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, K.M.; Anderson, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    Graphitic carbon foams are a unique material form with very high structural and thermal properties at a light weight. A process has been developed to produce microcellular, open-celled graphitic foams. The process includes heating a mesophase pitch preform above the pitch melting temperature in a pressurized reactor. At the appropriate time, the pressure is released, the gas nucleates bubbles, and these bubbles grow forming the pitch into the foam structure. The resultant foamed pitch is then stabilized in an oxygen environment. At this point a rigid structure exists with some mechanical integrity. The foam is then carbonized to 800 C followed by a graphitization to 2700 C. The shear action from the growing bubbles aligns the graphitic planes along the foam struts to provide the ideal structure for good mechanical properties. Some of these properties have been characterized for some of the foam materials. It is known that variations of the blowing temperature, blowing pressure and saturation time result in foams of variously sized with mostly open pores; however, the mechanism of bubble nucleation is not known. Therefore foams were blown with various gases to begin to determine the nucleation method. These gases are comprised of a variety of molecular weights as well as a range of various solubility levels. By examining the resultant structures of the foam, differences were noted to develop an explanation of the foaming mechanism.

  5. Tritium Removal from JET and TFTR Tiles by a Scanning Laser

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; N. Bekris; J.P. Coad; C.A. Gentile; M. Glugla

    2002-05-30

    Fast and efficient tritium removal is needed for future D-T machines with carbon plasma-facing components. A novel method for tritium release has been demonstrated on co-deposited layers on tiles retrieved from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and from the Joint European Torus (JET). A scanning continuous wave neodymium laser beam was focused to =100 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the co-deposits, heating them to temperatures =2000 C for about 10 ms in either air or argon atmospheres. Fiber optic coupling between the laser and scanner was implemented. Up to 87% of the co-deposited tritium was thermally desorbed from the JET and TFTR samples. This technique appears to be a promising in-situ method for tritium removal in a next-step D-T device as it avoids oxidation, the associated de-conditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces, and the expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide.

  6. Interference Lattice-based Loop Nest Tilings for Stencil Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Frumkin, Michael

    2000-01-01

    A common method for improving performance of stencil operations on structured multi-dimensional discretization grids is loop tiling. Tile shapes and sizes are usually determined heuristically, based on the size of the primary data cache. We provide a lower bound on the numbers of cache misses that must be incurred by any tiling, and a close achievable bound using a particular tiling based on the grid interference lattice. The latter tiling is used to derive highly efficient loop orderings. The total number of cache misses of a code is the sum of (necessary) cold misses and misses caused by elements being dropped from the cache between successive loads (replacement misses). Maximizing temporal locality is equivalent to minimizing replacement misses. Temporal locality of loop nests implementing stencil operations is optimized by tilings that avoid data conflicts. We divide the loop nest iteration space into conflict-free tiles, derived from the cache miss equation. The tiling involves the definition of the grid interference lattice an equivalence class of grid points whose images in main memory map to the same location in the cache-and the construction of a special basis for the lattice. Conflicts only occur on the boundaries of the tiles, unless the tiles are too thin. We show that the surface area of the tiles is bounded for grids of any dimensionality, and for caches of any associativity, provided the eccentricity of the fundamental parallelepiped (the tile spanned by the basis) of the lattice is bounded. Eccentricity is determined by two factors, aspect ratio and skewness. The aspect ratio of the parallelepiped can be bounded by appropriate array padding. The skewness can be bounded by the choice of a proper basis. Combining these two strategies ensures that pathologically thin tiles are avoided. They do not, however, minimize replacement misses per se. The reason is that tile visitation order influences the number of data conflicts on the tile boundaries. If two

  7. Intercalating oleylamines in graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaikun; Liang, Si; Zou, Lianfeng; Huang, Liwei; Park, Cheol; Zhu, Lisheng; Fang, Jiye; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Howard

    2012-02-01

    Graphite oxide has been synthesized from raw graphite particles and been treated with various mass amounts of oleylamine as intercalants to form intercalation compounds. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the inter-sheet distances strongly depend on the graphite oxide to oleylamine mass ratios. The equilibrium-like behavior implies diffusion-dominated oleylamine adsorption on graphite oxide in solution and excluded volume intercalations among oleylamine-adsorbed graphite oxide during restacking. The intercalation compounds are soluble in organic solvents, and their applications in the fabrication of transparent and conductive coatings have been demonstrated. PMID:22229856

  8. Design, fabrication, and tests of a metallic shell tile thermal protection system for space transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, Ian O.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1989-01-01

    A thermal protection tile for earth-to-orbit transports is described. The tiles consist of a rigid external shell filled with a flexible insulation. The tiles tend to be thicker than the current Shuttle rigidized silica tiles for the same entry heat load but are projected to be more durable and lighter. The tiles were thermally tested for several simulated entry trajectories.

  9. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education. Builders School, Ceramic Tile Setting 3-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, for individualized or group instruction on ceramic tile setting, was developed from military sources for use in vocational education. The course provides students with skills in mortar preparation, surface preparation, tile layout planning, tile setting, tile cutting, and the grouting of tile joints. Both theory and shop assignments…

  10. Evaluation of graphite/steam interactions for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, G.R.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.; Holland, D.F.

    1990-09-01

    In this report we present the results of an experimental/analytical study designed to determine the quantity of hydrogen generated during a coolant inleakage accident in ITER. This hydrogen could represent a potential explosive hazard, provided the proper conditions exist, causing machine damage and release of radioactive material. We have measured graphite/steam reaction rates for several graphites and carbon-based composites at temperatures between 1000 C and 1700 C. The effects of steam flow rate, and partial pressure were also examined. The measured reaction rates correlated well with two Arrhenius type relationships. We have used the relationships for GraphNOL N3M in a thermal model to determine that for ITER the quantity of hydrogen produced would range between 5 and 35 kg, depending upon how the graphite tiles are attached to the first wall. While 5 kg is not a significant concern, 35 kg presents an explosive hazard. 20 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  11. 55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED THE CUTTERS INTO SLABS OF CLAY, LIFTED THEM ONTO DRYING BOARDS AND PRESSED THE PLUNGERS TO RELEASE THE CUT TILES. REPRODUCTIONS CUTTERS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. WOODEN FORMS FOR PRODUCING CLAY SLABS WITH ROLLING PINS REST AGAINST THE WALL. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  12. Design optimization methods for genomic DNA tiling arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bertone, Paul; Trifonov, Valery; Rozowsky, Joel S.; Schubert, Falk; Emanuelsson, Olof; Karro, John; Kao, Ming-Yang; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A recent development in microarray research entails the unbiased coverage, or tiling, of genomic DNA for the large-scale identification of transcribed sequences and regulatory elements. A central issue in designing tiling arrays is that of arriving at a single-copy tile path, as significant sequence cross-hybridization can result from the presence of non-unique probes on the array. Due to the fragmentation of genomic DNA caused by the widespread distribution of repetitive elements, the problem of obtaining adequate sequence coverage increases with the sizes of subsequence tiles that are to be included in the design. This becomes increasingly problematic when considering complex eukaryotic genomes that contain many thousands of interspersed repeats. The general problem of sequence tiling can be framed as finding an optimal partitioning of non-repetitive subsequences over a prescribed range of tile sizes, on a DNA sequence comprising repetitive and non-repetitive regions. Exact solutions to the tiling problem become computationally infeasible when applied to large genomes, but successive optimizations are developed that allow their practical implementation. These include an efficient method for determining the degree of similarity of many oligonucleotide sequences over large genomes, and two algorithms for finding an optimal tile path composed of longer sequence tiles. The first algorithm, a dynamic programming approach, finds an optimal tiling in linear time and space; the second applies a heuristic search to reduce the space complexity to a constant requirement. A Web resource has also been developed, accessible at http://tiling.gersteinlab.org, to generate optimal tile paths from user-provided DNA sequences. PMID:16365382

