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Sample records for d-xylose breath test

  1. Predisposing factors for positive D-Xylose breath test for evaluation of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: A retrospective study of 932 patients

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, Richard A; Zhang, Qing; Lodhia, Nilesh; Shuster, Jonathan; Toskes, Phillip P; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate, in the largest cohort to date, patient characteristics and associated risk factors for developing small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) using the D-Xylose breath test (XBT). METHODS: We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study to analyze patient characteristics who underwent the XBT for evaluation of SIBO. Diagnostic testing with the XBT was performed based on a clinical suspicion for SIBO in patients with symptoms of bloating, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, weight loss, diarrhea, and/or constipation. Consecutive electronic medical records of 932 patients who completed the XBT at the University of Florida between 2005 and 2009 were reviewed. A two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to test for several associations including age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) with a +XBT. A two-way ANOVA was also performed to control for the differences and interaction with age and between genders. A similar analysis was repeated for BMI. Associations between medical conditions and prior surgical histories were conducted using the Mantel-Haenszel method for 2 by 2 contingency tables, stratified for gender. Reported odds ratio estimates reflect the odds of the prevalence of a condition within the +XBT group to that of the -XBT group. P values of less than 0.05 (two-sided) were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: In the 932 consecutive eligible subjects studied, 513 had a positive XBT. A positive association was found between female gender and a positive XBT (P = 0.0025), and females with a positive test were, on average, greater than 5 years older than those with a negative test (P = 0.024). The mean BMI of positive XBT subjects was normal (24.5) and significantly lower than the subjects with a negative XBT (29.5) (P = 0.0050). A positive XBT was associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (OR = 1.35; 95%CI: 1.02-1.80, P = 0.04), peptic ulcer disease (PUD) (OR = 2.61; 95%CI: 1.48-4.59, P < 0.01), gastroparesis

  2. D-xylose absorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  3. The effect of canola meal tannins on the intestinal absorption capacity of broilers using a D-xylose test.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, B; Rogiewicz, A; Slominski, B A

    2015-12-01

    In three D-xylose absorption experiments, the effect of 1% HCl/methanol, 70% methanol or 70% acetone extracts of canola meal (CM) or 70% acetone extract of soybean meal (SBM) containing polyphenols, phenolic acids, tannins and phytic acid on intestinal absorption capacity of broilers was determined. In Exp. 1, the experimental groups received orally D-xylose solution alone or with methanol/HCl, methanol or acetone extracts of CM. In Exp. 2, the experimental groups received D-xylose alone or with acetone extracts of CM or SBM. In Exp. 3, the experimental groups received D-xylose plus sucrose solution or D-xylose plus acetone extracts of CM or SBM. In Exps. 2 and 3, the CM extracts contained 2.7 and 2.6, 2.4 and 2.3, 3.2 and 3.2, and 2.4 and 2.2 times higher polyphenols, phenolic acids, tannins and condensed tannins than the corresponding SBM extracts respectively. Blood samples were collected in 40-min intervals, and plasma D-xylose was measured. Compared to the Control, plasma D-xylose in Exp. 1 was lower (p < 0.001) by 81, 69 and 73% at 40-min, by 41, 44 and 37% at 80-min and by 22, 31, and 23% at 120-min post-ingestion of the HCl/methanol, methanol and acetone extracts respectively. In both Exps. 2 and 3, plasma D-xylose level was lower (p < 0.001) in groups dosed with CM extract or SBM extract at each time of blood collection, when compared to the respective Control group. However, in Exp. 3, birds dosed with SBM extract had higher plasma D-xylose than CM extract-dosed birds by 28, 8 and 21% at 40, 80 and 120 min respectively (p < 0.01). In conclusion, although CM extract caused a lower absorption of D-xylose, based on 5 to 10% of CM inclusion levels in practical broiler rations, the soluble bioactive components of CM will likely have minor impact on the absorption capacity of the chicken intestine. PMID:25865561

  4. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  5. Isolation and screening of yeasts that ferment D-xylose directly to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, J.N.; Ireland, R.S.; Margaritis, A.; Lachance, M.A.

    1985-12-01

    Natural habitats of yeasts were examined for the presence of strains able to produce ethanol from D-xylose. Black knots, insect frass, and tree exudates were screened by enrichment in liquid D-xylose-yeast extract medium. These and each D-xylose-assimilating yeast in a collection from cactus fruits and Drosophila spp. were tested for alcohol production from this sugar. Among the 412 isolates examined, 36 produced more than 1 g of ethanol liter/sup -1/ from 20 g of D-xylose liter/sup -1/, all under aerated conditions. Closer examination of the strains indicated that their time courses of D-xylose fermentation followed different patterns. Some strains produced more biomass than ethanol, and among these, ethanol may or may not be assimilated rapidly after depletion of D-xylose. Others produced more ethanol than biomass, but all catabolized ethanol after carbohydrate exhaustion. Ethanol production appeared best at low pH values and under mild aeration. Possible correlations between the nutritional profiles of the yeasts and their ability to produce ethanol from D-xylose were explored by multivariate analysis. D-Xylose appeared slightly better utilized by yeasts which rate poorly in terms of fermentation. The fermentation of D-glucose had no bearing on D-xylose fermentation. No specific nutritional trait could discriminate well between better D-xylose fermentors and other yeasts.

  6. Isolation and Screening of Yeasts That Ferment d-Xylose Directly to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, J. N.; Ireland, R. S.; Margaritis, A.; Lachance, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Natural habitats of yeasts were examined for the presence of strains able to produce ethanol from d-xylose. Black knots, insect frass, and tree exudates were screened by enrichment in liquid d-xylose-yeast extract medium. These and each d-xylose-assimilating yeast in a collection from cactus fruits and Drosophila spp. were tested for alcohol production from this sugar. Among the 412 isolates examined, 36 produced more than 1 g of ethanol liter−1 from 20 g of d-xylose liter−1, all under aerated conditions. Closer examination of the strains indicated that their time courses of d-xylose fermentation followed different patterns. Some strains produced more biomass than ethanol, and among these, ethanol may or may not be assimilated rapidly after depletion of d-xylose. Others produced more ethanol than biomass, but all catabolized ethanol after carbohydrate exhaustion. Ethanol production appeared best at low pH values and under mild aeration. Possible correlations between the nutritional profiles of the yeasts and their ability to produce ethanol from d-xylose were explored by multivariate analysis. d-Xylose appeared slightly better utilized by yeasts which rate poorly in terms of fermentation. The fermentation of d-glucose had no bearing on d-xylose fermentation. No specific nutritional trait could discriminate well between better d-xylose fermentors and other yeasts. PMID:16346947

  7. Production of ethanol from D-xylose by using D-xylose isomerase and yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.S.; Chem, L.F.; Flickinger, M.C.; Chiang, L.C.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-02-01

    D-xylulose, an intermediate of D-xylose catabolism, was observed to be fermentable to ethanol and carbon dioxide in a yield of greater than 80% by yeasts (including industrial bakers' yeast) under fermentative conditions. This conversion appears to be carried out by many yeasts known for D-glucose fermentation. In some yeasts, xylitol, in addition to ethanol, was produced from D-xylulose. Fermenting yeasts are also able to produce ethanol from D-xylose when D-xylose isomerizing enzyme is present. The results indicate that ethanol could be produced from D-xylose in a yield of greater than 80% by a two-step process. First. D-xylose is converted to D-xylulose by xylose isomerase. D-xylulose is then fermented to ethanol by yeasts.

  8. Clinical applications of breath testing

    PubMed Central

    Paschke, Kelly M; Mashir, Alquam

    2010-01-01

    Breath testing has the potential to benefit the medical field as a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool for diseases of the lung and beyond. With growing evidence of clinical worth, standardization of methods, and new sensor and detection technologies the stage is set for breath testing to gain considerable attention and wider application in upcoming years. PMID:21173863

  9. Anomeric specificity of D-xylose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Collyer, C A; Goldberg, J D; Viehmann, H; Blow, D M; Ramsden, N G; Fleet, G W; Montgomery, F J; Grice, P

    1992-12-01

    Crystal structures of complexes of D-xylose isomerase with deoxysugars have been determined. Deoxynojirimycin is a structural analogue of alpha-pyranose and mimics the binding of these aldose substrates. The structure of this complex supports the hypothesis that an imidazole group catalyzes ring opening of the pyranose. The steric restrictions in the active site of the enzyme prevent a beta-pyranose from binding in the same way. For the reverse reaction with ketoses, the anomeric specificity is less certain. Dideoxyimino-D-glucitol is a structural analogue of the ketose alpha-D-furanose. The binding of the inhibitor dideoxyimino-D-glucitol to the crystals of the enzyme does not mimic the binding of the reactive alpha-D-fructofuranose. Superposition of the nonphysiological substrate alpha-D-fructofuranose onto the atomic positions of dideoxyimino-D-glucitol is not possible due to the steric restrictions of the active site. However, by utilizing the approximate 2-fold symmetry of the sugar, a stereochemically sensible model is produced which is consistent with other data. In addition to reaction with alpha-D-furanose, the enzyme probably reacts with open ring keto sugars which are present at significant concentrations. Other sugars which resemble furanoses either do not inhibit significantly or are not observed in the crystals bound in a single conformation. PMID:1457418

  10. How to interpret hydrogen breath tests.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Uday C

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen breath tests using various substrates like glucose, lactulose, lactose and fructose are being used more and more to diagnose small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and lactose or fructose malabsorption. Though quantitative culture of jejunal aspirate is considered as gold standard for the diagnosis of SIBO, hydrogen breath tests, in spite of their low sensitivity, are popular for their non-invasiveness. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for the diagnosis of SIBO as conventionally accepted double-peak criterion on lactulose hydrogen breath test is very insensitive and recently described early-peak criterion is often false positive. Hydrogen breath test is useful to diagnose various types of sugar malabsorption. Technique and interpretation of different hydrogen breath tests are outlined in this review. PMID:21860825

  11. Isobutanol production from D-xylose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brat, Dawid; Boles, Eckhard

    2013-03-01

    Simultaneous overexpression of an optimized, cytosolically localized valine biosynthesis pathway together with overexpression of xylose isomerase XylA from Clostridium phytofermentans, transaldolase Tal1 and xylulokinase Xks1 enabled recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to complement the valine auxotrophy of ilv2,3,5 triple deletion mutants for growth on D-xylose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, after additional overexpression of ketoacid decarboxylase Aro10 and alcohol dehydrogenase Adh2, the cells were able to ferment D-xylose directly to isobutanol. PMID:23279585

  12. Hydrogen breath tests in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen breath tests are widely used to explore pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and carbohydrate malabsorption are disorders detected by these tests that have been proposed to be of great importance for symptoms of GI diseases. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for diagnosis of SIBO whereas lactose and fructose hydrogen breath tests are used for detection of lactose and fructose maldigestion respectively. Lactulose hydrogen breath test is also used widely to measure the orocecal transit time for GI motility. These methods are noninvasive and inexpensive. Many patients with functional gut disorders are unaware of the relationship between diet and GI symptoms they present. In particular, patients with chronic symptoms may regard their condition as normal and may not be aware that their symptoms can be effectively managed following a proper diagnosis. Patients with symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and altered bowel movements (diarrhea and constipation), or with a medical diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome or celiac disease, may have undiagnosed carbohydrate malabsorption or SIBO. Hydrogen breath tests are specific and sensitive diagnostic tests that can be used to either confirm or eliminate the possibility of carbohydrate malabsorption or SIBO in such patients. Breath tests, though valuable tools, are underutilized in evaluating dyspepsia and functional bloating and diarrhea as well as suspected malabsorption. However, because of their simplicity, reproducibility and safety of procedure they are now being substituted to more uncomfortable and expensive techniques that were traditionally used in gastroenterology. PMID:25298621

  13. Breath Testing for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Should We Bother?

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen breath test is based on following breath hydrogen levels after the administration of a carbohydrate (most commonly lactulose) to a patient with suspected small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. The test is based on the interaction between the administered carbohydrate and the intestinal bacteria. The resulting fermentation produces hydrogen. A positive breath test is based on a breath hydrogen rise prior to the expected arrival time in the highly microbial cecum. Despite renewed enthusiasm for breath testing in recent years due to associations with conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, breath testing poses many challenges. In this argument against breath testing, several pitfalls that complicate breath testing will be described. PMID:26902227

  14. Breathing air trailer acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-09-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0251 Rev. 0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment being tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity for use in the core sampling program. The ATP was written by the Seller and will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing the test at the Seller`s location. This test procedure is to verify that the American Bristol Industries, Inc., Model 5014-0001 low pressure Mobile Breathing Air Trailer, meets or exceeds the requirements of the Westinghouse Hanford specification.

  15. Breath tests and airway gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    Measuring soluble gas in the exhaled breath is a non-invasive technique used to estimate levels of respiratory, solvent, and metabolic gases. The interpretation of these measurements is based on the assumption that the measured gases exchange in the alveoli. While the respiratory gases have a low blood-solubility and exchange in the alveoli, high blood-soluble gases exchange in the airways. The effect of airway gas exchange on the interpretation of these exhaled breath measurements can be significant. We describe airway gas exchange in relation to exhaled measurements of soluble gases that exchange in the alveoli. The mechanisms of airway gas exchange are reviewed and criteria for determining if a gas exchanges in the airways are provided. The effects of diffusion, perfusion, temperature and breathing maneuver on airway gas exchange and on measurement of exhaled soluble gas are discussed. A method for estimating the impact of airway gas exchange on exhaled breath measurements is presented. We recommend that investigators should carefully control the inspired air conditions and type of exhalation maneuver used in a breath test. Additionally, care should be taken when interpreting breath tests from subjects with pulmonary disease. PMID:16413216

  16. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  17. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  20. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  2. Comparison of Gavage, Water Bottle, and a High-Moisture Diet Bolus as Dosing Methods for Quantitative D-xylose Administration to B6D2F1 (Mus musculus) Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmer, J. Paul; Lewis, Sherry M.; Moyer, Jerry L.

    1993-01-01

    Gavage, water bottle, and diet incorporation are 3 dosing methods used orally to administer test compounds to rodents. These 3 methods were compared in mice to determine which represented the most quantitative delivery system. For dietary incorporation, a high-moisture bolus form of NIH-31 rodent meal was developed using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as an autoclave-stable binding agent. A high-moisture bolus were selected to increase the acceptability of the dosed diet and to promote quantitative consumption through reduced wastage. The test compound used was D-xylose, a pentose sugar that may be quantitatively detected, colorimetrically, in urine following oral dosing. Six male and 6 female B6D2FI mice were placed in metabolism cages and dosed with a known quantity of D-xylose by each of the 3 methods. Urine was collected before and after each method of administration and analysed for total D-xylose; the per cent recovery was based upon the amount of D-xylose consumed. Quantitative consumption was apparently greatest for water bottle dosing with an average recovery of 56.0% of the original D-xylose dose. High-moisture bolus incorporation ranked second with 50.0% D-xylose recovery, and gavage was third with 41.0% D-xylose recovery.

  3. Environmental testing of escape breathing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Stengel, J W

    1982-05-03

    A new generation of 60-minute self-contained breathing apparatus was being introduced into the underground coal mining industry for use as respiratory protection during fires and mine disasters. Little field experience existed from which to predict the survivability of this new life-support equipment. A series of environmental tests was proposed consisting of exposure to heat, cold, shock, and vibration. Treated and untreated apparatus were evaluated and compared by use on human subjects and a mechanical breathing simulator. Results are reported. After field data have been collected, information may be able to be correlated with environmental testing and used as a predictor of survivability.

  4. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air... employed in lieu of the breathing tubes required. (c)(1) A flexible, nonkinking type breathing tube...

  5. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air... employed in lieu of the breathing tubes required. (c)(1) A flexible, nonkinking type breathing tube...

  6. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air... employed in lieu of the breathing tubes required. (c)(1) A flexible, nonkinking type breathing tube...

  7. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air... employed in lieu of the breathing tubes required. (c)(1) A flexible, nonkinking type breathing tube...

  8. Production of xylitol from D-xylose by Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, J.M.; Gong, Cheng S.; Tsao, G.T.

    1997-12-31

    Xylitol, a naturally occurring five-carbon sugar alcohol, can be produced from D-xylose through microbial hydrogenation. Xylitol has found increasing use in the food industries, especially in confectionary. It is the only so-called {open_quotes}second-generation polyol sweeteners{close_quotes} that is allowed to have the specific health claims in some world markets. In this study, the effect of cell density on the xylitol production by the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii NRRL Y-7426 from D-xylose under microaerobic conditions was examined. The rate of xylitol production increased with increasing yeast cell density to 3 g/L. Beyond this amount there was no increase in the xylitol production with increasing cell density. The optimal pH range for xylitol production was between 4.5 and 5.5. The optimal temperature was between 28 and 37{degrees}C, and the optimal shaking speed was 300 rpm. The rate of xylitol production increased linearly with increasing initial xylose concentration. A high concentration of xylose (279 g/L) was converted rapidly and efficiently to produce xylitol with a product concentration of 221 g/L was reached after 48 h of incubation under optimum conditions. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Breathing air trailer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0251, Rev.0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-104. The equipment tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a design and fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and was performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing portions of the test at the Seller`s location.

  10. Direct fermentation of d-xylose to ethanol by Kluyveromyces marxianus strains

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-11-01

    Eight strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus were screened, and all of them were found to ferment the aldopentose D-xylose directly to ethanol under aerobic conditions. One of these strains, K. marxianus SUB-80-S, was grown in a medium containing 20 g of D-xylose per liter, and the following results were obtained: maximum ethanol concentration, 5.6 g/liter; ethanol yield, 0.28 g of ethanol per g of D-xylose (55% of theoretical); maximum specific growth rate, 0.12/hour; 100% D-xylose utilization was completed in 48 hours. (Refs. 12).

  11. Studies on the simultaneous enzymatic isomerization and yeast fermentation of D-xylose

    SciTech Connect

    Roman de Rodriguez Ganduglia, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    The addition of the enzyme D-xylose isomerase (glucose isomerase) to fermentation medium facilitates the conversion of D-xylose into ethanol by a two step process in which D-xylose is first isomerized to D-xylose, which is in turn converted to ethanol by yeast. Detailed kinetic studies were conducted independently for the isomerization reaction and for the fermentation of D-xylose by the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The kinetics of the isomerization reaction has been examined using a differential batch reactor at different temperatures and pH value. The kinetics of the utilization of D-xylose by the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been examined in presence of D-xylose and ethanol under anaerobic batch conditions. The effects of the concentration of each of the two sugars upon the production of ethanol were also examined. A combined model has been formulated that predicts the performance of the batch conversion of D-xylose to ethanol by the simultaneous isomerization/fermentation process. A reasonable agreement was found between experimental data and values calculated from the model.

  12. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H2 and CH4 gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence, headaches and lack of energy. Abdominal bloating is a common nonspecific symptom which can negatively impact quality of life. It may reflect dietary imbalance, such as excess fiber intake, or may be a manifestation of IBS. However, bloating may also represent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients with persistent symptoms of abdominal bloating and distension despite dietary interventions should be referred for H2 breath testing to determine the presence or absence of bacterial overgrowth. If bacterial overgrowth is identified, patients are typically treated with antibiotics. Evaluation of IBS generally includes testing of other disorders that cause similar symptoms. Carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) can cause abdominal fullness, bloating, nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea, which are similar to the symptoms of IBS. However, it is unclear if these digestive disorders contribute to or cause the symptoms of IBS. Research studies show that a proper diagnosis and effective dietary intervention significantly reduces the severity and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Thus, diagnosis of malabsorption of these carbohydrates in IBS using a breath test is very important to guide the clinician in the proper treatment of IBS patients. PMID:24976698

  13. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-06-28

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H₂ and CH₄ gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence, headaches and lack of energy. Abdominal bloating is a common nonspecific symptom which can negatively impact quality of life. It may reflect dietary imbalance, such as excess fiber intake, or may be a manifestation of IBS. However, bloating may also represent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients with persistent symptoms of abdominal bloating and distension despite dietary interventions should be referred for H₂ breath testing to determine the presence or absence of bacterial overgrowth. If bacterial overgrowth is identified, patients are typically treated with antibiotics. Evaluation of IBS generally includes testing of other disorders that cause similar symptoms. Carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) can cause abdominal fullness, bloating, nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea, which are similar to the symptoms of IBS. However, it is unclear if these digestive disorders contribute to or cause the symptoms of IBS. Research studies show that a proper diagnosis and effective dietary intervention significantly reduces the severity and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Thus, diagnosis of malabsorption of these carbohydrates in IBS using a breath test is very important to guide the clinician in the proper treatment of IBS patients. PMID:24976698

  14. Reciprocal Regulation of l-Arabinose and d-Xylose Metabolism in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Santosh; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glucose is known to inhibit the transport and metabolism of many sugars in Escherichia coli. This mechanism leads to its preferential consumption. Far less is known about the preferential utilization of nonglucose sugars in E. coli. Two exceptions are l-arabinose and d-xylose. Previous studies have shown that l-arabinose inhibits d-xylose metabolism in Escherichia coli. This repression results from l-arabinose-bound AraC binding to the promoter of the d-xylose metabolic genes and inhibiting their expression. This mechanism, however, has not been explored in single cells. Both the l-arabinose and d-xylose utilization systems are known to exhibit a bimodal induction response to their cognate sugar, where mixed populations of cells either expressing the metabolic genes or not are observed at intermediate sugar concentrations. This suggests that l-arabinose can only inhibit d-xylose metabolism in l-arabinose-induced cells. To understand how cross talk between these systems affects their response, we investigated E. coli during growth on mixtures of l-arabinose and d-xylose at single-cell resolution. Our results showed that mixed, multimodal populations of l-arabinose- and d-xylose-induced cells occurred at intermediate sugar concentrations. We also found that d-xylose inhibited the expression of the l-arabinose metabolic genes and that this repression was due to XylR. These results demonstrate that a strict hierarchy does not exist between l-arabinose and d-xylose as previously thought. The results may also aid in the design of E. coli strains capable of simultaneous sugar consumption. IMPORTANCE Glucose, d-xylose, and l-arabinose are the most abundant sugars in plant biomass. Developing efficient fermentation processes that convert these sugars into chemicals and fuels will require strains capable of coutilizing these sugars. Glucose has long been known to repress the expression of the l-arabinose and d-xylose metabolic genes in Escherichia coli. Recent

  15. Genetic and biochemical characterization of mutations affecting the ability of the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to metabolize D-xylose

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.P.; Zahab, D.M.; Mahmourides, G.; Maleszka, R.; Schneider, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Induced mutants, selected for their defective growth on D-xylose while retaining the ability to grow normally on D-glucose, were studied in Pachysolen tannophilus, a yeast capable of converting D-xylose to ethanol. Fourteen of the mutations were found to occur at nine distinct loci, and data indicated that many more loci remain to be detected. Most of the mutations were pleiotropic in character, and the expression of some of them was much affected by nutritional conditions and by genetic background. Mutations at several loci resulted in poor growth on at least one compound that was either an intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, succinate or {alpha}-ketoglutarate, or on compounds metabolizable via this cycle, ethanol or glycerol. An initial biochemical characterization of the mutants was undertaken. Analysis for xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulose kinase activity showed that one or more of these activities was affected in 12 of 13 mutants. However, drastic reduction in activity of a single enzyme was confined to that of xylitol dehydrogenase by mutations at three different loci and to that of D-xylose reductase by mutation at another locus. Growth of these latter four mutants was normal on all carbon sources tested that were not five-carbon sugars.

  16. 42 CFR 84.88 - Breathing bag test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing bag test. 84.88 Section 84.88 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.88 Breathing bag test. (a)...

  17. D-Xylose as a sugar complement regulates blood glucose levels by suppressing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats and by enhancing glucose uptake in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunju; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Jung, Sangwon; Yoo, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more frequently diagnosed and is characterized by hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. D-Xylose, a sucrase inhibitor, may be useful as a functional sugar complement to inhibit increases in blood glucose levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-diabetic effects of D-xylose both in vitro and stretpozotocin (STZ)-nicotinamide (NA)-induced models in vivo. MATERIALS/METHODS Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: (i) normal control; (ii) diabetic control; (iii) diabetic rats supplemented with a diet where 5% of the total sucrose content in the diet was replaced with D-xylose; and (iv) diabetic rats supplemented with a diet where 10% of the total sucrose content in the diet was replaced with D-xylose. These groups were maintained for two weeks. The effects of D-xylose on blood glucose levels were examined using oral glucose tolerance test, insulin secretion assays, histology of liver and pancreas tissues, and analysis of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) expression in liver tissues of a STZ-NA-induced experimental rat model. Levels of glucose uptake and insulin secretion by differentiated C2C12 muscle cells and INS-1 pancreatic β-cells were analyzed. RESULTS In vivo, D-xylose supplementation significantly reduced fasting serum glucose levels (P < 0.05), it slightly reduced the area under the glucose curve, and increased insulin levels compared to the diabetic controls. D-Xylose supplementation enhanced the regeneration of pancreas tissue and improved the arrangement of hepatocytes compared to the diabetic controls. Lower levels of PEPCK were detected in the liver tissues of D-xylose-supplemented rats (P < 0.05). In vitro, both 2-NBDG uptake by C2C12 cells and insulin secretion by INS-1 cells were increased with D-xylose supplementation in a dose-dependent manner compared to treatment with glucose alone. CONCLUSIONS In this study, D-xylose exerted anti-diabetic effects in vivo by

  18. Air-breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie depicts the Rocketdyne static test of an air-breathing rocket. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's advanced Transportation Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  19. Aerobic Fermentation of D-Xylose to Ethanol by Clavispora sp

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, J. N.; Margaritis, A.; Lachance, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Eleven strains of an undescribed species of Clavispora fermented D-xylose directly to ethanol under aerobic conditions. Strain UWO(PS)83-877-1 was grown in a medium containing 2% D-xylose and 0.5% yeast extract, and the following results were obtained: ethanol yield coefficient (ethanol/D-xylose), 0.29 g g−1 (57.4% of theoretical); cell yield coefficient (dry biomass/D-xylose), 0.25 g g−1; maximum ethanol concentration, 5.9 g liter−1; maximum volumetric ethanol productivity, 0.11 g liter−1 h−1. With initial D-xylose concentrations of 40, 60, and 80 g liter−1, maximum ethanol concentrations of 8.8, 10.9, and 9.8 g liter−1 were obtained, respectively (57.2, 57.1, and 48.3% of theoretical). Ethanol was found to inhibit the fermentation of D-xylose (Kp = 0.58 g liter−1) more than the fermentation of glucose (Kp = 6.5 g liter−1). The performance of this yeast compared favorably with that reported for some other D-xylose-fermenting yeasts. PMID:16346910

  20. Continuous fermentation of D-xylose by immobilized Pichia stipitis

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, M.J.; Dominguez, C.H.; Sanroman, A.; Lema, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    The main purpose of this work was to compare the performance of two different kinds of reactors (CSTR and CPFR) in order to enhance the ethanol productivity in the fermentation of D-xylose by Pichia steps immobilized in {kappa}-carrageenan. Immobilization was carried out in a 4% aqueous suspension of {kappa}-carrageenan, which was mixed with the inoculum. The bioparticles were treated with Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} as hardening agent. The fermenters operated during a long period of time (about 30 d). Best results were obtained in the packed-bed reactor (CPFR), which allowed operation at high final ethanol concentrations, this fact having been explained because of the observed strong product inhibition. The overall productivity reached values higher than 3.8 g/(L{circ}h). This supposed an interesting improvement with relation to the productivities found in the literature, which as an average did not exceed 1 g/(L{circ}h). However, the specific productivities of yeast in the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were always greater because the bioparticles were kept in close contact with the broth, whereas in the CPFR, there were at least two problems: (a) the possibility that the produced gas could prevent the intimate contact between the substrate and the particles and (b) the possible existence of preferential paths.

  1. Breath testing for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: maximizing test accuracy.

    PubMed

    Saad, Richard J; Chey, William D

    2014-12-01

    The diagnosis of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has increased considerably owing to a growing recognition of its association with common bowel symptoms including chronic diarrhea, bloating, abdominal distention, and the irritable bowel syndrome. Ideally, an accurate and objective diagnosis of SIBO should be established before initiating antibiotic treatment. Unfortunately, no perfect test exists for the diagnosis of SIBO. The current gold standard, small-bowel aspiration and quantitative culture, is limited by its high cost, invasive nature, lack of standardization, sampling error, and need for dedicated infrastructure. Although not without shortcomings, hydrogen breath testing provides the simplest noninvasive and widely available diagnostic modality for suspected SIBO. Carbohydrates such as lactulose and glucose are the most widely used substrates in hydrogen breath testing, with glucose arguably providing greater testing accuracy. Lactose, fructose, and sorbitol should not be used as substrates in the assessment of suspected SIBO. The measurement of methane in addition to hydrogen can increase the sensitivity of breath testing for SIBO. Diagnostic accuracy of hydrogen breath testing in SIBO can be maximized by careful patient selection for testing, proper test preparation, and standardization of test performance as well as test interpretation. PMID:24095975

  2. Development of a new method for d-xylose detection and quantification in urine, based on the use of recombinant xylose dehydrogenase from Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, Israel; García-Junceda, Eduardo; Hermida, Carmen; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso

    2016-09-20

    The gene xylB from Caulobacter crescentus has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli providing a high yield of xylose dehydrogenase (XylB) production and excellent purity (97%). Purified recombinant XylB showed an absolute dependence on the cofactor NAD(+) and a strong preference for d-xylose against other assayed mono and disaccharides. Additionally, XylB showed strong stability when stored as freeze-dried powder at least 250days both at 4°C and room temperature. In addition, more than 80% of the initial activity of rehydrated freeze-dried enzyme remained after 150days of incubation at 4°C. Based on these characteristics, the capability of XylB in d-xylose detection and quantification was studied. The linearity of the method was maintained up to concentrations of d-xylose of 10mg/dL and the calculated limits of detection (LoD) and quantification (LoQ) of xylose in buffer were 0.568mg/dL and 1.89mg/dL respectively. Thus, enzymatic detection was found to be an excellent method for quantification of d-xylose in both buffer and urine samples. This method can easily be incorporated in a new test for the diagnosis of hypolactasia through the measurement of intestinal lactase activity. PMID:27480343

  3. Air-Breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  4. Coconut-derived D-xylose affects postprandial glucose and insulin responses in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Yun Jung; Bak, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Bumsik; Kim, Min-Sun; Lee, Jin-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic alterations including postprandial hyperglycemia have been implicated in the development of obesity-related diseases. Xylose is a sucrase inhibitor suggested to suppress the postprandial glucose surge. The objectives of this study were to assess the inhibitory effects of two different concentrations of xylose on postprandial glucose and insulin responses and to evaluate its efficacy in the presence of other macronutrients. Randomized double-blind cross-over studies were conducted to examine the effect of D-xylose on postprandial glucose and insulin response following the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). In study 1, the overnight-fasted study subjects (n = 49) consumed a test sucrose solution (50 g sucrose in 130 ml water) containing 0, 5, or 7.5 g D-xylose powder. In study 2, the overnight-fasted study subjects (n = 50) consumed a test meal (50 g sucrose in a 60 g muffin and 200 ml sucrose-containing solution). The control meal provided 64.5 g of carbohydrates, 4.5 g of fat, and 10 g of protein. The xylose meal was identical to the control meal except 5 g of xylose was added to the muffin mix. In study 1, the 5 g xylose-containing solutions exhibited significantly lower area under the glucose curve (AUCg) and area under the insulin curve (AUCi) values for 0-15 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-30 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-45 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-60 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-90 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001) and 0-120 min (P = 0.0071, P = 0.0016). In study 2, the test meal exhibited significantly lower AUCg and AUCi values for 0-15 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-30 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-45 min (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0005), 0-60 min (P = 0.0002, P = 0.0025), and 0-90 min (P = 0.0396, P = 0.0246). In conclusion, xylose showed an acute suppressive effect on the postprandial glucose and insulin surges. PMID:22259678

  5. 46 CFR 197.450 - Breathing gas tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.450 Breathing gas tests. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) The output of each air... commencement of diving operations, at the umbilical or underwater breathing apparatus connection point for...

