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Sample records for d1 receptor-mediated nmda

  1. NMDA Receptors Mediate Synaptic Competition in Culture

    PubMed Central

    She, Kevin; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background Activity through NMDA type glutamate receptors sculpts connectivity in the developing nervous system. This topic is typically studied in the visual system in vivo, where activity of inputs can be differentially regulated, but in which individual synapses are difficult to visualize and mechanisms governing synaptic competition can be difficult to ascertain. Here, we develop a model of NMDA-receptor dependent synaptic competition in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Methodology/Principal Findings GluN1 -/- (KO) mouse hippocampal neurons lacking the essential NMDA receptor subunit were cultured alone or cultured in defined ratios with wild type (WT) neurons. The absence of functional NMDA receptors did not alter neuron survival. Synapse development was assessed by immunofluorescence for postsynaptic PSD-95 family scaffold and apposed presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut1. Synapse density was specifically enhanced onto minority wild type neurons co-cultured with a majority of GluN1 -/- neighbour neurons, both relative to the GluN1 -/- neighbours and relative to sister pure wild type cultures. This form of synaptic competition was dependent on NMDA receptor activity and not conferred by the mere physical presence of GluN1. In contrast to these results in 10% WT and 90% KO co-cultures, synapse density did not differ by genotype in 50% WT and 50% KO co-cultures or in 90% WT and 10% KO co-cultures. Conclusions/Significance The enhanced synaptic density onto NMDA receptor-competent neurons in minority coculture with GluN1 -/- neurons represents a cell culture paradigm for studying synaptic competition. Mechanisms involved may include a retrograde ‘reward’ signal generated by WT neurons, although in this paradigm there was no ‘punishment’ signal against GluN1 -/- neurons. Cell culture assays involving such defined circuits may help uncover the rules and mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic competition in the developing nervous

  2. NMDA receptors mediate calcium accumulation in myelin during chemical ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Micu, I; Jiang, Q; Coderre, E; Ridsdale, A; Zhang, L; Woulfe, J; Yin, X; Trapp, B D; McRory, J E; Rehak, R; Zamponi, G W; Wang, W; Stys, P K

    2006-02-23

    Central nervous system myelin is a specialized structure produced by oligodendrocytes that ensheaths axons, allowing rapid and efficient saltatory conduction of action potentials. Many disorders promote damage to and eventual loss of the myelin sheath, which often results in significant neurological morbidity. However, little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that initiate myelin damage, with the assumption being that its fate follows that of the parent oligodendrocyte. Here we show that NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) glutamate receptors mediate Ca2+ accumulation in central myelin in response to chemical ischaemia in vitro. Using two-photon microscopy, we imaged fluorescence of the Ca2+ indicator X-rhod-1 loaded into oligodendrocytes and the cytoplasmic compartment of the myelin sheath in adult rat optic nerves. The AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid)/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX completely blocked the ischaemic Ca2+ increase in oligodendroglial cell bodies, but only modestly reduced the Ca2+ increase in myelin. In contrast, the Ca2+ increase in myelin was abolished by broad-spectrum NMDA receptor antagonists (MK-801, 7-chlorokynurenic acid, d-AP5), but not by more selective blockers of NR2A and NR2B subunit-containing receptors (NVP-AAM077 and ifenprodil). In vitro ischaemia causes ultrastructural damage to both axon cylinders and myelin. NMDA receptor antagonism greatly reduced the damage to myelin. NR1, NR2 and NR3 subunits were detected in myelin by immunohistochemistry and immunoprecipitation, indicating that all necessary subunits are present for the formation of functional NMDA receptors. Our data show that the mature myelin sheath can respond independently to injurious stimuli. Given that axons are known to release glutamate, our finding that the Ca2+ increase was mediated in large part by activation of myelinic NMDA receptors suggests a new mechanism of axo-myelinic signalling. Such a mechanism may represent a

  3. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Manfred J; Schulz, Jan M; Kelsch, Wolfgang; Oorschot, Dorothy E; Reynolds, John N J

    2015-01-01

    Pauses in the tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) emerge during reward-related learning in response to conditioning of a neutral cue. We have previously reported that augmenting the postsynaptic response to cortical afferents in CINs is coupled to the emergence of a cell-intrinsic afterhyperpolarization (AHP) underlying pauses in tonic activity. Here we investigated in a bihemispheric rat-brain slice preparation the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of excitatory afferents to CINs and the association with changes in the AHP. We found that high frequency stimulation (HFS) of commissural corticostriatal afferents from the contralateral hemisphere induced a robust long-term depression (LTD) of postsynaptic potentials (PSP) in CINs. Depression of the PSP of smaller magnitude and duration was observed in response to HFS of the ipsilateral white matter or cerebral cortex. In Mg(2+)-free solution HFS induced NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation of the PSP, evident in both the maximal slope and amplitude of the PSP. The increase in maximal slope corroborates previous findings, and was blocked by antagonism of either D1-like dopamine receptors with SCH23390 or D2-like dopamine receptors with sulpiride during HFS in Mg(2+)-free solution. Potentiation of the slower PSP amplitude component was due to augmentation of the NMDA receptor-mediated potential as this was completely reversed on subsequent application of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5. HFS similarly potentiated NMDA receptor currents isolated by blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors with CNQX. The plasticity-induced increase in the slow PSP component was directly associated with an increase in the subsequent AHP. Thus plasticity of cortical afferent synapses is ideally suited to influence the cue-induced firing dynamics of CINs, particularly through potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:25914618

  4. The receptor subunits generating NMDA receptor mediated currents in oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Burzomato, Valeria; Frugier, Guillaume; Pérez-Otaño, Isabel; Kittler, Josef T; Attwell, David

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been shown to contribute to glutamate-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes. Activation of these receptors damages myelin in ischaemia, in part because they are more weakly blocked by Mg2+ than are most neuronal NMDA receptors. This weak Mg2+ block was suggested to reflect an unusual subunit composition including the NR2C and NR3A subunits. Here we expressed NR1/NR2C and triplet NR1/NR2C/NR3A recombinant receptors in HEK cells and compared their currents with those of NMDA-evoked currents in rat cerebellar oligodendrocytes. NR1/NR2C/3A receptors were less blocked by 2 mm Mg2+ than were NR1/NR2C receptors (the remaining current was 30% and 18%, respectively, of that seen without added Mg2+) and showed less channel noise, suggesting a smaller single channel conductance. NMDA-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes showed a Mg2+ block (to 32%) similar to that observed for NR1/NR2C/NR3A and significantly different from that for NR1/NR2C receptors. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed interactions between NR1, NR2C and NR3A subunits in a purified myelin preparation from rat brain. These data are consistent with NMDA-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes reflecting the activation of receptors containing NR1, NR2C and NR3A subunits. PMID:20660562

  5. Silent NMDA receptor-mediated synapses are developmentally regulated in the dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Baba, H; Doubell, T P; Moore, K A; Woolf, C J

    2000-02-01

    In vitro whole cell patch-clamp recording techniques were utilized to study silent pure-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic responses in lamina II (substantia gelatinosa, SG) and lamina III of the spinal dorsal horn. To clarify whether these synapses are present in the adult and contribute to neuropathic pain, transverse lumbar spinal cord slices were prepared from neonatal, naive adult and adult sciatic nerve transected rats. In neonatal rats, pure-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were elicited in SG neurons either by focal intraspinal stimulation (n = 15 of 20 neurons) or focal stimulation of the dorsal root (n = 2 of 7 neurons). In contrast, in slices from naive adult rats, no silent pure-NMDA EPSCs were recorded in SG neurons following focal intraspinal stimulation (n = 27), and only one pure-NMDA EPSC was observed in lamina III (n = 23). Furthermore, in rats with chronic sciatic nerve transection, pure-NMDA EPSCs were elicited by focal intraspinal stimulation in only 2 of 45 SG neurons. Although a large increase in Abeta fiber evoked mixed alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and NMDA receptor-mediated synapses was detected after sciatic nerve injury, Abeta fiber-mediated pure-NMDA EPSCs were not evoked in SG neurons by dorsal root stimulation. Pure-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs are therefore a transient, developmentally regulated phenomenon, and, although they may have a role in synaptic refinement in the immature dorsal horn, they are unlikely to be involved in receptive field plasticity in the adult. PMID:10669507

  6. S-nitrosylated SHP-2 contributes to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhong-Qing; Sunico, Carmen R.; McKercher, Scott R.; Cui, Jiankun; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) can cause neuronal damage, contributing to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases and stroke (i.e., focal cerebral ischemia). NO can mediate neurotoxic effects at least in part via protein S-nitrosylation, a reaction that covalently attaches NO to a cysteine thiol (or thiolate anion) to form an S-nitrosothiol. Recently, the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) and its downstream pathways have emerged as important mediators of cell survival. Here we report that in neurons and brain tissue NO can S-nitrosylate SHP-2 at its active site cysteine, forming S-nitrosylated SHP-2 (SNO–SHP-2). We found that NMDA exposure in vitro and transient focal cerebral ischemia in vivo resulted in increased levels of SNO–SHP-2. S-Nitrosylation of SHP-2 inhibited its phosphatase activity, blocking downstream activation of the neuroprotective physiological ERK1/2 pathway, thus increasing susceptibility to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity. These findings suggest that formation of SNO–SHP-2 represents a key chemical reaction contributing to excitotoxic damage in stroke and potentially other neurological disorders. PMID:23382182

  7. Enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Blue, Mary E; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2016-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from mutations in the X-linked gene for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The underlying cellular mechanism for the sensory deficits in patients with RTT is largely unknown. This study used the Bird mouse model of RTT to investigate sensory thalamocortical synaptic transmission in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice. Electrophysiological results showed an excitation/inhibition imbalance, biased toward inhibition, due to an increase in efficacy of postsynaptic GABAA receptors rather than alterations in inhibitory network and presynaptic release properties. Enhanced inhibition impaired the transmission of tonic sensory signals from the thalamus to the somatosensory cortex. Previous morphological studies showed an upregulation of NMDA receptors in the neocortex of both RTT patients and Mecp2-null mice at early ages [Blue ME, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Ann Neurol 45: 541-545, 1999; Blue ME, Kaufmann WE, Bressler J, Eyring C, O'Driscoll C, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294: 1624-1634, 2011]. Although AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission was not altered in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice, extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses increased markedly. These responses were blocked by memantine, suggesting that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of RTT. The results suggest that enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses may underlie impaired somatosensation and that pharmacological blockade of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors may have therapeutic value for RTT. PMID:26683074

  8. Dopamine D1 receptor inhibition of NMDA receptor currents mediated by tyrosine kinase-dependent receptor trafficking in neonatal rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Huaxia; Gibb, Alasdair J

    2008-01-01

    NMDA receptors are of particular importance in the control of synaptic strength and integration of synaptic activity. Dopamine receptor modulation of NMDA receptors in neonatal striatum may influence the efficacy of synaptic transmission in the cortico-striatal pathway and if so, this modulation will affect the behaviour of the basal ganglia network. Here, we show that in acute brain slices of neonatal (P7) rat striatum the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-82958 significantly decreases NMDA receptor currents in patch-clamp whole-cell recordings. This inhibition is not abolished by application of a G protein inhibitor (GDP-β-S) or irreversible G protein activator (GTP-γ-S) suggesting a G protein-independent mechanism. In addition, intracellular application of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (lavendustin A or PP2) abolished D1 inhibition of NMDA currents. In contrast, in older animals (P28) D1 receptor activation produces a potentiation of the NMDA response which suggests there is a developmental switch in D1 modulation of striatal NMDA receptors. Single-channel recordings show that direct D1 receptor inhibition of NMDA receptors cannot be observed in isolated membrane patches. We hypothesize that D1 inhibition in whole-cell recordings from neonatal rats may be mediated by a change in NMDA receptor trafficking. Consistent with this hypothesis, intracellular application of a dynamin inhibitory peptide (QVPSRPNRAP) abolished D1 inhibition of NMDA receptor currents. We therefore conclude that a tyrosine kinase-dependent alteration of NMDA receptor trafficking underlies D1 dopamine receptor-mediated down-regulation of NMDA receptor currents in medium spiny neurons of neonatal rat striatum. PMID:18703578

  9. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  10. NMDA Receptor-Mediated Activation of NADPH Oxidase and Glomerulosclerosis in Hyperhomocysteinemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun; Yi, Fan; Xia, Min; Boini, Krishna M.; Zhu, Qing; Laperle, Laura A.; Abais, Justine M.; Brimson, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the role of NMDA receptor in hyperhomocyteinemia (hHcys)-induced NADPH oxidase (Nox) activation and glomerulosclerosis. Sprague–Dawley rats were fed a folate-free (FF) diet to produce hHcys, and a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, was administrated. Rats fed the FF diet exhibited significantly increased plasma homocysteine levels, upregulated NMDA receptor expression, enhanced Nox activity and Nox-dependent O2.− production in the glomeruli, which were accompanied by remarkable glomerulosclerosis. MK-801 treatment significantly inhibited Nox-dependent O2.− production induced by hHcys and reduced glomerular damage index as compared with vehicle-treated hHcys rats. Correspondingly, glomerular deposition of extracellular matrix components in hHcys rats was ameliorated by the administration of MK-801. Additionally, hHcys induced an increase in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) expression and a decrease in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-9 activities, all of which were abolished by MK-801 treatment. In vitro studies showed that homocysteine increased Nox-dependent O2.− generation in rat mesangial cells, which was blocked by MK-801. Pretreatment with MK-801 also reversed homocysteine-induced decrease in MMP-1 activity and increase in TIMP-1 expression. These results support the view that the NMDA receptor may mediate Nox activation in the kidney during hHcys and thereby play a critical role in the development of hHcys-induced glomerulosclerosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 975–986. PMID:20406136

  11. Chronic alcohol remodels prefrontal neurons and disrupts NMDA receptor-mediated fear extinction encoding

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Paul J.; MacPherson, Kathryn P.; DeBrouse, Lauren; Colacicco, Giovanni; Flynn, Shaun M.; Masneuf, Sophie; Pleil, Kristen E.; Li, Chia; Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A.; Kash, Thomas L.; Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Camp, Marguerite

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism is frequently co-morbid with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but it is unclear how alcohol impacts neural circuits mediating recovery from trauma. We found that chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) impaired fear extinction and remodeled the dendritic arbor of medial prefrontal cortical (mPFC) neurons in mice. CIE impaired extinction encoding by infralimbic (IL) mPFC neurons in vivo, and functionally downregulated burst-mediating NMDA GluN1 receptors. These findings suggest alcohol may increase risk for trauma-related anxiety disorders by disrupting mPFC-mediated extinction of fear. PMID:22941108

  12. PSD-95 Uncouples Dopamine-Glutamate Interaction in the D1/PSD-95/NMDA Receptor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingping; Xu, Tai-Xiang; Hallett, Penelope J.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Grant, Seth G. N.; Isacson, Ole; Yao, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    Classical dopaminergic signaling paradigms and emerging studies on direct physical interactions between the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor and the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor predict a reciprocally facilitating, positive feedback loop. This loop, if not controlled, may cause concomitant overactivation of both D1 and NMDA receptors, triggering neurotoxicity. Endogenous protective mechanisms must exist. Here we show that PSD-95, a prototypical structural and signaling scaffold in the postsynaptic density, inhibits D1-NMDA receptor association and uncouples NMDA receptor-dependent enhancement of D1 signaling. This uncoupling is achieved, at least in part, via a disinhibition mechanism by which PSD-95 abolishes NMDA receptor-dependent inhibition of D1 internalization. Knockdown of PSD-95 immobilizes D1 receptors on the cell surface and escalates NMDA receptor-dependent D1 cAMP signaling in neurons. Thus, in addition to its role in receptor stabilization and synaptic plasticity, PSD-95 acts as a brake on the D1-NMDA receptor complex and dampens the interaction between them. PMID:19261890

  13. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  14. NMDA receptor mediates chronic visceral pain induced by neonatal noxious somatic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Adrian; Mickle, Aaron; Bruckert, Mitchell; Kannampalli, Pradeep; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDAR) are important in the development and maintenance of central sensitization. Our objective was to investigate the role of spinal neurons and NMDAR in the maintenance of chronic visceral pain. Neonatal rats were injected with acidic saline adjusted to pH4.0 in the gastrocnemius muscle every other day for 12 days. In adult rats, NR1 and NR2B subunits were examined in the lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal cord. A baseline, visceromotor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) was recorded before and after administration of the NMDA antagonist, CGS-19755. Extracellular recordings were performed from CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons and pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) before and after CGS-19755. Rats that received pH 4.0 saline injections demonstrated a significant increase in the expression NR2B subunits and VMR response to CRD >20mmHg. CGS-19755 (i.v. or i.t.) had no effect in naïve rats, but significantly decreased the response to CRD in pH4.0 saline injected rats. CGS-19755 had no effect on the spontaneous firing of SL-A, but decreased that of SL-S. Similarly, CGS-19755 attenuates the responses of SL-S neurons to CRD, but had no effect on SL-A neurons or on the response characteristics of PNA fibers. Neonatal noxious somatic stimulation results in chronic visceral hyperalgesia and sensitizes a specific subpopulation of CRD-sensitive spinal neurons. The sensitization of these SL-S spinal neurons is attenuated by the NMDAR antagonist. The results of this study suggest that spinal NMDARs play an important role in the development of hyperalgesia early in life. PMID:25281204

  15. PDZ protein interactions underlying NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and neuroprotection by PSD-95 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong; Hayashi, Amy; Sun, Hong-Shuo; Belmares, Michael P; Cobey, Carolyn; Phan, Thuymy; Schweizer, Johannes; Salter, Michael W; Wang, Yu Tian; Tasker, R Andrew; Garman, David; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Lu, Peter S; Tymianski, Michael

    2007-09-12

    In neuronal synapses, PDZ domains [postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95)/Discs large/zona occludens-1] of PSD-95 proteins interact with C termini of NMDA receptor [NMDAR (NR)] subunits, linking them to downstream neurotoxic signaling molecules. Perturbing NMDAR/PSD-95 interactions with a Tat peptide comprising the nine C-terminal residues of the NR2B subunit (Tat-NR2B9c) reduces neurons' vulnerability to excitotoxicity and ischemia. However, NR subunit C termini may bind many of >240 cellular PDZs, any of which could mediate neurotoxic signaling independently of PSD-95. Here, we performed a proteomic and biochemical analysis of the interactions of all known human PDZs with synaptic signaling proteins including NR1, NR2A-NR2D, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Tat-NR2B9c, whose interactions define PDZs involved in neurotoxic signaling, was also used. NR2A-NR2D subunits and Tat-NR2B9c had similar, highly specific, PDZ protein interactions, of which the strongest were with the PSD-95 family members (PSD-95, PSD-93, SAP97, and SAP102) and Tax interaction protein 1 (TIP1). The PSD-95 PDZ2 domain bound NR2A-NR2C subunits most strongly (EC50, approximately 1 microM), and fusing the NR2B C terminus to Tat enhanced its affinity for PSD-95 PDZ2 by >100-fold (EC50, approximately 7 nM). IC50 values for Tat-NR2B9c inhibiting NR2A-NR2C/PSD-95 interactions (approximately 1-10 microM) and nNOS/PSD-95 interactions (200 nM) confirmed the feasibility of such inhibition. To determine which of the PDZ interactions of Tat-NR2B9c mediate neuroprotection, one of PSD-95, PSD-93, SAP97, SAP102, TIP1, or nNOS expression was inhibited in cortical neurons exposed to NMDA toxicity. Only neurons lacking PSD-95 or nNOS but not PSD-93, SAP97, SAP102, or TIP1 exhibited reduced excitotoxic vulnerability. Thus, despite the ubiquitousness of PDZ domain-containing proteins, PSD-95 and nNOS above any other PDZ proteins are keys in effecting NMDAR-dependent excitotoxicity. Consequently, PSD-95

  16. In adult female hamsters hypothyroidism stimulates D1 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroidism affects cardiopulmonary regulation and function of dopaminergic receptors. Here we evaluated effects of 5 months of hypothyroidism on dopamine D1 receptor modulation of breathing in female hamsters using a D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Euthyroid hamsters (EH) served as controls. Results indicated that hypothyroid female hamsters (HH) exhibited decreased body weights and minute ventilation (VE) following hypoxia due to decreased frequency of breathing (F). Moreover, SCH 23390 administration in HH increased VE by increasing tidal volume during exposure to air, hypoxia and following hypoxia. Relative to vehicle, SCH 23390 treatment decreased body temperature and hypoxic VE responsiveness in both groups. In EH, SCH 23390 decreased F in air, hypoxia and post hypoxia, and VE during hypoxia trended to decrease (P=0.053). Finally, expression of D1 receptor protein was not different between the two groups in any region evaluated. Thus, hypothyroidism in older female hamsters affected D1 receptor modulation of ventilation differently relative to euthyroid animals, but not expression of D1 receptors. PMID:26232642

  17. Peripheral NMDA Receptors Mediate Antidromic Nerve Stimulation-Induced Tactile Hypersensitivity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun Ho; Nam, Taick Sang; Jun, Jaebeom; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of peripheral NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in antidromic nerve stimulation-induced tactile hypersensitivity outside the skin area innervated by stimulated nerve. Tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) of the decentralized L5 spinal nerve, which induced enlargement of plasma extravasation, resulted in tactile hypersensitivity in the L4 plantar dermatome of the hind-paw. When intraplantar (i.pl.) injection was administered into the L4 dermatome before ES, NMDAR and group-I metabotropic Glu receptor (mGluR) antagonists and group-II mGluR agonist but not AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. I.pl. injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors also prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. When the same injections were administered after establishment of ES-induced hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity was partially reduced by NMDAR antagonist only. In naïve animals, i.pl. Glu injection into the L4 dermatome induced tactile hypersensitivity, which was blocked by NMDAR antagonist and PKA and PKC inhibitors. These results suggest that the peripheral release of Glu, induced by antidromic nerve stimulation, leads to the expansion of tactile hypersensitive skin probably via nociceptor sensitization spread due to the diffusion of Glu into the skin near the release site. In addition, intracellular PKA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms mediated mainly by NMDAR activation are involved in Glu-induced nociceptor sensitization and subsequent hypersensitivity. PMID:26770021

  18. NMDA Receptors Mediate Stimulus-Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Neural Synchrony in the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Stefanescu, Roxana A.; Shore, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory information relayed by auditory nerve fibers and somatosensory information relayed by granule cell parallel fibers converge on the fusiform cells (FCs) of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the first brain station of the auditory pathway. In vitro, parallel fiber synapses on FCs exhibit spike-timing-dependent plasticity with Hebbian learning rules, partially mediated by the NMDA receptor (NMDAr). Well-timed bimodal auditory-somatosensory stimulation, in vivo equivalent of spike-timing-dependent plasticity, can induce stimulus-timing-dependent plasticity (StTDP) of the FCs spontaneous and tone-evoked firing rates. In healthy guinea pigs, the resulting distribution of StTDP learning rules across a FC neural population is dominated by a Hebbian profile while anti-Hebbian, suppressive and enhancing LRs are less frequent. In this study, we investigate in vivo, the NMDAr contribution to FC baseline activity and long term plasticity. We find that blocking the NMDAr decreases the synchronization of FC- spontaneous activity and mediates differential modulation of FC rate-level functions such that low, and high threshold units are more likely to increase, and decrease, respectively, their maximum amplitudes. Three significant alterations in mean learning-rule profiles were identified: transitions from an initial Hebbian profile towards (1) an anti-Hebbian; (2) a suppressive profile; and (3) transitions from an anti-Hebbian to a Hebbian profile. FC units preserving their learning rules showed instead, NMDAr-dependent plasticity to unimodal acoustic stimulation, with persistent depression of tone-evoked responses changing to persistent enhancement following the NMDAr antagonist. These results reveal a crucial role of the NMDAr in mediating FC baseline activity and long-term plasticity which have important implications for signal processing and auditory pathologies related to maladaptive plasticity of dorsal cochlear nucleus circuitry. PMID:26622224

  19. Glucocorticoid receptor mediated the propofol self-administration by dopamine D1 receptor in nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binbin; Liang, Yuyuan; Dong, Zhanglei; Chen, Zhichuan; Zhang, Gaolong; Lin, Wenxuan; Wang, Sicong; Wang, Benfu; Ge, Ren-Shan; Lian, Qingquan

    2016-07-22

    Propofol, a widely used anesthetic, can cause addictive behaviors in both human and experimental animals. In the present study, we examined the involvement of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in the molecular process by which propofol may cause addiction. The propofol self-administration model was established by a fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule of reinforced dosing over successive 14days in rats. On day 15, the rats were treated with dexamethasone, a GR agonist (10-100μg/kg), or RU486, a GR antagonist (10-100μg/kg) at 1h prior to the last training. The animal behaviors were recorded automatically by the computer. The expression of dopamine D1 receptor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was examined by Western blot and the concentrations of plasma corticosterone were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To further examine the specificity of GR in the process, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, spironolactone, and dexamethasone plus MR agonist, aldosterone, were also tested. Administration of dexamethasone (100μg/kg) or RU486 (⩾10mg/kg) significantly attenuated the rate of propofol maintained active nose-poke responses and infusions, which were accompanied by reductions in both plasma corticosterone level and the expression of D1 receptor in the NAc. Neither spironolactone alone nor dexamethasone combined with aldosterone affected the propofol-maintaining self-administrative behavior, indicating GR, but not MR, modulates the propofol reward in rats. In addition, neither the food-maintaining sucrose responses under FR1 schedule nor the locomotor activity was affected by any doses of dexamethasone or RU486 tested. These findings provide evidence that GR signaling may play an important role in propofol reward. PMID:27126557

  20. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  1. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A.; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J.; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P.; Zhu, J. Julius

    2015-01-01

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE. PMID:26220996

  2. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P; Stornetta, Ruth L; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P; Zhu, J Julius

    2015-07-15

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE. PMID:26220996

  3. Olfactory Bulb Glomerular NMDA Receptors Mediate Olfactory Nerve Potentiation and Odor Preference Learning in the Neonate Rat

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Carolyn W.; Yuan, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Rat pup odor preference learning follows pairing of bulbar beta-adrenoceptor activation with olfactory input. We hypothesize that NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated olfactory input to mitral cells is enhanced during training, such that increased calcium facilitates and shapes the critical cAMP pattern. Here, we demonstrate, in vitro, that olfactory nerve stimulation, at sniffing frequencies, paired with beta-adrenoceptor activation, potentiates olfactory nerve-evoked mitral cell firing. This potentiation is blocked by a NMDAR antagonist and by increased inhibition. Glomerular dishinhibtion also induces NMDAR-sensitive potentiation. In vivo, in parallel, behavioral learning is prevented by glomerular infusion of an NMDAR antagonist or a GABAA receptor agonist. A glomerular GABAA receptor antagonist paired with odor can induce NMDAR-dependent learning. The NMDA GluN1 subunit is phosphorylated in odor-specific glomeruli within 5 min of training suggesting early activation, and enhanced calcium entry, during acquisition. The GluN1 subunit is down-regulated 3 h after learning; and at 24 h post-training the GluN2B subunit is down-regulated. These events may assist memory stability. Ex vivo experiments using bulbs from trained rat pups reveal an increase in the AMPA/NMDA EPSC ratio post-training, consistent with an increase in AMPA receptor insertion and/or the decrease in NMDAR subunits. These results support a model of a cAMP/NMDA interaction in generating rat pup odor preference learning. PMID:22496886

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5, but not 1, modulates NMDA receptor-mediated activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-03-01

    In cerebellar neurons in culture, activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) prevents glutamate and NMDA-induced neuronal death, indicating that it interferes with the excitotoxic mechanisms leading to death. However, it is not known which step of these mechanisms is affected by mGluRs. The aims of this work were to assess: (a) whether activation of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 or mGluR5) impairs NMDA-induced activation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway; (b) which mGluR (1 or 5) is responsible for this impairment and (c) whether impairment of the pathway occurs at the level of activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by nitric oxide or of activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by NMDA. It is shown that activation of mGluR1 enhances the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by increasing activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by nitric oxide. In contrast, mGluR5 activation inhibits the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by reducing NMDA-induced activation of nNOS. This is due to reduced NMDA-induced increase in cAMP, reduced activation of Akt by cAMP and of nNOS by Akt. The impairment of activation of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway by activation of mGluR5 would contribute to its neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in cerebellar neurons in culture. PMID:20043967

  5. Dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors mediate the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide and MDMA/ecstasy on memory retrieval in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Marzieh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    A combination of cannabis and ecstasy may change the cognitive functions more than either drug alone. The present study was designed to investigate the possible involvement of dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors in the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) and ecstasy/MDMA on memory retrieval. Adult male Wistar rats were cannulated into the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) and memory retrieval was examined using the step-through type of passive avoidance task. Intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective CB1 receptor agonist, ACPA (0.5-4ng/rat) immediately before the testing phase (pre-test), but not after the training phase (post-training), impaired memory retrieval. In addition, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of MDMA (0.5-1μg/rat) dose-dependently decreased step-through latency, indicating an amnesic effect of the drug by itself. Interestingly, pre-test microinjection of a higher dose of MDMA into the CA1 regions significantly improved ACPA-induced memory impairment. Moreover, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, D-AP5 (1 and 2μg/rat) inhibited the reversal effect of MDMA on the impairment of memory retrieval induced by ACPA. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of D-AP5 had no effect on memory retrieval alone. These findings suggest that ACPA or MDMA consumption can induce memory retrieval impairment, while their co-administration improves this amnesic effect through interacting with hippocampal glutamatergic-NMDA receptor mechanism. Thus, it seems that the tendency to abuse cannabis with ecstasy may be for avoiding cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26612394

  6. Spinal D1-like dopamine receptors modulate NMDA receptor-induced hyperexcitability and NR1 subunit phosphorylation at serine 889.

    PubMed

    Aira, Zigor; Barrenetxea, Teresa; Buesa, Itsaso; Martínez, Endika; Azkue, Jon Jatsu

    2016-04-01

    Activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in dorsal horn neurons is recognized as a fundamental mechanism of central sensitization and pathologic pain. This study assessed the influence of dopaminergic, D1-like receptor-mediated input to the spinal dorsal horn on NMDAR function. PMID:26957228

  7. Facilitation of AMPA receptor-mediated steady-state current by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in supraoptic magnocellular neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yoon Hyoung; Lim, Chae Seong; Park, Kyung-Ah; Cho, Hyun Sil; Lee, Gyu-Seung; Shin, Yong Sup; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Yoon, Seok Hwa; Park, Jin Bong

    2016-07-01

    In addition to classical synaptic transmission, information is transmitted between cells via the activation of extrasynaptic receptors that generate persistent tonic current in the brain. While growing evidence supports the presence of tonic NMDA current (INMDA) generated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (eNMDARs), the functional significance of tonic INMDA in various brain regions remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that activation of eNMDARs that generate INMDA facilitates the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate receptor (AMPAR)-mediated steady-state current in supraoptic nucleus (SON) magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs). In low-Mg(2+) artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), glutamate induced an inward shift in Iho lding (IGLU) at a holding potential (Vholding) of -70 mV which was partly blocked by an AMPAR antagonist, NBQX. NBQX-sensitive IGLU was observed even in normal aCSF at Vholding of -40 mV or -20 mV. IGLU was completely abolished by pretreatment with an NMDAR blocker, AP5, under all tested conditions. AMPA induced a reproducible inward shift in Iholding (IAMPA) in SON MNCs. Pretreatment with AP5 attenuated IAMPA amplitudes to ~60% of the control levels in low-Mg(2+) aCSF, but not in normal aCSF at Vholding of -70 mV. IAMPA attenuation by AP5 was also prominent in normal aCSF at depolarized holding potentials. Memantine, an eNMDAR blocker, mimicked the AP5-induced IAMPA attenuation in SON MNCs. Finally, chronic dehydration did not affect IAMPA attenuation by AP5 in the neurons. These results suggest that tonic INMDA, mediated by eNMDAR, facilitates AMPAR function, changing the postsynaptic response to its agonists in normal and osmotically challenged SON MNCs. PMID:27382359

  8. Facilitation of AMPA receptor-mediated steady-state current by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in supraoptic magnocellular neurosecretory cells

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yoon Hyoung; Lim, Chae Seong; Park, Kyung-Ah; Cho, Hyun Sil; Lee, Gyu-Seung; Shin, Yong Sup; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In addition to classical synaptic transmission, information is transmitted between cells via the activation of extrasynaptic receptors that generate persistent tonic current in the brain. While growing evidence supports the presence of tonic NMDA current (INMDA) generated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (eNMDARs), the functional significance of tonic INMDA in various brain regions remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that activation of eNMDARs that generate INMDA facilitates the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate receptor (AMPAR)-mediated steady-state current in supraoptic nucleus (SON) magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs). In low-Mg2+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), glutamate induced an inward shift in Iholding (IGLU) at a holding potential (Vholding) of –70 mV which was partly blocked by an AMPAR antagonist, NBQX. NBQX-sensitive IGLU was observed even in normal aCSF at Vholding of –40 mV or –20 mV. IGLU was completely abolished by pretreatment with an NMDAR blocker, AP5, under all tested conditions. AMPA induced a reproducible inward shift in Iholding (IAMPA) in SON MNCs. Pretreatment with AP5 attenuated IAMPA amplitudes to ~60% of the control levels in low-Mg2+ aCSF, but not in normal aCSF at Vholding of –70 mV. IAMPA attenuation by AP5 was also prominent in normal aCSF at depolarized holding potentials. Memantine, an eNMDAR blocker, mimicked the AP5-induced IAMPA attenuation in SON MNCs. Finally, chronic dehydration did not affect IAMPA attenuation by AP5 in the neurons. These results suggest that tonic INMDA, mediated by eNMDAR, facilitates AMPAR function, changing the postsynaptic response to its agonists in normal and osmotically challenged SON MNCs. PMID:27382359

  9. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Wetsel, William C.; Caron, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. While it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, an understanding of the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum is not well understood. Here we use knockout (KO) mouse models to examine the regulation of striatal ERK1/2 signaling by behaviorally relevant doses of cannabinoids. This cellular pathway has been implicated as a central mediator of drug reward and synaptic plasticity. In C57BL/6J mice, acute administration of cannabinoid agonists, HU-210 and Δ9-THC, promotes a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal striatum. Co-administration of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) antagonist AM251 with HU-210 prevents ERK1/2 inactivation, indicating a requirement for activation of this receptor. In dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) KO animals treated with HU-210, the magnitude of the HU-210-dependent decrease in striatal ERK1/2 signaling is greater than in wild-type controls. In contrast, the HU-210 administration to NMDA receptor knockdown mice (NR1-Kd) was ineffective at promoting striatal ERK1/2 inactivation. Genetic deletion of other potential ERK1/2 mediators, the dopamine D2 receptors (D2R)s or βarrestin-1 or -2, did not affect HU-210-induced modulation of ERK1/2 signaling in the striatum. These results support the hypothesis that dopamine D1 receptors and NMDA receptors act in an opposite manner to regulate striatal CB1R signal transduction. PMID:22034973

  10. D1 Dopamine Receptor-Mediated LTP at GABA Synapses Encodes Motivation to Self-Administer Cocaine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Michal; Mason, Xenos; DeBacker, Julian; Sharma, Robyn; Normandeau, Catherine P.; Hawken, Emily R.; Di Prospero, Cynthia; Chiang, Cindy; Martinez, Audrey; Jones, Andrea A.; Doudnikoff, Évelyne; Caille, Stephanie; Bézard, Erwan; Georges, François; Dumont, Éric C.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced motivation to take drugs is a central characteristic of addiction, yet the neural underpinning of this maladaptive behavior is still largely unknown. Here, we report a D1-like dopamine receptor (DRD1)-mediated long-term potentiation of GABAA-IPSCs (D1-LTPGABA) in the oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis that was positively correlated with motivation to self-administer cocaine in rats. Likewise, in vivo intra-oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis DRD1 pharmacological blockade reduced lever pressing for cocaine more effectively in rats showing enhanced motivation toward cocaine. D1-LTPGABA resulted from enhanced function and expression of G-protein-independent DRD1 coupled to c-Src tyrosine kinases and required local release of neurotensin. There was no D1-LTPGABA in rats that self-administered sucrose, in those with limited cocaine self-administration experience, or in those that received cocaine passively (yoked). Therefore, our study reveals a novel neurophysiological mechanism contributing to individual motivation to self-administer cocaine, a critical psychobiological element of compulsive drug use and addiction. PMID:23864683

