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Sample records for d3-modified regulatory dendritic

  1. Generation of regulatory dendritic cells after treatment with paeoniflorin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Li, Yingxi; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Keqiu; Jing, Yaqing; He, Jinghua; Qiang, Zhaoyan; Tong, Jingzhi; Sun, Ke; Ding, Wen; Kang, Yi; Li, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory dendritic cells are a potential therapeutic tool for assessing a variety of immune overreaction diseases. Paeoniflorin, a bioactive glucoside extracted from the Chinese herb white paeony root, has been shown to be effective at inhibiting the maturation and immunostimulatory function of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. However, whether paeoniflorin can program conventional dendritic cells toward regulatory dendritic cells and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. Here, our study demonstrates that paeoniflorin can induce the production of regulatory dendritic cells from human peripheral blood monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not from mature dendritic cells, thereby demonstrating the potential of paeoniflorin as a specific immunosuppressive drug with fewer complications and side effects. These regulatory dendritic cells treated with paeoniflorin exhibited high CD11b/c and low CD80, CD86 and CD40 expression levels as well as enhanced abilities to capture antigen and promote the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells and reduced abilities to migrate and promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, which is associated with the upregulation of endogenous transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-mediated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression. Collectively, paeoniflorin could program immature dendritic cells (imDCs) and imDCs stimulated with LPS toward a regulatory DC fate by upregulating the endogenous TGF-β-mediated IDO expression level, thereby demonstrating its potential as a specific immunosuppressive drug. PMID:26721806

  2. Regulatory multitasking of tolerogenic dendritic cells - lessons taken from vitamin d3-treated tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Tatjana; Roep, Bart O

    2013-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) work through silencing of differentiated antigen-specific T cells, activation and expansion of naturally occurring T regulatory cells (Tregs), transfer of regulatory properties to T cells, and the differentiation of naïve T cells into Tregs. Due to an operational definition based on T cell activation assays, the identity of tolerogenic DCs has been a matter of debate and it need not represent a specialized DC subset. Human tolerogenic DCs generated in vitro using inhibitory cytokines, growth factors, natural immunomodulators, or genetic manipulation have been effective and several of these tolerogenic DCs are currently being tested for clinical use. Ex vivo generated tolerogenic DCs reduce activation of naïve T cells using various means, promote a variety of regulatory T cells and most importantly, frequently show stable inhibitory phenotypes upon repetitive maturation with inflammatory factors. Yet, tolerogenic DCs differ with respect to the phenotype or the number of regulatory mechanisms they employ to modulate the immune system. In our experience, tolerogenic DCs generated using the biologically active form of vitamin D (VD3-DCs), alone, or combined with dexamethasone are proficient in their immunoregulatory functions. These tolerogenic DCs show a stable maturation-resistant semi-mature phenotype with low expression of activating co-stimulatory molecules, no production of the IL-12 family of cytokines and high expression of inhibitory molecules and IL-10. VD3-DCs induce increased apoptosis of effector T cells and induce antigen-specific regulatory T cells, which work through linked suppression ensuring infectious tolerance. Lessons learned on VD3-DCs help understanding the contribution of different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and secondary signals to the tolerogenic function and how a cross-talk between DCs and T cells translates into immune regulation. PMID:23717310

  3. Role of regulatory dendritic cells in allergy and asthma.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Omid; Umetsu, Dale T

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient inducers of all immune responses, and are capable of either inducing productive immunity or maintaining the state of tolerance to self antigens and allergens. In this review, we summarize the emerging literature on DCs, with emphasis on the regulatory function of DCs in allergy and asthma. In particular, we summarize recent data regarding the relationship between DC subsets and TH1, TH2, and regulatory T (TReg) cells. The diverse functions of DCs have been attributed to distinct lineages of DCs, which arise from common immature precursor cells that differentiate in response to specific maturation-inducing or local microenvironment conditions. These subsets of DCs induce different lineages of T cells, such as TH1, TH2, and TReg cells, including Th1Reg and Th2Reg cells, which regulate allergic diseases and asthma. Subsets of DCs regulate the induction of a variety of T-cell subtypes, which suppress the development of allergy and asthma, thus providing anti-inflammatory responses and protective immunity. PMID:15659264

  4. Prospective Clinical Testing of Regulatory Dendritic Cells in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Angus W.; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Metes, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering the incidence and severity of rejection and reducing patients’ dependence on anti-rejection drugs. Generation of donor- or recipient-derived DCreg that suppress T cell responses and prolong transplant survival in rodents or non-human primates has been well-described. Recently, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade DCreg have been produced at our Institution for prospective use in human organ transplantation. We briefly review experience of regulatory immune therapy in organ transplantation and describe our experience generating and characterizing human monocyte-derived DCreg. We propose a phase I/II safety study in which the influence of donor-derived DCreg combined with conventional immunosuppression on subclinical and clinical rejection and host alloimmune responses will be examined in detail. PMID:26858719

  5. How tolerogenic dendritic cells induce regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Roberto A.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery by Steinman and Cohn in 1973, dendritic cells (DCs) have become increasingly recognized for their crucial role as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are exquisitely adept at acquiring, processing and presenting antigens to T cells. They also adjust the context (and hence the outcome) of antigen presentation in response to a plethora of environmental inputs that signal the occurence of pathogens or tissue damage. Such signals generally boost DC maturation, which promotes their migration from peripheral tissues into and within secondary lymphoid organs and their capacity to induce and regulate effector T cell responses. Conversely, more recent observations indicate that DCs are also crucial to ensure immunological peace. Indeed, DCs constantly present innocuous self and non-self antigens in a fashion that promotes tolerance, at least in part, through the control of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs are specialized T cells that exert their immuno-suppressive function through a variety of mechanisms affecting both DCs and effector cells. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between tolerogenic DCs and Tregs. PMID:21056730

  6. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells for Regulatory T Cell Induction in Man

    PubMed Central

    Raker, Verena K.; Domogalla, Matthias P.; Steinbrink, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized professional antigen-presenting cells that regulate immune responses, maintaining the balance between tolerance and immunity. Mechanisms via which they can promote central and peripheral tolerance include clonal deletion, the inhibition of memory T cell responses, T cell anergy, and induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). These properties have led to the analysis of human tolerogenic DCs as a therapeutic strategy for the induction or re-establishment of tolerance. In recent years, numerous protocols for the generation of human tolerogenic DCs have been developed and their tolerogenic mechanisms, including induction of Tregs, are relatively well understood. Phase I trials have been conducted in autoimmune disease, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of treatments with tolerogenic DCs. Therefore, the scientific rationale for the use of tolerogenic DCs therapy in the fields of transplantation medicine and allergic and autoimmune diseases is strong. This review will give an overview on efforts and protocols to generate human tolerogenic DCs with focus on IL-10-modulated DCs as inducers of Tregs and discuss their clinical applications and challenges faced in further developing this form of immunotherapy. PMID:26617604

  7. Role of dendritic cells in the induction of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in initiating immune responses and maintaining immune tolerance. In addition to playing a role in thymic selection, DCs play an active role in tolerance under steady state conditions through several mechanisms which are dependent on IL-10, TGF-β, retinoic acid, indoleamine-2,3,-dioxygenase along with vitamin D. Several of these mechanisms are employed by DCs in induction of regulatory T cells which are comprised of Tr1 regulatory T cells, natural and inducible foxp3+ regulatory T cells, Th3 regulatory T cells and double negative regulatory T cells. It appears that certain DC subsets are highly specialized in inducing regulatory T cell differentiation and in some tissues the local microenvironment plays a role in driving DCs towards a tolerogenic response. In this review we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DC driven regulatory T cell induction. PMID:21711933

  8. The Effect of Traditional Chinese Formula Danchaiheji on the Differentiation of Regulatory Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaodong; Tong, Jingzhi; Li, Keqiu; Jing, Yaqing

    2016-01-01

    Recently, regulatory dendritic cells (DCregs), a newly described dendritic cell subset with potent immunomodulatory function, have attracted increased attention for their utility in treating immune response-related diseases, such as graft-versus-host disease, hypersensitivity, and autoimmune diseases. Danchaiheji (DCHJ) is a traditional Chinese formula that has been used for many years in the clinic. However, whether DCHJ can program dendritic cells towards a regulatory phenotype and the underlying mechanism behind this process remain unknown. Herein, we investigate the effects of traditional Chinese DCHJ on DCregs differentiation and a mouse model of skin transplantation. The current study demonstrates that DCHJ can induce dendritic cells to differentiate into DCregs, which are represented by high CD11b and low CD86 and HLA-DR expression as well as the secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β. In addition, DCHJ inhibited DC migration and T cell proliferation, which correlated with increased IDO expression. Furthermore, DCHJ significantly prolonged skin graft survival time in a mouse model of skin transplantation without any liver or kidney toxicity. The traditional Chinese formula DCHJ has the potential to be a potent immunosuppressive agent with high efficiency and nontoxicity. PMID:27525028

  9. Regulatory Multitasking of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells – Lessons Taken from Vitamin D3-Treated Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Tatjana; Roep, Bart O.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) work through silencing of differentiated antigen-specific T cells, activation and expansion of naturally occurring T regulatory cells (Tregs), transfer of regulatory properties to T cells, and the differentiation of naïve T cells into Tregs. Due to an operational definition based on T cell activation assays, the identity of tolerogenic DCs has been a matter of debate and it need not represent a specialized DC subset. Human tolerogenic DCs generated in vitro using inhibitory cytokines, growth factors, natural immunomodulators, or genetic manipulation have been effective and several of these tolerogenic DCs are currently being tested for clinical use. Ex vivo generated tolerogenic DCs reduce activation of naïve T cells using various means, promote a variety of regulatory T cells and most importantly, frequently show stable inhibitory phenotypes upon repetitive maturation with inflammatory factors. Yet, tolerogenic DCs differ with respect to the phenotype or the number of regulatory mechanisms they employ to modulate the immune system. In our experience, tolerogenic DCs generated using the biologically active form of vitamin D (VD3-DCs), alone, or combined with dexamethasone are proficient in their immunoregulatory functions. These tolerogenic DCs show a stable maturation-resistant semi-mature phenotype with low expression of activating co-stimulatory molecules, no production of the IL-12 family of cytokines and high expression of inhibitory molecules and IL-10. VD3-DCs induce increased apoptosis of effector T cells and induce antigen-specific regulatory T cells, which work through linked suppression ensuring infectious tolerance. Lessons learned on VD3-DCs help understanding the contribution of different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and secondary signals to the tolerogenic function and how a cross-talk between DCs and T cells translates into immune regulation. PMID:23717310

  10. Control of regulatory T cells and airway tolerance by lung macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; Croft, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Airway tolerance, a state of immunological surveillance, suppresses the development of lung inflammatory disorders that are driven by various pathological effector cells of the immune system. Tolerance in the lung to inhaled antigens is primarily mediated by regulatory T cells (Treg cells) that can inhibit effector T cells via a myriad of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence suggests that regulatory antigen-presenting cells are critical for generating Treg cells and/or maintaining the suppressive environment in the lung. This review focuses on the control of airway tolerance by Treg cells and the role of regulatory lung tissue and alveolar macrophages, and lung and lymph node dendritic cells, in contributing to airway tolerance that is associated with suppression of allergic asthmatic disease. PMID:25525738

  11. Origin and pharmacological modulation of tumor-associated regulatory dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Gutkin, Dmitriy W.; Han, Baohui; Ma, Yang; Keskinov, Anton A.; Shurin, Michael R.; Shurin, Galina V.

    2014-01-01

    Protumorigenic activity of immune regulatory cells has been proven to play a major role in precluding immunosurveillance and limiting the efficacy of anticancer therapies. Although several approaches have been offered to deplete myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T cells, there are no data on how to control suppressive dendritic cell (DC) accumulation or function in the tumor environment. Although immunosuppressive function of DC in cancer was implicated to immature and plasmacytoid DC, details of how conventional DC (cDC) develop immunosuppressive properties remain less understood. Here, we show that the development of lung cancer in mice was associated with fast accumulation of regulatory DC (regDC) prior to the appearance of MDSC. Using the in vitro and in vivo approaches, we demonstrated that (i)both cDC and MDSC could be polarized into protumor regDC in the lung cancer environment; (ii) cDC → regDC polarization was mediated by the small Rho GTPase signaling, which could be controlled by noncytotoxic doses of paclitaxel; and (iii) prevention of regDC appearance increased the antitumor potential of DC vaccine in lung cancer. These findings not only bring new players to the family of myeloid regulatory cells and provide new targets for cancer therapy, but offer novel insights into the immunomodulatory capacity of chemotherapeutic agents used in low, noncytotoxic doses. PMID:24443321

  12. Drosophila Valosin-Containing Protein is required for dendrite pruning through a regulatory role in mRNA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Sebastian; Bagley, Joshua A.; Thompson-Peer, Katherine L.; Zhu, Sijun; Gorczyca, David; Beckstead, Robert B.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2014-01-01

    The dendritic arbors of the larval Drosophila peripheral class IV dendritic arborization neurons degenerate during metamorphosis in an ecdysone-dependent manner. This process—also known as dendrite pruning—depends on the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), but the specific processes regulated by the UPS during pruning have been largely elusive. Here, we show that mutation or inhibition of Valosin-Containing Protein (VCP), a ubiquitin-dependent ATPase whose human homolog is linked to neurodegenerative disease, leads to specific defects in mRNA metabolism and that this role of VCP is linked to dendrite pruning. Specifically, we find that VCP inhibition causes an altered splicing pattern of the large pruning gene molecule interacting with CasL and mislocalization of the Drosophila homolog of the human RNA-binding protein TAR–DNA-binding protein of 43 kilo-Dalton (TDP-43). Our data suggest that VCP inactivation might lead to specific gain-of-function of TDP-43 and other RNA-binding proteins. A similar combination of defects is also seen in a mutant in the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme ubcD1 and a mutant in the 19S regulatory particle of the proteasome, but not in a 20S proteasome mutant. Thus, our results highlight a proteolysis-independent function of the UPS during class IV dendritic arborization neuron dendrite pruning and link the UPS to the control of mRNA metabolism. PMID:24799714

  13. Generation and characterization of regulatory dendritic cells derived from murine induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Fujino, Masayuki; Iwasaki, Shizue; Hirano, Hiroshi; Cai, Songjie; Kitajima, Yuya; Xu, Jinhua; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory dendritic cells (DCregs) represent a potential therapeutic tool for assessing a variety of immune overreaction conditions; however, current approaches for generating DCregs for therapeutic purposes are limited. We attempted to generate and characterize DCregs from murine induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The iPS cells co-cultured with OP9 cells displayed mesodermally differentiated flat colonies. GM-CSF drove most of the colonies exhibiting a differentiated morphology. Thereafter, cells became morphologically heterologous under the effects of TGF-β and IL-10. Most of the floating cells developed an irregular shape with areas of protrusion. The generated iPS-DCregs demonstrated high CD11b/c and low CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-II expressions with a high antigen uptake ability and poor T-cell stimulatory function. Importantly, iPS-DCregs showed immune responsiveness regulation effects both in vitro and in vivo and the ability to generate regulatory T-cells in vitro. Our result illustrates a feasible approach for generating functional DCregs from murine iPS cells. PMID:24496181

  14. The role of dendritic cells and regulatory T cells in the pathogenesis of morphea

    PubMed Central

    Teresiak-Mikołajczak, Ewa; Dańczak-Pazdrowska, Aleksandra; Kowalczyk, Michał; Żaba, Ryszard; Adamski, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Morphea is one of diseases characterised by fibrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. It is a chronic disease that does not shorten the life of the patient, yet significantly affects its quality. The group of factors responsible for its pathogenesis is thought to include disturbed functioning of endothelial cells as well as immune disturbances leading to chronic inflammatory conditions, accompanied by increased production of collagen and of other extracellular matrix components. Dendritic cells (DC) are a type of professional antigen-presenting cells and can be found in almost all body tissues. Individual investigations have demonstrated high numbers of plasmacytoid DC (pDC) in morphoeic skin lesions, within deeper dermal layers, around blood vessels, and around collagen fibres in subcutaneous tissue. It appears that DC has a more pronounced role in the development of inflammation and T cell activation in morphea, as compared to systemic sclerosis (SSc). Regulatory T (Treg) cells represent a subpopulation of T cells with immunosuppressive properties. Recent studies have drawn attention to the important role played by Treg in the process of autoimmunisation. Just a few studies have demonstrated a decrease in the number and activity of Treg in patients with SSc, and only such studies involve morphea. This article reviews recent studies on the role of DC and regulatory T cells in the pathogenesis of morphea. Moreover, mechanisms of phototherapy and potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of morphea are discussed in this context. PMID:26155191

  15. Characterization of Dendritic Cell and Regulatory T Cell Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Gonzalez, Brenda; Khurasany, Melissa; Kassissa, Christine; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Bui, Steven; Guerra, Carlos; Chan, John; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide that regulates intracellular redox and other vital aspects of cellular functions. GSH plays a major role in enhancing the immune system. Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells that participate in both innate and acquired immune responses against microbial infections. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a significant role in immune homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the effects of GSH in enhancing the innate and adaptive immune functions of DCs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection. We also characterized the functions of the sub-populations of CD4+T cells such as Tregs and non-Tregs in modulating the ability of monocytes to control the intracellular M. tb infection. Our results indicate that GSH by its direct antimycobacterial activity inhibits the growth of intracellular M. tb inside DCs. GSH also increases the expressions of costimulatory molecules such as HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 on the cell surface of DCs. Furthermore, GSH-enhanced DCs induced a higher level of T-cell proliferation. We also observed that enhancing the levels of GSH in Tregs resulted in downregulation in the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β and reduction in the fold growth of M. tb inside monocytes. Our studies demonstrate novel regulatory mechanisms that favor both innate and adaptive control of M. tb infection. PMID:23762843

  16. Human spleen contains different subsets of dendritic cells and regulatory T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez-Lopera, M M; Correa, L A; García, L F