  6. 46 CFR 197.450 - Breathing gas tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.450 Breathing gas tests. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) The output of each air... commencement of diving operations, at the umbilical or underwater breathing apparatus connection point for...

  7. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air... employed on Type C supplied-air respirators of the continuous flow class shall meet the...

  8. Physiological properties of a mutant of Pachysolen tannophilus deficient in NADPH-dependent D-xylose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, H.; James, A.P. ); Lee, Hung; Barbosa, M. De F.S. Univ. of Guelph, Ontario ); Kubicek, C.P. )

    1989-11-01

    A D-xylose reductase mutant of Pachysolen tannophilus was isolated on the basis of its poor growth on D-xylose but normal growth on xylitol and D-glucose. Fractionation of cell extracts indicated that the mutant was deficient in D-cylose reductase activity that used NADPH exclusively as a cofactor, but not in activity that used both NADH and NADPH. Mutant cultures grown on D-xylose as the sole carbon source exhibited some properties that would be desired in improved strains. Growth rate, growth yield, and D-xylose consumption rate of the mutant were less sensitive than those of the wild type to changes in aeration rate. D-Xylose was utilized more efficiently in that less of a by-product, xylitol, was produced. In addition, under low aeration conditions, more ethanol was produced. A disadvantage was a relatively slow rate of D-xylose utilization.

  9. 42 CFR 84.91 - Breathing resistance test; exhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; exhalation. 84.91 Section 84.91 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.91...

  10. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90 Section 84.90 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90...

  11. Alcoholic fermentation of d-xylose by yeasts. [Brettanomyces naardenensis; Candida shehatae; Candida tenuis; Pachysolen tannaphilus, Pichia segobiensis; Pichia stipitis

    SciTech Connect

    Toivola, A.; Yarrow, D.; van den Bosch, E.; van Dijken, J.P.; Scheffers, W.A.

    1984-06-01

    Type strains of 200 species of yeasts able to ferment glucose and grow on xylose were screened for fermentation of D-xylose. In most of the strains tested, ethanol production was negligible. Nineteen were found to produce between 0.1 and 1.0 g of ethanol per liter. Strains of the following species produce more than 1 g of ethanol per liter in the fermentation test with 2% xylose: Brettanomyces naardenensis, Candida shehatae, Candida tenuis, Pachysolen tannophilus, Pichia segobiensis, and Pichia stipitis. Subsequent screening of these yeasts for their capacity to ferment D-cellobiose revealed that only Candida tenuis CBS 4435 was a good fermenter of both xylose and cellobiose under the test conditions used.

  12. A Systematic Approach to Multiple Breath Nitrogen Washout Test Quality

    PubMed Central

    Klingel, Michelle; Pizarro, Maria Ester; Hall, Graham L.; Ramsey, Kathryn; Foong, Rachel; Saunders, Clare; Robinson, Paul D.; Webster, Hailey; Hardaker, Kate; Kane, Mica; Ratjen, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate estimates of multiple breath washout (MBW) outcomes require correct operation of the device, appropriate distraction of the subject to ensure they breathe in a manner representative of their relaxed tidal breathing pattern, and appropriate interpretation of the acquired data. Based on available recommendations for an acceptable MBW test, we aimed to develop a protocol to systematically evaluate MBW measurements based on these criteria. Methods 50 MBW test occasions were systematically reviewed for technical elements and whether the breathing pattern was representative of relaxed tidal breathing by an experienced MBW operator. The impact of qualitative and quantitative criteria on inter-observer agreement was assessed across eight MBW operators (n = 20 test occasions, compared using a Kappa statistic). Results Using qualitative criteria, 46/168 trials were rejected: 16.6% were technically unacceptable and 10.7% were excluded due to inappropriate breathing pattern. Reviewer agreement was good using qualitative criteria and further improved with quantitative criteria from (κ = 0.53–0.83%) to (κ 0.73–0.97%), but at the cost of exclusion of further test occasions in this retrospective data analysis. Conclusions The application of the systematic review improved inter-observer agreement but did not affect reported MBW outcomes. PMID:27304432

  13. Diversity and Physiological Characterization of D-Xylose-Fermenting Yeasts Isolated from the Brazilian Amazonian Forest

    PubMed Central

    Cadete, Raquel M.; Melo, Monaliza A.; Dussán, Kelly J.; Rodrigues, Rita C. L. B.; Silva, Silvio S.; Zilli, Jerri E.; Vital, Marcos J. S.; Gomes, Fátima C. O.; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Background This study is the first to investigate the Brazilian Amazonian Forest to identify new D-xylose-fermenting yeasts that might potentially be used in the production of ethanol from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysates. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 224 yeast strains were isolated from rotting wood samples collected in two Amazonian forest reserve sites. These samples were cultured in yeast nitrogen base (YNB)-D-xylose or YNB-xylan media. Candida tropicalis, Asterotremella humicola, Candida boidinii and Debaryomyces hansenii were the most frequently isolated yeasts. Among D-xylose-fermenting yeasts, six strains of Spathaspora passalidarum, two of Scheffersomyces stipitis, and representatives of five new species were identified. The new species included Candida amazonensis of the Scheffersomyces clade and Spathaspora sp. 1, Spathaspora sp. 2, Spathaspora sp. 3, and Candida sp. 1 of the Spathaspora clade. In fermentation assays using D-xylose (50 g/L) culture medium, S. passalidarum strains showed the highest ethanol yields (0.31 g/g to 0.37 g/g) and productivities (0.62 g/L·h to 0.75 g/L·h). Candida amazonensis exhibited a virtually complete D-xylose consumption and the highest xylitol yields (0.55 g/g to 0.59 g/g), with concentrations up to 25.2 g/L. The new Spathaspora species produced ethanol and/or xylitol in different concentrations as the main fermentation products. In sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic fermentation assays, S. stipitis UFMG-XMD-15.2 generated the highest ethanol yield (0.34 g/g) and productivity (0.2 g/L·h), while the new species Spathaspora sp. 1 UFMG-XMD-16.2 and Spathaspora sp. 2 UFMG-XMD-23.2 were very good xylitol producers. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the promise of using new D-xylose-fermenting yeast strains from the Brazilian Amazonian Forest for ethanol or xylitol production from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysates. PMID:22912807

  14. Identification and characterization of D-xylose reductase involved in pentose catabolism of the zygomycetous fungus Rhizomucor pusillus.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Hidenobu; Yamasaki-Yashiki, Shino; Hoshino, Kazuhiro; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Rhizomucor pusillus NBRC 4578 efficiently produces ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass because of its ability to ferment not only d-glucose, but also d-xylose. When the strain was cultivated on d-xylose, ethanol was gradually formed in the culture medium with a decrease in d-xylose and the simultaneous accumulation of xylitol, which suggested that the strain catabolized d-xylose with d-xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). XR (RpXR) was purified to homogeneity from the crude extract prepared from the mycelia of the strain grown on d-xylose. The purified enzyme was found to be NADPH-dependent and prefer pentoses such as d-xylose, d-ribose, and l-arabinose as substrates. Isolation of the genomic DNA and cDNA of the xyl1 gene encoding RpXR revealed that the gene was interrupted by two introns and the exon of the gene encoded a protein composed of 322 amino acids with a Mr of 36,724. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RpXR is more related to 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenases from Mucoraseae fungi rather than the previously reported fungal XRs. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that transcription of the xyl1 gene was marked in the presence of d-xylose and l-arabinose, but was week in the presence of d-glucose. These biochemical and expression analyses suggest that RpXR is involved in the catabolism of l-arabinose as well as d-xylose. This is the first report of the purification, characterization, and gene cloning of XR from zygomycetous fungi. PMID:25041710

  15. New optical analyzer for 13C-breath test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Dressler, Matthias; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich

    2008-04-01

    Medical breath tests are well established diagnostic tools, predominantly for gastroenterological inspections, but also for many other examinations. Since the composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflect the physical condition of a patient, a breath analysis allows one to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that is based on photoacoustic spectroscopy and uses a DFB diode laser at 2.744 μm. The concentration ratio of the CO II isotopologues is determined by measuring the absorption on a 13CO II line in comparison to a 12CO II line. In the specially selected spectral range the lines have similar strengths, although the concentrations differ by a factor of 90. Therefore, the signals are well comparable. Due to an excellent signal-noise-ratio isotope variations of less than 1% can be resolved as required for the breath test.

  16. 42 CFR 84.88 - Breathing bag test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... gasoline vapor at room temperature (24-30 °C./75-85 °F.) for a continuous period of twice the rated time of the apparatus (except for apparatus for escape only where the test period shall be the rated time of the apparatus). (b) The bag will be operated during this test by a breathing machine with...

  17. A Quasi-Laue Neutron Crystallographic Study of D-Xylose Isomerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meilleur, Flora; Snell, Edward H.; vanderWoerd, Mark; Judge, Russell A.; Myles, Dean A. A.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen atom location and hydrogen bonding interaction determination are often critical to explain enzymatic mechanism. Whilst it is difficult to determine the position of hydrogen atoms using X-ray crystallography even with subatomic (less than 1.0 Angstrom) resolution data available, neutron crystallography provides an experimental tool to directly localise hydrogeddeuteriwn atoms in biological macromolecules at resolution of 1.5-2.0 Angstroms. Linearisation and isomerisation of xylose at the active site of D-xylose isomerase rely upon a complex hydrogen transfer. Neutron quasi-Laue data were collected on Streptomyces rubiginosus D-xylose isomerase crystal using the LADI instrument at ILL with the objective to provide insight into the enzymatic mechanism (Myles et al. 1998). The neutron structure unambiguously reveals the protonation state of His 53 in the active site, identifying the model for the enzymatic pathway.

  18. Analysis of UDP-D-apiose/UDP-D-xylose synthase-catalyzed conversion of UDP-D-apiose phosphonate to UDP-D-xylose phosphonate: implications for a retroaldol-aldol mechanism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sei-hyun; Mansoorabadi, Steven O; Liu, Yung-nan; Chien, Tun-Cheng; Liu, Hung-wen

    2012-08-29

    UDP-D-apiose/UDP-D-xylose synthase (AXS) catalyzes the conversion of UDP-D-glucuronic acid to UDP-D-apiose and UDP-D-xylose. An acetyl-protected phosphonate analogue of UDP-D-apiose was synthesized and used in an in situ HPLC assay to demonstrate for the first time the ability of AXS to interconvert the two reaction products. Density functional theory calculations provided insight into the energetics of this process and the apparent inability of AXS to catalyze the conversion of UDP-D-xylose to UDP-D-apiose. The data suggest that this observation is unlikely to be due to an unfavorable equilibrium but rather results from substrate inhibition by the most stable chair conformation of UDP-D-xylose. The detection of xylose cyclic phosphonate as the turnover product reveals significant new details about the AXS-catalyzed reaction and supports the proposed retroaldol-aldol mechanism of catalysis. PMID:22830643

  19. High yield production of D-xylonic acid from D-xylose using engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaiwei; Valdehuesa, Kris Niño G; Nisola, Grace M; Ramos, Kristine Rose M; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2012-07-01

    An engineered Escherichia coli was constructed to produce D-xylonic acid, one of the top 30 high-value chemicals identified by US Department of Energy. The native pathway for D-xylose catabolism in E. coli W3110 was blocked by disrupting xylose isomerase (XI) and xylulose kinase (XK) genes. The native pathway for xylonic acid catabolism was also blocked by disrupting two genes both encoding xylonic acid dehydratase (yagE and yjhG). Through the introduction of a D-xylose dehydrogenase from Caulobacter crescentus, a D-xylonic acid producing E. coli was constructed. The recombinant E. coli produced up to 39.2 g L(-1) D-xylonic acid from 40 g L(-1) D-xylose in M9 minimal medium. The average productivity was as high as 1.09 g L(-1) h(-1) and no gluconic acid byproduct was produced. These results suggest that the engineered E. coli has a promising application for the industrial-scale production of D-xylonic acid. PMID:21917451

  20. Fermentation of D-xylose to ethanol by genetically modified Klebsiella planticola

    SciTech Connect

    Tolan, J.S.; Finn, R.K.

    1987-09-01

    D-Xylose is a plentiful pentose sugar derived from agricultural or forest residues. Enteric bacteria such as Klebsiella spp. ferment D-xylose to form mixed acids and butanediol in addition to ethanol. Thus, the ethanol yield is normally low. This report describes the fermentation of D-xylose by Klebsiella planticola ATCC 33531 bearing multicopy plasmids containing the pdc gene inserted from Zymomonas mobilis. Expression of the gene markedly increased the yield of ethanol to 1.3 mol/mol of xylose, or 25.1 g/liter. Concurrently, there were significant decreases in the yields of formate, acetate, lactate, and butanediol. Transconjugant Klebsiella spp. grew almost as fast as the wild type and tolerated up to 4% ethanol. The plasmid was retained by the cells during at least one batch culture, even in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics to maintain the plasmid. Ethanol production was 31.6 g/liter from 79.6 g of mixed substrate per liter chosen to simulate hydrolyzed hemicellulose. The physiology of the wild-type of K. planticola is described in more detail than in the original report of its isolation.

  1. 14C-urea breath test in C pylori gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rauws, E A; Royen, E A; Langenberg, W; Woensel, J V; Vrij, A A; Tytgat, G N

    1989-01-01

    14C-urea breath test was used to detect Campylobacter pylori colonisation in 129 consecutive non-ulcer dyspepsia patients. Fasting patients were given 3 microCi (110 kBq) of 14C-labelled urea after a test meal. Breath samples were collected at 10 minute intervals for 90 minutes and the C-14 activity was counted on a liquid scintillation analyser. Urea derived 14CO2 appears in the exhaled breath of Campylobacter pylori culture positive individuals within 20-30 minutes. Likelihood analysis revealed a most favourable cut off level of [0.07% dose 14C-urea/mmol CO2] multiplied by body weight at t = 40 minutes, to separate culture positive from culture negative subjects. Using this upper limit of normal, a positive likelihood ratio of 50 and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.05 was calculated. Sensitivity of the test was 95% and specificity 98%. The 14C-urea breath test is a simple, sensitive and non-invasive test, that detects viable C pylori microorganism and semiquantitatively assesses the bacterial load of C pylori colonisation. Administration of a single dose of colloidal bismuth subcitrate resulted in a rapid decrease in 14CO2 excretion, so this test can be used to confirm eradication of the bacterium in therapeutic trials without endoscopy, or need for culture. PMID:2753404

  2. 42 CFR 84.203 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84.203 Section 84.203 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators §...

  3. Formation of xylitol and xylitol-5-phosphate and its impact on growth of d-xylose-utilizing Corynebacterium glutamicum strains.

    PubMed

    Radek, Andreas; Müller, Moritz-Fabian; Gätgens, Jochem; Eggeling, Lothar; Krumbach, Karin; Marienhagen, Jan; Noack, Stephan

    2016-08-10

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum has no endogenous metabolic activity for utilizing the lignocellulosic pentose d-xylose for cell growth. Therefore, two different engineering approaches have been pursued resulting in platform strains harbouring a functional version of either the Isomerase (ISO) or the Weimberg (WMB) pathway for d-xylose assimilation. In a previous study we found for C. glutamicum WMB by-product formation of xylitol during growth on d-xylose and speculated that the observed lower growth rates are due to the growth inhibiting effect of this compound. Based on a detailed phenotyping of the ISO, WMB and the wild-type strain of C. glutamicum, we here show that this organism has a natural capability to synthesize xylitol from d-xylose under aerobic cultivation conditions. We furthermore observed the intracellular accumulation of xylitol-5-phosphate as a result of the intracellular phosphorylation of xylitol, which was particularly pronounced in the C. glutamicum ISO strain. Interestingly, low amounts of supplemented xylitol strongly inhibit growth of this strain on d-xylose, d-glucose and d-arabitol. These findings demonstrate that xylitol is a suitable substrate of the endogenous xylulokinase (XK, encoded by xylB) and its overexpression in the ISO strain leads to a significant phosphorylation of xylitol in C. glutamicum. Therefore, in order to circumvent cytotoxicity by xylitol-5-phosphate, the WMB pathway represents an interesting alternative route for engineering C. glutamicum towards efficient d-xylose utilization. PMID:27297548

  4. The measurand problem in infrared breath alcohol testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosk, Ted

    2012-02-01

    Measurements are made to determine the value of a quantity known as a measurand. The measurand is not always the quantity subject to measurement, however. Often, a distinct quantity will be measured and related to the measurand through a measurement function. When the identities of the measurand and the quantity actually measured are not well defined or distinguished, it can lead to the misinterpretation of results. This is referred to as the measurand problem. The measurand problem can present significant difficulties when the law and not science determines the measurand. This arises when the law requires that a particular quantity be measured. Legal definitions are seldom as rigorous or complete as those utilized in science. Thus, legally defined measurands often fall prey to the measurand problem. An example is the measurement of breath alcohol concentration by infrared spectroscopy. All 50 states authorize such tests but the measurand differs by jurisdiction. This leads to misinterpretation of results in both the forensic and legal communities due to the measurand problem with the consequence that the innocent are convicted and guilty set free. Correct interpretation of breath test results requires that the measurand be properly understood and accounted for. I set forth the varying measurands defined by law, the impact these differing measurands have on the interpretation of breath test results and how the measurand problem can be avoided in the measurement of breath alcohol concentration.

  5. Mechanism of D-fructose isomerization by Arthrobacter D-xylose isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, M; Hartley, B S

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of D-fructose isomerization by Arthrobacter D-xylose isomerase suggested from X-ray-crystallographic studies was tested by detailed kinetic analysis of the enzyme with various metal ions at different pH values and temperatures. At D-fructose concentrations used in commercial processes Mg2+ is the best activator with an apparent dissociation constant of 63 microM; Co2+ and Mn2+ bind more strongly (apparent Kd 20 microM and 10 microM respectively) but give less activity (45% and 8% respectively). Ca2+ is a strict competitive inhibitor versus Mg2+ (Ki 3 microM) or Co2+ (Ki 105 microM). The kinetics show a compulsory order of binding; Co2+ binds first to Site 2 and then to Site 1; then D-fructose binds at Site 1. At normal concentrations Mg2+ binds at Site 1, then D-fructose and then Mg2+ at Site 2. At very high Mg2+ concentrations (greater than 10 mM) the order is Mg2+ at Site 1, Mg2+ at Site 2, then D-fructose. The turnover rate (kcat.) is controlled by ionization of a residue with apparent pKa at 30 degrees C of 6.0 +/- 0.07 (Mg2+) or 5.3 +/- 0.08 (Co2+) and delta H = 23.5 kJ/mol. This appears to be His-219, which is co-ordinated to M[2]; protonation destroys isomerization by displacing M[2]; Co2+ binds more strongly at Site 2 than Mg2+, so competes more strongly against H+. The inhibition constant (Ki) for the two competitive inhibitors 5-thio-alpha-D-glucopyranose and D-sorbitol is invariant with pH, but Km(app.) in the Mg[1]-enzyme is controlled by ionization of a group with pKa 6.8 +/- 0.07 and delta H = 27 kJ/mol, which appears to be His-53. This shows that Km(app.) is a complex constant that includes the rate of the ring-opening step catalysed by His-53, which explains the pH-dependence. In the Mg[1]Mg[2]-enzyme or Co[1]Co[2]-enzyme, the pKa is lower (6.2 +/- 0.1 or 5.6 +/- 0.08) because of the extra adjacent cation. Hence the results fit the previously proposed pathway, but show that the mechanisms differ for Mg2+ and Co2+ and that the rate

  6. 13C urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori: Evaluation of 10-minute breath collection

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Marina; Radovic, Vladimir; Wolfe, Melanie; Kamath, Markad; Bercik, Premsyl; Armstrong, David

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether a shortened 13C urea breath test (13C UBT) (breath collection time of 10 min) is as reliable as the standard assay (30 min). METHODS: Two hundred ninety-seven patients (mean ± SD: 53±16 years, 57% female) completed a 13C UBT. Breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 5 min intervals up to 30 min. Sixty-seven patients also underwent endoscopic biopsy. Cluster analysis was performed on the 13C UBT data to determine the optimal cut-off point at each time interval. Sensitivity and specificity of the 13C UBT at all intervals compared with histology and culture and against the standard 30 min interval were determined. RESULTS: The calculated optimal cut-off points for each time interval (T), expressed as delta over baseline (δ‰), were 3.29 δ‰ at T5, 3.15 δ‰ at T10, 3.42 δ‰ at T15, 3.17 δ‰ at T20, 2.99 δ‰ at T25 and 2.82 δ ‰ at T30. Except at T5, the risk of false-positive and false-negative test results at each time interval was lower than 2.3% using these cut-off points. When replacing the cut-off points with 3.0 δ‰, the risk of error was still lower than 2.3%. The test at T10 showed 98.6% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity compared with T30. T10 and T30 showed 100% sensitivity and 96% specificity compared with histology and culture. CONCLUSIONS: The 13C UBT is an accurate, noninvasive test, even when the breath sample interval is reduced to 10 min. The present study confirms the validity of a cut-off point of 3.0 δ‰ for the 10 min and 30 min 13C UBT. PMID:17171196

  7. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  8. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  9. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  10. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  11. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  12. Shotgun Proteomics of Aspergillus niger Microsomes upon d-Xylose Induction▿ †

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, José Miguel P. Ferreira; van Passel, Mark W. J.; Schaap, Peter J.; de Graaff, Leo H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein secretion plays an eminent role in cell maintenance and adaptation to the extracellular environment of microorganisms. Although protein secretion is an extremely efficient process in filamentous fungi, the mechanisms underlying protein secretion have remained largely uncharacterized in these organisms. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the d-xylose induction of cellulase and hemicellulase enzyme secretion on the protein composition of secretory organelles in Aspergillus niger. We aimed to systematically identify the components involved in the secretion of these enzymes via mass spectrometry of enriched subcellular microsomal fractions. Under each condition, fractions enriched for secretory organelles were processed for tandem mass spectrometry, resulting in the identification of peptides that originate from 1,081 proteins, 254 of which—many of them hypothetical proteins—were predicted to play direct roles in the secretory pathway. d-Xylose induction led to an increase in specific small GTPases known to be associated with polarized growth, exocytosis, and endocytosis. Moreover, the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) components Cdc48 and all 14 of the 20S proteasomal subunits were recruited to the secretory organelles. In conclusion, induction of extracellular enzymes results in specific changes in the secretory subproteome of A. niger, and the most prominent change found in this study was the recruitment of the 20S proteasomal subunits to the secretory organelles. PMID:20453123

  13. Consecutively Preparing D-Xylose, Organosolv Lignin, and Amorphous Ultrafine Silica from Rice Husk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica) are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m2/g. PMID:25140120

  14. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of sublimation of D-glucose, D-xylose, cellobiose, and levoglucosan

    SciTech Connect

    Oja, V.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The vapor pressures of {alpha}-D-glucose (or dextrose), D-xylose, D-cellobiose (or 4-{beta}-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucopyranose), and levoglucosan (or 1,6-anhydro-{beta}-D-glucopyranose) have been measured using the Knudsen effusion technique, in the range of temperatures from 344 to 488 K. The measurements were all made in the solid sublimation regime, and enthalpies of sublimation were calculated from the Clausius-Claperon equation. The vapor pressures may be correlated by ln(P/Pa) = A {minus} B/(T/K), where A = 53.16, B = 23.382 ({+-}600) for D-glucose (395--406 K), A = 46.29 and B = 19,006 ({+-} 375) for D-xylose (370--395 K), and A = 70.30 and B = 36,264 ({+-} 5,220) for cellobiose (474--488 K). Levoglucosan displayed a solid phase transition at approximately 386 K, and its vapor pressure was affected accordingly. For this material, A = 38.96 and B = 15,049 ({+-} 123) in the temperature range 344--386 K and A = 31.19 and B = 12,066 ({+-} 709) in the temperature range 386--405 K.

  15. Kinetics of ethanolic fermentation of D-xylose by Klebsiella pneumoniae and its mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, M

    1989-01-01

    The microbial production of ethanol from D-xylose by a new soil isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae and the mutants K. pneumoniae MB-16 and MB-16-1048 was studied. Kinetic and physiological properties of the mutants were compared with those of the original isolate. The volumetric rates of ethanol formation by mutants MB-16-1048 and MB-16 and the original isolate were 1.58, 0.50, and 0.06 g liter-1 h-1, respectively. The cultivation times of mutants MB-16-1048 and MB-16 were 20 and 18 h, respectively, and that of the original isolate was 118 h. Both the mutants exhibited metabolic similarities with the original isolate. Ethanol was the major end product of fermentation in all three strains. Acetic acid and carbon dioxide were the other two important by-products of fermentation. Pyruvic acid was accumulated in significant proportions as an intermediate. The proportion of pyruvate in the original isolate was 54% of the total D-xylose utilized, whereas for MB-16 and MB-16-1048 the values were about 42 and 22%, respectively. The lower fractions of pyruvate in mutants MB-16 and MB-16-1048 showed up as a 41 and 82% improvement, respectively, over the original isolate in terms of the ethanol yield. PMID:2502944

  16. Consecutively preparing d-xylose, organosolv lignin, and amorphous ultrafine silica from rice husk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica) are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m(2)/g. PMID:25140120

  17. 4-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-D-xylose: a new synthesis and application to the evaluation of intestinal lactase.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Sagredo, A; Fernández-Mayoralas, A; Jiménez-Barbero, J; Martín-Lomas, M; Villanueva, D; Aragón, J J

    1992-04-10

    4-O-beta-D-Galactopyranosyl-D-xylose (2) was prepared from benzyl 2,3-O-isopropylidene-beta-D-xylopyranoside by glycosylation with 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzoyl-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl bromide and subsequent deprotection. Compound 2 was hydrolyzed in vitro by intestinal lactase; the Vmax was 25% of that with lactose and the Km was 370mM (cf. 27mM for lactose). Oral administration of 2 suckling rats led to urinary excretion of D-xylose which could be estimated colorimetrically. PMID:1516083

  18. 49 CFR 40.277 - Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath... Testing § 40.277 Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations? No.... Only saliva or breath for screening tests and breath for confirmation tests using approved devices...

  19. 49 CFR 40.277 - Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath... Testing § 40.277 Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations? No.... Only saliva or breath for screening tests and breath for confirmation tests using approved devices...

  20. 49 CFR 40.277 - Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath... Testing § 40.277 Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations? No.... Only saliva or breath for screening tests and breath for confirmation tests using approved devices...

  1. Test-retest reproducibility of hydrogen breath test for lactose maldigestion in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Barillas-Mury, C; Solomons, N W

    1987-01-01

    The test-retest reproducibility of the H2 breath test within the same individual has not been rigorously evaluated in preschool children. In the present study, 10 children--5 of whom were diagnosed as lactose-digesters on their first testing, and 5 of whom were diagnosed as lactose-maldigesters at first screening--were retested under identical conditions of a second opportunity. In each case, the same diagnostic classification was provided, for a reproducibility of 100%. Regression of the area under the curve of the change in breath H2 concentration during the 3 h of the test had a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.59 (p = 0.05). The time-course of 3-h H2 breath tests in 43 children with lactose maldigestion revealed a peaking of the concentration of H2 most commonly 120 min following the oral dose of 240 ml whole milk. Seventy-seven percent of the children who eventually proved to be lactose maldigesters were so diagnosed by the end of the second hour of the breath test. Thus, even the abbreviated breath sampling schedule used in children is sensitive, and few maldigesters would go undetected because of a late rise in breath H2 concentration. PMID:3694351

  2. Assessment of the 14C-Glycocholic Acid Breath Test

    PubMed Central

    James, O. F. W.; Agnew, J. E.; Bouchier, I. A. D.