  13. Geopolymers as potential repair material in tiles conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldes, Catarina F. M.; Lima, Augusta M.; Delgado-Rodrigues, José; Mimoso, João Manuel; Pereira, Sílvia R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The restoration materials currently used to fill gaps in historical architectural tiles (e.g. lime or organic resin pastes) usually show serious drawbacks in terms of compatibility, effectiveness or durability. The existing solutions do not fully protect Portuguese faïence tiles ( azulejos) in outdoor conditions and frequently result in further deterioration. Geopolymers can be a potential solution for tile lacunae infill, given the chemical-mineralogical similitude to the ceramic body, and also the durability and versatile range of physical properties that can be obtained through the manipulation of their formulation and curing conditions. This work presents and discusses the viability of the use of geopolymeric pastes to fill lacunae in tiles or to act as "cold" cast ceramic tile surrogates reproducing missing tile fragments. The formulation of geopolymers, namely the type of activators, the alumino-silicate source, the quantity of water required for adequate workability and curing conditions, was studied. The need for post-curing desalination was also considered envisaging their application in the restoration of outdoor historical architectural tiles frequently exposed to adverse environmental conditions. The possible advantages and disadvantages of the use of geopolymers in the conservation of tiles are also discussed. The results obtained reveal that geopolymers pastes are a promising material for the restoration of tiles, when compared to other solutions currently in use.

  14. NASA TileWorld manual (system version 2.2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philips, Andrew B.; Bresina, John L.

    1991-01-01

    The commands are documented of the NASA TileWorld simulator, as well as providing information about how to run it and extend it. The simulator, implemented in Common Lisp with Common Windows, encodes a particular range in a spectrum of domains, for controllable research experiments. TileWorld consists of a two dimensional grid of cells, a set of polygonal tiles, and a single agent which can grasp and move tiles. In addition to agent executable actions, there is an external event over which the agent has not control; this event correspond to a 'gust of wind'.

  15. Graphite Polyhedral Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Libera, Joseph A.; Kalashnikov, Nikolay; Yoshimura, Masahiro

    2000-10-01

    Polyhedral nano- and microstructures with shapes of faceted needles, rods, rings, barrels, and double-tipped pyramids, which we call graphite polyhedral crystals (GPCs), have been discovered. They were found in pores of glassy carbon. They have nanotube cores and graphite faces, and they can exhibit unusual sevenfold, ninefold, or more complex axial symmetry. Although some are giant radially extended nanotubes, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy suggest GPCs have a degree of perfection higher than in multiwall nanotubes of similar size. The crystals are up to 1 micrometer in cross section and 5 micrometers in length, and they can probably be grown in much larger sizes. Preliminary results suggest a high electrical conductivity, strength, and chemical stability of GPC.

  16. Milestone 5 test report. Task 5, subtask 5.2: Tile to foam strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work that has been performed to date on the strength of a cryotank insulation system using Rohacell foam and TUFI-coated AETB-12 ceramic tiles directly bonded to a simulated graphite-epoxy tank wall. Testing utilized a custom specimen design which consists of a long tensile specimen with eccentric loading to induce curvature similar to the curvature expected due to 'pillowing' of the tank when pressurized. A finite element model was constructed to predict the specific element strains in the test article, and to assist with design of the test specimen to meet the specific goals of curvature and laminate strain. The results indicate that the heat treated 3.25-pcf density Rohacell foam does not provide sufficient strength for the induced stresses due to curvature and stress concentration at the RTV bondline to the TUFI tile. The test was repeated using higher density non-heat treated Rohacell foam (6.9 pcf) without foam failure. The finite element model was shown to predict specimen behavior, and validation of the model was successful. It is pertinent to mention that the analyses described herein accurately predicted the failure of the heat treated foams and based on this analysis method it is expected that the untreated 3.25 pcf Rohacell foam will be successful.

  17. Milestone 5 test report. Task 5, subtask 5.2: Tile to foam strength tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes work that has been performed to date on the strength of a cryotank insulation system using Rohacell foam and TUFI-coated AETB-12 ceramic tiles directly bonded to a simulated graphite-epoxy tank wall. Testing utilized a custom specimen design which consists of a long tensile specimen with eccentric loading to induce curvature similar to the curvature expected due to 'pillowing' of the tank when pressurized. A finite element model was constructed to predict the specific element strains in the test article, and to assist with design of the test specimen to meet the specific goals of curvature and laminate strain. The results indicate that the heat treated 3.25-pcf density Rohacell foam does not provide sufficient strength for the induced stresses due to curvature and stress concentration at the RTV bondline to the TUFI tile. The test was repeated using higher density non-heat treated Rohacell foam (6.9 pcf) without foam failure. The finite element model was shown to predict specimen behavior, and validation of the model was successful. It is pertinent to mention that the analyses described herein accurately predicted the failure of the heat treated foams and based on this analysis method it is expected that the untreated 3.25 pcf Rohacell foam will be successful.