  11. D1 dopamine receptor-mediated LTP at GABA synapses encodes motivation to self-administer cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Michal; Mason, Xenos; DeBacker, Julian; Sharma, Robyn; Normandeau, Catherine P; Hawken, Emily R; Di Prospero, Cynthia; Chiang, Cindy; Martinez, Audrey; Jones, Andrea A; Doudnikoff, Évelyne; Caille, Stephanie; Bézard, Erwan; Georges, François; Dumont, Éric C

    2013-07-17

    Enhanced motivation to take drugs is a central characteristic of addiction, yet the neural underpinning of this maladaptive behavior is still largely unknown. Here, we report a D1-like dopamine receptor (DRD1)-mediated long-term potentiation of GABAA-IPSCs (D1-LTPGABA) in the oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis that was positively correlated with motivation to self-administer cocaine in rats. Likewise, in vivo intra-oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis DRD1 pharmacological blockade reduced lever pressing for cocaine more effectively in rats showing enhanced motivation toward cocaine. D1-LTPGABA resulted from enhanced function and expression of G-protein-independent DRD1 coupled to c-Src tyrosine kinases and required local release of neurotensin. There was no D1-LTPGABA in rats that self-administered sucrose, in those with limited cocaine self-administration experience, or in those that received cocaine passively (yoked). Therefore, our study reveals a novel neurophysiological mechanism contributing to individual motivation to self-administer cocaine, a critical psychobiological element of compulsive drug use and addiction. PMID:23864683

  12. The D1 receptor-mediated effects of the ergoline derivative LEK-8829 in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, M.; Sprah, L.; Sket, D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Previous experiments have suggested a potential atypical antipsychotic activity of the ergoline derivative LEK-8829. In vitro experiments showed a high affinity to 5-HT1A, 5-HT2 and D2 receptors (the ratio of pKi values 5-HT2/D2 = 1.11) and a moderate affinity to D1 receptors. In vivo experiments showed antagonism of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor-linked behaviours. 2. In the present study, the rats with unilateral dopaminergic deafferentation of the striatum, induced by the lesion of the median forebrain bundle with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), were used to determine the effects of LEK-8829 on turning behaviour and on striatal c-fos mRNA levels. 3. The administration of LEK-8829 induced a long lasting contralateral turning behaviour that was dose-dependent. It was found that the specific D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390 but not the D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol or 5-HT1A antagonist pindolol, dose-dependently inhibited the turning behaviour induced by LEK-8829. 4. In an attempt to clarify the D1:D2 receptor interactions involved in the action of LEK-8829 in the 6OHDA model, we used in situ hybridization histochemistry to compare the effect of SCH-23390 pretreatment on striatal c-fos mRNA expression induced either by LEK-8829 or by the typical antipsychotic haloperidol. 5. LEK-8829 induced a bilateral striatal c-fos mRNA expression that was significantly higher in the denervated striatum as compared to the intact striatum and was completely blocked on both sides by pretreatment with SCH-23390. In contrast, haloperidol-induced striatal c-fos mRNA expression was limited to the innervated striatum and was not blocked by SCH-23390. 6. Our data demonstrate an intrinsic activity of LEK-8829 on D1 receptors that is potentiated in the dopamine-depleted striatum. We conclude, therefore, that the putative atypical antipsychotic LEK-8829 may prove useful as an experimental tool for the study of D1:D2 receptor interactions and could have beneficial

  13. Methamphetamine blunts Ca(2+) currents and excitatory synaptic transmission through D1/5 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    González, Betina; Rivero-Echeto, Celeste; Muñiz, Javier A; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J; Bisagno, Verónica

    2016-05-01

    Psychostimulant addiction is associated with dysfunctions in frontal cortex. Previous data demonstrated that repeated exposure to methamphetamine (METH) can alter prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent functions. Here, we show that withdrawal from repetitive non-contingent METH administration (7 days, 1 mg/kg) depressed voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa ) and increased hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH ) amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in deep-layer pyramidal mPFC neurons. Most of these effects were blocked by systemic co-administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.5 and 0.05 mg/kg). In vitro METH (i.e. bath-applied to slices from naïve-treated animals) was able to emulate its systemic effects on ICa and evoked EPSCs paired-pulse ratio. We also provide evidence of altered mRNA expression of (1) voltage-gated calcium channels P/Q-type Cacna1a (Cav 2.1), N-type Cacna1b (Cav 2.2), T-type Cav 3.1 Cacna1g, Cav 3.2 Cacna1h, Cav 3.3 Cacna1i and the auxiliary subunit Cacna2d1 (α2δ1); (2) hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels Hcn1 and Hcn2; and (3) glutamate receptors subunits AMPA-type Gria1, NMDA-type Grin1 and metabotropic Grm1 in the mouse mPFC after repeated METH treatment. Moreover, we show that some of these changes in mRNA expression were sensitive D1/5 receptor blockade. Altogether, these altered mechanisms affecting synaptic physiology and transcriptional regulation may underlie PFC functional alterations that could lead to PFC impairments observed in METH-addicted individuals. PMID:25871318

  14. Bisphenol-A rapidly promotes dynamic changes in hippocampal dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaohong Ye Yinping; Li Tao; Chen Lei; Tian Dong; Luo Qingqing; Lu Mei

    2010-12-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is known to be a potent endocrine disrupter. Evidence is emerging that estrogen exerts a rapid influence on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and the dendritic spine density, which requires activation of NMDA receptors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BPA (ranging from 1 to 1000 nM), focusing on the rapid dynamic changes in dendritic filopodia and the expressions of estrogen receptor (ER) {beta} and NMDA receptor, as well as the phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the cultured hippocampal neurons. A specific ER antagonist ICI 182,780 was used to examine the potential involvement of ERs. The results demonstrated that exposure to BPA (ranging from 10 to 1000 nM) for 30 min rapidly enhanced the motility and the density of dendritic filopodia in the cultured hippocampal neurons, as well as the phosphorylation of NR2B (pNR2B), though the expressions of NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2B, and ER{beta} were not changed. The antagonist of ERs completely inhibited the BPA-induced increases in the filopodial motility and the number of filopodia extending from dendrites. The increased pNR2B induced by BPA (100 nM) was also completely eliminated. Furthermore, BPA attenuated the effects of 17{beta}-estradiol (17{beta}-E{sub 2}) on the dendritic filopodia outgrowth and the expression of pNR2B when BPA was co-treated with 17{beta}-E{sub 2}. The present results suggest that BPA, like 17{beta}-E{sub 2}, rapidly results in the enhanced motility and density of dendritic filopodia in the cultured hippocampal neurons with the concomitant activation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B via an ER-mediated signaling pathway. Meanwhile, BPA suppressed the enhancement effects of 17{beta}-E{sub 2} when it coexists with 17{beta}-E{sub 2}. These results provided important evidence suggesting the neurotoxicity of the low levels of BPA during the early postnatal development of the brain.

  15. MMP-9- and NMDA receptor-mediated mechanism of diabetic renovascular remodeling and kidney dysfunction: hydrogen sulfide is a key modulator

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Sourav; Pushpakumar, Sathnur B.; Sen, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in diabetic kidney. Induction of NMDA-R and dysregulation of connexins (Cxs) were also observed. We concluded that this was due to decreased H2S production by down regulation of CBS and CSE enzymes. However, the potential role of H2S to mitigate ECM dysregulation and renal dysfunction was not clearly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine whether H2S supplementation reduces MMP-9-induced ECM remodeling and dysfunction in diabetic kidney. Wild type (C57BL/6J), diabetic (Akita, C57BL/6J-Ins2Akita), MMP-9 knockout (MMP-9−/− , M9KO) and double KO of Akita/MMP-9−/− (DKO) mice were treated without or with 0.05 g/L of NaHS (as a source of H2S) in drinking water for 30 days. Decreased tissue production and plasma content of H2S in Akita mice were ameliorated with H2S supplementation. Dysregulated expression of MMP-9, CBS, CSE, NMDA-R1 and Cxs-40, -43 were also normalized in Akita mice treated with H2S. In addition, increased renovascular resistive index (RI), ECM deposition, plasma creatinine, and diminished renal vascular density and cortical blood flow in Akita mice were normalized with H2S treatment. We conclude that diminished H2S production in renal tissue and plasma levels in diabetes mediates adverse renal remodeling, and H2S therapy improves renal function through MMP-9- and NMDA-R1-mediated pathway. PMID:25659756

  16. Rapastinel (GLYX-13) has therapeutic potential for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: Characterization of a NMDA receptor-mediated metaplasticity process in the medial prefrontal cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Kroes, Roger A; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Gross, Amanda L; Schmidt, Mary; Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F; Burch, Ronald M; Stanton, Patric K; Moskal, Joseph R

    2015-11-01

    depression models, PEL, and most importantly on CFE demonstrate the therapeutic potential of rapastinel for the treatment of PTSD. Moreover, rapastinel appears to elicit its therapeutic effects through a NMDA receptor-mediated, LTP-like, metaplasticity process in the MPFC. PMID:26210936

  17. Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Transmission Maintains Information Flow Through the Cortico-Striato-Entopeduncular Direct Pathway to Release Movements

    PubMed Central

    Chiken, Satomi; Sato, Asako; Ohta, Chikara; Kurokawa, Makoto; Arai, Satoshi; Maeshima, Jun; Sunayama-Morita, Tomoko; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Nambu, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    In the basal ganglia (BG), dopamine plays a pivotal role in motor control, and dopamine deficiency results in severe motor dysfunctions as seen in Parkinson's disease. According to the well-accepted model of the BG, dopamine activates striatal direct pathway neurons that directly project to the output nuclei of the BG through D1 receptors (D1Rs), whereas dopamine inhibits striatal indirect pathway neurons that project to the external pallidum (GPe) through D2 receptors. To clarify the exact role of dopaminergic transmission via D1Rs in vivo, we developed novel D1R knockdown mice in which D1Rs can be conditionally and reversibly regulated. Suppression of D1R expression by doxycycline treatment decreased spontaneous motor activity and impaired motor ability in the mice. Neuronal activity in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), one of the output nuclei of the rodent BG, was recorded in awake conditions to examine the mechanism of motor deficits. Cortically evoked inhibition in the EPN mediated by the cortico-striato-EPN direct pathway was mostly lost during suppression of D1R expression, whereas spontaneous firing rates and patterns remained unchanged. On the other hand, GPe activity changed little. These results suggest that D1R-mediated dopaminergic transmission maintains the information flow through the direct pathway to appropriately release motor actions. PMID:26443442

  18. AMPA/Kainate, NMDA, and Dopamine D1 Receptor Function in the Nucleus Accumbens Core: A Context-Limited Role in the Encoding and Consolidation of Instrumental Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Pepe J.; Andrzejewski, Matthew E.; Sadeghian, Kenneth; Panksepp, Jules B.; Kelley, Ann E.

    2005-01-01

    Neural integration of glutamate- and dopamine-coded signals within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a fundamental process governing cellular plasticity underlying reward-related learning. Intra-NAc core blockade of NMDA or D1 receptors in rats impairs instrumental learning (lever-pressing for sugar pellets), but it is not known during which phase of…

  19. NR2A/B-containing NMDA receptors mediate cocaine-induced synaptic plasticity in the VTA and cocaine psychomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Johanna; Matzner, Henry; Michaeli, Avner; Yaka, Rami

    2009-09-18

    Cocaine-induced modifications of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the mesolimbic system play a key role in adaptations that promote addictive behaviors. In particular, the activation of ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is critical for both cocaine-induced synaptic plasticity induced by a single cocaine injection and for the initiation of cocaine psychomotor sensitization. In this study, we set to determine whether the NR2 subunits of the NMDAR play a specific role in triggering cocaine-induced alterations in synaptic plasticity and the development of psychomotor sensitization. We found that inhibition of NR2A-containing NMDARs by NVP-AAM077, or NR2B-containing receptors by ifenprodil, blocked cocaine-induced increase in the AMPAR/NMDAR currents ratio, a measure of long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo, in VTA neurons 24h following a single cocaine injection. Furthermore, inhibition of the NR2A subunit during the development of psychomotor sensitization attenuated the enhanced locomotor activity following repeated cocaine injections. Together, these results suggest that NR2-containing NMDA receptors play an important role in the machinery that triggers synaptic and behavioral adaptations to drugs of abuse such as cocaine. PMID:19524640

  20. Chemokine CCL2 enhances NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic current in rat hippocampal slices-a potential mechanism for HIV-1-associated neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Tang, Hongmei; Xiong, Huangui

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected mononuclear phagocytes (brain macrophages and microglial cells) release proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Elevated levels of chemokine CC motif ligand 2 (CCL2, known previously as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) have been detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV-1-infected individuals and the raised CCL2 in the CSF correlates with HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. To understand how elevated CCL2 induces HIV-1-associated neuropathy, we studied effects of CCL2 on excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSCs) in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal brain slices using whole-cell patch recording techniques. The AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated EPSC (EPSCAMPAR) and N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR)-mediated EPSCs (EPSCNMDAR) were isolated pharmacologically. Bath application of CCL2 produced a significant enhancement of the amplitudes of EPSCs, EPSCAMPAR and EPSCNMDAR. Further studies revealed that CCL2 potentiated NMDAR subtype NR2A-mediated EPSC (EPSCNR2AR) and NR2B-mediated EPSC (EPSCNR2BR). To determine the site of action, we recorded spontaneous mini EPSCs (mEPSC) before and during bath application of CCL2. Our results showed that CCL2 decreased inter event interval (IEI) and increased the frequency of mEPSCs without change on the amplitude, suggesting a presynaptic site of CCL2 action. CCL2 was also found to injure primary rat hippocampal neuronal cultures and neuronal dendrites in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices. The CCL2-associated neuronal and dendritic injuries were blocked by a specific NMDAR antagonist or by a CCR2 receptor antagonist, indicating that CCL2-associated neural injury was mediated via NMDARs and/or CCR2 receptors. Taken together, these results suggest a potential role CCL2 may play in HIV-1-associated neuropathology. PMID:26968849

  1. Segregation and crosstalk of D1 receptor-mediated activation of ERK in striatal medium spiny neurons upon acute administration of psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Eriksson, Olivia; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren

    2014-01-01

    The convergence of corticostriatal glutamate and dopamine from the midbrain in the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN) triggers synaptic plasticity that underlies reinforcement learning and pathological conditions such as psychostimulant addiction. The increase in striatal dopamine produced by the acute administration of psychostimulants has been found to activate not only effectors of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade such as GluR1, but also effectors of the NMDAR/Ca(2+)/RAS cascade such as ERK. The dopamine-triggered effects on both these cascades are mediated by D1R coupled to Golf but while the phosphorylation of GluR1 is affected by reductions in the available amount of Golf but not of D1R, the activation of ERK follows the opposite pattern. This segregation is puzzling considering that D1R-induced Golf activation monotonically increases with DA and that there is crosstalk from the AC5/cAMP/PKA cascade to the NMDAR/Ca(2+)/RAS cascade via a STEP (a tyrosine phosphatase). In this work, we developed a signaling model which accounts for this segregation based on the assumption that a common pool of D1R and Golf is distributed in two D1R/Golf signaling compartments. This model integrates a relatively large amount of experimental data for neurons in vivo and in vitro. We used it to explore the crosstalk topologies under which the sensitivities of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade to reductions in D1R or Golf are transferred or not to the activation of ERK. We found that the sequestration of STEP by its substrate ERK together with the insensitivity of STEP activity on targets upstream of ERK (i.e. Fyn and NR2B) to PKA phosphorylation are able to explain the experimentally observed segregation. This model provides a quantitative framework for simulation based experiments to study signaling required for long term potentiation in MSNs. PMID:24499932

  2. D1 receptor-mediated inhibition of medial prefrontal cortex neurons is disrupted in adult rats exposed to amphetamine in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Paul, K; Hankosky, E R; Cox, C L; Gulley, J M

    2016-06-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) exposure leads to changes in behavior and dopamine receptor function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since dopamine plays an important role in regulating GABAergic transmission in the PFC, we investigated if AMPH exposure induces long-lasting changes in dopamine's ability to modulate inhibitory transmission in the PFC as well as whether the effects of AMPH differed depending on the age of exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given saline or 3 mg/kg AMPH (i.p.) repeatedly during adolescence or adulthood and following a withdrawal period of up to 5 weeks (Experiment 1) or up to 14 weeks (Experiment 2), they were sacrificed for in vitro whole-cell recordings in layer V/VI of the medial PFC. We found that in brain slices from either adolescent- or adult-exposed rats, there was an attenuation of dopamine-induced increases in inhibitory synaptic currents in pyramidal cells. These effects did not depend on age of exposure, were mediated at least partially by a reduced sensitivity of D1 receptors in AMPH-treated rats, and were associated with an enhanced behavioral response to the drug in a separate group of rats given an AMPH challenge following the longest withdrawal period. Together, these data reveal a prolonged effect of AMPH exposure on medial PFC function that persisted for up to 14 weeks in adolescent-exposed animals. These long-lasting neurophysiological changes may be a contributing mechanism to the behavioral consequences that have been observed in those with a history of amphetamine abuse. PMID:26946269

  3. CHANGES IN LEVELS OF D1, D2, OR NMDA RECEPTORS DURING WITHDRAWAL FROM BRIEF OR EXTENDED DAILY ACCESS TO IV COCAINE

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shahar, Osnat; Keeley, Patrick; Cook, Mariana; Brake, Wayne; Joyce, Megan; Nyffeler, Myriel; Heston, Rebecca; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported that brief (1 hr), but not extended (6 hrs), daily access to cocaine results in a sensitized locomotor response to cocaine and in elevated c-Fos immunoreactivity and DAT binding in the nucleus accumbens (N.Acc) core. In order to better our understanding of the neural adaptations mediating the transition from controlled drug-use to addiction, the current experiments were set to further explore the neural adaptations resulting from these two access conditions. Rats received either brief daily access to saline or cocaine, or brief daily access followed by extended daily access, to cocaine. Subjects were then sacrificed either 20 minutes, or 14 or 60 days, after the last self-administration session. Samples of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), N.Acc core and shell, dorsal striatum, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were taken for analysis of D1 ([3H]SCH-23390), D2 ([3H]Spiperone), and NMDA ([3H]MK-801) receptor binding (using the method of receptor autoradiography). At 20 minutes into withdrawal D2 receptors were elevated and NMDA receptors were reduced in the mPFC of the brief access animals while D1 receptors were elevated in the N.Acc shell of the extended access animals, compared to saline controls. D2 receptors were reduced in the N.Acc shell of the brief access animals compared to saline controls after 14 days, and compared to extended access animals after 60 days of withdrawal. In summary, extended access to cocaine resulted in only transient changes in D1 receptors binding. These results suggest that the development of compulsive drug use is largely unrelated to changes in total binding of D2 or NMDA receptors. PMID:17161392

  4. NMDA and D1 receptors are involved in one-trial tolerance to the anxiolytic-like effects of diazepam in the elevated plus maze test in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heng; Yu, Cheng-Long; Wang, Li-Ping; Yang, Yue-Xiong; Mao, Rong-Rong; Zhou, Qi-Xin; Xu, Lin

    2015-08-01

    The elevated plus maze (EPM) test is used to examine anxiety-like behaviors in rodents. One interesting phenomenon in the EPM test is one-trial tolerance (OTT), which refers to the reduction in the anxiolytic-like effects of benzodiazepines when rodents are re-exposed to the EPM. However, the underlying mechanism of OTT is still unclear. In this study, we reported that OTT occurred when re-exposure to the EPM (trial 2) only depended on the prior experience of the EPM (trial 1) rather than diazepam treatment. This process was memory-dependent, as it was prevented by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors antagonist MK-801 1.5h before trial 2. In addition, OTT was maintained for at least one week but was partially abolished after an interval of 28 days. Furthermore, the administration of the D1-like receptors agonist SKF38393 to the bilateral dorsal hippocampus largely prevented OTT, as demonstrated by the ability of the diazepam treatment to produce significant anxiolytic-like effects in trial 2 after a one-day interval. These findings suggest that OTT to the EPM test may occur via the activation of NMDA receptors and the inactivation of D1-like receptors in certain brain regions, including the hippocampus. PMID:26004015

  5. Methylphenidate Enhances NMDA-Receptor Response in Medial Prefrontal Cortex via Sigma-1 Receptor: A Novel Mechanism for Methylphenidate Action

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue; Ji, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Ji-Yun; Zhang, Xue-Han; Zhen, Xue-Chu; Li, Bao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH), commercially called Ritalin or Concerta, has been widely used as a drug for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Noteworthily, growing numbers of young people using prescribed MPH improperly for pleasurable enhancement, take high risk of addiction. Thus, understanding the mechanism underlying high level of MPH action in the brain becomes an important goal nowadays. As a blocker of catecholamine transporters, its therapeutic effect is explained as being due to proper modulation of D1 and α2A receptor. Here we showed that higher dose of MPH facilitates NMDA-receptor mediated synaptic transmission via a catecholamine-independent mechanism, in layer V∼VI pyramidal cells of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). To indicate its postsynaptic action, we next found that MPH facilitates NMDA-induced current and such facilitation could be blocked by σ1 but not D1/5 and α2 receptor antagonists. And this MPH eliciting enhancement of NMDA-receptor activity involves PLC, PKC and IP3 receptor mediated intracellular Ca2+ increase, but does not require PKA and extracellular Ca2+ influx. Our additional pharmacological studies confirmed that higher dose of MPH increases locomotor activity via interacting with σ1 receptor. Together, the present study demonstrates for the first time that MPH facilitates NMDA-receptor mediated synaptic transmission via σ1 receptor, and such facilitation requires PLC/IP3/PKC signaling pathway. This novel mechanism possibly explains the underlying mechanism for MPH induced addictive potential and other psychiatric side effects. PMID:23284812

  6. Roles of NMDA and dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the acquisition and expression of flavor preferences conditioned by oral glucose in rats.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, J A D; Coke, T; Icaza-Cukali, D; Khalifa, N; Bodnar, R J

    2014-10-01

    Animals learn to prefer flavors associated with the intake of sugar (sucrose, fructose, glucose) and fat (corn oil: CO) solutions. Conditioned flavor preferences (CFP) have been elicited for sugars based on orosensory (flavor-flavor: e.g., fructose-CFP) and post-ingestive (flavor-nutrient: e.g., intragastric (IG) glucose-CFP) processes. Dopamine (DA) D1, DA D2 and NMDA receptor antagonism differentially eliminate the acquisition and expression of fructose-CFP and IG glucose-CFP. However, pharmacological analysis of fat (CO)-CFP, mediated by both flavor-flavor and flavor-nutrient processes, indicated that acquisition and expression of fat-CFP were minimally affected by systemic DA D1 and D2 antagonists, and were reduced by NMDA antagonism. Therefore, the present study examined whether systemic DA D1 (SCH23390), DA D2 (raclopride) or NMDA (MK-801) receptor antagonists altered acquisition and/or expression of CFP induced by oral glucose that should be mediated by both flavor-flavor and flavor-nutrient processes. Oral glucose-CFP was elicited following by training rats to drink one novel flavor (CS+, e.g., cherry) mixed in 8% glucose and another flavor (CS-, e.g., grape) mixed in 2% glucose. In expression studies, food-restricted rats drank these solutions in one-bottle sessions (2 h) over 10 days. Subsequent two-bottle tests with the CS+ and CS- flavors mixed in 2% glucose occurred 0.5 h after systemic administration of vehicle (VEH), SCH23390 (50-800 nmol/kg), raclopride (50-800 nmol/kg) or MK-801 (50-200 μg/kg). Rats displayed a robust CS+ preference following VEH treatment (94-95%) which was significantly though marginally attenuated by SCH23390 (67-70%), raclopride (77%) or MK-801 (70%) at doses that also markedly reduced overall CS intake. In separate acquisition studies, rats received VEH, SCH23390 (50-400 nmol/kg), raclopride (50-400 nmol/kg) or MK-801 (100 μg/kg) 0.5 h prior to ten 1-bottle training trials with CS+/8%G and CS-/2%G training solutions that was

  7. Interaction of ApoA-IV with NR4A1 and NR1D1 Represses G6Pase and PEPCK Transcription: Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Downregulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in Mice and a Human Hepatocyte Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Fei; Ji, Yong; DavidsoN, W. Sean; Li, Zongfang; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the nuclear receptor, NR1D1, is a cofactor in ApoA-IV-mediated downregulation of gluconeogenesis. Nuclear receptor, NR4A1, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of various genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. We investigated whether NR4A1 influences the effect of ApoA-IV on hepatic glucose metabolism. Our in situ proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that ApoA-IV colocalized with NR4A1 in human liver (HepG2) and kidney (HEK-293) cell lines. The chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase reporter assays indicated that the ApoA-IV and NR4A1 colocalized at the RORα response element of the human G6Pase promoter, reducing its transcriptional activity. Our RNA interference experiments showed that knocking down the expression of NR4A1 in primary mouse hepatocytes treated with ApoA-IV increased the expression of NR1D1, G6Pase, and PEPCK, and that knocking down NR1D1 expression increased the level of NR4A1. We also found that ApoA-IV induced the expression of endogenous NR4A1 in both cultured primary mouse hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and decreased glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Our findings showed that ApoA-IV colocalizes with NR4A1, which suppresses G6Pase and PEPCK gene expression at the transcriptional level, reducing hepatic glucose output and lowering blood glucose. The ApoA-IV-induced increase in NR4A1 expression in hepatocytes mediates further repression of gluconeogenesis. Our findings suggest that NR1D1 and NR4A1 serve similar or complementary functions in the ApoA-IV-mediated regulation of gluconeogenesis. PMID:26556724

  8. Electrophysiological actions of phenytoin on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated responses in rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Laffling, A. J.; Scherr, P.; McGivern, J. G.; Patmore, L.; Sheridan, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of the anticonvulsant, phenytoin, have been examined on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated population spikes in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus in vitro. 2. The 'conventional' (AMPA receptor-mediated) CA1 population spike, evoked by electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway, was abolished by 5 min treatment with 5 x 10(-6) M 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), after which superfusion with a nominally Mg(2+)-free Krebs solution (containing 5 x 10(-6) M CNQX) led to the appearance of an epileptiform population spike which was fully developed by 30-40 min. 3. The epileptiform population spike was abolished by the non-competitive NMDA antagonist, dizocilpine (1 x 10(-6) M, 20-30 min) and inhibited by the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, D-CPP (IC50 for reducing the amplitude of the first spike in the train = 8.3 x 10(-7) M), demonstrating that the response was mediated by activation of NMDA receptors and validating its use as an assay for antagonists acting at the NMDA receptor/channel complex. 4. Phenytoin (0.1, 0.3 and 1 x 10(-4) M applied cumulatively for 30 min at each concentration) failed to inhibit the NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform population response (n = 7 slices).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7647985

  9. Non-ionotropic signaling by the NMDA receptor: controversy and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Gray, John A; Zito, Karen; Hell, Johannes W

    2016-01-01

    Provocative emerging evidence suggests that the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor can signal in the absence of ion flux through the receptor. This non-ionotropic signaling is thought to be due to agonist-induced conformational changes in the receptor, independently of channel opening. Non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling has been proposed to be sufficient to induce synaptic long-term depression (LTD), directly challenging the decades-old model that prolonged low-level calcium influx is required to induce LTD. Here, we briefly review these recent findings, focusing primarily on the potential role of non-ionotropic signaling in NMDA receptor-mediated LTD. Further reports concerning additional roles of non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling are also discussed. If validated, this new view of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling will usher in an exciting new era of exploring synapse function and dysfunction. PMID:27303637

  10. Non-ionotropic signaling by the NMDA receptor: controversy and opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Gray, John A.; Zito, Karen; Hell, Johannes W.

    2016-01-01

    Provocative emerging evidence suggests that the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor can signal in the absence of ion flux through the receptor. This non-ionotropic signaling is thought to be due to agonist-induced conformational changes in the receptor, independently of channel opening. Non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling has been proposed to be sufficient to induce synaptic long-term depression (LTD), directly challenging the decades-old model that prolonged low-level calcium influx is required to induce LTD. Here, we briefly review these recent findings, focusing primarily on the potential role of non-ionotropic signaling in NMDA receptor-mediated LTD. Further reports concerning additional roles of non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling are also discussed. If validated, this new view of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling will usher in an exciting new era of exploring synapse function and dysfunction. PMID:27303637

  11. [Glutamate receptor-mediated retinal neuronal injury in experimental glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Feng; Yang, Xiong-Li

    2016-08-25

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by optic nerve degeneration related to apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In the pathogenesis of RGC death following the onset of glaucoma, functional changes of glutamate receptors are commonly regarded as important risk factors. During the past several years, we have explored the mechanisms underlying RGC apoptosis and retinal Müller cell reactivation (gliosis) in a rat chronic ocular hypertension (COH) model. We demonstrated that elevated intraocular pressure in COH rats may induce changes of various signaling pathways, which are involved in RGC apoptosis by modulating glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR I) by excessive extracellular glutamate in COH rats could contribute to Müller cell gliosis by suppressing Kir4.1 channels. In this review, incorporating our results, we discuss glutamate receptor- mediated RGC apoptosis and Müller cell gliosis in experimental glaucoma. PMID:27546508

  12. NMDA-Receptor Activation but Not Ion Flux Is Required for Amyloid-Beta Induced Synaptic Depression

    PubMed Central

    Tamburri, Albert; Dudilot, Anthony; Licea, Sara; Bourgeois, Catherine; Boehm, Jannic

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is characterized by a gradual decrease of synaptic function and, ultimately, by neuronal loss. There is considerable evidence supporting the involvement of oligomeric amyloid-beta (Aβ) in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease. Historically, AD research has mainly focused on the long-term changes caused by Aβ rather than analyzing its immediate effects. Here we show that acute perfusion of hippocampal slice cultures with oligomeric Aβ depresses synaptic transmission within 20 minutes. This depression is dependent on synaptic stimulation and the activation of NMDA-receptors, but not on NMDA-receptor mediated ion flux. It, therefore, appears that Aβ dependent synaptic depression is mediated through a use-dependent metabotropic-like mechanism of the NMDA-receptor, but does not involve NMDA-receptor mediated synaptic transmission, i.e. it is independent of calcium flux through the NMDA-receptor. PMID:23750255

  13. NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors in auditory transmission in the barn owl inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D E; Knudsen, E I

    1994-10-01

    The pharmacology of auditory responses in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the barn owl was investigated by iontophoresis of excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists into two different functional subdivisions of the IC, the external nucleus (ICx) and the lateral shell of the central nucleus (lateral shell), both of which carry out important computations in the processing of auditory spatial information. Combined application of the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) and the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-5-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) significantly reduced auditory-evoked spikes at all sites in these two subdivisions, and completely eliminated responses at many locations. This suggests that excitatory amino acid receptors mediate the bulk, if not all, of auditory responses in the ICx and lateral shell. NMDA and non-NMDA receptors contributed differently to auditory responses in the two subdivisions. In the ICx, AP5 significantly reduced the number of auditory-evoked spikes at every site tested. On average, AP5 eliminated 55% of auditory-evoked spikes at multiunit sites and 64% at single-unit sites in this structure. In contrast, in the lateral shell, AP5 significantly reduced responses at less than half the sites tested, and, on average, AP5 eliminated only 19% of spikes at multiunit sites and 25% at single-unit sites. When the magnitude of response blockade produced by AP5 at individual multiunit sites was normalized to adjust for site-to-site differences in the efficacy of iontophoresed AP5 and CNQX, AP5 blockade was still significantly greater in the ICx than the lateral shell. CNQX application strongly reduced responses in both subdivisions. These data suggest that NMDA receptor currents make a major contribution to auditory responses in the ICx, while they make only a small contribution to auditory responses in the lateral shell. Non-NMDA receptor currents, on the other hand, contribute to auditory responses in both

  14. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal "clock" gene expression.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, M; Yildiz, S; Dirim Arslan, A; Sharma, R; Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-23

    Using a transgenic mice model (i.e. "clock" knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulates the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in culture express dopamine receptors as well as clock genes and have been successfully used in studying dopamine receptor functioning. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine receptors on neuronal clock gene expression in this model using specific receptor agonists. We found an inhibitory effect on the expression of mClock and mPer1 genes with the D2-class (i.e. D2/D3) receptor agonist quinpirole. We also found a generalized stimulatory effect on the expression of clock genes mPer1, mClock, mNPAS2 (neuronal PAS domain protein 2), and mBmal1 with the D1-class (i.e. D1) receptor agonist SKF38393. Further, we tested whether systemic administration of dopamine receptor agonists causes similar changes in striatal clock gene expression in vivo. We found quinpirole-induced alterations in mPER1 protein levels in the mouse striatum (i.e. rhythm shift). Collectively, our results indicate that the dopamine receptor system may mediate psychostimulant-induced changes in clock gene expression. Using striatal neurons in culture as a model, further research is needed to better understand how dopamine signaling modulates the expression dynamics of clock genes (i.e. intracellular signaling pathways) and thereby influences neuronal gene expression, neuronal transmission, and brain functioning. PMID:19017537

  15. Role of NMDA Receptor-Mediated Glutamatergic Signaling in Chronic and Acute Neuropathologies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) have two opposing roles in the brain. On the one hand, NMDARs control critical events in the formation and development of synaptic organization and synaptic plasticity. On the other hand, the overactivation of NMDARs can promote neuronal death in neuropathological conditions. Ca2+ influx acts as a primary modulator after NMDAR channel activation. An imbalance in Ca2+ homeostasis is associated with several neurological diseases including schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These chronic conditions have a lengthy progression depending on internal and external factors. External factors such as acute episodes of brain damage are associated with an earlier onset of several of these chronic mental conditions. Here, we will review some of the current evidence of how traumatic brain injury can hasten the onset of several neurological conditions, focusing on the role of NMDAR distribution and the functional consequences in calcium homeostasis associated with synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death present in this group of chronic diseases.