    2008-01-01

    Most knowledge about dendritic cells (DCs) and regulatory T cells in humans has been gathered from circulating cells but little is known about their frequency and distribution in lymphoid organs. This report shows the frequency, phenotype and location of DCs and regulatory T cells in deceased organ donors' spleens. As determined by flow cytometry, conventional/myeloid DCs (cDCs) CD11chighHLA-DR+CD123−/low were 2·3 ± 0·9% and LIN- HLA-DR+CD11chigh 2·1 ± 0·3% of total spleen cells. Mature CD11chighHLA-DR+CD83+ were 1·5 ± 0·8% and 1·0 ± 1·6% immature CD11chighHLA-DR+CD83- cDC. There were 0·3 ± 0·3% plasmacytoid DCs (pDC) CD11c−/lowHLA-DR+CD123high and 0·3 ± 0·1% LIN-HLA-DR+CD123high. Cells expressing cDCs markers, BDCA-1 and BDCA-3, and pDCs markers BDCA-2 and BDCA-4 were observed in higher frequencies than DCs with other phenotypes evaluated. CD11c+, CD123+ and CD83+ cells were located in subcapsular zone, T cells areas and B-cell follicles. CD4+CD25high Tregs were 0·2 ± 0·2% and CD8+CD28- comprised 11·5 ± 8·1% of spleen lymphocytes. FOXP3+ cells were found in T- and B-cell areas. The improvement in cell separation, manipulation and expansion techniques, will facilitate the manipulation of donor spleen cells as a part of protocols for induction and maintenance of allograft tolerance or treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:18727627

  17. Induction of CD4+ Regulatory and Polarized Effector/helper T Cells by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to play major roles during the induction of T cell immune responses as well as the maintenance of T cell tolerance. Naive CD4+ T cells have been shown to respond with high plasticity to signals inducing their polarization into effector/helper or regulatory T cells. Data obtained from in vitro generated bone-marrow (BM)-derived DCs as well as genetic mouse models revealed an important but not exclusive role of DCs in shaping CD4+ T cell responses. Besides the specialization of some conventional DC subsets for the induction of polarized immunity, also the maturation stage, activation of specialized transcription factors and the cytokine production of DCs have major impact on CD4+ T cells. Since in vitro generated BM-DCs show a high diversity to shape CD4+ T cells and their high similarity to monocyte-derived DCs in vivo, this review reports data mainly on BM-DCs in this process and only touches the roles of transcription factors or of DC subsets, which have been discussed elsewhere. Here, recent findings on 1) the conversion of naive into anergic and further into Foxp3− regulatory T cells (Treg) by immature DCs, 2) the role of RelB in steady state migratory DCs (ssmDCs) for conversion of naive T cells into Foxp3+ Treg, 3) the DC maturation signature for polarized Th2 cell induction and 4) the DC source of IL-12 for Th1 induction are discussed. PMID:26937228

  18. Zinc Induces Dendritic Cell Tolerogenic Phenotype and Skews Regulatory T Cell-Th17 Balance.

    PubMed

    George, Mariam Mathew; Subramanian Vignesh, Kavitha; Landero Figueroa, Julio A; Caruso, Joseph A; Deepe, George S

    2016-09-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential metal for development and maintenance of both the innate and adaptive compartments of the immune system. Zn homeostasis impacts maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) that are important in shaping T cell responses. The mechanisms by which Zn regulates the tolerogenic phenotype of DCs remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of Zn on DC phenotype and the generation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) using a model of Histoplasma capsulatum fungal infection. Exposure of bone marrow-derived DCs to Zn in vitro induced a tolerogenic phenotype by diminishing surface MHC class II (MHCII) and promoting the tolerogenic markers, programmed death-ligand (PD-L)1, PD-L2, and the tryptophan degrading enzyme, IDO. Zn triggered tryptophan degradation by IDO and kynurenine production by DCs and strongly suppressed the proinflammatory response to stimulation by TLR ligands. In vivo, Zn supplementation and subsequent H. capsulatum infection supressed MHCII on DCs, enhanced PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression on MHCII(lo) DCs, and skewed the Treg-Th17 balance in favor of Foxp3(+) Tregs while decreasing Th17 cells. Thus, Zn shapes the tolerogenic potential of DCs in vitro and in vivo and promotes Tregs during fungal infection. PMID:27465530

  19. What are the molecules involved in regulatory T-cells induction by dendritic cells in cancer?

    PubMed

    Ramos, Rodrigo Nalio; de Moraes, Cristiano Jacob; Zelante, Bruna; Barbuto, José Alexandre M

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the maintenance of homeostasis in the organism, and they do that by modulating lymphocyte priming, expansion, and response patterns according to signals they receive from the environment. The induction of suppressive lymphocytes by DCs is essential to hinder the development of autoimmune diseases but can be reverted against homeostasis when in the context of neoplasia. In this setting, the induction of suppressive or regulatory T cells contributes to the establishment of a state of tolerance towards the tumor, allowing it to grow unchecked by an otherwise functional immune system. Besides affecting its local environment, tumor also has been described as potent sources of anti-inflammatory/suppressive factors, which may act systemically, generating defects in the differentiation and maturation of immune cells, far beyond the immediate vicinity of the tumor mass. Cytokines, as IL-10 and TGF-beta, as well as cell surface molecules like PD-L1 and ICOS seem to be significantly involved in the redirection of DCs towards tolerance induction, and recent data suggest that tumor cells may, indeed, modulate distinct DCs subpopulations through the involvement of these molecules. It is to be expected that the identification of such molecules should provide molecular targets for more effective immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer. PMID:23762097

  20. Interleukin 10 and dendritic cells are the main suppression mediators of regulatory T cells in human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Arce-Sillas, A; Álvarez-Luquín, D D; Cárdenas, G; Casanova-Hernández, D; Fragoso, G; Hernández, M; Proaño Narváez, J V; García-Vázquez, F; Fleury, A; Sciutto, E; Adalid-Peralta, L

    2016-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium cysticerci in the central nervous system. It is considered that, during co-evolution, the parasite developed strategies to modulate the host's immune response. The action mechanisms of regulatory T cells in controlling the immune response in neurocysticercosis are studied in this work. Higher blood levels of regulatory T cells with CD4(+) CD45RO(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(high) and CD4(+) CD25(high) FoxP3(+) CD95(high) phenotype and of non-regulatory CD4(+) CD45RO(+) FoxP3(med) T cells were found in neurocysticercosis patients with respect to controls. Interestingly, regulatory T cells express higher levels of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3), programmed death 1 (PD-1) and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR), suggesting a cell-to-cell contact mechanism with dendritic cells. Furthermore, higher IL-10 and regulatory T cell type 1 (Tr1) levels were found in neurocysticercosis patients' peripheral blood, suggesting that the action mechanism of regulatory T cells involves the release of immunomodulatory cytokines. No evidence was found of the regulatory T cell role in inhibiting the proliferative response. Suppressive regulatory T cells from neurocysticercosis patients correlated negatively with late activated lymphocytes (CD4(+) CD38(+) ). Our results suggest that, during neurocysticercosis, regulatory T cells could control the immune response, probably by a cell-to-cell contact with dendritic cells and interleukin (IL)-10 release by Tr1, to create an immunomodulatory environment that may favour the development of T. solium cysticerci and their permanence in the central nervous system. PMID:26391104

  1. Natural IgM Switches the Function of Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells to a Regulatory Dendritic Cell That Suppresses Innate Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Peter I; Schlegel, Kailo H; Bajwa, Amandeep; Huang, Liping; Kurmaeva, Elvira; Wang, Binru; Ye, Hong; Tedder, Thomas F; Kinsey, Gilbert R; Okusa, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    We have previously shown that polyclonal natural IgM protects mice from renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) by inhibiting the reperfusion inflammatory response. We hypothesized that a potential mechanism involved IgM modulation of dendritic cells (DC), as we observed high IgM binding to splenic DC. To test this hypothesis, we pretreated bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) with polyclonal murine or human IgM prior to LPS activation and demonstrated that 0.5 × 10(6) IgM/LPS-pretreated BMDC, when injected into wild-type C57BL/6 mice 24 h before renal ischemia, protect mice from developing renal IRI. We show that this switching of LPS-activated BMDC to a regulatory phenotype requires modulation of BMDC function that is mediated by IgM binding to nonapoptotic BMDC receptors. Regulatory BMDC require IL-10 and programmed death 1 as well as downregulation of CD40 and p65 NF-κB phosphorylation to protect in renal IRI. Blocking the programmed death ligand 1 binding site just before i.v. injection of IgM/LPS-pretreated BMDC or using IL-10 knockout BMDC fails to induce protection. Similarly, IgM/LPS-pretreated BMDC are rendered nonprotective by increasing CD40 expression and phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB. How IgM/LPS regulatory BMDC suppress in vivo ischemia-induced innate inflammation remains to be determined. However, we show that suppression is dependent on other in vivo regulatory mechanisms in the host, that is, CD25(+) T cells, B cells, IL-10, and circulating IgM. There was no increase in Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in the spleen either before or after renal IRI. Collectively, these findings show that natural IgM anti-leukocyte Abs can switch BMDC to a regulatory phenotype despite the presence of LPS that ordinarily induces BMDC maturation. PMID:26519533

  2. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence of specialized DC subsets that act to expand Natural T-regs or induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. For example, two major subsets of DCs in lymphoid organs act differentially in inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− cells or expanding Natural T-regs with model-antigen delivery by anti-DC subset monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Furthermore, DCs expressing CD103 in the intestine induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells with endogenous TGF-β and retinoic acid. In addition, antigen-presenting DCs have a capacity to generate Foxp3+ T-regs in the oral cavity where many antigens and commensals exist, similar to intestine and skin. In skin and skin-draining lymph nodes, at least six DC subsets have been identified, suggesting a complex DC-T-reg network. Here, we will review the specific activity of DCs in expanding Natural T-regs and inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− precursors, and further discuss the critical function of DCs in maintaining tolerance at various locations including skin and oral cavity. PMID:23801989

  3. Characterization of regulatory dendritic cells differentiated from the bone marrow of UV-irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Ng, Royce L X; Scott, Naomi M; Bisley, Jackie L; Lambert, Misty J; Gorman, Shelley; Norval, Mary; Hart, Prue H

    2013-12-01

    When antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) differentiated from the bone marrow (BM) of UV-irradiated mice (UV-BMDCs) were adoptively transferred into naive mice or mice pre-sensitized with that antigen, the recipients exhibited a reduced immune response following antigen challenge. Hence, UV-BMDCs are poorly immunogenic and can suppress pre-existing immunity. The UV-induced effect on BM-derived DCs was rapid (observed 1 day after UV radiation), long-lasting (observed 10 days after UV radiation) and UV dose-dependent. The mechanism by which UV-BMDCs could regulate immunity was investigated. The CD11c(+) cells, differentiated using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor + interleukin-4, were confirmed to be DCs because they did not express the myeloid-derived suppressor cell marker, Gr1. UV-BMDCs did not display altered antigen uptake, processing or ability to activate T cells in vitro. When gene expression in UV-BMDCs and DCs differentiated from the BM of non-irradiated mice (control-BMDCs) was examined, Ccl7, Ccl8 and CSF1R (CD115) mRNA transcripts were up-regulated in UV-BMDCs compared with control-BMDCs. However, neutralizing antibodies for Ccl7 and Ccl8 did not abrogate the reduced immunogenicity of UV-BMDCs in vivo. Moreover, the up-regulation of CSF1R transcript did not correspond with increased receptor expression on UV-BMDCs. The phenotypes of UV-BMDCs and control-BMDCs were similar, with no difference in the expression of CD4, CD8α, CD103, B220 or F4/80, or the regulatory molecules CCR7 (CD197), FasL (CD95L), B7H3 (CD276) and B7H4. However, PDL1 (CD274) expression was reduced in UV-BMDCs compared with control-BMDCs following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. In summary, UV-BMDCs do not express the classical phenotypic or gene expression properties of DCs reported by others as 'regulatory' or 'tolerogenic'. PMID:23826713

  4. Tumor-educated CD11bhighIalow regulatory dendritic cells suppress T cell response through arginase I.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiuyan; Zhang, Chaoxiong; Sun, Anna; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Wang, Li; Cao, Xuetao

    2009-05-15

    Tumors can induce generation and accumulation of the immunosuppressive cells such as regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment, contributing to tumor escape from immunological attack. Although dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccine can initiate antitumor immune response, regulatory DC subsets involved in the tolerance induction attracted much attention recently. Our previous studies demonstrate that the stromal microenvironment of the spleen, lung, and liver can program generation of CD11c(low)CD11b(high)Ia(low) DCs with regulatory function (CD11b(high)Ia(low) regulatory DCs). However, whether and how the tumor microenvironment can program generation of CD11b(high)Ia(low) regulatory DCs remain to be investigated. In this study, we used the freshly isolated tumor cells to mimic tumor microenvironment to coculture DCs and found that the freshly isolated tumor cells could drive DCs to differentiate into regulatory DCs with a CD11c(low)CD11b(high)Ia(low) phenotype and high expression of IL-10, NO, vascular endothelial growth factor, and arginase I. Tumor-educated CD11b(high)Ia(low) regulatory DCs inhibited CD4(+) T cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. 3LL lung cancer-derived TGF-beta and PGE(2) were responsible for the generation of regulatory DCs. PGE(2) was the main inducer of arginase I in regulatory DCs. Arginase I played a major role in the suppression of T cell response by regulatory DCs induced by 3LL lung cancer. A natural counterpart of CD11b(high)Ia(low) DCs was identified in tumor tissue, and CD11b(high)Ia(low) DCs sorted from 3LL lung cancer tissue expressed arginase I and inhibited T cell response. Therefore, tumors can educate DCs to differentiate into a regulatory DC subset, which contributes to constitution of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and promotes tumor immune escape. PMID:19414774

  5. Complement-induced regulatory T cells suppress T-cell responses but allow for dendritic-cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Barchet, Winfried; Price, Jeffrey D.; Cella, Marina; Colonna, Marco; MacMillan, Sandra K.; Cobb, J. Perren; Thompson, Paul A.; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Atkinson, John P.; Kemper, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent activation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and complement regulator CD46 on human CD4+ T lymphocytes induces Tr1-like regulatory T cells that suppress through IL-10 secretion bystander T-cell proliferation. Here we show that, despite their IL-10 production, CD46-induced T-regulatory T cells (Tregs) do not suppress the activation/maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). DC maturation by complement/CD46-induced Tregs is mediated through simultaneous secretion of GM-CSF and soluble CD40L, factors favoring DC differentiation and reversing inhibitory effects of IL-10. Thus, CD46-induced Tregs produce a distinct cytokine profile that inhibits T-cell responses but leaves DC activation unimpaired. Such “DC-sparing” Tregs could be desirable at host/environment interfaces such as the gastrointestinal tract where their specific cytokine profile provides a mechanism that ensures unresponsiveness to commensal bacteria while maintaining reactivity to invading pathogens. PMID:16239430

  6. Role of Dendritic Cell Maturity/Costimulation for Generation, Homeostasis, and Suppressive Activity of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pletinckx, Katrien; Döhler, Anja; Pavlovic, Vladimir; Lutz, Manfred B.

    2011-01-01

    Tolerogenicity of dendritic cells (DCs) has initially been attributed exclusively to immature/resting stages, while mature/activated DCs were considered strictly immunogenic. Later, all different subsets among the myeloid/conventional DCs and plasmacytoid DCs have been shown to bear tolerogenic potential, so that tolerogenicity could not be attributed to a specific subset. Immunosuppressive treatments of immature DC subsets could prevent re-programming into mature DCs or upregulated inhibitory surface markers or cytokines. Furthermore, the different T cell tolerance mechanisms anergy, deletion, immune deviation, and suppression require different quantities and qualities of costimulation by DCs. Since expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been shown to be promoted best by fully mature DCs the role of CD80/B7-1 and CD86/B7-2 as major costimulatory molecules for Treg biology is under debate. In this review, we discuss the role of these and other costimulatory molecules on myeloid DCs and their ligands CD28 and CD152/CTLA-4 on Tregs for peripheral conversion from naive CD4+ T cells into the major subsets of Foxp3+ Tregs and Foxp3− IL-10+ regulatory type-1 T cells (Tr1) or Tr1-like cells and their role for peripheral maintenance in the steady state and after activation. PMID:22566829

  7. The SOCS3-independent expression of IDO2 supports the homeostatic generation of T regulatory cells by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Trabanelli, Sara; Očadlíková, Darina; Ciciarello, Marilena; Salvestrini, Valentina; Lecciso, Mariangela; Jandus, Camilla; Metz, Richard; Evangelisti, Cecilia; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa; Romero, Pedro; Prendergast, George C; Curti, Antonio; Lemoli, Roberto M

    2014-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional APCs that have a role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and tolerance. Among the tolerogenic mechanisms, the expression of the enzyme IDO1 represents an effective tool to generate T regulatory cells. In humans, different DC subsets express IDO1, but less is known about the IDO1-related enzyme IDO2. In this study, we found a different pattern of expression and regulation between IDO1 and IDO2 in human circulating DCs. At the protein level, IDO1 is expressed only in circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs) and is modulated by PGE2, whereas IDO2 is expressed in both mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs and is not modulated by PGE2. In healthy subjects, IDO1 expression requires the presence of PGE2 and needs continuous transcription and translation, whereas IDO2 expression is constitutive, independent from suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 activity. Conversely, in patients suffering from inflammatory arthritis, circulating DCs express both IDO1 and IDO2. At the functional level, both mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs generate T regulatory cells through an IDO1/IDO2-dependent mechanism. We conclude that, in humans, whereas IDO1 provides an additional mechanism of tolerance induced by proinflammatory mediators, IDO2 is stably expressed in steady-state conditions and may contribute to the homeostatic tolerogenic capacity of DCs. PMID:24391212