  18. Complex tiling patterns in liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Tschierske, C.; Nürnberger, C.; Ebert, H.; Glettner, B.; Prehm, M.; Liu, F.; Zeng, X.-B.; Ungar, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this account recent progress in enhancing the complexity of liquid crystal self-assembly is highlighted. The discussed superstructures are formed mainly by polyphilic T-shaped and X-shaped molecules composed of a rod-like core, tethered with glycerol units at both ends and flexible non-polar chain(s) in lateral position, but also related inverted molecular structures are considered. A series of honeycomb phases composed of polygonal cylinders ranging from triangular to hexagonal, followed by giant cylinder honeycombs is observed for ternary T-shaped polyphiles on increasing the size of the lateral chain(s). Increasing the chain size further leads to new modes of lamellar organization followed by three-dimensional and two-dimensional structures incorporating branched and non-branched axial rod-bundles. Grafting incompatible chains to opposite sides of the rod-like core leads to quaternary X-shaped polyphiles. These form liquid crystalline honeycombs where different cells are filled with different material. Projected on an Euclidian plane, all honeycomb phases can be described either by uniformly coloured Archimedean and Laves tiling patterns (T-shaped polyphiles) or as multi-colour tiling patterns (X-shaped polyphiles). It is shown that geometric frustration, combined with the tendency to segregate incompatible chains into different compartments and the need to find a periodic tiling pattern, leads to a significant increase in the complexity of soft self-assembly. Mixing of different chains greatly enhances the number of possible ‘colours’ and in this way, periodic structures comprising up to seven distinct compartments can be generated. Relations to biological self-assembly are discussed shortly. PMID:24098852

  19. Symmetries and color symmetries of a family of tilings with a singular point.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Imogene F; Felix, Rene P; Loquias, Manuel Joseph C

    2015-11-01

    Tilings with a singular point are obtained by applying conformal maps on regular tilings of the Euclidean plane and their symmetries are determined. The resulting tilings are then symmetrically colored by applying the same conformal maps on colorings of regular tilings arising from sublattice colorings of the centers of the tiles. In addition, conditions are determined in order that the coloring of a tiling with singularity that is obtained in this manner is perfect. PMID:26522407

  20. Radiation shielding design of BNCT treatment room for D-T neutron source.

    PubMed

    Pouryavi, Mehdi; Farhad Masoudi, S; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that D-T neutron generator can be used as a proper neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of deep-seated brain tumors. In this paper, radiation shielding calculations have been conducted based on the computational method for designing a BNCT treatment room for a recent proposed D-T neutron source. By using the MCNP-4C code, the geometry of the treatment room has been designed and optimized in such a way that the equivalent dose rate out of the treatment room to be less than 0.5μSv/h for uncontrolled areas. The treatment room contains walls, monitoring window, maze and entrance door. According to the radiation protection viewpoint, dose rate results of out of the proposed room showed that using D-T neutron source for BNCT is safe. PMID:25732097

  1. Study of TFTR D-T neutron spectra using natural diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, A.L.; Krasilnikov, A.V., Gorelenkov, N.N.

    1996-12-31

    Three Natural Diamond Detector (NDD) based spectrometers have been used for neutron spectra measurement during Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) experiments using high power Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) and Ton Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in 1996. A 2-3 % energy resolution coupled with the high radiation resistance of NDDs (5 x 10{sup 14}n/cm{sup 2}) makes them ideal for measuring the D-T neutron spectra in the high radiation environment of TFTR tritium experiments. The compact size of the NDD made it possible to insert one of the detectors into one of the center channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator to provide a vertical view perpendicular to the vessel midplane, Two other detectors were placed inside shields in TFTR test cell and provide measurements of the neutrons having angles of emission of 110- 180{degrees} and 60-12-{degrees} with respect to the direction of the plasma current. By using a 0.25 {mu}s shaping time of the Ortec 673 spectroscopy amplifier we were able to accumulate useful spectrometry data at count rates up to 1.5 x 10{sup 3} counts/sec. To model the D- T neutron spectra measured by each of three NDD`s the Neutron Source post TRANSP (NST) code and semi-analytical model were developed. A set of D-T and D-D plasmas is analyzed for the dynamics of D-T neutron spectral broadening for each of three NDD cones of view. The application of three NDD based D-T neutron -spectrometer array demonstrated the anisotropy of the ion distribution function. and provided a mature of the dynamics of the effective ion temperatures for each detector view, and determined the tangential velocity of resonant tritons during ICRH.

  2. CMB-13 research on carbon and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary results of the research on carbon and graphite accomplished during this report period are presented. Included are: particle characteristics of Santa Maria fillers, compositions and density data for hot-molded Santa Maria graphites, properties of hot-molded Santa Maria graphites, and properties of hot-molded anisotropic graphites. Ablation-resistant graphites are also discussed.

  3. METHOD OF FABRICATING A GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kratz, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    S>A nuclear reactor formed of spaced bodies of uranium and graphite blocks is improved by diffusing helium through the graphite blocks in order to replace the air in the pores of the graphite with helium. The helium-impregnated graphite conducts heat better, and absorbs neutrons less, than the original air- impregnated graphite. (AEC)

  4. METHOD FOR EVALUATING MOLD GROWTH ON CEILING TILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method to extract mold spores from porous ceiling tiles was developed using a masticator blender. Ceiling tiles were inoculated and analyzed using four species of mold. Statistical analysis comparing results obtained by masticator extraction and the swab method was performed. T...

  5. Drainage water management effects on tile discharge and water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) fluxes from tile drained watersheds have been implicated in water quality studies of the Mississippi River Basin, but the contribution of tile drains to N export in headwater watersheds is not well understood. The objective of this study was to ascertain seasonal and annual contribution...

  6. New SWAT tile drain equations: Modifications, Calibration, Validation, and Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface tile drainage is a commonly used agricultural practice to enhance crop yield in poorly drained but highly productive soils in many other regions of the world. However, the presence of subsurface tile drainage systems also expedites the transport of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) and other chemi...

  7. Creative Tiling: A Story of 1000-and-1 Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Darwish, Nasir

    2012-01-01

    We describe a procedure that utilizes symmetric curves for building artistic tiles. One particular curve was found to mesh nicely with hundreds other curves, resulting in eye-catching tiling designs. The results of our work serve as a good example of using ideas from 2-D graphics and algorithms in a practical web-based application.

  8. Low-Density, Aerogel-Filled Thermal-Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Maryann; Heng, Vann; Barney, Andrea; Oka, Kris; Droege, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel fillings have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop low-density thermal-insulation tiles that, relative to prior such tiles, have greater dimensional stability (especially less shrinkage), equal or lower thermal conductivity, and greater strength and durability. In preparation for laboratory tests of dimensional and thermal stability, prototypes of aerogel-filled versions of recently developed low-density tiles have been fabricated by impregnating such tiles to various depths with aerogel formations ranging in density from 1.5 to 5.6 lb/ft3 (about 53 to 200 kg/cu m). Results available at the time of reporting the information for this article showed that the thermal-insulation properties of the partially or fully aerogel- impregnated tiles were equivalent or superior to those of the corresponding non-impregnated tiles and that the partially impregnated tiles exhibited minimal (<1.5 percent) shrinkage after multiple exposures at a temperature of 2,300 F (1,260 C). Latest developments have shown that tiles containing aerogels at the higher end of the density range are stable after multiple exposures at the said temperature.