    1973-01-01

    The 1-(14C)-glycine-glycocholic-acid breath test has been performed on 104 subjects and a normal range established. Abnormal results due to bacterial deconjugation of bile salts were found not only in patients with the “contaminated bowel” syndrome and in those with ileal resection but also in a third group, patients with cholangitis. Abnormal results were also found in patients with gastrocolic fistula and staphylococcal enterocolitis, while mildly abnormal results were also found in some patients with liver disease. PMID:4718834

  3. Reactivity of D-fructose and D-xylose in acidic media in homogeneous phases.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Maxime B; Chagnault, Vincent; Postel, Denis

    2015-05-29

    Chemistry development of renewable resources is a real challenge. Carbohydrates from biomass are complex and their use as substitutes for fossil materials remains difficult (European involvement on the incorporation of 20% raw material of plant origin in 2020). Most of the time, the transformation of these polyhydroxylated structures are carried out in acidic conditions. Recent reviews on this subject describe homogeneous catalytic transformations of pentoses, specifically toward furfural, and also the transformation of biomass-derived sugars in heterogeneous conditions. To complete these informations, the objective of this review is to give an overview of the structural variety described during the treatment of two monosaccharides (D-Fructose and D-xylose) in acidic conditions in homogeneous phases. The reaction mechanisms being not always determined with certainty, we will also provide a brief state of the art regarding this. PMID:25889471

  4. A 20-minute breath test for helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.J.; Plankey, M.W.; Hoffman, S.R.; Boyd, C.L.; Dye, K.R.; Frierson, H.F. Jr.; Guerrant, R.L.; McCallum, R.W. )

    1991-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated a simplified rapid {sup 14}C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. Fasting patients undergoing initial assessment for H. pylori drank 5 microCi of {sup 14}C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath was collected at intervals for 30 min. Samples were counted in a beta-counter, and the results were expressed as counts per minute (cpm). In the same week, patients underwent endoscopy, and a blinded investigator examined biopsy samples of gastric mucosa by culture and histology for H. pylori. There were 49 H. pylori-negative (HP-) and 104 H. pylori-positive (HP+) patients in the study. HP+ patients expired a mean of 4398 cpm (SD 2468) per mmol CO{sub 2} in a sample taken 20 min after ingestion of the isotope. In contrast, HP--patients expired only 340 cpm (SD 196). If the mean +3 SD of HP- patients was used as a cutoff value, the 20-minute sample gave a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% for detecting H. pylori. The radiation exposure from this test is less than 1% of that received from an upper gastrointestinal series, and the short collection time makes it both convenient and cost effective.

  5. Breath tests to phenotype drug disposition in oncology.

    PubMed

    Opdam, Frans L; Modak, Anil S; Gelderblom, Hans; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2013-11-01

    Breath tests (BTs) have been investigated as diagnostic tools to phenotype drug disposition in cancer patients in the pursuit to individualize drug treatment. The choice of the right phenotype probe is crucial and depends on the metabolic pathway of the anticancer agent of interest. BTs using orally or intravenously administered selective non-radioactive (13)C-labeled probes to non-invasively evaluate dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, and CYP2D6 enzyme activity have been published. Clinically, a (13)C-dextromethorphan BT to predict endoxifen levels in breast cancer patients and a (13)C-uracil BT to predict fluoropyrimidine toxicity in colorectal cancer patients are most promising. However, the clinical benefit and cost effectiveness of these phenotype BTs need to be determined in order to make the transition from an experimental setting to clinical practice as companion diagnostic tests. PMID:23868281

  6. Exhaled breath for drugs of abuse testing - evaluation in criminal justice settings.

    PubMed

    Beck, Olof

    2014-01-01

    Exhaled breath is being developed as a possible specimen for drug testing based on the collection of aerosol particles originating from the lung fluid. The present study was aimed to evaluate the applicability of exhaled breath for drugs of abuse testing in criminal justice settings. Particles in exhaled breath were collected with a new device in parallel with routine urine testing in two Swedish prisons, comprising both genders. Urine screening was performed according to established routines either by dipstick or by immunochemical methods at the Forensic Chemistry Laboratory and confirmations were with mass spectrometry methods. A total of 247 parallel samples were studied. Analysis of exhaled breath samples was done with a sensitive mass spectrometric method and identifications were made according to forensic standards. In addition tested subjects and personnel were asked to fill in a questionnaire concerning their views about drug testing. In 212 cases both the urine and breath testing were negative, and in 22 cases both urine and breath were positive. Out of 6 cases where breath was negative and urine positive 4 concerned THC. Out of 7 cases where, breath was positive and urine negative 6 concerned amphetamine. Detected substances in breath comprised: amphetamine, methamphetamine, THC, methylphenidate, buprenorphine, 6-acetylmorphine, cocaine, benzoylecgonine, diazepam and tramadol. Both the prison inmates and staff members reported breath testing to be preferable due to practical considerations. The results of this study documented that drug testing using exhaled breath provided as many positives as urine testing despite an expected shorter detection window, and that the breath sampling procedure was well accepted and provided practical benefits reported both by the prison inmates and testing personnel. PMID:24438778

  7. Development of a D-xylose fermenting and inhibitor tolerant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with high performance in lignocellulose hydrolysates using metabolic and evolutionary engineering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The production of bioethanol from lignocellulose hydrolysates requires a robust, D-xylose-fermenting and inhibitor-tolerant microorganism as catalyst. The purpose of the present work was to develop such a strain from a prime industrial yeast strain, Ethanol Red, used for bioethanol production. Results An expression cassette containing 13 genes including Clostridium phytofermentans XylA, encoding D-xylose isomerase (XI), and enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway was inserted in two copies in the genome of Ethanol Red. Subsequent EMS mutagenesis, genome shuffling and selection in D-xylose-enriched lignocellulose hydrolysate, followed by multiple rounds of evolutionary engineering in complex medium with D-xylose, gradually established efficient D-xylose fermentation. The best-performing strain, GS1.11-26, showed a maximum specific D-xylose consumption rate of 1.1 g/g DW/h in synthetic medium, with complete attenuation of 35 g/L D-xylose in about 17 h. In separate hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates of Arundo donax (giant reed), spruce and a wheat straw/hay mixture, the maximum specific D-xylose consumption rate was 0.36, 0.23 and 1.1 g/g DW inoculum/h, and the final ethanol titer was 4.2, 3.9 and 5.8% (v/v), respectively. In simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Arundo hydrolysate, GS1.11-26 produced 32% more ethanol than the parent strain Ethanol Red, due to efficient D-xylose utilization. The high D-xylose fermentation capacity was stable after extended growth in glucose. Cell extracts of strain GS1.11-26 displayed 17-fold higher XI activity compared to the parent strain, but overexpression of XI alone was not enough to establish D-xylose fermentation. The high D-xylose consumption rate was due to synergistic interaction between the high XI activity and one or more mutations in the genome. The GS1.11-26 had a partial respiratory defect causing a reduced aerobic growth rate. Conclusions An industrial yeast strain for

  8. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. 26.95 Section 26.95 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a)...

  9. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. 26.95 Section 26.95 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a)...

  10. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. 26.95 Section 26.95 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a)...

  11. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. 26.95 Section 26.95 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a)...

  12. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. 26.95 Section 26.95 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a)...

  13. Operation and testing of Mark 10 Mod 3 underwater breathing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milwee, W. I., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Performance tests on a closed circuit, mixed gas underwater breathing apparatus are reported. The equipment is designed to provide a minimum diving duration of four hours at 1500 ft below sea surface; it senses oxygen partial pressure in the breathing gas mix and controls oxygen content of the breathing gas within narrow limits about a preset value. The breathing circuit subsystem provides respirable gas to the diver and removes carbon dioxide and moisture from the expired gas. Test results indicate undesirable variations in oxygen partial pressure with oxygen addition and insufficient carbon dioxide absorption.

  14. Production and Purification of Extracellular D-Xylose Isomerase from an Alkaliphilic, Thermophilic Bacillus sp. †

    PubMed Central

    Chauthaiwale, Jyoti; Rao, Mala

    1994-01-01

    An alkaliphilic, thermophilic Bacillus sp. (NCIM 59) produced extracellular xylose isomerase at pH 10 and 50°C by using xylose or wheat bran as the carbon source. The distribution of xylose isomerase as a function of growth in comparison with distributions of extra- and intracellular marker enzymes such as xylanase and β-galactosidase revealed that xylose isomerase was truly secreted as an extracellular enzyme and was not released because of sporulation or lysis. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by gel filtration, preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and ion-exchange chromatography. The molecular weight of xylose isomerase was estimated to be 160,000 by gel filtration and 50,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating the presence of three subunits. The enzyme is most active at pH 8.0 and with incubation at 85°C for 20 min. Divalent metal ions Mg2+, Co2+, and Mn2+ were required for maximum activity of the enzyme. The Km values for D-xylose and D-glucose at 80°C and pH 7.5 were 6.66 and 142 mM, respectively, while Kcat values were 2.3 × 102 s-1 and 0.5 × 102 s-1, respectively. Images PMID:16349464

  15. Aspiration tests in aqueous foam using a breathing simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-12-01

    Non-toxic aqueous foams are being developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) for use in crowd control, cell extractions, and group disturbances in the criminal justice prison systems. The potential for aspiration of aqueous foam during its use and the resulting adverse effects associated with complete immersion in aqueous foam is of major concern to the NIJ when examining the effectiveness and safety of using this technology as a Less-Than-Lethal weapon. This preliminary study was designed to evaluate the maximum quantity of foam that might be aspirated by an individual following total immersion in an SNL-developed aqueous foam. A.T.W. Reed Breathing simulator equipped with a 622 Silverman cam was used to simulate the aspiration of an ammonium laureth sulfate aqueous foam developed by SNL and generated at expansion ratios in the range of 500:1 to 1000:1. Although the natural instinct of an individual immersed in foam is to cover their nose and mouth with a hand or cloth, thus breaking the bubbles and decreasing the potential for aspiration, this study was performed to examine a worst case scenario where mouth breathing only was examined, and no attempt was made to block foam entry into the breathing port. Two breathing rates were examined: one that simulated a sedentary individual with a mean breathing rate of 6.27 breaths/minute, and one that simulated an agitated or heavily breathing individual with a mean breathing rate of 23.7 breaths/minute. The results of this study indicate that, if breathing in aqueous foam without movement, an air pocket forms around the nose and mouth within one minute of immersion.

  16. Effects of D-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose and D-xylose on renal function in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Garland, H O; Singh, H J

    1988-01-01

    1. Standard renal clearance techniques were used to investigate the effects of 2.5, 5 and 10% D-glucose, 2.5% 2-deoxy-D-glucose and 2.5% D-xylose on kidney function in male rats. 2. There was no consistent effect of D-glucose on urinary sodium output except with 10% D-glucose, where sodium excretion was raised compared to controls. 3. An increased urinary calcium output was seen in all D-glucose-infused rats compared to controls. Values obtained for 2.5, 5 and 10% glucose were respectively 32, 61 and 58% above control data. Neither 2-deoxy-D-glucose nor D-xylose produced a calciuresis. 4. The increased urinary calcium excretion in D-glucose rats was the result of a reduction in fractional calcium reabsorption. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was unchanged. It was not dependent upon glycosuria or a diuresis. PMID:3418534

  17. Spathaspora arborariae sp. nov., a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species isolated from rotting wood in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cadete, Raquel M; Santos, Renata O; Melo, Monaliza A; Mouro, Adriane; Gonçalves, Davi L; Stambuk, Boris U; Gomes, Fátima C O; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2009-12-01

    Four strains of a new yeast species were isolated from rotting wood from two sites in an Atlantic Rain Forest and a Cerrado ecosystem in Brazil. The analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rRNA gene showed that this species belongs to the Spathaspora clade. The new species ferments D-xylose efficiently and is related to Candida jeffriesii and Spathaspora passalidarum, both of which also ferment D-xylose. Similar to S. passalidarum, the new species produces unconjugated asci with a single greatly elongated ascospore with curved ends. The type strain of Spathaspora arborariae sp. nov. is UFMG-HM19.1A(T) (=CBS11463(T)=NRRL Y-48658(T)). PMID:19840117

  18. (13) C Breath Tests Are Feasible in Patients With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Devices.

    PubMed

    Bednarsch, Jan; Menk, Mario; Malinowski, Maciej; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Pratschke, Johann; Stockmann, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Temporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been established as an essential part of therapy in patients with pulmonary or cardiac failure. As physiological gaseous exchange is artificially altered in this patient group, it is debatable whether a (13) C-breath test can be carried out. In this proof of technical feasibility report, we assess the viability of the (13) C-breath test LiMAx (maximum liver function capacity) in patients on ECMO therapy. All breath probes for the test device were obtained directly via the membrane oxygenator. Data of four patients receiving liver function assessment with the (13) C-breath test LiMAx while having ECMO therapy were analyzed. All results were compared with validated scenarios of the testing procedures. The LiMAx test could successfully be carried out in every case without changing ECMO settings. Clinical course of the patients ranging from multiorgan failure to no sign of liver insufficiency was in accordance with the results of the LiMAx liver function test. The (13) C-breath test is technically feasible in the context of ECMO. Further evaluation of (13) C-breath test in general would be worthwhile. The LiMAx test as a (13) C-breath test accessing liver function might be of particular predictive interest if patients with ECMO therapy develop multiorgan failure. PMID:26527580

  19. 46 CFR 197.450 - Breathing gas tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... commencement of diving operations, at the umbilical or underwater breathing apparatus connection point for the..., supplying mixed-gas to a diver, is checked, prior to commencement of diving operations, at the umbilical...

  20. 46 CFR 197.450 - Breathing gas tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... commencement of diving operations, at the umbilical or underwater breathing apparatus connection point for the..., supplying mixed-gas to a diver, is checked, prior to commencement of diving operations, at the umbilical...

  1. 46 CFR 197.450 - Breathing gas tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... commencement of diving operations, at the umbilical or underwater breathing apparatus connection point for the..., supplying mixed-gas to a diver, is checked, prior to commencement of diving operations, at the umbilical...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  4. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  5. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  6. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  7. Phase V of the single-breath washout test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichol, G. M.; Michels, D. B.; Guy, H. J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A downward-deflecting phase V is often seen following the terminal rise (phase IV) in single-breath washout tests. To investigate the nature of phase V, experiments using simultaneous washouts of N2 and tracer boluses of Ar were performed on eight normal nonsmoking subjects aged 27-41 who exhibited a phase V. Phase V is found to occur in all subjects at expiratory flow rates between 0.1 and 2.0 l/sec shortly after expiration became flow limited. Volumes of both phases IV and V increase with increasing flow rate. The difference between the exhaled volumes at which flow became limited and phase V appeared is shown to be approximately equal to the anatomic dead space. Results support a model of lung emptying in a gravitational field in which flow limitation occurs first in the lower lung regions and then progresses toward the upper regions, causing phase IV. A decrease in the amount of flow from the upper relative to the lower regions after all regions have become flow limited then causes phase V.

  8. [*C]octanoic acid breath test to measure gastric emptying rate of solids.

    PubMed

    Maes, B D; Ghoos, Y F; Rutgeerts, P J; Hiele, M I; Geypens, B; Vantrappen, G

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a breath test to measure solid gastric emptying using a standardized scrambled egg test meal (250 kcal) labeled with [14C]octanoic acid or [13C]octanoic acid. In vitro incubation studies showed that octanoic acid is a reliable marker of the solid phase. The breath test was validated in 36 subjects by simultaneous radioscintigraphic and breath test measurements. Nine healthy volunteers were studied after intravenous administration of 200 mg erythromycin and peroral administration of 30 mg propantheline, respectively. Erythromycin significantly enhanced gastric emptying, while propantheline significantly reduced gastric emptying rates. We conclude that the [*C]octanoic breath test is a promising and reliable test for measuring the gastric emptying rate of solids. PMID:7995200

  9. 13C breath tests in infections and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kurpad, Anura V; Ajami, Alfred; Young, Vernon R

    2002-09-01

    Stable isotope labeled compounds are widely used as diagnostic probes in medicine. These diagnostic stable isotope probes are now being expanded in their scope, to provide precise indications of the presence or absence of etiologically significant change in metabolism due to a specific disease. This concept exploits a labeled tracer probe that is a specifically designed substrate of a "gateway" enzyme in a discrete metabolic pathway, whose turnover can be measured by monitoring unidirectional precursor product mass flow. An example of such a probe is the 13C-urea breath test, where labeled urea is given to patients with H. pylori infection. Another example of this kind of probe is used to study the tripeptide glutathione (glu-cys-gly, GSH), which is the most abundant cellular thiol, and protects cells from the toxic effects of reactive oxygen species. Within the gamma glutamyl cycle, 5-oxoproline (L-pyroglutamic acid) is a metabolite generated during GSH catabolism, and is metabolized to glutamic acid by 5-oxoprolinase. This enzyme can also utilize the substrate L-2-oxothiazolidone-4-carboxylate (OTC), to generate intracellular cysteine, which is beneficial to the cell. Thus, labeled (13C) OTC would, under enzymatic attack yield cysteine and 13CO2, and can thus track the state and capacity of glutathione metabolism. Similarly, stable isotope labeled probes can be used to track the activity of the rate of homocysteine clearance, lymphocyte CD26, and liver CYP (cytochrome P450) enzyme activity. In the future, these applications should be able to titrate, in vivo, the characteristics of various specific enzyme systems in the body and their response to stress or infection as well as to treatment regimes. PMID:12362798

  10. The urea breath test: a non-invasive clinical tool for detecting Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Perri, F; Ghoos, Y; Hiele, M; Andriulli, A; Rutgeerts, P

    1995-03-01

    The urea breath test exploits the urease enzyme of Helicobacter pylori. The hydrolysis of labelled urea releases labelled carbon dioxide that is excreted in the breath. Distribution of urea throughout the stomach prevents sampling errors and allows for semiquantitative assessment of the extent of Helicobacter pylori infection. The urea breath test is very specific and sensitive and can be proposed as the method of choice for detecting Helicobacter pylori infection in ulcer patients before and after eradicating treatment as well as in epidemiological studies. PMID:7579592

  11. (13)C-5-FU breath test current status and future directions: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ezzeldin, Hany H; Acosta, Edward P; Mattison, Lori K; Fourie, Jeanne; Modak, Anil; Diasio, Robert B

    2009-12-01

    Breath tests (BTs) represent a safe non-invasive alternative strategy that could provide valuable diagnostic information in conditions like fat malabsorption, carbohydrate (lactose and fructose) malabsorption, liver dysfunction, impaired gastric emptying, abnormal small bowel transit time, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. To date, despite the availability of a number of breath tests, only three have gained approval by the FDA for application in a clinical setting ((13)C-urea breath test for the detection of H. pylori; NO breath test for monitoring asthma and alkane breath test for heart transplant rejection). Unfortunately, none of these tests investigate cancer patients or response to cancer chemotherapy. Several years ago it was realized that the presence of a reliable non-invasive approach could assist in the detection of patients at risk of developing severe life-threatening toxicities prior to the administration of fluoropyrimidines (e.g. 5-FU) or related cancer chemotherapy. 5-FU toxicity results mainly from deficient uracil catabolism. This review discusses the development of a BT that utilizes an orally administered pyrimidine ([2-(13)C]-uracil) which is metabolized via the same catabolic pathway as 5-FU. This ([2-(13)C]-uracil) breath test could provide a valuable addition to the patients' standard of care. PMID:21386199

  12. Steady state respiratory responses to tasks used in Federal testing of self-contained breathing apparatus.

    PubMed

    Kamon, E; Bernard, T; Stein, R

    1975-12-01

    A portion of Title 30, Part II, CFR calls for a Man Test, which is a series of regimens performed with a breathing apparatus. The respiratory responses to the tasks in the Man Test were established on coal miners and students. Based on these responses, the minimal metabolic requirements were derived for the use of breathing apparatuses with a service life of 30 minutes or more. PMID:1211359

  13. (13)C-Breath testing in animals: theory, applications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Welch, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    The carbon isotope values in the exhaled breath of an animal mirror the carbon isotope values of the metabolic fuels being oxidized. The measurement of stable carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide is called (13)C-breath testing and offers a minimally invasive method to study substrate oxidation in vivo. (13)C-breath testing has been broadly used to study human exercise, nutrition, and pathologies since the 1970s. Owing to reduced use of radioactive isotopes and the increased convenience and affordability of (13)C-analyzers, the past decade has witnessed a sharp increase in the use of breath testing throughout comparative physiology-especially to answer questions about how and when animals oxidize particular nutrients. Here, we review the practical aspects of (13)C-breath testing and identify the strengths and weaknesses of different methodological approaches including the use of natural abundance versus artificially-enriched (13)C tracers. We critically compare the information that can be obtained using different experimental protocols such as diet-switching versus fuel-switching. We also discuss several factors that should be considered when designing breath testing experiments including extrinsic versus intrinsic (13)C-labelling and different approaches to model nutrient oxidation. We use case studies to highlight the myriad applications of (13)C-breath testing in basic and clinical human studies as well as comparative studies of fuel use, energetics, and carbon turnover in multiple vertebrate and invertebrate groups. Lastly, we call for increased and rigorous use of (13)C-breath testing to explore a variety of new research areas and potentially answer long standing questions related to thermobiology, locomotion, and nutrition. PMID:26660654

  14. A new method of utilizing rice husk: consecutively preparing D-xylose, organosolv lignin, ethanol and amorphous superfine silica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Chen, Xue; Ma, Yuejia; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2015-06-30

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product with the annual output of 120 and 40 million tons in the world and China, respectively. The common disposal method of rice husk in China has caused the pollution. This manuscript deals with a new method of comprehensively utilizing rice husk, by which hazardous materials are avoided to release. 100.3, 219.4, 50.1 and 170.5 g of D-xylose, organosolv lignin, ethanol and superfine silica are consecutively prepared from 1000 g of rice husk. This new method is helpful to resolving the problem of pollution and waste aroused by rice husk. PMID:25768989

  15. Combining inhibitor tolerance and D-xylose fermentation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient lignocellulose-based bioethanol production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In addition to efficient pentose utilization, high inhibitor tolerance is a key trait required in any organism used for economically viable industrial bioethanol production with lignocellulose biomass. Although recent work has succeeded in establishing efficient xylose fermentation in robust industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, the resulting strains still lacked sufficient inhibitor tolerance for efficient sugar fermentation in lignocellulose hydrolysates. The aim of the present work was to combine high xylose fermentation activity and high inhibitor tolerance in a single industrial yeast strain. Results We have screened 580 yeast strains for high inhibitor tolerance using undetoxified acid-pretreated spruce hydrolysate and identified a triploid industrial baker’s yeast strain as having the highest inhibitor tolerance. From this strain, a mating competent diploid segregant with even higher inhibitor tolerance was obtained. It was crossed with the recently developed D-xylose fermenting diploid industrial strain GS1.11-26, with the Ethanol Red genetic background. Screening of 819 diploid segregants from the tetraploid hybrid resulted in two strains, GSF335 and GSF767, combining high inhibitor tolerance and efficient xylose fermentation. In a parallel approach, meiotic recombination of GS1.11-26 with a haploid segregant of Ethanol Red and screening of 104 segregants resulted in a similar inhibitor tolerant diploid strain, GSE16. The three superior strains exhibited significantly improved tolerance to inhibitors in spruce hydrolysate, higher glucose consumption rates, higher aerobic growth rates and higher maximal ethanol accumulation capacity in very-high gravity fermentation, compared to GS1.11-26. In complex medium, the D-xylose utilization rate by the three superior strains ranged from 0.36 to 0.67 g/g DW/h, which was lower than that of GS1.11-26 (1.10 g/g DW/h). On the other hand, in batch fermentation of undetoxified acid-pretreated spruce

  16. sup 14 C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S.J.; Tytgat, K.M.; Hollingsworth, J.; Jalali, S.; Rshid, F.A.; Bowen, B.M.; Goldie, J.; Goodacre, R.L.; Riddell, R.H.; Hunt, R.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The high urease activity of Helicobacter pylori can be used to detect this bacterium by noninvasive breath tests. We have developed a {sup 14}C-urea breath test which uses 5 microCi {sup 14}C with 50 mg nonradioactive urea. Breath samples are collected at baseline and every 30 min for 2 h. Our study compared the outcome of the breath test to the results of histology and culture of endoscopically obtained gastric biopsies in 84 patients. The breath test discriminated well between the 50 positive patients and the 34 patients negative for Helicobacter pylori: the calculated sensitivity was 100%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value 93%, and negative predictive value 100%. Treatment with bismuth subsalicylate and/or ampicillin resulted in lower counts of exhaled {sup 14}CO{sub 2} which correlated with histological improvement in gastritis. The {sup 14}C-urea breath test is a better gold standard for the detection of Helicobacter pylori than histology and/or culture.

  17. Can handling E85 motor fuel cause positive breath alcohol test results?

    PubMed

    Ran, Ran; Mullins, Michael E

    2013-09-01

    Hand-held breath alcohol analyzers are widely used by police in traffic stops of drivers suspected of driving while intoxicated (DWI). E85 is a motor fuel consisting of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline or other hydrocarbons, and is available at nearly 2,600 stations in the USA. We sought to determine whether handling E85 fuel could produce measurable breath alcohol results using a hand-held analyzer and to see if this would be a plausible explanation for a positive breath alcohol test. Five healthy adult subjects dispensed or transferred 8 US gallons of E85 fuel in each of four scenarios. We measured breath alcohol concentration in g/210 L of exhaled breath using the BACTrack S50 at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 15 and 20 min after each fuel-handling scenario. Most of the subjects had no detectable breath alcohol after handling E85 motor fuel. Transient elevations (0.02-0.04 g/210 L) in breath alcohol measurement occurred up to 6 min after handling E85 in a minority of subjects. We conclude that it is unlikely that handling E85 motor fuel would result in erroneous prosecution for DWI. PMID:23843422

  18. Tricks for interpreting and making a good report on hydrogen and 13C breath tests.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, G; Di Rienzo, T A; Scaldaferri, F; Del Zompo, F; Pizzoferrato, M; Lopetuso, L R; Laterza, L; Bruno, G; Petito, V; Campanale, M C; Cesario, V; Franceschi, F; Cammarota, G; Gaetani, E; Gasbarrini, A; Ojetti, V

    2013-01-01

    Breath tests (BT) represent a valid and non-invasive diagnostic tool in many gastroenterological disorders. Their wide diffusion is due to the low cost, simplicity and reproducibility and their common indications include diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, Helicobacter pylori infection, small bowel bacterial overgrowth, gastric emptying time and orocaecal transit time. The review deals with key points on methodology, which would influence the correct interpretation of the test and on a correct report. While a clear guideline is available for lactose and glucose breath tests, no gold standard is available for Sorbitol, Fructose or other H2 BTs. Orocaecal transit time (OCTT) defined as time between assumption of 10 g lactulose and a peak > 10 ppm over the baseline value, is a well-defined breath test. The possible value of lactulose as a diagnostic test for the diagnosis of small bowel bacterial overgrowth is still under debate. Among (13)C breath test, the best and well characterized is represented by the urea breath test. Well-defined protocols are available also for other (13)C tests, although a reimbursement for these tests is still not available. Critical points in breath testing include the patient preparation for test, type of substrate utilized, reading machines, time between when the test is performed and when the test is processed. Another crucial point involves clinical conclusions coming from each test. For example, even if lactulose could be utilized for diagnosing small bowel bacterial overgrowth, this indication should be only secondary to orocaecal transit time, and added into notes, as clinical guidelines are still uncertain. PMID:24443074

  19. Engineering of a Synthetic Metabolic Pathway for the Assimilation of (d)-Xylose into Value-Added Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Cam, Yvan; Alkim, Ceren; Trichez, Debora; Trebosc, Vincent; Vax, Amélie; Bartolo, François; Besse, Philippe; François, Jean Marie; Walther, Thomas

    2016-07-15

    A synthetic pathway for (d)-xylose assimilation was stoichiometrically evaluated and implemented in Escherichia coli strains. The pathway proceeds via isomerization of (d)-xylose to (d)-xylulose, phosphorylation of (d)-xylulose to obtain (d)-xylulose-1-phosphate (X1P), and aldolytic cleavage of the latter to yield glycolaldehyde and DHAP. Stoichiometric analyses showed that this pathway provides access to ethylene glycol with a theoretical molar yield of 1. Alternatively, both glycolaldehyde and DHAP can be converted to glycolic acid with a theoretical yield that is 20% higher than for the exclusive production of this acid via the glyoxylate shunt. Simultaneous expression of xylulose-1 kinase and X1P aldolase activities, provided by human ketohexokinase-C and human aldolase-B, respectively, restored growth of a (d)-xylulose-5-kinase mutant on xylose. This strain produced ethylene glycol as the major metabolic endproduct. Metabolic engineering provided strains that assimilated the entire C2 fraction into the central metabolism or that produced 4.3 g/L glycolic acid at a molar yield of 0.9 in shake flasks. PMID:26186096

  20. Locating active-site hydrogen atoms in d-xylose isomerase: Time-of-flight neutron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Amy K.; Li, Xinmin; Carrell, H. L.; Hanson, B. Leif; Langan, Paul; Coates, Leighton; Schoenborn, Benno P.; Glusker, Jenny P.; Bunick, Gerard J.

    2006-01-01

    Time-of-flight neutron diffraction has been used to locate hydrogen atoms that define the ionization states of amino acids in crystals of d-xylose isomerase. This enzyme, from Streptomyces rubiginosus, is one of the largest enzymes studied to date at high resolution (1.8 Å) by this method. We have determined the position and orientation of a metal ion-bound water molecule that is located in the active site of the enzyme; this water has been thought to be involved in the isomerization step in which d-xylose is converted to d-xylulose or d-glucose to d-fructose. It is shown to be water (rather than a hydroxyl group) under the conditions of measurement (pH 8.0). Our analyses also reveal that one lysine probably has an −NH2-terminal group (rather than NH3+). The ionization state of each histidine residue also was determined. High-resolution x-ray studies (at 0.94 Å) indicate disorder in some side chains when a truncated substrate is bound and suggest how some side chains might move during catalysis. This combination of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and x-ray diffraction can contribute greatly to the elucidation of enzyme mechanisms. PMID:16707576

  1. Production of Xylitol from d-Xylose by a Xylitol Dehydrogenase Gene-Disrupted Mutant of Candida tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Byoung Sam; Kim, Jinmi; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2006-01-01

    Xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) is one of the key enzymes in d-xylose metabolism, catalyzing the oxidation of xylitol to d-xylulose. Two copies of the XYL2 gene encoding XDH in the diploid yeast Candida tropicalis were sequentially disrupted using the Ura-blasting method. The XYL2-disrupted mutant, BSXDH-3, did not grow on a minimal medium containing d-xylose as a sole carbon source. An enzyme assay experiment indicated that BSXDH-3 lost apparently all XDH activity. Xylitol production by BSXDH-3 was evaluated using a xylitol fermentation medium with glucose as a cosubstrate. As glucose was found to be an insufficient cosubstrate, various carbon sources were screened for efficient cofactor regeneration, and glycerol was found to be the best cosubstrate. BSXDH-3 produced xylitol with a volumetric productivity of 3.23 g liter−1 h−1, a specific productivity of 0.76 g g−1 h−1, and a xylitol yield of 98%. This is the first report of gene disruption of C. tropicalis for enhancing the efficiency of xylitol production. PMID:16751533

  2. Cholesteryl octanoate breath test. Preliminary studies on a new noninvasive test of human pancreatic exocrine function.