  16. Actions of Bupivacaine, a Widely Used Local Anesthetic, on NMDA Receptor Responses

    PubMed Central

    Paganelli, Meaghan A.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in brain and spinal cord and play a pivotal role in the neurological disease state of chronic pain, which is caused by central sensitization. Bupivacaine is the indicated local anesthetic in caudal, epidural, and spinal anesthesia and is widely used clinically to manage acute and chronic pain. In addition to blocking Na+ channels, bupivacaine affects the activity of many other channels, including NMDA receptors. Importantly, bupivacaine inhibits NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, an area critically involved in central sensitization. We used recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in HEK293 cells and found that increasing concentrations of bupivacaine decreased channel open probability in GluN2 subunit- and pH-independent manner by increasing the mean duration of closures and decreasing the mean duration of openings. Using kinetic modeling of one-channel currents, we attributed the observed current decrease to two main mechanisms: a voltage-dependent “foot-in-the-door” pore block and an allosteric gating effect. Further, the inhibition was state-independent because it occurred to the same degree whether the drug was applied before or after glutamate stimulation and was mediated by extracellular and intracellular inhibitory sites, via hydrophilic and hydrophobic pathways. These results predict that clinical doses of bupivacaine would decrease the peak and accelerate the decay of synaptic NMDA receptor currents during normal synaptic transmission. These quantitative predictions inform possible applications of bupivacaine as preventative and therapeutic approaches in chronic pain. PMID:25589775

  17. An EP2 Agonist Facilitates NMDA-Induced Outward Currents and Inhibits Dendritic Beading through Activation of BK Channels in Mouse Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Zhou; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major metabolite of arachidonic acid produced by cyclooxygenase pathways, exerts its bioactive responses by activating four E-prostanoid receptor subtypes, EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. PGE2 enables modulating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses. However, the effect of E-prostanoid receptor agonists on large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels, which are functionally coupled with NMDA receptors, remains unclear. Here, we showed that EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways increased NMDA-induced outward currents (I NMDA-OUT), which are associated with the BK channel activation. Patch-clamp recordings from the acutely dissociated mouse cortical neurons revealed that an EP2 receptor agonist activated I NMDA-OUT, whereas an EP3 receptor agonist reduced it. Agonists of EP1 or EP4 receptors showed no significant effects on I NMDA-OUT. A direct perfusion of 3,5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) through the patch pipette facilitated I NMDA-OUT, which was abolished by the presence of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Furthermore, facilitation of I NMDA-OUT caused by an EP2 receptor agonist was significantly suppressed by PKA inhibitor. Finally, the activation of BK channels through EP2 receptors facilitated the recovery phase of NMDA-induced dendritic beading in the primary cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that a direct activation of BK channels by EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways plays neuroprotective roles in cortical neurons. PMID:27298516

  18. The Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Suppresses CREB Signaling by Targeting NMDA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hailong; Chávez, Andrés E.; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Yang, Hongtian; Gu, Hua; Siddoway, Benjamin A.; Hall, Benjamin J.; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptor signaling plays a complex role in CREB activation and CREB-mediated gene transcription, depending on the subcellular location of NMDA receptors, as well as how strongly they are activated. However, it is not known whether Rac1, the prototype of Rac GTPase, plays a role in neuronal CREB activation induced by NMDA receptor signaling. Here, we report that NSC23766, a widely used specific Rac1 inhibitor, inhibits basal CREB phosphorylation at S133 (pCREB) and antagonizes changes in pCREB levels induced by NMDA bath application in rat cortical neurons. Unexpectedly, we found that NSC23766 affects the levels of neuronal pCREB in a Rac1-independent manner. Instead, our results indicate that NSC23766 can directly regulate NMDA receptors as indicated by their strong effects on both exogenous and synaptically evoked NMDA receptor-mediated currents in mouse and rat neurons, respectively. Our findings strongly suggest that Rac1 does not affect pCREB signaling in cortical neurons and reveal that NSC23766 could be a novel NMDA receptor antagonist. PMID:25319697

  19. NAAG fails to antagonize synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Losi, G; Vicini, S; Neale, J

    2004-03-01

    The peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) selectively activates the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Several reports also suggest that this peptide acts as a partial agonist at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors but its putative antagonist effects have not been directly tested. To do this, we used whole cell recordings from cerebellar granule cells (CGC) in culture that allow the highest possible resolution of NMDA channel activation. When CGC were activated with equimolar concentrations of NMDA and NAAG, the peptide failed to alter the peak current elicited by NMDA. Very high concentrations of NAAG (100-200 microM) did not significantly reduce the current elicited by 10 microM NMDA or 0.1 microM glutamate, while 400 microM NAAG produced only a very small (less than 15%) reduction in these whole cell currents. Similarly, NAAG (400 microM) failed to significantly alter the average decay time constant or the peak amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs). We conclude that high concentrations of the peptide do not exert physiologically relevant antagonist actions on synaptic NMDA receptor activation following vesicular release of glutamate. As an agonist, purified NAAG was found to be at least 10,000-fold less potent than glutamate in increasing "background" current via NMDA receptors on CGC. Inasmuch as it is difficult to confirm that NAAG preparations are completely free from contamination with glutamate at the 0.01% level, the peptide itself appears unlikely to have a direct agonist activity at the NMDA receptor subtypes found in CGC. Recent reports indicate that enhancing the activity of endogenous NAAG may be an important therapeutic approach to excitotoxicity and chronic pain perception. These effects are likely mediated by group II mGluRs, not NMDA receptors. PMID:14975672

  20. Targeted gene delivery via N-acetylglucosamine receptor mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Kim, You-Kyoung; Jiang, Tai; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2014-11-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a promising approach of gene delivery into the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction. Vimentins at the cell surface are recently known to bind N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue, therefore, the cell surfaces of vimentin-expressing cells could be targeted by using the GlcNAc residue as a specific ligand for receptor-mediated gene delivery. Here, we have developed polymeric gene delivery vectors, based on poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO) and poly(aspartamide), namely poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO-(GlcNAc)] (PADPG) and poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO] (PADP) to elucidate the efficiency of GlcNAc ligand for gene delivery through receptor mediated endocytosis. To determine the efficiency of these polymeric vectors for specific gene delivery, the DNA condensation ability of PADPG and PADP and the subsequent formation of polymeric nanoparticles were confirmed by gel retardation assay and transmission electron microscopy respectively. Both PADPG and PADP had lower cytotoxicity than polyethylenimine 25 K (PEI 25 K). However, their transfection efficiency was comparatively lower than PEI 25 K due to hydrophilic property of PEO in the vectors. To observe the stability of polymeric nanoparticles, the transfection of PADPG and PADP was carried out in the presence of serum. Favorably, the interfering effect of serum on the transfection efficiency of PADPG and PADP was also very low. Finally, when the cell specificity of these polymeric vectors was investigated, PADPG had high gene transfection in vimentin-expressing cells than vimentin-deficiency cells. The high transfection efficiency of PADPG was attributed to the GlcNAc in the polymeric vector which interact specifically with vimentin in the cells for the receptor-mediated endocytosis. The competitive inhibition assay further proved the receptor-mediated endocytosis of PADPG. Thus, this study demonstrates that conjugation of GlcNAc is an effective and rational

  1. Effects of rasagiline, its metabolite aminoindan and selegiline on glutamate receptor mediated signalling in the rat hippocampus slice in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rasagiline, a new drug developed to treat Parkinson's disease, is known to inhibit monoamine oxidase B. However, its metabolite R-(-)-aminoindan does not show this kind of activity. The present series of in vitro experiments using the rat hippocampal slice preparation deals with effects of both compounds on the pyramidal cell response after electric stimulation of the Schaffer Collaterals in comparison to selegiline, another MAO B inhibitor. Method Stimulation of the Schaffer Collaterals by single stimuli (SS) or theta burst stimulation (TBS) resulted in stable responses of pyramidal cells measured as population spike amplitude (about 1 mV under control SS conditions or about 2 mV after TBS). Results During the first series, this response was attenuated in the presence of rasagiline and aminoindan-to a lesser degree of selegiline-in a concentration dependent manner (5-50 μM) after single stimuli as well as under TBS. During oxygen/glucose deprivation for 10 min the amplitude of the population spike breaks down by 75%. The presence of rasagiline and aminoindan, but rarely the presence of selegiline, prevented this break down. Following glutamate receptor mediated enhancements of neuronal transmission in a second series of experiments very clear differences could be observed in comparison to the action of selegiline: NMDA receptor, AMPA receptor as well as metabotropic glutamate receptor mediated increases of transmission were concentration dependently (0,3 - 2 μM) antagonized by rasagiline and aminoindan, but not by selegiline. On the opposite, only selegiline attenuated kainate receptor mediated increases of excitability. Thus, both monoamino oxidase (MAO) B inhibitors show attenuation of glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus but interfere with different receptor mediated excitatory modulations at low concentrations. Conclusions Since aminoindan does not induce MAO B inhibition, these effects must be regarded as being independent from MAO B

  2. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Entry via Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Virus infections are ubiquitous and remain major threats to human health worldwide. Viruses are intracellular parasites and must enter host cells to initiate infection. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the most common entry pathway taken by viruses, the whole process is highly complex and dictated by various events, such as virus motions, membrane deformations, receptor diffusion and ligand-receptor reactions, occurring at multiple length and time scales. We develop a multiscale model for virus entry through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The binding of virus to cell surface is based on a mesoscale three dimensional stochastic adhesion model, the internalization (endocytosis) of virus and cellular membrane deformation is based on the discretization of Helfrich Hamiltonian in a curvilinear space using Monte Carlo method. The multiscale model is based on the combination of these two models. We will implement this model to study the herpes simplex virus entry into B78 cells and compare the model predictions with experimental measurements.

  4. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge Blocks Ethanol-Induced Synaptic Dysfunction through Regulation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jin; Lee, Seungheon; Jung, Ji Wook; Lee, Young Choon; Choi, Seong-Min; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of high doses of ethanol can lead to amnesia, which often manifests as a blackout. These blackouts experienced by ethanol consumers may be a major cause of the social problems associated with excess ethanol consumption. However, there is currently no established treatment for preventing these ethanol-induced blackouts. In this study, we tested the ethanol extract of the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) for its ability to mitigate ethanol-induced behavioral and synaptic deficits. To test behavioral deficits, an object recognition test was conducted in mouse. In this test, ethanol (1 g/kg, i.p.) impaired object recognition memory, but SM (200 mg/kg) prevented this impairment. To evaluate synaptic deficits, NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the mouse hippocampal slices were tested, as they are known to be vulnerable to ethanol and are associated with ethanol-induced amnesia. SM (10 and 100 μg/ml) significantly ameliorated ethanol-induced long-term potentiation and NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP deficits in the hippocampal slices. Therefore, these results suggest that SM prevents ethanol-induced amnesia by protecting the hippocampus from NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity deficits induced by ethanol. PMID:27257009

  5. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge Blocks Ethanol-Induced Synaptic Dysfunction through Regulation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Synaptic Transmission.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Jin; Lee, Seungheon; Jung, Ji Wook; Lee, Young Choon; Choi, Seong-Min; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Consumption of high doses of ethanol can lead to amnesia, which often manifests as a blackout. These blackouts experienced by ethanol consumers may be a major cause of the social problems associated with excess ethanol consumption. However, there is currently no established treatment for preventing these ethanol-induced blackouts. In this study, we tested the ethanol extract of the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) for its ability to mitigate ethanol-induced behavioral and synaptic deficits. To test behavioral deficits, an object recognition test was conducted in mouse. In this test, ethanol (1 g/kg, i.p.) impaired object recognition memory, but SM (200 mg/kg) prevented this impairment. To evaluate synaptic deficits, NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the mouse hippocampal slices were tested, as they are known to be vulnerable to ethanol and are associated with ethanol-induced amnesia. SM (10 and 100 μg/ml) significantly ameliorated ethanol-induced long-term potentiation and NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP deficits in the hippocampal slices. Therefore, these results suggest that SM prevents ethanol-induced amnesia by protecting the hippocampus from NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity deficits induced by ethanol. PMID:27257009

  6. Genetic NMDA receptor deficiency disrupts acute and chronic effects of cocaine but not amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Amy J; Laakso, Aki; Cyr, Michel; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Salahpour, Ali; Medvedev, Ivan O; Dykstra, Linda A; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G

    2008-10-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission is required for several forms of neuronal plasticity. Its role in the neuronal responses to addictive drugs is an ongoing subject of investigation. We report here that the acute locomotor-stimulating effect of cocaine is absent in NMDA receptor-deficient mice (NR1-KD). In contrast, their acute responses to amphetamine and to direct dopamine receptor agonists are not significantly altered. The striking attenuation of cocaine's acute effects is not likely explained by alterations in the dopaminergic system of NR1-KD mice, since most parameters of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine function are unchanged. Consistent with the behavioral findings, cocaine induces less c-Fos expression in the striatum of these mice, while amphetamine-induced c-Fos expression is intact. Furthermore, chronic cocaine-induced sensitization and conditioned place preference are attenuated and develop more slowly in mutant animals, but amphetamine's effects are not altered significantly. Our results highlight the importance of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission specifically in cocaine actions, and support a hypothesis that cocaine and amphetamine elicit their effects through differential actions on signaling pathways. PMID:18185498

  7. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Strick, Christine A; Li, Cheryl; Scott, Liam; Harvey, Brian; Hajós, Mihály; Steyn, Stefanus J; Piotrowski, Mary A; James, Larry C; Downs, James T; Rago, Brian; Becker, Stacey L; El-Kattan, Ayman; Xu, Youfen; Ganong, Alan H; Tingley, F David; Ramirez, Andres D; Seymour, Patricia A; Guanowsky, Victor; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fox, Carol B; Schmidt, Christopher J; Duplantier, Allen J

    2011-01-01

    Observations that N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) antagonists produce symptoms in humans that are similar to those seen in schizophrenia have led to the current hypothesis that schizophrenia might result from NMDA receptor hypofunction. Inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), the enzyme responsible for degradation of D-serine, should lead to increased levels of this co-agonist at the NMDA receptor, and thereby provide a therapeutic approach to schizophrenia. We have profiled some of the preclinical biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral consequences of administering potent and selective inhibitors of DAAO to rodents to begin to test this hypothesis. Inhibition of DAAO activity resulted in a significant dose and time dependent increase in D-serine only in the cerebellum, although a time delay was observed between peak plasma or brain drug concentration and cerebellum D-serine response. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling employing a mechanism-based indirect response model was used to characterize the correlation between free brain drug concentration and D-serine accumulation. DAAO inhibitors had little or no activity in rodent models considered predictive for antipsychotic activity. The inhibitors did, however, affect cortical activity in the Mescaline-Induced Scratching model, produced a modest but significant increase in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in primary neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, and resulted in a significant increase in evoked hippocampal theta rhythm, an in vivo electrophysiological model of hippocampal activity. These findings demonstrate that although DAAO inhibition did not cause a measurable increase in D-serine in forebrain, it did affect hippocampal and cortical activity, possibly through augmentation of NMDA receptor-mediated currents. PMID:21763704

  8. Receptor-mediated mitophagy in yeast and mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Sakakibara, Kaori; Chen, Quan; Okamoto, Koji

    2014-07-01

    Mitophagy, or mitochondria autophagy, plays a critical role in selective removal of damaged or unwanted mitochondria. Several protein receptors, including Atg32 in yeast, NIX/BNIP3L, BNIP3 and FUNDC1 in mammalian systems, directly act in mitophagy. Atg32 interacts with Atg8 and Atg11 on the surface of mitochondria, promoting core Atg protein assembly for mitophagy. NIX/BNIP3L, BNIP3 and FUNDC1 also have a classic motif to directly bind LC3 (Atg8 homolog in mammals) for activation of mitophagy. Recent studies have shown that receptor-mediated mitophagy is regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylates Atg32 and activates mitophagy in yeast. In contrast, in mammalian cells Src kinase and CK2 phosphorylate FUNDC1 to prevent mitophagy. Notably, in response to hypoxia and FCCP treatment, the mitochondrial phosphatase PGAM5 dephosphorylates FUNDC1 to activate mitophagy. Here, we mainly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of receptor-mediated mitophagy and the implications of this catabolic process in health and disease. PMID:24903109

  9. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice. PMID:25524412

  10. Hemoglobin Uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. Is Receptor-Mediated

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  11. Receptor-mediated endocytosis and brain delivery of therapeutic biologics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guangqing; Gan, Liang-Shang

    2013-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed. PMID:23840214

  12. H-Ras regulation of TRAIL death receptor mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Jie; Bozza, William P.; Di, Xu; Zhang, Yaqin; Hallett, William; Zhang, Baolin

    2014-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through the death receptors (DRs) 4 and/or 5 expressed on the cell surface. Multiple clinical trials are underway to evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human TRAIL and agonistic antibodies to DR4 or DR5. However, their therapeutic potential is limited by the high frequency of cancer resistance. Here we provide evidence demonstrating the role of H-Ras in TRAIL receptor mediated apoptosis. By analyzing the genome wide mRNA expression data of the NCI60 cancer cell lines, we found that H-Ras expression was consistently upregulated in TRAIL-resistant cell lines. By contrast, no correlation was found between TRAIL sensitivity and K-Ras expression levels or their mutational profiles. Notably, H-Ras upregulation associated with a surface deficiency of TRAIL death receptors. Selective inhibition of H-Ras activity in TRAIL-resistant cells restored the surface expression of both DR4 and DR5 without changing their total protein levels. The resulting cells became highly susceptible to both TRAIL and agonistic DR5 antibody, whereas K-Ras inhibition had little or no effect on TRAIL-induced apoptosis, indicating H-Ras plays a distinct role in the regulation of TRAIL death receptors. Further studies are warranted to determine the therapeutic potential of H-Ras-specific inhibitors in combination with TRAIL receptor agonists. PMID:25026275

  13. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Brain Delivery of Therapeutic Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guangqing

    2013-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed. PMID:23840214

  14. Targeting receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways with nanoparticles: rationale and advances

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shi; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Okamoto, Curtis T.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of drugs and their carrier systems by using receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways was in its nascent stages 25 years ago. In the intervening years, an explosion of knowledge focused on design and synthesis of nanoparticulate delivery systems as well as elucidation of the cellular complexity of what was previously-termed receptor-mediated endocytosis has now created a situation when it has become possible to design and test the feasibility of delivery of highly specific nanoparticle drug carriers to specific cells and tissue. This review outlines the mechanisms governing the major modes of receptor-mediated endocytosis used in drug delivery and highlights recent approaches using these as targets for in vivo drug delivery of nanoparticles. The review also discusses some of the inherent complexity associated with the simple shift from a ligand-drug conjugate versus a ligand-nanoparticle conjugate, in terms of ligand valency and its relationship to the mode of receptor-mediated internalization. PMID:23026636

  15. Bombesin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity: review and current status

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Veronica; Di Florio, Alessia; Moody, Terry W.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    The three mammalian bombesin (Bn) receptors (gastrin-releasing peptide [GRP] receptor, neuromedin B [NMB] receptor, BRS-3) are one of the classes of G protein-coupled receptors that are most frequently over-express/ectopically expressed by common, important malignancies. Because of the clinical success of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity with neuroendocrine tumors, there is now increasing interest in pursuing a similar approach with Bn receptors. In the last few years then have been more than 200 studies in this area. In the present paper, the in vitro and in vivo results, as well as results of human studies from many of these studies are reviewed and the current state of Bn receptor-mediated imaging or cytotoxicity is discussed. Both Bn receptor-mediated imaging studies as well as Bn receptor-mediated tumoral cytotoxic studies using radioactive and non-radioactive Bn-based ligands are covered. PMID:21034419

  16. NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2D Subunit Control Neuronal Function in the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Swanger, Sharon A.; Vance, Katie M.; Pare, Jean-François; Sotty, Florence; Fog, Karina; Smith, Yoland

    2015-01-01

    synaptic transmission in the STN has been understudied. Here, we show that GluN2B- and GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors mediate the NMDA receptor component of EPSCs in subthalamic neurons. Moreover, our results demonstrate that pharmacologic modulation of GluN2D-containing receptors alters the time course of EPSCs and controls the in vivo spike-firing rate in the STN. This study identifies GluN2D as a potential target for modulating subthalamic neuron activity. PMID:26631477

  17. An EP2 Agonist Facilitates NMDA-Induced Outward Currents and Inhibits Dendritic Beading through Activation of BK Channels in Mouse Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Zhou; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major metabolite of arachidonic acid produced by cyclooxygenase pathways, exerts its bioactive responses by activating four E-prostanoid receptor subtypes, EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. PGE2 enables modulating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses. However, the effect of E-prostanoid receptor agonists on large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels, which are functionally coupled with NMDA receptors, remains unclear. Here, we showed that EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways increased NMDA-induced outward currents (INMDA-OUT), which are associated with the BK channel activation. Patch-clamp recordings from the acutely dissociated mouse cortical neurons revealed that an EP2 receptor agonist activated INMDA-OUT, whereas an EP3 receptor agonist reduced it. Agonists of EP1 or EP4 receptors showed no significant effects on INMDA-OUT. A direct perfusion of 3,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) through the patch pipette facilitated INMDA-OUT, which was abolished by the presence of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Furthermore, facilitation of INMDA-OUT caused by an EP2 receptor agonist was significantly suppressed by PKA inhibitor. Finally, the activation of BK channels through EP2 receptors facilitated the recovery phase of NMDA-induced dendritic beading in the primary cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that a direct activation of BK channels by EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways plays neuroprotective roles in cortical neurons. PMID:27298516

  18. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  19. A novel form of long-term potentiation selectively expressed by NMDA receptors at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Bae; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2008-01-01

    The mossy fiber to CA3 pyramidal cell synapse (mf-CA3) provides a major source of excitation to the hippocampus. Thus far, these glutamatergic synapses are well recognized for showing a presynaptic, NMDA receptor-independent form of LTP which is expressed as a long-lasting increase of transmitter release. Here, we show that in addition to this “classical” LTP, mf-CA3 synapses can undergo a form of LTP characterized by a selective enhancement of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. This potentiation requires coactivation of NMDA and mGlu5 receptors, and a postsynaptic calcium rise. Unlike classical LTP, expression of this novel mossy fiber LTP is due to a PKC-dependent recruitment of NMDA receptors specifically to the mf-CA3 synapse via a SNARE-dependent process. Having two mechanistically different forms of LTP may allow mf-CA3 synapses to respond with more flexibility to the changing demands of the hippocampal network. PMID:18184568

  20. Role for the NR2B Subunit of the NMDA Receptor in Mediating Light Input to the Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, LM; Schroeder, A; Loh, D; Smith, D; Lin, K; Han, JH; Michel, S; Hummer, DL; Ehlen, JC; Albers, HE; Colwell, CS

    2008-01-01

    Light information reaches the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells that utilize glutamate as a neurotransmitter. A variety of evidence suggests that the release of glutamate then activates N-methyl-Daspartate (NMDA) receptors within the SCN and triggers a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to phase shifts in the circadian system. In this study, we first sought to explore the role of the NR2B subunit in mediating the effects of light on the circadian system. We found that localized microinjection of the NR2B subunit antagonist ifenprodil into the SCN region inhibits the magnitude of light-induced phase shifts of the circadian rhythm in wheel-running activity. Next, we found that the NR2B message and levels of phospho-NR2B levels vary with time of day in SCN tissue using semi-quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Functionally, we found that blocking the NR2B subunit with ifenprodil significantly reduced the magnitude of NMDA currents recorded in SCN neurons. Ifenprodil also significantly reduced the magnitude of NMDA-induced calcium changes in SCN cells. Together, these results demonstrate that the NR2B subunit is an important component of NMDA receptor mediated responses within SCN neurons and that this subunit contributes to light-induced phase shifts of the mammalian circadian system. PMID:18380671

  1. Changes in NMDA receptor-induced cyclic nucleotide synthesis regulate the age-dependent increase in PDE4A expression in primary cortical cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hajjhussein, Hassan; Suvarna, Neesha U.; Gremillion, Carmen; Judson Chandler, L.; O’Donnell, James M.

    2007-01-01

    NMDA receptor-induced cAMP and cGMP are selectively hydrolyzed by PDE4 and PDE2, respectively, in rat primary cerebral cortical and hippocampal cultures. Because cAMP levels regulate the expression of PDE4 in rat primary cortical cultures, we examined the manner in which NMDA receptor activity regulates the age-dependent increase in the expression of PDE4A observed in vivo and in vitro. Inhibiting the activity of NR2B subunit with ifenprodil blocked NMDA receptor-induced cGMP synthesis and increased NMDA receptor-induced cAMP levels in a manner that reduced PDE4 activity. Therefore, NR1/NR2B receptor-induced cGMP signaling is involved in an acute cross-talk regulation of NR1/NR2A receptor-induced cAMP levels, mediated by PDE4. Chronic inhibition of NMDA receptor activity with MK-801 reduced PDE4A1 and PDE4A5 expression and activity in a time-dependent manner; this effect was reversed by adding the PKA activator dbr-cAMP. Inhibiting GABA receptors with bicuculline increased NMDA receptor-induced cAMP synthesis and PDE4A expression in cultures treated between DIV 16 and DIV 21 but not in cultures treated between DIV 8 and DIV 13. This effect was due to a high tone of NMDA receptor-induced cGMP in younger cultures, which negatively regulated the expression of PDE4A by a PKG-mediated process. The present results are consistent with behavioral data showing that both PDE4 and PDE2 are involved in NMDA receptor-mediated memory processes. PMID:17407767

  2. NMDA receptor contributions to visual contrast coding

    PubMed Central

    Manookin, Michael B.; Weick, Michael; Stafford, Benjamin K.; Demb, Jonathan B.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the retina, it is not well understood how visual processing depends on AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Here, we investigated how these receptors contribute to contrast coding in identified guinea pig ganglion cell types, in vitro. NMDA-mediated responses were negligible in ON α cells but substantial in OFF α and δ cells. OFF δ cell NMDA receptors were composed of GluN2B subunits. Using a novel deconvolution method, we determined the individual contributions of AMPA, NMDA and inhibitory currents to light responses of each cell type. OFF α and δ cells used NMDA receptors for encoding either the full contrast range (α), including near-threshold responses, or only a high range (δ). However, contrast sensitivity depended substantially on NMDA receptors only in OFF α cells. NMDA receptors contribute to visual contrast coding in a cell-type specific manner. Certain cell types generate excitatory responses using primarily AMPA receptors or disinhibition. PMID:20670835

  3. D1-like dopamine receptors selectively block P/Q-type calcium channels to reduce glutamate release onto cholinergic basal forebrain neurones of immature rats

    PubMed Central

    Momiyama, Toshihiko; Fukazawa, Yugo

    2007-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of non-NMDA glutamatergic EPSCs were made from identified cholinergic neurones in slices of basal forebrain (BF) of young rats (P13–P18), to investigate the subtypes of calcium channels involved in dopamine D1-like receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of the EPSCs. The BF cholinergic neurones were pre-labelled by intracerebroventricular injection of a fluorescent marker, Cy3-192IgG. A D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 81297 (30 μm) suppressed the EPSCs reversibly by about 30%, and this inhibition was reproducible. Calcium channel subtypes involved in the glutamatergic transmission were elucidated using selective Ca2+ channel blockers. The N-type Ca2+ channel blocker ω-conotoxin (ω-CgTX, 3 μm) suppressed the EPSCs by 57.5%, whereas the P/Q-type channel selective blocker ω-agatoxin-TK (ω-Aga-TK, 200 nm) suppressed the EPSCs by 68.9%. Simultaneous application of both blockers suppressed the EPSCs by 96.1%. The R-type Ca2+ channel blocker SNX-482 (300 nm) suppressed the EPSCs by 18.4%, whereas nifedipine, the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker (10 μm), had little effect. In the presence of ω-Aga-TK, SKF 81297, a dopamine D1-like receptor agonist, had no effect on the EPSCs. On the other hand, SKF 81297 could still inhibit the EPSCs in the presence of either ω-CgTX, SNX-482 or nifedipine. SKF 81297 had no further effect on the EPSCs when external Ca2+ concentration was raised to 7.2 mm in the presence of ω-Aga-TK, but could still inhibit the EPSCs in high Ca2+ solution after ω-CgTX application. Forskolin (FK, 10 μm), an activator of adenylyl cyclase pathway, suppressed the EPSCs, and the FK-induced effect was mostly blocked in the presence of ω-Aga-TK but not that of ω-CgTX. These results suggest that D1-like receptor activation selectively blocks P/Q-type calcium channels to reduce glutamate release onto BF cholinergic neurones. PMID:17234695

  4. NMDA antagonists exert distinct effects in experimental organophosphate or carbamate poisoning in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dekundy, Andrzej . E-mail: andrzej.dekundy@merz.de; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Zielinska, Elzbieta; Turski, Waldemar A.

    2007-03-15

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors produce seizures and lethality in mammals. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists encourage the investigation of their effects in AChE inhibitor-induced poisonings. In the present study, the effects of dizocilpine (MK-801, 1 mg/kg) or 3-((RS)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10 mg/kg), alone or combined with muscarinic antagonist atropine (1.8 mg/kg), on convulsant and lethal properties of an OP pesticide dichlorvos or a carbamate drug physostigmine, were studied in mice. Both dichlorvos and physostigmine induced dose-dependent seizure activity and lethality. Atropine did not prevent the occurrence of convulsions but decreased the lethal effects of both dichlorvos and physostigmine. MK-801 or CPP blocked or attenuated, respectively, dichlorvos-induced convulsions. Contrariwise, NMDA antagonists had no effect in physostigmine-induced seizures or lethality produced by dichlorvos or physostigmine. Concurrent pretreatment with atropine and either MK-801 or CPP blocked or alleviated seizures produced by dichlorvos, but not by physostigmine. Both MK-801 and CPP co-administered with atropine enhanced its antilethal effects in both dichlorvos and physostigmine poisoning. In both saline- and AChE inhibitor-treated mice, no interaction of the investigated antidotes with brain cholinesterase was found. The data indicate that both muscarinic ACh and NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms contribute to the acute toxicity of AChE inhibitors, and NMDA receptors seem critical to OP-induced seizures.

  5. Spacelab D-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, Bonnie J.

    1990-01-01

    The Spacelab D-1 (Deutchland Eins) Mission is discussed from the points of view of safety, materials handling, and toxic materials; the laboratory and equipment used; and some of the different philosophies utilized on this flight. How to enhance scientific return at the same time as being safe was examined.

  6. MFR, a Putative Receptor Mediating the Fusion of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saginario, Charles; Sterling, Hyacinth; Beckers, Cornelius; Kobayashi, Ruji; Solimena, Michele; Ullu, Elisabetta; Vignery, Agnès

    1998-01-01

    We had previously identified a macrophage surface protein whose expression is highly induced, transient, and specific, as it is restricted to actively fusing macrophages in vitro and in vivo. This protein is recognized by monoclonal antibodies that block macrophage fusion. We have now purified this protein and cloned its corresponding cDNA. This protein belongs to the superfamily of immunoglobulins and is similar to immune antigen receptors such as the T-cell receptor, B-cell receptor, and viral receptors such as CD4. We have therefore named this protein macrophage fusion receptor (MFR). We show that the extracellular domain of MFR prevents fusion of macrophages in vitro and therefore propose that MFR belongs to the fusion machinery of macrophages. MFR is identical to SHPS-1 and BIT and is a homologue of P84, SIRPα, and MyD-1, all of which have been recently cloned and implicated in cell signaling and cell-cell interaction events. PMID:9774638

  7. Regulation of ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase by NMDA-receptor-induced seizure activity in cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Yoko; Kaneko, Koichi; Kase, Daisuke; Ishihara, Hiromi; Nairn, Angus C; Obata, Kunihiko; Imoto, Keiji

    2013-04-24

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) that belongs to a subfamily of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) plays diverse roles in the central nervous system. Activation of ERK1/2 has been observed in various types of neuronal excitation, including seizure activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as in NMDA-receptor (NMDA-R)-dependent long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. On the other hand, recent studies in cultured neurons have shown that NMDA-R stimulation could result in either ERK1/2 activation or non-activation, depending on the pharmacological manipulations. To assess NMDA-R-dependent regulation of ERK1/2 activity in vivo, here we examined the effect of NMDA-R-induced seizure activity on ERK1/2 activation by using rat cortical slice preparations. NMDA-R-dependent seizure activity introduced by Mg2+ -free condition did not cause ERK1/2 activation. On the other hand, when picrotoxin was added to concurrently suppress GABAA-receptor-mediated inhibition, profound ERK1/2 activation occurred, which was accompanied by strong phospho-ERK1/2-staining in the superficial and deep cortical layer neurons. In this case, prolonged membrane depolarization and enhanced burst action potential firings, both of which were much greater than those in Mg2+ -free condition alone, were observed. Differential ERK1/2 activation was supported by the concurrent selective increase in phosphorylation of a substrate protein, phospho-site 4/5 of synapsin I. These results indicate that NMDA-R activation through a release from Mg2+ -blockade, which accompanies enhancement of both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, was not enough, but concurrent suppression of GABAergic inhibition, which leads to a selective increase in excitatory synaptic transmission, was necessary for robust ERK1/2 activation to occur within the cortical network. PMID:23419897

  8. Regulation of ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase by NMDA-receptor-induced seizure activity in cortical slices

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Yoko; Kaneko, Koichi; Kase, Daisuke; Ishihara, Hiromi; Nairn, Angus C.; Obata, Kunihiko; Imoto, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) that belongs to a subfamily of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) plays diverse roles in the central nervous system. Activation of ERK1/2 has been observed in various types of neuronal excitation, including seizure activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as in NMDA-receptor (NMDA-R)-dependent long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. On the other hand, recent studies in cultured neurons have shown that NMDA-R stimulation could result in either ERK1/2 activation or non-activation, depending on the pharmacological manipulations. To assess NMDA-R-dependent regulation of ERK1/2 activity in vivo, here we examined the effect of NMDA-R-induced seizure activity on ERK1/2 activation by using rat cortical slice preparations. NMDA-R-dependent seizure activity introduced by Mg2+-free condition did not cause ERK1/2 activation. On the other hand, when picrotoxin was added to concurrently suppress GABAA-receptor-mediated inhibition, profound ERK1/2 activation occurred, which was accompanied by strong phospho-ERK1/2-staining in the superficial and deep cortical layer neurons. In this case, prolonged membrane depolarization and enhanced burst action potential firings, both of which were much greater than those in Mg2+-free condition alone, were observed. Differential ERK1/2 activation was supported by the concurrent selective increase in phosphorylation of a substrate protein, phospho-site 4/5 of synapsin I. These results indicate that NMDA-R activation through a release from Mg2+-blockade, which accompanies enhancement of both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, was not enough, but concurrent suppression of GABAergic inhibition, which leads to a selective increase in excitatory synaptic transmission, was necessary for robust ERK1/2 activation to occur within the cortical network. PMID:23419897

  9. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psychiatric condition, as it usually presents in the form of delusions, hallucinations or mania. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who later develop neurological symptoms such as various movement disorders, epileptic seizures and autonomic instability. Examination of serum or cerebrospinal fluid for NMDA receptor antibodies should be included in the assessment of patients with suspected encephalitis. MRI, EEG and assessment for tumours are important tools in diagnosing the condition and any underlying malignancy.INTERPRETATION If treatment is initiated early, the prognosis is good. Altogether 75 % of patients will fully recover or experience significant improvement. Apart from surgical resection of a possible tumour, the treatment consists of immunotherapy. Because of good possibilities for treatment, it is important that clinicians, particularly those in acute psychiatry, are aware of and alert to this condition. PMID:27325034

  10. SP-8203 shows neuroprotective effects and improves cognitive impairment in ischemic brain injury through NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Noh, Su-Jin; Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Ki Sung; Hong, Hyun Su; Lee, Chul Kyu; Cho, Il Hwan; Kim, Hye-Sun; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2011-11-01

    The extracts of earth worms, Eisenia andrei, have been used as a therapeutic agent for stroke in the traditional medicine. It is also reported that the protease fraction separated from the extracts has strong anti-thrombotic activity. Besides anti-thrombotic actions, we found that SP-8203, N-[3-(2,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydro-2H-quinazolin-3-yl)propyl]-N-{4-[3-(2,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydro-2H-quinazolin-3-yl)propylamino]butyl}acetamide, derived from the extracts of earth worms blocked N-methyl-(D)-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in a competitive manner. The neuroprotective effects of SP-8203 were attributable to prevention of Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors. The systemic administration of SP-8203 markedly reduced neuronal death following middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats. SP-8203 significantly improved spatial learning and memory in the water maze test. These results provided strong pharmacological basis for its potential therapeutic roles in cerebral ischemia. PMID:21835192

  11. Molecular determinants of NMDA receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Roche, K W; Standley, S; McCallum, J; Dune Ly, C; Ehlers, M D; Wenthold, R J

    2001-08-01

    Although synaptic AMPA receptors have been shown to rapidly internalize, synaptic NMDA receptors are reported to be static. It is not certain whether NMDA receptor stability at synaptic sites is an inherent property of the receptor, or is due to stabilization by scaffolding proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that NMDA receptors are internalized in both heterologous cells and neurons, and we define an internalization motif, YEKL, on the distal C-terminus of NR2B. In addition, we show that the synaptic protein PSD-95 inhibits NR2B-mediated internalization, and that deletion of the PDZ-binding domain of NR2B increases internalization in neurons. This suggests an involvement for PSD-95 in NMDA receptor regulation and an explanation for NMDA receptor stability at synaptic sites. PMID:11477425

  12. NMDA receptors and memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard G M

    2013-11-01

    It is humbling to think that 30 years have passed since the paper by Collingridge, Kehl and McLennan showing that one of Jeff Watkins most interesting compounds, R-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (d-AP5), blocked the induction of long-term potentiation in vitro at synapses from area CA3 of the hippocampus to CA1 without apparent effect on baseline synaptic transmission (Collingridge et al., 1983). This dissociation was one of the key triggers for an explosion of interest in glutamate receptors, and much has been discovered since that collectively contributes to our contemporary understanding of glutamatergic synapses - their biophysics and subunit composition, of the agonists and antagonists acting on them, and their diverse functions in different networks of the brain and spinal cord. It can be fairly said that Collingridge et al.'s (1983) observation was the stimulus that has led, on the one hand, to structural biological work at the atomic scale describing the key features of NMDA receptors that enables their coincidence function to happen; and, on the other, to work with whole animals investigating the contributions that calcium signalling via this receptor can have on rhythmical activities controlled by spinal circuits, memory encoding in the hippocampus (the topic of this article), visual cortical plasticity, sensitization in pain, and other functions. In this article, I lay out how my then interest in long-term potentiation (LTP) as a model of memory enabled me to recognise the importance of Collingridge et al.'s discovery - and how I and my colleagues endeavoured to take things forward in the area of learning and memory. This is in some respects a personal story, and I tell it as such. The idea that NMDA receptor activation is essential for memory encoding, though not for storage, took time to develop and to be accepted. Along the way, there have been confusions, challenges, and surprises surrounding the idea that activation of NMDA receptors can

  13. N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor NR2 Subunit Selectivity of a Series of Novel Piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylate Derivatives: Preferential Blockade of Extrasynaptic NMDA Receptors in the Rat Hippocampal CA3-CA1 Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bihua; Tsintsadze, Timur S.; Morley, Richard M.; Irvine, Mark W.; Tsintsadze, Vera; Lozovaya, Natasha A.; Jane, David E.; Monaghan, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists that are highly selective for specific NMDA receptor 2 (NR2) subunits have several potential therapeutic applications; however, to date, only NR2B-selective antagonists have been described. Whereas most glutamate binding site antagonists display a common pattern of NR2 selectivity, NR2A > NR2B > NR2C > NR2D (high to low affinity), (2S*,3R*)-1-(phenanthrene-2-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (PPDA) has a low selectivity for NR2C- and NR2D-containing NMDA receptors. A series of PPDA derivatives were synthesized and then tested at recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In addition, the optical isomers of PPDA were resolved; the (−) isomer displayed a 50- to 80-fold greater potency than the (+) isomer. Replacement of the phenanthrene moiety of PPDA with naphthalene or anthracene did not improve selectivity. However, phenylazobenzoyl (UBP125) or phenylethynylbenzoyl (UBP128) substitution significantly improved selectivity for NR2B-, NR2C-, and NR2D-containing receptors over NR2A-containing NMDA receptors. Phenanthrene attachment at the 3 position [(2R*,3S*)-1-(phenanthrene-3-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (UBP141); (2R*,3S*)-1-(9-bromophenanthrene-3-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (UBP145); (2R*,3S*)-1-(9-chlorophenanthrene-3-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (UBP160); and (2R*,3S*)-1-(9-iodophenanthrene-3-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (UBP161)] displayed improved NR2D selectivity. UBP141 and its 9-brominated homolog (UBP145) both display a 7- to 10- fold selectivity for NR2D-containing receptors over NR2B- or NR2A-containing receptors. Schild analysis indicates that these two compounds are competitive glutamate binding site antagonists. Consistent with a physiological role for NR2D-containing receptors in the hippocampus, UBP141 (5 μM) displayed greater selectivity than PPDA for inhibiting the slow-decaying component of the NMDA receptor-mediated

  14. Physiology and pathology of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Petrović, M; Horák, M; Sedlácek, M; Vyklický, L

    2005-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype are highly expressed in the central nervous system and are involved in excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Prolonged activation of NMDA receptors can lead to excitotoxicity, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration occurring in various acute and chronic disorders of the central nervous system. Recent advances in understanding the function, pharmacology, genetics and structure of NMDA receptors has promoted a search for new compounds that could be therapeutically used. These compounds act on agonist binding sites, either apart from them or directly within the ion channel pore. Members of the last group are called open channel blockers, and some of them, such as memantine and ketamine, are already clinically used. Kinetic modeling of NMDA receptor activity was employed to define the effects of various groups of modulators. Quantifying the action of these substances by kinetic parameters can help us to reveal the molecular mechanism of action at the receptor and to characterize the dependence of its action on the mode of NMDA receptor activation. Two modes are considered: phasic activation, induced by synaptically released glutamate, and tonic activation, which is expected to occur under pathological conditions when low, but sustained levels of glutamate activate NMDA receptors. The aim of our review is to summarize the recent data about the structural and functional properties of NMDA receptors and their role in long-term potentiation and excitotoxicity. PMID:16315761

  15. The hippocampal NMDA receptors may be involved in acquisition, but not expression of ACPA-induced place preference.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Sharaf-Dolgari, Elmira; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the functional interactions between the endocannabinoid and glutamate systems in the hippocampus. The present study was made to test whether N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors of the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) are implicated in ACPA (a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist)-induced place preference. Using a 3-day schedule of conditioning, it was found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of ACPA (0.02mg/kg) caused a significant conditioned place preference (CPP) in male albino NMRI mice. Intra-CA1 microinjection of the NMDA or D-[1]-2-amino-7-Phosphonoheptanoic acid (D-AP7, NMDA receptor antagonist), failed to induce CPP or CPA (condition place aversion), while NMDA (0.5μg/mouse) potentiated the ACPA (0.01mg/kg)-induced CPP; and D-AP7 (a specific NMDA receptor antagonist; 0.5 and 1μg/mouse) reversed the ACPA (0.02mg/kg)-induced CPP. Moreover, microinjection of different doses of glutamatergic agents on the testing day did not alter the expression of ACPA-induced place preference. None of the treatments, with the exception of ACPA (0.04mg/kg), had an effect on locomotor activity. In conclusion, these observations provide evidence that glutamate NMDA receptors of the CA1 may be involved in the potentiation of ACPA rewarding properties in the acquisition, but not expression, of CPP in mice. PMID:26072736

  16. MPX-004 and MPX-007: New Pharmacological Tools to Study the Physiology of NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2A Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Volkmann, Robert A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Anderson, David R.; Sirivolu, Venkata Ramana; Paschetto, Kathy; Gordon, Earl; Virginio, Caterina; Gleyzes, Melanie; Buisson, Bruno; Steidl, Esther; Mierau, Susanna B.; Fagiolini, Michela; Menniti, Frank S.