  8. Leptin deficiency impairs maturation of dendritic cells and enhances induction of regulatory T and Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M.M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Bassi, Enio J.; Peron, Jean Pierre S.; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinícius; Wasinski, Frederick; Araujo, Ronaldo; Thornley, Thomas; Quintana, Francisco J.; Basso, Alexandre S.; Strom, Terry B.; Câmara, Niels O.S.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose-secreted hormone that plays an important role in both metabolism and immunity. Leptin has been shown to induce Th1-cell polarization and inhibit Th2-cell responses. Additionally, leptin induces Th17-cell responses, inhibits regulatory T (Treg) cells and modulates autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated whether leptin mediates its activity on T cells by influencing dendritic cells (DCs) to promote Th17 and Treg-cell immune responses in mice. We observed that leptin deficiency (i) reduced the expression of DC maturation markers, (ii) decreased DC production of IL-12, TNF-α, and IL-6, (iii) increased DC production of TGF-β, and (iv) limited the capacity of DCs to induce syngeneic CD4+ T-cell proliferation. As a consequence of this unique phenotype, DCs generated under leptin-free conditions induced Treg or TH17 cells more efficiently than DCs generated in the presence of leptin. These data indicate important roles for leptin in DC homeostasis and the initiation and maintenance of inflammatory and regulatory immune responses by DCs. PMID:24271843

  9. CD8α+ Dendritic cells prime TCR-peptide-reactive regulatory CD4+FOXP3− T cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Trevor R. F.; Maricic, Igor; Ria, Francesco; Schneider, Susan; Kumar, Vipin

    2011-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T cells with immune regulatory function can be either FOXP3+ or FOXP3−. We have previously shown that priming of naturally occurring TCR-peptide-reactive regulatory CD4+FOXP3− T cells (Treg) specifically controls Vβ8.2+CD4+ T cells mediating experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the mechanism by which these Treg are primed to recognize their cognate antigenic determinant, which is derived from the TCRVβ8.2-chain, is not known. In this study we show that antigen presenting cells (APC) derived from splenocytes of naïve mice are able to stimulate cloned CD4+ Treg in the absence of exogenous antigen, and their stimulation capacity is augmented during EAE. Among the APC populations DC were the most efficient in stimulating the Treg. Stimulation of CD4+ Treg was dependent upon processing and presentation of TCR peptides from ingested Vβ8.2TCR+ CD4+ T cells. Additionally, dendritic cells pulsed with TCR peptide or apoptotic Vβ8.2+ T cells are able to prime Treg in vivo and mediate protection from disease in a CD8-dependent fashion. These data highlight a novel mechanism for the priming of CD4+ Treg by CD8α+ DC, and suggest a pathway that can be exploited to prime antigen-specific regulation of T cell-mediated inflammatory disease. PMID:20394075

  10. Induction of T helper 3 regulatory cells by dendritic cells infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Silva-Campa, Erika; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Resendiz, Monica; Pinelli-Saavedra, Araceli; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Mwangi, Waithaka; Hernandez, Jesus

    2009-05-10

    Delayed development of virus-specific immune response has been observed in pigs infected with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Several studies support the hypothesis that the PRRSV is capable of modulating porcine immune system, but the mechanisms involved are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the induction of T regulatory cells by PRRSV-infected dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that PRRSV-infected DCs significantly increased Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells, an effect that was reversible by IFN-alpha treatment, and this outcome was reproducible using two distinct PRRSV strains. Analysis of the expressed cytokines suggested that the induction of Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells is dependent on TGF-beta but not IL-10. In addition, a significant up-regulation of Foxp3 mRNA, but not TBX21 or GATA3, was detected. Importantly, our results showed that the induced Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were able to suppress the proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBMCs. The T cells induced by the PRRSV-infected DCs fit the Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T helper 3 (Th3) regulatory cell phenotype described in the literature. The induction of this cell phenotype depended, at least in part, on PRRSV viability because IFN-alpha treatment or virus inactivation reversed these effects. In conclusion, this data supports the hypothesis that the PRRSV succeeds to establish and replicate in porcine cells early post-infection, in part, by inducing Th3 regulatory cells as a mechanism of modulating the porcine immune system.

  11. HLA-G Level on Monocytoid Dendritic Cells Correlates with Regulatory T Cell Foxp3 Expression in Liver Transplant Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Castellaneta, Antonino; Mazariegos, George V; Nayyar, Navdeep; Zeevi, Adriana; Thomson, Angus W

    2011-01-01

    Background Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a non-classical HLA class I molecule expressed as membrane-bound and soluble isoforms. Interaction of HLA-G with its receptor, immunoglobulin (Ig)-like transcript (ILT) 4 on dendritic cells (DC) down-regulates their T cell stimulatory ability. Methods We examined expression of HLA-G, ILT4, other immune regulatory molecules (inducible costimulator ligand and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor-related receptor ligand), and the activation marker CMRF44 on circulating monocytoid (m) and plasmacytoid (p)DC by monoclonal antibody staining and flow cytometry. Three groups of stable liver transplant recipients,-operationally tolerant (TOL), prospective immunosuppressive drug weaning (PW) and maintenance immunosuppression (MI) were studied, together with healthy controls (HC). Serum HLA-G levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In TOL patients, mDC but not pDC expressed higher HLA-G than in MI patients or HC. In TOL patients, the incidence of CD4+CD25hiCD127− regulatory T cells (Treg) and the intensity of Treg forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression were significantly higher than in the MI group. HLA-G expression on circulating mDC correlated significantly with that of Foxp3 in the TOL group. There was no correlation between immunosuppressive drug (tacrolimus) dose or trough level and HLA-G expression or Treg frequency or Foxp3 expression. The incidence of patients with circulating HLA-G levels >100ng/ml was highest in the TOL group, although statistical significance was not achieved. Conclusions Higher HLA-G expression on circulating mDC in TOL recipients compared with MI or HC, suggests a possible role of HLA-G in immune regulation possibly mediated by enhanced host Treg Foxp3 expression. PMID:21423069

  12. Microbiota/Host Crosstalk Biomarkers: Regulatory Response of Human Intestinal Dendritic Cells Exposed to Lactobacillus Extracellular Encrypted Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Mann, Elizabeth R.; Urdaci, María C.; Knight, Stella C.; Margolles, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is exposed to a huge variety of microorganisms, either commensal or pathogenic; at this site, a balance between immunity and immune tolerance is required. Intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) control the mechanisms of immune response/tolerance in the gut. In this paper we have identified a peptide (STp) secreted by Lactobacillus plantarum, characterized by the abundance of serine and threonine residues within its sequence. STp is encoded in one of the main extracellular proteins produced by such species, which includes some probiotic strains, and lacks cleavage sites for the major intestinal proteases. When studied in vitro, STp expanded the ongoing production of regulatory IL-10 in human intestinal DCs from healthy controls. STp-primed DC induced an immunoregulatory cytokine profile and skin-homing profile on stimulated T-cells. Our data suggest that some of the molecular dialogue between intestinal bacteria and DCs may be mediated by immunomodulatory peptides, encoded in larger extracellular proteins, secreted by commensal bacteria. These peptides may be used for the development of nutraceutical products for patients with IBD. In addition, this kind of peptides seem to be absent in the gut of inflammatory bowel disease patients, suggesting a potential role as biomarker of gut homeostasis. PMID:22606249

  13. Antigen targeting to dendritic cells combined with transient regulatory T cell inhibition results in long-term tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Wendy WJ; Mayer, Christian T; Engels, Steef; Hesse, Christina; Perdicchio, Maurizio; Puttur, Franz; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Litjens, Manja; Kalay, Hakan; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccinations against cancer are still largely ineffective. Major caveats are inefficient delivery of tumor antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) and excessive immune suppression by Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), resulting in defective T cell priming and failure to induce tumor regression. To circumvent these problems we evaluated a novel combinatorial therapeutic strategy. We show that tumor antigen targeting to DC-SIGN in humanized hSIGN mice via glycans or specific antibodies induces superior T cell priming. Next, this targeted therapy was combined with transient Foxp3+ Treg depletion employing hSIGNxDEREG mice. While Treg depletion alone slightly delayed B16-OVA melanoma growth, only the combination therapy instigated long-term tumor regression in a substantial fraction of mice. This novel strategy resulted in optimal generation of antigen-specific activated CD8+ T cells which accumulated in regressing tumors. Notably, Treg depletion also allowed the local appearance of effector T cells specific for endogenous B16 antigens. This indicates that antitumor immune responses can be broadened by therapies aimed at controlling Tregs in tumor environments. Thus, transient inhibition of Treg-mediated immune suppression potentiates DC targeted antigen vaccination and tumor-specific immunity. PMID:26405564

  14. Levels of dendritic cell populations and regulatory T cells vary significantly between two commonly used mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Petra; Hovden, Arnt-Ove; Jonsson, Roland; Appel, Silke

    2009-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are a heterogeneous group of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) involved in both initiating immune responses and maintaining tolerance. Roughly, DC can be divided into plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and conventional DC (cDC). By controlling regulatory T cells (Treg), DC can influence the outcome of both immunity and autoimmunity. Since the use of mice as in vivo models became a practical tool for researchers studying pathological events in all kind of human diseases, we decided to compare levels of cDC, pDC and Treg in both spleen and blood between two inbred mouse strains. Here we show that two commonly used mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/10J mice, have significantly different levels of distinct CD11c(+)/CD4(-)/CD8a(+), CD11c(+)/CD4(+)/CD8a(-) and CD11c(+)/CD4(-)/CD8a(-) cDC populations, pDC and Treg. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of considering the proper model when comparing data sets from different mouse strains. PMID:19906196

  15. Clec4A4 is a regulatory receptor for dendritic cells that impairs inflammation and T-cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Uto, Tomofumi; Fukaya, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hideaki; Arimura, Keiichi; Nakamura, Takeshi; Kojima, Naoya; Malissen, Bernard; Sato, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) comprise several subsets that are critically involved in the initiation and regulation of immunity. Clec4A4/DC immunoreceptor 2 (DCIR2) is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) exclusively expressed on CD8α− conventional DCs (cDCs). However, how Clec4A4 controls immune responses through regulation of the function of CD8α− cDCs remains unclear. Here we show that Clec4A4 is a regulatory receptor for the activation of CD8α− cDCs that impairs inflammation and T-cell immunity. Clec4a4−/−CD8α− cDCs show enhanced cytokine production and T-cell priming following Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated activation. Furthermore, Clec4a4−/− mice exhibit TLR-mediated hyperinflammation. On antigenic immunization, Clec4a4−/− mice show not only augmented T-cell responses but also progressive autoimmune pathogenesis. Conversely, Clec4a4−/− mice exhibit resistance to microbial infection, accompanied by enhanced T-cell responses against microbes. Thus, our findings highlight roles of Clec4A4 in regulation of the function of CD8α− cDCs for control of the magnitude and quality of immune response. PMID:27068492

  16. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  17. Embryonic Trophoblasts Induce Decidual Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Maternal–Fetal Tolerance through Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Instructing Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mei-Rong; Guo, Pei-Fen; Piao, Hai-Lan; Wang, Song-Cun; Sun, Chan; Jin, Li-Ping; Tao, Yu; Li, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Di; Zhu, Rui; Fu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Physiological pregnancy requires the maternal immune system to recognize and tolerate embryonic Ags. Although multiple mechanisms have been proposed, it is not yet clear how the fetus evades the maternal immune system. In this article, we demonstrate that trophoblast-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) instructs decidual CD11c+ dendritic cells (dDCs)with increased costimulatory molecules; MHC class II; and Th2/3-type, but not Th1-type, cytokines. TSLP-activated dDCs induce proliferation and differentiation of decidual CD4+CD25− T cells into CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) through TGF-β1. TSLP-activated dDC–induced Tregs display immunosuppressive features and express Th2-type cytokines. In addition, decidual CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs promote invasiveness and HLA-G expression of trophoblasts, resulting in preferential production of Th2 cytokines and reduced cytotoxicity in decidual CD56brightCD16− NK cells. Of interest, decreased TSLP expression and reduced numbers of Tregs were observed at the maternal–fetal interface during miscarriage. Our study identifies a novel feedback loop between embryo-derived trophoblasts and maternal decidual leukocytes, which induces a tolerogenic immune response to ensure a successful pregnancy. PMID:24453244

  18. Allostimulatory Effects of Dendritic Cells with Characteristic Features of a Regulatory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, C. W. M.; van der Vlag, J.; Hilbrands, L. B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) have the potential to prolong graft survival after transplantation. Tolerogenic DCs are in general characterized by a low expression of co-stimulatory molecule and a high IL-10:IL-12 production ratio. Based on promising results with earlier used alternatively activated DCs, we aimed to generate in culture potentially tolerogenic DC by simultaneously blocking GSK3 by lithium chloride (LiCl) and stimulating TLR2 by PAM3CysSerLys4. Materials and Methods Bone marrow-derived LiClPAM3 DCs were generated by the addition of LiCl 24 hours before harvesting, and one hour later PAM3CysSerLys4. The phenotype of the DCs was assessed by determining the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in flow cytometry and cytokine production in ELISA, whereas their functional properties were tested in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. A fully MHC mismatched heterotopic heart transplant preceded by infusion of donor-derived LiClPAM3 DC was performed to assess the tolerogenic potential of LiClPAM3 DCs in vivo. Results LiClPAM3 DCs displayed a tolerogenic phenotype accompanied with a low expression of co-stimulatory molecules and a high IL-10:IL-12 production ratio. However, in mixed lymphocyte reaction, LiClPAM3 DCs appeared superior in T cell stimulation, and induced Th1 and Th17 differentiation. Moreover, mice pretreated with LiClPAM3 DC displayed a reduced graft survival. Analysis of LiClPAM3 DC culture supernatant revealed high levels of CXCL-1, which was also found in supernatants of co-cultures of LiClPAM3 DC and T cells. Nevertheless, we could not show a role for CXCL-1 in T cell proliferation or activation in vitro. Discussion LiClPAM3 DCs display in vitro a tolerogenic phenotype with a high IL-10:IL-12 ratio, but appeared to be highly immunogenic, since allograft rejection was accelerated. As yet unidentified LiClPAM3 DC-derived factors, may explain the immunogenic character of LiClPAM3 DCs in vivo. PMID:27525971

  19. Differentially modulated dendritic cells induce regulatory T cells with different characteristics.

    PubMed

    Roelen, Dave L; van den Boogaardt, Daniëlle E M; van Miert, Paula P M C; Koekkoek, Karin; Offringa, Rienk; Claas, Frans H J

    2008-07-01

    Dexamethason (DEX) treated DC display several features that establish them as candidates for specific allogeneic tolerance induction. We report the results of in vitro studies of polarization of the alloimmune T cell response with two types of differentially modulated human DC. Both DEX treated DC triggered by LPS for 6 h (DEX6-DC) and DEX treated DC triggered by LPS for 48 h (DEX48-DC) acquired low levels of costimulatory, adhesion, and MHC class II molecules compared with mature DC (mDC). In contrast to mDC, both DEX6-DC and DEX48-DC did not produce any IL-12. DEX6-DC were able to produce significant amounts of IL-10 whereas DEX48-DC did not actively produce IL-10. Conversely, the induction of IL-10 producing cells was significantly increased when PBL were stimulated with DEX48-DC compared with DEX6-DC. Both stimulation of PBL with DEX6-DC and DEX48-DC led to the induction of cell populations able to suppress the proliferative alloimmune response of primed T cells in a cell-cell contact independent and antigen-nonspecific manner. Tregs obtained after stimulation with DEX48-DC were also able to inhibit the IFN-gamma production of the effector cells and this effect could be blocked by anti-IL-10. Tregs induced by DEX6-DC produced similar amounts of IL-10, yet were not able to inhibit IFN-gamma production of the effector T cells, indicating a different mechanism. In summary, we show that differential modulation of DC results in the induction of different populations of regulatory T cells. PMID:18639635

  20. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin-Activated Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Induce the Generation of FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Human Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Hanabuchi, Shino; Ito, Tomoki; Park, Woon-Ryon; Watanabe, Norihiko; Shaw, Joanne L.; Roman, Eulogia; Arima, Kazuhiko; Wang, Yui-Hsi; Voo, Kui Shin; Cao, Wei; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Human thymus contains major dendritic cell (DC) subsets, myeloid DCs (mDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). We previously showed that mDCs, educated by thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) produced by the epithelial cells of the Hassall’s corpuscles, induced differentiation of CD4+CD25− thymocytes into Forkhead Box P3+ (FOXP3+) regulatory T cells (TR) within the medulla of human thymus. In this study, we show that pDCs expressed the TSLP receptor and IL-7 receptor a complexes upon activation and became responsive to TSLP. TSLP-activated human pDCs secrete macrophage-derived chemokine CCL-22 and thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine CCL-17 but not Th1- or Th2-polarizing cytokines. TSLP-activated pDCs induced the generation of FOXP3+ TR from CD4+CD8−CD25− thymocytes, which could be strongly inhibited by Th1-polarizing cytokine IL-12 or Th2-polarizing cytokine IL-4. Interestingly, the FOXP3+ TR induced by the TSLP-pDCs expressed more IL-10 but less TGF-b than that induced by the TSLP-mDCs. These data suggest that TSLP expressed by thymic epithelial cells can activate mDCs and pDCs to positively select the FOXP3+ TR with different cytokine production potential in human thymus. The inability of TSLP to induce DC maturation without producing Th1- or Th2-polarizing cytokines may provide a thymic niche for TR development. PMID:20173030

  1. Decreased Numbers of Blood Dendritic Cells and Defective Function of Regulatory T Cells in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rimbert, Marie; Hamidou, Mohamed; Braudeau, Cécile; Puéchal, Xavier; Teixeira, Luis; Caillon, Hélène; Néel, Antoine; Audrain, Marie; Guillevin, Loic; Josien, Régis