    PubMed

    Cole, S G; Rossi, S; Stern, A; Hofmann, A F

    1987-12-01

    A new breath test for noninvasive assessment of pancreatic exocrine function in humans was developed. The test is based on the hydrolysis of cholesteryl-[1-14C]octanoate by pancreatic carboxyl ester lipase (cholesterol esterase) with subsequent absorption and hepatic metabolism of the liberated octanoate to 14CO2. The rate at which 14CO2 appears in breath appeared to be proportional to the rate of hydrolysis. The substrate is administered as a gum acacia stabilized emulsion of vegetable oil (18 g) containing cholesteryl octanoate (2 g; 4.4 microCi) dispersed in a 500-ml isotonic meal. Tests were performed in 6 healthy volunteers and 11 patients with pancreatic disease with varying degrees of steatorrhea. In healthy subjects, 14CO2 output was rapid with peak output occurring at 60-90 min in all subjects; cumulative output in 4 h averaged 30%. Duplicate studies indicated that the time-course of 14CO2 recovery was reproducible. The pattern of 14CO2 output in patients with pancreatic disease varied widely. Patients without steatorrhea (fecal fat less than or equal to 7 g/day) or with mild steatorrhea (fecal fat 7-11 g/day) had normal or near normal patterns of 14CO2 output, whereas patients with moderate or severe steatorrhea (fecal fat greater than 11 g/day) expired 14CO2 at a rate one-third to one-tenth that of the healthy volunteers. Addition of pancreatic enzyme supplementation to the test meal increased 14CO2 output in 6 of 6 patients with moderate or severe steatorrhea, suggesting that the activity of pancreatic carboxyl ester lipase was rate limiting in these patients. In an additional study in a healthy volunteer, 14CO2 and 13CO2 were measured simultaneously in breath after ingestion of a test meal containing cholesteryl-[1-13C]octanoate and 14C-octanoate. 14CO2 was expired more rapidly than 13CO2, suggesting that hydrolysis of the substrate may also be rate limiting in healthy volunteers. These studies indicate that severe pancreatic exocrine dysfunction can

  3. [The diagnostic value of the aminophenazone breath test in chronic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Sensing, H; Treutler, J; Haustein, K O; Hüller, G

    1991-09-01

    In 230 patients (90 females, 140 males aged between 20 and 73 years, average age 47.8 years) with and without exception histologically and/or laparoscopically ascertained chronic liver diseases (degenerative damages of liver parenchyma in 45, fatty liver stage I in 28, fatty liver stage II in 36, cholangiohepatitis in 4, chronic persisting hepatitis in 31, chronic active hepatitis in 57 and liver cirrhosis in 59 cases) the incorporation of the aminophenazon breathing test in the so-called laboratory chemical liver spectrum was controlled. The restriction of the microsomal biotransformation established by means of the aminophenazon breathing test behaved parallel to the degree of severity of the disease. The aminophenazon breathing test was performed in the modification after Haustein and Schenker (1985). The largest delays in the decomposition were found in the complete cirrhotic transformation of the liver. The unequivocally pathologic result of the aminophenazon breathing test in severe irreversible damages of the liver parenchyma was confirmed by the formation of correlations with parameters of the conventional laboratory spectrum of the liver. Thus the restriction of the performance of the synthesis of the liver for coagulation factors and albumins was parallel to the loss of function of the mixed functional oxidases. In all patients with chronic liver diseases a connection between the value of the thromboplastin time (Quick's test) and result of the breathing test was found. Positive linear correlation between serum albumin and results of the breathing test could also be proved particularly in the group of the severe chronic inflammatory liver diseases. In chronic fibrosing liver diseases there were positive inverse correlations between gamma-globulin concentration in the serum and thymol turbidity test on the one hand as well as the aminophenazon breathing test on the other. There were no correlations between liver enzyme and aminophenazon breathing test. The

  4. 13C-egg white breath test: a non-invasive test of pancreatic trypsin activity in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Evenepoel, P; Hiele, M; Geypens, B; Geboes, K; Rutgeerts, P; Ghoos, Y

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The recent availability of egg white protein highly enriched with 13C has allowed breath test technology to be adapted for the study of protein digestion and absorption. Pancreatic trypsin is considered to be the key enzyme in the proteolytic cascade.
AIM—To evaluate trypsin activity in the small intestine of healthy volunteers and patients with pancreatic disease by a recently developed 13C-egg white breath test.
METHODS—A total of 48 healthy volunteers and 30 patients with pancreatic disease were studied after ingestion of a test meal consisting of 22 g 13C-labelled egg protein. Breath samples were taken before and after ingestion of the meal and analysed for 13CO2 concentration. Moreover, pancreatic trypsin output after maximal stimulation was measured in 13 patients and nine healthy volunteers.
RESULTS—The six hour cumulative 13CO2 excretion in breath was significantly lower in patients than controls (mean (SEM): 6.23 (0.82)% v 19.16 (0.58)%, p<0.0001). An excellent correlation was found between the six hour cumulative 13CO2 excretion and trypsin activity after maximal pancreatic stimulation.
CONCLUSION—The non-invasive 13C-egg white breath test is promising as an indirect pancreatic proteolytic function test.


Keywords: breath test; pancreatic disease; trypsin; protein; assimilation PMID:10601055

  5. The relationship between aminopyrine breath test and severity of liver disease in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Morelli, A.; Narducci, F.; Pelli, M.A.; Farroni, F.; Vedovelli, A.

    1981-08-01

    Twenty-two patients with cirrhosis were evaluated by the 2 hr.-(C14)-aminopyrine breath test, the conventional liver tests and two systems for grading the severity of liver disease. Twenty-three patients with noncirrhotic liver disease and 15 controls were also studied. Reduced 14CO2 values were found in 21 of the 22 cirrhotic patients and seven of those had noncirrhotic liver disease associated with severe functional reserve impairment. The values in patients with minor liver diseases or cholestasis were normal. In the cirrhotic patients 2 hr.-(C14)-aminopyrine breath test scores correlated with prothrombin time, retention of bromosulfalein, fasting serum bile acid, albumin, bilirubin, serum aspartate aminotransferase and, above all, with the scores of the two clinical rating systems. The 2 hr.-(C14)-aminopyrine breath test was superior to conventional tests in quantifying the degree of hepatic functional reserve and forecasting the prognosis.

  6. d-Xylose Metabolism in Hypocrea jecorina: Loss of the Xylitol Dehydrogenase Step Can Be Partially Compensated for by lad1-Encoded l-Arabinitol-4-Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Seiboth, Bernhard; Hartl, Lukas; Pail, Manuela; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2003-01-01

    With the goal of the genetic characterization of the d-xylose pathway in Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph: Trichoderma reesei), we cloned the xdh1 gene, encoding NAD-xylitol dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the second step of fungal d-xylose catabolism. This gene encodes a 363-amino-acid protein which has a mass of 38 kDa, belongs to the zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase family, exhibits high sequence identity to the published sequences of xylitol dehydrogenases from yeast origins, but contains a second, additional binding site for Zn2+. The enzyme catalyzed the NAD-dependent oxidation of xylitol and d-sorbitol and the NADH-dependent reduction of d-xylulose and d-fructose. No activity was observed with NADP, l-arabinose, or l-arabinitol. A single 1.4-kb transcript was formed during growth on xylan, d-xylose, l-arabinose, l-arabinitol and, at a lower abundance, xylitol, d-galactose, galactitol, and lactose but not on d-glucose and glycerol. xdh1 deletion mutants exhibited 50% reduced growth rates on d-xylose, whereas growth rates on xylitol remained unaltered. These mutants contained 30% of the xylitol dehydrogenase activity of the parent strain, indicating the presence of a second xylitol dehydrogenase. This activity was shown to be due to lad1-encoded l-arabinitol-4-dehydrogenase, because H. jecorina xdh1 lad1 double-deletion strains failed to grow on d-xylose or xylitol. In contrast, lad1 deletion strains of H. jecorina grew normally on these carbon sources. These results show that H. jecorina contains a single xylitol dehydrogenase which is encoded by xdh1 and is involved in the metabolism of d-xylose and that lad1-encoded l-arabinitol-4-dehydrogenase can compensate for it partially in mutants with a loss of xdh1 function. PMID:14555469

  7. A 14-day elemental diet is highly effective in normalizing the lactulose breath test.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Mark; Constantino, Tess; Kong, Yuthana; Bajwa, Meera; Rezaei, Abolghasem; Park, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    Treatment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frustrated by the low efficacy of antibiotics. Elemental diets have been shown to reduce enteric flora. In this study, we evaluate the ability of an elemental diet to normalize the lactulose breath test (LBT) in IBS subjects with abnormal breath test findings. Consecutive subjects with IBS and abnormal LBT suggesting the presence of bacterial overgrowth underwent a 2-week exclusive elemental diet. The diet consisted of Vivonex Plus (Novartis Nutrition Corp., Minneapolis, MN) in a quantity based on individual caloric requirement. On day 15 (prior to solid food), subjects returned for a follow-up breath test and those with an abnormal LBT were continued on the diet for an additional 7 days. The ability of an elemental diet to normalize the LBT was determined for days 15 and 21. A chart review was then conducted to evaluate any clinical benefit 1 month later. Of the 93 subjects available for analysis, 74 (80%) had a normal LBT on day 15 of the elemental diet. When those who continued to day 21 were included, five additional patients normalized the breath test (85%). On chart review, subjects who successfully normalized their breath test had a 66.4 +/- 36.1% improvement in bowel symptoms, compared to 11.9 +/- 22.0% in those who failed to normalize (P < 0.001). An elemental diet is highly effective in normalizing an abnormal LBT in IBS subjects, with a concomitant improvement in clinical symptoms. PMID:14992438

  8. Meta-Analysis and Functional Validation of Nutritional Requirements of Solventogenic Clostridia Growing under Butanol Stress Conditions and Coutilization of d-Glucose and d-Xylose

    PubMed Central

    Heluane, Humberto; Evans, Matthew R.; Dagher, Sue F.; Bruno-Bárcena, José M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in systems biology, omics, and computational studies allow us to carry out data mining for improving biofuel production bioprocesses. Of particular interest are bioprocesses that center on microbial capabilities to biotransform both the hexose and pentose fractions present in crop residues. This called for a systematic exploration of the components of the media to obtain higher-density cultures and more-productive fermentation operations than are currently found. By using a meta-analysis approach of the transcriptional responses to butanol stress, we identified the nutritional requirements of solvent-tolerant strain Clostridium beijerinckii SA-1 (ATCC 35702). The nutritional requirements identified were later validated using the chemostat pulse-and-shift technique. C. beijerinckii SA-1 was cultivated in a two-stage single-feed-stream continuous production system to test the proposed validated medium formulation, and the coutilization of d-glucose and d-xylose was evaluated by taking advantage of the well-known ability of solventogenic clostridia to utilize a large variety of carbon sources such as mono-, oligo-, and polysaccharides containing pentose and hexose sugars. Our results indicated that C. beijerinckii SA-1 was able to coferment hexose/pentose sugar mixtures in the absence of a glucose repression effect. In addition, our analysis suggests that the solvent and acid resistance mechanisms found in this strain are differentially regulated compared to strain NRRL B-527 and are outlined as the basis of the analysis toward optimizing butanol production. PMID:21602379

  9. ( sup 14 C)urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, J.E.; Talley, N.J.; Carpenter, H.A.; Shorter, R.G.; Conley, C.R.; Wilson, W.R.; DiMagno, E.P.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Phillips, S.F. )

    1990-07-01

    H. pylori is a potent urease producer, a characteristic that has been exploited in the development of the (14C)- and (13C)urea breath tests. The prevalence of H. pylori infection also is known to increase with advancing age; however, the individual patient's age has not routinely been considered when interpreting urea breath test results. The aim of this study was to validate a short, age-adjusted (14C)urea breath test for use in diagnosing H. pylori infections. Forty-one subjects (28 volunteers, 13 patients) underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies. Subjects were defined as being H. pylori-positive if histology or culture was positive. In addition, all subjects completed a 120-min (14C)urea breath test. A logistic regression analysis adjusting for age was used to estimate the probability of H. pylori positivity as a function of the 14C values generated. Sixteen subjects were H. pylori-positive, and 25 were H. pylori-negative. The 14C values generated between 15 and 80 min were found to be equally predictive in identifying H. pylori-positive subjects. Advancing age was associated with a higher probability of H. pylori-positivity. By taking advantage of the statistical probabilities, older patients could be accurately diagnosed with H. pylori at lower 14C values. We found that (14C)urea breath test to be both a sensitive and specific test that can be abbreviated to a 30-min examination (total test time). Moreover, our mathematical model indicates that a patient's age should be considered in order to optimize interpretation of the (14C)urea breath test, although further observations are needed to confirm this model.

  10. Diagnostic values of Helicobacter pylori diagnostic tests: stool antigen test, urea breath test, rapid urease test, serology and histology*

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Shadi; Tavakkoli, Hamid; Habizadeh, Mohamad Reza; Emami, Mohammad Hasan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to compare validity of 5 diagnostic tests of helicobacter pylori with each other: stool antigen test, urea breath test (UBT), rapid urease test (RUT), serology and histology. METHODS: A total of 94 patients who had indication of endoscopy entered the study. All of the 5 tests were performed for each patient. When the results of at least 2 tests were positive (except serology), Helicobacter pylori infection was considered to be positive. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of these 5 tests were determined. RESULTS: The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and area under ROC curve of these 5 tests are as below, respectively. Histology: 89%, 78%, 93%, 91%, 85% and 0.881; RUT: 93%, 75%, 95%, 94%, 86% and 0.831; serology: 50%, 54%, 46%, 61%, 52% and 0.563; stool antigen test: 96%, 83%, 98%, 96%, 91% and 0.897; UBT: 89%, 73%, 92%, 90%, 82% and 0.892. CONCLUSIONS: Stool antigen test is the most accurate test for Helicobacter pylori diagnosis before eradication of these bacteria. PMID:22973378

  11. Photoacoustic sensor for VOCs: first step towards a lung cancer breath test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich G.; Dressler, Matthias; Harde, Hermann

    2005-08-01

    Development of new optical sensor technologies has a major impact on the progression of diagnostic methods. Specifically, the optical analysis of breath is an extraordinarily promising technique. Spectroscopic sensors for the non-invasive 13C-breath tests (the Urea Breath Test for detection of Helicobacter pylori is most prominent) are meanwhile well established. However, recent research and development go beyond gastroenterological applications. Sensitive and selective detection of certain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a patient's breath, could enable the diagnosis of diseases that are very difficult to diagnose with contemporary techniques. For instance, an appropriate VOC biomarker for early-stage bronchial carcinoma (lung cancer) is n-butane (C4H10). We present a new optical detection scheme for VOCs that employs an especially compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). This method makes use of the transformation of absorbed modulated radiation into a sound wave. Employing a wavelength-modulated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser and taking advantage of acoustical resonances of the sample cell, we performed very sensitive and selective measurements on butane. A detection limit for butane in air in the ppb range was achieved. In subsequent research the sensitivity will be successively improved to match the requirements of the medical application. Upon optimization, our photoacoustic sensor has the potential to enable future breath tests for early-stage lung cancer diagnostics.

  12. The mechanism of 2-furaldehyde formation from D-xylose dehydration in the gas phase. A tandem mass spectrometric study.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Andreina; Piccolella, Simona; Pepi, Federico; Garzoli, Stefania; Giacomello, Pierluigi

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of reactions occurring in solution can be investigated also in the gas phase by suited mass spectrometric techniques, which allow to highlight fundamental mechanistic features independent of the influence of the medium and to clarifying controversial hypotheses proposed in solution studies. In this work, we report a gas-phase study performed by electrospray triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-TSQ/MS) on the dehydration of D-xylose, leading mainly to the formation of 2-furaldehyde (2-FA). It is generally known in carbohydrate chemistry that the thermal acid catalyzed dehydration of pentoses leads to the formation of 2-FA, but several aspects on the solution-phase mechanism are controversial. Here, gaseous reactant ions corresponding to protonated xylose molecules obtained from ESI of a solution containing D-xylose and ammonium acetate as protonating reagent were allowed to undergo collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) into the triple stage quadrupole analyzer. The product ion mass spectra of protonated xylose are characterized by the presence of ionic intermediates arising from xylose dehydration, which were structurally characterized by their fragmentation patterns. As expected, the xylose triple dehydration leads to the formation of the ion at m/z 97, corresponding to protonated 2-FA. On the basis of mass spectrometric evidences, we demonstrated that in the gas phase, the formation of 2-FA involves protonation at the OH group bound to the C1 atom of the sugar, the first ionic intermediate being characterized by a cyclic structure. Finally, energy resolved product ion mass spectra allowed to obtain information on the energetic features of the D-xylose→2-FA conversion. ᅟ PMID:23690250

  13. Inhibition of d-xylose isomerase by polyols: atomic details by joint X-ray/neutron crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalevsky, Andrey; Hanson, B. Leif; Mason, Sax A.; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Fisher, Zoe; Mustyakimov, Marat; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Keen, David A.; Langan, Paul

    2012-09-01

    A joint X-ray/neutron structure of d-xylose isomerase in complex with the inhibitor sorbitol was determined at room temperature at an acidic pH of 5.9. Protonation of the O5 O atom of the sugar was directly observed in the nuclear density maps. Under acidic conditions sorbitol gains a water-mediated interaction with the enzyme active site, which may explain the increased potency of the inhibitor at low pH. d-Xylose isomerase (XI) converts the aldo-sugars xylose and glucose to their keto analogs xylulose and fructose, but is strongly inhibited by the polyols xylitol and sorbitol, especially at acidic pH. In order to understand the atomic details of polyol binding to the XI active site, a 2.0 Å resolution room-temperature joint X-ray/neutron structure of XI in complex with Ni{sup 2+} cofactors and sorbitol inhibitor at pH 5.9 and a room-temperature X-ray structure of XI containing Mg{sup 2+} ions and xylitol at the physiological pH of 7.7 were obtained. The protonation of oxygen O5 of the inhibitor, which was found to be deprotonated and negatively charged in previous structures of XI complexed with linear glucose and xylulose, was directly observed. The Ni{sup 2+} ions occupying the catalytic metal site (M2) were found at two locations, while Mg{sup 2+} in M2 is very mobile and has a high B factor. Under acidic conditions sorbitol gains a water-mediated interaction that connects its O1 hydroxyl to Asp257. This contact is not found in structures at basic pH. The new interaction that is formed may improve the binding of the inhibitor, providing an explanation for the increased affinity of the polyols for XI at low pH.

  14. Isotopic exchange plus substrate and inhibition kinetics of D-xylose isomerase do not support a proton-transfer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Allen, K N; Lavie, A; Farber, G K; Glasfeld, A; Petsko, G A; Ringe, D

    1994-02-15

    The D-xylose isomerase of Streptomyces olivochromogenes is a Mg2+- or Mn(2+)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the aldose-ketose isomerization of xylose to xylulose or of glucose to fructose. Proton exchange into water during enzyme-catalyzed isomerization of C-2 tritiated glucose at 15, 25 and 55 degrees C shows < 0.6% exchange (the loss of one proton in every billion turnovers). High concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride and extremes of pH had no effect on the amount of exchange detected. Such a low percentage of exchange is inconsistent with a proton-transfer mechanism as the main kinetic pathway for isomerization. 19F NMR experiments showed no release of fluoride after incubation of the enzyme for 4 weeks with 800 mM 3-deoxy-3-fluoroglucose or 3-deoxy-3-fluoroallose (both are competitive inhibitors with Ki values of 600 mM). This result is also inconsistent with a proton-transfer mechanism. A hydride-shift mechanism following ring opening has been proposed for the isomerization. Enzyme-catalyzed ring opening was directly measured by demonstrating H2S release upon reaction of xylose isomerase with 1-thioglucose. D-Xylose isomerase-catalyzed interconversion of glucose to fructose exhibited linear Arrhenius behavior with an activation energy of 14 kcal/mol from 0 to 50 degrees C. No change in rate-determining step occurs over this temperature range. 13C NMR experiments with glucose show that enzyme-bound magnesium or manganese does not interact specifically with any one site on the sugar. These results are consistent with nonproductive binding modes for the substrate glucose in addition to productive binding. PMID:8312268

  15. Compressed air demand-type firefighter's breathing system, volume 1. [design analysis and performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The commercial availability of lightweight high pressure compressed air vessels has resulted in a lightweight firefighter's breathing apparatus. The improved apparatus, and details of its design and development are described. The apparatus includes a compact harness assembly, a backplate mounted pressure reducer assembly, a lightweight bubble-type facemask with a mask mounted demand breathing regulator. Incorporated in the breathing regulator is exhalation valve, a purge valve and a whistle-type low pressure warning that sounds only during inhalation. The pressure reducer assembly includes two pressure reducers, an automatic transfer valve and a signaling device for the low pressure warning. Twenty systems were fabricated, tested, refined through an alternating development and test sequence, and extensively examined in a field evaluation program. Photographs of the apparatus are included.

  16. Use of the single-breath method of estimating cardiac output during exercise-stress testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Mauldin, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-breath cardiac output measurement technique of Kim et al. (1966) has been modified for use in obtaining cardiac output measurements during exercise-stress tests on Apollo astronauts. The modifications involve the use of a respiratory mass spectrometer for data acquisition and a digital computer program for data analysis. The variation of the modified method for triplicate steady-state cardiac output measurements was plus or minus 1 liter/min. The combined physiological and methodological variation seen during a set of three exercise tests on a series of subjects was 1 to 2.5 liter/min. Comparison of the modified method with the direct Fick technique showed that although the single-breath values were consistently low, the scatter of data was small and the correlation between the two methods was high. Possible reasons for the low single-breath cardiac output values are discussed.

  17. FEV manoeuvre induced changes in breath VOC compositions: an unconventional view on lung function tests

    PubMed Central

    Sukul, Pritam; Schubert, Jochen K.; Oertel, Peter; Kamysek, Svend; Taunk, Khushman; Trefz, Phillip; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis can open a non-invasive window onto pathological and metabolic processes in the body. Decades of clinical breath-gas analysis have revealed that changes in exhaled VOC concentrations are important rather than disease specific biomarkers. As physiological parameters, such as respiratory rate or cardiac output, have profound effects on exhaled VOCs, here we investigated VOC exhalation under respiratory manoeuvres. Breath VOCs were monitored by means of real-time mass-spectrometry during conventional FEV manoeuvres in 50 healthy humans. Simultaneously, we measured respiratory and hemodynamic parameters noninvasively. Tidal volume and minute ventilation increased by 292 and 171% during the manoeuvre. FEV manoeuvre induced substance specific changes in VOC concentrations. pET-CO2 and alveolar isoprene increased by 6 and 21% during maximum exhalation. Then they decreased by 18 and 37% at forced expiration mirroring cardiac output. Acetone concentrations rose by 4.5% despite increasing minute ventilation. Blood-borne furan and dimethyl-sulphide mimicked isoprene profile. Exogenous acetonitrile, sulphides, and most aliphatic and aromatic VOCs changed minimally. Reliable breath tests must avoid forced breathing. As isoprene exhalations mirrored FEV performances, endogenous VOCs might assure quality of lung function tests. Analysis of exhaled VOC concentrations can provide additional information on physiology of respiration and gas exchange. PMID:27311826

  18. FEV manoeuvre induced changes in breath VOC compositions: an unconventional view on lung function tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukul, Pritam; Schubert, Jochen K.; Oertel, Peter; Kamysek, Svend; Taunk, Khushman; Trefz, Phillip; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2016-06-01

    Breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis can open a non-invasive window onto pathological and metabolic processes in the body. Decades of clinical breath-gas analysis have revealed that changes in exhaled VOC concentrations are important rather than disease specific biomarkers. As physiological parameters, such as respiratory rate or cardiac output, have profound effects on exhaled VOCs, here we investigated VOC exhalation under respiratory manoeuvres. Breath VOCs were monitored by means of real-time mass-spectrometry during conventional FEV manoeuvres in 50 healthy humans. Simultaneously, we measured respiratory and hemodynamic parameters noninvasively. Tidal volume and minute ventilation increased by 292 and 171% during the manoeuvre. FEV manoeuvre induced substance specific changes in VOC concentrations. pET-CO2 and alveolar isoprene increased by 6 and 21% during maximum exhalation. Then they decreased by 18 and 37% at forced expiration mirroring cardiac output. Acetone concentrations rose by 4.5% despite increasing minute ventilation. Blood-borne furan and dimethyl-sulphide mimicked isoprene profile. Exogenous acetonitrile, sulphides, and most aliphatic and aromatic VOCs changed minimally. Reliable breath tests must avoid forced breathing. As isoprene exhalations mirrored FEV performances, endogenous VOCs might assure quality of lung function tests. Analysis of exhaled VOC concentrations can provide additional information on physiology of respiration and gas exchange.

  19. FEV manoeuvre induced changes in breath VOC compositions: an unconventional view on lung function tests.

    PubMed

    Sukul, Pritam; Schubert, Jochen K; Oertel, Peter; Kamysek, Svend; Taunk, Khushman; Trefz, Phillip; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis can open a non-invasive window onto pathological and metabolic processes in the body. Decades of clinical breath-gas analysis have revealed that changes in exhaled VOC concentrations are important rather than disease specific biomarkers. As physiological parameters, such as respiratory rate or cardiac output, have profound effects on exhaled VOCs, here we investigated VOC exhalation under respiratory manoeuvres. Breath VOCs were monitored by means of real-time mass-spectrometry during conventional FEV manoeuvres in 50 healthy humans. Simultaneously, we measured respiratory and hemodynamic parameters noninvasively. Tidal volume and minute ventilation increased by 292 and 171% during the manoeuvre. FEV manoeuvre induced substance specific changes in VOC concentrations. pET-CO2 and alveolar isoprene increased by 6 and 21% during maximum exhalation. Then they decreased by 18 and 37% at forced expiration mirroring cardiac output. Acetone concentrations rose by 4.5% despite increasing minute ventilation. Blood-borne furan and dimethyl-sulphide mimicked isoprene profile. Exogenous acetonitrile, sulphides, and most aliphatic and aromatic VOCs changed minimally. Reliable breath tests must avoid forced breathing. As isoprene exhalations mirrored FEV performances, endogenous VOCs might assure quality of lung function tests. Analysis of exhaled VOC concentrations can provide additional information on physiology of respiration and gas exchange. PMID:27311826

  20. Dosimetry and reproducibility of a capsule-based C-14 urea breath test

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, M.J.; Stubbs, J.B.; Buck, D.A. |

    1995-05-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to determine the excretion of the C-14 and associated radiation dose and (2) to examine the reproducibility of a commercial C-14 urea breath test for H.pylori diagnosis. Tests were performed on twenty consenting volunteers (13M, 7F, 24-48 yr). Breath samples containing 1 mmol CO{sub 2} were obtained at 0,5,10,15,20,25,30 min. and 1,2,3,4,5,6,12, 24 hrs following administration of the 37kBq C-14 urea test capsule. A 24 hr urine collection was performed with each voiding collected separately. A repeat breath test was performed 24 hr after the first. H. pylori positive (HP+) was defined as a 15 minute breath sample >=50 dpm. Total urine excretion was obtained directly. Breath excretion was modeled by estimating the area under the excretion curve and using a constant factor of 884 mmol CO{sub 2}/ hr. Urine and breath excretion data in HP+ and H. pylori-negative (HP-) volunteers were pooled and fit to a monoexponential function thus estimating the cumulative urinary excretion of unmetabolized urea. Previously reported biokinetic models of C-14 urea and bicarbonate were used to estimate radiation doses form each compound. Weighted sums were calculated for each dose estimate using each group`s excretion fraction distribution. Both HP+ and HP- volunteers excreted an average of 73% of the C-14 over the first 24 hr. HP+ excretion was evenly divided between breath (34%) and urine (38%). HP-excretion is almost solely by the urinary pathway. The maximum dose for HP= was to the red marrow (0.0033 mGy) and a maximum of 0.0054 mGy to the urinary bladder wall for HP-. There was no difference between 15 inch breath samples on the two days (t-test, p>0.6). The minimum HP+ result at 15 inch was 270 dpm and the maximum HP- result at 15 inch was 18 dpm, indicating great separation between HP+ and HP- results. This study verifies previous dose estimates using C-14 excretion data. The test is sensitive and reproducible with a low radiation dose.