    2016-01-01

    GluN2A is the most abundant of the GluN2 NMDA receptor subunits in the mammalian CNS. Physiological and genetic evidence implicate GluN2A-containing receptors in susceptibility to autism, schizophrenia, childhood epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett Syndrome. However, GluN2A-selective pharmacological probes to explore the therapeutic potential of targeting these receptors have been lacking. Here we disclose a novel series of pyrazine-containing GluN2A antagonists exemplified by MPX-004 (5-(((3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)pyrazine-2-carboxamide) and MPX-007 (5-(((3-fluoro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)methylpyrazine-2-carboxamide). MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibit GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors expressed in HEK cells with IC50s of 79 nM and 27 nM, respectively. In contrast, at concentrations that completely inhibited GluN2A activity these compounds have no inhibitory effect on GluN2B or GluN2D receptor-mediated responses in similar HEK cell-based assays. Potency and selectivity were confirmed in electrophysiology assays in Xenopus oocytes expressing GluN2A-D receptor subtypes. Maximal concentrations of MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibited ~30% of the whole-cell current in rat pyramidal neurons in primary culture and MPX-004 inhibited ~60% of the total NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP in rat hippocampal slices. GluN2A-selectivity at native receptors was confirmed by the finding that MPX-004 had no inhibitory effect on NMDA receptor mediated synaptic currents in cortical slices from GRIN2A knock out mice. Thus, MPX-004 and MPX-007 offer highly selective pharmacological tools to probe GluN2A physiology and involvement in neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. PMID:26829109

  17. MPX-004 and MPX-007: New Pharmacological Tools to Study the Physiology of NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2A Subunit.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Robert A; Fanger, Christopher M; Anderson, David R; Sirivolu, Venkata Ramana; Paschetto, Kathy; Gordon, Earl; Virginio, Caterina; Gleyzes, Melanie; Buisson, Bruno; Steidl, Esther; Mierau, Susanna B; Fagiolini, Michela; Menniti, Frank S

    2016-01-01

    GluN2A is the most abundant of the GluN2 NMDA receptor subunits in the mammalian CNS. Physiological and genetic evidence implicate GluN2A-containing receptors in susceptibility to autism, schizophrenia, childhood epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett Syndrome. However, GluN2A-selective pharmacological probes to explore the therapeutic potential of targeting these receptors have been lacking. Here we disclose a novel series of pyrazine-containing GluN2A antagonists exemplified by MPX-004 (5-(((3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)pyrazine-2-carboxamide) and MPX-007 (5-(((3-fluoro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)methylpyrazine-2-carboxamide). MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibit GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors expressed in HEK cells with IC50s of 79 nM and 27 nM, respectively. In contrast, at concentrations that completely inhibited GluN2A activity these compounds have no inhibitory effect on GluN2B or GluN2D receptor-mediated responses in similar HEK cell-based assays. Potency and selectivity were confirmed in electrophysiology assays in Xenopus oocytes expressing GluN2A-D receptor subtypes. Maximal concentrations of MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibited ~30% of the whole-cell current in rat pyramidal neurons in primary culture and MPX-004 inhibited ~60% of the total NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP in rat hippocampal slices. GluN2A-selectivity at native receptors was confirmed by the finding that MPX-004 had no inhibitory effect on NMDA receptor mediated synaptic currents in cortical slices from GRIN2A knock out mice. Thus, MPX-004 and MPX-007 offer highly selective pharmacological tools to probe GluN2A physiology and involvement in neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. PMID:26829109

  18. NMDA Receptors on Dopaminoceptive Neurons Are Essential for Drug-Induced Conditioned Place Preference123

    PubMed Central

    Tokarski, Krzysztof; Bobula, Bartosz; Zygmunt, Magdalena; Smutek, Magdalena; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Hess, Grzegorz; Przewlocki, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Plasticity of the brain’s dopamine system plays a crucial role in adaptive behavior by regulating appetitive motivation and the control of reinforcement learning. In this study, we investigated drug- and natural-reward conditioned behaviors in a mouse model in which the NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity of dopaminoceptive neurons was disrupted. We generated a transgenic mouse line with inducible selective inactivation of the NR1 subunit in neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors (the NR1D1CreERT2 mice). Whole-cell recordings of spontaneous EPSCs on neurons in the nucleus accumbens confirmed that a population of neurons lacked the NMDA receptor-dependent component of the current. This effect was accompanied by impaired long-term potentiation in the nucleus accumbens and in the CA1 area of the ventral, but not the dorsal, hippocampus. Mutant mice did not differ from control animals when tested for pavlovian or instrumental conditioning. However, NR1D1CreERT2 mice acquired no preference for a context associated with administration of drugs of abuse. In the conditioned place preference paradigm, mutant mice did not spend more time in the context paired with cocaine, morphine, or ethanol, although these mice acquired a preference for sucrose jelly and an aversion to naloxone injections, as normal. Thus, we observed that the selective inducible ablation of the NMDA receptors specifically blocks drug-associated context memory with no effect on positive reinforcement in general. PMID:27294197

  19. NMDA Receptors on Dopaminoceptive Neurons Are Essential for Drug-Induced Conditioned Place Preference.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Magdalena; Tokarski, Krzysztof; Bobula, Bartosz; Zajdel, Joanna; Jastrzębska, Kamila; Cieślak, Przemysław Eligiusz; Zygmunt, Magdalena; Sowa, Joanna; Smutek, Magdalena; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Engblom, David; Hess, Grzegorz; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Rodriguez Parkitna, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity of the brain's dopamine system plays a crucial role in adaptive behavior by regulating appetitive motivation and the control of reinforcement learning. In this study, we investigated drug- and natural-reward conditioned behaviors in a mouse model in which the NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity of dopaminoceptive neurons was disrupted. We generated a transgenic mouse line with inducible selective inactivation of the NR1 subunit in neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors (the NR1(D1CreERT2) mice). Whole-cell recordings of spontaneous EPSCs on neurons in the nucleus accumbens confirmed that a population of neurons lacked the NMDA receptor-dependent component of the current. This effect was accompanied by impaired long-term potentiation in the nucleus accumbens and in the CA1 area of the ventral, but not the dorsal, hippocampus. Mutant mice did not differ from control animals when tested for pavlovian or instrumental conditioning. However, NR1(D1CreERT2) mice acquired no preference for a context associated with administration of drugs of abuse. In the conditioned place preference paradigm, mutant mice did not spend more time in the context paired with cocaine, morphine, or ethanol, although these mice acquired a preference for sucrose jelly and an aversion to naloxone injections, as normal. Thus, we observed that the selective inducible ablation of the NMDA receptors specifically blocks drug-associated context memory with no effect on positive reinforcement in general. PMID:27294197

  20. Human neuroepithelial cells express NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Christopher D; Fowler, M; Jackson, T H; Houghton, J; Warren, A; Nanda, A; Chandler, I; Cappell, B; Long, A; Minagar, A; Alexander, J S

    2003-11-13

    L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1) cerebral endothelial barrier and 2) cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells) have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR) expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1) were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease. PMID:14614784

  1. Activation of the sigma receptor 1 modulates AMPA receptor-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei-Lei; Deng, Qin-Qin; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-09-22

    Sigma receptor (σR), a unique receptor family, is classified into three subtypes: σR1, σR2 and σR3. It was previously shown that σR1 activation induced by 1μM SKF10047 (SKF) suppressed N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses of rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) and the suppression was mediated by a distinct Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase C (PLC)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. In the present work, using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we further demonstrate that SKF of higher dosage (50μM) significantly suppressed AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) of retinal ON-type GCs (ON GCs), and the effect was reversed by the σR1 antagonist BD1047, suggesting the involvement of σR1. The SKF (50μM) effect was unlikely due to a change in glutamate release from bipolar cells, as suggested by the unaltered paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of AMPAR-mediated EPSCs of ON GCs. SKF (50μM) did not change L-EPSCs of ON GCs when the G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S or the protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor KT5823 was intracellularly infused. Calcium imaging further revealed that SKF (50μM) did not change intracellular calcium concentration in GCs and persisted to suppress L-EPSCs when intracellular calcium was chelated by BAPTA. The SKF (50μM) effect was intact when protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphatidylinostiol (PI)-PLC signaling pathways were both blocked. We conclude that the SKF (50μM) effect is Ca(2+)-independent, PKG-dependent, but not involving PKA, PI-PLC pathways. PMID:27373906

  2. Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin: in vivo characterization of receptor-mediated binding to hepatocyctes

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, D.R.; Krohn, K.A.; Stadalnik, R.C.; Scheibe, P.O.

    1984-04-01

    The biodistribution and kinetics of a receptor-binding hepatic radiopharmaceutical, Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (Tc-NGA), were investigated using mammalian and avian models. The radiopharmaceutical exhibited four significant features associated with receptor-mediated binding at the hepatocyte membrane in mammals: (a) high tissue specificity, (b) high molecular specificity, (c) affinity-dependent uptake, and (d) dose-dependent uptake. Diminished hepatic uptake by the avian model illustrated low nonspecific binding. The kinetic sensitivity to ligand-receptor affinity and stoichiometry illustrated the principal feature of receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals, namely, quantitative assessment of tissue function based upon the biochemical interaction of a ligand and its specific receptor.

  3. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery to Macrophages in Chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Arora, Sunil K.; Sehgal, Shobha; Basu, Sandip K.

    1989-05-01

    Methotrexate coupled to maleylated bovine serum albumin was taken up efficiently through the ``scavenger'' receptors present on macrophages and led to selective killing of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amazonensis amastigotes in cultured hamster peritoneal macrophages. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free methotrexate in eliminating the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, in a model of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in hamsters, the drug conjugate brought about more than 90% reduction in the size of footpad lesions within 11 days. In contrast, the free drug at a similar concentration did not significantly affect lesion size. These studies demonstrate the potential of receptor-mediated drug delivery in the therapy of macrophage-associated diseases.

  4. [Molecular physiology of receptor mediated endocytosis and its role in overcoming multidrug resistance].

    PubMed

    Severin, E S; Posypanova, G A

    2011-06-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays important role in the selective uptake of proteins at the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. Endocytosis regulates many processes of cell signalling by controlling the number of functional receptors on the cell surface. The article reviews the mechanism of clathrin-dependent endocytosis and the possibility of using this phenomenon for the targeted delivery of drugs. Use of certain proteins as targeting component of drug delivery systems can significantly improve the selectivity of this drug, as well as to overcome the multidrug resistance of cells resulting from the activity of the ABC-transporters. PMID:21874867

  5. NMDA receptors in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Rodrigo, Regina; Monfort, Pilar; Montoliu, Carmina; Kosenko, Elena; Cauli, Omar; Piedrafita, Blanca; El Mlili, Nisrin; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-12-01

    The NMDA type of glutamate receptors modulates learning and memory. Excessive activation of NMDA receptors leads to neuronal degeneration and death. Hyperammonemia and liver failure alter the function of NMDA receptors and of some associated signal transduction pathways. The alterations are different in acute and chronic hyperammonemia and liver failure. Acute intoxication with large doses of ammonia (and probably acute liver failure) leads to excessive NMDA receptors activation, which is responsible for ammonia-induced death. In contrast, chronic hyperammonemia induces adaptive responses resulting in impairment of signal transduction associated to NMDA receptors. The function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway is impaired in brain in vivo in animal models of chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia and in homogenates from brains of patients died in hepatic encephalopathy. The impairment of this pathway leads to reduced cGMP and contributes to impaired cognitive function in hepatic encephalopathy. Learning ability is reduced in animal models of chronic liver failure and hyperammonemia and is restored by pharmacological manipulation of brain cGMP by administering phosphodiesterase inhibitors (zaprinast or sildenafil) or cGMP itself. NMDA receptors are therefore involved both in death induced by acute ammonia toxicity (and likely by acute liver failure) and in cognitive impairment in hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:17701332

  6. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    PubMed

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  7. Understanding magnetic nanoparticle osteoblast receptor-mediated endocytosis using experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhiem; Webster, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are promising candidates for controlling drug delivery through an external magnetic force to treat a wide range of diseases, including osteoporosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that in the presence of hydroxyapatite coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, osteoblast (or bone forming cell) proliferation and long-term functions (such as calcium deposition) were significantly enhanced. Hydroxyapatite is the major inorganic component of bone. As a further attempt to understand why, in the current study, the uptake of such nanoparticles into osteoblasts was experimentally investigated and mathematically modeled. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using a co-precipitation method and were coated with hydroxyapatite. A cellular uptake experiment at low temperatures indicated that receptor-mediated endocytosis contributed to the internalization of the magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts. A model was further developed to explain the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts using receptor-mediated endocytosis. This model may explain the internalization of hydroxyapatite into osteoblasts to elevate intracellular calcium levels necessary to promote osteoblast functions to treat a wide range of orthopedic problems, including osteoporosis.

  8. Heterogeneity and probabilistic binding contributions to receptor-mediated cell detachment kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Saterbak, A; Kuo, S C; Lauffenburger, D A

    1993-01-01

    Biospecific cell adhesion is mediated by receptor-ligand bonds. Early theoretical work presented a deterministic analysis of receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment for a homogeneous cell population. However, initial comparison of a deterministic framework to experimental detachment profiles of model "cells" (antibody-coated latex beads) did not show qualitative or quantitative agreement (Cozens-Roberts, C., D.A. Lauffenburger, and J.A. Quinn. 1990. Biophys. J. 58:857-872). Hence, we determine the contributions of population heterogeneity and probabilistic binding to the detachment behavior of this experimental system which was designed to minimize experimental and theoretical complications. This work also corrects an error in the numerical solution of the probabilistic model of receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment developed previously (Cozens-Roberts, C., D.A. Lauffenburger, and J.A. Quinn. 1990. Biophys J. 58:841-856). Measurement of the population distribution of the number of receptors per bead has enabled us to explicitly consider the effect of receptor number heterogeneity within the cell-surface contact area. A deterministic framework that incorporates receptor number heterogeneity qualitatively and quantitatively accounts in large part for the model cell detachment data. Using measured and estimated parameter values for the model cell system, we estimate that about 90% of the observed kinetic detachment behavior originates from heterogeneity effects, while about 10% is due to probabilistic binding effects. In general, these relative contributions may differ for other systems. PMID:8396454

  9. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    PubMed

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils. PMID:24141311

  10. Receptor-mediated binding and uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist by pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jennes, L.; Stumpf, W.E.; Conn, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular pathway of an enzyme resistant GnRH agonist (D- Lys6 -GnRH) conjugated to ferritin or to colloidal gold was followed in cultured pituitary cells. After an initial uniform distribution over the cell surface of gonadotropes, the electrondense marker was internalized, either individually or in small groups. After longer incubation times, the marker appeared in the lysosomal compartment and the Golgi apparatus, where it could be found in the vesicular as well as cisternal portion. In addition, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of the GnRH antagonist D-p-Glu1-D-Phe2-D-Trp3-D- Lys6 -GnRH was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after 30 and 60 min of incubation to ensure uptake. At both time points, in in vitro as well as in vivo studies, silver grains were localized over cytoplasmic organelles of castration cells, including dilated endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and clear vesicles. No consistent association with cell nuclei, mitochondria, or secretory vesicles could be observed. The results suggest that both agonist and antagonist are binding selectively to the plasma membrane of gonadotropes and subsequently are taken up via receptor-mediated endocytosis for degradation or possible action on synthetic processes.

  11. Target shape dependence in a simple model of receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Richards, David M.; Endres, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis are vitally important particle uptake mechanisms in many cell types, ranging from single-cell organisms to immune cells. In both processes, engulfment by the cell depends critically on both particle shape and orientation. However, most previous theoretical work has focused only on spherical particles and hence disregards the wide-ranging particle shapes occurring in nature, such as those of bacteria. Here, by implementing a simple model in one and two dimensions, we compare and contrast receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis for a range of biologically relevant shapes, including spheres, ellipsoids, capped cylinders, and hourglasses. We find a whole range of different engulfment behaviors with some ellipsoids engulfing faster than spheres, and that phagocytosis is able to engulf a greater range of target shapes than other types of endocytosis. Further, the 2D model can explain why some nonspherical particles engulf fastest (not at all) when presented to the membrane tip-first (lying flat). Our work reveals how some bacteria may avoid being internalized simply because of their shape, and suggests shapes for optimal drug delivery. PMID:27185939

  12. Receptor-mediated tumor targeting with radiopeptides. Part 1. General principles and methods.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Alex N; Mild, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Radiolabeled peptides have become important tools for preclinical cancer research, and in nuclear oncology they serve as diagnostic and more recently also as therapeutic agents. In the latter application, radiolabeled peptides represent a distinct sector of the molecular targeting approach, which in many areas of therapy implements the old "magic bullet" concept by specifically directing the therapeutic agent to the site of action. Although in the past few years the development of receptor-mediated targeting for therapy has been confined to some radiolabeled antibodies and to somatostatin/SRIF, research into an increasing number of radiolabeled peptides and their receptors expressed by different tumors will soon lead to a wider use of peptide radiopharmaceuticals. In a consecutive series of six reviews we present a comprehensive overview of the literature on receptor-mediated tumor targeting with the different radiopeptides currently studied. Part 1 summarizes the concepts and methods of radiopeptide targeting, the selection of radioisotopes, chelators, the criteria of peptide ligand development and some general aspects of diagnostic and therapeutic application of peptide radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:19519167

  13. Interleukin 1 amplifies receptor-mediated activation of phospholipase A2 in 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Burch, R M; Connor, J R; Axelrod, J

    1988-01-01

    Human recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and IL-1 beta stimulated prostaglandin E2 synthesis in 3T3 fibroblasts in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Enhanced prostaglandin E2 synthesis after IL-1 treatment was apparent by 1 hr and continued to increase for at least 2 days. Half-maximal stimulation occurred at 0.5 pM IL-1 alpha or IL-1 beta, and both interleukins were equally effective, with maximal stimulation occurring in response to 5-10 pM IL-1. In contrast to IL-1, bradykinin stimulation of prostaglandin E2 synthesis is rapid; its effect is maximal by 5 min. In cells that had been pretreated with IL-1 for 24 hr, prostaglandin E2 synthesis in response to bradykinin was amplified more than 10-fold. IL-1 also amplified the receptor-mediated formation of prostaglandin E2 by bombesin and thrombin. The lymphokine did not affect bradykinin receptor number or affinity. IL-1 treatment induced phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase but not phospholipase C or prostaglandin E isomerase. It also enhanced bradykinin-stimulated GTPase activity, suggesting possible induction of the GTP-binding regulatory protein coupled to the bradykinin receptor. Thus, IL-1 enhanced receptor-mediated release of prostaglandin E2 in response to bradykinin, bombesin, and thrombin by increasing the cellular levels of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, and GTP-binding regulatory protein(s). PMID:2901097

  14. Opioid receptors mediate direct predictive fear learning: Evidence from one-trial blocking

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including μ-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear learning. Four experiments reported here used a within-subject one-trial blocking design to study whether opioid receptors mediate a direct or indirect action of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. In Stage I, rats were trained to fear conditioned stimulus (CS) A by pairing it with shock. In Stage II, CSA and CSB were co-presented once and co-terminated with shock. Two novel stimuli, CSC and CSD, were also co-presented once and co-terminated with shock in Stage II. The results showed one-trial blocking of fear learning (Experiment 1) as well as one-trial unblocking of fear learning when Stage II training employed a higher intensity footshock than was used in Stage I (Experiment 2). Systemic administrations of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (Experiment 3) or intra-vlPAG administrations of the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP (Experiment 4) prior to Stage II training prevented one-trial blocking. These results show that opioid receptors mediate the direct actions of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. PMID:17404385

  15. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  16. NMDA receptors regulate nicotine-enhanced brain reward function and intravenous nicotine self-administration: role of the ventral tegmental area and central nucleus of the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Paul J; Chartoff, Elena; Roberto, Marisa; Carlezon, William A; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine is considered an important component of tobacco responsible for the smoking habit in humans. Nicotine increases glutamate-mediated transmission throughout brain reward circuitries. This action of nicotine could potentially contribute to its intrinsic rewarding and reward-enhancing properties, which motivate consumption of the drug. Here we show that the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist LY235959 (0.5-2.5 mg per kg) abolished nicotine-enhanced brain reward function, reflected in blockade of the lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds usually observed after experimenter-administered (0.25 mg per kg) or intravenously self-administered (0.03 mg per kg per infusion) nicotine injections. The highest LY235959 dose (5 mg per kg) tested reversed the hedonic valence of nicotine from positive to negative, reflected in nicotine-induced elevations of ICSS thresholds. LY235959 doses that reversed nicotine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds also markedly decreased nicotine self-administration without altering responding for food reinforcement, whereas the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonist NBQX had no effects on nicotine intake. In addition, nicotine self-administration upregulated NMDA receptor subunit expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), suggesting important interactions between nicotine and the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, nicotine (1 microM) increased NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat CeA slices, similar to its previously described effects in the VTA. Finally, infusion of LY235959 (0.1-10 ng per side) into the CeA or VTA decreased nicotine self-administration. Taken together, these data suggest that NMDA receptors, including those in the CeA and VTA, gate the magnitude and valence of the effects of nicotine on brain reward systems, thereby regulating motivation to consume the drug. PMID:18418357

  17. GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors-mediate synaptic currents in hippocampal interneurons and pyramidal cells in juvenile mice

    PubMed Central

    von Engelhardt, Jakob; Bocklisch, Christina; Tönges, Lars; Herb, Anne; Mishina, Masayoshi; Monyer, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    The differential regulation of the two major N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits GluN2A and GluN2B during development in forebrain pyramidal cells has been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, much less is known about the role of GluN2D, which is expressed at low levels and is downregulated following the second postnatal week. However, it appears that few cells, presumably interneurons, continue to express GluN2D also in juvenile mice. To investigate which hippocampal cell types express this subunit, we generated transgenic mice with EGFP-tagged GluN2D receptors. The expression of the transgene was confined to hippocampal interneurons, most of which were parvalbumin- and/or somatostatin-positive. Electrophysiological and morphological analyses showed that GluN2D was present mainly in fast spiking basket and axo-axonic cells. Based on pharmacological evidence and electrophysiological analysis of GluN2D knockout mice, we conclude that GluN2D-containing NMDARs mediate synaptic currents in hippocampal interneurons of young and juvenile mice and in CA1 pyramidal neurons of newborn mice. PMID:25859181

  18. Presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors dampen cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal glutamatergic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, S G; Gonçalves, F Q; Marques, J M; Tomé, Â R; Rodrigues, R J; Nunes-Correia, I; Ledent, C; Harkany, T; Venance, L; Cunha, R A; Köfalvi, A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Both cannabinoid CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors (CB1 receptors and A2A receptors) control synaptic transmission at corticostriatal synapses, with great therapeutic importance for neurological and psychiatric disorders. A postsynaptic CB1−A2A receptor interaction has already been elucidated, but the presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated control of presynaptic neuromodulation by CB1 receptors remains to be defined. Because the corticostriatal terminals provide the major input to the basal ganglia, understanding the interactive nature of converging neuromodulation on them will provide us with novel powerful tools to understand the physiology of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and interpret changes associated with pathological conditions. Experimental Approach Pharmacological manipulation of CB1 and A2A receptors was carried out in brain nerve terminals isolated from rats and mice, using flow synaptometry, immunoprecipitation, radioligand binding, ATP and glutamate release measurement. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made in horizontal corticostriatal slices. Key Results Flow synaptometry showed that A2A receptors were extensively co-localized with CB1 receptor-immunopositive corticostriatal terminals and A2A receptors co-immunoprecipitated CB1 receptors in these purified terminals. A2A receptor activation decreased CB1 receptor radioligand binding and decreased the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of high-K+-evoked glutamate release in corticostriatal terminals. Accordingly, A2A receptor activation prevented CB1 receptor-mediated paired-pulse facilitation and attenuated the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission in glutamatergic synapses of corticostriatal slices. Conclusions and Implications Activation of presynaptic A2A receptors dampened CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal terminals. This constitutes a thus far unrecognized mechanism to modulate the potent CB1 receptor-mediated presynaptic

  19. Crystal structure of a heterotetrameric NMDA receptor ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Erkan; Furukawa, Hiro

    2014-01-01

    N -methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors, which mediate most excitatory synaptic transmission in mammalian brains. Calcium permeation triggered by activation of NMDA receptors is the pivotal event for initiation of neuronal plasticity. Here we show the crystal structure of the intact heterotetrameric GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptor ion channel at 4 Å. The NMDA receptors are arranged as a dimer of GluN1-GluN2B heterodimers with the two-fold symmetry axis running through the entire molecule composed of an amino terminal domain (ATD), a ligand-binding domain (LBD), and a transmembrane domain (TMD). The ATD and LBD are much more highly packed in the NMDA receptors than non-NMDA receptors, which may explain why ATD regulates ion channel activity in NMDA receptors but not in non-NMDA receptors. PMID:24876489

  20. Novel NMDA Receptor Modulators: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Rose M.; Acker, Timothy M.; Zimmerman, Sommer S.; Katzman, Brooke M.; Strong, Katie L.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction The NMDA receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that plays a critical role in higher level brain processes and has been implicated in a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions. Although initial studies for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists in neuroprotection were unsuccessful, more recently, NMDA receptor antagonists have shown clinical promise in other indications such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, pain and depression. Based on the clinical observations and more recent insights into receptor pharmacology, new modulatory approaches are beginning to emerge, with potential therapeutic benefit. Areas Covered The article covers the known pharmacology and important features regarding NMDA receptors and their function. A discussion of pre-clinical and clinical relevance is included, as well. The subsequent patent literature review highlights the current state of the art targeting the receptor since the last review in 2010. Expert Opinion The complex nature of the NMDA receptor structure and function is becoming better understood. As knowledge about this receptor increases, it opens up new opportunities for targeting the receptor for many therapeutic indications. New strategies and advances in older technologies will need to be further developed before clinical success can be achieved. First-in-class potentiators and subunit-selective agents form the basis for most new strategies, complemented by efforts to limit off-target liability and fine-tune on-target properties. PMID:23009122

  1. New advances in NMDA receptor pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Kevin K.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are tetrameric ion channels containing two of four possible GluN2 subunits. These receptors have been implicated for decades in neurological diseases such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, dementia, and schizophrenia. The GluN2 subunits contribute substantially to functional diversity of NMDA receptors and are distinctly expressed in development and among brain regions. Thus, subunit-selective antagonists and modulators that differentially target the GluN2 subunit might provide an opportunity to pharmacologically modify the function of select groups of neurons for therapeutic gain. A flurry of clinical, functional, and chemical studies have together reinvigorated efforts to identify subunit-selective modulators of NMDA receptor function, resulting in a handful of new compounds that appear to act at novel sites. Here we review the properties of new emerging classes of subunit-selective NMDA receptor modulators, which we predict will mark the beginning of a productive period of progress for NMDA receptor pharmacology. PMID:21996280

  2. Increased incidence of gap junctional coupling between spinal motoneurones following transient blockade of NMDA receptors in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Mentis, George Z; Díaz, Eugenia; Moran, Linda B; Navarrete, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    Neonatal rat motoneurones are electrically coupled via gap junctions and the incidence of this coupling declines during postnatal development. The mechanisms involved in this developmental regulation of gap junctional communication are largely unknown. Here we have studied the role of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic synaptic activity in the regulation of motoneurone coupling. Gap junctional coupling was demonstrated by the presence of graded, short latency depolarising potentials following ventral root stimulation, and by the transfer of the low molecular weight tracer Neurobiotin to neighbouring motoneurones. Sites of close apposition between the somata and/or dendrites of the dye-coupled motoneurones were identified as potential sites of gap junctional coupling. Early postnatal blockade of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors using the non-competitive antagonist dizocilpine maleate (MK801) arrested the developmental decrease in electrotonic and dye coupling during the first postnatal week. These results suggest that the postnatal increase in glutamatergic synaptic activity associated with the onset of locomotion promote the loss of gap junctional connections between developing motoneurones. PMID:12411521

  3. EP4 prostanoid receptor-mediated vasodilatation of human middle cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Richard J; Murdoch, Colin E; Ali, Mozam; Purbrick, Stuart; Ravid, Rivka; Baxter, Gordon S; Tilford, Nick; Sheldrick, Robert L G; Clark, Kenneth L; Coleman, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    Dilatation of the cerebral vasculature is recognised to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine. Furthermore, elevated levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) occur in the blood, plasma and saliva of migraineurs during an attack, suggestive of a contributory role. In the present study, we have characterised the prostanoid receptors involved in the relaxation and contraction of human middle cerebral arteries in vitro. In the presence of indomethacin (3 μM) and the TP receptor antagonist GR32191 (1 μM), PGE2 was found to relax phenylephrine precontracted cerebral arterial rings in a concentration-dependent manner (mean pEC50 8.0±0.1, n=5). Establishment of a rank order of potency using the EP4>EP2 agonist 11-deoxy PGE1, and the EP2>EP4 agonist PGE1-OH (mean pEC50 of 7.6±0.1 (n=6) and 6.4±0.1 (n=4), respectively), suggested the presence of functional EP4 receptors. Furthermore, the selective EP2 receptor agonist butaprost at concentrations <1 μM failed to relax the tissues. Blockade of EP4 receptors with the EP4 receptor antagonists AH23848 and EP4A caused significant rightward displacements in PGE2 concentration–response curves, exhibiting pA2 and pKB values of 5.7±0.1, n=3, and 8.4, n=3, respectively. The IP receptor agonists iloprost and cicaprost relaxed phenylephrine precontracted cerebral arterial rings (mean pEC50 values 8.3±0.1 (n=4) and 8.1±0.1 (n=9), respectively). In contrast, the DP and FP receptor agonists PGD2 and PGF2α failed to cause appreciable relaxation or contraction at concentrations of up to 30 μM. In the absence of phenylephrine contraction and GR32191, the TP receptor agonist U46619 caused concentration-dependent contraction of cerebral artery (mean pEC50 7.4±0.3, n=3). These data demonstrate the presence of prostanoid EP4 receptors mediating PGE2 vasodilatation of human middle cerebral artery. IP receptors mediating relaxation and TP receptors mediating contraction were also functionally demonstrated. PMID:14744815

  4. NMDA Receptor Activation and Calpain Contribute to Disruption of Dendritic Spines by the Stress Neuropeptide CRH

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Adrienne L.; Regev, Limor; Phi, Lucas; Seese, Ronald R.; Chen, Yuncai; Gall, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    The complex effects of stress on learning and memory are mediated, in part, by stress-induced changes in the composition and structure of excitatory synapses. In the hippocampus, the effects of stress involve several factors including glucocorticoids and the stress-released neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which influence the integrity of dendritic spines and the structure and function of the excitatory synapses they carry. CRH, at nanomolar, presumed-stress levels, rapidly abolishes short-term synaptic plasticity and destroys dendritic spines, yet the mechanisms for these effects are not fully understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that glutamate receptor-mediated processes, which shape synaptic structure and function, are engaged by CRH and contribute to spine destabilization. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, CRH application reduced dendritic spine density in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and this action depended on the CRH receptor type 1. CRH-mediated spine loss required network activity and the activation of NMDA, but not of AMPA receptors; indeed GluR1-containing dendritic spines were resistant to CRH. Downstream of NMDA receptors, the calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, was recruited, resulting in the breakdown of spine actin-interacting proteins including spectrin. Pharmacological approaches demonstrated that calpain recruitment contributed critically to CRH-induced spine loss. In conclusion, the stress hormone CRH co-opts mechanisms that contribute to the plasticity and integrity of excitatory synapses, leading to selective loss of dendritic spines. This spine loss might function as an adaptive mechanism preventing the consequences of adverse memories associated with severe stress. PMID:24155300