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DC) and regulatory cells (Treg) play pivotal roles in controlling both normal and autoimmune adaptive immune responses. DC are the main antigen-presenting cells to T cells, and they also control Treg functions. In this study, we examined the frequency and phenotype of DC subsets, and the frequency and function of Treg from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Methodology/Principal Findings Blood samples from 19 untreated patients with AAV during flares and before any immunosuppressive treatment were analyzed, along with 15 AAV patients in remission and 18 age-matched healthy controls. DC and Treg numbers, and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry, and in vitro suppressive function of Treg was determined by co-culture assay. When compared to healthy volunteers, absolute numbers of conventional and plasmacytoid DC were decreased in AAV patients. During the acute phase this decrease was significantly more pronounced and was associated with an increased DC expression of CD62L. Absolute numbers of Treg (CD4+CD25highCD127low/− Tcells) were moderately decreased in patients. FOXP3 and CD39 were expressed at similar levels on Treg from patients as compared to controls. The suppressive function of Treg from AAV patients was dramatically decreased as compared to controls, and this defect was more pronounced during flares than remission. This Treg functional deficiency occurred in the absence of obvious Th17 deviation. Conclusion In conclusion, these data show that AAV flares are associated with both a decrease number and altered phenotype of circulating DC and point to a role for Treg functional deficiency in the pathogenesis of AAV. PMID:21494636

  2. Ginsenoside Rp1 Exerts Anti-inflammatory Effects via Activation of Dendritic Cells and Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jingyu; Koo, Jihye; Kim, Soochan; Park, Tae-Yoon; Kim, Mi-Yeon

    2012-10-01

    Ginsenoside Rp1 (G-Rp1) is a saponin derivate that provides anti-metastatic activities through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. In this study, we examined the effects of G-Rp1 on regulatory T cell (Treg) activation. After treatment of splenocytes with G-Rp1, Tregs exhibited upregulation of IL-10 expression, and along with dendritic cells (DCs), these Tregs showed increased cell number compared to other cell populations. The effect of G-Rp1 on Treg number was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mimics pathological changes that occur during inflammation. However, depletion of DCs prevented the increase in Treg number in the presence of G-Rp1 and/or LPS. In addition, G-Rp1 promoted the differentiation of the memory types of CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD62L(low) Tregs rather than the generation of new Tregs. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that Tregs and DCs from mice that were fed G-Rp1 for 7 d and then injected with LPS exhibited increased activation compared with those from mice that were injected with LPS alone. Expression of TGF-β and CTLA4 in Tregs was increased, and upregulation of IL-2 and CD80/ CD86 expression by DCs affected the suppressive function of Tregs through IL-2 receptors and CTLA4. These data demonstrate that G-Rp1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by activating Tregs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23717139

  3. Murine Melanoma-Infiltrating Dendritic Cells Are Defective in Antigen Presenting Function Regardless of the Presence of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ataera, Haley; Hyde, Evelyn; Price, Kylie M.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Ronchese, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells are often ineffective at presenting tumor-derived antigen in vivo, a defect usually ascribed to the suppressive tumor environment. We investigated the effects of depleting CD4+CD25+ “natural” regulatory T cells (Treg) on the frequency, phenotype and function of total dendritic cell populations in B16.OVA tumors and in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Intraperitoneal injection of the anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody PC61 reduced Treg frequency in blood and tumors, but did not affect the frequency of tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells, or their expression of CD40, CD86 and MHCII. Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells from PC61-treated or untreated mice induced the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in vitro, but could not induce proliferation of OVA-specific OTI and OTII T cells unless specific peptide antigen was added in culture. Some proliferation of naïve, OVA-specific OTI T cells, but not OTII T cells, was observed in the tumor-draining LN of mice carrying B16.OVA tumors, however, this was not improved by PC61 treatment. Experiments using RAG1−/− hosts adoptively transferred with OTI and CD25-depleted OTII cells also failed to show improved OTI and OTII T cell proliferation in vivo compared to C57BL/6 hosts. We conclude that the defective presentation of B16.OVA tumor antigen by tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells and in the tumor-draining lymph node is not due to the presence of “natural” CD4+CD25+ Treg. PMID:21390236

  4. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  5. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho; Rodrigues, Maurício M

    2016-06-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  6. Thymic regulatory T cell niche size is dictated by limiting interleukin 2 from antigen-bearing dendritic cells and feedback competition

    PubMed Central

    Weist, Brian M.; Kurd, Nadia; Boussier, Jeremy; Chan, Shiao Wei; Robey, Ellen A.

    2015-01-01

    Thymic regulatory T (Treg) cell production requires interleukin 2 (IL-2) and agonist TCR ligands, and is controlled by competition for a limited developmental niche, but the thymic sources of IL-2 and the factors that limit access to the niche are poorly understood. Here we show that IL-2 produced by antigen-bearing dendritic cells plays a key role in Treg cell development, and that existing Treg cells limit new Treg cell development by competing for IL-2. . Our data suggest that antigen-presenting cells that can provide both IL-2 and a TCR ligand comprise the thymic niche, and that competition by existing Treg cells for a limited supply of IL-2 provides negative feedback for new Treg cell production. PMID:25939026

  7. Binding immunoglobulin protein-treated peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells are refractory to maturation and induce regulatory T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Corrigall, Valerie M; Vittecoq, Olivier; Panayi, Gabriel S

    2009-10-01

    Binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) has been shown previously to have immunomodulatory functions. Herein we investigated whether BiP could affect the differentiation of monocytes into dendritic cells (DCs) and thence the development of regulatory T cells. Peripheral blood monocyte-derived DCs were matured with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of BiP. DC development and T-cell changes were monitored by flow cytometry and regulatory T-cell function was measured by uptake of tritiated thymidine. More BiP-treated DCs (DC((BiP))s) expressed amounts of intracellular indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and cell surface leucocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B member 1 (LILRB1), retained CD14 expression but down-regulated expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and CD86, and produced copious amounts of interleukin (IL)-10, when compared with control DCs. T cells co-cultured with DC((BiP))s developed regulatory function with increased surface expression of CD4(+) CD25(hi) CD27(hi) but with no concomitant increase in forkhead box P3 (Foxp3). These T cells also showed significantly higher levels of intracellular cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4. The latter could be inhibited by the presence of the IDO inhibitor 1 methyl tryptophan. The addition of neutralizing anti-IL-10 antibody or the specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 inhibitor SB203580 reversed the inhibition of DC differentiation by BiP. In conclusion, BiP is an immunomodulator able to arrest inflammation through induction of tolerogenic DCs and subsequent generation of T regulatory cells. PMID:19740378

  8. Retinoic acid treated human dendritic cells induce T regulatory cells via the expression of CD141 and GARP which is impaired with age.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Ganguly, Sreerupa; Tran, Alexander; Sundaram, Padmaja; Agrawal, Anshu

    2016-06-01

    Aged subjects display increased susceptibility to mucosal diseases. Retinoic Acid (RA) plays a major role in inducing tolerance in the mucosa. RA acts on Dendritic cells (DCs) to induce mucosal tolerance. Here we compared the response of DCs from aged and young individuals to RA with a view to understand the role of DCs in age-associated increased susceptibility to mucosal diseases. Our investigations revealed that compared to young DCs, RA stimulated DCs from aged subjects are defective in inducing IL-10 and T regulatory cells. Examinations of the underlying mechanisms indicated that RA exposure led to the upregulation of CD141 and GARP on DCs which rendered the DCs tolerogenic. CD141(hi), GARP(+) DCs displayed enhanced capacity to induce T regulatory cells compared to CD141(lo) and GARP(-) DCs. Unlike RA stimulated DCs from young, DCs from aged subjects exhibited diminished upregulation of both CD141 and GARP. The percentage of DCs expressing CD141 and GARP on RA treatment was significantly reduced in DCs from aged individuals. Furthermore, the remaining CD141(hi), GARP(+) DCs from aged individuals were also deficient in inducing T regs. In summary, reduced response of aged DCs to RA enhances mucosal inflammation in the elderly, increasing their susceptibility to mucosal diseases. PMID:27244900

  9. Retinoic acid treated human dendritic cells induce T regulatory cells via the expression of CD141 and GARP which is impaired with age

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Ganguly, Sreerupa; Tran, Alexander; Sundaram, Padmaja; Agrawal, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Aged subjects display increased susceptibility to mucosal diseases. Retinoic Acid (RA) plays a major role in inducing tolerance in the mucosa. RA acts on Dendritic cells (DCs) to induce mucosal tolerance. Here we compared the response of DCs from aged and young individuals to RA with a view to understand the role of DCs in age-associated increased susceptibility to mucosal diseases. Our investigations revealed that compared to young DCs, RA stimulated DCs from aged subjects are defective in inducing IL-10 and T regulatory cells. Examinations of the underlying mechanisms indicated that RA exposure led to the upregulation of CD141 and GARP on DCs which rendered the DCs tolerogenic. CD141hi, GARP+ DCs displayed enhanced capacity to induce T regulatory cells compared to CD141lo and GARP− DCs. Unlike RA stimulated DCs from young, DCs from aged subjects exhibited diminished upregulation of both CD141 and GARP. The percentage of DCs expressing CD141 and GARP on RA treatment was significantly reduced in DCs from aged individuals. Furthermore, the remaining CD141hi, GARP+ DCs from aged individuals were also deficient in inducing T regs. In summary, reduced response of aged DCs to RA enhances mucosal inflammation in the elderly, increasing their susceptibility to mucosal diseases. PMID:27244900

  10. Reduced Dendritic Cells Expressing CD200R1 in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Correlation with Th17 and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Elshal, Mohamed F.; Aldahlawi, Alia M.; Saadah, Omar I.; McCoy, J. Philip

    2015-01-01

    Loss of tolerance of the adaptive immune system towards indigenous flora contributes to the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Defects in dendritic cell (DC)-mediated innate and adoptive immune responses are conceivable. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the inhibitory molecules CD200R1 and their ligand CD200 on DCs, to clarify the role of the DCs in the pathogenesis of IBD. Thirty-seven pediatric IBD patients (23 with Crohn’s disease (CD) and 14 with ulcerative colitis (UC)) with mean age 13.25 ± 2.9 years were included. Fourteen age-matched healthy pediatric volunteers (five males and nine females) served as a control group (HC). The percentage of CD11c+ myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) expressing CD200R1 and CD200 were evaluated in peripheral blood using flow cytometry and were correlated with routine biochemical, serological markers, serum levels of cytokines and with the percentages of circulating regulatory T cells (Treg) and CD4+ producing IL-17 (Th17). IBD patients showed a significant decrease in the percentage of pDCs and mDCs expressing CD200R1 compared to that of HC. Patients with UC showed increased expressions of the CD200 molecule on pDCs as compared to HC. DCs expressing CD200R1 were found to be correlated positively with Treg and negatively with TH17 and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Our findings suggest that IBD is associated with dysregulation in the CD200R1/CD200 axis and that the decrease in DCs expressing CD200R1 may contribute to the imbalance of Th17 and Treg cells and in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:26690123

  11. Myeloid Dendritic Cells (DCs) of Mice Susceptible to Paracoccidioidomycosis Suppress T Cell Responses whereas Myeloid and Plasmacytoid DCs from Resistant Mice Induce Effector and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Adriana; Frank de Araujo, Eliseu; Felonato, Maíra; Loures, Flávio V.; Feriotti, Claudia; Bernardino, Simone; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.

    2013-01-01

    The protective adaptive immune response in paracoccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic among humans, is mediated by T cell immunity, whereas impaired T cell responses are associated with severe, progressive disease. The early host response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection is not known since the disease is diagnosed at later phases of infection. Our laboratory established a murine model of infection where susceptible mice reproduce the severe disease, while resistant mice develop a mild infection. This work aimed to characterize the influence of dendritic cells in the innate and adaptive immunity of susceptible and resistant mice. We verified that P. brasiliensis infection induced in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of susceptible mice a prevalent proinflammatory myeloid phenotype that secreted high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-β, whereas in resistant mice, a mixed population of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs secreting proinflammatory cytokines and expressing elevated levels of secreted and membrane-bound transforming growth factor β was observed. In proliferation assays, the proinflammatory DCs from B10.A mice induced anergy of naïve T cells, whereas the mixed DC subsets from resistant mice induced the concomitant proliferation of effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Equivalent results were observed during pulmonary infection. The susceptible mice displayed preferential expansion of proinflammatory myeloid DCs, resulting in impaired proliferation of effector T cells. Conversely, the resistant mice developed myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs that efficiently expanded gamma interferon-, IL-4-, and IL-17-positive effector T cells associated with increased development of Tregs. Our work highlights the deleterious effect of excessive innate proinflammatory reactions and provides new evidence for the importance of immunomodulation during pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:23340311

  12. Early exposure of interferon-γ inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 signalling and nuclear factor κB activation in a short-term monocyte-derived dendritic cell culture promoting ‘FAST’ regulatory dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Canales, D; Krishnan, R; Jessup, C F; Coates, P T

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ is a cytokine with immunomodulatory properties, which has been shown previously to enhance the generation of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) when administered early ex vivo in 7-day monocyte-derived DC culture. To generate tolerogenic DC rapidly within 48 h, human monocytes were cultured for 24 h with interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the presence (IFN-γ-DC) or absence of IFN-γ (500 U/ml) (UT-DC). DC were matured for 24 h with TNF-α and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). DC phenotype, signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 (STAT-6) phosphorylation and promotion of CD4+CD25+CD127neg/lowforkhead box P3 (FoxP3)hi T cells were analysed by flow cytometry. DC nuclear factor (NF)-κB transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homologue B (RELB) and IL-12p70 protein expression were also determined. Phenotypically, IFN-γ-DC displayed reduced DC maturation marker CD83 by 62% and co-stimulation molecules CD80 (26%) and CD86 (8%). IFN-γ treatment of monocytes inhibited intracellular STAT6, RELB nuclear translocation and IL-12p70 production. IFN-γ-DC increased the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127neg/lowfoxp3hi T cells compared to UT-DC from 12 to 23%. IFN-γ-DC primed T cells inhibited antigen-specific, autologous naive T cell proliferation by 70% at a 1:1 naive T cells to IFN-γ-DC primed T cell ratio in suppression assays. In addition, we examined the reported paradoxical proinflammatory effects of IFN-γ and confirmed in this system that late IFN-γ exposure does not inhibit DC maturation marker expression. Early IFN-γ exposure is critical in promoting the generation of regulatory DC. Early IFN-γ modulated DC generated in 48 h are maturation arrested and promote the generation of antigen-specific regulatory T cells, which may be clinically applicable as a novel cellular therapy for allograft rejection. PMID:22288588

  13. Imperatorin exerts antiallergic effects in Th2-mediated allergic asthma via induction of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells by modulating the function of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chu-Lun; Hsiao, George; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Lee, Yueh-Lun

    2016-08-01

    Imperatorin is a furanocoumarin compound which exists in many medicinal herbs and possesses various biological activities. Herein, we investigated the antiallergic effects of imperatorin in asthmatic mice and explored the immunomodulatory actions of imperatorin on immune cells. We used a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma to evaluate the therapeutic potential of imperatorin. Additionally, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs; BMDCs) were used to clarify whether imperatorin exerts an antiallergic effect through altering the ability of DCs to regulate T cells. Oral administration of imperatorin to OVA-sensitized and -challenged mice decreased serum OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) production, attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and alleviated airway inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, secretions of Th2 cytokines and chemokines were reduced, and numbers of interleukin (IL)-10-producing regulatory T cells (Tregs) increased in imperatorin-treated mice. Imperatorin inhibited proinflammatory cytokines and IL-12 production but enhanced IL-10 secretion by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BMDCs. Compared to fully mature DCs, imperatorin-treated DCs expressed high levels of the inducible costimulatory ligand (ICOSL) and Jagged1 molecules, and had the regulatory capacity to promote the generation of IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Additionally, imperatorin directly suppressed activated CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. Imperatorin may possess therapeutic potential against Th2-mediated allergic asthma not only via stimulating DC induction of Tregs but also via direct inhibition of Th2 cell activation. These findings provide new insights into how imperatorin affects the Th2 immune response and the development of imperatorin as a Treg-type immunomodulatory agent to treat allergic asthma. PMID:27185659

  14. Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Suppression of Conventional T-Cells and Dendritic Cells by Different cAMP Intracellular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Cesar M.; Jackson, Courtney M.; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) mediate their suppressive action by acting directly on conventional T-cells (Tcons) or dendritic cells (DCs). One mechanism of Treg suppression is the increase of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) levels in target cells. Tregs utilize cAMP to control Tcon responses, such as proliferation and cytokine production. Tregs also exert their suppression on DCs, diminishing DC immunogenicity by downmodulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and actin polymerization at the immunological synapse. The Treg-mediated usage of cAMP occurs through two major mechanisms. The first involves the Treg-mediated influx of cAMP in target cells through gap junctions. The second is the conversion of adenosine triphosphate into adenosine by the ectonucleases CD39 and CD73 present on the surface of Tregs. Adenosine then binds to receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to increased intracellular cAMP levels in these targets. Downstream, cAMP can activate the canonical protein kinase A (PKA) pathway and the exchange protein activated by cyclic AMP (EPAC) non-canonical pathway. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings related to cAMP activation of PKA and EPAC, which are implicated in Treg homeostasis as well as the functional alterations induced by cAMP in cellular targets of Treg suppression. PMID:27313580

  15. CD8α+β− and CD8α+β+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells induce Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and prevent the induction of airway hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Vincent; Speak, Anneliese O.; Kerzerho, Jérôme; Szely, Natacha; Akbari, Omid

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) control the balance between protection against pathogens and tolerance to innocuous or self-antigens. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that mouse plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) can be segregated into three distinct populations, exhibiting phenotypic and functional differences, according to their surface expression of CD8α or CD8β as CD8α−β−, CD8α+β− or CD8α+β+. In a mouse model of lung inflammation, adoptive transfer of CD8α+β− or CD8α+β+ pDCs prevents the development of airway hyperreactivity. The tolerogenic features of these subsets are associated with increased production of retinoic acid, which leads to the enhanced induction of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells compared to CD8α−β− pDCs. Our data thus identify subsets of pDCs with potent tolerogenic functions that may contribute to the maintenance of tolerance in mucosal sites such as the lungs. PMID:22472775

  16. The indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase pathway is essential for human plasmacytoid dendritic cell-induced adaptive T regulatory cell generation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Liang, Xueqing; Peterson, Amanda J; Munn, David H; Blazar, Bruce R