  1. Transcriptional comparison of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa growing on three major monosaccharides D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose are the three major monosaccharides in plant cell walls. Complete utilization of all three sugars is still a bottleneck for second-generation cellulolytic bioethanol production, especially for L-arabinose. However, little is known about gene expression profiles during L-arabinose utilization in fungi and a comparison of the genome-wide fungal response to these three major monosaccharides has not yet been reported. Results Using next-generation sequencing technology, we have analyzed the transcriptome of N. crassa grown on L-arabinose versus D-xylose, with D-glucose as the reference. We found that the gene expression profiles on L-arabinose were dramatically different from those on D-xylose. It appears that L-arabinose can rewire the fungal cell metabolic pathway widely and provoke the expression of many kinds of sugar transporters, hemicellulase genes and transcription factors. In contrast, many fewer genes, mainly related to the pentose metabolic pathway, were upregulated on D-xylose. The rewired metabolic response to L-arabinose was significantly different and wider than that under no carbon conditions, although the carbon starvation response was initiated on L-arabinose. Three novel sugar transporters were identified and characterized for their substrates here, including one glucose transporter GLT-1 (NCU01633) and two novel pentose transporters, XAT-1 (NCU01132), XYT-1 (NCU05627). One transcription factor associated with the regulation of hemicellulase genes, HCR-1 (NCU05064) was also characterized in the present study. Conclusions We conducted the first transcriptome analysis of Neurospora crassa grown on L-arabinose and performed a comparative analysis with cells grown on D-xylose and D-glucose, which deepens the understanding of the utilization of L-arabinose and D-xylose in filamentous fungi. The dataset generated by this research will be useful for mining target genes for D-xylose and L-arabinose utilization

  2. 13C labelled cholesteryl octanoate breath test for assessing pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ventrucci, M; Cipolla, A; Ubalducci, G; Roda, A; Roda, E

    1998-01-01

    Background—A non-invasive test for assessment of fat digestion has been developed based on the intraluminal hydrolysis of cholesteryl-[1-13C]octanoate by pancreatic esterase. 
Aims—To determine the diagnostic performance of this breath test in the assessment of exocrine pancreatic function. 
Methods—The test was performed in 20 healthy controls, 22 patients with chronic pancreatic disease (CPD), four with biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and 32 with non-pancreatic digestive diseases (NPD); results were compared with those of other tubeless tests (faecal chymotrypsin and fluorescein dilaurate test). 
Results—Hourly recoveries of 13CO2 were significantly lower in CPD when compared with healthy controls or NPD. In patients with CPD with mild to moderate insufficiency, the curve of 13CO2 recovery was similar to that of healthy controls, while in those with severe insufficiency it was flat. In three patients with CPD with severe steatorrhoea, a repeat test after pancreatic enzyme supplementation showed a significant rise in 13CO2 recovery. The four BPD patients had low and delayed 13CO2 recovery. Only eight of the 32 patients with NPD had abnormal breath test results. There was a significant correlation between the results of the breath test and those of faecal chymotrypsin, the fluorescein dilaurate test, and faecal fat measurements. For the diagnosis of pancreatic disease using the three hour cumulative 13CO2 recovery test, the sensitivity was 68.2% and specificity 75.0%; values were similar to those of the other two tubeless pancreatic function tests. In seven healthy controls, nine patients with CPD, and nine with NPD a second breath test was performed using Na-[1-13C]octanoate and a pancreatic function index was calculated as the ratio of 13C recovery obtained in the two tests: at three hours this index was abnormal in eight patients with CPD and in three with NPD. 
Conclusion—The cholesteryl-[1-13C]octanoate breath test can be useful for the

  3. Breath tests sustainability in hospital settings: cost analysis and reimbursement in the Italian National Health System.

    PubMed

    Volpe, M; Scaldaferri, F; Ojetti, V; Poscia, A

    2013-01-01

    The high demand of Breath Tests (BT) in many gastroenterological conditions in time of limited resources for health care systems, generates increased interest in cost analysis from the point of view of the delivery of services to better understand how use the money to generate value. This study aims to measure the cost of C13 Urea and other most utilized breath tests in order to describe key aspects of costs and reimbursements looking at the economic sustainability for the hospital. A hospital based cost-analysis of the main breath tests commonly delivery in an ambulatory setting is performed. Mean salary for professional nurses and gastroenterologists, drugs/preparation used and disposable materials, purchase and depreciation of the instrument and the testing time was used to estimate the cost, while reimbursements are based on the 2013 Italian National Health System ambulatory pricelist. Variables that could influence the model are considered in the sensitivity analyses. The mean cost for C13--Urea, Lactulose and Lactose BT are, respectively, Euros 30,59; 45,20 and 30,29. National reimbursement often doesn't cover the cost of the analysis, especially considering the scenario with lower number of exam. On the contrary, in high performance scenario all the reimbursement could cover the cost, except for the C13 Urea BT that is high influenced by the drugs cost. However, consideration about the difference between Italian Regional Health System ambulatory pricelist are done. Our analysis shows that while national reimbursement rates cover the costs of H2 breath testing, they do not cover sufficiently C13 BT, particularly urea breath test. The real economic strength of these non invasive tests should be considered in the overall organization of inpatient and outpatient clinic, accounting for complete diagnostic pathway for each gastrointestinal disease. PMID:24443075

  4. Breath Ketone Testing: A New Biomarker for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Monitoring of Diabetic Ketosis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yue; Gao, Zhaohua; Liu, Yong; Cheng, Yan; Yu, Mengxiao; Zhao, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetone, β-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic acid are three types of ketone body that may be found in the breath, blood, and urine. Detecting altered concentrations of ketones in the breath, blood, and urine is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of different detection methods for ketones, and to establish whether detection of the concentration of ketones in the breath is an effective and practical technique. Methods. We measured the concentrations of acetone in the breath using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and β-hydroxybutyrate in fingertip blood collected from 99 patients with diabetes assigned to groups 1 (−), 2 (±), 3 (+), 4 (++), or 5 (+++) according to urinary ketone concentrations. Results. There were strong relationships between fasting blood glucose, age, and diabetic ketosis. Exhaled acetone concentration significantly correlated with concentrations of fasting blood glucose, ketones in the blood and urine, LDL-C, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen. Conclusions. Breath testing for ketones has a high sensitivity and specificity and appears to be a noninvasive, convenient, and repeatable method for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diabetic ketosis. PMID:24900994

  5. 13c-SUCROSE BREATH TEST TO DIFFERENTIATE CONGENITAL SUCRASE-ISOMALTASE DEFICIENCY FROM PANDISACCHARIDASE DEFICIENCY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A substrate-paired breath test using 13C-sucrose (S) and 13C-glucose (G) has been developed to assess congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (CSID). The aim was to determine if CSID could be detected without duodenal enzyme assay. Methods: Two patients (1F:1M, aged 1 & 15 yrs) wi...

  6. Production of Xylitol from D-Xylose by Overexpression of Xylose Reductase in Osmotolerant Yeast Candida glycerinogenes WL2002-5.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zong, Hong; Zhuge, Bin; Lu, Xinyao; Fang, Huiying; Zhuge, Jian

    2015-07-01

    Efficient bioconversion of D-xylose into various biochemicals is critical for the developing lignocelluloses application. In this study, we compared D-xylose utilization in Candida glycerinogenes WL2002-5 transformants expressing xylose reductase (XYL1) in D-xylose metabolism. C. glycerinogenes WL2002-5 expressing XYL1 from Schefferomyces stipitis can produce xylitol. Xylitol production by the recombinant strains was evaluated using a xylitol fermentation medium with glucose as a co-substrate. As glucose was found to be an insufficient co-substrate, various carbon sources were screened for efficient cofactor regeneration, and glycerol was found to be the best co-substrate. The effects of glycerol on the xylitol production rate by a xylose reductase gene (XYL1)-overexpressed mutant of C. glycerinogenes WL2002-5 were investigated. The XYL1-overexpressed mutant produced xylitol from D-xylose using glycerol as a co-substrate for cell growth and NAD (P) H regeneration: 100 g/L D-xylose was completely converted into xylitol when at least 20 g/L glycerol was used as a co-substrate. XYL1 overexpressed mutant grown on glycerol as co-substrate accumulated 2.1-fold increased xylitol concentration over those cells grown on glucose as co-substrate. XYL1 overexpressed mutant produced xylitol with a volumetric productivity of 0.83 g/L/h, and a xylitol yield of 98 % xylose. Recombinant yeast strains obtained in this study are promising candidates for xylitol production. This is the first report of XYL1 gene overexpression of C. glycerinogenes WL2002-5 for enhancing the efficiency of xylitol production. PMID:26018342

  7. Estimation of prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in an asymptomatic elderly population comparing [14C] urea breath test and serology.

    PubMed Central

    Newell, D G; Hawtin, P R; Stacey, A R; MacDougall, M H; Ruddle, A C

    1991-01-01

    A non-invasive serological assay devised in this laboratory had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% as determined by culture and confirmed by histology in a group of 47 patients who had undergone endoscopy. The correlation between serology and the non-invasive [14C] breath test was very good. Only one of 24 culture positive patients was, while all 23 culture negative patients were, breath test negative. In a group of 46 healthy elderly persons, however, significant anomalies between serology and breath test were observed. Only 83% of the breath test negative persons were seronegative, while only 68% of the breath test positive persons were seropositive. These results can be explained in terms of age related atrophic gastritis and immune incompetence, causing reduced colonisation and decreased antibody production, respectively. These investigations suggest that non-invasive tests for H pylori infection may not be reliable in the elderly. PMID:2045496

  8. 13CO2 breath tests in non-invasive hepatological diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Musialik, Joanna; Kasicka-Jonderko, Anna; Buschhaus, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    In liver diagnostics, a simple, non-invasive test with high sensitivity and specificity is permanently being sought in order to assess the degree of liver damage. In addition to liver biopsy, algorithms using blood parameters or elastometry are used in clinical practice. However, these methods do not provide information about the true liver reserve, so the liver breath test seem to be a promising diagnostic tool. The basis of this test depends on the ability of particular hepatocyte enzyme systems to metabolise a tested substance labelled with a stable carbon isotope. The kinetics of 13CO2 elimination with expiratory air then permits quantitative assessment of the functional liver reserve and the degree of organ damage. In this paper the most commonly used tests, grouped according to the main metabolic pathways, are described. The usefulness of liver breath tests in specific clinical situations, both as a diagnostic and prognostic tool, is presented. PMID:25960807

  9. Evaluation of a [13C]-Dextromethorphan Breath Test to Assess CYP2D6 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J. Steven; Pearce, Robin E.; Gaedigk, Andrea; Modak, Anil; Rosen, David I.

    2016-01-01

    A [13C]-dextromethorphan ([13C]-DM) breath test was evaluated to assess its feasibility as a rapid, phenotyping assay for CYP2D6 activity. [13C]-DM (0.5 mg/kg) was administered orally with water or potassium bicarbonate-sodium bicarbonate to 30 adult Caucasian volunteers (n = 1 each): CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (2 null alleles; PM-0) and extensive metabolizers with 1 (EM-1) or 2 functional alleles (EM-2). CYP2D6 phenotype was determined by 13CO2 enrichment measured by infrared spectrometry (delta-over-baseline [DOB] value) in expired breath samples collected before and up to 240 minutes after [13C]-DM ingestion and by 4-hour urinary metabolite ratio. The PM-0 group was readily distinguishable from either EM group by both the breath test and urinary metabolite ratio. Using a single point determination of phenotype at 40 minutes and defining PMs as subjects with a DOB ≤ 0.5, the sensitivity of the method was 100%; specificity was 95% with 95% accuracy and resulted in the misclassification of 1 EM-1 individual as a PM. Modification of the initial protocol (timing of potassium bicarbonate-sodium bicarbonate administration relative to dose) yielded comparable results, but there was a tendency toward increased DOB values. Although further development is required, these studies suggest that the [13C]-DM breath test offers promise as a rapid, minimally invasive phenotyping assay for CYP2D6 activity. PMID:18728242

  10. Additional Value of CH₄ Measurement in a Combined (13)C/H₂ Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-01

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H₂) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined (13)C/H₂ lactose breath test that measures breath (13)CO₂ as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H₂ and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 (13)C/H₂ lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH₄ in addition to H₂ and (13)CO₂. Based on the (13)C/H₂ breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH₄ further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H₂-excretion were found to excrete CH₄. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH₄-concentrations has an added value to the (13)C/H₂ breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. PMID:26371034

  11. Oral Adherence Monitoring Using a Breath Test to Supplement Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Timothy E.; Booth, Matthew; Wasdo, Scott; Wishin, Judith; Quinn, Brian; Gonzalez, Daniel; Derendorf, Hartmut; McGorray, Susan P.; Simoni, Jane; Melker, Richard J.; Dennis, Donn M.

    2012-01-01

    A breath-based adherence system to document ingestion of oral medications (e.g., HAART) was investigated. Specifically, the food additive 2-butanol, which can be easily packaged with a drug, is converted via alcohol dehydrogenase to the volatile metabolite 2-butanone that rapidly appears in breath, indicating adherence. In healthy adults using a portable sensor and GC-MS, the following experiments were performed: yield of 2-butanone in breath following ingestion of 2-butanol, adherence system accuracy, and potential interference of the adherence system by food or misplacement of 2-butanol on the tongue. During feasibility testing, every subject exhaled 2-butanone with 6.6±1.5 min to peak concentrations of 548±235 ppb following ingestion of 2-butanol (40 mg). ROC areas at 5 and 10 min were 0.95 (0.86–1.00) and 3 1.00 (1.00–1.00). Food did not interfere. Tongue application resulted in large concentrations of 2-butanol, but not 2-butanone. A breath test to provide definitive evidence of oral medication adherence appears technically feasible. PMID:23001413

  12. Anomalous behavior of helium and sulfur hexafluoride during single-breath tests in sustained microgravity.

    PubMed

    Prisk, G K; Lauzon, A M; Verbanck, S; Elliot, A R; Guy, H J; Paiva, M; West, J B

    1996-04-01

    We performed single-breath wash-in tests for He and SF6 in four subjects exposed to 14 days of microgravity (microG) during the Spacelab flight Spacelab Life Sciences-2. Subjects inspired a vital capacity breath of 5% He-1.25% SF6-balance O2 and then exhaled to residual volume at 0.5l/s. The tests were also performed with a 10-s breath hold at the end of inspiration. Measurements were also made with the subjects standing and supine in 1 G. Phase III slope was measured after the dead-space washout and before the onset of airway closure. In all subjects in 1 G, whether standing or supine, phase III slope for SF6 was significantly steeper than that for He. However, in microG, the slopes became the same. Furthermore, after breath holding in microG, the SF6 slopes were significantly flatter than those for He. On return to 1 G, the changes were reversed, and there was no difference between preflight and postflight values. Because most of the phase III slope reflects events occurring in the acinar regions of the lung, the results suggest that microG causes conformational changes in the acini or changes in cardiogenic mixing in the lung periphery, but in either case the mechanism is unclear. PMID:8926236

  13. [DELAYED RESULTS OF ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY, PRESCRIBED BY RESULTS OF 13C-TRIGLYCERIDE BREATH TEST].

    PubMed

    Chernyavskiy, V V; Gvozdetska, L S

    2015-01-01

    Maldigestion persists in most patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). The objective lipase and amylase insufficiency diagnosis is needed to achieve an adequate clinical response to oral pancreatic enzyme substitution therapy. The novel data is presented in the article about the role of 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test as a tool for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency diagnosis, for evaluating fat malabsorbtion in CP patients. 135 patients were included in the investigation. Delayed results of enzyme replacement therapy were estimated after 1 and 2 year of surveillance. It has been shown, that partial recovery of exocrine pancreatic function is possible, and replacement therapy leads to patients nutritional status improving. Thus 13C-triglyceride breath test could be useful tool in clinical practice for CP diagnosis. The test make it possible to choose the initial pancreatic enzyme dosage and are beneficial during the treatment for pancreatic enzyme dose correction. PMID:26827447

  14. Taxonomy and physiological characterisation of Scheffersomyces titanus sp. nov., a new D-xylose-fermenting yeast species from China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Cao, Wan-Nan; Ren, Yong-Cheng; Xu, Long-Long; Yi, Ze-Hao; Liu, Zheng; Hui, Feng-Li

    2016-01-01

    Three strains of a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from the host beetle Dorcus titanus collected from two different localities in Henan Province, Central China. These strains formed two hat-shaped ascospores in conjugated and deliquescent asci. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis that included the nearly complete small subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rDNAs, as well as RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1) gene demonstrated that these strains represent a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Scheffersomyces. The phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of the xylose reductase (XYL1) gene supported the view that the new strains could be grouped as a unique species. Although this new species is highly similar to Scheffersomyces stipitis-like yeasts in terms of nrDNA sequences and morphological and physiological characteristics, the species can be clearly differentiated from its close relatives on the basis of the sequences of XYL1 and RPB1. Therefore, a novel yeast species, Scheffersomyces titanus sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is NYNU 14712T (CICC 33061T = CBS 13926T). PMID:27558134

  15. Description of Scheffersomyces henanensis sp. nov., a New D-Xylose-Fermenting Yeast Species Isolated from Rotten Wood

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yongcheng; Chen, Liang; Niu, Qiuhong; Hui, Fengli

    2014-01-01

    Two strains of a D-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from rotten wood samples collected from the Baotianman Nature Reserve in Henan Province, central China. These strains formed hat-shaped ascospores in conjugated and deliquescent asci. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis that included the nearly complete small subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA genes, as well as RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1) gene demonstrated that the two strains represent a novel yeast species closely related to Scheffersomyces segobiensis. A sequence comparison of xylose reductase (XYL1) gene, which was recently recommended for rapid identification of cryptic species in the Scheffersomyces clade, revealed a significant sequence divergence of 25 nucleotides between the novel strains and their closest relative S. segobiensis, supporting their classification as a distinct species. Furthermore, these new strains can be clearly distinguished from S. segobiensis by a number of morphological and physiological characteristics. Therefore, a novel yeast species, Scheffersomyces henanensis sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is BY-41T ( =  CICC 1974T  =  CBS 12475T). PMID:24647466

  16. Spathaspora allomyrinae sp. nov., a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species isolated from a scarabeid beetle Allomyrina dichotoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Ren, Yong-Cheng; Zhang, Zheng-Tian; Ke, Tao; Hui, Feng-Li

    2016-05-01

    During an investigation of yeasts associated with insects, three strains of a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from the gut of the host beetles Allomyrina dichotoma (Coleoptera: Scarabeidae) collected on the Baotianman National Nature Reserve, Nanyan, Henan Province, China. These strains formed two elongated ascospores, which were tapered and curved at the ends in persistent asci. Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) and small subunit (SSU) rRNA genes showed that these new strains represent a phylogenetically distinct species in the Spathaspora clade. This novel species differed from the closest species, Candida lyxosophila NRRL Y-17539T, by a 6.7 % sequence divergence (31 substitutions and 7 gaps) in the D1/D2 LSU rRNA gene and a 1.2 % divergence (17 substitutions, 4 gaps) in the SSU rRNA gene. The novel species can also be distinguished from C. lyxosophila NRRL Y-17539T in terms of the ability to assimilate myo-inositol and to grow in the presence of 0.1 % cycloheximide, as well as the inability to assimilate citrate. The name Spathaspora allomyrinae sp. nov. is proposed for this species. The type strain is NYNU 1495T ( = CICC 33057T = CBS 13924T). The MycoBank number is MB 815071. PMID:26895992

  17. Description of Scheffersomyces henanensis sp. nov., a new D-xylose-fermenting yeast species isolated from rotten wood.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yongcheng; Chen, Liang; Niu, Qiuhong; Hui, Fengli

    2014-01-01

    Two strains of a D-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from rotten wood samples collected from the Baotianman Nature Reserve in Henan Province, central China. These strains formed hat-shaped ascospores in conjugated and deliquescent asci. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis that included the nearly complete small subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA genes, as well as RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1) gene demonstrated that the two strains represent a novel yeast species closely related to Scheffersomyces segobiensis. A sequence comparison of xylose reductase (XYL1) gene, which was recently recommended for rapid identification of cryptic species in the Scheffersomyces clade, revealed a significant sequence divergence of 25 nucleotides between the novel strains and their closest relative S. segobiensis, supporting their classification as a distinct species. Furthermore, these new strains can be clearly distinguished from S. segobiensis by a number of morphological and physiological characteristics. Therefore, a novel yeast species, Scheffersomyces henanensis sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is BY-41T ( =  CICC 1974T  =  CBS 12475T). PMID:24647466

  18. Taxonomy and physiological characterisation of Scheffersomyces titanus sp. nov., a new D-xylose-fermenting yeast species from China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Cao, Wan-Nan; Ren, Yong-Cheng; Xu, Long-Long; Yi, Ze-Hao; Liu, Zheng; Hui, Feng-Li

    2016-01-01

    Three strains of a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from the host beetle Dorcus titanus collected from two different localities in Henan Province, Central China. These strains formed two hat-shaped ascospores in conjugated and deliquescent asci. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis that included the nearly complete small subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rDNAs, as well as RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1) gene demonstrated that these strains represent a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Scheffersomyces. The phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of the xylose reductase (XYL1) gene supported the view that the new strains could be grouped as a unique species. Although this new species is highly similar to Scheffersomyces stipitis-like yeasts in terms of nrDNA sequences and morphological and physiological characteristics, the species can be clearly differentiated from its close relatives on the basis of the sequences of XYL1 and RPB1. Therefore, a novel yeast species, Scheffersomyces titanus sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is NYNU 14712(T) (CICC 33061(T) = CBS 13926(T)). PMID:27558134

  19. When Breathing Interferes with Cognition: Experimental Inspiratory Loading Alters Timed Up-and-Go Test in Normal Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Demiri, Suela; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Allali, Gilles; Morélot-Panzini, Capucine; Similowski, Thomas; Adler, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Human breathing stems from automatic brainstem neural processes. It can also be operated by cortico-subcortical networks, especially when breathing becomes uncomfortable because of external or internal inspiratory loads. How the “irruption of breathing into consciousness” interacts with cognition remains unclear, but a case report in a patient with defective automatic breathing (Ondine's curse syndrome) has shown that there was a cognitive cost of breathing when the respiratory cortical networks were engaged. In a pilot study of putative breathing-cognition interactions, the present study relied on a randomized design to test the hypothesis that experimentally loaded breathing in 28 young healthy subjects would have a negative impact on cognition as tested by “timed up-and-go” test (TUG) and its imagery version (iTUG). Progressive inspiratory threshold loading resulted in slower TUG and iTUG performance. Participants consistently imagined themselves faster than they actually were. However, progressive inspiratory loading slowed iTUG more than TUG, a finding that is unexpected with regard to the known effects of dual tasking on TUG and iTUG (slower TUG but stable iTUG). Insofar as the cortical networks engaged in response to inspiratory loading are also activated during complex locomotor tasks requiring cognitive inputs, we infer that competition for cortical resources may account for the breathing-cognition interference that is evidenced here. PMID:26978782

  20. When Breathing Interferes with Cognition: Experimental Inspiratory Loading Alters Timed Up-and-Go Test in Normal Humans.

    PubMed

    Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Demiri, Suela; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Allali, Gilles; Morélot-Panzini, Capucine; Similowski, Thomas; Adler, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Human breathing stems from automatic brainstem neural processes. It can also be operated by cortico-subcortical networks, especially when breathing becomes uncomfortable because of external or internal inspiratory loads. How the "irruption of breathing into consciousness" interacts with cognition remains unclear, but a case report in a patient with defective automatic breathing (Ondine's curse syndrome) has shown that there was a cognitive cost of breathing when the respiratory cortical networks were engaged. In a pilot study of putative breathing-cognition interactions, the present study relied on a randomized design to test the hypothesis that experimentally loaded breathing in 28 young healthy subjects would have a negative impact on cognition as tested by "timed up-and-go" test (TUG) and its imagery version (iTUG). Progressive inspiratory threshold loading resulted in slower TUG and iTUG performance. Participants consistently imagined themselves faster than they actually were. However, progressive inspiratory loading slowed iTUG more than TUG, a finding that is unexpected with regard to the known effects of dual tasking on TUG and iTUG (slower TUG but stable iTUG). Insofar as the cortical networks engaged in response to inspiratory loading are also activated during complex locomotor tasks requiring cognitive inputs, we infer that competition for cortical resources may account for the breathing-cognition interference that is evidenced here. PMID:26978782

  1. Update on diagnostic value of breath test in gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ahmed, Sibtain; Abid, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    In the field of gastroenterology, breath tests (BTs) are used intermittently as diagnostic tools that allow indirect, non-invasive and relatively less cumbersome evaluation of several disorders by simply quantifying the appearance in exhaled breath of a metabolite of a specific substrate administered. The aim of this review is to have an insight into the principles, methods of analysis and performance parameters of various hydrogen, methane and carbon BTs which are available for diagnosing gastrointestinal disorders such as Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and carbohydrate malabsorption. Evaluation of gastric emptying is routinely performed by scintigraphy which is however, difficult to perform and not suitable for children and pregnant women, this review has abridged the 13C-octanoic acid test in comparison to scintigraphy and has emphasized on its working protocol and challenges. A new development such as electronic nose test is also highlighted. Moreover we have also explored the limitations and constraints restraining the wide use of these BT. We conclude that breath testing has an enormous potential to be used as a diagnostic modality. In addition it offers distinct advantages over the traditional invasive methods commonly employed. PMID:27574563

  2. Update on diagnostic value of breath test in gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ahmed, Sibtain; Abid, Shahab

    2016-08-15

    In the field of gastroenterology, breath tests (BTs) are used intermittently as diagnostic tools that allow indirect, non-invasive and relatively less cumbersome evaluation of several disorders by simply quantifying the appearance in exhaled breath of a metabolite of a specific substrate administered. The aim of this review is to have an insight into the principles, methods of analysis and performance parameters of various hydrogen, methane and carbon BTs which are available for diagnosing gastrointestinal disorders such as Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and carbohydrate malabsorption. Evaluation of gastric emptying is routinely performed by scintigraphy which is however, difficult to perform and not suitable for children and pregnant women, this review has abridged the 13C-octanoic acid test in comparison to scintigraphy and has emphasized on its working protocol and challenges. A new development such as electronic nose test is also highlighted. Moreover we have also explored the limitations and constraints restraining the wide use of these BT. We conclude that breath testing has an enormous potential to be used as a diagnostic modality. In addition it offers distinct advantages over the traditional invasive methods commonly employed. PMID:27574563

  3. System for routine testing of self-contained and airline breathing equipment.

    PubMed

    McDermott, H J; Hermens, G A

    1980-07-01

    Airline respirators and self-contained breathing equipment are tested in a Shell refinery/petrochemical complex before issue and use of a specially designed system. The pressure-demand devices are tested for: adequate positive pressure inside the facemask during rest and inhalation; sufficient airflow during worker inhalation; and proper operation of the mask exhalation valve. Routine testing after cleaning and maintenance indicates that, although most equipment checks out satisfactorily, the system helps to identify problems that could impair performance. Workers also have added confidence in the respiratory protective equipment because of this testing program. PMID:7415969

  4. A Modified Carbon Monoxide Breath Test for Measuring Erythrocyte Lifespan in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Du, Ji-Hui; Li, Rong; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study was to develop a CO breath test for RBC lifespan estimation of small animals. The ribavirin induced hemolysis rabbit models were placed individually in a closed rebreath cage and air samples were collected for measurement of CO concentration. RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO, blood volume, and hemoglobin concentration data. RBC lifespan was determined in the same animals with the standard biotin-labeling method. RBC lifespan data obtained by the CO breath test method for control (CON, 49.0 ± 5.9 d) rabbits, rabbits given 10 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB10, 31.0 ± 4.0 d), and rabbits given 20 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB20, 25.0 ± 2.9 d) were statistically similar (all p > 0.05) to and linearly correlated (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) with the RBC lifespan data obtained for the same rabbits by the standard biotin-labeling method (CON, 51.0 ± 2.7 d; RIB10, 33.0 ± 1.3 d; and RIB20, 27.0 ± 0.8 d). The CO breath test method takes less than 3 h to complete, whereas the standard method requires at least several weeks. In conclusion, the CO breath test method provides a simple and rapid means of estimating RBC lifespan and is feasible for use with small animal models. PMID:27294128

  5. Flight test of multi-pulses vertical laser propulsion in air breathing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ming; Wu, Jie; Wang, Guangyu

    2013-05-01

    The air breathing vertical laser propulsion experiment refers to that in the air breathing mode the light craft under the irradiation of incident laser of vertical direction will turn pulse laser energy into the vertical propulsion thrust of the light craft and continue along the fixed rail upward propulsion flight. It is an important experiment to test the minimum single pulse energy, the optimization degree of light craft structure, and the characteristics of turning the laser energy into the thrust. The experiment is to be conducted dozens of meters in height away the ground generally. The article gives a detailed explanation of the whole process of the air breathing vertical propulsion test, including vertical propulsion light craft design, the connections design, the connections performance test, the frictional resistance detection and the whole process of movement performance test. A vertical propulsion tower was used to conduct the single pulse experiment and multi-pulse performance was predicted with a multiple-pulse thrust measuring system. The impulse coupling coefficient was estimated from fight height. Finally, through the experiments of air breathing vertical laser propulsion, the relation of the movement time and flight height was obtained. In the curve, the mean acceleration of the light craft can arrive to 6m/s2 in the first 20 pulses and the propulsion height can reach 3.5m in 1.12s. After 0.65s, the acceleration of the light craft decreased significantly. The results of the article lay the good foundation for the laser propulsion launch system verification.

  6. Application of electrochemical breath test for detection of Helicobacter pylori in screening of Moscow students.

    PubMed

    Kukushkina, I A; Korotkova, O A; Loginov, I A; Vasilieva, E A; Yashina, N V; Anokhina, I V; Kozlov, A V; Tumanova, G M; Tedoradze, R V; Dalin, M V

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection is analyzed by the results of screening of first- and fourth-year students of Moscow Institute of Foreign Affairs using HelicoSense Scientific breath test system. Age-related dynamics of the infection in patients examined for the first time has been traced. The data on infection rates in patients after eradication therapy are presented. PMID:22803077

  7. A Modified Carbon Monoxide Breath Test for Measuring Erythrocyte Lifespan in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Du, Ji-Hui; Li, Rong; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study was to develop a CO breath test for RBC lifespan estimation of small animals. The ribavirin induced hemolysis rabbit models were placed individually in a closed rebreath cage and air samples were collected for measurement of CO concentration. RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO, blood volume, and hemoglobin concentration data. RBC lifespan was determined in the same animals with the standard biotin-labeling method. RBC lifespan data obtained by the CO breath test method for control (CON, 49.0 ± 5.9 d) rabbits, rabbits given 10 mg/kg·d(-1) of ribavirin (RIB10, 31.0 ± 4.0 d), and rabbits given 20 mg/kg·d(-1) of ribavirin (RIB20, 25.0 ± 2.9 d) were statistically similar (all p > 0.05) to and linearly correlated (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) with the RBC lifespan data obtained for the same rabbits by the standard biotin-labeling method (CON, 51.0 ± 2.7 d; RIB10, 33.0 ± 1.3 d; and RIB20, 27.0 ± 0.8 d). The CO breath test method takes less than 3 h to complete, whereas the standard method requires at least several weeks. In conclusion, the CO breath test method provides a simple and rapid means of estimating RBC lifespan and is feasible for use with small animal models. PMID:27294128

  8. An acetone breath analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy: an initial test with human subjects under various situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuji; Surampudi, Anand B.