  9. 49. TILE PACKING AREA AND APPRENTICE WORKSPACE, SECOND FLOOR, SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. TILE PACKING AREA AND APPRENTICE WORKSPACE, SECOND FLOOR, SOUTH END OF EAST WING. THE SKYLIGHT, ADDED IN 1976. COVERS A ROOF OPENING LEFT FOR THE CHIMNEY OF A POSSIBLE THIRD BISCUIT KILN. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  10. Highly Symmetric and Congruently Tiled Meshes for Shells and Domes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Muhibur; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2016-01-01

    We describe the generation of all possible shell and dome shapes that can be uniquely meshed (tiled) using a single type of mesh face (tile), and following a single meshing (tiling) rule that governs the mesh (tile) arrangement with maximal vertex, edge and face symmetries. Such tiling arrangements or congruently tiled meshed shapes, are frequently found in chemical forms (fullerenes or Bucky balls, crystals, quasi-crystals, virus nano shells or capsids), and synthetic shapes (cages, sports domes, modern architectural facades). Congruently tiled meshes are both aesthetic and complete, as they support maximal mesh symmetries with minimal complexity and possess simple generation rules. Here, we generate congruent tilings and meshed shape layouts that satisfy these optimality conditions. Further, the congruent meshes are uniquely mappable to an almost regular 3D polyhedron (or its dual polyhedron) and which exhibits face-transitive (and edge-transitive) congruency with at most two types of vertices (each type transitive to the other). The family of all such congruently meshed polyhedra create a new class of meshed shapes, beyond the well-studied regular, semi-regular and quasi-regular classes, and their duals (platonic, Catalan and Johnson). While our new mesh class is infinite, we prove that there exists a unique mesh parametrization, where each member of the class can be represented by two integer lattice variables, and moreover efficiently constructable. PMID:27563368

  11. Computerized Machine for Cutting Space Shuttle Thermal Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Luis E.; Reuter, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    A report presents the concept of a machine aboard the space shuttle that would cut oversized thermal-tile blanks to precise sizes and shapes needed to replace tiles that were damaged or lost during ascent to orbit. The machine would include a computer-controlled jigsaw enclosed in a clear acrylic shell that would prevent escape of cutting debris. A vacuum motor would collect the debris into a reservoir and would hold a tile blank securely in place. A database stored in the computer would contain the unique shape and dimensions of every tile. Once a broken or missing tile was identified, its identification number would be entered into the computer, wherein the cutting pattern associated with that number would be retrieved from the database. A tile blank would be locked into a crib in the machine, the shell would be closed (proximity sensors would prevent activation of the machine while the shell was open), and a "cut" command would be sent from the computer. A blade would be moved around the crib like a plotter, cutting the tile to the required size and shape. Once the tile was cut, an astronaut would take a space walk for installation.

  12. Improving Efficiency of 3-SAT-Solving Tile Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Yuriy

    The tile assembly model has allowed the study of the nature's process of self-assembly and the development of self-assembling systems for solving complex computational problems. Research into this model has led to progress in two distinct classes of computational systems: Internet-sized distributed computation, such as software architectures for computational grids, and molecular computation, such as DNA computing. The design of large complex tile systems that emulate Turing machines has shown that the tile assembly model is Turing universal, while the design of small tile systems that implement simple algorithms has shown that tile assembly can be used to build private, fault-tolerant, and scalable distributed software systems and robust molecular machines. However, in order for these types of systems to compete with traditional computing devices, we must demonstrate that fairly simple tile systems can implement complex and intricate algorithms for important problems. The state of the art, however, requires vastly complex tile systems with large tile sets to implement such algorithms.

  13. Nutrient and Pesticide Removal From Laboratory Simulated Tile Drainage Discharge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excess nutrient and pesticide transport through subsurface tile drainage is well documented. One approach receiving consideration for reducing the amount of nutrients and pesticides in subsurface drainage waters is end-of-tile filters. The filters are often comprised of industrial wastes or by-produ...

  14. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    SciTech Connect

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  15. Introduction to building projection-based tiled display systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Stevens, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2000-07-01

    This tutorial introduces the concepts and technologies needed to build projector-based display systems. Tiled displays offer scalability, high resolution, and large formats for various applications. Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation. The largest impact may well arise from using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building information or active spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows. These environments may prove the ultimate successor to the desktop metaphor for information technology work. Several fundamental technological problems must be addressed to make tiled displays practical. These include: the choice of screen materials and support structures; choice of projectors, projector supports, and optional fine positioners; techniques for integrating image tiles into a seamless whole; interface devices for interaction with applications; display generators and interfaces; and the display software environment.

  16. Graphitic packing removal tool

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  17. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  18. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  19. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panatarani, C.; Muthahhari, N.; Rianto, Anton; Joni, I. Made

    2016-03-01

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H2SO4 and KMNO4. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  20. Removal of nutrient and pesticides from tile drainage discharge using an end-of-tile cartridge approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient transport from subsurface tile drainage is pretty well documented. One approach receiving consideration for reducing the amount of nutrients and pesticides in subsurface drainage waters is end-of-tile filters. The filters are often comprised of industrial wastes or by-products that have a s...

  1. Emergence of Multidrug-resistant Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, David; Cloeckaert, Axel; Ahmed, Rafiq; Ng, Lai-King

    2004-01-01

    We document an increase in the number of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+ identified in Canada. Most of these strains harbor Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). Further studies are needed to determine factors contributing to the observed emergence of this multidrug-resistant strain. PMID:15324556

  2. The photochemistry of d(T-A) in aqueous solution and in ice.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, S N; Kumar, S; Davies, R J; Sethi, S K; McCloskey, J A

    1984-01-01

    When d(T-A) is irradiated at 254 nm in aqueous solution an internal photoadduct is formed between its constituent adenine and thymine bases. The resultant photoproduct, designated TA*, arises from a singlet excited state precursor; a similar photoreaction is not observed with d(C-A) or d(T-G). In contradistinction, irradiation of d(T-A) in frozen aqueous solution yields a dimeric photoproduct in which two d(T-A) molecules are coupled together by a (6-4) photoadduct linkage between their respective thymine bases. Both photoproducts have been extensively characterised by a combination of electron impact and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, UV, CD, 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Acid treatment of TA* gives 6-methylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridin-5-one whose identity was established by an independent chemical synthesis involving photorearrangement of 6-methyl-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine N(4)-oxide. A tentative mechanism is presented to account for the acid degradation of TA*. The structure of the dimeric ice photoproduct follows from its cleavage, by snake venom phosphodiesterase, to 5'-dAMP and the (6-4) bimolecular photoadduct of thymidine; on acid hydrolysis it gives adenine and 6-(5'-methyl-2'-oxopyrimidin-4'-yl) thymine. PMID:6493984