  5. NMDA receptor activation and calpain contribute to disruption of dendritic spines by the stress neuropeptide CRH.

    PubMed

    Andres, Adrienne L; Regev, Limor; Phi, Lucas; Seese, Ronald R; Chen, Yuncai; Gall, Christine M; Baram, Tallie Z

    2013-10-23

    The complex effects of stress on learning and memory are mediated, in part, by stress-induced changes in the composition and structure of excitatory synapses. In the hippocampus, the effects of stress involve several factors including glucocorticoids and the stress-released neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which influence the integrity of dendritic spines and the structure and function of the excitatory synapses they carry. CRH, at nanomolar, presumed-stress levels, rapidly abolishes short-term synaptic plasticity and destroys dendritic spines, yet the mechanisms for these effects are not fully understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that glutamate receptor-mediated processes, which shape synaptic structure and function, are engaged by CRH and contribute to spine destabilization. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, CRH application reduced dendritic spine density in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and this action depended on the CRH receptor type 1. CRH-mediated spine loss required network activity and the activation of NMDA, but not of AMPA receptors; indeed GluR1-containing dendritic spines were resistant to CRH. Downstream of NMDA receptors, the calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, was recruited, resulting in the breakdown of spine actin-interacting proteins including spectrin. Pharmacological approaches demonstrated that calpain recruitment contributed critically to CRH-induced spine loss. In conclusion, the stress hormone CRH co-opts mechanisms that contribute to the plasticity and integrity of excitatory synapses, leading to selective loss of dendritic spines. This spine loss might function as an adaptive mechanism preventing the consequences of adverse memories associated with severe stress. PMID:24155300

  6. D1 dopamine receptor-induced cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation and potentiation of striatal glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Kim, P; Raymond, L A

    1999-12-01

    Dopamine receptor activation regulates cyclic AMP levels and is critically involved in modulating neurotransmission in the striatum. Others have shown that alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA)-type glutamate receptor-mediated current is potentiated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activation. We made whole-cell patch clamp recordings from cultured striatal neurons and tested whether D1-type dopamine receptor activation affected AMPA receptor-mediated currents. After a 5-min exposure to the D1 agonist SKF 81297 (1 microM), kainate-evoked current amplitude was enhanced in approximately 75% of cells to 121+/-2.5% of that recorded prior to addition of drug. This response was inhibited by the D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and mimicked by activators of PKA. Moreover, by western blot analysis using an antibody specific for the phosphorylated PKA site Ser845 of GluR1, we observed a marked increase in phosphorylated GluR1 following a 10-min exposure of striatal neurons to 1 microM SKF 81297. Our data demonstrate that activation of D1-type dopamine receptors on striatal neurons promotes phosphorylation of AMPA receptors by PKA as well as potentiation of current amplitude. These results elucidate one mechanism by which dopamine can modulate neurotransmission in the striatum. PMID:10582604

  7. D1 dopamine receptor activity of anti-parkinsonian drugs.

    PubMed

    Fici, G J; Wu, H; VonVoigtlander, P F; Sethy, V H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical investigations suggest that stimulation of D1 dopamine receptors may be responsible for dyskinesias induced by dopamine agonist treatment of Parkinson's Disease (PD), and that these dyskinesias may be decreased by treatment with a D1 antagonist (clozapine). Therefore, the effects of dopamine agonists and antagonists have been investigated in a primary cerebellar granule cell model of cAMP formation that seems to be highly responsive to the D1 receptors. SKF 38393, lisuride, apomorphine, pergolide, dopamine, bromocriptine and 7-OH-DPAT showed concentration-dependent increases in cAMP formation, with EC50s (in microM) of 0.013, 0.053, 0.25, 1.04, 2.18, 50.9 and 54.4, respectively. SKF 38393, apomorphine, dopamine and pergolide had similar intrinsic activity (100%), while the intrinsic activities of 7-OH-DPAT, bromocriptine and lisuride were 28.0%, 20.7% and 17.2%, respectively. SCH 23390, a selective D1 dopamine receptor antagonist, blocked an increase in cAMP formation produced by EC50 concentrations of all of the dopamine agonists investigated in this study. Clozapine concentration-dependently blocked pergolide-induced increases in cAMP and was approximately 1700-fold less potent than SCH 23390 (IC50: 0.97 microM and 0.56 nM, respectively). U-95666A (1-1000 microM), selective for the D2 receptors, showed no significant effect on cAMP, while pramipexole (0.1-100 microM), a D3 preferring agonist, did not elevate cAMP. These data suggest that primary cerebellar granule cell cultures are an excellent model for measuring D1 dopamine receptor-mediated changes in cellular cAMP. The results are discussed with reference to the relationship between the D1 receptor-stimulated increase in cAMP formation and the induction of dyskinesia in humans by these anti-parkinsonian drugs. PMID:9126882

  8. NMDA Receptor Activity in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Caro, Mario; Hadzimichalis, Norell

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a variety of physiologic roles and their proper signaling is essential for cellular homeostasis. Any disruption in this pathway, leading to either enhanced or decreased activity, may result in the manifestation of neuropsychiatric pathologies such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, substance induced psychosis, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we explore the notion that the overlap in activity of at least one biochemical pathway, the NMDA receptor pathway, may be the link to understanding the overlap in psychotic symptoms between diseases. This review intends to present a broad overview of those neuropsychiatric disorders for which alternations in NMDA receptor activity is prominent thus suggesting that continued direction of pharmaceutical intervention to this pathway may present a viable option for managing symptoms. PMID:23772215

  9. Enzyme induction and histopathology elucidate aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated versus non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated effects of Aroclor 1268 in American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations reported in preferred prey and blubber of bottlenose dolphins from the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (Georgia, USA) suggest the potential for adverse effects. However, PCBs in Turtle-Brunswick River estuary dolphins are primarily derived from Aroclor 1268, and predicting toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 is uncertain because of the mixture's unique composition and associated physiochemical characteristics. These differences suggest that toxicity benchmarks for other PCB mixtures may not be relevant to dolphins exposed to Aroclor 1268. American mink (Neovison vison) were used as a surrogate model for cetaceans to characterize mechanisms of action associated with Aroclor 1268 exposure. Mink share similarities in phylogeny and life history with cetaceans and are characteristically sensitive to PCBs, making them an attractive surrogate species for marine mammals in ecotoxicity studies. Adult female mink and a subsequent F1 generation were exposed to Aroclor 1268 through diet, and effects on enzyme induction, histopathology, thyroid hormone regulation, hematology, organ weights, and body condition index were compared to a negative control and a 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-positive control. Aroclor 1268 dietary exposure concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g wet weight to 29 µg/g wet weight. Anemia, hypothyroidism, and hepatomegaly were observed in mink exposed to Aroclor 1268 beyond various dietary thresholds. Cytochrome P450 induction and squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions were low in Aroclor 1268 treatments relative to the positive control. Differences in enzyme induction and the development of squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions between Aroclor 1268 treatments and the positive control, coupled with effects observed in Aroclor 1268 treatments not observed in the positive control, indicate that mechanisms additional to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway are associated with

  10. Receptor-mediated entry of diphtheria toxin into monkey kidney (Vero) cells: electron microscopic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, R E; Gerstein, A S; Bonventre, P F; Saelinger, C B

    1985-01-01

    To express toxicity in living cells, diphtheria toxin (DT) must cross a membrane barrier and reach its target in the cytosol. Here we examine the entry of DT into the toxin-sensitive monkey kidney (Vero) cells. Using electron microscopy we directly demonstrated for the first time that DT is internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, i.e., via clathrin-coated pits, and enters the endosomal system. Methylamine, which is known to protect cells from DT, stopped the movement of toxin to coated areas of the cell membrane. In the presence of amine, prebound biotinyl-DT was internalized, but toxicity was inhibited. Biochemical evidence revealed that methylamine maintained toxin molecules at a site accessible to neutralization by antitoxin. The data suggest that DT entering Vero cells in the presence of methylamine is sequestered within the cell and does not express toxicity. Images PMID:4066029

  11. Administration of pyrene lipids by receptor-mediated endocytosis and their degradation in skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Agmon, V.; Dinur, T.; Cherbu, S.; Dagan, A.; Gatt, S. )

    1991-10-01

    Sphingomyelin and seven glycosphingolipids were labeled with the fluorescent probe pyrene and administered into cultured fibroblasts by receptor-mediated endocytosis. For this purpose pyrene sphingomyelin or mixtures of pyrene glycolipid and unlabeled sphingomyelin were dispersed as small, unilamellar liposomes. Apolipoprotein E was then added and the receptor for this ligand on the cell surface was utilized for uptake of the liposomes and their transport to the lysosomes, where the respective pyrene lipids were degraded. Following incubation with each of the respective pyrene lipids, only the administered compound and the pyrene ceramide were present; intermediate hydrolysis products were not detected. This indicated that, in skin fibroblasts, the lysosomal ceramidase was limiting and controlled the rate of total degradation of the pyrene sphingolipids.

  12. Transferrin protein nanospheres: a nanoplatform for receptor-mediated cancer cell labeling and gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael A.; Spurlin, Tighe A.; Tona, Alessandro; Elliott, John T.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents preliminary results on the use of transferrin protein nanospheres (TfpNS) for targeting cancer cells in vitro. Protein nanospheres represent an easily prepared and modifiable nanoplatform for receptor-specific targeting, molecular imaging and gene delivery. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate conjugated TfpNS (RBITC-TfpNS) show significantly enhanced uptake in vitro in SK-MEL-28 human malignant melanoma cells known to overexpress transferrin receptors compared to controls. RBITCTfpNS labeling of the cancer cells is due to transferrin receptor-mediated uptake, as demonstrated by competitive inhibition with native transferrin. Initial fluorescence microscopy studies indicate GFP plasmid can be transfected into melanoma cells via GFP plasmid encapsulated by TfpNS.

  13. Targeting receptor-mediated transport for delivery of biologics across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, Jason M; Shusta, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    Biologics are an emerging class of medicines with substantial promise to treat neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. However, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a formidable obstacle that appreciably limits brain uptake and hence the therapeutic potential of biologics following intravenous administration. One promising strategy for overcoming the BBB to deliver biologics is the targeting of endogenous receptor-mediated transport (RMT) systems that employ vesicular trafficking to transport ligands across the BBB endothelium. If a biologic is modified with an appropriate targeting ligand, it can gain improved access to the brain via RMT. Various RMT-targeting strategies have been developed over the past 20 years, and this review explores exciting recent advances, emphasizing studies that show brain targeting in vivo. PMID:25340933

  14. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  15. Administration of a non-NMDA antagonist, GYKI 52466, increases excitotoxic Purkinje cell degeneration caused by ibogaine.

    PubMed

    O'Hearn, E; Molliver, M E

    2004-01-01

    Ibogaine is a tremorigenic hallucinogen that has been proposed for clinical use in treating addiction. We previously reported that ibogaine, administered systemically, produces degeneration of a subset of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, primarily within the vermis. Ablation of the inferior olive affords protection against ibogaine-induced neurotoxicity leading to the interpretation that ibogaine itself is not directly toxic to Purkinje cells. We postulated that ibogaine produces sustained excitation of inferior olivary neurons that leads to excessive glutamate release at climbing fiber terminals, causing subsequent excitotoxic injury to Purkinje cells. The neuronal degeneration induced by ibogaine provides an animal model for studying excitotoxic injury in order to analyze the contribution of glutamate receptors to this injury and to evaluate neuroprotective strategies. Since non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate Purkinje cell excitation by climbing fibers, we hypothesized that 1-4-aminophenyl-methyl-7,8-methylenedioxy-5H-2,3-benzodiazepine (GYKI-52466), which antagonizes non-NMDA receptors, may have a neuroprotective effect by blocking glutamatergic excitation at climbing fiber synapses. To test this hypothesis, rats were administered systemic ibogaine plus GYKI-52466 and the degree of neuronal injury was analyzed in cerebellar sections. The results indicate that the AMPA antagonist GYKI-52466 (10 mg/kg i.p. x 3) does not protect against Purkinje cell injury at the doses used. Rather, co-administration of GYKI-52466 with ibogaine produces increased toxicity evidenced by more extensive Purkinje cell degeneration. Several hypotheses that may underlie this result are discussed. Although the reason for the increased toxicity found in this study is not fully explained, the present results show that a non-NMDA antagonist can produce increased excitotoxic injury under some conditions. Therefore, caution should be exercised before employing glutamate

  16. The Role of NMDA Receptor Subtypes in Short-Term Plasticity in the Rat Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Sophie E. L.; Yang, Jian; Jones, Roland S. G.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that spontaneous release of glutamate in the entorhinal cortex (EC) is tonically facilitated via activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDAr) containing the NR2B subunit. Here we show that the same receptors mediate short-term plasticity manifested by frequency-dependent facilitation of evoked glutamate release at these synapses. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from layer V pyramidal neurones in rat EC slices. Evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents showed strong facilitation at relatively low frequencies (3 Hz) of activation. Facilitation was abolished by an NR2B-selective blocker (Ro 25-6981), but unaffected by NR2A-selective antagonists (Zn2+, NVP-AAM077). In contrast, postsynaptic NMDAr-mediated responses could be reduced by subunit-selective concentrations of all three antagonists. The data suggest that NMDAr involved in presynaptic plasticity in layer V are exclusively NR1/NR2B diheteromers, whilst postsynaptically they are probably a mixture of NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B diheteromers and NR1/NR2A/NR2B triheteromeric receptors. PMID:18989370

  17. PSD-95 and Calcineurin Control the Sensitivity of NMDA Receptors to Calpain Cleavage in Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Eunice Y.; Ren, Yi; Yan, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a Ca2+-permeable glutamate receptor mediating many neuronal functions under normal and pathological conditions. Ca2+-influx via NMDARs activates diverse intracellular targets, including Ca2+-dependent protease calpain. Biochemical studies suggest that NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDARs are substrates of calpain. Our physiological data showed that calpain, activated by prolonged NMDA treatment (100 µM, 5 min) of cultured cortical neurons, irreversibly decreased the whole-cell currents mediated by extrasynaptic NMDARs. Animals exposed to transient forebrain ischemia, a condition that activates calpain, exhibited the reduced NMDAR current density and the lower full-length NR2A/B level in a calpain-dependent manner. Disruption of the association between NMDARs and the scaffolding protein PSD-95 facilitated the calpain regulation of synaptic NMDAR responses and NR2 cleavage in cortical slices, while inhibition of calcineurin activity blocked the calpain effect on NMDAR currents and NR2 cleavage. Calpain-cleaved NR2B subunits were removed from the cell surface. Moreover, cell viability assays showed that calpain, by targeting NMDARs, provided a negative feedback to dampen neuronal excitability in excitotoxic conditions. These data suggest that calpain activation suppresses NMDAR function via proteolytic cleavage of NR2 subunits in vitro and in vivo, and the susceptibility of NMDARs to calpain cleavage is controlled by PSD-95 and calcineurin. PMID:18445709

  18. Modulation of the NMDA receptor by polyamines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Romano, C.; Dichter, M.A.; Molinoff, P.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Results of recent biochemical and electrophysiological studies have suggested that a recognition site for polyamines exists as part of the NMDA receptor complex. The endogenous polyamines spermine and spermidine increase the binding of open-channel blockers and increase NMDA-elicited currents in cultured neutrons. These polyamines have been termed agonists at the polyamine recognition site. Studies of the effects of natural and synthetic polyamines on the binding of ({sup 3}H)MK-801 and on NMDA-elicited currents in cultured neurons have led to the identification of compounds classified as partial agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists at the polyamine recognition site. Polyamines have also been found to affect the binding of ligands to the recognition sites for glutamate and glycine. However, these effects may be mediated at a site distinct from that at which polyamines act to modulate the binding of open-channel blockers. Endogenous polyamines may modulate excitatory synaptic transmission by acting at the polyamine recognition site of the NMDA receptor. This site could represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemia-induced neurotoxicity, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. NMDA Receptors: Power Switches for Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Krasnow, Anna M; Attwell, David

    2016-07-01

    The role of NMDA receptors in oligodendrocytes has been controversial. A new paper (Saab et al., 2016) suggests they play a key role in regulating glucose uptake in response to axonal glutamate release, thus controlling metabolic cooperation between oligodendrocytes and axons. PMID:27387644

  20. Subunit Arrangement and Function in NMDA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa,H.; Singh, S.; Mancusso, R.; Gouaux, E.

    2005-01-01

    Excitatory neurotransmission mediated by NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors is fundamental to the physiology of the mammalian central nervous system. These receptors are heteromeric ion channels that for activation require binding of glycine and glutamate to the NR1 and NR2 subunits, respectively. NMDA receptor function is characterized by slow channel opening and deactivation, and the resulting influx of cations initiates signal transduction cascades that are crucial to higher functions including learning and memory. Here we report crystal structures of the ligand-binding core of NR2A with glutamate and that of the NR1-NR2A heterodimer with glutamate and glycine. The NR2A-glutamate complex defines the determinants of glutamate and NMDA recognition, and the NR1-NR2A heterodimer suggests a mechanism for ligand-induced ion channel opening. Analysis of the heterodimer interface, together with biochemical and electrophysiological experiments, confirms that the NR1-NR2A heterodimer is the functional unit in tetrameric NMDA receptors and that tyrosine 535 of NR1, located in the subunit interface, modulates the rate of ion channel deactivation.

  1. Diurnal inhibition of NMDA-EPSCs at rat hippocampal mossy fibre synapses through orexin-2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Martina; Longordo, Fabio; Massonnet, Christine; Welker, Egbert; Lüthi, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Diurnal release of the orexin neuropeptides orexin-A (Ox-A, hypocretin-1) and orexin-B (Ox-B, hypocretin-2) stabilises arousal, regulates energy homeostasis and contributes to cognition and learning. However, whether cellular correlates of brain plasticity are regulated through orexins, and whether they do so in a time-of-day-dependent manner, has never been assessed. Immunohistochemically we found sparse but widespread innervation of hippocampal subfields through Ox-A- and Ox-B-containing fibres in young adult rats. The actions of Ox-A were studied on NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission in acute hippocampal slices prepared around the trough (Zeitgeber time (ZT) 4–8, corresponding to 4–8 h into the resting phase) and peak (ZT 23) of intracerebroventricular orexin levels. At ZT 4–8, exogenous Ox-A (100 nm in bath) inhibited NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (NMDA-EPSCs) at mossy fibre (MF)–CA3 (to 55.6 ± 6.8% of control, P = 0.0003) and at Schaffer collateral–CA1 synapses (70.8 ± 6.3%, P = 0.013), whereas it remained ineffective at non-MF excitatory synapses in CA3. Ox-A actions were mediated postsynaptically and blocked by the orexin-2 receptor (OX2R) antagonist JNJ10397049 (1 μm), but not by orexin-1 receptor inhibition (SB334867, 1 μm) or by adrenergic and cholinergic antagonists. At ZT 23, inhibitory effects of exogenous Ox-A were absent (97.6 ± 2.9%, P = 0.42), but reinstated (87.2 ± 3.3%, P = 0.002) when endogenous orexin signalling was attenuated for 5 h through i.p. injections of almorexant (100 mg kg−1), a dual orexin receptor antagonist. In conclusion, endogenous orexins modulate hippocampal NMDAR function in a time-of-day-dependent manner, suggesting that they may influence cellular plasticity and consequent variations in memory performance across the sleep–wake cycle. PMID:25085886

  2. E2F1 in neurons is cleaved by calpain in an NMDA receptor-dependent manner in a model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zyskind, Jacob W.; Wang, Ying; Cho, Giyong; Ting, Jenhao H.; Kolson, Dennis L.; Lynch, David R.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor E2F1 activates gene targets required for G1-S phase progression and for apoptosis, and exhibits increased expression levels in neurons in several CNS diseases including HIV encephalitis, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson Disease. While E2F1 is known to regulate cell viability through activation of caspases, here we present evidence supporting the involvement of E2F1 in NMDA receptor-dependent, HIV-induced neuronal death mediated by calpains. Using an in vitro model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity that is dependent on NMDA receptor and calpain activation, we have shown that cortical neurons lacking functional E2F1 are less susceptible to neuronal death. Additionally, we report that neuronal E2F1 is cleaved by calpain to a stable 55-kiloDalton fragment following NR2B-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation. This cleavage of E2F1 is protein conformation-dependent and involves at least two cleavage events, one at each terminus of the protein. Intriguingly, the stabilized E2F1 cleavage product is produced in postmitotic neurons of all ages, but fails to be stabilized in cycling cells. Finally, we show that a matching E2F1 cleavage product is produced in human fetal neurons, suggesting that calpain cleavage of E2F1 may be produced in human cortical tissue. These results suggest neuronal E2F1 is processed in a novel manner in response to NMDA receptor-mediated toxicity, a mechanism implicated in HAND pathogenesis as well as several other diseases of the CNS. PMID:25279448

  3. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  4. Development of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors and their correlation with NMDA receptors in fast-spiking interneurons of rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huai-Xing; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal influx of Ca2+ is thought to contribute to the neuronal injury associated with a number of brain disorders, and Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) play a critical role in the pathological process. Despite the apparent vulnerability of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in neurological disorders, little is known about the CP-AMPARs expressed by functionally identified FS interneurons in the developing prefrontal cortex (PFC). We investigated the development of inwardly rectifying AMPA receptor-mediated currents and their correlation with NMDA receptor-mediated currents in FS interneurons in the rat PFC. We found that 78% of the FS interneurons expressed a low rectification index, presumably Ca2+-permeable AMPARs, with only 22% exhibiting AMPARs with a high rectification index, probably Ca2+ impermeable (CI). FS interneurons with CP-AMPARs exhibited properties distinct from those expressing CI-AMPARs, although both displayed similar morphologies, passive membrane properties and AMPA currents at resting membrane potentials. The AMPA receptors also exhibited dramatic changes during cortical development with significantly more FS interneurons with CP-AMPARs and a clearly decreased rectification index during adolescence. In addition, FS interneurons with CP-AMPARs exhibited few or no NMDA currents, distinct frequency-dependent synaptic facilitation, and protracted maturation in short-term plasticity. These data suggest that CP-AMPARs in FS interneurons may play a critical role in neuronal integration and that their characteristic properties may make these cells particularly vulnerable to disruptive influences in the PFC, thus contributing to the onset of many psychiatric disorders. PMID:20547673

  5. Evidence that 5-HT1D receptors mediate inhibition of sympathetic ganglionic transmission in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J. F.; Martin, G. R.; Ramage, A. G.

    1995-01-01

    In anaesthetized cats, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) (0.3-300 micrograms kg-1,i.v.) inhibited the postganglionic compound action potential evoked by preganglionic electrical stimulation (0.5 Hz) with a similar potency in the stellate and splanchnic ganglia. In the 5-HT experiments transmission thorough the inferior mesenteric ganglia was also recorded. The maximal inhibitory effect of 5-HT was greater on the stellate and splanchnic ganglia (60 +/- 4 and 52 +/- 5%) than on the inferior mesenteric (15 +/- 2%). The effects of 5-HT were unaffected by pretreatment with antagonists (1 mg kg-1;i.v.) for 5-HT2 (BW501C67), 5-HT1A (WAY-100635) and 5-HT3 receptors (ondansetron). However, responses to both 5-HT and 5-CT were attenuated significantly by GR127935 (1 mg kg-1) except the responses to 5-HT at the inferior mesenteric ganglia. These results are consistent with the involvement of 5-HT1D receptors mediating inhibition of sympathetic ganglionic transmission in vivo. PMID:8528548

  6. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  7. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of lysozyme in renal proximal tubules of the frog Rana temporaria.

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endosomes), and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intracellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals. PMID:26150156

  8. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Cho, J Hoon; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways. PMID:26018733

  9. Evidence for 5-HT7 receptors mediating relaxation of human colonic circular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Nicolaas H; Briejer, Michel R; Van Bergen, Patrick J E; Akkermans, Louis M A; Schuurkes, Jan A J

    1999-01-01

    5-HT4 receptors mediate relaxation of human colon circular muscle. However, after 5-HT4 receptor blockade (SB 204070 10 nM), 5-HT still induced a relaxation (pEC50 6.3). 5-HT4 receptors were sufficiently blocked, as the curves to 5-HT obtained in the presence of 10 and 100 nM SB 204070 were indistinguishable. This 5-HT-induced relaxation was tetrodotoxin-insensitive, indicative of a smooth muscle relaxant 5-HT receptor. This, and the rank order of potency (5-CT=5-MeOT=5-HT) suggested involvement of 5-HT1 or 5-HT7 receptors. Mesulergine, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist at nanomolar concentrations, and a 5-HT1 receptor antagonist at micromolar concentrations, competitively antagonized the 5-HT-induced relaxation (pKB 8.3) and antagonized the relaxation to 5-CT. Methysergide antagonized the 5-HT-induced relaxation (pA2 7.6). It is concluded that the profile of the smooth muscle inhibitory 5-HT receptor resembles that of the 5-HT7 receptor. These data provide the first evidence for functional human 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:10556917

  10. The effect of vanadate on receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid in rat liver parenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kindberg, G.M.; Gudmundsen, O.; Berg, T. )

    1990-06-05

    Vanadate is a phosphate analogue that inhibits enzymes involved in phosphate release and transfer reactions. Since such reactions may play important roles in endocytosis, we studied the effects of vanadate on various steps in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid labeled with 125I-tyramine-cellobiose (125I-TC-AOM). The labeled degradation products formed from 125I-TC-AOM are trapped in the lysosomes and may therefore serve as lysosomal markers in subcellular fractionation studies. Vanadate reduced the amount of active surface asialoglycoprotein receptors approximately 70%, but had no effect on the rate of internalization and retroendocytosis of ligand. The amount of surface asialoglycoprotein receptors can be reduced by lowering the incubation temperature gradually from 37 to 15 degrees C; vanadate affected only the temperature--sensitive receptors. Vanadate inhibited degradation of 125I-TC-AOM 70-80%. Degradation was much more sensitive to vanadate than binding; half-maximal effects were seen at approximately 1 mM vanadate for binding and approximately 0.1 mM vanadate for degradation. By subcellular fractionation in sucrose and Nycodenz gradients, it was shown that vanadate completely prevented the transfer of 125I-TC-AOM from endosomes to lysosomes. Therefore, the inhibition of degradation by vanadate was indirect; in the presence of vanadate, ligand did not gain access to the lysosomes. The limited degradation in the presence of vanadate took place in a prelysosomal compartment. Vanadate did not affect cell viability and ATP content.

  11. Effects of chronic ethanol administration on receptor mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that acute and chronic ethanol administration decreases hepatic glycoprotein secretion and membrane biogenesis. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of chronic ethanol feeding on receptor-mediated endocytosis using the endocytosis of ASOR as a model system. Rats were fed either rat chow ad lib or pair-fed with Lieber-DeCarli diet (ethanol or isocaloric glucose as 36% of total calories) for 5 to 7 weeks. Binding of /sup 125/I ASOR to isolated hepatocytes was studied at 0-4/sup 0/C. Internalization (cell-associated acid precipitable radioactivity) and degradation (acid soluble radioactivity) were determined at 37/sup 0/C for periods up to 240 min. Results were expressed as pmoles ASOR bound, degraded or internalized/10/sup 6/ cells. In ethanol-fed rats the number of pmoles ASOR bound/10/sup 6/ cells was decreased by 40-50% (p< 0.01) as compared to pair-fed and chow-fed animals. Rates of degradation and internalization of the ligand were also 50-70% lower (p< 0.01) in chronic ethanol-treated animals. No significant differences were observed for either binding or internalization of ASOR between chow-fed and pair-fed animals. These results indicate that chronic ethanol feeding decreases internalization and degradation of ASOR in rat hepatocytes.

  12. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  13. Plasma clearance of rat bikunin: evidence for receptor-mediated uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, E M; Blom, A; Larsson, B S; Alston-Smith, J; Sjöquist, M; Fries, E

    1995-01-01

    Bikunin is a chondroitin sulphate-containing protease inhibitor with a molecular mass of 25 kDa. It is secreted into the blood by hepatocytes, and recent observations indicate that it may have an extravascular function. Here we have studied the plasma clearance of bikunin in rats and mice. On intravenous injection, radiolabelled bikunin was found to have a half-life of 10 min; in rats with ligated renal arteries, the clearance time was twice as long, implying that the kidneys account for half the uptake. As judged by gel filtration, the size of bikunin is similar to that of albumin. Autoradiographic analysis of kidneys removed 2 min after the injection of radiolabelled bikunin indicated that, despite its size, bikunin is cleared by glomerular filtration. On ligation of the renal arteries, the plasma concentration of bikunin increased linearly to at least four times normal. This finding shows that the non-renal uptake system is saturated and therefore presumably receptor-mediated. Most of the non-renal uptake of injected bikunin was found to occur in non-visceral tissues such as the skin. Analysis of skin samples by autoradiography after injection of radiolabelled bikunin suggested that bikunin had been transferred from the plasma to the interstitial space. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8948446

  14. Toll Receptor-Mediated Hippo Signaling Controls Innate Immunity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zheng, Yonggang; Yin, Feng; Yu, Jianzhong; Silverman, Neal; Pan, Duojia

    2016-01-28

    The Hippo signaling pathway functions through Yorkie to control tissue growth and homeostasis. How this pathway regulates non-developmental processes remains largely unexplored. Here, we report an essential role for Hippo signaling in innate immunity whereby Yorkie directly regulates the transcription of the Drosophila IκB homolog, Cactus, in Toll receptor-mediated antimicrobial response. Loss of Hippo pathway tumor suppressors or activation of Yorkie in fat bodies, the Drosophila immune organ, leads to elevated cactus mRNA levels, decreased expression of antimicrobial peptides, and vulnerability to infection by Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, Gram-positive bacteria acutely activate Hippo-Yorkie signaling in fat bodies via the Toll-Myd88-Pelle cascade through Pelle-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of the Cka subunit of the Hippo-inhibitory STRIPAK PP2A complex. Our studies elucidate a Toll-mediated Hippo signaling pathway in antimicrobial response, highlight the importance of regulating IκB/Cactus transcription in innate immunity, and identify Gram-positive bacteria as extracellular stimuli of Hippo signaling under physiological settings. PMID:26824654

  15. Receptor-Mediated Entry of Pristine Octahedral DNA Nanocages in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Giulia; Raniolo, Sofia; Ottaviani, Alessio; Falconi, Mattia; Franch, Oskar; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Desideri, Alessandro; Biocca, Silvia

    2016-06-28

    DNA offers excellent programming properties for the generation of nanometer-scaled polyhedral structures with a broad variety of potential applications. Translation to biomedical applications requires improving stability in biological fluids, efficient and selective cell binding, and/or internalization of the assembled DNA nanostructures. Here, we report an investigation on the selective mechanism of cellular uptake of pristine DNA nanocages in cells expressing the receptor "oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1" (LOX-1), a scavenger receptor associated with cardiovascular diseases and, more recently, identified as a tumor marker. For this purpose a truncated octahedral DNA nanocage functionalized with a single biotin molecule, which allows DNA cage detection through the biotin-streptavidin assays, was constructed. The results indicate that DNA nanocages are stable in biological fluids, including human serum, and are selectively bound and very efficiently internalized in vesicles only in LOX-1-expressing cells. The amount of internalized cages is 30 times higher in LOX-1-expressing cells than in normal fibroblasts, indicating that the receptor-mediated uptake of pristine DNA nanocages can be pursued for a selective cellular internalization. These results open the route for a therapeutic use of pristine DNA cages targeting LOX-1-overexpressing tumor cells. PMID:27214742

  16. Delivery of liposomes into cultured KB cells via folate receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Low, P S

    1994-02-01

    Folic acid was covalently conjugated to 66-nm liposomes via spacers of various lengths in an attempt to target the liposomes to KB cells expressing folate receptors. Spacers of short and intermediate lengths were unable to mediate association of folate-conjugated liposomes with receptor-bearing cells, however, use of a 250 A polyethyleneglycol spacer (PEG, M(r) approximately 3350) permitted avid uptake of the liposomes at approximately 2.5 x 10(5) sites/cell. The binding of folate-PEG liposomes to KB cells could be competitively inhibited by excess free folate or by antiserum against the folate receptor, demonstrating the interaction is mediated by the cell surface folate-binding protein. Following binding, cell-associated folate-PEG liposomes were internalized by folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. These folate-PEG liposomes show potential for delivering large quantities of low molecular weight compounds nondestructively into folate receptor-bearing cells. PMID:8106354

  17. Muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol tetrakisphosphate response in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, B.B.; Schneider, A.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), a product of the phosphoinositide cycle, mobilizes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in many cell types. New evidence suggests that inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP{sub 4}), an IP{sub 3} derivative, may act as another second messenger to further alter calcium homeostasis. However, the function and mechanism of action of IP{sub 4} are presently unresolved. We now report evidence of muscarinic receptor-mediated accumulation of IP{sub 4} in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, a classic neurosecretory system in which calcium movements have been well studied. Muscarine stimulated an increase in ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} accumulation in chromaffin cells and this effect was completely blocked by atropine. ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} accumulation was detectable within 15 sec, increased to a maximum by 30 sec and thereafter declined. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an inhibitor of IP{sub 3} and IP{sub 4} hydrolysis, enhanced accumulation of these inositol polyphosphates. The results provide the first evidence of a rapid inositol tetrakisphosphate response in adrenal chromaffin cells, which should facilitate the future resolution of the relationship between IP{sub 4} and calcium homeostasis.

  18. Killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis by receptor-mediated drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Basu, S.K. )

    1991-01-01

    p-Aminosalicylic acid (PAS) conjugated to maleylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA) was taken up efficiently through high-affinity MBSA-binding sites on macrophages. Binding of the radiolabeled conjugate to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages at 4 degrees C was competed for by MBSA but not by PAS. At 37 degrees C, the radiolabeled conjugate was rapidly degraded by the macrophages, leading to release of acid-soluble degradation products in the medium. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free PAS in killing the intracellular mycobacteria in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected in culture with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The killing of intracellular mycobacteria mediated by the drug conjugate was effectively prevented by simultaneous addition of excess MBSA (100 micrograms/ml) or chloroquine (3 microM) to the medium, whereas these agents did not affect the microbicidal action of free PAS. These results suggest that (i) uptake of the PAS-MBSA conjugate was mediated by cell surface receptors on macrophages which recognize MBSA and (ii) lysosomal hydrolysis of the internalized conjugate resulted in intracellular release of a pharmacologically active form of the drug, which led to selective killing of the M. tuberculosis harbored by mouse macrophages infected in culture. This receptor-mediated modality of delivering drugs to macrophages could contribute to greater therapeutic efficacy and minimization of toxic side effects in the management of tuberculosis and other intracellular mycobacterial infections.