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a portable breath acetone analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS). The instrument was initially tested by measuring the absorbance of breath gases at a single wavelength (266 nm) from 32 human subjects under various conditions. A background subtraction method, implemented to obtain absorbance differences, from which an upper limit of breath acetone concentration was obtained, is described. The upper limits of breath acetone concentration in the four Type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects, tested after a 14 h overnight fast, range from 0.80 to 3.97 parts per million by volume (ppmv), higher than the mean acetone concentration (0.49 ppmv) in non-diabetic healthy breath reported in the literature. The preliminary results show that the instrument can tell distinctive differences between the breath from individuals who are healthy and those with T1D. On-line monitoring of breath gases in healthy people post-exercise, post-meals and post-alcohol-consumption was also conducted. This exploratory study demonstrates the first CRDS-based acetone breath analyzer and its potential application for point-of-care, non-invasive, diabetic monitoring.

  9. The cut-off criterion for a positive hydrogen breath test in children: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Solomons, N W; Barillas, C

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-three preschool children with adequate nutritional status underwent interval-sampling, 3-hour breath-hydrogen carbohydrate absorption tests after consuming either 240 ml of intact milk (containing 12 g of lactose) or the same volume of milk with 90-95% of its lactose prehydrolyzed in vitro (containing less than 1 g lactose, with the remaining sugar as glucose and galactose). Results were examined in a reappraisal of the cut-off criterion for the rise of breath H2 concentration signifying biologically incomplete absorption. If the greater than or equal to 10-ppm criterion advocated by some investigators is used, 83% of our subjects would have been classified as incomplete lactose digesters and 30% would have their tests with the monosaccharide-rich milk classified as positive. With the greater than or equal to 20 ppm criterion used in our laboratory and others, the prevalence of lactose maldigestion in the sample becomes 60% and only 4% of subjects have apparent monosaccharide absorption, 96% having a rise below the cut-off level with prehydrolyzed milk. At least in Guatemalan preschoolers, the 20-ppm criterion for a positive breath H2 test provides a superior specificity-sensitivity balance and more reasonable diagnostic conclusions. PMID:3794911

  10. On the importance of developing a new generation of breath tests for Helicobacter pylori detection.

    PubMed

    Kushch, Ievgeniia; Korenev, Nikolai; Kamarchuk, Lyudmila; Pospelov, Alexander; Kravchenko, Andrey; Bajenov, Leonid; Kabulov, Mels; Amann, Anton; Kamarchuk, Gennadii

    2015-12-01

    State-of-the-art methods for non-invasive detection of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been considered. A reported global tendency towards a non-decreasing prevalence of H. pylori worldwide could be co-influenced by the functional limitations of urea breath tests (UBTs), currently preferred for the non-invasive recognition of H. pylori in a clinical setting. Namely, the UBTs can demonstrate false-positive or false-negative results. Within this context, limitations of conventional clinically exploited H. pylori tests have been discussed to justify the existing need for the development of a new generation of breath tests for the detection of H. pylori and the differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of the bacterium. This paper presents the results of a pilot clinical study aimed at evaluating the development and diagnostic potential of a new method based on the detection of the non-urease products of H. pylori vital activity in exhaled gas. The characteristics of breath of adolescents with H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative functional dyspepsia, together with a consideration of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) status of H. pylori-positive subjects, have been determined for the first time using innovative point-contact nanosensor devices based on salts of the organic conductor tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The clinical and diagnostic relevance of the response curves of the point-contact sensors was assessed. It was found that the recovery time of the point-contact sensors has a diagnostic value for differentiation of the H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease. The diagnostically significant elongation of the recovery time was even more pronounced in patients infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains compared to the CagA-negative patients. Taking into account the operation of the point-contact sensors in the real-time mode, the obtained results are essential prerequisites for the development of a fast and

  11. Measurement of fat digestion in early life using a stable isotope breath test.

    PubMed Central

    McClean, P; Harding, M; Coward, W A; Green, M R; Weaver, L T

    1993-01-01

    13C breath tests are a safe, non-invasive way of assessing nutrient digestion and absorption that can be used repeatedly in infancy and childhood. The aim of this study was to assess their value for measuring fat digestion in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis, and healthy controls whose pancreatic exocrine function is immature, and to monitor pancreatic enzyme supplementation. Six infants with cystic fibrosis (aged 10-18 months) and nine healthy controls (aged 6-19 months) were studied. After an overnight fast each child ingested 7.5 mg/kg 13C trioctanoin (99 atom % excess) followed by a known volume of milk. Breath samples were collected before and at 30 minute intervals thereafter for five hours. The 13C enrichment of expired carbon dioxide was measured by gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The mean (SD) percentage dose recovery of 13C was 13.5 (5.3) for the cystic fibrosis group and 24.2 (6.7) for the healthy controls. When those with cystic fibrosis were studied after supplementary pancreatic enzymes, the mean percentage dose recovery rose to 17.1 (6.9). Total intraluminal lipolysis was diminished by 44% in young children with cystic fibrosis. Pancreatic enzyme supplements improved digestion by 27%. The 13C trioctanoin breath test was effective in detecting fat maldigestion and can be used to measure the benefits of enzyme supplements in early life. PMID:8215547

  12. 13C-urea breath test for diagnosis of experimental Helicobacter pylori infection in barrier born pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Rosberg, K; Gustavsson, S

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies with Helicobacter pylori infected barrier born pigs indicate that the infection has a patchy distribution, resulting in false negative culture results on endoscopic biopsy specimens. This study aimed to adapt the 13C-urea breath test as used in humans to diagnose H pylori infection in barrier born pigs. The breath test was also performed after bismuth as a single treatment and after triple therapy (bismuth, ampicillin, metronidazole). In control pigs the median excess of 13CO2 in expired air was 2.2 (range 0-12 n = 22) ppm. The infected pigs (n = 4) showed consistently high values (median 23 range 14-43) when examined on four occasions (n = 16) four to 10 weeks after inoculation. Biopsy specimens for culture had lower sensitivity than the breath test. No reduction in excess 13CO2 was seen after three days' single bismuth treatment, but after two weeks' triple therapy the breath test results had returned to normal. This suppression was temporary only, however, as the breath test was positive again four weeks after stopping treatment. In conclusion, the 13C-urea breath test is a simple and reliable test for determining H pylori infection and monitoring treatment effects in barrier born pigs. Because the test can be performed in awake pigs anaesthesia and gastroscopy are unnecessary. Images Figure 1 PMID:8504957

  13. Diagnosing lactose malabsorption in children: difficulties in interpreting hydrogen breath test results.

    PubMed

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Entenmann, Andreas; Karall, Daniela; Müller, Thomas; Schimkowitsch, Alexander; Amann, Anton; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Lactose malabsorption (LM) is caused by insufficient enzymatic degradation of the disaccharide by intestinal lactase. Although hydrogen (H2) breath tests (HBTs) are routinely applied to diagnose LM, false-negative results are not uncommon. Thirty-two pediatric patients (19 females, 13 males) were included in this prospective study. After oral lactose administration (1 g kg(-1) bodyweight to a maximum of 25 g), breath H2 was measured by electrochemical detection. HBT was considered positive if H2 concentration exceeded an increase of  ⩾20 ppm from baseline. In addition to H2, exhaled methane (CH4), blood glucose concentrations and clinical symptoms (flatulence, abdominal pain, diarrhea) were monitored. A positive HBT indicating LM was found in 12/32 (37.5%) patients. Only five (41.7%, 5/12) of these had clinical symptoms during HBT indicating lactose intolerance (LI). Decreased blood glucose concentration increments (⩽20 mg dL(-1) (⩽1.1 mmol L(-1))) were found in 3/5 of these patients. CH4 concentrations  ⩾10 ppm at any time during the test were observed in 5/32 (15.6%) patients and in 9/32 (28.1%) between 1 ppm and 9 ppm above baseline after lactose ingestion. In patients with positive HBT 10/12 (83.3%) showed elevated CH4 (>1 ppm) above baseline in breath gas, whereas in patients with negative HBT this figure was only 4/17 (23.5%). In addition to determining H2 in exhaled air, documentation of clinical symptoms, measurement of blood glucose and breath CH4 concentrations may be helpful in deciding whether in a given case an HBT correctly identifies patients with clinically relevant LM. PMID:26934035

  14. 49 CFR 40.243 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD? 40.243 Section 40.243 Transportation Office of the...-evidential breath ASD? As the BAT or STT, you must take the following steps: (a) Select, or allow the... breath has been obtained. (d) Show the employee the displayed test result. (e) If the device is one...

  15. 49 CFR 40.243 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD? 40.243 Section 40.243 Transportation Office of the...-evidential breath ASD? As the BAT or STT, you must take the following steps: (a) Select, or allow the... breath has been obtained. (d) Show the employee the displayed test result. (e) If the device is one...

  16. 49 CFR 40.243 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD? 40.243 Section 40.243 Transportation Office of the...-evidential breath ASD? As the BAT or STT, you must take the following steps: (a) Select, or allow the... breath has been obtained. (d) Show the employee the displayed test result. (e) If the device is one...

  17. 49 CFR 40.243 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD? 40.243 Section 40.243 Transportation Office of the...-evidential breath ASD? As the BAT or STT, you must take the following steps: (a) Select, or allow the... breath has been obtained. (d) Show the employee the displayed test result. (e) If the device is one...

  18. 49 CFR 40.243 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... test using an EBT or non-evidential breath ASD? 40.243 Section 40.243 Transportation Office of the...-evidential breath ASD? As the BAT or STT, you must take the following steps: (a) Select, or allow the... breath has been obtained. (d) Show the employee the displayed test result. (e) If the device is one...

  19. Assessment of liver function in dogs using the 13C-galactose breath test.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Wyse, C A; Goodfellow, M R; Yam, P S; Preston, T; Papasouliotis, K; Hall, E J

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of the 13C-galactose breath test (13C-GBT) in assessing canine liver function by applying it to a group of healthy dogs, and to a group with clinicopathological evidence of liver dysfunction. Breath samples were collected 30 min before ingestion of 13C-galactose, and then at regular intervals thereafter for 6 h. The proportion of 13CO2/12CO2 in the breath samples was measured by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. There was no significant difference in recovery of 13CO2 in the diseased group, compared to the healthy controls, but there was considerable inter-subject variation in both groups, possibly due to differences in the rate of gastric emptying, which could preclude detection of alterations in hepatic metabolism of galactose. The results of this study do not support the application of the 13C-GBT for assessment of canine liver function. PMID:19546016

  20. Comparison of breath testing with fructose and high fructose corn syrups in health and IBS

    PubMed Central

    Skoog, S. M.; Bharucha, A. E.; Zinsmeister, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Although incomplete fructose absorption has been implicated to cause gastrointestinal symptoms, foods containing high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) contain glucose. Glucose increases fructose absorption in healthy subjects. Our hypothesis was that fructose intolerance is less prevalent after HFCS consumption compared to fructose alone in healthy subjects and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Breath hydrogen levels and gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed after 40 g of fructose (12% solution) prepared either in water or as HFCS, administered in double-blind randomized order on 2 days in 20 healthy subjects and 30 patients with IBS. Gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded on 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales. Breath hydrogen excretion was more frequently abnormal (P < 0.01) after fructose (68%) than HFCS (26%) in controls and patients. Fructose intolerance (i.e. abnormal breath test and symptoms) was more prevalent after fructose than HFCS in healthy subjects (25% vs 0%, P = 0.002) and patients (40% vs 7%, P = 0.062). Scores for several symptoms (e.g. bloating r = 0.35) were correlated (P ≤ 0.01) to peak breath hydrogen excretion after fructose but not HFCS; in the fructose group, this association did not differ between healthy subjects and patients. Symptoms were not significantly different after fructose compared to HFCS. Fructose intolerance is more prevalent with fructose alone than with HFCS in health and in IBS. The prevalence of fructose intolerance is not significantly different between health and IBS. Current methods for identifying fructose intolerance should be modified to more closely reproduce fructose ingestion in daily life. PMID:18221251

  1. Cost-effectiveness of the Carbon-13 Urea Breath Test for the Detection of Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Masucci, L; Blackhouse, G; Goeree, R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This analysis aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of various testing strategies for Helicobacter pylori in patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia and to calculate the budgetary impact of these tests for the province of Ontario. Data Sources Data on the sensitivity and specificity were obtained from the clinical evidence-based analysis. Resource items were obtained from expert opinion, and costs were applied on the basis of published sources as well as expert opinion. Review Methods A decision analytic model was constructed to compare the costs and outcomes (false-positive results, false-negative results, and misdiagnoses avoided) of the carbon-13 (13C) urea breath test (UBT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) serology test, and a 2-step strategy of an ELISA serology test and a confirmatory 13C UBT based on the sensitivity and specificity of the tests and prevalence estimates. Results The 2-step strategy is more costly and more effective than the ELISA serology test and results in $210 per misdiagnosis case avoided. The 13C UBT is dominated by the 2-step strategy, i.e., it is more costly and less effective. The budget impact analysis indicates that it will cost $7.9 million more to test a volume of 129,307 patients with the 13C UBT than with ELISA serology, and $4.7 million more to test these patients with the 2-step strategy. Limitations The clinical studies that were pooled varied in the technique used to perform the breath test and in reference standards used to make comparisons with the breath test. However, these parameters were varied in a sensitivity analysis. The economic model was designed to consider intermediate outcomes only (i.e., misdiagnosed cases) and was not a complete model with final patient outcomes (e.g., quality-adjusted life years). Conclusions Results indicate that the 2-step strategy could be economically attractive for the testing of H. pylori. However, testing with the 2-step strategy will cost the Ministry of

  2. Use of liver breath tests to assess severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Furnari, Manuele; Savarino, Vincenzo; Giannini, Edoardo G

    2014-01-01

    As the prevalence of obesity and insulin-resistance continues to increase in the general population, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has reached epidemic proportions, thus becoming one of the leading causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. It may present as simple steatosis (NAFL) or steatohepatitis (NASH), which in turn may develop fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis. Conventional biochemical liver test and radiological investigations are not able to provide reliable information on liver functional reserve, and liver biopsy remains the gold standard to stage NAFLD, differentiate simple steatosis from NASH, and grade fibrosis. However, liver biopsy has some limitations, and is not preferred by patients due to its invasiveness. Thus, non-invasive assessment of disease stage by using liver breath tests - which are based on hepatic clearance of non-radioactive stable (13)C-labelled drugs - may be of interest to stage disease and assess patients prognosis due to good accuracy and repeatability. These substrates are orally administered and are cleaved by enzymes specifically located in the liver thus reflecting either the microsomal, cytosolic, or mitochondrial functions. (13)C-Breath Tests have been initially oriented to differentiate broad categories of patients and more recently to refine stage differentiation in patients with early stages of liver disease. In NAFLD patients, (13)C-BTs were able to distinguish simple steatosis from NASH and had good correlation with both histological fibrosis stage and biochemical markers of fibrogenesis. Although promising results have been achieved in this field, their use in clinical practice is still restricted to a specialized niche. However, concordant data from literature conferred to (13)C-Breath Tests a potential role in providing punctual and longitudinal evaluation of patients, identifying those patients where liver biopsy may selectively be performed to stage disease, monitoring and predicting therapeutic

  3. Posttreatment 13C-Urea Breath Test Is Predictive of Antimicrobial Resistance to H. pylori After Failed Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ai-Wen; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Lin, Ching-Yih; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested whether a 13C-urea breath test can predict antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS Seventy patients who had failed triple eradication therapy and 108 untreated H. pylori-infected patients were given a 13C-urea breath test, endoscopy for culture of H. pylori, and assessment of clarithromycin resistance. The patients who had failed triple therapy then received 1 week of quadruple therapy to eradicate residual H. pylori. RESULTS The posttreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test expressed as excessive δ13CO2 per ml (ECR) was higher in patients with residual H. pylori with clarithromycin resistance than in those without (23.8 vs 10.6; P <.0001). With a cutoff of ECR >or≤15, the 13C-urea breath test was 88.6% sensitive and 88.9% specific in predicting clarithromycin resistance of residual H. pylori. The H. pylori eradication rate of the rescue regimen was higher for patients with a posttreatment ECR of the 13C-urea breath test ≤ 15 than for those with a value >15 (93.8% vs 73.3%; P <.05). In contrast, in treatment-naive H. pylori-infected patients, the pretreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test did not differ between patients infected with clarithromycin-resistant or-sensitive isolates (P >.05). CONCLUSION The posttreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test is predictive of clarithromycin resistance in residual H. pylori after failed triple therapy and predicts efficacy of the rescue regimen. The value of the noninvasive test is promising for primary care physicians who need to select a rescue regimen without invasive H. pylori culture. PMID:15836546

  4. Simple 13C-urea breath test with infra-red spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Y; Kimura, K; Sohara, H; Shirasaki, A; Kawada, H; Satoh, K; Kihira, K; Wang, X M; Takimoto, T; Goto, Y; Takatori, K; Iida, K; Kajiwara, M

    1996-11-01

    When mass spectrophotometric analysis is used for the 13C-urea breath test to assess H. pylori infection, it is costly, complicated, and time-consuming. To overcome these disadvantages, we utilized an infra-red spectrophotometer as a substitute for the mass spectrophotometer. A total of 153 patients (181 tests) analyzed with peptic ulcers or non-ulcer dyspepsia were investigated. Breath samples were collected 15 min after ingestion of 13C-urea (100 mg in 30 ml water). An infra-red spectrophotometer was used to determine the concentration of 13CO2 in the expirate. The 13CO2/12CO2 ratio was also measured by mass spectrophotometry to compare results with those of infra-red spectrophotometric analysis. Direct detection of H. pylori was qualified in biopsy specimens. Of the 181 biopsies, 138 were positive for H. pylori infection and 43 were negative. With the urea breath test, the mean value in the positive group was significantly higher than that in the negative group (0.062 +/- 0.044 vs 0.011 +/- 0.014, respectively). The cut-off level, 0.01, was determined as delta 13C atom %. The sensitivity of infra-red spectrophotometry was 97.8% (135/138) and specificity was 74.4% (32/43). There was an extremely high coefficient of correlation (r = 0.996) between mass and infra-red photometric analysis. Infra-red spectrometry appears to have great potential not only for diagnosing H. pylori infection but also for assessing treatment results. Its advantages include technical simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and high accuracy. PMID:8959516

  5. 49 CFR 40.245 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD? 40.245 Section 40.245 Transportation Office of the... a breath tube ASD? (a) As the STT or BAT, you must take the following steps when using the saliva... ATF. (b) As the STT or BAT, you must take the following steps when using the breath tube ASD:...

  6. A nanomaterial-based breath test for distinguishing gastric cancer from benign gastric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Z-q; Broza, Y Y; Ionsecu, R; Tisch, U; Ding, L; Liu, H; Song, Q; Pan, Y-y; Xiong, F-x; Gu, K-s; Sun, G-p; Chen, Z-d; Leja, M; Haick, H

    2013-01-01

    Background: Upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy and histopathological evaluation of the biopsy material is the standard method for diagnosing gastric cancer (GC). However, this procedure may not be widely available for screening in the developing world, whereas in developed countries endoscopy is frequently used without major clinical gain. There is a high demand for a simple and non-invasive test for selecting the individuals at increased risk that should undergo the endoscopic examination. Here, we studied the feasibility of a nanomaterial-based breath test for identifying GC among patients with gastric complaints. Methods: Alveolar exhaled breath samples from 130 patients with gastric complaints (37 GC/32 ulcers / 61 less severe conditions) that underwent endoscopy/biopsy were analyzed using nanomaterial-based sensors. Predictive models were built employing discriminant factor analysis (DFA) pattern recognition, and their stability against possible confounding factors (alcohol/tobacco consumption; Helicobacter pylori) was tested. Classification success was determined (i) using leave-one-out cross-validation and (ii) by randomly blinding 25% of the samples as a validation set. Complementary chemical analysis of the breath samples was performed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Results: Three DFA models were developed that achieved excellent discrimination between the subpopulations: (i) GC vs benign gastric conditions, among all the patients (89% sensitivity; 90% specificity); (ii) early stage GC (I and II) vs late stage (III and IV), among GC patients (89% sensitivity; 94% specificity); and (iii) ulcer vs less severe, among benign conditions (84% sensitivity; 87% specificity). The models were insensitive against the tested confounding factors. Chemical analysis found that five volatile organic compounds (2-propenenitrile, 2-butoxy-ethanol, furfural, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and isoprene) were significantly elevated in patients with GC and

  7. Air-breathing aerospace plane development essential: Hypersonic propulsion flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1994-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion utilizing scramjets can fundamentally change transatmospheric accelerators for low earth-to-orbit and return transportation. The value and limitations of ground tests, of flight tests, and of computations are presented, and scramjet development requirements are discussed. It is proposed that near full-scale hypersonic propulsion flight tests are essential for developing a prototype hypersonic propulsion system and for developing computational-design technology so that it can be used for designing this system. In order to determine how these objectives should be achieved, some lessons learned from past programs are presented. A conceptual two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) prototype/experimental aerospace plane is recommended as a means of providing access-to-space and for conducting flight tests. A road map for achieving these objectives is also presented.

  8. Hypersonic propulsion flight tests as essential to air-breathing aerospace plane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U.

    1995-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion utilizing scramjets can fundamentally change transatmospheric acclerators for transportation from low Earth orbits (LEOs). The value and limitations of ground tests, of flight tests, and of computations are presented, and scramjet development requirements are discussed. Near-full-scale hypersonic propulsion flight tests are essential for developing a prototype hypersonic propulsion system and for developing computation-design technology that can be used in designing that system. In order to determine how these objectives should be achieved, some lessons learned from past programs are presented. A conceptual two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) prototype/experimental aerospace plane is recommended as a means of providing access-to-space and for conducting flight tests. A road map for achieving these objectives is also presented.

  9. Specific 13C functional pathways as diagnostic targets in gastroenterology breath-tests: tricks for a correct interpretation.

    PubMed

    Pizzoferrato, M; Del Zompo, F; Mangiola, F; Lopetuso, L R; Petito, V; Cammarota, G; Gasbarrini, A; Scaldaferri, F

    2013-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive, non-radioactive, safe, simple and effective tests able to determine significant metabolic alterations due to specific diseases or lack of specific enzymes. Carbon isotope (13)C, the stable-non radioactive isotope of carbon, is the most used substrate in breath testing, in which (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured and expressed as a delta value, a differences between readings and a fixed standard. (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured with isotope ratio mass spectrometry or non-dispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometer and generally there is a good agreement between these techniques in the isotope ratio estimation. (13)C/(12)C ratio can be expressed as static measurement (like delta over baseline in urea breath test) or as dynamic measurement as percent dose recovery, but more dosages are necessary. (13)C Breath-tests are involved in many fields of interest within gastroenterology, such as detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, study of gastric emptying, assessment of liver and exocrine pancreatic functions, determination of oro-caecal transit time, evaluation of absorption and to a lesser extend detection of bacterial overgrowth. The use of every single test in a clinical setting is vary depending on accuracy and substrate costs. This review is meant to present (13)C the meaning of (13)C/(12)C ratio and static and dynamic measure and, finally, the instruments dedicated to its use in gastroenterology. A brief presentation of (13)C breath tests in gastroenterology is also provided. PMID:24443068

  10. Binding Energy and Catalysis by D-Xylose Isomerase: Kinetic, Product and X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis of Enzyme-Catalyzed Isomerization of (R)-Glyceraldehyde‡, ¶

    PubMed Central

    Toteva, Maria M.; Silvaggi, Nicholas R.; Allen, Karen N.; Richard, John P.

    2011-01-01

    D-Xylose isomerase (XI) and triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyze the aldose-ketose isomerization reactions of D-xylose and D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (DGAP), respectively. D-Glyceraldehyde (DGA) is the triose fragment common to the substrates for XI and TIM. The XI-catalyzed isomerization of DGA to give dihydroxyacetone (DHA) in D2O was monitored by 1H NMR spectroscopy and kcat/Km = 0.034 M−1 s−1 was determined for this isomerization at pD 7.0. This is similar to kcat/Km = 0.017 M−1 s−1 for the TIM-catalyzed carbon deprotonation reaction of DGA in D2O at pD 7.0 [Amyes, T. L.; O’Donoghue, A. C. and Richard J. P. (2001) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 11325–11326]. The much larger activation barrier for XI-catalyzed isomerization of D-xylose (kcat/Km = 490 M−1 s−1) than for the TIM-catalyzed isomerization of DGAP (kcat/Km = 9.6 x 106 M−1 s−1) is due to: (i) The larger barrier to conversion of cyclic D-xylose to the reactive linear sugar (5.4 kcal/mol) than for conversion of DGAP hydrate to the free aldehyde (1.7 kcal/mol). (ii) The smaller intrinsic binding energy [Jencks, W. P. (1975) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas Mol. Biol. 43, 219–410] of the terminal ethylene glycol fragment of D-xylose (9.3 kcal/mol) than of the phosphodianion group of DGAP (ca. 12 kcal/mol). The XI-catalyzed isomerization of DGA in D2O at pD 7.0 gives a 90% yield of [1-1H]-DHA and a 10% yield of [1-2H]-DHA, the product of isomerization with deuterium incorporation from solvent D2O. By comparison, the transfer of 3H from labeled hexose substrate to solvent is observed only once in every 109 turnovers for the XI-catalyzed isomerization of [2-3H]-glucose in H2O [Allen, K. N., Lavie, A., Farber, G. K., Glasfeld, A., Petsko, G. A., and Ringe, D. (1994), Biochemistry 33, 1481–1487]. We propose that truncation of the terminal ethylene glycol fragment of D-xylose to give DGA results in a large decrease in the rate of XI-catalyzed isomerization with hydride transfer compared with that

  11. An optimized 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of H pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To validate an optimized 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) protocol for the diagnosis of H pylori infection that is cost-efficient and maintains excellent diagnostic accuracy. METHODS: 70 healthy volunteers were tested with two simplified 13C-UBT protocols, with test meal (Protocol 2) and without test meal (Protocol 1). Breath samples were collected at 10, 20 and 30 min after ingestion of 50 mg 13C-urea dissolved in 10 mL of water, taken as a single swallow, followed by 200 mL of water (pH 6.0) and a circular motion around the waistline to homogenize the urea solution. Performance of both protocols was analyzed at various cut-off values. Results were validated against the European protocol. RESULTS: According to the reference protocol, 65.7% individuals were positive for H pylori infection and 34.3% were negative. There were no significant differences in the ability of both protocols to correctly identify positive and negative H pylori individuals. However, only Protocol 1 with no test meal achieved accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The highest values achieved by Protocol 2 were 98.57%, 97.83%, 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: A 10 min, 50 mg 13C-UBT with no test meal using a cut-off value of 2-2.5 is a highly accurate test for the diagnosis of H pylori infection at a reduced cost. PMID:17907288

  12. Organization and regulation of the D-xylose operons in Escherichia coli K-12: XylR acts as a transcriptional activator.

    PubMed Central

    Song, S; Park, C

    1997-01-01

    The metabolism of D-xylose in Escherichia coli K-12 is known to be mediated by the xylAB gene. However, the nearby xylFGHR genes were found by genome sequencing and predicted to be responsible for transport and regulation for xylose based on their sequence similarities to other functionally related genes. Here, we investigated transcriptional organization and functions of the xyl genes. An analysis with random transposon insertions revealed that the xyl genes are organized into two major transcriptional units, xylAB and xylFGHR, governed by the promoters PA and PF, respectively. However, there is an additional weak promoter, PR, which is specific for xylR. Sites of transcription initiation were determined by primer extension analysis. When studied with operon fusions to lacZ, the PA and PF promoters were activated by D-xylose and repressed by glucose. In contrast, the PR promoter was not regulated by these sugars. A mutation in xylR completely abolished expression from the PA and PF promoters, causing a defect in both growth and transport. Binding of XylR to the xyl promoter was enhanced by the presence of D-xylose, suggesting that transcription was positively regulated by XylR. In vivo footprinting analysis revealed that XylR binds to at least two DNA regions, IA and IF, each with a direct repeat. It is very likely that XylR interacts with IA and IF as a dimer. The presumed binding sites are located just upstream of the promoter consensus sequences (-35), while IA is additionally flanked by a cyclic AMP receptor protein-binding site on the other side. The proposed structure of xyl promoters is consistent with the regulation of xyl gene expression and with phenotypes of transposon insertions obtained in the promoter regions. PMID:9371449

  13. Novel transporters from Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enable growth on L-arabinose and D-xylose.