  3. Multiaxial graphite test specimen

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    A multiaxial test program is to be conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on the core component graphite. The objectives of the tests are to obtain failure data under uniaxial and biaxial states of stress in order to construct a failure surface in a two-dimensional stress space. These data will be used in verifying the accuracy of the maximum stress failure theory being proposed for use in designing the core graphite components. Tubular specimens are proposed to be used and are either loaded axially and/or subjected to internal pressure. This report includes a study on three specimen configurations. The conclusions of that study indicate that an elliptical transition geometry procedures the smallest discontinuity effects. Several loading combustions were studied using the elliptical transition specimen. The primary purpose is to establish the location of the highest stress state and its relation to the gage section for all of the loading conditions. The tension/internal pres sure loading condition (1:1) indicated that the high stress area is just outside the gage section but still should be acceptable. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  4. Examining graphite reinforcement in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, R. E.; Yates, C. I.

    1980-01-01

    Structure of graphite layers in composite parts can be checked by pyrolizing epoxy portion of composite samples. After 2-3 hours in nitrogen atmosphere at 540 C, only graphite fibers remain. These can be separated and checked for proper number, thickness, and orientation.

  5. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  6. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  7. Tile-in-ONE: A web platform which integrates Tile Calorimeter data quality and calibration assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivolella, A.; Ferreira, F.; Maidantchik, C.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Burghgrave, B.; Smirnov, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter collaboration assesses the quality of calibration data in order to ensure its proper operation. A number of tasks is then performed by executing several tools and accessing web systems, which were independently developed to meet distinct collaboration's requirements and do not necessarily are connected with each other. Thus, to attend the collaboration needs, several programs are usually implemented without a global perspective of the detector, requiring basic software features. In addition, functionalities may overlap in their objectives and frequently replicate resources retrieval mechanisms. Tile-in-ONE is a designed and implemented platform that assembles various web systems used by the calorimeter community through a single framework and a standard technology. It provides an infrastructure to support the code implementation, avoiding duplication of work while integrating with an overall view of the detector status. Database connectors smooth the process of information access since developers do not need to be aware of where records are placed and how to extract them. Within the environment, a dashboard stands for a particular Tile operation aspect and gets together plug-ins, i.e. software components that add specific features to an existing application. A server contains the platform core, which represents the basic environment to deal with the configuration, manage user settings and load plug-ins at runtime. A web middleware assists users to develop their own plug-ins, perform tests and integrate them into the platform as a whole. Backends are employed to allow that any type of application is interpreted and displayed in a uniform way. This paper describes Tile-in-ONE web platform.

  8. Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet

    SciTech Connect

    Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the

  9. Floor tile and mastic removal project report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    A test program was developed and coordinated with State and Federal Regulators and carried out at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. This program was carefully designed to create the worst conditions in order to evaluate whether asbestos fibers are released when asbestos containing floor tile and mastic are removed. There were over 1,000 samples taken and analyzed during the execution of the program. The conclusions reached were based upon analysis of the critical samples using the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) technology. Additionally, the TEM procedures were used to evaluate personnel samples to determine whether those fibers found were asbestos or other materials. Most of the (TEM) samples were analyzed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio.

  10. Tile-Compressed FITS Kernel for IRAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.

    2011-07-01

    The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) is a ubiquitously supported standard of the astronomical community. Similarly, the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF), developed by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, is a widely used astronomical data reduction package. IRAF supplies compatibility with FITS format data through numerous tools and interfaces. The most integrated of these is IRAF's FITS image kernel that provides access to FITS from any IRAF task that uses the basic IMIO interface. The original FITS kernel is a complex interface of purpose-built procedures that presents growing maintenance issues and lacks recent FITS innovations. A new FITS kernel is being developed at NOAO that is layered on the CFITSIO library from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The simplified interface will minimize maintenance headaches as well as add important new features such as support for the FITS tile-compressed (fpack) format.

  11. Local growth of icosahedral quasicrystalline tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hann, Connor T.; Socolar, Joshua E. S.; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-07-01

    Icosahedral quasicrystals (IQCs) with extremely high degrees of translational order have been produced in the laboratory and found in naturally occurring minerals, yet questions remain about how IQCs form. In particular, the fundamental question of how locally determined additions to a growing cluster can lead to the intricate long-range correlations in IQCs remains open. In answer to this question, we have developed an algorithm that is capable of producing a perfectly ordered IQC yet relies exclusively on local rules for sequential, face-to-face addition of tiles to a cluster. When the algorithm is seeded with a special type of cluster containing a defect, we find that growth is forced to infinity with high probability and that the resultant IQC has a vanishing density of defects. The geometric features underlying this algorithm can inform analyses of experimental systems and numerical models that generate highly ordered quasicrystals.

  12. Electronic structure of graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae Kyung; Yang, Cheolsoo; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Ki-Jeong

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of graphite oxide by photoelectron spectroscopy at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Korea. The typical sp 2 hybridization states found in graphite were also seen in graphite oxide. However, the π state disappeared near the Fermi level because of bonding between the π and oxygen-related states originating from graphite oxide, indicating electron transfer from graphite to oxygen and resulting in a downward shift of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) state to higher binding energies. The band gap opening increased to about 1.8 eV, and additional oxygen-related peaks were observed at 8.5 and 27 eV. This research was supported by the Basic Science Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0004592), and partly by the MEST (2009-0087138). Experiments at the PLS were supported in part by POSTECH and MEST.

  13. Nucleosome positioning from tiling microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Yassour, Moran; Kaplan, Tommy; Jaimovich, Ariel; Friedman, Nir

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The packaging of DNA around nucleosomes in eukaryotic cells plays a crucial role in regulation of gene expression, and other DNA-related processes. To better understand the regulatory role of nucleosomes, it is important to pinpoint their position in a high (5–10 bp) resolution. Toward this end, several recent works used dense tiling arrays to map nucleosomes in a high-throughput manner. These data were then parsed and hand-curated, and the positions of nucleosomes were assessed. Results: In this manuscript, we present a fully automated algorithm to analyze such data and predict the exact location of nucleosomes. We introduce a method, based on a probabilistic graphical model, to increase the resolution of our predictions even beyond that of the microarray used. We show how to build such a model and how to compile it into a simple Hidden Markov Model, allowing for a fast and accurate inference of nucleosome positions. We applied our model to nucleosomal data from mid-log yeast cells reported by Yuan et al. and compared our predictions to those of the original paper; to a more recent method that uses five times denser tiling arrays as explained by Lee et al.; and to a curated set of literature-based nucleosome positions. Our results suggest that by applying our algorithm to the same data used by Yuan et al. our fully automated model traced 13% more nucleosomes, and increased the overall accuracy by about 20%. We believe that such an improvement opens the way for a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling gene expression, and how they are encoded in the DNA. Contact: nir@cs.huji.ac.il PMID:18586706

  14. Spectral response data for development of cool coloured tile coverings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libbra, Antonio; Tarozzi, Luca; Muscio, Alberto; Corticelli, Mauro A.