    2008-10-15

    Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) can drive naive, allogeneic CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells to differentiate into CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, the intracellular mechanism or mechanisms underlying PDC-induced Treg generation are unknown. In this study, we show that human PDCs express high levels of IDO, an intracellular enzyme that catabolizes tryptophan degradation. Triggering of TLR 9 with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides activates PDCs to up-regulate surface expression of B7 ligands and HLA-DR Ag, but also significantly increases the expression of IDO and results in the generation of inducible Tregs from CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells with potent suppressor cell function. Blocking IDO activity with the pharmacologic inhibitor 1-methyl-D-tryptophan significantly abrogates PDC-driven inducible Treg generation and suppressor cell function. Adding kynurenine, the immediate downstream metabolite of tryptophan, bypasses the 1-methyl-D-tryptophan effect and restores PDC-driven Treg generation. Our results demonstrate that the IDO pathway is essential for PDC-driven Treg generation from CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells and implicate the generation of kynurenine pathway metabolites as the critical mediator of this process. PMID:18832696

  17. TLR2 dependent induction of vitamin A metabolizing enzymes in dendritic cells promotes T regulatory responses and inhibits TH-17 mediated autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Ravindran, Rajesh; Deng, Jiusheng; Oluoch, Herold; Denning, Timothy L; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Rosenthal, Kristen M.; Evavold, Brian D.; Pulendran, Bali

    2009-01-01

    Immune sensing of a microbe occurs via multiple receptors. How signals from different receptors are coordinated to yield a specific immune response is poorly understood. We demonstrate that the different pathogen recognition receptors, TLR2 and dectin-1, recognizing the same microbial stimulus, stimulate distinct innate and adaptive responses. TLR2 signaling induced splenic dendritic cells (DCs) to express the retinoic acid (RA) metabolizing enzyme Raldh2 and IL-10, and to metabolize vitamin A and stimulate Foxp3+ T regulatory cells (Treg cells). RA acted on DCs to induce Socs3 expression, which suppressed activation of p38 MAPK and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Consistent with this, TLR2 signaling induced Treg cells, and suppressed IL-23 and TH-17/ TH-1 mediated autoimmune responses in vivo. In contrast, dectin-1 signaling mostly induced IL-23 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented TH-17/ TH-1 mediated autoimmune responses in vivo. These data define a new mechanism for the systemic induction of RA and immune suppression against autoimmunity. PMID:19252500

  18. Toll-like receptor 2-dependent induction of vitamin A-metabolizing enzymes in dendritic cells promotes T regulatory responses and inhibits autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Ravindran, Rajesh; Deng, Jiusheng; Oluoch, Herold; Denning, Timothy L; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Rosenthal, Kristen M; Evavold, Brian D; Pulendran, Bali

    2009-04-01

    Immune sensing of a microbe occurs via multiple receptors. How signals from different receptors are coordinated to yield a specific immune response is poorly understood. We show that two pathogen recognition receptors, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and dectin-1, recognizing the same microbial stimulus, stimulate distinct innate and adaptive responses. TLR2 signaling induced splenic dendritic cells (DCs) to express the retinoic acid metabolizing enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) and to metabolize vitamin A and stimulate Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells (T(reg) cells). Retinoic acid acted on DCs to induce suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 expression, which suppressed activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and proinflammatory cytokines. Consistent with this finding, TLR2 signaling induced T(reg) cells and suppressed IL-23 and T helper type 17 (T(H)17) and T(H)1-mediated autoimmune responses in vivo. In contrast, dectin-1 signaling mostly induced IL-23 and proinflammatory cytokines and augmented T(H)17 and T(H)1-mediated autoimmune responses in vivo. These data define a new mechanism for the systemic induction of retinoic acid and immune suppression against autoimmunity. PMID:19252500

  19. Human dendritic cells acquire a semimature phenotype and lymph node homing potential through interaction with CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Triebel, Frédéric; Kaveri, Srini V; Tough, David F

    2007-04-01

    Interactions between dendritic cells (DC) and T cells are known to involve the delivery of signals in both directions. We sought to characterize the effects on human DC of contact with different subsets of activated CD4+ T cells. The results showed that interaction with CD25(high)CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) caused DC to take on very different properties than contact with naive or memory phenotype T cells. Whereas non-Tregs stimulated DC maturation, culture with Tregs produced DC with a mixed phenotype. By many criteria, Tregs inhibited DC maturation, inducing down-regulation of costimulatory molecules and T cell stimulatory activity. However, DC exposed to Tregs also showed some changes typically associated with DC maturation, namely, increased expression of CCR7 and MHC class II molecules, and gained the ability to migrate in response to the CCR7 ligand CCL19. Both soluble factors and cell-associated molecules were shown to be involved in Treg modulation of DC, with lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) playing a predominant role in driving maturation-associated changes. The data show that Tregs induce the generation of semimature DC with the potential to migrate into lymphoid organs, suggesting a possible mechanism by which Tregs down-modulate immune responses. PMID:17371975

  20. Suppression of allergic inflammation by allergen-DNA-modified dendritic cells depends on the induction of Foxp3+ Regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Bi, Yuttian; Sun, Kun; Xia, Junbo; Wang, Yan; Wang, Changzheng

    2008-02-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play important roles in regulating allergic inflammation. To analyse if allergen-DNA-modified dendritic cells (DC) can suppress allergic responses and what roles Treg cells play in DC-based allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immature DC were transfected with retrovirus encoding Der p2 DNA, and administered to mice that sensitized and challenged with Der p2 protein. After Treg cells were depleted with anti-CD25 mAb, mice were re-challenged to observe the airway inflammation, and Treg cells in spleen CD4(+) T cells. And responses of spleen CD4(+) T cells to Der p2 were determined. Co-culture of naïve CD4(+) T cells with allergen-modified DC induced Foxp3+ Tregs. Sensitized and challenged mice developed allergic airway inflammation and Th2 responses, and decreased Foxp3(+) Tregs. Treatment with allergen-modified-DC suppressed airway inflammation and Th2 responses, and increased IL-10 and IFN-gamma production and Foxp3(+) Tregs significantly; and eliminated the responses of CD4(+) T cells to allergen. Administration of anit-CD25 mAb eliminated all the effects of modified-DC except for the increasing of IFN-gamma. Allergen-modified DC can induce immune tolerance to allergens and reverse the established Th2 responses induced by allergen, with dependence on the induction of Foxp3(+) Tregs. PMID:18201369

  1. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection induced allergic airway sensitization is controlled by regulatory T-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crother, Timothy R; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate), but not a high dose (severe) CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/- mice were infected intranasally (i.n.) with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA) and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2-/- mice, but not in TLR4-/- mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2-/- mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4-/- mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs. PMID:21695198

  2. Dendritic cell-specific disruption of TGFβ receptor II leads to altered regulatory T-cell phenotype and spontaneous multi-organ autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Rajalakshmy; Larmonier, Claire B.; Thurston, Robert D.; Midura-Kiela, Monica T.; Zheng, Song Guo; Ghishan, Fayez K.; Kiela, Pawel R.

    2012-01-01

    In vitrodata and transgenic mouse models suggest a role for TGFβ signaling in dendritic cells (DC) to prevent autoimmunity primarily through maintenance of DCs in their immature and tolerogenic state characterized by low expression of MHCII and co-stimulatory molecules, and increased expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), among others. To test whether a complete lack of TGFβ signaling in DCs predisposes mice to spontaneous autoimmunity, and to verify the mechanisms implicated previously in vitro, we generated conditional knock-out mice with Cre-mediated DC-specific deletion of Tgfbr2 (DC-Tgfbr2 KO). DC-Tgfbr2 KO mice die before 15 weeks of age with multi-organ autoimmune inflammation and spontaneous activation of T and B cells. Interestingly, there were no significant differences in the expression of MHCII, co-stimulatory molecules, or IDO in secondary lymphoid organ DCs, although Tgfbr2-deficient DCs were more pro-inflammatory in vitro and in vivo. DC-Tgfbr2 KO showed attenuated FoxP3 expression in regulatory T cells (Tregs) and abnormal expansion of CD25−FoxP3+ Tregs in vivo. Tgfbr2-deficient DCs secreted elevated levels of IFNγ and were not capable of directing antigen-specific Treg conversion unless in the presence of anti-IFNγ blocking antibody. Adoptive transfer of iTregs into DC-Tgfbr2 KO mice partially rescued the phenotype. Therefore, in vivo, TGFβ signaling in DCs is critical in the control of autoimmunity through both Treg dependent and independent mechanisms, but it does not affect MHCII and co-stimulatory molecule expression. PMID:22972928

  3. Low-dose temozolomide before dendritic-cell vaccination reduces (specifically) CD4+CD25++Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells in advanced melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In cancer immunotherapy, dendritic cells (DCs) play a fundamental role in the dialog between innate and adaptive immune response, but several immunosuppressive mechanisms remain to be overcome. For example, a high number of CD4+CD25++Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells (Foxp3+Tregs) have been observed in the peripheral blood and tumor microenvironment of cancer patients. On the basis of this, we conducted a study on DC-based vaccination in advanced melanoma, adding low-dose temozolomide to obtain lymphodepletion. Methods Twenty-one patients were entered onto our vaccination protocol using autologous DCs pulsed with autologous tumor lysate and keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Patients received low-dose temozolomide before vaccination and 5 days of low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) after vaccination. Circulating Foxp3+Tregs were evaluated before and after temozolomide, and after IL-2. Results Among the 17 evaluable patients we observed 1 partial response (PR), 6 stable disease (SD) and 10 progressive disease (PD). The disease control rate (PR+SD = DCR) was 41% and median overall survival was 10 months. Temozolomide reduced circulating Foxp3+Treg cells in all patients. A statistically significant reduction of 60% was observed in Foxp3+Tregs after the first cycle, whereas the absolute lymphocyte count decreased by only 14%. Conversely, IL-2 increased Foxp3+Treg cell count by 75.4%. Of note the effect of this cytokine, albeit not statistically significant, on the DCR subgroup led to a further 33.8% reduction in Foxp3+Treg cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that the combined immunological therapy, at least as far as the DCR subgroup is concerned, effectively reduced the number of Foxp3+Treg cells, which exerted a blunting effect on the growth-stimulating effect of IL-2. However, this regimen, with its current modality, would not seem to be capable of improving clinical outcome. PMID:23725550

  4. Regulation of IFN regulatory factor-7 and IFN-alpha production by enveloped virus and lipopolysaccharide in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jihong; Megjugorac, Nicholas J; Amrute, Sheela B; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Patricia

    2004-08-01

    Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are a major source of IFN-alpha upon exposure to enveloped viruses and TLR-7 and TLR-9 ligands. Although IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7) is known to play an essential role in virus-activated transcription of IFN-alpha genes, the molecular mechanisms of IFN-alpha production in human PDC remain poorly understood. We and others have recently reported high constitutive levels of IRF-7 expression in PDC as compared with other PBMC. In this study, we demonstrate that both LPS and HSV up-regulate the expression of IRF-7 in PDC, and that this enhancement of IRF-7 is dependent on NF-kappa B activation. The NF-kappa B inhibitors MG132 and pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate efficiently inhibited the induction of IRF-7 by HSV or LPS, and also down-regulated the constitutive expression of IRF-7 in PDC and blocked the HSV-induced production of IFN-alpha. In addition, we found that nuclear translocation of IRF-7 occurred rapidly in response to HSV stimulation, but not in response to LPS, which is consistent with the stimulation of IFN-alpha production by virus and not by LPS. Although LPS by itself was not able to induce IFN-alpha production, it led to rapid up-regulation of TLR-4 on PDC and increased the magnitude and accelerated the kinetics of HSV-induced IFN-alpha production in PDC, providing a mechanism that might be operative in a scenario of mixed infection. In contrast to the current concept of IFN-alpha regulation established in cell lines, this study strongly supports the immediate availability of high constitutive levels of IRF-7 expression in PDC, and suggests an activation required for IRF-7 that contributes to IFN-alpha production in virus-stimulated PDC. PMID:15265881

  5. Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 enhances experimental asthma by promoting Th2 and Th17 and limiting regulatory T cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cell responses.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Yong; Jing, Xuefang; Gupta, Dipika; Dziarski, Roman

    2013-04-01

    Asthma is a common inflammatory disease involving cross-talk between innate and adaptive immunity. We reveal that antibacterial innate immunity protein, peptidoglycan recognition protein (Pglyrp)1, is involved in the development of allergic asthma. Pglyrp1(-/-) mice developed less severe asthma than wild-type (WT) mice following sensitization with house dust mite (allergen) (HDM). HDM-sensitized Pglyrp1(-/-) mice, compared with WT mice, had diminished bronchial hyperresponsiveness (lung airway resistance); numbers of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lungs; inflammatory cell infiltrates in the lungs around bronchi, bronchioles, and pulmonary arteries and veins; lung remodeling (mucin-producing goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy and fibrosis); levels of IgE, eotaxins, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17 in the lungs; and numbers of Th2 and Th17 cells and expression of their marker genes in the lungs. The mechanism underlying this decreased sensitivity of Pglyrp1(-/-) mice to asthma was increased generation and activation of CD8α(+)β(+) and CD8α(+)β(-) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and increased recruitment and activity of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lungs. In vivo depletion of pDC in HDM-sensitized Pglyrp1(-/-) mice reversed the low responsive asthma phenotype of Pglyrp1(-/-) mice to resemble the more severe WT phenotype. Thus, Pglyrp1(-/-) mice efficiently control allergic asthma by upregulating pDC and Treg cells in the lungs, whereas in WT mice, Pglyrp1 is proinflammatory and decreases pDC and Treg cells and increases proasthmatic Th2 and Th17 responses. Blocking Pglyrp1 or enhancing pDC in the lungs may be beneficial for prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:23420883

  6. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naïve T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical relationship between the allergic immune response and helminth infection. PMID:21440530

  7. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  8. Regulation of calcium signaling in dendritic cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Shumilina, Ekaterina; Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Matzner, Nicole; Bhandaru, Madhuri; Zemtsova, Irina M; Lang, Florian

    2010-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that provide a link between innate and adaptive immunity. Ca(2+)-dependent signaling plays a central regulatory role in DC responses to diverse antigens. DCs are a primary target of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], a secosteroid hormone, that, in addition to its well-established action on Ca(2+) homeostasis, possesses immunomodulatory properties. Surprisingly, nothing is known about its effects on DC cytosolic Ca(2+) activity. The present study explored whether 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) modifies the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in DCs. Here we show that mouse DCs expressed K(+)-independent (NCX1-3) and K(+)-dependent (NCKX1, 3, 4, and 5) Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers. Acute application of LPS (100 ng/ml) to DCs increased [Ca(2+)](i), an effect significantly blunted by prior incubation with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased the membrane abundance of the NCKX1 protein, up-regulated the K(+)- and Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) entry and enhanced the K(+)-dependent Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger currents. The NCKX blocker 3',4'-dichlorobenzamyl (DBZ) reversed the inhibitory effect of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on the LPS-induced increase of [Ca(2+)](i). Expression of the costimulatory molecule CD86 was down-regulated by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), an effect reversed by DBZ. In summary, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) blunts the LPS-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) by stimulation of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-dependent Ca(2+) extrusion, an effect that contributes to 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-mediated immunosuppression. The results disclose completely novel mechanisms in the regulation of DC maturation and function. PMID:20124438

  9. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid.

  10. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.

    1988-06-07

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid. 2 figs.

  11. Dendrite Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Donald Gilles, the Discipline Scientist for Materials Science in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Applications Department, demonstrates to Carl Dohrman a model of dendrites, the branch-like structures found in many metals and alloys. Dohrman was recently selected by the American Society for Metals International as their 1999 ASM International Foundation National Merit Scholar. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign freshman recently toured NASA's materials science facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  12. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, De-Hua; Dou, Li-Ping; Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong; Shi, Bing-Yi

    2010-05-14

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-{gamma} by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4{sup +}CD25{sup high}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  13. Identification of a novel basic helix-loop-helix-PAS factor, NXF, reveals a Sim2 competitive, positive regulatory role in dendritic-cytoskeleton modulator drebrin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Norihisa; Saito, Koichi; Mikami, Nobuyoshi; Nakatuka, Iwao; Kaneko, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    Sim2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS transcriptional repressor, is thought to be involved in some symptoms of Down's syndrome. In the course of searching for hypothetical Sim2 relatives, we isolated another bHLH-PAS factor, NXF. NXF was a novel gene and was selectively expressed in neuronal tissues. While no striking homolog of NXF was found in vertebrates, a Caenorhabditis elegans putative transcription factor, C15C8.2, showed similarity in the bHLH-PAS domain. NXF had an activation domain as a transcription activator, and Arnt-type bHLH-PAS subfamily members were identified as the heterodimer partners of NXF. The NXF/Arnt heterodimer was capable of binding and activating a subset of Sim2/Arnt target DNA variants, and Sim2 could compete with the NXF activity on the elements. We showed that Drebrin had several such NXF/Arnt binding elements on the promoter, which could be direct or indirect cross talking points between NXF (activation) and Sim2 (repression) action. Drebrin has been reported to be engaged in dendritic-cytoskeleton modulation at synapses, and such a novel NXF signaling system on neural gene promoter may be a molecular target of the adverse effects of Sim2 in the mental retardation of Down's syndrome. PMID:14701734

  14. Dominating expression of negative regulatory factors downmodulates major histocompatibility complex Class-II expression on dendritic cells in chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Tomer, Shallu; Chawla, Yogesh K; Duseja, Ajay; Arora, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to development of functionally impaired dendritic cells (DCs) in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients infected with genotype 3 virus. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted on the cohorts of CHC individuals identified as responders or non-responders to antiviral therapy. Myeloid DCs were isolated from the peripheral blood of each subject using CD1c (BDCA1)+ DC isolation Kit. Monocytes from healthy donor were cultured with DC growth factors such as IL-4 and GM-CSF either in the presence or absence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral proteins followed by LPS stimulation. Phenotyping was done by flowcytometry and gene expression profiling was evaluated by real-time PCR. RESULTS: Non-responders [sustained virological response (SVR)-ve] to conventional antiviral therapy had significantly higher expression of genes associated with interferon responsive element such as IDO1 and PD-L1 (6-fold) and negative regulators of JAK-STAT pathway such as SOCS (6-fold) as compared to responders (SVR+ve) to antiviral therapy. The down-regulated genes in non-responders included factors involved in antigen processing and presentation mainly belonging to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class-II family as HLA-DP, HLA-DQ (2-fold) and superoxide dismutase (2-fold). Cells grown in the presence of HCV viral proteins had genes down-regulated for factors involved in innate response, interferon signaling, DC maturation and co-stimulatory signaling to T-cells, while the genes for cytokine signaling and Toll-like receptors (4-fold) were up-regulated as compared to cells grown in absence of viral proteins. CONCLUSION: Underexpressed MHC class-II genes and upregulated negative regulators in non-responders indicate diminished capacity to present antigen and may constitute mechanism of functionally defective state of DCs. PMID:27298560

  15. Human dendritic cell DC-SIGN and TLR-2 mediate complementary immune regulatory activities in response to Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1.