    PubMed

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Vidgren, Virve; Magalhães, Frederico; Jarvis, Eric E; Franden, Mary Ann; Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    Genes encoding L-arabinose transporters in Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii were identified by functional complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose growth on L-arabinose was dependent on a functioning L-arabinose transporter, or by screening a differential display library, respectively. These transporters also transport D-xylose and were designated KmAXT1 (arabinose-xylose transporter) and PgAXT1, respectively. Transport assays using L-arabinose showed that KmAxt1p has K(m) 263 mM and V(max) 57 nM/mg/min, and PgAxt1p has K(m) 0.13 mM and V(max) 18 nM/mg/min. Glucose, galactose and xylose significantly inhibit L-arabinose transport by both transporters. Transport assays using D-xylose showed that KmAxt1p has K(m) 27 mM and V(max) 3.8 nM/mg/min, and PgAxt1p has K(m) 65 mM and V(max) 8.7 nM/mg/min. Neither transporter is capable of recovering growth on glucose or galactose in a S. cerevisiae strain deleted for hexose and galactose transporters. Transport kinetics of S. cerevisiae Gal2p showed K(m) 371 mM and V(max) 341 nM/mg/min for L-arabinose, and K(m) 25 mM and V(max) 76 nM/mg/min for galactose. Due to the ability of Gal2p and these two newly characterized transporters to transport both L-arabinose and D-xylose, one scenario for the complete usage of biomass-derived pentose sugars would require only the low-affinity, high-throughput transporter Gal2p and one additional high-affinity general pentose transporter, rather than dedicated D-xylose or L-arabinose transporters. Additionally, alignment of these transporters with other characterized pentose transporters provides potential targets for substrate recognition engineering. PMID:26129747

  14. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Marilyn G; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-11-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, producing D-gluconate and D-sorbitol when a mixture of D-glucose and D-fructose was used as substrate. However, the activity in Cc aaor expressing strain was >100-fold lower compared to strains expressing Zm gfor. Interestingly, C. crescentus AAOR was clearly more efficient than the Zm GFOR in converting in vitro a single sugar substrate D-xylose (10 mM) to xylitol without an added cofactor, whereas this type of activity was very low with Zm GFOR. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of D-xylose, the S. cerevisiae strain expressing Cc aaor produced nearly equal concentrations of D-xylonate and xylitol (12.5 g D-xylonate l(-1) and 11.5 g D-xylitol l(-1) from 26 g D-xylose l(-1)), whereas the control strain and strain expressing Zm gfor produced only D-xylitol (5 g l(-1)). Deletion of the gene encoding the major aldose reductase, Gre3p, did not affect xylitol production in the strain expressing Cc aaor, but decreased xylitol production in the strain expressing Zm gfor. In addition, expression of Cc aaor together with the D-xylonolactone lactonase encoding the gene xylC from C. crescentus slightly increased the final concentration and initial volumetric production rate of both D-xylonate and D-xylitol. These results suggest that C. crescentus AAOR is a novel type of oxidoreductase able to convert the single aldose substrate D-xylose to both its oxidized and reduced product. PMID:26264136

  15. Reporter Phage and Breath Tests: Emerging Phenotypic Assays for Diagnosing Active Tuberculosis, Antibiotic Resistance, and Treatment Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Paras; Thaler, David S.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Timmins, Graham S.; Bishai, William R.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Jacobs, William R.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid and accurate diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) and its drug susceptibility remain a challenge. Phenotypic assays allow determination of antibiotic susceptibilities even if sequence data are not available or informative. We review 2 emerging diagnostic approaches, reporter phage and breath tests, both of which assay mycobacterial metabolism. The reporter phage signal, Green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-galactosidase, indicates transcription and translation inside the recipient bacilli and its attenuation by antibiotics. Different breath tests assay, (1) exhaled antigen 85, (2) mycobacterial urease activity, and (3) detection by trained rats of disease-specific odor in sputum, have also been developed. When compared with culture, reporter phage assays shorten the time for initial diagnosis of drug susceptibility by several days. Both reporter phage and breath tests have promise as early markers to determine the efficacy of treatment. While sputum often remains smear and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA positive early in the course of efficacious antituberculous treatment, we predict that both breath and phage tests will rapidly become negative. If this hypothesis proves correct, phage assays and breath tests could become important surrogate markers in early bactericidal activity (EBA) studies of new antibiotics. PMID:21996696

  16. False-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Jones, A W; Rössner, S

    2007-03-01

    A 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ketonemia with high concentrations of acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate in the blood. The interlock device determines alcohol (ethanol) in breath by electrochemical oxidation, but acetone does not undergo oxidation with this detector. However, under certain circumstances acetone is reduced in the body to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ignition interlock device responds to other alcohols (e.g. methanol, n-propanol and isopropanol), which therefore explains the false-positive result. This 'side effect' of ketogenic diets needs further discussion by authorities when people engaged in safety-sensitive work (e.g. bus drivers and airline pilots) submit to random breath-alcohol tests. PMID:16894360

  17. Carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Campylobacter pylori associated gastritis

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.J.; Surveyor, I.

    1988-01-01

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Campylobacter pylori (CP), an organism suspected of causing chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. To detect gastric urease, we examined 32 patients who were being evaluated for possible peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given 10 microCi (370 kBq) of /sup 14/C-labeled urea. Breath samples were collected in hyamine at intervals between 1 and 30 min. The amount of /sup 14/C collected at these times was expressed as: body weight X (% of administered dose of /sup 14/C in sample)/(mmol of CO/sub 2/ collected). The presence of C. pylori colonization was also determined by examination of multiple endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens. On average, patients who were proven to have C. pylori infection exhaled 20 times more labeled CO/sub 2/ than patients who were not infected. The difference between infected patients and C. pylori negative control patients was highly significant at all time points between 2 and 30 min after ingestion of the radionuclide (p less than 0.0001). The noninvasive urea breath is less expensive than endoscopic biopsy of the stomach and more accurate than serology as a means of detecting Campylobacter pylori infection. Because the test detects actual viable CP organisms, it can be used to confirm eradication of the bacterium after antibacterial therapy.

  18. Nitric oxide breath testing by tunable-diode laser absorption spectroscopy: application in monitoring respiratory inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Chad; Namjou, Khosrow; Jeffers, James D.; Camp, Mark; Mock, Adam; McCann, Patrick J.; Grego, Joe

    2002-10-01

    We used a high-resolution mid-IR tunable-laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) system with a single IV-VI laser operating near 5.2 mum to measure the level of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) in human breath. A method of internal calibration using simultaneous eNO and exhaled CO2 measurements eliminated the need for system calibration with gas standards. The results observed from internally calibrating the instrument for eNO measurements were compared with measurements of eNO calibrated to gas standards and were found to be similar. Various parameters of the TLAS system for eNO breath testing were examined and include gas cell pressure, exhalation time, and ambient NO concentrations. A reduction in eNO from elevated concentrations (approx44 parts in 109) to near-normal levels (<20 parts in 109) from an asthmatic patient was observed after the patient had received treatment with an inhaled glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory medication. Such measurements can help in evaluating airway inflammation and in monitoring the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory therapies.

  19. Gravitational independence of single-breath washout tests in recumbent dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomioka, Shinichi; Kubo, Susumu; Guy, Harold J. B.; Prisk, G. K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of gravitational orientation in the mechanism of lung filling and emptying in dogs was examined by conducting simultaneously Ar-bolus and N2 single-breath washout tests (SBWTs) in 10 anesthetized dogs (prone and supine), with three of the dogs subjected to body rotation. Transpulmonary pressure was measured simultaneously, allowing identification of the lung volume above residual volume at which there was an inflection point in the pressure-volume curve. Combined resident gas and bolus SBWTs in recumbent dogs were found to be different from such tests in humans; in dogs, the regional distribution of ventilation was not primarily determined by gravity. The measurements did not make it possible to discern exact mechanisms of filling and emptying, but both processes appear to be related to lung, thorax, and mediastinum interactions and/or differences in regional mechanical properties of the lungs.

  20. Carbon-13 Urea Breath Test for Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Patients with Uninvestigated Ulcer-Like Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Ling, D

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyspepsia is a condition defined by chronic pain or discomfort in the upper gastrointestinal tract that can be caused by Helicobacter pylori. The carbon-13 urea breath test (13C UBT) is a non-invasive test to detect H. pylori. Objectives We aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of the 13C UBT in adult patients with ulcer-like dyspepsia who have no alarm features. Data Sources A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published between 2003 and 2012. Review Methods We abstracted the sensitivity and specificity, which were calculated against a composite reference standard. Summary estimates were obtained using bivariate random effects regression analysis. Results From 19 diagnostic studies, the 13C UBT summary estimates were 98.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 96.3–99.0) for sensitivity and 95.1% (95% CI, 90.3–97.6) for specificity. In 6 studies that compared the 13C UBT with serology, the 113C UBT sensitivity was 95.0% (95% CI, 90.1–97.5) and specificity was 91.6 % (95% CI, 81.3–96.4). The sensitivity and specificity for serology were 92.9% (95% CI, 82.6–97.3) and 71.1% (95% CI, 63.8–77.5), respectively. In 1 RCT, symptom resolution, medication use, and physician visits were similar among the 13C UBT, serology, gastroscopy, or empirical treatment arms. However, patients tested with 13C UBT reported higher dyspepsia-specific quality of life scores. Limitations Processing of the 13C UBT results can vary according to many factors. Further, the studies showed significant heterogeneity and used different composite reference standards. Conclusions The 13C UBT is an accurate test with high sensitivity and specificity. Compared with serology, it has higher specificity. There is a paucity of data on the 13C UBT beyond test accuracy. Plain Language

  1. Solubility testing of actinides on breathing-zone and area air samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Robert Lawrence

    The solubility of inhaled radionuclides in the human lung is an important characteristic of the compounds needed to perform internal dosimetry assessments for exposed workers. A solubility testing method for uranium and several common actinides has been developed with sufficient sensitivity to allow profiles to be determined from routine breathing zone and area air samples in the workplace. Air samples are covered with a clean filter to form a filter-sample-filter sandwich which is immersed in an extracellular lung serum simulant solution. The sample is moved to a fresh beaker of the lung fluid simulant each day for one week, and then weekly until the end of the 28 day test period. The soak solutions are wet ashed with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to destroy the organic components of the lung simulant solution prior to extraction of the nuclides of interest directly into an extractive scintillator for subsequent counting on a Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALSsp°ler ) spectrometer. Solvent extraction methods utilizing the extractive scintillators have been developed for the isotopes of uranium, plutonium, and curium. The procedures normally produce an isotopic recovery greater than 95% and have been used to develop solubility profiles from air samples with 40 pCi or less of Usb3Osb8. This makes it possible to characterize solubility profiles in every section of operating facilities where airborne nuclides are found using common breathing zone air samples. The new method was evaluated by analyzing uranium compounds from two uranium mills whose product had been previously analyzed by in vitro solubility testing in the laboratory and in vivo solubility testing in rodents. The new technique compared well with the in vivo rodent solubility profiles. The method was then used to evaluate the solubility profiles in all process sections of an operating in situ uranium plant using breathing zone and area air samples collected during routine

  2. 49 CFR 40.277 - Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations? 40.277 Section 40.277 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in...

  3. 49 CFR 40.277 - Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Are alcohol tests other than saliva or breath permitted under these regulations? 40.277 Section 40.277 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in...

  4. L-Arabinose binding, isomerization, and epimerization by D-xylose isomerase: X-ray/neutron crystallographic and molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Langan, Paul; Sangha, Amandeep K; Wymore, Troy; Parks, Jerry M; Yang, Zamin Koo; Hanson, B Leif; Fisher, Zoe; Mason, Sax A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Forsyth, V Trevor; Glusker, Jenny P; Carrell, Horace L; Smith, Jeremy C; Keen, David A; Graham, David E; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2014-09-01

    D-xylose isomerase (XI) is capable of sugar isomerization and slow conversion of some monosaccharides into their C2-epimers. We present X-ray and neutron crystallographic studies to locate H and D atoms during the respective isomerization and epimerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose and L-ribose, respectively. Neutron structures in complex with cyclic and linear L-arabinose have demonstrated that the mechanism of ring-opening is the same as for the reaction with D-xylose. Structural evidence and QM/MM calculations show that in the reactive Michaelis complex L-arabinose is distorted to the high-energy (5)S1 conformation; this may explain the apparent high KM for this sugar. MD-FEP simulations indicate that amino acid substitutions in a hydrophobic pocket near C5 of L-arabinose can enhance sugar binding. L-ribulose and L-ribose were found in furanose forms when bound to XI. We propose that these complexes containing Ni(2+) cofactors are Michaelis-like and the isomerization between these two sugars proceeds via a cis-ene-diol mechanism. PMID:25132082

  5. 13C-phenylalanine breath test detects altered phenylalanine kinetics in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Teraishi, T; Ozeki, Y; Hori, H; Sasayama, D; Chiba, S; Yamamoto, N; Tanaka, H; Iijima, Y; Matsuo, J; Kawamoto, Y; Kinoshita, Y; Hattori, K; Ota, M; Kajiwara, M; Terada, S; Higuchi, T; Kunugi, H

    2012-01-01

    Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid required for the synthesis of catecholamines including dopamine. Altered levels of phenylalanine and its metabolites in blood and cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in schizophrenia patients. This study attempted to examine for the first time whether phenylalanine kinetics is altered in schizophrenia using L-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine breath test ((13)C-PBT). The subjects were 20 chronically medicated schizophrenia patients (DSM-IV) and the same number of age- and sex-matched controls. (13)C-phenylalanine (99 atom% (13)C; 100 mg) was administered orally and the breath (13)CO(2) /(12)CO(2) ratio was monitored for 120 min. The possible effect of antipsychotic medication (risperidone (RPD) or haloperidol (HPD) treatment for 21 days) on (13)C-PBT was examined in rats. Body weight (BW), age and diagnostic status were significant predictors of the area under the curve of the time course of Δ(13)CO(2) (‰) and the cumulative recovery rate (CRR) at 120 min. A repeated measures analysis of covariance controlled for age and BW revealed that the patterns of CRR change over time differed between the patients and controls and that Δ(13)CO(2) was lower in the patients than in the controls at all sampling time points during the 120 min test, with an overall significant difference between the two groups. Chronic administration of RPD or HPD had no significant effect on (13)C-PBT indices in rats. Our results suggest that (13)C-PBT is a novel laboratory test that can detect altered phenylalanine kinetics in chronic schizophrenia patients. Animal experiments suggest that the observed changes are unlikely to be attributable to antipsychotic medication. PMID:22832963

  6. (14C)Aminopyrine breath test in chronic liver disease: preliminary diagnostic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Burnstein, A.V.; Galambos, J.T.

    1981-12-01

    The (14C)aminopyrine breath test (APBT) score, an estimate of hepatic mixed-oxidase function, was evaluated in 21 consecutive patients wih active nonalcoholic chronic liver diseases. Ten had primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and 11 had chronic active hepatitis (CAH). The APBT score was normal or elevated in patients with PBC (P less than 0.001), and lower than normal in CAH patients (P less than 0.01); 10.5 +/- 1.6 and 3.5 +/- 1.86, respectively, vs control 7.65 +/- 1.15 (mean +/- SD). The 11 patients with CAH included two middle-aged women who displayed ambiguous severe intrahepatic cholestasis. There was no overlap between the APBT scores of the 10 PBC and 11 CAH patients. These initial data suggest that the APBT may be helpful in the differentiation of PBC and CAH, including misleading cholestatic forms of CAH.

  7. 49 CFR 40.245 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD? 40.245 Section 40.245 Transportation Office of the... Alcohol Screening Tests § 40.245 What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD? (a) As the STT or BAT, you must take the following steps when using the...

  8. 49 CFR 40.245 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD? 40.245 Section 40.245 Transportation Office of the... Alcohol Screening Tests § 40.245 What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD? (a) As the STT or BAT, you must take the following steps when using the...

  9. 49 CFR 40.245 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD? 40.245 Section 40.245 Transportation Office of the... Alcohol Screening Tests § 40.245 What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD? (a) As the STT or BAT, you must take the following steps when using the...

  10. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori by carbon-13 urea breath test using a portable mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, J; France, N; Taylor, S; Matthews, T; Turner, P; Bliss, P; Watson, AJM

    2015-01-01

    Context: In the non-invasive detection of markers of disease, mass spectrometry is able to detect small quantities of volatile markers in exhaled air. However, the problem of size, expense and immobility of conventional mass spectrometry equipment has restricted its use. Now, a smaller, less expensive, portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system has been developed. Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the development of chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. Objectives: To compare the results obtained from the presence of H. pylori by a carbon-13 urea test using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system with those from a fixed mass spectrometer in a hospital-based clinical trial. Methods: Following ethical approval, 45 patients attending a gastroenterology clinic at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital exhaled a breath sample into a Tedlar gas sampling bag. They then drank an orange juice containing urea radiolabelled with carbon and 30 min later gave a second breath sample. The carbon-13 content of both samples was measured using both quadrupole mass spectrometer systems. If the post-drink level exceeded the pre-drink level by 3% or more, a positive diagnosis for the presence of H. pylori was made. Results: The findings were compared to the results using conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry using a laboratory-based magnetic sector instrument off-site. The results showed agreement in 39 of the 45 patients. Conclusions: This study suggests that a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer is a potential alternative to the conventional centralised testing equipment. Future development of the portable quadrupole mass spectrometer to reduce further its size and cost is indicated, together with further work to validate this new equipment and to enhance its use in mass spectrometry diagnosis of other medical conditions. PMID:26770764

  11. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency: accuracy and clinical value of the uniformly labelled 13C-Hiolein breath test.

    PubMed Central

    Lembcke, B; Braden, B; Caspary, W F

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The 13C-Hiolein breath test (98% [U-13C] labelled long chain triglyceride mixture (highly labelled triolein) was evaluated as a non-invasive, non-radioactive test for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Accuracy and clinical validity were examined with reference to both the secretin pancreozymin test and faecal fat analysis. METHODS: A secretin pancreozymin test and faecal fat analysis were performed in 46 patients, 30 with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and 16 with normal pancreatic function. In all of these patients and in seven healthy volunteers (controls), a 13C-Hiolein breath test was performed using 2 mg/kg [U-13C] labelled Hiolein with a standard risk snack (1.5 g/kg; 25% fat). 13CO2/12CO2 enrichment in the exhaled breath was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. RESULTS: In patients with pancreatic steatorrhoea the 13CO2 response was below the 95% confidence interval of 13CO2 exhalation in the controls. These responses were also diminished (p < 0.001) compared with patients with impaired lipase output but normal fat excretion and with disease as well as healthy controls. There was a linear correlation between stimulated lipase output and the ratio of lipase output/13CO2 response (r = 0.95). Among the 40 patients in whom direct pancreatic function testing was clinically indicated, the sensitivity of the 13C-Hiolein test for detecting steatorrhoea was 91.7%, with a specificity of 85.7%. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with pancreatic disease the 13C-Hiolein breath test reflects impaired lipase output and indicates decompensated lipolysis. The 13C-Hiolein breath test is a convenient alternative to faecal fat analysis. PMID:9026480

  12. Capsule 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Nan-Jing; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lee, Shui-Cheng; Tsay, Daw-Guey; Lo, Ching-Chu; Tseng, Huei-Hwa; Huang, Wen-Keui; Lo, Gin-Ho; Hsu, Ping-I

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the accuracy of capsule 13C-urea breath test (UBT) with conventional invasive methods for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. METHODS: One hundred patients received CLO test, histological examination, culture and 100- or 50-mg capsule UBT for the diagnosis of H pylori infection. H pylori infection was defined as those with positive culture or positive results from both histology and CLO test. RESULTS: Both the sensitivity and specificity of the 100-mg capsule UBT (n = 50) were 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of the 50-mg capsule UBT (n = 50) were 96.4 and 100%, respectively. Taken together, the accuracy of capsule UBT (n = 100) was higher than that of CLO test, histology and culture (100% vs 92%, 91% and 89%, respectively; P = 0.035, 0.018 and 0.005, respectively). Our data showed that the optimal timing of sampling for 100- and 50-mg capsule UBT was 15-30 and 6-15 min, respectively. CONCLUSION: Capsule UBT has a higher accuracy compared with biopsy-based tests. It is an ideal method for the diagnosis of H pylori infection. PMID:15761976

  13. Comparison of an enzyme immunoassay for the detection of Helicobacter pylori antigens in the faeces with the urea breath test

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, A.; Williams, C.; Doherty, C.; Hossack, M.; Preston, T.; McColl, K.; Weaver, L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Current diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori are invasive (endoscopy) or indirect (urea breath test, serology).
AIMS—To evaluate a new enzyme immunoassay (EIA) which detects H pylori antigens in faeces, by comparing its sensitivity and specificity in children with the 13C urea breath test (UBT).
METHODS—A total of 119 children underwent a UBT and provided a faecal sample for antigen testing within seven days. After an overnight fast each child provided a pretest breath sample, and samples at 30 and 40 minutes after ingestion of 100 mg 13C labelled urea. 13C enrichment of breath was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Faeces were stored at −70°C until antigen testing, using the EIA. Samples were read spectrophotometrically at 450 nm and results were interpreted using recommended cut offs of optical density <0.14 as negative, ⩾0.16 as positive, with ⩾0.14 and <0.16 representing equivocal results. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using the manufacturer's cut off compared with UBT.
RESULTS—Sensitivity and specificity were 88% and 82%, respectively. Negative and positive predictive values were 97% and 58%.
CONCLUSIONS—The EIA is an alternative, non-invasive, and easy to use method for the detection of H pylori in children. Its high negative predictive value suggests a role in screening out uninfected children.

 PMID:10952653

  14. l-Arabinose Isomerase and d-Xylose Isomerase from Lactobacillus reuteri: Characterization, Coexpression in the Food Grade Host Lactobacillus plantarum, and Application in the Conversion of d-Galactose and d-Glucose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The l-arabinose isomerase (l-AI) and the d-xylose isomerase (d-XI) encoding genes from Lactobacillus reuteri (DSMZ 17509) were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The proteins were purified to homogeneity by one-step affinity chromatography and characterized biochemically. l-AI displayed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 6.0, whereas d-XI showed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 5.0. Both enzymes require divalent metal ions. The genes were also ligated into the inducible lactobacillal expression vectors pSIP409 and pSIP609, the latter containing a food grade auxotrophy marker instead of an antibiotic resistance marker, and the l-AI- and d-XI-encoding sequences/genes were coexpressed in the food grade host Lactobacillus plantarum. The recombinant enzymes were tested for applications in carbohydrate conversion reactions of industrial relevance. The purified l-AI converted d-galactose to d-tagatose with a maximum conversion rate of 35%, and the d-XI isomerized d-glucose to d-fructose with a maximum conversion rate of 48% at 60 °C. PMID:24443973

  15. Effect of posture on 13C-urea breath test in partial gastrectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Shi, Dong-Mei; Xiang, Ping; Xiao, Li; Huang, Yi-Qin; Zhang, Gan-Sheng; Bao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether posture affects the accuracy of 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) detection in partial gastrectomy patients. METHODS: We studied 156 consecutive residual stomach patients, including 76 with H. pylori infection (infection group) and 80 without H. pylori infection (control group). H. pylori infection was confirmed if both the rapid urease test and histology were positive during gastroscopy. The two groups were divided into four subgroups according to patients’ posture during the 13C-UBT: subgroup A, sitting position; subgroup B, supine position; subgroup C, right lateral recumbent position; and subgroup D, left lateral recumbent position. Each subject underwent the following modified 13C-UBT: 75 mg of 13C-urea (powder) in 100 mL of citric acid solution was administered, and a mouth wash was performed immediately; breath samples were then collected at baseline and at 5-min intervals up to 30 min while the position was maintained. Seven breath samples were collected for each subject. The cutoff value was 2.0‰. RESULTS: The mean delta over baseline (DOB) values in the subgroups of the infection group were similar at 5 min (P > 0.05) and significantly higher than those in the corresponding control subgroups at all time points (P < 0.01). In the infection group, the mean DOB values in subgroup A were higher than those in other subgroups within 10 min and peaked at the 10-min point (12.4‰ ± 2.4‰). The values in subgroups B and C both reached their peaks at 15 min (B, 13.9‰ ± 1.5‰; C, 12.2‰ ± 1.7‰) and then decreased gradually until the 30-min point. In subgroup D, the value peaked at 20 min (14.7‰ ± 1.7‰). Significant differences were found between the values in subgroups D and B at both 25 min (t = 2.093, P = 0.043) and 30 min (t = 2.141, P = 0.039). At 30 min, the value in subgroup D was also significantly different from those in subgroups A and C (D vs C: t = 6.325, P = 0.000; D vs A: t

  16. Dynamic carbon 13 breath tests for the study of liver function and gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-02-01

    In gastroenterological practice, breath tests (BTs) are diagnostic tools used for indirect, non-invasive assessment of several pathophysiological metabolic processes, by monitoring the appearance in breath of a metabolite of a specific substrate. Labelled substrates originally employed radioactive carbon 14 ((14)C) and, more recently, the stable carbon 13 isotope ((13)C) has been introduced to label specific substrates. The ingested (13)C-substrate is metabolized, and exhaled (13)CO2 is measured by mass spectrometry or infrared spectroscopy. Some (13)C-BTs evaluate specific (microsomal, cytosolic, and mitochondrial) hepatic metabolic pathways and can be employed in liver diseases (i.e. simple liver steatosis, non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, drug and alcohol effects). Another field of clinical application for (13)C-BTs is the assessment of gastric emptying kinetics in response to liquids ((13)C-acetate) or solids ((13)C-octanoic acid in egg yolk or in a pre-packed muffin or the (13)C-Spirulina platensis given with a meal or a biscuit). Studies have shown that (13)C-BTs, used for gastric emptying studies, yield results that are comparable to scintigraphy and can be useful in detecting either delayed- (gastroparesis) or accelerated gastric emptying or changes of gastric kinetics due to pharmacological effects. Thus, (13)C-BTs represent an indirect, cost-effective and easy method of evaluating dynamic liver function and gastric kinetics in health and disease, and several other potential applications are being studied. PMID:25339354

  17. Dynamic carbon 13 breath tests for the study of liver function and gastric emptying

    PubMed Central

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    In gastroenterological practice, breath tests (BTs) are diagnostic tools used for indirect, non-invasive assessment of several pathophysiological metabolic processes, by monitoring the appearance in breath of a metabolite of a specific substrate. Labelled substrates originally employed radioactive carbon 14 (14C) and, more recently, the stable carbon 13 isotope (13C) has been introduced to label specific substrates. The ingested 13C-substrate is metabolized, and exhaled 13CO2 is measured by mass spectrometry or infrared spectroscopy. Some 13C-BTs evaluate specific (microsomal, cytosolic, and mitochondrial) hepatic metabolic pathways and can be employed in liver diseases (i.e. simple liver steatosis, non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, drug and alcohol effects). Another field of clinical application for 13C-BTs is the assessment of gastric emptying kinetics in response to liquids (13C-acetate) or solids (13C-octanoic acid in egg yolk or in a pre-packed muffin or the 13C-Spirulina platensis given with a meal or a biscuit). Studies have shown that 13C-BTs, used for gastric emptying studies, yield results that are comparable to scintigraphy and can be useful in detecting either delayed- (gastroparesis) or accelerated gastric emptying or changes of gastric kinetics due to pharmacological effects. Thus, 13C-BTs represent an indirect, cost-effective and easy method of evaluating dynamic liver function and gastric kinetics in health and disease, and several other potential applications are being studied. PMID:25339354

  18. Test plan 241-C-103 natural breathing characteristics evaluation using the ultra sensitive flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Hertelendy, N.A.

    1995-02-13

    To facilitate the reduction of worker exposure to hazardous fumes and vapors, it is imperative to characterize and measure flows out of waste tanks that breathe due to atmospheric pressure changes. These measurements will lead to a better understanding of how these tanks breathe and thus will aid in better worker exposure control at lower cost.

  19. Impact of hydrogen breath testing on diagnosis, management, and clinical outcome in children with chronic functional GI symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain) in children may have numerous etiologies including carbohydrate malabsorption and small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO). Hydrogen breath testing (HBT) frequently is used as a modality to evaluate for these two diagnoses. Howev...

  20. 13C-breath tests for sucrose digestion in congenital sucrase isomaltase-deficient and sacrosidase-supplemented patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (CSID) is characterized by absence or deficiency of the mucosal sucrase-isomaltase enzyme. Specific diagnosis requires upper gastrointestinal biopsy with evidence of low to absent sucrase enzyme activity and normal histology. The hydrogen breath test (BT) is ...

  1. Solubility testing of actinides on breathing-zone and area air samples

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, R.L.; Jessop, B.H.; McDowell, B.L.

    1996-02-01

    A solubility testing method for several common actinides has been developed with sufficient sensitivity to allow profiles to be determined from routine breathing zone and area air samples in the workplace. Air samples are covered with a clean filter to form a filter-sample-filter sandwich which is immersed in an extracellular lung serum simulant solution. The sample is moved to a fresh beaker of the lung fluid simulant each day for one week, and then weekly until the end of the 28 day test period. The soak solutions are wet ashed with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to destroy the organic components of the lung simulant solution prior to extraction of the nuclides of interest directly into an extractive scintillator for subsequent counting on a Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS{reg_sign}) spectrometer. Solvent extraction methods utilizing the extractive scintillators have been developed for the isotopes of uranium, plutonium, and curium. The procedures normally produce an isotopic recovery greater than 95% and have been used to develop solubility profiles from air samples with 40 pCi or less of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Profiles developed for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} samples show good agreement with in vitro and in vivo tests performed by other investigators on samples from the same uranium mills.

  2. Additional Value of CH4 Measurement in a Combined 13C/H2 Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H2) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined 13C/H2 lactose breath test that measures breath 13CO2 as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H2 and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 13C/H2 lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH4 in addition to H2 and 13CO2. Based on the 13C/H2 breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH4 further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H2-excretion were found to excrete CH4. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH4-concentrations has an added value to the 13C/H2 breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. PMID:26371034

  3. Hydrogen Location in Stages of an Enzyme-Catalyzed Reaction: Time-of-Flight Neutron Structure of D-Xylose Isomerase with Bound D-Xylulose

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Leighton

    2009-01-01

    The time-of-flight neutron Laue technique has been used to determine the location of hydrogen atoms in the enzyme D-xylose isomerase (XI). The neutron structure of crystalline XI with bound product, D-xylulose, shows, unexpectedly, that O5 of D-xylulose is not protonated but is hydrogen-bonded to doubly protonated His54. Also, Lys289, which is neutral in native XI, is protonated (positively charged), while the catalytic water in native XI has become activated to a hydroxyl anion which is in the proximity of C1 and C2, the molecular site of isomerization of xylose. These findings impact our understanding of the reaction mechanism.

  4. Conversion of hemicellulose sugars catalyzed by formic acid: kinetics of the dehydration of D-xylose, L-arabinose, and D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Dussan, Karla; Girisuta, Buana; Lopes, Marystela; Leahy, James J; Hayes, Michael H B

    2015-04-24

    The pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass produces a liquid stream of hemicellulose-based sugars, which can be further converted to high-value chemicals. Formosolv pulping and the Milox process use formic acid as the fractionating agent, which can be used as the catalyst for the valorisation of hemicellulose sugars to platform chemicals. The objective of this study was to investigate the reaction kinetics of major components in the hemicelluloses fraction of biomass, that is, D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-glucose. The kinetics experiments for each sugar were performed at temperatures between 130 and 170 °C in various formic acid concentrations (10-64 wt %). The implications of these kinetic models on the selectivity of each sugar to the desired products are discussed. The models were used to predict the reaction kinetics of solutions that resemble the liquid stream obtained from the fractionation process of biomass using formic acid. PMID:25821128

  5. Furfural Production from d-Xylose and Xylan by Using Stable Nafion NR50 and NaCl in a Microwave-Assisted Biphasic Reaction.