    2011-03-01

    Most ancient or traditional buildings in Italy show steep-slope roofs covered by red clay tiles. As the rooms immediately below the roof are often inhabited in historical or densely urbanized centres, the combination of low solar reflectance of tile coverings and low thermal inertia of either wooden roof structures or sub-tile insulation panels makes summer overheating a major problem. The problem can be mitigated by using tiles coated with cool colours, that is colours with the same spectral response of clay tiles in the visible, but highly reflecting in the near infrared range, which includes more than half of solar radiation. Cool colours can yield the same visible aspect of common building surfaces, but higher solar reflectance. Studies aimed at developing cool colour tile coverings for traditional Italian buildings have been started. A few coating solutions with the typical red terracotta colour have been produced and tested in the laboratory, using easily available materials. The spectral response and the solar reflectance have been measured and compared with that of standard tiles.

  15. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter: simulation and validation of the response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltova, Jana; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is readout by wavelength shifting fibers and transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being further transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. Detailed simulations are described in this contribution, ranging from the implementation of the geometrical elements to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, including specific noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Special attention is given to the improved optical signal propagation and the validation with the real particle data.

  16. 57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING, HENRY MERCER USED THE KILN FOR HIS EARLIEST GLAZE TESTS. THE PRESS WAS DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH METAL CASED MOLDS. SINCE ONLY THE EARLIEST TILE DESIGNS ARE IN METAL CASES. THIS TECHNIQUE WAS PROBABLY DISCONTINUED. THIS PRESS WAS, THEREFORE, PROBABLY NOT USED EXTENSIVELY AT THIS SITE. THE UPPER PART OF GLAZE KILN No. 2 IS AT THE LEFT REAR. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  17. Tiling and demand-driven evaluation for picture processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horain, Patrick J.; Dogaru, Victor

    1995-08-01

    We propose a software architecture for picture processing that allows efficient memory management when algorithms with many operators are applied to large images, and that allows automated parallelization. This architecture relies on image tiling and operators with a call back function that evaluates image tiles on demand. Several tiling strategies with and without overlapping are discussed. The compexity of this evaluation strategy is hidden to application programs. This is shown with a sample program. This architecture is well suited for neighborhood operators such as convolutions and mathematical morphology operators.

  18. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  19. Optical properties of graphite oxide and reduced graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eilho; Lee, Seokbae; Roh, Seulki; Hwang, Eunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung; Hwang, Jungseek

    2014-07-01

    We studied the optical properties of a graphite oxide and a reduced graphite oxide by using the optical spectroscopic technique. The graphite oxide does not show a finite dc conductivity and has several characteristic absorption modes in the mid-infrared region, caused by an epoxide functional group and hydroxyl and carboxyl moieties in the mid-infrared range. The reduced graphite oxide shows a Drude-like response in the far-infrared region and the estimated dc conductivity and electric mobility are around 200 Ω-1cm-1 and ˜100 cm2V-1s-1, respectively. We found that the optical conductivity cannot be fitted with a simple Drude model, which indicates that the charge carriers are correlated. We applied an extended Drude model and obtained the optical scattering rate and the optical effective mass. We found that the optical effective mass can carry information of both the enhanced mass by correlation and the electronic band structure.

  20. Graphitized needle cokes and natural graphites for lithium intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Spellman, L.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Goldberger, W.M.; Kinoshita, K.

    1996-05-10

    This paper examined effects of heat treatment and milling (before or after heat treatment) on the (electrochemical) intercalating ability of needle petroleum coke; natural graphite particles are included for comparison. 1 tab, 4 figs, 7 refs.

  1. Implementation of the {alpha}-CHERS diagnostic for D-T operation of TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, G.R.; Fonck, R.J.; Stratton, F.K.

    1995-03-01

    The {alpha}-CHERS diagnostic is a high throughput charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic designed to measure the density profile and time evolution of 0-500 keV alpha particles during D-T operation of TFTR. Following successful tests with a prototype ({alpha}-CHERS system, an improved, multi-channel system has been installed for D-T Operation. Three spatial channels may be observed simultaneously, and the spectral resolution of 0.5 nm permits increased alpha energy resolution and improved impurity line identification. More efficient coupling optics between the spectrometer and CCD detectors have increased the light throughput, and radiation shielding has been installed around the detectors and spectrometers to eliminate the neutron/gamma ray noise observed in high power D-D plasmas.

  2. Radioactivity measurements of ITER materials using the TFTR D-T neutron field

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Barnes, C.W.; Kugel, H.W.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    The availability of high D-T fusion neutron yields at TFTR has provided a useful opportunity to directly measure D-T neutron-induced radioactivity in a realistic tokamak fusion reactor environment for materials of vital interest to ITER. These measurements are valuable for characterizing radioactivity in various ITER candidate materials. for validating complex neutron transport calculations, and for meeting fusion reactor licensing requirements. The radioactivity measurements at TFTR involve potential ITER materials including stainless steel 316, vanadium, titanium, chromium, silicon, iron, cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, aluminum, copper, zinc. zirconium, niobium, and tungsten. Small samples of these materials were irradiated close to the plasma and just outside the vacuum vessel wall of TFTR, locations of different neutron energy spectra. Saturation activities for both threshold and capture reactions were measured. Data from dosimetric reactions have been used to obtain preliminary neutron energy spectra. Spectra from the first wall were compared to calculations from ITER and to measurements from accelerator-based tests.

  3. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by D-T neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, D.C.; Edwards, A.A.; Prosser, J.S.; Bolton, D.; Sherwin, A.G.

    1984-06-01

    Unstable chromosome aberrations induced by in vitro irradiation with D-T neutrons have been analyzed in human blood lymphocytes. With respect to 250 kVp X rays a maximum limiting RBE at low doses of 4.1 was obtained for dicentric aberrations. Using aberrations as markers in mixed cultures of irradiated and unirradiated cells permits an assessment of interphase death plus mitotic delay. The low-dose RBE for this effect is 2.5. Assuming all unstable aberrations observed at metaphase would lead to cell death by nondisjunction allows an assessment of mitotic death. The low-dose RBE for this effect is 4.5. The data are compared with similar work obtained earlier with /sup 242/Cm ..cap alpha.. particles. The application of the present work to cytogenetic assessment of dose after accidental exposure to D-T neutrons is discussed.