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Schiavi, Elisa; Ziegler, Mario; Groeger, David; Healy, Selena; Grant, Ray; O'Mahony, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota is required for optimal host development and ongoing immune homeostasis. Lactobacilli are common inhabitants of the mammalian large intestine and immunoregulatory effects have been described for certain, but not all, strains. The mechanisms underpinning these protective effects are beginning to be elucidated. One such protective organism is Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 (Lb. rhamnosus JB-1). Lb. murinus has no such anti-inflammatory protective effects and was used as a comparator organism. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) were co-incubated with bacteria and analysed over time for bacterial adhesion and intracellular processing, costimulatory molecule expression, cytokine secretion and induction of lymphocyte polarization. Neutralising antibodies were utilized to identify the responsible MDDC receptors. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhered to MDDCs, but internalization and intracellular processing was significantly delayed, compared to Lb. murinus which was rapidly internalized and processed. Lb. murinus induced CD80 and CD86 expression, accompanied by high levels of cytokine secretion, while Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 was a poor inducer of costimulatory molecule expression and cytokine secretion. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 primed MDDCs induced Foxp3 expression in autologous lymphocytes, while Lb. murinus primed MDDCs induced Foxp3, T-bet and Ror-γt expression. DC-SIGN was required for Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhesion and influenced IL-12 secretion, while TLR-2 influenced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion. Here we demonstrate that the delayed kinetics of bacterial processing by MDDCs correlates with MDDC activation and stimulation of lymphocytes. Thus, inhibition or delay of intracellular processing may be a novel strategy by which certain commensals may avoid the induction of proinflammatory responses. PMID:25816321

  16. Human Dendritic Cell DC-SIGN and TLR-2 Mediate Complementary Immune Regulatory Activities in Response to Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Schiavi, Elisa; Ziegler, Mario; Groeger, David; Healy, Selena; Grant, Ray; O’Mahony, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota is required for optimal host development and ongoing immune homeostasis. Lactobacilli are common inhabitants of the mammalian large intestine and immunoregulatory effects have been described for certain, but not all, strains. The mechanisms underpinning these protective effects are beginning to be elucidated. One such protective organism is Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 (Lb. rhamnosus JB-1). Lb. murinus has no such anti-inflammatory protective effects and was used as a comparator organism. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) were co-incubated with bacteria and analysed over time for bacterial adhesion and intracellular processing, costimulatory molecule expression, cytokine secretion and induction of lymphocyte polarization. Neutralising antibodies were utilized to identify the responsible MDDC receptors. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhered to MDDCs, but internalization and intracellular processing was significantly delayed, compared to Lb. murinus which was rapidly internalized and processed. Lb. murinus induced CD80 and CD86 expression, accompanied by high levels of cytokine secretion, while Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 was a poor inducer of costimulatory molecule expression and cytokine secretion. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 primed MDDCs induced Foxp3 expression in autologous lymphocytes, while Lb. murinus primed MDDCs induced Foxp3, T-bet and Ror-γt expression. DC-SIGN was required for Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhesion and influenced IL-12 secretion, while TLR-2 influenced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion. Here we demonstrate that the delayed kinetics of bacterial processing by MDDCs correlates with MDDC activation and stimulation of lymphocytes. Thus, inhibition or delay of intracellular processing may be a novel strategy by which certain commensals may avoid the induction of proinflammatory responses. PMID:25816321

  17. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells.

    PubMed

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita; Azogui, Orly

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy. PMID:27341421

  18. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy. PMID:27341421

  19. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  20. Free dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  1. The PD-L1/CD86 ratio is increased in dendritic cells co-infected with porcine circovirus type 2 and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and the PD-L1/PD-1 axis is associated with anergy, apoptosis, and the induction of regulatory T-cells in porcine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Richmond, O; Cecere, T E; Erdogan, E; Meng, X J; Piñeyro, P; Subramaniam, S; Todd, S M; LeRoith, T

    2015-11-18

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continue to have a negative economic impact on global swine production operations. Host immune modulations that potentiate disease during PCV2 and/or PRRSV infections are important areas of ongoing research. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of PD-L1, CD86, and IL-10 in order to phenotype dendritic cells following viral infection with PCV2b and/or PRRSV. The results showed that the inhibitory marker PD-L1 was significantly increased in monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDC) in both singular PCV2 infection and PCV2/PRRSV co-infections. MoDC expression of stimulatory marker CD86 was significantly increased during singular PCV2 infections, while it was significantly decreased in the treatment groups co-infected with both PCV2 and PRRSV. IL-10 production was highest among MoDCs that were co-infected with PCV2 and PRRSV. These results indicate that dendritic cells develop a regulatory phenotype following PCV2/PRRSV co-infections. We further investigated the role of the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in lymphocyte anergy, apoptosis, and the induction of regulatory T-cells in porcine mononuclear cell populations. Lymphocyte populations with normal PD-1 expression had higher percentages of anergic, apoptotic lymphocytes and CD4(+)CD25(HIGH)FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cells when compared to a PD-1 deficient lymphocyte population. These results implicate the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in negative regulation of lymphocyte responses in pigs. PMID:26446939

  2. Dendritic Growth Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Representatives of NASA materials science experiments supported the NASA exhibit at the Rernselaer Polytechnic Institute's Space Week activities, April 5 through 11, 1999. From left to right are: Angie Jackman, project manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for dendritic growth experiments; Dr. Martin Glicksman of Rennselaer Polytechnic Instutute, Troy, NY, principal investigator on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) that flew three times on the Space Shuttle; and Dr. Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA, a co-investigator on the IDGE and now principal investigator on the Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment being developed for the International Space Station (ISS). The image at far left is a dendrite grown in Glicksman's IDGE tests aboard the Shuttle. Glicksman is also principal investigator for the Evolution of Local Microstructures: Spatial Instabilities of Coarsening Clusters.

  3. On the dendrites and dendritic transitions in undercooled germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, C.F.; Kui, H.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-07-01

    Undercooled molten Ge was allowed to solidify at initial bulk undercoolings, [Delta]T, from 10 to 200C under dehydrated boron oxide flux. It turned out that in addition to the (211) twin dendrite found by Billig and the (100) twin-free dendrite discovered by Devaud and Turnbill, there is a third novel twin dendrite, the (110) twin dendrite. The twin planes in a (110) dendrite always appear in multiple numbers and the orientation is (111). These different kinds of dendrites exist at different initial interfacial undercoolings and the transition temperatures for (110) to (211), (211) to (100) are [Delta]T = 61 and 93C, respectively.

  4. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - SCN Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to the crystals that form inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dentrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provid a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. These shadowgraphic images show succinonitrile (SCN) dentrites growing in a melt (liquid). The space-grown crystals also have cleaner, better defined sidebranches. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institude (RPI) and NASA/ Glenn Research Center(GRC). Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo gredit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  5. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Wen Jing; Ahl, Patricia Jennifer; Connolly, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential. PMID:26980944

  6. Dendritic Polymers for Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuan; Mou, Quanbing; Wang, Dali; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic polymers are highly branched polymers with controllable structures, which possess a large population of terminal functional groups, low solution or melt viscosity, and good solubility. Their size, degree of branching and functionality can be adjusted and controlled through the synthetic procedures. These tunable structures correspond to application-related properties, such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, stimuli-responsiveness and self-assembly ability, which are the key points for theranostic applications, including chemotherapeutic theranostics, biotherapeutic theranostics, phototherapeutic theranostics, radiotherapeutic theranostics and combined therapeutic theranostics. Up to now, significant progress has been made for the dendritic polymers in solving some of the fundamental and technical questions toward their theranostic applications. In this review, we briefly summarize how to control the structures of dendritic polymers, the theranostics-related properties derived from their structures and their theranostics-related applications. PMID:27217829

  7. Lithium Dendrite Formation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-06

    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. Video shows annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging (ADF STEM) of lithium dendrite nucleation and growth from a glassy carbon working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DM battery electrolyte.

  8. Stability of dendritic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, James A.; Langer, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    An approximate method for studying steady-state properties and linear stability of the dendritic arrays that are formed in directional solidification of alloys is proposed. This analysis is valid at high growth rates where the primary spacing between dendrites is larger than the velocity-dependent solutal diffusion length. A neutral stability boundary is computed and it is found that, in the situations where the results should be valid, the experimental data of Somboonsuk, et al. (1984) lie in the stable region, well away from the boundary.

  9. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  10. Transport Processes in Dendritic Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dentritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical dendrite problem. The development of theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status is sketched showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) are insufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of maximum velocity was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to be able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip.

  11. Modification of dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  12. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  13. Dendritic cell-based cancer therapeutic vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen tremendous developments in novel cancer therapies, through targeting of tumor cell-intrinsic pathways whose activity is linked to genetic alterations, as well as the targeting of tumor cell-extrinsic factors such as growth factors. Furthermore, immunotherapies are entering the clinic at an unprecedented speed following the demonstration that T cells can efficiently reject tumors and that their anti-tumor activity can be enhanced with antibodies against immune regulatory molecules (checkpoints blockade). Current immunotherapy strategies include monoclonal antibodies against tumor cells or immune regulatory molecules, cell-based therapies such as adoptive transfer of ex vivo activated T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, and cancer vaccines. Herein, we discuss the immunological basis for therapeutic cancer vaccines and how the current understanding of dendritic cell (DC) and T cell biology might enable development of next-generation curative therapies for patients with cancer. PMID:23890062

  14. Web-dendritic ribbon growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, R. B., Jr.; Faust, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A web furnace was constructed for pulling dendritic-web samples. The effect of changes in the furnace thermal geometry on the growth of dendritic-web was studied. Several attempts were made to grow primitive dendrites for use as the dendritic seed crystals for web growth and to determine the optimum twin spacing in the dendritic seed crystal for web growth. Mathematical models and computer programs were used to determine the thermal geometries in the susceptor, crucible melt, meniscus, and web. Several geometries were determined for particular furnace geometries and growth conditions. The information obtained was used in conjunction with results from the experimental growth investigations in order to achieve proper conditions for sustained pulling of two dendrite web ribbons. In addition, the facilities for obtaining the following data were constructed: twin spacing, dislocation density, web geometry, resistivity, majority charge carrier type, and minority carrier lifetime.

  15. IDGE: Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flew on STS-62 to study the microscopic, tree-like structures (dendrites) that form within metals as they solidify from molten materials. The size, shape, and orientation of these dendrites affect the strength and usefulness of metals. Data from this experiment will be used to test and improve the mathematical models that support the industrial production of metals.

  16. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions. PMID:27034589

  17. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions. PMID:27034589

  18. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV. PMID:24788809

  19. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  20. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Achandira M.; Al-Bahri, Maiya; Burney, Ikram A.; Al-Haddabi, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a rare neoplasm with a non-specific and insidious presentation further complicated by the difficult diagnostic and therapeutic assessment. It has a low to intermediate risk of recurrence and metastasis. Unlike other soft tissue sarcomas or histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, cytogenetic studies are very limited in FDCS cases. Although no specific chromosomal marker has yet been established, complex aberrations and different ploidy types have been documented. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with FDCS who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in February 2013. Ultrastructural, immunophenotypical and histological findings are reported. In addition, karyotypic findings showed deletions of the chromosomes 1p, 3q, 6q, 7q, 8q and 11q. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, these have not been reported previously in this tumour. Techniques such as spectral karyotyping may help to better characterise chromosomal abnormalities in this type of tumour. PMID:26355964

  1. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity. PMID:23111238

  2. Dendritic cells in asthma.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Mary J; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-12-01

    The lungs are constantly exposed to antigens, most of which are non-pathogenic and do not require the induction of an immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are situated at the basolateral site of the lungs and continuously scan the environment to detect the presence of pathogens and subsequently initiate an immune response. They are a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells that exert specific functions. Compelling evidence is now provided that DCs are both sufficient and necessary to induce allergic responses against several inhaled harmless allergens. How various DC subsets exactly contribute to the induction of allergic asthma is currently a subject of intense investigation. We here review the current progress in this field. PMID:24455765

  3. Transcriptional control of dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Izumi; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells involved critically not only in provoking innate immune responses but also in establishing adaptive immune responses. Dendritic cells are heterogenous and divided into several subsets, including plasmactyoid DCs (pDCs) and several types of conventional DCs (cDCs), which show subset-specific functions. Plasmactyoid DCs are featured by their ability to produce large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) in response to nucleic acid sensors, TLR7 and TLR9 and involved in anti-viral immunity and pathogenesis of certain autoimmune disorders such as psoriasis. Conventional DCs include the DC subsets with high crosspresentation activity, which contributes to anti-viral and anti-tumor immunity. These subsets are generated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) via several intermediate progenitors and the development is regulated by the transcriptional mechanisms in which subset-specific transcription factors play major roles. We have recently found that an Ets family transcription factor, SPI-B, which is abundantly expressed in pDCs among DC subsets, plays critical roles in functions and late stage development of pDCs. SPI-B functions in cooperation with other transcription factors, especially, interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members. Here we review the transcription factor-based molecular mechanisms for generation and functions of DCs, mainly by focusing on the roles of SPI-B and its relatives. PMID:24875951

  4. Can dendritic cells see light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    There are many reports showing that low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) can enhance wound healing, upregulate cell proliferation and has anti-apoptotic effects by activating intracellular protective genes. In the field of immune response study, it is not known with any certainty whether light/laser is proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Increasingly in recent times dendritic cells have been found to play an important role in inflammation and the immunological response. In this study, we try to look at the impact of low level near infrared light (810-nm) on murine bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. Changes in surface markers, including MHC II, CD80 and CD11c and the secretion of interleukins induced by light may provide additional evidence to reveal the mystery of how light affects the maturation of dendritic cells as well how these light-induced mature dendritic cells would affect the activation of adaptive immune response.

  5. Optimal Current Transfer in Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of synaptic currents across an extensive dendritic tree is a prerequisite for computation in the brain. Dendritic tapering away from the soma has been suggested to both equalise contributions from synapses at different locations and maximise the current transfer to the soma. To find out how this is achieved precisely, an analytical solution for the current transfer in dendrites with arbitrary taper is required. We derive here an asymptotic approximation that accurately matches results from numerical simulations. From this we then determine the diameter profile that maximises the current transfer to the soma. We find a simple quadratic form that matches diameters obtained experimentally, indicating a fundamental architectural principle of the brain that links dendritic diameters to signal transmission. PMID:27145441

  6. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Expepriment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior of widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Expepriment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of TDSE. A similar view is available with labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  7. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior or widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of the TDSE. A similar view is availble without labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  8. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  9. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yang; Shurin, Galina V.; Peiyuan, Zhu; Shurin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer. PMID:23386903

  10. Lysophosphatidic acid induces osteocyte dendrite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Karin, Norm J.

    2007-05-25

    A method was developed to measure dendrite formation in bone cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was found to stimulate dendrite outgrowth. It is postulated that LPA plays a role in regulating the osteocyte network in vivo.

  11. Mechanisms and Function of Dendritic Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Matthew J.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dendritic exocytosis is required for a broad array of neuronal functions including retrograde signaling, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and establishment of neuronal morphology. While the details of synaptic vesicle exocytosis from presynaptic terminals have been intensely studied for decades, the mechanisms of dendritic exocytosis are only now emerging. Here we review the molecules and mechanisms of dendritic exocytosis, and discuss how exocytosis from dendrites influences neuronal function and circuit plasticity. PMID:21382547

  12. An Inverse Approach for Elucidating Dendritic Function

    PubMed Central

    Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Stiefel, Klaus M.