  19. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-11-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  20. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Lysozyme in Renal Proximal Tubules of the Frog Rana Temporaria

    PubMed Central

    Seliverstova, E.V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endo-somes), and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intra-cellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals. PMID:26150156

  1. Receptor-mediated adhesion phenomena. Model studies with the Radical-Flow Detachment Assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenberger, D A

    1990-01-01

    Receptor-mediated cell adhesion phenomena play a vital role in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. To investigate the physical and chemical factors that influence the cell/surface interaction, we have used a radial flow device, a so-called Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA). The RFDA allows us to make direct observations of the detachment process under specified experimental conditions. In results reported here, we have studied the detachment of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) from ligand-coated glass surfaces. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine several aspects of the adhesion process with particles having uniform properties that can be varied systematically. Advantages of the RFDA are many, especially direct observation of cell detachment over a range of shear stresses with quantitative measurement of the adhesive force. We focus our studies on the effects of ligand and receptor densities, along with the influence of pH and ionic strength of the medium. These data are analyzed with a mathematical model based on the theoretical framework of Bell, G. I. (1978. Science [Wash. DC]. 200:618-627) and Hammer, D. A. and D. A. Lauffenburger (1987. Biophys. J. 52:475-487). We demonstrate experimental validation of a theoretical expression for the critical shear stress for particle detachment, and show that it is consistent with reasonable estimates for the receptor-ligand bond affinity. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2166596

  2. LRP6 Protein Regulates Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor-mediated LDL Uptake*

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhi-jia; Go, Gwang-Woong; Singh, Rajvir; Liu, Wenzhong; Keramati, Ali Reza; Mani, Arya

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variations in LRP6 gene are associated with high serum LDL cholesterol levels. We have previously shown that LDL clearance in peripheral B-lymphocytes of the LRP6R611C mutation carriers is significantly impaired. In this study we have examined the role of wild type LRP6 (LRP6WT) and LRP6R611C in LDL receptor (LDLR)-mediated LDL uptake. LDL binding and uptake were increased when LRP6WT was overexpressed and modestly reduced when it was knocked down in LDLR-deficient CHO (ldlA7) cells. These findings implicated LRP6 in LDLR-independent cellular LDL binding and uptake. However, LRP6 knockdown in wild type CHO cells resulted in a much greater decline in LDL binding and uptake compared with CHO-ldlA7 cells, suggesting impaired function of the LDLR. LDLR internalization was severely diminished when LRP6 was knocked down and was restored after LRP6 was reintroduced. Further analysis revealed that LRP6WT forms a complex with LDLR, clathrin, and ARH and undergoes a clathrin-mediated internalization after stimulation with LDL. LDLR and LRP6 internalizations as well as LDL uptake were all impaired in CHO-k1 cells expressing LRP6R611C. These studies identify LRP6 as a critical modulator of receptor-mediated LDL endocytosis and introduce a mechanism by which variation in LRP6 may contribute to high serum LDL levels. PMID:22128165

  3. Tonic GABAA Receptor-Mediated Inhibition in the Rat Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors expressed in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus (DMV) critically regulate the activity of vagal motor neurons and, by inference, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Two types of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition have been identified in the brain, represented by phasic (Iphasic) and tonic (Itonic) inhibitory currents. The hypothesis that Itonic regulates neuron activity was tested in the DMV using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in transverse brain stem slices from rats. An Itonic was present in a subset of DMV neurons, which was determined to be mediated by different receptors than those mediating fast, synaptic currents. Preapplication of tetrodotoxin significantly decreased the resting Itonic amplitude in DMV neurons, suggesting that most of the current was due to action potential (AP)–dependent GABA release. Blocking GABA transport enhanced Itonic and multiple GABA transporters cooperated to regulate Itonic. The Itonic was composed of both a gabazine-insensitive component that was nearly saturated under basal conditions and a gabazine-sensitive component that was activated when extracellular GABA concentration was elevated. Perfusion of THIP (10 μM) significantly increased Itonic amplitude without increasing Iphasic amplitude. The Itonic played a major role in determining the overall excitability of DMV neurons by contributing to resting membrane potential and AP frequency. Our results indicate that Itonic contributes to DMV neuron membrane potential and activity and is thus an important regulator of vagally mediated GI function. PMID:20018836

  4. Pharmacological characterization of the receptors mediating vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced vasodilation in rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.T.; Bylund, D.B.

    1986-03-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-contain nerve fibers associated with blood vessels are widely distributed, both in the central nervous system and in the periphery. VIP has been shown to be a potent vasodilator in a variety of vascular preparations. The authors have evaluated VIP, the VIP fragment 10-28, and several related peptides including PHI-27, PHM-27 and secretin in terms of their potencies in (1) stimulating the synthesis of cyclic AMP, using the method of Shimizu, in aortic rings; and (2) reversing norepinephrine induced contraction in aortic rings. The authors results indicate that VIP is the most potent of the peptides in both experimental protocols and that the rank order potencies of the various peptides are consistent between the two parameters measured. The authors are currently conducting radioligand binding studies with (/sup 125/I)VIP to further characterize the receptors involved. Additionally, the authors experiments in rat aorta indicate that the presence of the endothelial layer is not required for VIP receptor mediated effects to occur. A potential role for synthetic compounds with high specificity for the VIP receptor in treating hypertension is suggested.

  5. Coupling of mitochondrial import and export translocases by receptor-mediated supercomplex formation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Zerbes, Ralf M; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Bohnert, Maria; Stroud, David A; Wirth, Christophe; Ellenrieder, Lars; Thornton, Nicolas; Kutik, Stephan; Wiese, Sebastian; Schulze-Specking, Agnes; Zufall, Nicole; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Guiard, Bernard; Hunte, Carola; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils; Becker, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane harbors two protein translocases that are essential for cell viability: the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). The precursors of β-barrel proteins use both translocases-TOM for import to the intermembrane space and SAM for export into the outer membrane. It is unknown if the translocases cooperate and where the β-barrel of newly imported proteins is formed. We established a position-specific assay for monitoring β-barrel formation in vivo and in organello and demonstrated that the β-barrel was formed and membrane inserted while the precursor was bound to SAM. β-barrel formation was inhibited by SAM mutants and, unexpectedly, by mutants of the central import receptor, Tom22. We show that the cytosolic domain of Tom22 links TOM and SAM into a supercomplex, facilitating precursor transfer on the intermembrane space side. Our study reveals receptor-mediated coupling of import and export translocases as a means of precursor channeling. PMID:23911324

  6. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Hoon Cho, J; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways. PMID:26018733

  7. Peptides in Receptor-Mediated Radiotherapy: From Design to the Clinical Application in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Catherine; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Vivès, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Short peptides can show high affinity for specific receptors overexpressed on tumor cells. Some of these are already used in cancerology as diagnostic tools and others are in clinical trials for therapeutic applications. Therefore, peptides exhibit great potential as a diagnostic tool but also as an alternative or an additional antitumoral approach upon the covalent attachment of a therapeutic moiety such as a radionuclide or a cytotoxic drug. The chemistry offers flexibility to graft onto the targeting-peptide either fluorine or iodine directly, or metallic radionuclides through appropriate chelating agent. Since short peptides are straightforward to synthesize, there is an opportunity to further improve existing peptides or to design new ones for clinical applications. However, several considerations have to be taken into account to optimize the recognition properties of the targeting-peptide to its receptor, to improve its stability in the biological fluids and its residence in the body, or to increase its overall therapeutic effect. In this review, we highlight the different aspects which need to be considered for the development of an efficient peptide receptor-mediated radionuclide therapy in different neoplasms. PMID:24093086

  8. Involvement of protein kinase C and Src tyrosine kinase in acute tolerance to ethanol inhibition of spinal NMDA-induced pressor responses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, W-K; Lin, H-H; Lai, C-C

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein kinases in the development of acute tolerance to the effects of ethanol on spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated pressor responses during prolonged ethanol exposure. Experimental approach: Blood pressure responses induced by intrathecal injection of NMDA were recorded. The levels of several phosphorylated residues on NMDA receptor NR1 (GluN1) (NR1) and NMDA receptor NR2B (GluN2B) (NR2B) subunits were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Key results: Ethanol inhibited spinal NMDA-induced pressor responses at 10 min, but the inhibition was significantly reduced at 40 min following continuous infusion. This effect was dose-dependently blocked by chelerythrine [a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, 1–1000 pmol] or PP2 (a Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor, 1–100 pmol) administered intrathecally 10 min following ethanol infusion. A significant increase in the immunoreactivity of phosphoserine 896 of NR1 subunits (pNR1-Ser896) and phosphotyrosine 1336 of NR2B subunits (pNR2B-Tyr1336) was found in neurons of intermediolateral cell column during the development of tolerance. Levels of pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 were also significantly increased in lateral horn regions of the spinal cord slices incubated with ethanol for 40 min in vitro. The increases in pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 levels were inhibited by post-treatment with chelerythrine and PP2, respectively, both in the in vivo and in vitro studies. Conclusions and implications: The results suggest that activation of PKC and Src tyrosine kinase during prolonged ethanol exposure leading to increases in the levels of pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 may contribute to acute tolerance to inhibition by ethanol of NMDA receptor function. PMID:19703167

  9. NMDA receptor binding in focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    McGinnity, C J; Koepp, M J; Hammers, A; Riaño Barros, D A; Pressler, R M; Luthra, S; Jones, P A; Trigg, W; Micallef, C; Symms, M R; Brooks, D J; Duncan, J S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor availability in patients with focal epilepsies using positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]GE-179, a ligand that selectively binds to the open NMDA receptor ion channel, which is thought to be overactive in epilepsy. Methods Eleven patients (median age 33 years, 6 males) with known frequent interictal epileptiform discharges had an [18F]GE-179 PET scan, in a cross-sectional study. MRI showed a focal lesion but discordant EEG changes in two, was non-localising with multifocal EEG abnormalities in two, and was normal in the remaining seven patients who all had multifocal EEG changes. Individual patient [18F]GE-179 volume-of-distribution (VT) images were compared between individual patients and a group of 10 healthy controls (47 years, 7 males) using Statistical Parametric Mapping. Results Individual analyses revealed a single cluster of focal VT increase in four patients; one with a single and one with multifocal MRI lesions, and two with normal MRIs. Post hoc analysis revealed that, relative to controls, patients not taking antidepressants had globally increased [18F]GE-179 VT (+28%; p<0.002), and the three patients taking an antidepressant drug had globally reduced [18F]GE-179 VT (−29%; p<0.002). There were no focal abnormalities common to the epilepsy group. Conclusions In patients with focal epilepsies, we detected primarily global increases of [18F]GE-179 VT consistent with increased NMDA channel activation, but reduced availability in those taking antidepressant drugs, consistent with a possible mode of action of this class of drugs. [18F]GE-179 PET showed focal accentuations of NMDA binding in 4 out of 11 patients, with difficult to localise and treat focal epilepsy. PMID:25991402

  10. A family of photoswitchable NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Shai; Szobota, Stephanie; Reiner, Andreas; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Kienzler, Michael A; Guyon, Alice; Xiao, Tong; Tauner, Dirk; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors, which regulate synaptic strength and are implicated in learning and memory, consist of several subtypes with distinct subunit compositions and functional properties. To enable spatiotemporally defined, rapid and reproducible manipulation of function of specific subtypes, we engineered a set of photoswitchable GluN subunits ('LiGluNs'). Photo-agonism of GluN2A or GluN2B elicits an excitatory drive to hippocampal neurons that can be shaped in time to mimic synaptic activation. Photo-agonism of GluN2A at single dendritic spines evokes spine-specific calcium elevation and expansion, the morphological correlate of LTP. Photo-antagonism of GluN2A alone, or in combination with photo-antagonism of GluN1a, reversibly blocks excitatory synaptic currents, prevents the induction of long-term potentiation and prevents spine expansion. In addition, photo-antagonism in vivo disrupts synaptic pruning of developing retino-tectal projections in larval zebrafish. By providing precise and rapidly reversible optical control of NMDA receptor subtypes, LiGluNs should help unravel the contribution of specific NMDA receptors to synaptic transmission, integration and plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12040.001 PMID:26929991

  11. A family of photoswitchable NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Shai; Szobota, Stephanie; Reiner, Andreas; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Kienzler, Michael A; Guyon, Alice; Xiao, Tong; Tauner, Dirk; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors, which regulate synaptic strength and are implicated in learning and memory, consist of several subtypes with distinct subunit compositions and functional properties. To enable spatiotemporally defined, rapid and reproducible manipulation of function of specific subtypes, we engineered a set of photoswitchable GluN subunits ('LiGluNs'). Photo-agonism of GluN2A or GluN2B elicits an excitatory drive to hippocampal neurons that can be shaped in time to mimic synaptic activation. Photo-agonism of GluN2A at single dendritic spines evokes spine-specific calcium elevation and expansion, the morphological correlate of LTP. Photo-antagonism of GluN2A alone, or in combination with photo-antagonism of GluN1a, reversibly blocks excitatory synaptic currents, prevents the induction of long-term potentiation and prevents spine expansion. In addition, photo-antagonism in vivo disrupts synaptic pruning of developing retino-tectal projections in larval zebrafish. By providing precise and rapidly reversible optical control of NMDA receptor subtypes, LiGluNs should help unravel the contribution of specific NMDA receptors to synaptic transmission, integration and plasticity. PMID:26929991

  12. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  13. A pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex modulates androgen receptor-mediated transcription and associates with components of the splicing machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Adegbola, Onikepe; Pasternack, Gary R. . E-mail: gpastern@jhmi.edu

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein interact. pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein are nuclear receptor transcriptional coregulators: the retinoblastoma protein is a coactivator for androgen receptor, the major regulator of prostate cancer growth, while pp32, which is highly expressed in prostate cancer, is a corepressor of the estrogen receptor. We now show pp32 increases androgen receptor-mediated transcription and the retinoblastoma protein modulates this activity. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify members of the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex as PSF and nonO/p54nrb, proteins implicated in coordinate regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and splicing. We show that the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex is modulated during TPA-induced K562 differentiation. Present evidence suggests that nuclear receptors assemble multiprotein complexes to coordinately regulate transcription and mRNA processing. Our results suggest that pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein may be part of a multiprotein complex that coordinately regulates nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and mRNA processing.

  14. The BCL2L1 and PGAM5 axis defines hypoxia-induced receptor-mediated mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Xue, Danfeng; Chen, Guo; Han, Zhe; Huang, Li; Zhu, Chongzhuo; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Yushan; Liu, Lei; Chen, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-mediated mitophagy is one of the major mechanisms of mitochondrial quality control essential for cell survival. We previously have identified FUNDC1 as a mitophagy receptor for selectively removing damaged mitochondria in mammalian systems. A critical unanswered question is how receptor-mediated mitophagy is regulated in response to cellular and environmental cues. Here, we report the striking finding that BCL2L1/Bcl-xL, but not BCL2, suppresses mitophagy mediated by FUNDC1 through its BH3 domain. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that BCL2L1, but not BCL2, interacts with and inhibits PGAM5, a mitochondrially localized phosphatase, to prevent the dephosphorylation of FUNDC1 at serine 13 (Ser13), which activates hypoxia-induced mitophagy. Our results showed that the BCL2L1-PGAM5-FUNDC1 axis is critical for receptor-mediated mitophagy in response to hypoxia and that BCL2L1 possesses unique functions distinct from BCL2. PMID:25126723

  15. Signaling Cascades Regulating NMDA Receptor Sensitivity to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    RON, DORIT

    2005-01-01

    One of the major targets for ethanol (alcohol) in the brain is the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, a glutamate-gated ion channel. Intriguingly, the effects of ethanol on the NMDA receptor are not homogeneous throughout the brain. This review focuses on recent studies revealing molecular mechanisms that mediate the actions of ethanol on the NMDA receptor in different brain regions via changes in NMDA receptor phosphorylation and compartmentalization. Specifically, the role of the scaffolding protein RACK1 and the regulatory protein DARPP-32 in mediating the distinct effects of ethanol is presented. PMID:15271260

  16. Characterization of putative 5-HT7 receptors mediating tachycardia in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Carlos M; Heiligers, Jan P C; Centurión, David; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R

    1997-01-01

    , sumatriptan (30, 100 and 300 μg kg−1) and indorenate (300 and 1000 μg kg−1) or the 5-HT4 receptor (partial) agonist cisapride (300 and 1000 μg kg−1) were devoid of effects on feline heart rate per se and failed to modify significantly 5-HT-induced tachycardic responses. Based upon the above rank order of agonist potency, the failure of sumatriptan, indorenate or cisapride to produce cardioacceleration and the blockade by a series of drugs showing high affinity for the cloned 5-ht7 receptor, the present results indicate that the 5-HT receptor mediating tachycardia in the cat is operationally similar to other putative 5-HT7 receptors mediating vascular and non-vascular responses (e.g. relaxation of the rabbit femoral vein, canine external carotid and coronary arteries, rat systemic vasculature and guinea-pig ileum). Since these responses represent functional correlates of the 5-ht7 gene product, the 5-HT7 receptor appellation is reinforced. Therefore, the present experimental model, which is not complicated by the presence of other 5-HT receptors, can be utilized to characterize and develop new drugs with potential agonist and antagonist properties at functional 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:9249256

  17. Renal opiate receptor mediation of renin secretion to renal nerve stimulation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Koyama, S; Hosomi, H

    1986-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate renal opiate receptor mediation of the renin secretion response to electrical stimulation of the renal nerves in the pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized dog by use of the opiate agonist leucine-enkephalin (Leu-enk) and the opiate antagonist naloxone. In all animals studied, left kidneys were pump perfused at a constant renal blood flow. Renal perfusion pressure (RPP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were unaltered at a stimulation frequency of 1.0 Hz; however, renin secretion rate (RSR) increased significantly in the nontreated group. High-frequency renal nerve stimulation (10 Hz) increased RPP and decreased GFR. RSR at the high-frequency stimulation was significantly augmented in the nontreated group. Renal arterial infusion of either Leu-enk (25 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) or naloxone (7 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) did not alter base-line levels of renal hemodynamics and RSR and did not produce significant changes in these variables even when renal nerves were stimulated at the low frequency; however, Leu-enk inhibited RPP and RSR responses to the high-frequency stimulation, and naloxone augmented these responses. Phentolamine (13 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) prevented renal hemodynamic responses to the renal nerve stimulation, whereas RSR responses to the stimulation were unaffected. Propranolol (8 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) resulted in decreases in RSR at the renal nerve stimulation despite the presence of changes in renal hemodynamics similar to the other groups. The results indicate that intrarenal opiate receptors may participate in inhibiting renal secretion of renin mediated by the renal nerves when renal vasoconstriction and reduction of GFR occurred at the high-frequency stimulation. PMID:3013030

  18. β2 Adrenergic receptors mediate important electrophysiological effects in human ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, M; Rowland, E; Brown, M; Grace, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To define the effects of β2 adrenergic receptor stimulation on ventricular repolarisation in vivo.
DESIGN—Prospective study.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre.
PATIENTS—85 patients with coronary artery disease and 22 normal controls.
INTERVENTIONS—Intravenous and intracoronary salbutamol (a β2 adrenergic receptor selective agonist; 10-30 µg/min and 1-10 µg/min), and intravenous isoprenaline (a mixed β1/β2 adrenergic receptor agonist; 1-5 µg/min), infused during fixed atrial pacing.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—QT intervals, QT dispersion, monophasic action potential duration.
RESULTS—In patients with coronary artery disease, salbutamol decreased QTonset and QTpeak but increased QTend duration; QTonset-QTpeak and QTpeak-QTend intervals increased, resulting in T wave prolongation (mean (SEM): 201 (2) ms to 233 (2) ms; p < 0.01). There was a large increase in dispersion of QTonset, QTpeak, and QTend which was more pronounced in patients with coronary artery disease—for example, QTend dispersion: 50 (2) ms baseline v 98 (4) ms salbutamol (controls), and 70 (1) ms baseline v 108 (3) ms salbutamol (coronary artery disease); p < 0.001. Similar responses were obtained with isoprenaline. Monophasic action potential duration at 90% repolarisation shortened during intracoronary infusion of salbutamol, from 278 (4.1) ms to 257 (3.8) ms (p < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—β2 adrenergic receptors mediate important electrophysiological effects in human ventricular myocardium. The increase in dispersion of repolarisation provides a mechanism whereby catecholamines acting through this receptor subtype may trigger ventricular arrhythmias.


Keywords: β2 adrenergic receptors; ventricular repolarisation; QT dispersion; salbutamol; isoprenaline PMID:11410561

  19. Scavenger Receptors Mediate the Role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talamillo, Ana; Herboso, Leire; Pirone, Lucia; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Sánchez, Jonatan; Mayor, Ugo; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S.; Sutherland, James D.; Barrio, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval–pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor), the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi–mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues. PMID:23637637

  20. Receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment kinetics. I. Probabilistic model and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C.; Lauffenburger, D. A.; Quinn, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to a ligand-coated surface play a key role in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. We present a probabilistic model of receptor-ligand bond formation between a cell and surface to describe the probability of adhesion in a fluid shear field. Our model extends the deterministic model of Hammer and Lauffenburger (Hammer, D.A., and D.A. Lauffenburger. 1987. Biophys. J. 52:475-487) to a probabilistic framework, in which we calculate the probability that a certain number of bonds between a cell and surface exists at any given time. The probabilistic framework is used to account for deviations from ideal, deterministic behavior, inherent in chemical reactions involving relatively small numbers of reacting molecules. Two situations are investigated: first, cell attachment in the absence of fluid stress; and, second, cell detachment in the presence of fluid stress. In the attachment case, we examine the expected variance in bond formation as a function of attachment time; this also provides an initial condition for the detachment case. Focusing then on detachment, we predict transient behavior as a function of key system parameters, such as the distractive fluid force, the receptor-ligand bond affinity and rate constants, and the receptor and ligand densities. We compare the predictions of the probabilistic model with those of a deterministic model, and show how a deterministic approach can yield some inaccurate results; e.g., it cannot account for temporally continuous cell attach mentor detachment, it can underestimate the time needed for cell attachment, it can overestimate the time required for cell detachment for a given level of force, and it can overestimate the force necessary for cell detachment. PMID:2174271

  1. Direct muscarinic and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelan, K. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have utilized intracellular recording techniques to investigate the cholinoceptivity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in a submerged brain slice preparation. Exogenous application of the mixed cholinergic agonists, acetylcholine (ACh) or carbachol (CCh), produced predominantly membrane depolarization, induction of action potential firing, and decreased input resistance. Application of the selective muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine (MUSC), or the selective nicotinic receptor agonists nicotine (NIC) or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP) also produced membrane depolarizations. The MUSC-induced depolarization was accompanied by decreased conductance, while an increase in conductance appeared to underlie the NIC- and DMPP-induced depolarizations. The muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mediated depolarizations persisted in tetrodotoxin and/or low Ca2+/high Mg2+ containing media, suggesting direct postsynaptic receptor activation. The MUSC-induced depolarization could be reversibly blocked by the selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, atropine, while the DMPP-induced depolarization could be reversibly suppressed by the selective ganglionic nicotinic-receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. Some neurons exhibited a transient membrane hyperpolarization during the depolarizing response to CCh or MUSC application. This transient inhibition could be reversibly blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, suggesting that the underlying hyperpolarization results indirectly from the endogenous release of GABA acting at GABA receptors. This study confirms the cholinoceptivity of MVN neurons and establishes that individual MVN cells possess muscarinic as well as nicotinic receptors. The data provide support for a prominent role of cholinergic mechanisms in the direct and indirect regulation of the excitability of MVN neurons.

  2. Scavenger receptors mediate the role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Talamillo, Ana; Herboso, Leire; Pirone, Lucia; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Sánchez, Jonatan; Mayor, Ugo; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S; Sutherland, James D; Barrio, Rosa

    2013-04-01

    SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval-pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor), the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi-mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues. PMID:23637637

  3. Reversal of endogenous dopamine receptor silencing in pituitary cells augments receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzawi, Haneen; Yacqub-Usman, Kiren; Richardson, Alan; Hofland, Leo J; Clayton, Richard N; Farrell, William E

    2011-02-01

    Dopamine (DA)-agonist targeting of the DA D(2) receptor (D2R) in prolactinomas is the first-line treatment choice for suppression of prolactin and induction of tumor shrinkage. Resistance to DA agonists seems to be related to receptor number. Using the MMQ and GH3 pituitary cell lines, that either do or do not express D2R, respectively, we explored the epigenetic profile associated with the presence or absence of D2R in these cells lines. These studies led us to explore pharmacological strategies designed to restore receptor expression and thereby potentially augment DA agonist-mediated apoptosis. We show in GH3 cells that the D2R harbors increased CpG island-associated methylation and enrichment for histone H3K27me3. Conversely, MMQ cells and normal pituitaries show enrichment for H3K9Ac and barely detectable H3K27me3. Coculture of GH3 cells with the demethylating agent zebularine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A was responsible for a decrease in CpG island methylation and enrichment for the histone H3K9Ac mark. In addition, challenge of GH3 cells with zebularine alone or coculture with both agents led to expression of endogenous D2R in these cells. Induced expression D2R in GH3 cells was associated with a significant increase in apoptosis indices to challenge with either DA or bromocriptine. Specificity of a receptor-mediated response was established in coincubations with specific D2R antagonist and siRNA approaches in GH3 cell and D2R expressing MMQ cell lines. These studies point to the potential efficacy of combined treatment with epigenetic drugs and DA agonists for the medical management of different pituitary tumor subtypes, resistant to conventional therapies. PMID:21177832

  4. Receptor-mediated mechanism for the transport of prolactin from blood to cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R.J.; Slaby, F.J.; Posner, B.I.

    1987-05-01

    Prolactin (PRL) interacts with areas of the central nervous system which reside behind the blood-brain barrier. While vascular PRL does not cross this barrier, it is readily accessible to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from which it may gain access to the PRL-responsive areas of the brain. Studies were undertaken to characterize the mechanism responsible for the translocation of PRL from blood to CSF. Rats were given external jugular vein injections of (/sup 125/-I)iodo-PRL in the presence or absence of an excess of unlabeled ovine PRL (oPRL), human GH, bovine GH, or porcine insulin. CSF and choroid plexus were removed 60 min later. CSF samples were electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gels and resultant autoradiographs were analyzed with quantitative microdensitometry. The data revealed that unlabeled lactogenic hormones, viz. oPRL and human GH, caused a statistically significant inhibition of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport from blood to CSF. In contrast, nonlactogenic hormones, viz bovine GH and insulin, had no effect on (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport into the CSF. An identical pattern of competition was observed in the binding of hormone to the choroid plexus. Furthermore, vascular injections of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL administered with a range of concentrations of unlabeled oPRL revealed a dose-response inhibition in the transport of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL from blood to CSF. The study demonstrates that PRL enters the CSF by a specific, PRL receptor-mediated transport mechanism. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that the transport mechanism resides at the choroid plexus. The existence of this transport mechanism reflects the importance of the cerebroventricular system in PRL-brain interactions.

  5. Receptor-mediated uptake of labeled transferrin by embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Markelonis, G J; Oh, T H; Park, L P; Azari, P; Max, S R

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin is a growth-promoting plasma protein which is known to occur within developing neurons. Since little information exists on the process by which transferrin is internalized by neurons, we studied this process using dissociated embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. Cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons were incubated in the presence of 3.75 nM (125)I-transferrin at 37°C, the cultures were extensively washed, the neurons were solubilized in a Triton-containing buffer and internalized (125)I-transferrin was quantified with a gamma counter. (125)I-transferrin was internalized in a linear fashion for at least 60 min, and this uptake was abolished by the presence of 1.25 μM unlabeled transferrin. No competition for the uptake of (125)I-transferrin was observed in the presence of 1.25 μM ovalbumin, cytochrome c, hemoglobin, insulin, horseradish peroxidase, aldolase or the carboxyl-terminal fragment ('half-site') of transferrin. By contrast, uptake was inhibited by approximately 50% in the presence of the ammo-terminal fragment ('half-site') of transferrin (1.25 μM) or in the presence of concanavalin A (1.25 μM). The binding of transferrin conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate to neurons at 4°C and its subsequent internalization at 37°C was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy of unfixed cells following incubation of the neurons in the presence of the fluorescently labeled protein. Furthermore, the transferrin receptors were visualized immunocytochemically on the surface membranes of dorsal root ganglion neurons using rabbit antibodies directed against transferrin receptors from chicken reticulocytes. From these data, we conclude that transferrin is internalized by neurons via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and suggest that this protein may serve an important role in the development and survival of dorsal root ganglion neurons. PMID:24874753

  6. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by GABAB receptors in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Robin A; Manuel, Nick A; Bulters, Diederick O; Cobb, Stuart R; Davies, Ceri H

    2001-01-01

    Both GABAB and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) influence hippocampal-dependent mnemonic processing. Here the possibility of a direct interaction between GABAB receptors and mAChR-mediated synaptic responses has been studied using intracellular recording in rat hippocampal slices. The GABAB receptor agonist(−)-baclofen (5–10 μm) depressed an atropine-sensitive slow EPSP (EPSPM) and occluded the GABAB-receptor-mediated IPSP (IPSPB) which preceded it. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by postsynaptic hyperpolarization (9 ± 2 mV) and a reduction in cell input resistance (12 ± 3 %). The selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845A (1 μm) fully reversed the depressant effects of (−)-baclofen (5–10 μm) such that in the combined presence of (−)-baclofen and CGP 55845A the EPSPM was 134 ± 21 % of control. (−)-Baclofen (5–10 μm) caused a small (28 ± 11 %) inhibition of carbachol-induced (3.0 μm) postsynaptic depolarizations and increases in input resistance. CGP 55845A (1 μm) alone caused an increase in the amplitude of the EPSPM (253 ± 74 % of control) and blocked the IPSPB that preceded it. In contrast, the selective GABA uptake inhibitor NNC 05–0711 (10 μm) increased the amplitude of the IPSPB by 141 ± 38 % and depressed the amplitude of the EPSPM by 58 ± 10 %. This inhibition was abolished by CGP 55845A (1 μm). Taken together these data provide good evidence that synaptically released GABA activates GABAB receptors that inhibit mAChR-mediated EPSPs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones. The mechanism of inhibition may involve both pre- and postsynaptic elements. PMID:11559773

  7. Greater Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Mediated Vasodilation in Women Using Oral Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Harrell, John W.; Kellawan, Jeremy M.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Schrage, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: β-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mitigating the pressor effects of sympathetic nervous system activity in young women. Based on recent data showing oral contraceptive use in women abolishes the relationship between muscle sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure, we hypothesized forearm blood flow responses to a β-adrenergic receptor agonist would be greater in young women currently using oral contraceptives (OC+, n = 13) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (OC–, n = 10). Methods: Women (18–35 years) were studied during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (days 1–5) or placebo phase of oral contraceptive use. Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, brachial arterial catheter) were measured at baseline and during graded brachial artery infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Isoproterenol (ISO), as well as Acetylcholine (ACH, endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and Nitroprusside (NTP, endothelium-independent vasodilation). Forearm vascular conductance was calculated (FVC = FBF/MAP, ml/min/100 mmHg) and the rise in FVC from baseline during infusion quantified vasodilation (ΔFVC = FVCinfusion − FVCbaseline). Results: ISO increased FVC in both groups (p < 0.01) and ISO-mediated ΔFVC was greater in OC+ compared to OC– (Main effect of group, p = 0.02). Expressing data as FVC and FBF resulted in similar conclusions. FVC responses to both ACH and NTP were also greater in OC+ compared to OC–. Conclusions: These data are the first to demonstrate greater β-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilation in the forearm of women currently using oral contraceptives (placebo phase) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (early follicular phase), and suggest oral contraceptive use influences neurovascular control. PMID:27375493

  8. Characterization of muscarinic receptors mediating relaxation and contraction in the rat iris dilator muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Y; Yamahara, N S; Tanaka, M; Ryang, S; Kawai, T; Imaizumi, Y; Watanabe, M

    1995-01-01

    1. The characteristics of muscarinic receptors mediating relaxation and/or contraction in the rat iris dilator muscle were examined. 2. Relaxation was induced in a dilator muscle by application of acetylcholine (ACh) at low doses (3 microM or less) and contraction was induced by high doses. Methacholine and carbachol also showed biphasic effects similar to those of ACh; in contrast, bethanechol, arecoline, pilocarpine and McN-A-343 induced mainly relaxation but no substantial contraction. 3. After parasympathetic denervation by ciliary ganglionectomy, the relaxant response to muscarinic agonists disappeared upon nerve stimulation. Application of McN-A-343 and pilocarpine induced only small contractions in denervated dilator muscles, indicating that these are partial agonists for contraction. 4. pA2 values of pirenzepine, methoctramine, AF-DX 116, himbacine, and 4-DAMP for antagonism to pilocarpine-induced relaxation in normal dilator muscles and those for antagonism to ACh-induced contraction in denervated dilator muscles were determined. The pA2 values for antagonism to relaxation of all these antagonists were most similar to those for M3-type muscarinic receptors. 5. Although pA2 values for contraction of these antagonists, except for methoctramine, were very close to those for relaxation, contraction was not significantly antagonized by methoctramine. Contraction might be mediated by M3-like receptors which have a very low affinity for methoctramine. 6. In conclusion, ACh-induced biphasic responses in rat iris dilator muscles were clearly distinguished from each other by specific muscarinic agonists and parasympathetic denervation, whereas muscarinic receptors could not be subclassified according to the pA2 values of 5 specific antagonists only. PMID:7539696

  9. Evidence for 5-HT1-like receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in human pulmonary artery.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, M. R.; Clayton, R. A.; Templeton, A. G.; Morecroft, I.