  4. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  5. 44. Everett Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN, FROM LOGGIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Everett Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN, FROM LOGGIA LOOKING EAST ACROSS RECEPTION HALL - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 45. Everett, Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN FROM RECEPTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Everett, Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN FROM RECEPTION HALL LOOKING EAST ACROSS ARRIVAL LOBBY FLOOR - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. VIEW OF COMPASS ROSE TILE INLAY IN FLOOR OF LOBBY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF COMPASS ROSE TILE INLAY IN FLOOR OF LOBBY, BUILDING 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Roosevelt Base, Administration & Brig Building, Bounded by Nevada & Colorado Streets, Reeves & Richardson Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 12. FIREPLACE: TILES AND CARVED WOOD PANEL. IN THE LATTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. FIREPLACE: TILES AND CARVED WOOD PANEL. IN THE LATTER READS THE WORDS OF THE MORRIS FAMILY'S HOMES: CEDAR GROVE, A.D. 1774 AND COMPTON, A.D. 1887. - Compton, Meadowbrook Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food cooked on the stove was served to workers in the eating area to the left of the counter (off picture). - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  10. Using Homemade Algebra Tiles To Develop Algebra and Prealgebra Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitze, Annette Ricks; Kitt, Nancy A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use homemade tiles, sketches, and the box method to reach a broader group of students for successful algebra learning. Provides a list of concepts appropriate for such an approach. (KHR)

  11. Detail of first floor of loading dock showing composition tile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of first floor of loading dock showing composition tile over wood floor/basement ceiling - Southern Pacific Railroad Depot, Railroad Terminal Post Office & Express Building, Fifth & I Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  12. Self-glazing ceramic tiles based on acidic igneous glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Merkin, A.P.; Nanazashvili, V.I.

    1988-07-01

    A technology was derived to produce self-glazing ceramic tiles based on single-component systems of acidic igneous (volcanic) glasses. A weakly alkaline solution of NaOH or KOH was used as the sealing water to activate the sintering process. Tests conducted on the self-glazing ceramic tiles showed that their water absorption amounts to 2.5-8%, linear shrinkage is 3.2-7%, and frost resistance amounts to 35-70 cycles. The application of acidic igneous glasses as the main raw material for the production of ceramic facing tiles made it possible to widen the raw material base and simplify the technology for fabricating ceramic facing tiles at lower cost. The use of waste products when processing perlite-bearing rocks, when carrying out mining and cutting of tuffs, slags, and tuff breccia for recovering cut materials was recommended.

  13. Interference Heating to Cavities Between Simulated RSI Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Test results for full scale simulated surface insulation tiles on both the tunnel wall and in the free stream, for in-line and staggered tile orientations, are summarized as follows: (1) The staggered tile orientation has heating on the forward face which is a factor of 4.5 times higher than the heating to the forward face of the in-line tile orientation; (2) the longitudinal gap heating was the highest for the 0.3175 cm gap and the lowest for the 0.1587 cm gap; and (3) there was an order of magnitude decrease in the heating on the forward face of a spanwise gap when the gap size was decreased from 0.3175 cm to 0.1587 cm.

  14. South front, west part, showing wrought iron gates and tiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South front, west part, showing wrought iron gates and tiling at the former main entrance. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Excited states of 26Al studied via the reaction 27Al(d,t)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Bhattacharya, C.; Rana, T. K.; Manna, S.; Kundu, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, K.; Roy, P.; Pandey, R.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T. K.; Meena, J. K.; Roy, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Sinha, M.; Saha, A. K.; Asgar, Md. A.; Dey, A.; Roy, Subinit; Moin Shaikh, Md.

    2016-05-01

    The reaction 27Al(d,t) at 25 MeV was utilized to study the excited states of 26Al. The angular distributions of the observed excited states of 26Al were analyzed with zero range distorted wave Born approximation as well as by incorporating finite range correction parameters to extract spectroscopic factors. The two sets of extracted spectroscopic factors were compared with each other to see the effect of using finite range correction in the transfer form factor.

  16. Cross Sections Calculations of ( d, t) Nuclear Reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Yiğit, M.; Tanır, G.

    2013-04-01

    In nuclear fusion reactions two light atomic nuclei fuse together to form a heavier nucleus. Fusion power is the power generated by nuclear fusion processes. In contrast with fission power, the fusion reaction processes does not produce radioactive nuclides. The fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2. So the fusion energy will not contribute to environmental problems such as particulate pollution and excessive CO2 in the atmosphere. Fusion powered electricity generation was initially believed to be readily achievable, as fission power had been. However, the extreme requirements for continuous reactions and plasma containment led to projections being extended by several decades. In 2010, more than 60 years after the first attempts, commercial power production is still believed to be unlikely before 2050. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. In the fusion reactor, tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. Therefore, for self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. Working out the systematics of ( d, t) nuclear reaction cross sections is of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. Since the experimental data of charged particle induced reactions are scarce, self-consistent calculation and analyses using nuclear theoretical models are very important. In this study, ( d, t) cross sections for target nuclei 19F, 50Cr, 54Fe, 58Ni, 75As, 89Y, 90Zr, 107Ag, 127I, 197Au and 238U have been investigated up to 50 MeV deuteron energy. The excitation functions for ( d, t) reactions have been calculated by pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism. Calculation results have been also compared with the available measurements in

  17. Mineral resource of the month: graphite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    The article presents facts about graphite ideal for industrial applications. Among the characteristics of graphite are its metallic luster, softness, perfect basal cleavage and electrical conductivity. Batteries, brake linings and powdered metals are some of the products that make use of graphite. It attributes the potential applications for graphite in high-technology fields to innovations in thermal technology and acid-leaching techniques.

  18. Method of Obtaining Uniform Coatings on Graphite

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, I. E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  19. METHOD OF OBTAINING UNIFORM COATINGS ON GRAPHITE

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, I.E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  20. Experimental subcritical facility driven by D-D/D-T neutron generator at BARC, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Amar; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Bajpai, Shefali; Sarkar, P. S.; Bishnoi, Saroj

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents design of an experimental subcritical assembly driven by D-D/D-T neutron and preliminary experimental measurements. The system has been developed for investigating the static and dynamic neutronic properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems. This system is modular in design and it is first in the series of subcritical assemblies being designed. The subcritical core consists of natural uranium fuel with high density polyethylene as moderator and beryllium oxide as reflector. The fuel is embedded in high density polyethylene moderator matrix. Estimated keff of the system is ∼0.89. One of the unique features of subcritical core is the use of Beryllium oxide (BeO) as reflector and HDPE as moderator making the assembly a compact modular system. The subcritical core is coupled to Purnima Neutron Generator which works in D-D and D-T mode with both DC and pulsed operation. It has facility for online source strength monitoring using neutron tagging and programmable source modulation. Preliminary experiments have been carried out for spatial flux measurement and reactivity estimation using pulsed neutron source (PNS) techniques with D-D neutrons. Further experiments are being planned to measure the reactivity and other kinetic parameters using noise methods. This facility would also be used for carrying out studies on effect of source importance and measurement of source multiplication factor ks and external neutron source efficiency φ∗ in great details. Experiments with D-T neutrons are also underway.