    2010-01-01

    We outline an inverse approach for investigating dendritic function–structure relationships by optimizing dendritic trees for a priori chosen computational functions. The inverse approach can be applied in two different ways. First, we can use it as a “hypothesis generator” in which we optimize dendrites for a function of general interest. The optimization yields an artificial dendrite that is subsequently compared to real neurons. This comparison potentially allows us to propose hypotheses about the function of real neurons. In this way, we investigated dendrites that optimally perform input-order detection. Second, we can use it as a “function confirmation” by optimizing dendrites for functions hypothesized to be performed by classes of neurons. If the optimized, artificial, dendrites resemble the dendrites of real neurons the artificial dendrites corroborate the hypothesized function of the real neuron. Moreover, properties of the artificial dendrites can lead to predictions about yet unmeasured properties. In this way, we investigated wide-field motion integration performed by the VS cells of the fly visual system. In outlining the inverse approach and two applications, we also elaborate on the nature of dendritic function. We furthermore discuss the role of optimality in assigning functions to dendrites and point out interesting future directions. PMID:21258425

  13. Spindle-F Is the Central Mediator of Ik2 Kinase-Dependent Dendrite Pruning in Drosophila Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yu-Ting; Chiang, Kai-Wen; Hsieh, Hsin-Lun; Wu, Yi-Ping; Ke, Jian-Ming; Lee, Myong-Chol; Liao, Shih-Sian; Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Tang, Chiou-Yang; Yang, Shi-Bing; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    During development, certain Drosophila sensory neurons undergo dendrite pruning that selectively eliminates their dendrites but leaves the axons intact. How these neurons regulate pruning activity in the dendrites remains unknown. Here, we identify a coiled-coil protein Spindle-F (Spn-F) that is required for dendrite pruning in Drosophila sensory neurons. Spn-F acts downstream of IKK-related kinase Ik2 in the same pathway for dendrite pruning. Spn-F exhibits a punctate pattern in larval neurons, whereas these Spn-F puncta become redistributed in pupal neurons, a step that is essential for dendrite pruning. The redistribution of Spn-F from puncta in pupal neurons requires the phosphorylation of Spn-F by Ik2 kinase to decrease Spn-F self-association, and depends on the function of microtubule motor dynein complex. Spn-F is a key component to link Ik2 kinase to dynein motor complex, and the formation of Ik2/Spn-F/dynein complex is critical for Spn-F redistribution and for dendrite pruning. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for dendrite pruning achieved by temporal activation of Ik2 kinase and dynein-mediated redistribution of Ik2/Spn-F complex in neurons. PMID:26540204

  14. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xintong; Shen, Kang; Bülow, Hannes E

    2015-01-01

    The complex, branched morphology of dendrites is a cardinal feature of neurons and has been used as a criterion for cell type identification since the beginning of neurobiology. Regulated dendritic outgrowth and branching during development form the basis of receptive fields for neurons and are essential for the wiring of the nervous system. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis have been an intensely studied area. In this review, we summarize the major experimental systems that have contributed to our understandings of dendritic development as well as the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that instruct the neurons to form cell type-specific dendritic arbors. PMID:25386991

  15. Wiring dendrites in layers and columns.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiangnan; McQueen, Philip G; Shi, Bo; Lee, Chi-Hon; Ting, Chun-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    The most striking structure in the nervous system is the complex yet stereotyped morphology of the neuronal dendritic tree. Dendritic morphologies and the connections they make govern information flow and integration in the brain. The fundamental mechanisms that regulate dendritic outgrowth and branching are subjects of extensive study. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the molecular and cellular mechanisms for routing dendrites in layers and columns, prevalent organizational structures in the brain. We highlight how dendritic patterning influences the formation of synaptic circuits. PMID:27315108

  16. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  17. DENDRITIC POLYMERS AS FIRE SUPPRESSANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes an evaluation of the applicability of one of the latest advances in polymer technology (dendritic polymers) to suppressing fires, one of the greatest survivability threats to military personnel and vehicles. Certain types of alkali and transition metal compl...

  18. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Are Crucial in Bifidobacterium adolescentis-Mediated Inhibition of Yersinia enterocolitica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Alexandra; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    In industrialized countries bacterial intestinal infections are commonly caused by enteropathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. The interaction of the microbiota with the host immune system determines the adequacy of an appropriate response against pathogens. In this study we addressed whether the probiotic Bifidobacterium adolescentis is protective during intestinal Yersinia enterocolitica infection. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed with B. adolescentis, infected with Yersinia enterocolitica, or B. adolescentis fed and subsequently infected with Yersinia enterocolitica. B. adolescentis fed and Yersinia infected mice were protected from Yersinia infection as indicated by a significantly reduced weight loss and splenic Yersinia load when compared to Yersinia infected mice. Moreover, protection from infection was associated with increased intestinal plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell function was investigated using depletion experiments by injecting B. adolescentis fed, Yersinia infected C57BL/6 mice with anti-mouse PDCA-1 antibody, to deplete plasmacytoid dendritic cells, or respective isotype control. The B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia dissemination to the spleen was abrogated after plasmacytoid dendritic cell depletion indicating a crucial function for pDC in control of intestinal Yersinia infection. We suggest that feeding of B. adolescentis modulates the intestinal immune system in terms of increased plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies, which might account for the B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia enterocolitica infection. PMID:23977019

  19. Dendrite engineering on xenon crystals.

    PubMed

    Fell, Marco; Bilgram, Jörg

    2007-06-01

    The experimental work presented focuses on transient growth, morphological transitions, and control of xenon dendrites. Dendritic free growth is perturbed by two different mechanisms: Shaking and heating up to the melting temperature. Spontaneous and metastable multitip configurations are stabilized, coarsening is reduced, leading to a denser sidebranch growth, and a periodic tip splitting is found during perturbation by shaking. On the other hand, heating leads to controlled sidebranching and characteristic transitions of the tip shape. A deterministic behavior is found besides the random-noise-driven growth. The existence of a limit cycle is supported by the findings. Together the two perturbation mechanisms allow a "dendrite engineering"--i.e., a reproducible controlling of the crystal shape during its growth. The tip splitting for dendritic free growth is found not to be a splitting of the tip in two; rather, the respective growth velocities of the main tip and the fins change. The latter then surpass the main tip and develop into new tips. The occurrence of three- and four-tip configurations is explained with this mechanism. Finite-element calculations of the heat flow and the convective flow in the growth vessel show that the idea of a single axisymmetric toroidal convection roll across the whole growth vessel has to be dropped. The main effect of convection under Earth's gravity is the compression of the diffusive temperature field around the downward-growing tip. A model to explain the symmetry of dendritic crystals--e.g., snow crystals--is developed, based on the interaction of crystal shape and heat flow in the crystal. PMID:17677269

  20. Directing dendritic cell immunotherapy towards successful cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The use of dendritic cells (DCs) for tumor immunotherapy represents a powerful approach for harnessing the patient's own immune system to eliminate tumor cells. However, suboptimal conditions for generating potent immunostimulatory DCs, as well as the induction of tolerance and suppression mediated by the tumors and its microenvironment have contributed to limited success. Combining DC vaccines with new approaches that enhance immunogenicity and overcome the regulatory mechanisms underlying peripheral tolerance may be the key to achieving effective and durable anti-tumor immune responses that translate to better clinical outcomes. PMID:20473346

  1. Tolerogenic dendritic cells and their applications in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibin; Shi, Bingyi

    2015-01-01

    In transplantation immunology, the ultimate goal is always to successfully and specifically induce immune tolerance of allografts. Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tol-DCs) with immunoregulatory functions have attracted much attention as they play important roles in inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. Here, we focused on tol-DCs that have the potential to promote immune tolerance after solid-organ transplantation. We focus on their development and interactions with other regulatory cells, and we also explore various tol-DC engineering protocols. Harnessing tol-DCs represents a promising cellular therapy for promoting long-term graft functional survival in transplant recipients that will most likely be achieved in the future. PMID:25109681

  2. Type 1 diabetes genetic susceptibility and dendritic cell function: potential targets for treatment.

    PubMed

    Hotta-Iwamura, Chie; Tarbell, Kristin V

    2016-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from the defective induction or maintenance of T cell tolerance against islet β cell self-antigens. Under steady-state conditions, dendritic cells with tolerogenic properties are critical for peripheral immune tolerance. Tolerogenic dendritic cells can induce T cell anergy and deletion and, in some contexts, induce or expand regulatory T cells. Dendritic cells contribute to both immunomodulatory effects and triggering of pathogenesis in type 1 diabetes. This immune equilibrium is affected by both genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the development of type 1 diabetes. Genome-wide association studies and disease association studies have identified >50 polymorphic loci that lend susceptibility or resistance to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In parallel, diabetes susceptibility regions known as insulin-dependent diabetes loci have been identified in the nonobese diabetic mouse, a model for human type 1 diabetes, providing a better understanding of potential immunomodulatory factors in type 1 diabetes risk. Most genetic candidates have annotated immune cell functions, but the focus has been on changes to T and B cells. However, it is likely that some of the genomic susceptibility in type 1 diabetes directly interrupts the tolerogenic potential of dendritic cells in the pathogenic context of ongoing autoimmunity. Here, we will review how gene polymorphisms associated with autoimmune diabetes may influence dendritic cell development and maturation processes that could lead to alterations in the tolerogenic function of dendritic cells. These insights into potential tolerogenic and pathogenic roles for dendritic cells have practical implications for the clinical manipulation of dendritic cells toward tolerance to prevent and treat type 1 diabetes. PMID:26792821

  3. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites.

    PubMed

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W

    2016-07-01

    Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  4. Method of inhibiting dislocation generation in silicon dendritic webs

    DOEpatents

    Spitznagel, John A.; Seidensticker, Raymond G.; McHugh, James P.

    1990-11-20

    A method of tailoring the heat balance of the outer edge of the dendrites adjacent the meniscus to produce thinner, smoother dendrites, which have substantially less dislocation sources contiguous with the dendrites, by changing the view factor to reduce radiation cooling or by irradiating the dendrites with light from a quartz lamp or a laser to raise the temperature of the dendrites.

  5. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  6. Annealing kinetics of electrodeposited lithium dendrites.

    PubMed

    Aryanfar, Asghar; Cheng, Tao; Colussi, Agustin J; Merinov, Boris V; Goddard, William A; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    The densifying kinetics of lithium dendrites is characterized with effective activation energy of Ea ≈ 6 - 7 kcal mol(-1) in our experiments and molecular dynamics computations. We show that heating lithium dendrites for 55 °C reduces the representative dendrites length λ¯(T,t) up to 36%. NVT reactive force field simulations on three-dimensional glass phase dendrites produced by our coarse grained Monte Carlo method reveal that for any given initial dendrite morphology, there is a unique stable atomic arrangement for a certain range of temperature, combined with rapid morphological transition (∼10 ps) within quasi-stable states involving concurrent bulk and surface diffusions. Our results are useful for predicting the inherent structural characteristics of lithium dendrites such as dominant coordination number. PMID:26450322

  7. Dendritic Ion Channel Trafficking and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mala M.; Hammond, Rebecca S.; Hoffman, Dax

    2010-01-01

    Dendrites, the elaborate processes emerging from neuronal cell bodies, receive most excitatory synaptic inputs. Voltage- and calcium-gated ion channels are abundant in dendrites and modify the shape, propagation and integration of synaptic signals. These ion channels also determine intrinsic dendritic excitability and are therfore important for the induction and manifestation of Hebbian and non-Hebbian plasticity. Revealingly, dendritic channels have distinct expression patterns and biophysical properties from those present in other neuronal compartments. Recent evidence suggests that dendritic ion channels are locally regulated, perhaps contributing to different forms of plasticity. In this review, we will discuss the implications of regulating dendritic ion channel function and trafficking in the context of plasticity and information processing. PMID:20363038

  8. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca(2+) activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively. PMID:26988796

  9. Isothermal dendritic growth - A low gravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Lograsso, T. A.; Rubinstein, E. R.; Winsa, E.

    1987-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment has been designed to test dendritic growth theory at low undercoolings, under microgravity conditions in the Space Shuttle Cargo Bay-borne Material Science Laboratory. The experiment will be essentially autonomous, although limited in-flight interaction through a computer interface is planned. A crystal growth chamber able to yield oriented single-crystal dendritic growth will be incorporated; 'seeding' the chamber with a crystal of the requisite orientation will not in itself meet this requirement.

  10. WASp-dependent actin cytoskeleton stability at the dendritic cell immunological synapse is required for extensive, functional T cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Malinova, Dessislava; Fritzsche, Marco; Nowosad, Carla R; Armer, Hannah; Munro, Peter M G; Blundell, Michael P; Charras, Guillaume; Tolar, Pavel; Bouma, Gerben; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2016-05-01

    The immunological synapse is a highly structured and molecularly dynamic interface between communicating immune cells. Although the immunological synapse promotes T cell activation by dendritic cells, the specific organization of the immunological synapse on the dendritic cell side in response to T cell engagement is largely unknown. In this study, confocal and electron microscopy techniques were used to investigate the role of dendritic cell actin regulation in immunological synapse formation, stabilization, and function. In the dendritic cell-restricted absence of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an important regulator of the actin cytoskeleton in hematopoietic cells, the immunological synapse contact with T cells occupied a significantly reduced surface area. At a molecular level, the actin network localized to the immunological synapse exhibited reduced stability, in particular, of the actin-related protein-2/3-dependent, short-filament network. This was associated with decreased polarization of dendritic cell-associated ICAM-1 and MHC class II, which was partially dependent on Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein phosphorylation. With the use of supported planar lipid bilayers incorporating anti-ICAM-1 and anti-MHC class II antibodies, the dendritic cell actin cytoskeleton organized into recognizable synaptic structures but interestingly, formed Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-dependent podosomes within this area. These findings demonstrate that intrinsic dendritic cell cytoskeletal remodeling is a key regulatory component of normal immunological synapse formation, likely through consolidation of adhesive interaction and modulation of immunological synapse stability. PMID:26590149

  11. The involvement of actin, calcium channels and exocytosis proteins in somato-dendritic oxytocin and vasopressin release

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Vicky; Leng, Gareth; Ludwig, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Hypothalamic magnocellular neurons release vasopressin and oxytocin not only from their axon terminals into the blood, but also from their somata and dendrites into the extracellular space of the brain, and this can be regulated independently. Differential release of neurotransmitters from different compartments of a single neuron requires subtle regulatory mechanisms. Somato-dendritic, but not axon terminal release can be modulated by changes in intracellular calcium concentration [(Ca2+)] by release of calcium from intracellular stores, resulting in priming of dendritic pools for activity-dependent release. This review focuses on our current understanding of the mechanisms of priming and the roles of actin remodeling, voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs) and SNARE proteins in the regulation somato-dendritic and axon terminal peptide release. PMID:22934017

  12. Precipitation dendrites in turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angheluta, Luiza; Hawkins, Christopher; Hammer, Øyvind; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Surface precipitation in pipelines, as well as freezing in water pipes is of great concern in many industrial applications where scaling phenomena becomes a control problem of pipe-clogging or an efficiency reduction in transport. Flow blockage often occurs even when only a small fraction is deposited non-uniformly on the walls in the form of dendrites. Dendritic patterns are commonly encountered in surface precipitation from supersaturated solutions, e.g. calcite dendrites, as well as in solidification from undercooled liquids, e.g. freezing of water into ice dendrites. We explore the mathematical similarities between precipitation and freezing processes and, in particular, investigate the effect of fluid flow on the precipitation dendrites on pipe walls. We use a phase field approach to model surface growth coupled with a lattice Boltzmann method that simulates a channel flow at varying Reynolds number. The dendrites orientation and shape depend non-trivially on the ratio between advection and diffusion, i.e. the Peclet number, as well as the Reynolds number. Roughness induced vortices near growing dendrites at high flow rates further affect the branch splitting of dendrites. We show how the transport rate in a pipeline may depend on the different dendritic morphologies, and provide estimates for the flow conditions that correspond to most efficient transport regimes.

  13. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator, such as porous polypropylene, adjacent to the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  14. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator such as porous polypropylene adjacent the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator such as polytetrafluoroethylene that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  15. Hierarchical assembly of diphenylalanine into dendritic nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Han, Tae Hee; Oh, Jun Kyun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Pyun, Su-Il; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2010-09-01

    Highly ordered, multi-dimensional dendritic nanoarchitectures were created via self-assembly of diphenylalanine from an acidic buffer solution. The self-similarity of dendritic structures was characterized by examining their fractal dimensions with the box-counting method. The fractal dimension was determined to be 1.7, which demonstrates the fractal dimension of structures generated by diffusion limited aggregation on a two-dimensional substrate surface. By confining the dendritic assembly of diphenylalanine within PDMS microchannels, the self-similar dendritic growth could be hierarchically directed to create linearly assembled nanoarchitectures. Our approach offers a novel pathway for creating and directing hierarchical nanoarchitecture from biomolecular assembly. PMID:20605423

  16. Mode of dendrite growth in undercooled alloy melts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Yang, G.; Zhou, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The mode of dendrite growth in the undercooled Ni-50 at% Cu alloy was investigated. At lower undercoolings, the dendrite growth is mainly controlled by solute diffusion, and the formed dendritic morphologies are similar to those of the conventional as-cast equiaxed crystals, except that here the branches are much denser. At higher undercoolings, however, the severe solutal trapping that results from high dendrite growth velocity weakens the effect of solute diffusion on the dendrite growth. In this case, the dendrites branch in the bunching form. The dendrite spacings were measured, and the results were interpreted with the current dendrite growth theories.

  17. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure. PMID:22715881

  18. Vertical solidification of dendritic binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Felicelli, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three numerical techniques are employed to analyze the influence of thermosolutal convection on defect formation in directionally solidified (DS) alloys. The finite-element models are based on the Boussinesq approximation and include the plane-front model and two plane-front models incorporating special dendritic regions. In the second model the dendritic region has a time-independent volume fraction of liquid, and in the last model the dendritic region evolves as local conditions dictate. The finite-element models permit the description of nonlinear thermosolutal convection by treating the dendritic regions as porous media with variable porosities. The models are applied to lead-tin alloys including DS alloys, and severe segregation phenomena such as freckles and channels are found to develop in the DS alloys. The present calculations and the permeability functions selected are shown to predict behavior in the dendritic regions that qualitatively matches that observed experimentally.

  19. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules.