    1996-01-01

    1. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors mediating contraction of human isolated pulmonary artery rings were investigated. Responses to the agonists 5-carboximidotryptamine (5-CT, non-selective 5-HT1 agonist), sumatriptan (5-HT1D-like receptor agonist), 5-HT and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 5-HT1A receptor agonist) were studied. Responses to 5-HT and sumatriptan in the presence of the antagonists, methiothepin (non-selective 5-HT1+2-receptor antagonist), ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist) and the novel antagonist, GR55562 (5-HT1D receptor antagonist) were also studied. 2. All agonists contracted human pulmonary artery ring preparations in the following order of potency 5-CT > 5-HT = sumatriptan > 8-OH-DPAT. Maximum responses to 5-HT, 5-CT and sumatriptan were not significantly different. 3. Methiothepin 1 nM and 10 nM, but not 0.1 nM reduced the maximum contractile responses to 5-HT but did not alter tissue sensitivity to 5-HT. Methiothepin 0.1 nM, 1 nM and 10 nM had a similar effect on responses to sumatriptan. 4. The 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (10 nM, 100 nM and 1 microM) also reduced the maximum contractile response to both 5-HT and sumatriptan without affecting tissue sensitivity to these agonists. 5. The novel 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, GR55562, inhibited responses to 5-HT and sumatriptan in a true competitive fashion. 6. The results suggest that the human pulmonary artery has a functional population of 5-HT1D-like receptors which are involved in the contractile response to 5-HT. PMID:8886409

  10. Self-Assembly into Nanoparticles Is Essential for Receptor Mediated Uptake of Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Kariem; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Koo, Taeyoung; McClorey, Graham; Benner, Leif; Coenen-Stass, Anna; O'Donovan, Liz; Lehto, Taavi; Garcia-Guerra, Antonio; Nordin, Joel; Saleh, Amer F; Behlke, Mark; Morris, John; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Dugovic, Branislav; Leumann, Christian; Gordon, Siamon; Gait, Michael J; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-07-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have the potential to revolutionize medicine due to their ability to manipulate gene function for therapeutic purposes. ASOs are chemically modified and/or incorporated within nanoparticles to enhance their stability and cellular uptake, however, a major challenge is the poor understanding of their uptake mechanisms, which would facilitate improved ASO designs with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here, we study the uptake mechanism of three therapeutically relevant ASOs (peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO), 2'Omethyl phosphorothioate (2'OMe), and phosphorothioated tricyclo DNA (tcDNA) that have been optimized to induce exon skipping in models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We show that PPMO and tcDNA have high propensity to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles. PPMO forms micelles of defined size and their net charge (zeta potential) is dependent on the medium and concentration. In biomimetic conditions and at low concentrations, PPMO obtains net negative charge and its uptake is mediated by class A scavenger receptor subtypes (SCARAs) as shown by competitive inhibition and RNAi silencing experiments in vitro. In vivo, the activity of PPMO was significantly decreased in SCARA1 knockout mice compared to wild-type animals. Additionally, we show that SCARA1 is involved in the uptake of tcDNA and 2'OMe as shown by competitive inhibition and colocalization experiments. Surface plasmon resonance binding analysis to SCARA1 demonstrated that PPMO and tcDNA have higher binding profiles to the receptor compared to 2'OMe. These results demonstrate receptor-mediated uptake for a range of therapeutic ASO chemistries, a mechanism that is dependent on their self-assembly into nanoparticles. PMID:26042553

  11. AMPA receptor desensitization is the determinant of AMPA receptor mediated excitotoxicity in purified retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong H; Mueller, Brett H; McGrady, Nolan R; Ma, Hai-Ying; Yorio, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGLuR) have been hypothesized to play a role in neuronal pathogenesis by mediating excitotoxic death. Previous studies on iGluR in the retina have focused on two broad classes of receptors: NMDA and non-NMDA receptors including the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic receptor (AMPAR) and kainate receptor. In this study, we examined the role of receptor desensitization on the specific excitotoxic effects of AMPAR activation on primary retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Purified rat RGCs were isolated from postnatal day 4-7 Sprague-Dawley rats. Calcium imaging was used to identify the functionality of the AMPARs and selectivity of the s-AMPA agonist. Phosphorylated CREB and ERK1/2 expression were performed following s-AMPA treatment. s-AMPA excitotoxicity was determined by JC-1 mitochondrial membrane depolarization assay, caspase 3/7 luciferase activity assay, immunoblot analysis for α-fodrin, and Live (calcein AM)/Dead (ethidium homodimer-1) assay. RGC cultures of 98% purity, lacking Iba1 and GFAP expression were used for the present studies. Isolated prenatal RGCs expressed calcium permeable AMPAR and s-AMPA (100 μM) treatment of cultured RGCs significantly increased phosphorylation of CREB but not that of ERK1/2. A prolonged (6 h) AMPAR activation in purified RGCs using s-AMPA (100 μM) did not depolarize the RGC mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, treatment of cultured RGCs with s-AMPA, both in the presence and absence of trophic factors (BDNF and CNTF), did not increase caspase 3/7 activities or the cleavage of α-fodrin (neuronal apoptosis marker), as compared to untreated controls. Lastly, a significant increase in cell survival of RGCs was observed after s-AMPA treatment as compared to control untreated RGCs. However, preventing the desensitization of AMPAR with the treatment with either kainic acid (100 μM) or the combination of s-AMPA and cyclothiazide (50 μM) significantly reduced cell

  12. Exploring neuroprotective potential of Withania somnifera phytochemicals by inhibition of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors: An in silico study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gaurav; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2016-07-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediated excitotoxicity has been implicated in multi-neurodegenerative diseases. Due to lack of efficacy and adverse effects of NMDA receptor antagonists, search for herbal remedies that may act as therapeutic agents is an active area of research to combat these diseases. Withania somnifera (WS) is being used for centuries as a nerve tonic and Nootropic agents. The present study targets the in silico evaluation of the neuroprotective efficacy of W. somnifera phytochemicals by inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through allosteric inhibition of the GluN2B containing NMDARs. We predict Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) penetration, mutagenicity, drug-likeness and Human Intestinal Absorption properties of 25 WS phytochemicals. Further, molecular docking was performed to know whether these phytochemicals inhibit the GluN2B containing NMDARs or not. The results suggest that Anaferine, Beta-Sitosterol, Withaferin A, Withanolide A, Withanolide B and Withanolide D inhibit GluN2B containing NMDARs through allosteric mode similar to the well-known selective antagonist Ifenprodil. These phytochemicals have potential as an essentially useful oral drug to counter NMDARs mediated excitotoxicity and to treat multi-neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27241252

  13. MDMA-induced loss of parvalbumin interneurons within the dentate gyrus is mediated by 5HT2A and NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Collins, Stuart A; Gudelsky, Gary A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2015-08-15

    MDMA is a widely abused psychostimulant which causes a rapid and robust release of the monoaminergic neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. Recently, it was shown that MDMA increases extracellular glutamate concentrations in the dorsal hippocampus, which is dependent on serotonin release and 5HT2A/2C receptor activation. The increased extracellular glutamate concentration coincides with a loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) interneurons of the dentate gyrus region. Given the known susceptibility of PV interneurons to excitotoxicity, we examined whether MDMA-induced increases in extracellular glutamate in the dentate gyrus are necessary for the loss of PV cells in rats. Extracellular glutamate concentrations increased in the dentate gyrus during systemic and local administration of MDMA. Administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, during systemic injections of MDMA, prevented the loss of PV-IR interneurons seen 10 days after MDMA exposure. Local administration of MDL100907, a selective 5HT2A receptor antagonist, prevented the increases in glutamate caused by reverse dialysis of MDMA directly into the dentate gyrus and prevented the reduction of PV-IR. These findings provide evidence that MDMA causes decreases in PV within the dentate gyrus through a 5HT2A receptor-mediated increase in glutamate and subsequent NMDA receptor activation. PMID:25936514

  14. Involvement of non-NMDA glutamate receptors of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in the cardiovascular response to the microinjection of noradrenaline into the dorsal periaqueductal gray area of rats.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Gislaine Garcia; Busnardo, Cristiane; Tavares, Rodrigo Fiacadori; Corrêa, Fernando Morgan Aguiar

    2015-03-30

    The dorsal periaqueductal gray area (dPAG) is involved in cardiovascular modulation. In a previous study, we showed that noradrenaline (NA) microinjected into the dPAG caused a vasopressin-mediated pressor response, involving a relay in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). In the present study, we evaluated the involvement of ionotropic glutamate receptors within the PVN in the cardiovascular response to NA microinjection into the dPAG of unanesthetized rats. Microinjection of the selective NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist LY235959 (2nmol/100nL) unilaterally into the PVN did not affect the cardiovascular response evoked by microinjection of NA (15nmol/50nL) into the dPAG. On the other hand, unilateral PVN pretreatment with the non-NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist NBQX (2nmol/100nL) significantly reduced the pressor and cardiac response caused by microinjection of NA into the dPAG. In addition, bilateral PVN pretreatment with NBQX (2nmol/100nL) blocked the cardiovascular response to NA injected into the dPAG. In conclusion, the present results suggest that bilateral PVN activation of non-NMDA glutamate receptors mediates the vasopressin-related cardiovascular response to the microinjection of NA into the dPAG. PMID:25617821

  15. NMDA Receptor Modulators in the Treatment of Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Tomek, Seven E.; LaCrosse, Amber L.; Nemirovsky, Natali E.; Olive, M. Foster

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction, and the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subtype serves as a molecular target for several drugs of abuse. In this review, we will provide an overview of NMDA receptor structure and function, followed by a review of the mechanism of action, clinical efficacy, and side effect profile of NMDA receptor ligands that are currently in use or being explored for the treatment of drug addiction. These ligands include the NMDA receptor modulators memantine and acamprosate, as well as the partial NMDA agonist d-Cycloserine. Data collected to date suggest that direct NMDA receptor modulators have relatively limited efficacy in the treatment of drug addiction, and that partial agonism of NMDA receptors may have some efficacy with regards to extinction learning during cue exposure therapy. However, the lack of consistency in results to date clearly indicates that additional studies are needed, as are studies examining novel ligands with indirect mechanisms for altering NMDA receptor function. PMID:24275950

  16. Oligodendroglial NMDA Receptors Regulate Glucose Import and Axonal Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saab, Aiman S; Tzvetavona, Iva D; Trevisiol, Andrea; Baltan, Selva; Dibaj, Payam; Kusch, Kathrin; Möbius, Wiebke; Goetze, Bianka; Jahn, Hannah M; Huang, Wenhui; Steffens, Heinz; Schomburg, Eike D; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Bakhtiari, Davood; Matute, Carlos; Löwel, Siegrid; Griesinger, Christian; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Kirchhoff, Frank; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes make myelin and support axons metabolically with lactate. However, it is unknown how glucose utilization and glycolysis are adapted to the different axonal energy demands. Spiking axons release glutamate and oligodendrocytes express NMDA receptors of unknown function. Here we show that the stimulation of oligodendroglial NMDA receptors mobilizes glucose transporter GLUT1, leading to its incorporation into the myelin compartment in vivo. When myelinated optic nerves from conditional NMDA receptor mutants are challenged with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation, they show a reduced functional recovery when returned to oxygen-glucose but are indistinguishable from wild-type when provided with oxygen-lactate. Moreover, the functional integrity of isolated optic nerves, which are electrically silent, is extended by preincubation with NMDA, mimicking axonal activity, and shortened by NMDA receptor blockers. This reveals a novel aspect of neuronal energy metabolism in which activity-dependent glutamate release enhances oligodendroglial glucose uptake and glycolytic support of fast spiking axons. PMID:27292539

  17. GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated effects in guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Giotti, A; Luzzi, S; Spagnesi, S; Zilletti, L

    1983-03-01

    1 The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and related substances were examined in guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle.2 GABA at doses ranging from 10(-7) M to 3 x 10(-6) M elicited a relaxation while at higher doses (3 x 10(-6) M - 10(-4) M), as previously described, it caused a contraction followed by relaxation.3 GABA-induced relaxation was bicuculline-insensitive, was mimicked by (-)-baclofen but not by homotaurine and muscimol. The effect of baclofen was stereospecific. GABA- and (-)-baclofen-induced relaxations were dose-dependent and their ED(50) values were similar. A specific cross-desensitization occurred between GABA and (-)-baclofen.4 The bicuculline-insensitive relaxation induced by GABA and (-)-baclofen was prevented by tetrodotoxin and hyoscine but not by phentolamine plus propranolol, naloxone or theophylline.5 In preparations in which the muscle tone was raised by histamine or prostaglandin F(2alpha), GABA and (-)-baclofen induced relaxation to the same extent as before increasing the tone. If the tone was raised by DMPP, a greater bicuculline-insensitive relaxation occurred.6 Contraction caused by GABA was bicuculline-sensitive and was mimicked by homotaurine and muscimol. Contraction was dose-dependent and muscimol was about three times more potent than GABA or homotaurine. A specific cross-desensitization occurred between the contractile effects of GABA and those of homotaurine or muscimol.7 Bicuculline competitively antagonized the contractile effects of GABA, homotaurine and muscimol and gave closely similar pA(2) values. The slope of the Schild plot for the above drugs was near 1, confirming the competitive nature of the antagonism.8 The bicuculline-sensitive contraction induced by GABA, homotaurine and muscimol was abolished by tetrodotoxin and was non-competitively antagonized by hyoscine, while it was unaffected by hexamethonium, mepyramine and methysergide.9 It is concluded that two receptors mediate the GABA effects in guinea

  18. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mediates glucocorticoid effects on hormone secretion induced by volume and osmotic changes.

    PubMed

    Ruginsk, S G; Uchoa, E T; Elias, L L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    2012-02-01

    The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mediates the effects of dexamethasone on hormone release induced by changes in circulating volume and osmolality. Male adult rats were administered with the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (10 mg/Kg, p.o.), followed or not in 1 hour by dexamethasone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.). Extracellular volume expansion (EVE, 2 mL/100 g of body weight, i.v.) was performed 2 hours after dexamethasone or vehicle treatment using either isotonic (I-EVE, 0.15 mol/L) or hypertonic (H-EVE, 0.30 mol/L) NaCl solution. Five minutes after EVE, animals were decapitated and trunk blood was collected for all plasma measurements. Rimonabant potentiated oxytocin (OT) secretion induced by H-EVE and completely reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone in response to the same stimulus. These data suggest that glucocorticoid modulation of OT release is mediated by the CB(1) receptor. Although dexamethasone did not affect vasopressin (AVP) secretion induced by H-EVE, the administration of rimonabant potentiated AVP release in response to the same stimulus, supporting the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor regulates AVP secretion independently of glucocorticoid-mediated signalling. Dexamethasone alone did not affect atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release stimulated by I-EVE or H-EVE. However, pretreatment with rimonabant potentiated ANP secretion induced by H-EVE, suggesting a possible role for the CB(1) receptor in the control of peripheral factors that modulate cardiovascular function. Rimonabant also reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on H-EVE-induced corticosterone secretion, reinforcing the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor may be involved in the negative feedback exerted by glucocorticoids on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that the CB(1) receptor modulates neurohypophyseal hormone secretion and

  19. The Impact of Hyperthermia on Receptor-Mediated Interleukin-6 Regulation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Welc, Steven S.; Morse, Deborah A.; Mattingly, Alex J.; Laitano, Orlando; King, Michelle A.; Clanton, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    In inflammatory cells, hyperthermia inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression and protein secretion. Since hyperthermia alone stimulates IL-6 in skeletal muscle, we hypothesized that it would amplify responses to other receptor-mediated stimuli. IL-6 regulation was tested in C2C12 myotubes and in soleus during treatment with epinephrine (EPI) or LPS. In EPI-treated myotubes (100 ng/ml), 1 h exposure at 40.5°C-42°C transiently increased IL-6 mRNA compared to EPI treatment alone at 37°C. In LPS-treated myotubes (1 μg/ml), exposure to 41°C-42°C also increased IL-6 mRNA. In isolated mouse soleus, similar amplifications of IL-6 gene expression were observed in 41°C, during both low (1 ng/ml) and high dose (100 ng/ml) EPI, but only in high dose LPS (1 μg/ml). In myotubes, heat increased IL-6 secretion during EPI exposure but had no effect or inhibited secretion with LPS. In soleus there were no effects of heat on IL-6 secretion during either EPI or LPS treatment. Mechanisms for the effects of heat on IL-6 mRNA were explored using a luciferase-reporter in C2C12 myotubes. Overexpression of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) had no impact on IL-6 promoter activity during EPI stimulation, but elevated IL-6 promoter activity during LPS stimulation. In contrast, when the activator protein-1 (AP-1) element was mutated, responses to both LPS and EPI were suppressed in heat. Using siRNA against activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), a heat-stress-induced inhibitor of IL-6, no ATF-3-dependent effects were observed. The results demonstrate that, unlike inflammatory cells, hyperthermia in muscle fibers amplifies IL-6 gene expression to EPI and LPS. The effect appears to reflect differential engagement of HSF-1 and AP-1 sensitive elements on the IL-6 gene, with no evidence for involvement of ATF-3. The functional significance of increased IL-6 mRNA expression during heat may serve to overcome the well-known suppression of protein synthetic

  20. RabGEF1/Rabex-5 Regulates TrkA-Mediated Neurite Outgrowth and NMDA-Induced Signaling Activation in NGF-Differentiated PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tam, See-Ying; Lilla, Jennifer N.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Tsai, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) binds to its cognate receptor TrkA and induces neuronal differentiation by activating distinct downstream signal transduction events. RabGEF1 (also known as Rabex-5) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab5, which regulates early endosome fusion and vesicular trafficking in endocytic pathways. Here, we used the antisense (AS) expression approach to induce an NGF-dependent sustained knockdown of RabGEF1 protein expression in stable PC12 transfectants. We show that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and modulates other cellular and signaling processes that are activated by the interaction of NGF with TrkA receptors, such as cell cycle progression, cessation of proliferation, and activation of NGF-mediated downstream signaling responses. Moreover, RabGEF1 can bind to Rac1, and the activation of Rac1 upon NGF treatment is significantly enhanced in AS transfectants, suggesting that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of NGF-induced Rac1 activation in PC12 cells. Furthermore, we show that RabGEF1 can also interact with NMDA receptors by binding to the NR2B subunit and its associated binding partner SynGAP, and negatively regulates activation of nitric oxide synthase activity induced by NMDA receptor stimulation in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Our data suggest that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of TrkA-dependent neuronal differentiation and of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling activation in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. PMID:26588713

  1. Zonal differences in ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoglycoproteins in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    We have shown previously that ethanol-induced defects in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid occurred as early as 1 wk after ethanol feeding. This study was undertaken as an initial attempt to establish a possible role of defective receptor-mediated endocytosis in liver injury by investigating whether differences exist in the effects of ethanol on receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatocytes isolated from different regions of the liver. Perivenule cells, present in the distal half of the liver, are thought to be more susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury than are the periportal cells located in the proximal half of the liver acini. For these studies, we fed male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days with liquid diets containing either ethanol (36% of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrate. Perivenule and periportal hepatocytes were then isolated using a digitonin-collagenase perfusion method. In control animals, cells isolated from the perivenule region bound significantly more ligand than did cells from the periportal region. Amounts of ligand internalized and degraded were also greater in perivenule than in periportal cells in these animals. After ethanol feeding, cells isolated from both the perivenule and periportal regions bound significantly less ligand than their respective controls. This impairment in surface and total binding was more pronounced in perivenule than in periportal cells. Internalization and degradation of the ligand were also more adversely affected in the centrilobular region as shown by decreases of greater than 60% in perivenule cells and by only 20% to 30% in periportal cells of ethanol-fed animals compared with controls.

  2. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  3. Reactivation of apolipoprotein II gene transcription by cycloheximide reveals two steps in the deactivation of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sensel, M G; Binder, R; Lazier, C B; Williams, D L

    1994-03-01

    In this report, we describe apolipoprotein II (apoII) gene expression in cell lines derived by stable expression of the chicken estrogen receptor in LMH chicken hepatoma cells. In cell lines expressing high levels of receptor (LMH/2A), apoII gene expression is increased by estrogen 300-fold compared with levels in the receptor-deficient parent LMH line. LMH/2A cells show apoII mRNA induction and turnover kinetics similar to those in chicken liver. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide (CHX) or puromycin following estrogen withdrawal superinduces apoII mRNA without affecting apoII mRNA stability. Superinduction is due to an estrogen-independent reactivation of apoII gene transcription. The apoII gene can be reactivated by CHX for up to 24 h following hormone withdrawal, suggesting that the gene is in a repressed yet transcriptionally competent state. These results reveal two distinct events necessary for termination of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription. The first event, removal of hormone, is sufficient to stop transcription when translation is ongoing. The second event is revealed by the CHX-induced superinduction of apoII mRNA following hormone withdrawal. This superinduction suggests that deactivation of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription requires a labile protein. Furthermore, reactivation of apoII gene expression by CHX and estrogen is additive, suggesting that estrogen is unable to overcome repression completely. Thus, a labile protein may act to repress estrogen receptor-mediated transcription of the apoII gene. PMID:8114707

  4. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase reduce receptor-mediated endocytosis in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, James E; Davidson, Robert G; McTaggart, Fergus; Orton, Terry C; Scott, Robert C; Smith, Graham J; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2004-09-01

    Renal proximal tubule cells are responsible for the reabsorption of proteins that are present in the tubular lumen. This occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process that has a requirement for some GTP-binding proteins. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase used for the therapeutic reduction of cholesterol-containing plasma lipoproteins. However, they can also reduce intracellular levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates that are derived from the product of the enzyme, mevalonate, and are required for the prenylation and normal function of GTP-binding proteins. The hypothesis that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase in renal proximal tubule cells could reduce receptor mediated-endocytosis was therefore tested. Five different statins inhibited the uptake of FITC-labeled albumin by the proximal tubule-derived opossum kidney cell line in a dose-dependent manner and in the absence of cytotoxicity. The reduction in albumin uptake was related to the degree of inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. Simvastatin (e.g., statin) inhibited receptor-mediated endocytosis of both FITC-albumin and FITC-beta(2)-microglobulin to similar extents but without altering the binding of albumin to the cell surface. The effect on albumin endocytosis was prevented by mevalonate and by the isoprenoid geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by cholesterol. Finally, evidence that the inhibitory effect of statins on endocytosis of proteins may be caused by reduced prenylation and thereby decreased function of one or more GTP-binding proteins is provided. These data establish the possibility in principle that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by statins in proximal tubule cells may reduce tubular protein reabsorption. PMID:15339975

  5. Effects of particle size and ligand density on the kinetics of receptor-mediated endocytosis of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongyan; Zhang, Sulin

    2010-01-01

    We elucidate, from thermodynamic arguments, the governing factors of receptor-mediated endocytosis of nanoparticles (NPs). We show that the endocytic energetics specifies a minimal particle size and a minimal ligand density below which endocytosis is not possible. Due to the entropic penalty involved in ligand-receptor binding, endocytosis may occur with a large fraction of ligands unbound with receptors. Our analyses suggest that the endocytic time depends interrelatedly on the particle size and ligand density. There exists an optimal condition at which the endocytic time minimizes. These findings may provide valuable guidance to the rational designs of NP-based biomarkers and anticancer bioagents.

  6. Treadmill exercise enhances NMDA receptor expression in schizophrenia mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon-Ki; Lee, Sam-Jun; Kim, Tae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious psychiatric disorder with several symptoms including cognitive dysfunction. Although the causes of schizophrenia are still unclear, there is a strong suspicion that the abnormality in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor may contribute to schizophrenia symptoms. In the present study, the effect of treadmill exercise on the NMDA receptor expression was evaluated using MK-801-induced schizophrenia mice. Immunohistochemistry for expressions of NMDA receptor tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was conducted. Western blot for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was also performed. In the present results, the mice in the MK-801-treated group displayed reduced NMDA receptor expression. Enhanced TH expression and suppressed BDNF expression were also observed in the MK-801-treated mice. Treadmill exercise improved NMDA receptor expression in the MK-801-induced schizophrenia mice. Treadmill exercise also suppressed TH expression and enhanced BDNF expression in the MK-801-induced schizophrenia mice. The present study showed that down-regulation of NMDA receptor demonstrated schizophrenia-like parameters, meanwhile treadmill running improved schizophrenia-related parameters through enhancing NMDA receptor expression. PMID:24678500

  7. NMDA Receptor Function During Senescence: Implication on Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, a family of L-glutamate receptors, play an important role in learning and memory, and are critical for spatial memory. These receptors are tetrameric ion channels composed of a family of related subunits. One of the hallmarks of the aging human population is a decline in cognitive function; studies in the past couple of years have demonstrated deterioration in NMDA receptor subunit expression and function with advancing age. However, a direct relationship between impaired memory function and a decline in NMDA receptors is still ambiguous. Recent studies indicate a link between an age-associated NMDA receptor hypofunction and memory impairment and provide evidence that age-associated enhanced oxidative stress might be contributing to the alterations associated with senescence. However, clear evidence is still deficient in demonstrating the underlying mechanisms and a relationship between age-associated impaired cognitive faculties and NMDA receptor hypofunction. The current review intends to present an overview of the research findings regarding changes in expression of various NMDA receptor subunits and deficits in NMDA receptor function during senescence and its implication in age-associated impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function. PMID:26732087

  8. Activation of D1 dopamine receptors induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Norman E.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND A recent study showed that methylphenidate induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. Methylphenidate inhibits dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake transporters. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that selective dopamine receptor activation induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. METHODS In adult rats, we tested the effects of chloro-APB (D1 agonist) and quinpirole (D2 agonist) on time to emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. We then performed a dose–response study to test for chloro-APB-induced restoration of righting during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. SCH-23390 (D1 antagonist) was used to confirm that the effects induced by chloro-APB are specifically mediated by D1 receptors. In a separate group of animals, spectral analysis was performed on surface electroencephalogram recordings to assess neurophysiological changes induced by chloro-APB and quinpirole during isoflurane general anesthesia. RESULTS Chloro-APB decreased median time to emergence from 330s to 50s. The median difference in time to emergence between the saline control group (n=6) and the chloro-APB group (n = 6) was 222s (95% CI: 77–534s, Mann-Whitney test). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0082). During continuous isoflurane anesthesia, chloro-APB dose-dependently restored righting (n = 6) and decreased electroencephalogram delta power (n = 4). These effects were inhibited by pretreatment with SCH-23390. Quinpirole did not restore righting (n = 6) and had no significant effect on the electroencephalogram (n = 4) during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. CONCLUSIONS Activation of D1 receptors by chloro-APB decreases time to emergence from isoflurane anesthesia, and produces behavioral and neurophysiological evidence of arousal during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. These findings suggest that selective activation of a D1 receptor-mediated arousal mechanism is sufficient to induce emergence from isoflurane general

  9. Oxidative stress upregulates the NMDA receptor on cerebrovascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Betzen, Christian; White, Robin; Zehendner, Christoph M; Pietrowski, Eweline; Bender, Bianca; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W

    2009-10-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in a variety of neuropathological diseases. Although some interactions between both phenomena have been elucidated, possible influences of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the NMDA-R itself have so far been neglected. The objective of this study was to examine how the cerebroendothelial NMDA-R is affected by exposure to oxidative stress and to assess possible influences on BBB integrity. RT-PCR confirmed several NMDA-R subunits (NR1, NR2B-D) expressed in the bEnd3 cell line (murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells). NR1 protein expression after exposure to ROS was observed via in-cell Western. The functionality of the expressed NMDA-R was determined by measuring DiBAC fluorescence in ROS-preexposed cells upon stimulation with the specific agonist NMDA. Finally, the effects on barrier integrity were evaluated using the ECIS system to detect changes in monolayer impedance upon NMDA-R stimulation after exposure to ROS. The expression of NR1 significantly (p<0.001) increased 72 h after 30 min exposure to superoxide (+33.8+/-7.5%), peroxynitrite (+84.9+/-10.7%), or hydrogen peroxide (+92.8+/-7.6%), resulting in increased cellular response to NMDA-R stimulation and diminished monolayer impedance. We conclude that oxidative stress upregulates NMDA-R on cerebrovascular endothelium and thus heightens susceptibility to glutamate-induced BBB disruption. PMID:19660541

  10. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials Undergoes Flat Vesiculation and Occurs by Revolution and Self-Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Pengyu; Liang, Junshi; Guo, Ruohai; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and transitional metal dichalcogenide nanosheets, are promising materials for the development of antimicrobial surfaces and the nanocarriers for intracellular therapy. Understanding cell interaction with these emerging materials is an urgently important issue to promoting their wide applications. Experimental studies suggest that two-dimensional nanomaterials enter cells mainly through receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and kinetic pathways of such processes remain unknown. Here, we combine computer simulations and theoretical derivation of the energy within the system to show that the receptor-mediated transport of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheet across model lipid membrane, experiences a flat vesiculation event governed by the receptor density and membrane tension. The graphene nanosheet is found to undergo revolution relative to the membrane and, particularly, unique self-rotation around its normal during membrane wrapping. We derive explicit expressions for the formation of the flat vesiculation, which reveals that the flat vesiculation event can be fundamentally dominated by a dimensionless parameter and a defined relationship determined by complicated energy contributions. The mechanism offers an essential understanding on the cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials. PMID:26741298

  11. Activation of innate antiviral immune response via double-stranded RNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Wei-Hua; Azadzoi, Kazem M.; Su, Ning; Dai, Peng; Sun, Jianbin; Wang, Qin; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Wentao; Lei, Xiaoying; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Viruses induce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the host cells. The mammalian system has developed dsRNA-dependent recognition receptors such as RLRs that recognize the long stretches of dsRNA as PAMPs to activate interferon-mediated antiviral pathways and apoptosis in severe infection. Here we report an efficient antiviral immune response through dsRNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis against infections from different classes of viruses. We demonstrated that virus-infected A549 cells were efficiently killed in the presence of a chimeric RLR receptor, dsCARE. It measurably suppressed the interferon antiviral pathway but promoted IL-1β production. Canonical cell death analysis by morphologic assessment, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase cleavage and chemical inhibition excluded the involvement of apoptosis and consistently suggested RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis as the underlying mechanism of infected cell death. The necroptotic pathway was augmented by the formation of RIP1-RIP3 necrosome, recruitment of MLKL protein and the activation of cathepsin D. Contributing roles of RIP1 and RIP3 were confirmed by gene knockdown. Furthermore, the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 but not the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD impeded dsCARE-dependent infected cell death. Our data provides compelling evidence that the chimeric RLR receptor shifts the common interferon antiviral responses of infected cells to necroptosis and leads to rapid death of the virus-infected cells. This mechanism could be targeted as an efficient antiviral strategy. PMID:26935990

  12. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubule cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J; Stuart, J; Tobin, A B; Walls, J; Nahorski, S

    1998-05-15

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin is an important function of the kidney proximal tubule epithelium. We have measured endocytosis of [125I]-albumin in opossum kidney cells and examined the regulation of this process by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). Albumin endocytosis was inhibited by both wortmannin (IC50 6.9 nM) and LY294002 (IC50 6.5 microM) at concentrations that suggested the involvement of PI 3-kinase in its regulation. Recycling rates were unaffected. We transfected OK cells with either a wild-type p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, or a dominant negative form of the p85 subunit (Deltap85) using the LacSwitch expression system. Transfects were screened by immunoblotting with anti-PI 3-kinase antibodies. Under basal conditions, transfects demonstrated no expression of p85 or Deltap85, but expression was briskly induced by treatment of the cells with IPTG (EC50 13.7 microM). Inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity by Deltap85 was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay of anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates from transfected cells stimulated with insulin. Expression of Deltap85 resulted in marked inhibition of albumin endocytosis, predominantly as a result of reduction of the Vmax of the transport process. Expression of p85 had no significant effect on albumin uptake. The results demonstrate that PI 3-kinase regulates an early step in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubular cells. PMID:9593770

  13. Downregulation of Plk1 Expression By Receptor-Mediated Uptake of Antisense Oligonucleotide-Loaded Nanoparticles1

    PubMed Central

    Spänkuch, Birgit; Steinhauser, Isabel; Wartlick, Heidrun; Kurunci-Csacsko, Elisabeth; Strebhardt, Klaus I; Langer, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles represent a promising tool for targeted drug delivery to tumor cells. The coupling of the antibody trastuzumab to nanoparticles uses the capability of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive cells to incorporate agents linked to HER2. In our present study, we developed targeted nanoparticles loaded with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) against polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). We evaluated the receptor-mediated uptake into HER2-positive and -negative breast cancer and murine cell lines. We performed quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analyses to monitor the impact on Plk1 expression in HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Antibody-conjugated nanoparticles showed a specific targeting to HER2-overexpressing cells with cellular uptake by receptor-mediated endocytosis and a release into HER2-positive BT-474 cells. We observed a significant reduction of Plk1 mRNA and protein expression and increased activation of Caspase 3/7. Thus, this is the first report about ASO-loaded HSA nanoparticles, where an impact on gene expression could be observed. The data provide the basis for the further development of carrier systems for Plk1-specific ASOs to reduce off-target effects evoked by systemically administered ASOs and to achieve a better penetration into primary and metastatic target cells. Treatment of tumors using trastuzumab-conjugated ASO-loaded HSA nanoparticles could be a promising approach to reach this goal. PMID:18320067

  14. INFLUENCE OF NMDA AND NON-NMDA ANTAGONISTS ON ACUTE AND INFLAMMATORY PAIN IN THE TRIGEMINAL TERRITORY

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Randunz, Vitor; Utiumi, Marco; Lange, Marcos Cristiano; Kowacs, Pedro André; Mulinari, Rogério Andrade; Oshinsky, Michael; Vital, Maria; Sereniki, Adriana; Fernandes, Artur Furlaneto; Silva, Lucas Leite e; Werneck, Lineu César

    2016-01-01

    NMDA and non-NMDA receptors are involved in spinal transmission of nociceptive information in physiological and pathological conditions. Our objective was to study the influence of NMDA and non-NMDA receptor antagonists on pain control in the trigeminal system using a formalin-induced orofacial pain model. Motor performance was also evaluated. Male Rattus norvegicus were pre-treated with topiramate (T) (n=8), memantine (M) (n=8), divalproex (D) (n=8) or isotonic saline solution (ISS) (n=10) intraperitoneally 30 minutes before the formalin test. Formalin 2.5% was injected into the right upper lip (V2 branch) and induced two phases: phase I (early or neurogenic) (0–3 min) and phase II (late or inflammatory) (12–30 min). For motor behavior performance we used the open-field test and measured latency to movement onset, locomotion and rearing frequencies, and immobility time. Pre-treatment of animals with M and D only attenuated nociceptive formalin behavior for phase II. T increased locomotion and rearing frequencies and reduced immobility time. Treatment with M increased immobility time and with D reduced locomotion frequency. Our results showed that the NMDA antagonist (M) is more potent than the non-NMDA antagonists (D and T) in the control of pain in the inflammatory phase. The non-NMDA topiramate improved motor performance more than did D and M, probably because T has more anxiolytic properties. PMID:19099122

  15. NMDA receptor blockade in the basolateral amygdala disrupts consolidation of stimulus-reward memory and extinction learning during reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in an animal model of relapse.

    PubMed

    Feltenstein, Matthew W; See, Ronald E

    2007-11-01

    Previous research from our laboratory has implicated the basolateral amygdala (BLA) complex in the acquisition and consolidation of cue-cocaine associations, as well as extinction learning, which may regulate the long-lasting control of conditioned stimuli (CS) over drug-seeking behavior. Given the well established role of NMDA glutamate receptor activation in other forms of amygdalar-based learning, we predicted that BLA-mediated drug-cue associative learning would be NMDA receptor dependent. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered i.v. cocaine (0.6 mg/kg/infusion) in the absence of explicit CS pairings (2-h sessions, 5 days), followed by a single 1-h classical conditioning (CC) session, during which they received passive infusions of cocaine discretely paired with a light+tone stimulus complex. Following additional cocaine self-administration sessions in the absence of the CS (2-h sessions, 5 days) and extinction training sessions (no cocaine or CS presentation, 2-h sessions, 7 days), the ability of the CS to reinstate cocaine-seeking on three test days was assessed. Rats received bilateral intra-BLA infusions (0.5 microl/hemisphere) of vehicle or the selective NMDA receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5), immediately prior to the CC session (acquisition), immediately following the CC session (consolidation), or immediately following reinstatement testing (consolidation of conditioned-cued extinction learning). AP-5 administered before or after CC attenuated subsequent CS-induced reinstatement, whereas AP-5 administered immediately following the first two reinstatement tests impaired the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior. These results suggest that NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms within the BLA play a crucial role in the consolidation of drug-CS associations into long-term memories that, in turn, drive cocaine-seeking during relapse. PMID:17613253

  16. NMDA receptor blockade in the basolateral amygdala disrupts consolidation of stimulus-reward memory and extinction learning during reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in an animal model of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Feltenstein, Matthew W.; See, Ronald E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research from our laboratory has implicated the basolateral amygdala (BLA) complex in the acquisition and consolidation of cue-cocaine associations, as well as extinction learning, which may regulate the long-lasting control of conditioned stimuli (CS) over drug-seeking behavior. Given the well established role of NMDA glutamate receptor activation in other forms of amygdalar-based learning, we predicted that BLA-mediated drug-cue associative learning would be NMDA receptor dependent. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered i.v. cocaine (0.6 mg/kg/infusion) in the absence of explicit CS pairings (2-h sessions, 5 days), followed by a single 1-h classical conditioning (CC) session, during which they received passive infusions of cocaine discretely paired with a light+tone stimulus complex. Following additional cocaine self-administration sessions in the absence of the CS (2-h sessions, 5 days) and extinction training sessions (no cocaine or CS presentation, 2-h sessions, 7 days), the ability of the CS to reinstate cocaine-seeking on three test days was assessed. Rats received bilateral intra-BLA infusions (0.5 μl/hemisphere) of vehicle or the selective NMDA receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5), immediately prior to the CC session (acquisition), immediately following the CC session (consolidation), or immediately following reinstatement testing (consolidation of conditioned-cued extinction learning). AP-5 administered before or after CC attenuated subsequent CS-induced reinstatement, whereas AP-5 administered immediately following the first two reinstatement tests impaired the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior. These results suggest that NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms within the BLA play a crucial role in the consolidation of drug-CS associations into long-term memories that, in turn, drive cocaine-seeking during relapse. PMID:17613253

  17. Involvement of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of selegiline in maternal separation model of mouse.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shayan; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Mohammadi-Asl, Ali; Alijanpour, Sakineh; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Razmi, Ali; Olson, Carl O; Rastegar, Mojgan; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-09-01

    Mother-infant interactions are known to be associated with the psychological well-being of an individual in adulthood. It is well accepted that emotional stress in early life, such as maternal separation (MS), leads to alterations in the neurotransmission systems of various brain regions, especially the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, and subsequently can increase the risk for development of psychiatric disorders including depression in adulthood. Selegiline is an irreversible monoamine oxidase (MAO) type B inhibitor which increases striatal dopamine levels and exerts an antidepressant effect. In this study, 180min of MS stress was applied to mice at postnatal day (PND) 2-14 followed by behavioral tests for determining depressive-like behaviors, such as forced swimming test (FST), splash test and sucrose preference test (SPT) in adult mice (PND 50). The open field test (OFT) also was applied to validate FST results. We used SCH23390 (D1 antagonist) and sulpiride (D2 antagonist) in order to determine the role of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in antidepressant-like effects of selegiline. Our results revealed that MS provoked depressive-like behaviors in adult male mice, and the administration of selegiline attenuated depressive-like behaviors in MS mice. Our findings showed that D1 dopamine receptors facilitate the positive effects of selegiline on the passive behavior in the FST. Furthermore, antidepressant effects of selegiline on hedonic difficulties are mediated via D2 receptor in the SPT. The results of the splash test revealed that both D1 and D2 receptors mediate the protective effect of selegiline against motivational and self-care problems. Based on our results, we conclude that both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors are involved in mediating the antidepressant-like effect of selegiline. We found that D1 receptors mediate an effect on despair behavior, D2 receptors mediate an effect on anhedonia, and both D1 and D2 receptors contribute to the protective effects of

  18. Serotonin potentiates sympathetic responses evoked by spinal NMDA

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2006-01-01

    In urethane–chloralose anaesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, ventilated rats, we examined the effects on sympathetic outflow to brown adipose tissue (BAT) of separate and simultaneous spinal microinjections of NMDA and serotonin. Microinjection of NMDA (12 pmol) into the right T4 spinal intermediolateral nucleus (IML) immediately increased ipsilateral brown adipose tissue (BAT) sympathetic nerve activity (SNA; peak: +546% of control), BAT thermogenesis (+0.8°C) and heart rate (+53 beats min−1), whereas microinjection of a lower dose of NMDA (1.2 pmol) did not change any of the recorded variables. Microinjection of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 2 nmol) into the T4 IML increased BAT SNA (peak: +342% of control) at a long latency (mean onset: 23min). The long latency 5-HT-evoked increase in BAT SNA was prevented by microinjection of methysergide (600 pmol) into the T4 IML. The increases in BAT SNA evoked by T4 IML microinjections of NMDA (12 pmol) were significantly potentiated (two to three times larger than the response to NMDA alone) following T4 IML microinjections of 5-HT (100 pmol to 2 nmol, but not 20 pmol). Also, microinjection of 5-HT (200 pmol) converted the subthreshold dose of NMDA (1.2 pmol) into an effective dose for increasing BAT SNA and heart rate. The 5-HT-mediated potentiation of the increase in BAT SNA evoked by microinjection of NMDA into the T4 IML was reversed by microinjection of methysergide (600 pmol) into the T4 IML. These results demonstrate that BAT SNA and thermogenesis can be driven by activation of spinal excitatory amino acid or 5-HT receptors and that concomitant activation of spinal NMDA and 5-HT receptors can act synergistically to markedly increase BAT SNA and thermogenesis. PMID:16973701

  19. Dicholine succinate, the neuronal insulin sensitizer, normalizes behavior, REM sleep, hippocampal pGSK3 beta and mRNAs of NMDA receptor subunits in mouse models of depression.