    PubMed

    Le Guenic, Sarah; Gergela, David; Ceballos, Claire; Delbecq, Frederic; Len, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Pentose dehydration and direct transformation of xylan into furfural were performed in a water-cyclopentyl methyl ether (CPME) biphasic system under microwave irradiation. Heated up between 170 and 190 °C in the presence of Nafion NR50 and NaCl, d-xylose, l-arabinose and xylan gave furfural with maximum yields of 80%, 42% and 55%, respectively. The influence of temperature and reaction time on the reaction kinetics was discussed. This study was also completed by the survey of different reactant ratios, such as organic layer-water or catalyst-inorganic salt ratios. The exchange between proton and cation induced by an excess of NaCl was monitored, and a synergetic effect between the remaining protons and the released HCl was also discovered. PMID:27556444

  6. Gender-associated differences in urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori infection referrals and results among dyspeptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Horowitz, Noya; Beit-Or, Anat; Halpern, Zamir; Santo, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To verify whether there is a gender difference in the 13C-urea breath test results in a large cohort. METHODS: The test results of dyspeptic patients referred for 13C-urea breath testing between January and December, 2007 were evaluated. Testing was carried out at the health insurance organization branches and evaluated at a central laboratory in Israel. RESULTS: Of a total of 28 746 test results, 18 122 (63.04%) were from females and 10 624 (36.95%) from males. Overall, 10 188 (35.4%) results [expressed as delta over baseline (DOB)] were positive (DOB 13C > 5), 18,326 (63.7%) were negative (DOB 13C < 3.5) and 232 (0.8%) were borderline (DOB 13C 3.5-5). There was a significant difference between the total positive rate among females and males (34.8% vs 37.2%, respectively, P = 0.0003). The mean test value was increased by approximately 10 units for females compared to males (P < 0.01) and this difference was consistent for all age groups (i.e., between 10-80 years of age, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: More females were referred to 13C-urea breath testing. More males had positive results. The mean test values were significantly higher among females of all age groups, possibly representing an increased bacterial load among females and suggesting gender-associated differences in Helicobacter pylori host interactions. PMID:22737592

  7. Man o' War Mutation in UDP-α-D-Xylose Synthase Favors the Abortive Catalytic Cycle and Uncovers a Latent Potential for Hexamer Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Jr., Richard M.; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Howard, Wesley W.; Wood, Zachary A.

    2015-03-17

    The man o’ war (mow) phenotype in zebrafish is characterized by severe craniofacial defects due to a missense mutation in UDP-α-D-xylose synthase (UXS), an essential enzyme in proteoglycan biosynthesis. The mow mutation is located in the UXS dimer interface ~16 Å away from the active site, suggesting an indirect effect on the enzyme mechanism. We have examined the structural and catalytic consequences of the mow mutation (R236H) in the soluble fragment of human UXS (hUXS), which shares 93% sequence identity with the zebrafish enzyme. In solution, hUXS dimers undergo a concentration-dependent association to form a tetramer. Sedimentation velocity studies show that the R236H substitution induces the formation of a new hexameric species. Using two new crystal structures of the hexamer, we show that R236H and R236A substitutions cause a local unfolding of the active site that allows for a rotation of the dimer interface necessary to form the hexamer. The disordered active sites in the R236H and R236A mutant constructs displace Y231, the essential acid/base catalyst in the UXS reaction mechanism. The loss of Y231 favors an abortive catalytic cycle in which the reaction intermediate, UDP-α-D-4-keto-xylose, is not reduced to the final product, UDP-α-D-xylose. Surprisingly, the mow-induced hexamer is almost identical to the hexamers formed by the deeply divergent UXS homologues from Staphylococcus aureus and Helicobacter pylori (21% and 16% sequence identity, respectively). The persistence of a latent hexamer-building interface in the human enzyme suggests that the ancestral UXS may have been a hexamer.

  8. Applicability of a short/rapid 13C-urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori: retrospective multicenter chart review study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbon labeled urea breath tests usually entail a two point sampling with a 20 to 30-minute gap. Our aim was to evaluate the duration of time needed for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori by the BreathID® System. Methods This is a retrospective multicenter chart review study. Test location, date, delta over baseline, and duration of the entire test were recorded. Consecutively 13C urea breath tests results were extracted from the files over a nine year period. Results Of the 12,791 tests results, 35.1% were positively diagnosed and only 0.1% were inconclusive. A statistically significant difference in prevalence among the countries was found: Germany showing the lowest, 13.3%, and Israel the highest, 44.1%. Significant differences were found in time to diagnosis: a positive diagnosis had the shortest and an inconclusive result had the longest. Overall test duration averaged 15.1 minutes in Germany versus approximately 13 minutes in other countries. Diagnosis was achieved after approximately 9 minutes in Israel, Italy and Switzerland, but after 10 on average in the others. The mean delta over baseline value for a negative diagnosis was 1.03 ± 0.86, (range, 0.9 - 5), versus 20.2 ± 18.9, (range, 5.1 - 159.4) for a positive one. Conclusions The BreathID® System used in diagnosing Helicobacter pylori can safely shorten test duration on average of 10-13 minutes without any loss of sensitivity or specificity and with no test lasting more than 21 minutes. PMID:22260296

  9. Accuracy of urea breath test in Helicobacter pylori infection: Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferwana, Mazen; Abdulmajeed, Imad; Alhajiahmed, Ali; Madani, Wedad; Firwana, Belal; Hasan, Rim; Altayar, Osama; Limburg, Paul J; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Knawy, Bandar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To quantitatively summarize and appraise the available evidence of urea breath test (UBT) use to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with dyspepsia and provide pooled diagnostic accuracy measures. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library and other databases for studies addressing the value of UBT in the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. We included cross-sectional studies that evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of UBT in adult patients with dyspeptic symptoms. Risk of bias was assessed using QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies)-2 tool. Diagnostic accuracy measures were pooled using the random-effects model. Subgroup analysis was conducted by UBT type (13C vs 14C) and by measurement technique (Infrared spectrometry vs Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry). RESULTS: Out of 1380 studies identified, only 23 met the eligibility criteria. Fourteen studies (61%) evaluated 13C UBT and 9 studies (39%) evaluated 14C UBT. There was significant variation in the type of reference standard tests used across studies.Pooled sensitivity was 0.96 (95%CI: 0.95-0.97) andpooled specificity was 0.93 (95%CI: 0.91-0.94). Likelihood ratio for a positive test was 12 and for a negative test was 0.05 with an area under thecurve of 0.985. Meta-analyses were associated with a significant statistical heterogeneity that remained unexplained after subgroup analysis. The included studies had a moderate risk of bias. CONCLUSION: UBT has high diagnostic accuracy for detecting H. pylori infection in patients with dyspepsia. The reliability of diagnostic meta-analytic estimates however is limited by significant heterogeneity. PMID:25632206

  10. Lactulose Hydrogen Breath Test Result Is Associated with Age and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Carolyn; Tierney, Ann; Pickett-Blakely, Octavia

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is associated with chronic gastrointestinal diseases and structural/functional abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract. SIBO's association with clinical characteristics is unclear. This study investigates the association between clinical factors and SIBO according to lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) result. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a university-based gastroenterology practice was performed. Data was abstracted from the medical records of subjects undergoing LHBT from 6/1/2009 to 6/1/2013. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between predictor variables: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and positive LHBT, the outcome of interest. Results. LHBT was performed in 791 subjects. Fifty-four percent had a positive LHBT. There was no statistically significant difference between the LHBT results according to age or BMI. In females, the likelihood of a positive LHBT increased with age (OR 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01–1.03). In males, the likelihood of a positive LHBT result decreased with age (OR 0.98; 95% CI: 0.97–1.00). Conclusion. There was an association between age, with respect to sex, and a positive LHBT. With increased age in females, the odds of a positive LHBT increased, while, in men, the odds of a positive LHBT decreased with age. PMID:27073800

  11. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Diagnosed by Glucose Hydrogen Breath Test in Post-cholecystectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hea Jung; Paik, Chang-Nyol; Chung, Woo Chul; Lee, Kang-Moon; Yang, Jin-Mo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients undergoing cholecystectomy may have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). We investigated the prevalence and characteristics of SIBO in patients with intestinal symptoms following cholecystectomy. Methods Sixty-two patients following cholecystectomy, 145 with functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGIDs), and 30 healthy controls undergoing hydrogen (H2)-methane (CH4) glucose breath test (GBT) were included in the study. Before performing GBT, all patients were interrogated using bowel symptom questionnaire. The positivity to GBT indicating the presence of SIBO, gas types and bowel symptoms were surveyed. Results Post-cholecystectomy patients more often had SIBO as evidenced by a positive (+) GBT than those with FGID and controls (29/62, 46.8% vs 38/145, 26.2% vs 4/30, 13.3%, respectively; P = 0.010). In the gas types, the GBT (H2) + post-cholecystectomy patients was significantly higher than those in FGIDs patients (P = 0.017). Especially, positivity to fasting GBT (H2) among the GBT (H2)+ post-cholecystectomy patients was high, as diagnosed by elevated fasting H2 level. The GBT+ group had higher symptom scores of significance or tendency in abdominal discomfort, bloating, chest discomfort, early satiety, nausea, and tenesmus than those of the GBT negative group. The status of cholecystectomy was the only significant independent factor for predicting SIBO. Conclusions The SIBO with high levels of baseline H2 might be the important etiologic factor of upper GI symptoms for post-cholecystectomy patients. PMID:26351251

  12. Lactulose Hydrogen Breath Test Result Is Associated with Age and Gender.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Carolyn; Tierney, Ann; Pickett-Blakely, Octavia

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is associated with chronic gastrointestinal diseases and structural/functional abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract. SIBO's association with clinical characteristics is unclear. This study investigates the association between clinical factors and SIBO according to lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) result. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a university-based gastroenterology practice was performed. Data was abstracted from the medical records of subjects undergoing LHBT from 6/1/2009 to 6/1/2013. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between predictor variables: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and positive LHBT, the outcome of interest. Results. LHBT was performed in 791 subjects. Fifty-four percent had a positive LHBT. There was no statistically significant difference between the LHBT results according to age or BMI. In females, the likelihood of a positive LHBT increased with age (OR 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.03). In males, the likelihood of a positive LHBT result decreased with age (OR 0.98; 95% CI: 0.97-1.00). Conclusion. There was an association between age, with respect to sex, and a positive LHBT. With increased age in females, the odds of a positive LHBT increased, while, in men, the odds of a positive LHBT decreased with age. PMID:27073800

  13. Co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and xylose dehydrogenase displayed whole cell on multiwalled carbon nanotube nanocomposite films modified electrode for simultaneous voltammetric detection of D-glucose and D-xylose.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Liang, Bo; Li, Feng; Shi, Jianguo; Mascini, Marco; Lang, Qiaolin; Liu, Aihua

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, we first report the construction of Nafion/glucose oxidase (GOD)/xylose dehydrogenase displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) modified electrode for simultaneous voltammetric determination of D-glucose and D-xylose. The optimal conditions for the immobilized enzymes were established. Both enzymes retained their good stability and activities. In the mixture solution of D-glucose and D-xylose containing coenzyme NAD⁺ (the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), the Nafion/GOD/XDH-bacteria/MWNTs modified electrode exhibited quasi-reversible oxidation-reduction peak at -0.5 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode, SCE) originating from the catalytic oxidation of D-glucose, and oxidation peak at +0.55 V(vs. SCE) responding to the oxidation of NADH (the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) by the carbon nanotubes, where NADH is the resultant product of coenzyme NAD⁺ involved in the catalysis of D-xylose by XDH-displayed bacteria. For the proposed biosensor, cathodic peak current at -0.5 V was linear with the concentration of D-glucose within the range of 0.25-6 mM with a low detection limit of 0.1 mM D-glucose (S/N=3), and the anodic peak current at +0.55 V was linear with the concentration of d-xylose in the range of 0.25∼4 mM with a low detection limit of 0.1 mM D-xylose (S/N=3). Further, D-xylose and D-glucose did not interfere with each other. 300-fold excess saccharides including D-maltose, D-galactose, D-mannose, D-sucrose, D-fructose, D-cellobiose, and 60-fold excess L-arabinose, and common interfering substances (100-fold excess ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid) as well as 300-fold excess D-xylitol did not affect the detection of D-glucose and D-xylose (both 1 mM). Therefore, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible, simple, rapid and cost-effective, which holds great potential in real applications. PMID:23202346

  14. Erythromycin breath test as an assay of glucocorticoid-inducible liver cytochromes P-450. Studies in rats and patients.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P B; Murray, S A; Winkelman, L G; Heuman, D M; Wrighton, S A; Guzelian, P S

    1989-01-01

    The major P-450IIIA gene family member present in human liver is HLp which, like its rat liver orthologue P-450p, is inducible by glucocorticoids and catalyzes erythromycin N-demethylation. To develop a practical method to estimate the amounts of HLp in patients [14C]N-methyl erythromycin was injected into rats that had been pretreated with dexamethasone or with inducers of other forms of cytochrome P-450. The rate of demethylation of this substrate, measured simply as 14CO2 in the breath, correlated well with the concentrations of immunoreactive P-450p protein (r = 0.70), holocytochrome P-450p (r = 0.70), or with erythromycin N-demethylase activity (r = 0.90) determined in the liver microsomes prepared from each rat. Next, [14C]N-methyl erythromycin was administered to 30 patients and there was a sixfold interindividual variation in breath 14CO2 production seemingly unrelated to medications, smoking status or age. However, the average breath test values were twofold greater in female as compared to male patients (P less than 0.01). Breath 14CO2 production rose in patients retested after treatment with the P-450IIIA inducers dexamethasone (P less than 0.05) or rifampicin (P less than 0.05) and was decreased after treatment with the HLp inhibitor triacetyloleandomycin (P less than 0.05). We conclude that the erythromycin breath test provides a convenient assay of P-450IIIA cytochromes in rats and in some patients. PMID:2913056

  15. Breathing metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a breathing metabolic simulator (BMS) is reported. This BMS simulates all of the breathing and metabolic parameters required for complete evaluation and test of life support and resuscitation equipment. It is also useful for calibrating and validating mechanical and gaseous pulmonary function test procedures. Breathing rate, breathing depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake, and carbon dioxide release are all variable over wide ranges simulating conditions from sleep to hard work with respiratory exchange ratios covering the range from hypoventilation. In addition, all of these parameters are remotely controllable to facilitate use of the device in hostile or remote environments. The exhaled breath is also maintained at body temperature and a high humidity. The simulation is accurate to the extent of having a variable functional residual capacity independent of other parameters.

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of an abbreviated 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test for measurement of pancreatic exocrine function

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Viola; Wolfram, Kristina U; Rosien, Ulrich; Layer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background A modified 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test (13C -MTGT) detects moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency noninvasively and reliably, but it requires prolonged breath sampling (6 hours (hr)). Objective We aimed to investigate whether 13C -MTGT can be abbreviated, to optimize clinical usability. Methods We analyzed the 13C-MTGT of 200 consecutive patients, retrospectively. Cumulative 1–5 hr 13C-exhalation values were compared with the standard parameter (6-hr cumulative 13C-exhalation). We determined the sensitivity and specificity of shortened breath sampling periods, by comparison with the normal values from 10 healthy volunteers, whom also underwent a secretin test to quantitate pancreatic secretion. Moreover, we evaluated the influence of gastric emptying (GE), using a 13C-octanoic acid breath test in a subset (N = 117). Results The 1–5 hr cumulative 13C-exhalation tests correlated highly and significantly with the standard parameter (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for detection of impaired lipolysis was high (≥77%), but the specificity was low (≥38%) for the early measurements. Both parameters were high after 4 hrs (88% and 94%, respectively) and 5 hrs (98% and 91%, respectively). Multivariate linear correlation analysis confirmed that GE strongly influenced early postprandial 13C-exhalation during the 13C-MTGT. Conclusion Shortening of the 13C -MTGT from 6 to 4 hrs of duration was associated with similar diagnostic accuracy, yet increased clinical usability. The influence of GE on early postprandial results of the 13C-MTGT precluded further abbreviation of the test. PMID:25083286

  17. Exhaled breath condensate pH decreases following oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Bikov, Andras; Pako, Judit; Montvai, David; Kovacs, Dorottya; Koller, Zsofia; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Horvath, Ildiko

    2015-12-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH is a widely measured non-invasive marker of airway acidity. However, some methodological aspects have not been thoroughly investigated. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on EBC pH in attempt to better standardize its measurement. Seventeen healthy subjects (24  ±  2 years, 6 men, 11 women) participated in the study. EBC collection and capillary blood glucose measurements were performed before as well as 0, 30, 60 and 120 min after a standardized OGTT test. The rate of respiratory droplet dilution and pH were evaluated in EBC. Blood glucose significantly increased at 30 min and maintained elevation after 60 and 120 min following OGTT. Compared to baseline (7.99  ±  0.25) EBC pH significantly decreased immediately after OGTT (7.41  ±  0.47); this drop sustained over 30 (7.44  ±  0.72) and 60 min (7.62  ±  0.44) without a significant difference at 120 min (7.78  ±  0.26). No change was observed in the rate of respiratory droplet dilution. There was no relationship between blood glucose and EBC pH values. Sugar intake may significantly decrease EBC pH. This effect needs to be considered when performing EBC pH studies. Further experiments are also warranted to investigate the effect of diet on other exhaled biomarkers. PMID:26669903

  18. Validation of a simplified carbon-14-urea breath test for routine use for detecting Helicobacter pylori noninvasively

    SciTech Connect

    Henze, E.; Malfertheiner, P.; Clausen, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Adam, W.E. )

    1990-12-01

    A carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) urea breath test for detecting Helicobacter pylori with multiple breath sampling was developed. Carbon-14-urea (110 kBq) administered orally to 18 normal subjects and to 82 patients with Helicobacter infection. The exhaled {sup 14}C-labeled CO{sub 2} was trapped at 10-min intervals for 90 min. The total {sup 14}C activity exhaled over 90 min was integrated and expressed in %activity of the total dose given. In normals, a mean of 0.59% +/- 0.24% was measured, resulting in an upper limit of normal of 1.07%. In 82 patients, a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 83.8%, and a positive predictive value of 90.2% was found. The single probes at intervals of 40-60 min correlated best with the integrated result, with r ranging from 0.986 to 0.990. The test's diagnostic accuracy did not change at all when reevaluated with the 40-, 50-, or 60-min sample data alone. Thus, the {sup 14}C-urea breath test can be applied routinely as a noninvasive, low-cost and one-sample test with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting Helicobacter pylori colonization.

  19. [BREATH TEST WITH LOCALLY PRODUCED 13С-UREA (TBILISI, GEORGIA) IN DIAGNOSTICS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Girdaladze, A; Mosidze, B; Elisabedashvili, G; Kordzaia, D

    2016-04-01

    Comparative assessment of results of detection of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection by breath tests with standard and locally produced 13С urea was done in 213 patients with gastric and duodenal pathology, including those who already were undergone the surgery. Invasive endoscopic biopsy test including rapid urease test (RUT), smear cytology and histology were also performed (tissue samples were obtained after endoscopy or surgery). RUT was carried out with the help of URE-HP test kit. Serological test for Hp antibodies was performed by IFA using kit ELISA. 13С urea breath test (UBT) was conducted for the determination of 13/12CO2 in breath samples by using of infrared spectroscope. In I group (125 patients) UBT was performed with standard 13С urea, in II group (88 patients) with locally produced 13С urea. Based on 5 different methods of Hp infection testing Hp positivity in 172 (80,8%) and Hp negativity in 41 (19,2%) patients were revealed. 13С-UBT showed the highest diagnostic value (accuracy-97,5%, sensibility-97,0%, specificity-100%) in Hp infection diagnosis. The (accuracy, sensibility and specificity of breath test with locally issued 13С urea (98,7%, 98,5% and 100% respectively) are the same as those for BT with standard 13С urea (96,7%, 96,2% and 100% respectively). These parameters are also highly credible in control of treatment efficiency (96,7%, 90,0% and 100% respectively). The correlation of index DOB‰ of breath test with results of RUT was revealed In Hp positive patients. This can serve as a marker of Hp infection rate. Preliminarily, in pre-clinical experimental study, harmless of locally issued 13С-urea from point of view of acute/sub-acute toxicity and allergy development was confirmed. The advantages (noninvasiveness, simplicity, rapidity, safety) and high diagnostic value of UBT (with both standard as well as locally produced 13С-urea) provide the opportunity to offer 13С-UBT as screening method of Hp infection diagnosis. It also

  20. [COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF MASS-SPECTROMETRY AND INFRARED SPECRTROMETRY USED IN 13C-UREA BREATH TEST FOR HELICOBACTER PYLORI].

    PubMed

    Plavnik, R G; Nevmerzhitsky, V I; Butorova, L I; Plavnik, T E

    2015-01-01

    At present, mass-spectrometry is the most accurate and efficient method for measuring carbon isotope ratio in 13C-urea breath test for H. pylori infection but its wide application is restricted by the high cost of equipment and operational complexity. IR spectrometry is one of the less expensive techniques recently proposedfor the purpose. To compare the effectiveness of the two methods, we undertook a study including 20 volunteers (6 men and 14 women) aged 18-60 years with parallel measurements by IR and mass-spectrometry. IR spectrometry was shown to be highly accurate (94-96%), sensitive (up to 100%), and specific (87.5%) which makes it a promising alternative to mass-spectrometry to be used in urea breath test for mass examination especially in outpatient facilities. PMID:27008742

  1. Four-sample lactose hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Fox, Mark; Chu, Hua; Zheng, Xia; Long, Yan-Qin; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Dai, Ning

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To validate 4-sample lactose hydrogen breath testing (4SLHBT) compared to standard 13-sample LHBT in the clinical setting. METHODS: Irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea (IBS-D) and healthy volunteers (HVs) were enrolled and received a 10 g, 20 g, or 40 g dose lactose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. The lactase gene promoter region was sequenced. Breath samples and symptoms were acquired at baseline and every 15 min for 3 h (13 measurements). The detection rates of lactose malabsorption (LM) and lactose intolerance (LI) for a 4SLHBT that acquired four measurements at 0, 90, 120, and 180 min from the same data set were compared with the results of standard LHBT. RESULTS: Sixty IBS-D patients and 60 HVs were studied. The genotype in all participants was C/C-13910. LM and LI detection rates increased with lactose dose from 10 g, 20 g to 40 g in both groups (P < 0.001). 4SLHBT showed excellent diagnostic concordance with standard LHBT (97%-100%, Kappa​​ 0.815-0.942) with high sensitivity (90%-100%) and specificity (100%) at all three lactose doses in both groups. CONCLUSION: Reducing the number of measurements from 13 to 4 samples did not significantly impact on the accuracy of LHBT in health and IBS-D. 4SLHBT is a valid test for assessment of LM and LI in clinical practice. PMID:26140004

  2. Dual therapy for third-line Helicobacter pylori eradication and urea breath test prediction

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Maekawa, Takama; Harada, Naohiko; Toyokawa, Tatsuya; Kuwai, Toshio; Ohara, Masanori; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Noguchi, Kenji; Yoshio, Toshiyuki; Katsushima, Shinji; Tsuruta, Hideo; Masuda, Eiji; Tanaka, Munehiro; Katayama, Shunsuke; Kawamura, Norio; Nishizawa, Yuko; Hibi, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of a dual therapy with rabeprazole and amoxicillin (AMX) as an empiric third-line rescue therapy. In patients with failure of first-line treatment with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-AMX-clarithromycin regimen and second-line treatment with the PPI-AMX-metronidazole regimen, a third-line eradication regimen with rabeprazole (10 mg q.i.d.) and AMX (500 mg q.i.d.) was prescribed for 2 wk. Eradication was confirmed by the results of the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) at 12 wk after the therapy. A total of 46 patients were included; however, two were lost to follow-up. The eradication rates as determined by per-protocol and intention-to-treat analyses were 65.9% and 63.0%, respectively. The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects showing eradication failure; those patients showing successful eradication comprised 32.9 ± 28.8 permil and 14.8 ± 12.8 permil, respectively. The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects with eradication failure were significantly higher than those in the patients with successful eradication (P = 0.019). A low pretreatment UBT result (≤ 28.5 permil) predicted the success of the eradication therapy with a positive predictive value of 81.3% and a sensitivity of 89.7%. Adverse effects were reported in 18.2% of the patients, mainly diarrhea and stomatitis. Dual therapy with rabeprazole and AMX appears to serve as a potential empirical third-line strategy for patients with low values on pretreatment UBT. PMID:22690086

  3. A selective and sensitive D-xylose electrochemical biosensor based on xylose dehydrogenase displayed on the surface of bacteria and multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Liang, Bo; Shi, Jianguo; Li, Feng; Mascini, Marco; Liu, Aihua

    2012-03-15

    A novel Nafion/bacteria-displaying xylose dehydrogenase (XDH)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite film-modified electrode was fabricated and applied for the sensitive and selective determination of d-xylose (INS 967), where the XDH-displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria) was prepared using a newly identified ice nucleation protein from Pseudomonas borealis DL7 as an anchoring motif. The XDH-displayed bacteria can be used directly, eliminating further enzyme-extraction and purification, thus greatly improved the stability of the enzyme. The optimal conditions for the construction of biosensor were established: homogeneous Nafion-MWNTs composite dispersion (10 μL) was cast onto the inverted glassy carbon electrode, followed by casting 10-μL of XDH-bacteria aqueous solution to stand overnight to dry, then a 5-μL of Nafion solution (0.05 wt%) is syringed to the electrode surface. The bacteria-displaying XDH could catalyze the oxidization of xylose to xylonolactone with coenzyme NAD(+) in 0.1M PBS buffer (pH7.4), where NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is reduced to NADH (the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). The resultant NADH is further electrocatalytically oxidized by MWNTs on the electrode, resulting in an obvious oxidation peak around 0.50 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). In contrast, the bacteria-XDH-only modified electrode showed oxidation peak at higher potential of 0.7 V and less sensitivity. Therefore, the electrode/MWNTs/bacteria-XDH/Nafion exhibited good analytical performance such as long-term stability, a wide dynamic range of 0.6-100 μM and a low detection limit of 0.5 μM D-xylose (S/N=3). No interference was observed in the presence of 300-fold excess of other saccharides including D-glucose, D-fructose, D-maltose, D-galactose, D-mannose, D-sucrose, and D-cellbiose as well as 60-fold excess of L-arabinose. The proposed microbial biosensor is stable, specific, sensitive, reproducible, simple, rapid and cost-effective, which holds

  4. Aperitif effects on gastric emptying: a crossover study using continuous real-time 13C breath test (BreathID System).

    PubMed

    Inamori, M; Iida, H; Endo, H; Hosono, K; Akiyama, T; Yoneda, K; Fujita, K; Iwasaki, T; Takahashi, H; Yoneda, M; Goto, A; Abe, Y; Kobayashi, N; Kubota, K; Nakajima, A

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between aperitif and gastric emptying. Ten healthy male volunteers participated in this randomized, two-way crossover study. Under two conditions (after drinking an aperitif versus not), the (13)C breath test was performed for 4 h with a liquid meal (200 kcal/200 ml) containing 100 mg (13)C acetate. We used 50 ml of umeshu as the aperitif. This is a traditional Japanese plum liqueur, and contains 7 ml alcohol (14%). In the aperitif group, T(1/2), T(lag), and T(peak) were significantly delayed [T(1/2) (132: 113-174) versus (112: 92-134) (P = 0.0069); T(lag) (80: 63-94) versus (55: 47-85) (P = 0.0069); and T(peak) (81: 62-96) versus (54: 34-84) (P = 0.0069), (median: range, aperitif versus control, min)]. Gastric emptying was significantly delayed in the aperitif group as compared with the control group. This study revealed that even a small amount of alcohol such as an aperitif may contribute to delayed gastric emptying. PMID:18688714

  5. Simplified single sample 13Carbon urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori: comparison with histology, culture, and ELISA serology.

    PubMed Central

    Logan, R P; Polson, R J; Misiewicz, J J; Rao, G; Karim, N Q; Newell, D; Johnson, P; Wadsworth, J; Walker, M M; Baron, J H

    1991-01-01

    There is no ideal method for detecting Helicobacter pylori. The 'standard' 13Carbon urea breath test (13C-UBT), which involves collecting eight to 15 breath samples and subsequent costly analysis, was modified by pooling 21 samples of expired breath taken at five minute intervals for 40 minutes into a collecting bag, from which a single 20 ml aliquot was taken and analysed by mass spectrometry. This test was evaluated on 50 patients after routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and results were compared with those from the standard 13C-UBT, bacteriology, ELISA serology, and histology--the latter being taken as the gold standard. H pylori were seen in 34 of 50 (68%) patients (in three it was detected in biopsy specimens from the corpus alone). The modified 13C-UBT was positive (pooled excretion delta 13CO2 greater than 5 per mil) in 31 patients and negative in 19 (three false negative results), specificity was 100% (standard 13C-UBT 94%) and sensitivity 92% (standard 13C-UBT 93%). The modified 13C-UBT had a coefficient of variation within subjects of 3.7%. For the ELISA serology and culture the specificities were both 100%, but the sensitivities were 82% and 68% respectively. The 13C-UBT results correlated with the grade of histological gastritis. The modified 13C-UBT is simpler, cheaper, more reproducible, and provides an easy non-invasive method for the detection of H pylori. PMID:1773948

  6. Variables that Impact on the Results of Breath-Alcohol Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labianca, Dominick A.

    2004-01-01

    In a 2003 issue of the "Journal of Chemical Education," Kniesel and Bellamy describe a timely and pedagogically effective experiment involving breath-alcohol analysis using an FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) spectrometer. The present article clarifies some of the information presented in the 2003 article.

  7. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube) in place. The breath may have an ammonia-like odor (also described as urine-like or " ... kidney failure (can cause breath to smell like ammonia ) Diabetes (fruity or sweet chemical smell associated with ...

  8. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... re not getting enough air. Sometimes mild breathing problems are from a stuffy nose or hard exercise. ... emphysema or pneumonia cause breathing difficulties. So can problems with your trachea or bronchi, which are part ...

  9. Breathing difficulty

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary disease (COPD), such as chronic bronchitis or emphysema Other lung disease Pneumonia Pulmonary hypertension Problems with ... of breath; Breathlessness; Difficulty breathing; Dyspnea Images Lungs Emphysema References Kraft M. Approach to the patient with ...

  10. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a potentially life-threatening condition. Breath that smells like feces can occur with prolonged vomiting , especially ... renal failure Bowel obstruction (can cause breath to smell like feces) Bronchiectasis Chronic kidney failure (can cause ...