  1. Ceramic tile grout removal & sealing using high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.; Li, L.; Spencer, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    Work has been conducted using a Nd:YAG laser, a CO{sub 2} laser and a high power diode laser (HPDL) in order to determine the feasibility of removing contaminated tile grout from the void between adjoining vitrified ceramic tiles, and to seal the void permanently with a material having an impermeable surface glaze. Reported on in the paper are; the basic process phenomena, the process effectiveness, suitable vitrifiable material development, a heat affect study and a morphological and compositional analysis.

  2. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter performance with Run 1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá Alberich, L.

    2016-07-01

    The performance of the central hadronic calorimeter, TileCal, in the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is studied using cosmic-ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the Run 1 of LHC (2010-2012). Results are presented for the precision of the absolute energy scale and timing, noise characterization, and time-stability of the detector. The results show that the Tile Calorimeter performance is within the design requirements of the detector.

  3. 56. ORIGINAL MOLDS. THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS HAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. ORIGINAL MOLDS. THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS HAS APPROXIMATELY 6,000 PLASTER MOLDS OF VARIOUS TYPES, INCLUDING THE DEEP CAVITY MOLDS IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THESE MOLDS PRODUCED ALLEGORICAL FIGURES TO BE INSTALLED AROUND THE CORNICES OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  4. No inherent glassiness in a Penrose tiling quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Strandburg, K.J.; Dressel, P.R.

    1988-11-01

    Consideration of the structure of the Penrose pattern has led to speculation that a system with a Penrose tiling ground state might be subject to inherent glassy behavior. Monte Carol simulations show, using a simple model of the energetics, that there is no inherent glassiness in the Penrose tiling. Thermodynamic quantities measured are completely reversible, displaying no observable hysterisis, and the system may be easily cooled from a highly disordered configuration into its lowest energy state. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Spatial chaos of Wang tiles with two symbols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Yu; Chen, Yu-Jie; Hu, Wen-Guei; Lin, Song-Sun

    2016-02-01

    This investigation completely classifies the spatial chaos problem in plane edge coloring (Wang tiles) with two symbols. For a set of Wang tiles B , spatial chaos occurs when the spatial entropy h ( B ) is positive. B is called a minimal cycle generator if P ( B ) ≠ 0̸ and P ( B ' ) = 0̸ whenever B ' ⫋ B , where P ( B ) is the set of all periodic patterns on ℤ2 generated by B . Given a set of Wang tiles B , write B = C 1 ∪ C 2 ∪ ⋯ ∪ C k ∪ N , where Cj, 1 ≤ j ≤ k, are minimal cycle generators and B contains no minimal cycle generator except those contained in C1∪C2∪⋯∪Ck. Then, the positivity of spatial entropy h ( B ) is completely determined by C1∪C2∪⋯∪Ck. Furthermore, there are 39 equivalence classes of marginal positive-entropy sets of Wang tiles and 18 equivalence classes of saturated zero-entropy sets of Wang tiles. For a set of Wang tiles B , h ( B ) is positive if and only if B contains a MPE set, and h ( B ) is zero if and only if B is a subset of a SZE set.

  6. Intercalated hybrid graphite fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is directed to a highly conductive lightweight hybrid material and methods of producing the same. The hybrid composite is obtained by weaving strands of a high strength carbon or graphite fiber into a fabric-like structure, depositing a layer of carbon onto the structure, heat treating the structure to graphitize the carbon layer, and intercalating the graphitic carbon layer structure. A laminate composite material useful for protection against lightning strikes comprises at least one layer of the hybrid material over at least one layer of high strength carbon or graphite fibers. The composite material of the present invention is compatible with matrix compounds, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which is the same as underlying fiber layers, and is resistant to galvanic corrosion in addition to being highly conductive. These materials are useful in the aerospace industry, in particular as lightning strike protection for airplanes.

  7. CALANDRIA TYPE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, R.M.; Mahlmeister, J.E.; Vaughn, N.E.; Sanders, W.J.; Williams, A.C.

    1964-02-11

    A sodium graphite power reactor in which the unclad graphite moderator and fuel elements are contained within a core tank is described. The core tank is submersed in sodium within the reactor vessel. Extending longitudinally through the core thnk are process tubes with fuel elements positioned therein. A bellows sealing means allows axial expansion and construction of the tubes. Within the core tank, a leakage plenum is located below the graphite, and above the graphite is a gas space. A vent line regulates the gas pressure in the space, and another line removes sodium from the plenum. The sodium coolant flows from the lower reactor vessel through the annular space between the fuel elements and process tubes and out into the reactor vessel space above the core tank. From there, the heated coolant is drawn off through an outlet line and sent to the heat exchange. (AEC)

  8. A novel nanoporous graphitic composite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Ming; Hoshinoo, Kumiko; Xue, M; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Ooi, Kenta

    2002-08-21

    A novel nanoporous composite containing micrographitic carbon layers is synthesized by preliminarily expanding the interlayer of an oxidized product of graphite using surfactant, followed by Si bridging/pillaring, and carbonization. PMID:12211211

  9. Graphite for the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Fuller, E.L.; Romanoski, G.R.; Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite finds applications in both fission and fusion reactors. Fission reactors harness the energy liberated when heavy elements, such as uranium or plutonium, fragment or fission''. Reactors of this type have existed for nearly 50 years. The first nuclear fission reactor, Chicago Pile No. 1, was constructed of graphite under a football stand at Stagg Field, University of Chicago. Fusion energy devices will produce power by utilizing the energy produced when isotopes of the element hydrogen are fused together to form helium, the same reaction that powers our sun. The role of graphite is very different in these two reactor systems. Here we summarize the function of the graphite in fission and fusion reactors, detailing the reasons for their selection and discussing some of the challenges associated with their application in nuclear fission and fusion reactors. 10 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Graphite-reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chopped graphite fibers added to surgical bone cement form bonding agent with mechanical properties closely matched to those of bone. Curing reaction produces less heat, resulting in reduced traumatization of body tissues. Stiffness is increased without affecting flexural strength.