    PubMed

    Cline, Brandon H; Costa-Nunes, Joao P; Cespuglio, Raymond; Markova, Natalyia; Santos, Ana I; Bukhman, Yury V; Kubatiev, Aslan; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Central insulin receptor-mediated signaling is attracting the growing attention of researchers because of rapidly accumulating evidence implicating it in the mechanisms of plasticity, stress response, and neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. Dicholine succinate (DS), a mitochondrial complex II substrate, was shown to enhance insulin-receptor mediated signaling in neurons and is regarded as a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor. Compounds enhancing neuronal insulin receptor-mediated transmission exert an antidepressant-like effect in several pre-clinical paradigms of depression; similarly, such properties for DS were found with a stress-induced anhedonia model. Here, we additionally studied the effects of DS on several variables which were ameliorated by other insulin receptor sensitizers in mice. Pre-treatment with DS of chronically stressed C57BL6 mice rescued normal contextual fear conditioning, hippocampal gene expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR2A, the NR2A/NR2B ratio and increased REM sleep rebound after acute predation. In 18-month-old C57BL6 mice, a model of elderly depression, DS restored normal sucrose preference and activated the expression of neural plasticity factors in the hippocampus as shown by Illumina microarray. Finally, young naïve DS-treated C57BL6 mice had reduced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and, similarly to imipramine-treated mice, preserved hippocampal levels of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GSK3 beta that was lowered by forced swimming in pharmacologically naïve animals. Thus, DS can ameliorate behavioral and molecular outcomes under a variety of stress- and depression-related conditions. This further highlights neuronal insulin signaling as a new factor of pathogenesis and a potential pharmacotherapy of affective pathologies. PMID:25767439

  20. Dicholine succinate, the neuronal insulin sensitizer, normalizes behavior, REM sleep, hippocampal pGSK3 beta and mRNAs of NMDA receptor subunits in mouse models of depression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Brandon H.; Costa-Nunes, Joao P.; Cespuglio, Raymond; Markova, Natalyia; Santos, Ana I.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Kubatiev, Aslan; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Central insulin receptor-mediated signaling is attracting the growing attention of researchers because of rapidly accumulating evidence implicating it in the mechanisms of plasticity, stress response, and neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. Dicholine succinate (DS), a mitochondrial complex II substrate, was shown to enhance insulin-receptor mediated signaling in neurons and is regarded as a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor. Compounds enhancing neuronal insulin receptor-mediated transmission exert an antidepressant-like effect in several pre-clinical paradigms of depression; similarly, such properties for DS were found with a stress-induced anhedonia model. Here, we additionally studied the effects of DS on several variables which were ameliorated by other insulin receptor sensitizers in mice. Pre-treatment with DS of chronically stressed C57BL6 mice rescued normal contextual fear conditioning, hippocampal gene expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR2A, the NR2A/NR2B ratio and increased REM sleep rebound after acute predation. In 18-month-old C57BL6 mice, a model of elderly depression, DS restored normal sucrose preference and activated the expression of neural plasticity factors in the hippocampus as shown by Illumina microarray. Finally, young naïve DS-treated C57BL6 mice had reduced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and, similarly to imipramine-treated mice, preserved hippocampal levels of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GSK3 beta that was lowered by forced swimming in pharmacologically naïve animals. Thus, DS can ameliorate behavioral and molecular outcomes under a variety of stress- and depression-related conditions. This further highlights neuronal insulin signaling as a new factor of pathogenesis and a potential pharmacotherapy of affective pathologies. PMID:25767439

  1. Anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis in infants

    PubMed Central

    Matoq, Amr A.; Rappoport, Adam S.; Yang, Yiting; O'Babatunde, Jessica; Bakerywala, Rubina; Sheth, Raj D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibody encephalitis is an autoimmune disorder manifesting subacutely with prominent aberrant movements and psychiatric symptoms. The clinical course is one of progressive clinical deterioration that can be halted and often reversed by early diagnosis and treatment. Patterns of presentation and etiology of anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis are dependent on age and can be challenging to recognize in very young children. Reports Sequential clinical case observations of anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis presenting in very young children were examined over a year at a single tertiary pediatric institution. Cerebrospinal fluid confirmed anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies in two cases (a 21-month-old boy and a 29-month-old girl) that demonstrated either bizarre behavioral patterns or status epilepticus both associated with progressive deterioration. Once recognized, the clinical course was arrested and reversed by aggressive treatment with plasma exchange, immunoglobulin, and high dose IV steroids. Conclusion Infants with anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis can present with frank seizures or seizure mimics. Regardless, prompt recognition and aggressive treatment of anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis, while challenging, can quickly arrest deterioration and hasten recovery, thereby, limiting neurological morbidity. PMID:26744696

  2. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  4. Tuning the Engine of Cognition: A Focus on NMDA/D1 Receptor Interactions in Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castner, Stacy A.; Williams, Graham V.

    2007-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of the primate frontal lobes provides the capacity for judgment which can constantly adapt behavior in order to optimize its outcome. Adjudicating between long-term memory programs and prepotent responses, this capacity reviews all incoming information and provides an interpretation dependent on the events that have just…

  5. Effect of Dopaminergic D1 Receptors on Plasticity Is Dependent of Serotoninergic 5-HT1A Receptors in L5-Pyramidal Neurons of the Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Claire Nicole Jeanne; Callebert, Jacques; Cancela, José-Manuel; Fossier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Major depression and schizophrenia are associated with dysfunctions of serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems mainly in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Both serotonin and dopamine are known to modulate synaptic plasticity. 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1ARs) and dopaminergic type D1 receptors are highly represented on dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PyNs) in PFC. How these receptors interact to tune plasticity is poorly understood. Here we show that D1-like receptors (D1Rs) activation requires functional 5HT1ARs to facilitate LTP induction at the expense of LTD. Using 129/Sv and 5-HT1AR-KO mice, we recorded post-synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation in layer 2/3 after activation or inhibition of D1Rs. High frequency stimulation resulted in the induction of LTP, LTD or no plasticity. The D1 agonist markedly enhanced the NMDA current in 129/Sv mice and the percentage of L5PyNs displaying LTP was enhanced whereas LTD was reduced. In 5-HT1AR-KO mice, the D1 agonist failed to increase the NMDA current and orientated the plasticity towards L5PyNs displaying LTD, thus revealing a prominent role of 5-HT1ARs in dopamine-induced modulation of plasticity. Our data suggest that in pathological situation where 5-HT1ARs expression varies, dopaminergic treatment used for its ability to increase LTP could turn to be less and less effective. PMID:25775449

  6. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, R.A.; Ravinal, R.C.; Costa, R.S.; Lima, M.S.; Tucci, S.; Muglia, V.F.; Reis, R.B. Dos; Silva, G.E.B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness. PMID:24820071

  7. Multi-functionalized hyaluronic acid nanogels crosslinked with carbon dots as dual receptor-mediated targeting tumor theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu; Han, Yu; Pei, Mingliang; Zhao, Xubo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based theranostic nanogels were designed for the tumor diagnosis and chemotherapy, by crosslinking the folate-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) modified hyaluronic acid (FA-PEG-HA) with carbon dots (CDs) for the first time. Due to the extraordinary fluorescence property of the integrated CDs, the theranostic nanogels could be used for the real-time and noninvasive location tracking to cancer cells. HA could load Doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic interaction with a drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 32.5%. The nanogels possessed an ideal release of DOX in the weak acid environment, while it was restrained in the neutral media, demonstrating the pH-responsive controlled release behavior. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake results clearly illustrated that most DOX was released and accumulated in the cell nuclei and killed the cancer cells efficaciously, due to their dual receptor-mediated targeting characteristics. PMID:27516286

  8. Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis, superoxide production and calcium signaling of beta 2 integrin-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Sawada, C; Higuchi, H; Teraoka, H; Yamaguchi, M

    1997-01-01

    Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G-mediated phagocytosis, superoxide production and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling of complement receptor type 3 (CR3)-deficient neutrophils from a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) were compared to those of control heifers. The mean phagocytic activity of IgG-coated yeasts and aggregated bovine IgG (Agg-IgG)-induced superoxide production of CR3-deficient neutrophils were 10% and 77.9%, respectively, of those of control neutrophils. The [Ca2+]i signals in CR3-deficient neutrophils stimulated with Agg-IgG or concanavalin A were different with mean peak [Ca2+]i concentrations of 78% and 41.9%, respectively, of those of control neutrophils. These findings suggest that Fc receptor-mediated neutrophil functions are closely dependent on the presence of CR3 (CD11b/CD18) on the neutrophil cell surfaces. PMID:9343828

  9. The influence of receptor-mediated interactions on reaction-diffusion mechanisms of cellular self-organisation.

    PubMed

    Klika, Václav; Baker, Ruth E; Headon, Denis; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. PMID:22072186

  10. Opposite regulation of cocaine-induced intracellular signaling and gene expression by dopamine D1 and D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Ming

    2006-08-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine induces persistent neuroadaptations that involve alterations in cellular signaling and gene expression mediated by dopamine (DA) receptors in the brain. Both dopamine D1 and D3 receptors mediate cocaine-induced behaviors and they are also coexpressed in the same neurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudoputamen (CPu). We have investigated whether these two receptors coordinately regulate intracellular signaling and gene expression after acute and repeated cocaine administration. We found that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and c-fos induction in the CPu following an acute cocaine administration is mediated by the D1 receptor and inhibited by the D3 receptor. ERK activation is necessary for acute cocaine-induced expression of fos family genes that include c-fos, fosB, and fra2. Furthermore, potential target genes of cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein and/or AP-1 transcription complex, including dynorphin, neogenin, and synaptotagmin VII, are also oppositely regulated by D1 and D3 receptors after repeated cocaine injections. Lastly, such regulation requires proper ERK activation. These results suggest that D1 and D3 receptors oppositely regulate target gene expression by regulating ERK activation after cocaine administration. PMID:17105899

  11. Agonist-induced desensitization of histamine H1 receptor-mediated inositol phospholipid hydrolysis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    McCreath, G; Hall, I P; Hill, S J

    1994-01-01

    1. The regulation of histamine-induced [3H]-inositol phosphate formation was studied in human cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). 2. Histamine (EC50 4.8 microM) produced a 12.7 fold increase in [3H]-inositol phosphate formation over basal levels. Prior exposure to 0.1 mM histamine (2 h) produced a 78% reduction in the response to subsequent histamine (0.1 mM) challenge. The IC50 for this histamine-induced desensitization was 0.9 microM. 3. The inositol phosphate response to histamine (0.1 mM) was inhibited by phorbol dibutyrate (IC50 40 nM; maximal reduction 64%). This effect was antagonized by both staurosporine (100 nM) and Ro 31-8220 (10 microM). However, the histamine-induced desensitization of the H1-receptor-mediated inositol phosphate response was insensitive to the protein kinase inhibitors, staurosporine, Ro 31-8220, K252a and KN62. 4. Prior exposure to sodium nitroprusside (100 microM), forskolin (10 microM) or dibutyryl cyclic AMP (1 mM) had no effect upon histamine-induced [3H]-inositol phosphate formation. 5. NaF (20 mM) and thrombin (EC50 0.4 u ml-1) also induced inositol phosphate formation in HUVEC. Histamine pretreatment (0.1 mM, 10-120 min) failed to modify the inositol phosphate response to a subsequent NaF or thrombin challenge. 6. We conclude that the desensitization of histamine H1-receptor-mediated [3H]-inositol phosphate formation occurs at the level of the receptor and involves a mechanism independent of activation of protein kinase A, G, or C, or calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. PMID:7858873

  12. Halothane inhibits the cholinergic-receptor-mediated influx of calcium in primary culture of bovine adrenal medulla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, N.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.

    1986-04-01

    Adrenal medulla cells are cholinoceptive cells. Stimulation of the acetylcholine receptor causes the influx of Ca to the cells, and Ca acts as the coupler of the stimulus-secretion coupling. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of halothane on the receptor-mediated influx of /sup 45/Ca using cultured bovine adrenal medulla cells. Halothane at clinical concentrations (0.5-2%) inhibited the influx of /sup 45/Ca caused by carbachol, with simultaneous inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The influx of /sup 45/Ca and the secretion of catecholamines caused by K depolarization were inhibited by a large concentration of Mg, which competes with Ca at Ca channels, but not inhibited by halothane. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not overcome by increase in the carbachol concentration. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was examined in comparison with that caused by a large concentration of Mg by the application of Scatchard analysis as the function of the external Ca concentration. Halothane decreased the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca without altering the apparent kinetic constant of Ca to Ca channels. On the contrary, a large concentration of Mg increased the apparent kinetic constant without altering the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not due to the direct competitive inhibition of Ca channels, nor to the competitive antagonism of agonist-receptor interaction. As a possibility, halothane seems to inhibit the receptor-mediated activation of Ca channels through the interference of coupling between the receptor and Ca channels.

  13. Estrous cycle regulation of extrasynaptic δ-containing GABA(A) receptor-mediated tonic inhibition and limbic epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Gangisetty, Omkaram; Carver, Chase Matthew; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2013-07-01

    The ovarian cycle affects susceptibility to behavioral and neurologic conditions. The molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are poorly understood. Deficits in cyclical fluctuations in steroid hormones and receptor plasticity play a central role in physiologic and pathophysiologic menstrual conditions. It has been suggested that synaptic GABA(A) receptors mediate phasic inhibition in the hippocampus and extrasynaptic receptors mediate tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus. Here we report a novel role of extrasynaptic δ-containing GABA(A) receptors as crucial mediators of the estrous cycle-related changes in neuronal excitability in mice, with hippocampus subfield specificity. In molecular and immunofluorescence studies, a significant increase occurred in δ-subunit, but not α4- and γ2-subunits, in the dentate gyrus during diestrus. However, δ-subunit upregulation was not evident in the CA1 region. The δ-subunit expression was undiminished by age and ovariectomy and in mice lacking progesterone receptors, but it was significantly reduced by finasteride, a neurosteroid synthesis inhibitor. Electrophysiologic studies confirmed greater potentiation of GABA currents by progesterone-derived neurosteroid allopregnanolone in dissociated dentate gyrus granule cells in diestrus than in CA1 pyramidal cells. The baseline conductance and allopregnanolone potentiation of tonic currents in dentate granule cells from hippocampal slices were higher than in CA1 pyramidal cells. In behavioral studies, susceptibility to hippocampus kindling epileptogenesis was lower in mice during diestrus. These results demonstrate the estrous cycle-related plasticity of neurosteroid-sensitive, δ-containing GABA(A) receptors that mediate tonic inhibition and seizure susceptibility. These findings may provide novel insight on molecular cascades of menstrual disorders like catamenial epilepsy, premenstrual syndrome, and migraine. PMID:23667248

  14. Exposure and characterization of the action of noradrenaline at dopamine receptors mediating endothelium-independent relaxation of rat isolated small mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Graaf, P. H.; Saxena, P. R.; Shankley, N. P.; Black, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    dopamine and NA relaxation curves and application of the operational model of agonism yielded estimates of the affinity (pKA = 5.3 +/- 0.2 and 4.4 +/- 0.2) and efficacy (log gamma = 0.06 +/- 0.11 and 0.01 +/- 0.10) for dopamine and NA, respectively, at D1 receptors. 5. HV723 (0.1 and 1 microM), a ligand that yielded a Schild plot slope parameter of unity as an antagonist of NA in the contractile assay, produced concentration-dependent inhibition of the NA-mediated relaxation (pA2 approximately 8). 6. The results of this study indicate that NA can activate D1 receptors mediating relaxation in the rat SMA at concentrations which were encountered in our previous receptor classification experiments using competitive alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists. PMID:8719802

  15. Dendritic NMDA receptors activate axonal calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason M.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation can alter synaptic strength by regulating transmitter release from a variety of neurons in the CNS. As NMDARs are permeable to Ca2+ and monovalent cations, they could alter release directly by increasing presynaptic Ca2+ or indirectly by axonal depolarization sufficient to activate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Using two-photon microscopy to measure Ca2+ excursions, we found that somatic depolarization or focal activation of dendritic NMDARs elicited small Ca2+ transients in axon varicosities of cerebellar stellate cell interneurons. These axonal transients resulted from Ca2+ entry through VSCCs that were opened by the electrotonic spread of the NMDAR-mediated depolarization elicited in the dendrites. In contrast, we were unable to detect direct activation of NMDARs on axons indicating an exclusive somatodendritic expression of functional NMDARs. In cerebellar stellate cells, dendritic NMDAR activation masquerades as a presynaptic phenomenon and may influence Ca2+-dependent forms of presynaptic plasticity and release. PMID:18957221

  16. Excitatory Amino Acid Receptors Mediate Asymmetry and Lateralization in the Descending Cardiovascular Pathways from the Dorsomedial Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Ianzer, Danielle; Lima, Augusto Martins; Marins, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Vaz, Gisele; Menezes, Gustavo Batista; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2014-01-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) are anatomically and functionally connected. Both the DMH and PAG depend on glutamatergic inputs for activation. We recently reported that removal of GABA-ergic tone in the unilateral DMH produces: asymmetry, that is, a right- (R-) sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism, and lateralization, that is, a greater increase in ipsilateral renal sympathetic activity (RSNA). In the current study, we investigated whether excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors in the DMH–PAG pathway contribute to the functional interhemispheric difference. In urethane (1.2 to 1.4 g/kg, i.p.) anesthetized rats, we observed that: (i) nanoinjections of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA 100 pmol/100 nl) into the unilateral DMH produced the same right-sided predominance in the control of cardiac chronotropy, (ii) nanoinjections of NMDA into the ipsilateral DMH or PAG evoked lateralized RSNA responses, and (iii) blockade of EAA receptors in the unilateral DMH attenuated the cardiovascular responses evoked by injection of NMDA into either the R- or left- (L-) PAG. In awake rats, nanoinjection of kynurenic acid (1 nmol/100 nL) into the L-DMH or R- or L-PAG attenuated the tachycardia evoked by air stress. However, the magnitude of stress-evoked tachycardia was smallest when the EAA receptors of the R-DMH were blocked. We conclude that EAA receptors contribute to the right-sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism. This interhemispheric difference that involves EAA receptors was observed in the DMH but not in the PAG. PMID:25397884

  17. The Wedelolactone Derivative Inhibits Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Breast, Endometrial, and Ovarian Cancer Cells Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Defeng; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Cheng, Max A.; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the etiology and progression of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Attenuating ER activities by natural products and their derivatives is a relatively practical strategy to control and reduce breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk. Here, we found 3-butoxy-1,8,9-trihydroxy-6H-benzofuro[3,2-c]benzopyran-6-one (BTB), a new derivative of wedelolactone, could effectively inhibit the 17-estradiol (E2)-induced ER transactivation and suppress the growth of breast cancer as well as endometrial and ovarian cancer cells. Our results indicate that 2.5 μM BTB effectively suppresses ER-positive, but not ER-negative, breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that BTB can modulate ER transactivation and suppress the expression of E2-mediated ER target genes (Cyclin D1, E2F1, and TERT) in the ER-positive MCF-7, Ishikawa, and SKOV-3 cells. Importantly, this BTB mediated inhibition of ER activity is selective since BTB does not suppress the activities of other nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor and progesterone receptor, suggesting that BTB functions as a selective ER signaling inhibitor with the potential to treat breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. PMID:25221777

  18. Chronic hyperammonemia induces tonic activation of NMDA receptors in cerebellum.

    PubMed

    ElMlili, Nisrin; Boix, Jordi; Ahabrach, Hanan; Rodrigo, Regina; Errami, Mohammed; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-02-01

    Reduced function of the glutamate--nitric oxide (NO)--cGMP pathway is responsible for some cognitive alterations in rats with hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. Hyperammonemia impairs the pathway in cerebellum by increasing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation in Ser847 by calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), reducing nNOS activity, and by reducing nNOS amount in synaptic membranes, which reduces its activation following NMDA receptors activation. The reason for increased CaMKII activity in hyperammonemia remains unknown. We hypothesized that it would be as a result of increased tonic activation of NMDA receptors. The aims of this work were to assess: (i) whether tonic NMDA activation receptors is increased in cerebellum in chronic hyperammonemia in vivo; and (ii) whether this tonic activation is responsible for increased CaMKII activity and reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 increases cGMP and NO metabolites in cerebellum in vivo and in slices from hyperammonemic rats. This is because of reduced phosphorylation and activity of CaMKII, leading to normalization of nNOS phosphorylation and activity. MK-801 also increases nNOS in synaptic membranes and reduces it in cytosol. This indicates that hyperammonemia increases tonic activation of NMDA receptors leading to reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. PMID:20002515

  19. Amyloid β peptide oligomers directly activate NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Texidó, Laura; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Alberdi, Elena; Solsona, Carles; Matute, Carlos

    2011-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers accumulate in the brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients and are related to disease pathogenesis. The precise mechanisms by which Aβ oligomers cause neurotoxicity remain unknown. We recently reported that Aβ oligomers cause intracellular Ca(2+) overload and neuronal death that can be prevented by NMDA receptor antagonists. This study investigated whether Aβ oligomers directly activated NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using NR1/NR2A and NR1/NR2B receptors that were heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Indeed, Aβ oligomers induced inward non-desensitizing currents that were blocked in the presence of the NMDA receptor antagonists memantine, APV, and MK-801. Intriguingly, the amplitude of the responses to Aβ oligomers was greater for NR1/NR2A heteromers than for NR1/NR2B heteromers expressed in oocytes. Consistent with these findings, we observed that the increase in the cytosolic concentration of Ca(2+) induced by Aβ oligomers in cortical neurons is prevented by AP5, a broad spectrum NMDA receptor antagonist, but slightly attenuated by ifenprodil which blocks receptors with the NR2B subunit. Together, these results indicate that Aβ oligomers directly activate NMDA receptors, particularly those with the NR2A subunit, and further suggest that drugs that attenuate the activity of such receptors may prevent Aβ damage to neurons in Alzheimeŕs disease. PMID:21349580

  20. Valerian inhibits rat hepatocarcinogenesis by activating GABA(A) receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Kakehashi, Anna; Kato, Ayumi; Ishii, Naomi; Wei, Min; Morimura, Keiichirou; Fukushima, Shoji; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Valerian is widely used as a traditional medicine to improve the quality of sleep due to interaction of several active components with the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor (GABA(A)R) system. Recently, activation of GABA signaling in stem cells has been reported to suppress cell cycle progression in vivo. Furthermore, possible inhibitory effects of GABA(A)R agonists on hepatocarcinogenesis have been reported. The present study was performed to investigate modulating effects of Valerian on hepatocarcinogenesis using a medium-term rat liver bioassay. Male F344 rats were treated with one of the most powerful Valerian species (Valeriana sitchensis) at doses of 0, 50, 500 and 5000 ppm in their drinking water after initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Formation of glutathione S-transferase placental form positive (GST-P(+)) foci was significantly inhibited by Valerian at all applied doses compared with DEN initiation control rats. Generation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in the rat liver was significantly suppressed by all doses of Valerian, likely due to suppression of Nrf2, CYP7A1 and induction of catalase expression. Cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, while apoptosis was induced in areas of GST-P(+) foci of Valerian groups associated with suppression of c-myc, Mafb, cyclin D1 and induction of p21(Waf1/Cip1), p53 and Bax mRNA expression. Interestingly, expression of the GABA(A)R alpha 1 subunit was observed in GST-P(+) foci of DEN control rats, with significant elevation associated with Valerian treatment. These results indicate that Valerian exhibits inhibitory effects on rat hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting oxidative DNA damage, suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in GST-P(+) foci by activating GABA(A)R-mediated signaling. PMID:25419570

  1. Valerian Inhibits Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis by Activating GABA(A) Receptor-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kakehashi, Anna; Kato, Ayumi; Ishii, Naomi; Wei, Min; Morimura, Keiichirou; Fukushima, Shoji; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Valerian is widely used as a traditional medicine to improve the quality of sleep due to interaction of several active components with the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor (GABA(A)R) system. Recently, activation of GABA signaling in stem cells has been reported to suppress cell cycle progression in vivo. Furthermore, possible inhibitory effects of GABA(A)R agonists on hepatocarcinogenesis have been reported. The present study was performed to investigate modulating effects of Valerian on hepatocarcinogenesis using a medium-term rat liver bioassay. Male F344 rats were treated with one of the most powerful Valerian species (Valeriana sitchensis) at doses of 0, 50, 500 and 5000 ppm in their drinking water after initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Formation of glutathione S-transferase placental form positive (GST-P+) foci was significantly inhibited by Valerian at all applied doses compared with DEN initiation control rats. Generation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in the rat liver was significantly suppressed by all doses of Valerian, likely due to suppression of Nrf2, CYP7A1 and induction of catalase expression. Cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, while apoptosis was induced in areas of GST-P+ foci of Valerian groups associated with suppression of c-myc, Mafb, cyclin D1 and induction of p21Waf1/Cip1, p53 and Bax mRNA expression. Interestingly, expression of the GABA(A)R alpha 1 subunit was observed in GST-P+ foci of DEN control rats, with significant elevation associated with Valerian treatment. These results indicate that Valerian exhibits inhibitory effects on rat hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting oxidative DNA damage, suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in GST-P+ foci by activating GABA(A)R-mediated signaling. PMID:25419570

  2. Interplay between non-NMDA and NMDA receptor activation during oscillatory wave propagation: Analyses of caffeine-induced oscillations in the visual cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Sugai, Tokio; Kato, Nobuo; Tominaga, Takashi; Tominaga, Yoko; Hasegawa, Takahiro; Yao, Chenjuan; Akamatsu, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Generation and propagation of oscillatory activities in cortical networks are important features of the brain. However, many issues related to oscillatory phenomena are unclear. We previously reported neocortical oscillation following caffeine treatment of rat brain slices. Input to the primary visual cortex (Oc1) generates N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent oscillations, and we proposed that the oscillatory signals originate in the secondary visual cortex (Oc2). Because non-NMDA and NMDA receptors cooperate in synaptic transmission, non-NMDA receptors may also play an important role in oscillatory activities. Here we investigated how non-NMDA receptor activities contribute to NMDA receptor-dependent oscillations by using optical recording methods. After induction of stable oscillations with caffeine application, blockade of NMDA receptors abolished the late stable oscillatory phase, but elicited 'hidden' non-NMDA receptor-dependent oscillation during the early depolarizing phase. An interesting finding is that the origin of the non-NMDA receptor-dependent oscillation moved from the Oc1, during the early phase, toward the origin of the NMDA receptor-dependent oscillation that is fixed in the Oc2. In addition, the frequency of the non-NMDA receptor-dependent oscillation was higher than that of the NMDA receptor-dependent oscillation. Thus, in one course of spatiotemporal oscillatory activities, the relative balance in receptor activities between non-NMDA and NMDA receptors gradually changes, and this may be due to the different kinetics of the two receptor types. These results suggest that interplay between the two receptor types in the areas of Oc1 and Oc2 may play an important role in oscillatory signal communication. PMID:27136667

  3. EVALUATING THE NMDA-GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR AS A SITE OF ACTION FOR TOLUENE, IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro, toluene disrupts the function of NMDA-glutamate receptors, indicating that effects on NMDA receptor function may contribute to toluene neurotoxicity. NMDA-glutamate receptors are widely present in the visual system and contribute to pattern-elicited visual evoked potent...

  4. Receptor mechanisms and circuitry underlying NMDA antagonist neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Farber, N B; Kim, S H; Dikranian, K; Jiang, X P; Heinkel, C

    2002-01-01

    NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists are used in clinical anesthesia, and are being developed as therapeutic agents for preventing neurodegeneration in stroke, epilepsy, and brain trauma. However, the ability of these agents to produce neurotoxicity in adult rats and psychosis in adult humans compromises their clinical usefulness. In addition, an NMDA receptor hypofunction (NRHypo) state might play a role in neurodegenerative and psychotic disorders, like Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Thus, understanding the mechanism underlying NRHypo-induced neurotoxicity and psychosis could have significant clinically relevant benefits. NRHypo neurotoxicity can be prevented by several classes of agents (e.g. antimuscarinics, non-NMDA glutamate antagonists, and alpha(2) adrenergic agonists) suggesting that the mechanism of neurotoxicity is complex. In the present study a series of experiments was undertaken to more definitively define the receptors and complex neural circuitry underlying NRHypo neurotoxicity. Injection of either the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine or the non-NMDA antagonist NBQX directly into the cortex prevented NRHypo neurotoxicity. Clonidine, an alpha(2) adrenergic agonist, protected against the neurotoxicity when injected into the basal forebrain. The combined injection of muscarinic and non-NMDA Glu agonists reproduced the neurotoxic reaction. Based on these and other results, we conclude that the mechanism is indirect, and involves a complex network disturbance, whereby blockade of NMDA receptors on inhibitory neurons in multiple subcortical brain regions, disinhibits glutamatergic and cholinergic projections to the cerebral cortex. Simultaneous excitotoxic stimulation of muscarinic (m(3)) and glutamate (AMPA/kainate) receptors on cerebrocortical neurons appears to be the proximal mechanism by which the neurotoxic and psychotomimetic effects of NRHypo are mediated. PMID:11803444

  5. Central role for hydrogen peroxide in P2Y1 ADP receptor-mediated cellular responses in vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Kalwa, Hermann; Sartoretto, Juliano L.; Martinelli, Roberta; Romero, Natalia; Steinhorn, Benjamin S.; Tao, Ming; Ozaki, C. Keith; Carman, Christopher V.; Michel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ADP activates a family of cell surface receptors that modulate signaling pathways in a broad range of cells. ADP receptor antagonists are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease states. These studies identify a critical role for the stable reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mediating cellular responses activated by the G protein-coupled P2Y1 receptor for ADP. We found that ADP-dependent phosphorylation of key endothelial signaling proteins—including endothelial nitric oxide synthase, AMP-activated protein kinase, and the actin-binding MARCKS protein—was blocked by preincubation with PEG-catalase, which degrades H2O2. ADP treatment promoted the H2O2-dependent phosphorylation of c-Abl, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that modulates the actin cytoskeleton. Cellular imaging experiments using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensors revealed that ADP-stimulated activation of the cytoskeleton-associated small GTPase Rac1 was independent of H2O2. However, Rac1-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, the signaling phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-(4, 5)-bisphosphate, and the c-Abl–interacting protein CrkII are mediated by H2O2. We transfected endothelial cells with differentially targeted HyPer2 H2O2 biosensors and found that ADP promoted a marked increase in H2O2 levels in the cytosol and caveolae, and a smaller increase in mitochondria. We performed a screen for P2Y1 receptor-mediated receptor tyrosine kinase transactivation and discovered that ADP transactivates Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3), a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in these cells. Our observation that P2Y1 receptor-mediated responses involve Flt3 transactivation may identify a unique mechanism whereby cancer chemotherapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors promotes vascular dysfunction. Taken together, these findings establish a critical role for endogenous H2O2 in control of ADP-mediated signaling responses in the vascular wall. PMID:24550450

  6. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datz, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Gattner, Michael; Weiss, Veronika; Brunner, Korbinian; Bretzler, Johanna; von Schirnding, Constantin; Torrano, Adriano A.; Spada, Fabio; Vrabel, Milan; Engelke, Hanna; Bräuchle, Christoph; Carell, Thomas; Bein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranostic systems.Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the

  7. Developmental changes in NMDA receptor expression in the platyfish brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Magliulo-Cepriano, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the brain of a freshwater teleost using an antibody against the R1 subunit of the receptor (NMDAR1). The primary site of localization was the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a significant gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus. The number of cells expressing NMDAR1 in this nucleus was dependent upon developmental stage, with pubescent and mature animals displaying significantly more stained cells than immature and senescent animals. This is the first reported observation of age- and maturity-related NMDA receptor association with GnRH-containing brain areas.

  8. Serotoninergic and dopaminergic modulation of cortico-striatal circuit in executive and attention deficits induced by NMDA receptor hypofunction in the 5-choice serial reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Carli, Mirjana; Invernizzi, Roberto W.

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions are an emerging propriety of neuronal processing in circuits encompassing frontal cortex and other cortical and subcortical brain regions such as basal ganglia and thalamus. Glutamate serves as the major neurotrasmitter in these circuits where glutamate receptors of NMDA type play key role. Serotonin and dopamine afferents are in position to modulate intrinsic glutamate neurotransmission along these circuits and in turn to optimize circuit performance for specific aspects of executive control over behavior. In this review, we focus on the 5-choice serial reaction time task which is able to provide various measures of attention and executive control over performance in rodents and the ability of prefrontocortical and striatal serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C as well as dopamine D1- and D2-like receptors to modulate different aspects of executive and attention disturbances induced by NMDA receptor hypofunction in the prefrontal cortex. These behavioral studies are integrated with findings from microdialysis studies. These studies illustrate the control of attention selectivity by serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, and dopamine D1- but not D2-like receptors and a distinct contribution of these cortical and striatal serotonin and dopamine receptors to the control of different aspects of executive control over performance such as impulsivity and compulsivity. An association between NMDA antagonist-induced increase in glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex and attention is suggested. Collectively, this review highlights the functional interaction of serotonin and dopamine with NMDA dependent glutamate neurotransmission in the cortico-striatal circuitry for specific cognitive demands and may shed some light on how dysregulation of neuronal processing in these circuits may be implicated in specific neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24966814

  9. B cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus display abnormal antigen receptor-mediated early signal transduction events.

    PubMed Central

    Liossis, S N; Kovacs, B; Dennis, G; Kammer, G M; Tsokos, G C

    1996-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the B cell overactivity that is observed in patients with SLE, we have conducted experiments in which the surface immunoglobulin (sIg)-mediated early cell signaling events were studied. The anti-sIgM-mediated free intracytoplasmic calcium ([Ca2+]i) responses were significantly higher in SLE B cells compared with responses of normal individuals and to those of patients with other systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The anti-IgD mAb induced [Ca2+]i responses were also higher in lupus B cells than in controls. The magnitude of anti-sIgM-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores was also increased in B cells from SLE patients compared with normal controls. The amount of inositol phosphate metabolites produced upon crosslinking of sIgM was slightly higher in patients with lupus than in normal controls, although the difference was not statistically significant. In contrast, the degree of anti-sIgM-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation was obviously increased in lupus patients. Our study demonstrates clearly for the first time that SLE B cells exhibit aberrant early signal transduction events, including augmented calcium responses after crosslinking of the B cell receptor and increased antigen-receptor-mediated phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues. Because the above abnormalities did not correlate with disease activity or treatment status, we propose that they may have pathogenic significance. PMID:8958217

  10. Fatty acyl specificity of the receptor-mediated release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.D.

    1987-05-01

    Histamine and bradykinin appear to exhibit the same fatty acid specificity as thrombin. Incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 10 ..mu..M histamine for 10 min in buffered saline containing 50 ..mu..M fat-free albumin stimulates the release of previously incorporated (/sup 14/C)arachidonate but not (/sup 14/C)22:4(n-6) or (/sup 14/C)20:3(n-6). Similarly calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells release (/sup 14/C)arachidonate but not (/sup 14/C)22:4(n-6) in response to either bradykinin (1 /sup +/g/ml) or histamine (10..mu..M). In both types of endothelial cells, the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 ..mu..M) exhibits the same pattern of fatty acyl specificity as the receptor-mediated agonists. By contrast, mellitin (2-4 ..mu..g/ml) stimulates the release of free 22:4(n-6) and oleate in addition to arachidonate; release of 22:4(n-6) is 30-70% that of arachidonate. These results suggest that histamine, bradykinin and thrombin stimulate a common calcium-dependent fatty acyl-specific phospholipase activity.