    PubMed

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M; Schweizer, W Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  20. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M.; Schweizer, W. Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  1. GMP-Grade mRNA Electroporation of Dendritic Cells for Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Derdelinckx, Judith; Berneman, Zwi N; Cools, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    mRNA-electroporated dendritic cells (DC) are demonstrating clinical benefit in patients in many therapeutic areas, including cancer and infectious diseases. According to current good manufacturing guidelines, cell-based medicinal products have to be defined for identity, purity, potency, stability, and viability. In order to comply with the directives and guidelines defined by the regulatory authorities, we report here a standardized and reproducible method for the manufacturing of clinical-grade mRNA-transfected DC. PMID:27236797

  2. Ion channels modulating mouse dendritic cell functions.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Nguyen, Thi Xuan; Duszenko, Michael; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Lang, Florian

    2008-11-15

    Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathways play a central regulatory role in dendritic cell (DC) responses to diverse Ags. However, the mechanisms leading to increased [Ca(2+)](i) upon DC activation remained ill-defined. In the present study, LPS treatment (100 ng/ml) of mouse DCs resulted in a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which was due to Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores and influx of extracellular Ca(2+) across the cell membrane. In whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments, LPS-induced currents exhibited properties similar to the currents through the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels (CRAC). These currents were highly selective for Ca(2+), exhibited a prominent inward rectification of the current-voltage relationship, and showed an anomalous mole fraction and a fast Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. In addition, the LPS-induced increase of [Ca(2+)](i) was sensitive to margatoxin and ICAGEN-4, both inhibitors of voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5, respectively. MHC class II expression, CCL21-dependent migration, and TNF-alpha and IL-6 production decreased, whereas phagocytic capacity increased in LPS-stimulated DCs in the presence of both Kv channel inhibitors as well as the I(CRAC) inhibitor SKF-96365. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated DCs occurs via Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels, is sensitive to Kv channel activity, and is in turn critically important for DC maturation and functions. PMID:18981098

  3. Dendritic cell reprogramming by the hypoxic environment.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Maria Carla; Varesio, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells central to the orchestration of innate and acquired immunity and the maintenance of self-tolerance. The local microenvironment contributes to the regulation of DC development and functions, and deregulated DC responses may result in amplification of inflammation, loss of tolerance, or establishment of immune escape mechanisms. DC generation from monocytic precursors recruited at sites of inflammation, tissue damage, or neoplasia occurs under condition of low partial oxygen pressure (pO(2), hypoxia). We reviewed the literature addressing the phenotypic and functional changes triggered by hypoxia in monocyte-derived immature (i) and mature (m) DCs. The discussion will revolve around in vitro studies of gene expression profile, which give a comprehensive representation of the complexity of response of these cells to low pO(2). The gene expression pattern of hypoxic DC will be discussed to address the question of the relationship with a specific maturation stage. We will summarize data relative to the regulation of the chemotactic network, which points to a role for hypoxia in promoting a migratory phenotype in iDCs and a highly proinflammatory state in mDCs. Current knowledge of the strict regulatory control exerted by hypoxia on the expression of immune-related cell surface receptors will also be addressed, with a particular focus on a newly identified marker of hypoxic DCs endowed with proinflammatory properties. Furthermore, we discuss the literature on the transcription mechanisms underlying hypoxia-regulated gene expression in DCs, which support a major role for the HIF/HRE pathway. Finally, recent advances shedding light on the in vivo influence of the local hypoxic microenvironment on DCs infiltrating the inflamed joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients are outlined. PMID:22901977

  4. Solidification under microgravity conditions - Dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Lograsso, T. A.; Rubinstein, E. R.; Winsa, E.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental approach and apparatus of a zero-gravity active crystal growth experiment to test dendritic growth theory at low supercoolings are discussed. The experiment consists of 20 experimental cycles. Estimates have been made as to how low gravitational accelerations would have to be reduced to observe convection-free dendritic growth at supercoolings from 0.01-1.0 K. The experiment requires temperature control of + or - 2 mK and photographic resolution of a few microns with a depth of field of + or - 6 mm. The thermostatic bath and temperature control system, photographic system, growth chamber, and dendrite detection system are described in detail.

  5. Some aspects of the electroanatomy of dendrites.

    PubMed

    Lux, H D; Schubert, P

    1975-01-01

    An understanding of the neuronal function requires the knowledge of the electroanatomy of dendrites, which comprise the major area and receive the main input in most neurons. Some simplifying assumptions are necessary to describe the electrical characteristics of the dendritic tree. The applicability of the simplified model of a combined equivalent dendritic cylinder proposed by Rall, was tested and verified by a combined analysis of anatomic and electrical data from the same spinal motoneurons. Assuming a uniform somadendritic membrane, estimates of the specific membrane resistance (RM: 2,700 +/- 920 omegacm2) were made by relating the neuronal input resistance with the combined dendritic trunk parameter (sigmaD3/2: 320 +/- 150-10(-6) CM3/2). From these combined anatomic and electrical data the dendritic electrotonic lengths (Lgeom: 1.5 +/- 0.3 times the length constant) were derived. Comparable L values (Ltrans: 1.5 +/- 0.3) resulted independently from analysis of membrane voltage transients during current steps. The linear dendritic cable model has proved its applicability for the analysis of small voltage deflections during current step applications at the soma as well as for the analysis of the majority of minimal postsynaptic potentials (PSP's). During the transmission along the dendritic cable the PSP undergoes changes in shape. These changes often permit a determination of the distance of the dendritic input from the soma. Unfortunately, the attenuation of the dendritic signal cannot be directly assessed. Dendritic synaptic transmission can be observed in isolation in chromatolytic motoneurons because the somal synapses are peeled off from the soma by proliferating glial cells in the course of retrograde reaction. These observations support the prediction that the PSP's with relatively short rise-times and duration originate from synapses near the soma. It may be questioned as to whether the linear dendritic cable approximation also applies to the larger

  6. Evidence for Eigenfrequencies in Dendritic Growth Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Jeffrey C.; Koss, Matthew B.; Giummarra, Cindie; Frei, Julie E.; Lupulescu, Afina O.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    Microgravity dendritic growth experiments, conducted aboard the space shuttle Columbia, are described. In-situ video images reveal that pivalic acid dendrites growing in the diffusion-controlled environment of low-earth orbit exhibit a range of transient or non-steady-state behaviors. The observed transient features of the growth process are being studied with the objective of understanding the mechanisms responsible for these behaviors. Included in these observations is possible evidence for characteristic frequencies or limit cycles in the growth behavior near the tip of the dendrites. These data, and their interpretations, will be discussed.

  7. Dendritic cells in lung immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter C; MacDonald, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) lie at the heart of the innate immune system, specialised at recognising danger signals in many forms including foreign material, infection or tissue damage and initiating powerful adaptive immune and inflammatory responses. In barrier sites such as the lung, the instrumental role that DCs play at the interface between the environment and the host places them in a pivotal position in determining the severity of inflammatory disease. The past few years has seen a significant increase in our fundamental understanding of the subsets of DCs involved in pulmonary immunity, as well as the mechanisms by which they are activated and which they may use to coordinate downstream inflammation and pathology. In this review, we will summarise current understanding of the multi-faceted role that DCs play in the induction, maintenance and regulation of lung immunopathology, with an emphasis on allergic pulmonary disease. PMID:27256370

  8. Tumor Targeting, Trifunctional Dendritic Wedge

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a newly designed trifunctional theranostic agent for targeting solid tumors. This agent combines a dendritic wedge with high boron content for boron neutron capture therapy or boron MRI, a monomethine cyanine dye for visible-light fluorescent imaging, and an integrin ligand for efficient tumor targeting. We report photophysical properties of the new agent, its cellular uptake and in vitro targeting properties. Using live animal imaging and intravital microscopy (IVM) techniques, we observed a rapid accumulation of the agent and its retention for a prolonged period of time (up to 7 days) in fully established animal models of human melanoma and murine mammary adenocarcinoma. This macromolecular theranostic agent can be used for targeted delivery of high boron load into solid tumors for future applications in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:25350602

  9. Dendritic Cell-Targeted Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Lillian; Delamarre, Lélia

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant effort, the development of effective vaccines inducing strong and durable T-cell responses against intracellular pathogens and cancer cells has remained a challenge. The initiation of effector CD8+ T-cell responses requires the presentation of peptides derived from internalized antigen on class I major histocompatibility complex molecules by dendritic cells (DCs) in a process called cross-presentation. A current strategy to enhance the effectiveness of vaccination is to deliver antigens directly to DCs. This is done via selective targeting of antigen using monoclonal antibodies directed against endocytic receptors on the surface of the DCs. In this review, we will discuss considerations relevant to the design of such vaccines: the existence of DC subsets with specialized functions, the impact of the antigen intracellular trafficking on cross-presentation, and the influence of maturation signals received by DCs on the outcome of the immune response. PMID:24910635

  10. Fate Mapping of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poltorak, Mateusz Pawel; Schraml, Barbara Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of mononuclear phagocytes with versatile roles in immunity. They are classified predominantly based on phenotypic and functional properties, namely their stellate morphology, expression of the integrin CD11c, and major histocompatibility class II molecules, as well as their superior capacity to migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and stimulate naïve T cells. However, these attributes are not exclusive to DCs and often change within inflammatory or infectious environments. This led to debates over cell identification and questioned even the mere existence of DCs as distinct leukocyte lineage. Here, we review experimental approaches taken to fate map DCs and discuss how these have shaped our understanding of DC ontogeny and lineage affiliation. Considering the ontogenetic properties of DCs will help to overcome the inherent shortcomings of purely phenotypic- and function-based approaches to cell definition and will yield a more robust way of DC classification. PMID:25999945

  11. Epigenetic program and transcription factor circuitry of dendritic cell development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiong; Chauvistré, Heike; Costa, Ivan G; Gusmao, Eduardo G; Mitzka, Saskia; Hänzelmann, Sonja; Baying, Bianka; Klisch, Theresa; Moriggl, Richard; Hennuy, Benoit; Smeets, Hubert; Hoffmann, Kurt; Benes, Vladimir; Seré, Kristin; Zenke, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that develop from hematopoietic stem cells through successive steps of lineage commitment and differentiation. Multipotent progenitors (MPP) are committed to DC restricted common DC progenitors (CDP), which differentiate into specific DC subsets, classical DC (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC). To determine epigenetic states and regulatory circuitries during DC differentiation, we measured consecutive changes of genome-wide gene expression, histone modification and transcription factor occupancy during the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC. Specific histone marks in CDP reveal a DC-primed epigenetic signature, which is maintained and reinforced during DC differentiation. Epigenetic marks and transcription factor PU.1 occupancy increasingly coincide upon DC differentiation. By integrating PU.1 occupancy and gene expression we devised a transcription factor regulatory circuitry for DC commitment and subset specification. The circuitry provides the transcription factor hierarchy that drives the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC, including Irf4, Irf8, Tcf4, Spib and Stat factors. The circuitry also includes feedback loops inferred for individual or multiple factors, which stabilize distinct stages of DC development and DC subsets. In summary, here we describe the basic regulatory circuitry of transcription factors that drives DC development. PMID:26476451

  12. Epigenetic program and transcription factor circuitry of dendritic cell development

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiong; Chauvistré, Heike; Costa, Ivan G.; Gusmao, Eduardo G.; Mitzka, Saskia; Hänzelmann, Sonja; Baying, Bianka; Klisch, Theresa; Moriggl, Richard; Hennuy, Benoit; Smeets, Hubert; Hoffmann, Kurt; Benes, Vladimir; Seré, Kristin; Zenke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that develop from hematopoietic stem cells through successive steps of lineage commitment and differentiation. Multipotent progenitors (MPP) are committed to DC restricted common DC progenitors (CDP), which differentiate into specific DC subsets, classical DC (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC). To determine epigenetic states and regulatory circuitries during DC differentiation, we measured consecutive changes of genome-wide gene expression, histone modification and transcription factor occupancy during the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC. Specific histone marks in CDP reveal a DC-primed epigenetic signature, which is maintained and reinforced during DC differentiation. Epigenetic marks and transcription factor PU.1 occupancy increasingly coincide upon DC differentiation. By integrating PU.1 occupancy and gene expression we devised a transcription factor regulatory circuitry for DC commitment and subset specification. The circuitry provides the transcription factor hierarchy that drives the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC, including Irf4, Irf8, Tcf4, Spib and Stat factors. The circuitry also includes feedback loops inferred for individual or multiple factors, which stabilize distinct stages of DC development and DC subsets. In summary, here we describe the basic regulatory circuitry of transcription factors that drives DC development. PMID:26476451

  13. The Protein Dendrite Arborization and Synapse Maturation 1 (Dasm-1) Is Dispensable for Dendrite Arborization▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Archana; Knerr, Boris; Paixão, Sónia; Kramer, Edgar R.; Klein, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    The development of a highly branched dendritic tree is essential for the establishment of functional neuronal connections. The evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin superfamily member, the protein dendrite arborization and synapse maturation 1 (Dasm-1) is thought to play a critical role in dendrite formation of dissociated hippocampal neurons. RNA interference-mediated Dasm-1 knockdown was previously shown to impair dendrite, but not axonal, outgrowth and branching (S. H. Shi, D. N. Cox, D. Wang, L. Y. Jan, and Y. N. Jan, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101:13341-13345, 2004). Here, we report the generation and analysis of Dasm-1 null mice. We find that genetic ablation of Dasm-1 does not interfere with hippocampal dendrite growth and branching in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the absence of Dasm-1 does not affect the modulation of dendritic outgrowth induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Importantly, the previously observed impairment in dendrite growth after Dasm-1 knockdown is also observed when the Dasm-1 knockdown is performed in cultured hippocampal neurons from Dasm-1 null mice. These findings indicate that the dendrite arborization phenotype was caused by off-target effects and that Dasm-1 is dispensable for hippocampal dendrite arborization. PMID:18268009

  14. Modulation of dendritic cell maturation and function by B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Hermine, Olivier; Tough, David F; Kaveri, Srini V

    2005-07-01

    Investigating the signals that regulate the function of dendritic cells (DC), the sentinels of the immune system, is critical to understanding the role of DC in the regulation of immune responses. Accumulating lines of evidence indicate that in addition to innate stimuli and T cell-derived signals, B lymphocytes exert a profound regulatory effect in vitro and in vivo on the Ag-presenting function of DC. The identification of B cells as a cellular source of cytokines, chemokines, and autoantibodies that are critically involved in the process of maturation, migration, and function of DC provides a rationale for immunotherapeutic intervention of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions by targeting B cells. Conversely, efficient cross-presentation of Ags by DC pulsed with immune complexes provides an alternative approach in the immunotherapy of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:15972625

  15. Dendritic Cells in the Gut: Interaction with Intestinal Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Mendlovic, Fela; Flisser, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The mucosal environment in mammals is highly tolerogenic; however, after exposure to pathogens or danger signals, it is able to shift towards an inflammatory response. Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate immune responses and are highly responsible, through the secretion of cytokines and expression of surface markers, for the outcome of such immune response. In particular, the DC subsets found in the intestine have specialized functions and interact with different immune as well as nonimmune cells. Intestinal helminths primarily induce Th2 responses where DCs have an important yet not completely understood role. In addition, this cross-talk results in the induction of regulatory T cells (T regs) as a result of the homeostatic mucosal environment. This review highlights the importance of studying the particular relation “helminth-DC-milieu” in view of the significance that each of these factors plays. Elucidating the mechanisms that trigger Th2 responses may provide the understanding of how we might modulate inflammatory processes. PMID:20224759

  16. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for podosomes of dendritic cells. PMID:24424029

  17. Fluctuation effects on dendritic growth morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brener, E.; Ihle, T.; Müller-Krumbhaar, H.; Saito, Y.; Shiraishi, K.

    1994-03-01

    Dendrites are the typical patterns for many anisotropic growth processes. A detailed understanding of their dynamics appears to be crucial for a proper classification of various growth morphologies. In particular the morphology transitions occurring for varying anisotropy were predicted to depend upon fluctuations. In the present investigation we compare analytical and numerical results on the stability of dendrites under influence of external fluctuations. In particular we confirm the previous ideas that the dendrites are linearly stable under influence of noise even in the limit of extremely small but nonzero anisotropy. This supports the concept of a smooth change-over from compact to fractal dendrites and finally to fractal seaweed whose internal length scale was predicted to depend on noise.

  18. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Miller, Eric C.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Spines are small cytoplasmic extensions of dendrites that form the postsynaptic compartment of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Alterations in the numerical density, size, and shape of dendritic spines have been correlated with neuronal dysfunction in several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, including Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability that is caused by loss of function mutations in the transcriptional regulator methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that principal neurons in RTT individuals and Mecp2-based experimental models exhibit alterations in the number and morphology of dendritic spines. We also discuss the exciting possibility that signaling pathways downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is transcriptionally regulated by MeCP2, offer promising therapeutic options for modulating dendritic spine development and plasticity in RTT and other MECP2-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25309341

  19. Dendritic polymers: Universal glue for cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Holger

    2012-05-01

    A dendritic polymer consisting of inversely oriented lipid head groups on a polyvalent polyglycerol scaffold makes an effective reversible biomembrane adhesive that may find use as a tissue sealant and a drug-delivery vehicle.

  20. Dendritic Spine Pathology in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Herms, Jochen; Dorostkar, Mario M

    2016-05-23

    Substantial progress has been made toward understanding the neuropathology, genetic origins, and epidemiology of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease; tauopathies, such as frontotemporal dementia; α-synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies; Huntington's disease; and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dementia, as well as prion diseases. Recent evidence has implicated dendritic spine dysfunction as an important substrate of the pathogenesis of dementia in these disorders. Dendritic spines are specialized structures, extending from the neuronal processes, on which excitatory synaptic contacts are formed, and the loss of dendritic spines correlates with the loss of synaptic function. We review the literature that has implicated direct or indirect structural alterations at dendritic spines in the pathogenesis of major neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on those that lead to dementias such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, as well as frontotemporal dementia and prion diseases. We stress the importance of in vivo studies in animal models. PMID:26907528

  1. Dendritic Growth in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Garg, Shila

    2000-03-01

    The experimental study of the onset of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) through a dendritic growth is reported. If a magnetic Freedericksz-distorted liquid crystal of negative dielectric anisotropy is subjected to an electric field parallel to the magnetic field, EHC sets in through the nucleation of dendrites [1,2]. Measurements of tip speeds of the dendrites as a function of applied voltage at a fixed magnetic field are made. The goal is to explore the effect of the magnetic and electric fields on the dendritic growth. In addition, pattern dynamics is monitored once the final state of spatio-temporal chaos is reached by the system. [1] J. T. Gleeson, Nature 385, 511 (1997). [2] J. T. Gleeson, Physica A 239, 211 (1997). This research was supported by NSF grants DMR 9704579 and DMR 9619406.

  2. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3475920

  3. Free Energy and Dendritic Self-Organization

    PubMed Central

    Kiebel, Stefan J.; Friston, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we pursue recent observations that, through selective dendritic filtering, single neurons respond to specific sequences of presynaptic inputs. We try to provide a principled and mechanistic account of this selectivity by applying a recent free-energy principle to a dendrite that is immersed in its neuropil or environment. We assume that neurons self-organize to minimize a variational free-energy bound on the self-information or surprise of presynaptic inputs that are sampled. We model this as a selective pruning of dendritic spines that are expressed on a dendritic branch. This pruning occurs when postsynaptic gain falls below a threshold. Crucially, postsynaptic gain is itself optimized with respect to free energy. Pruning suppresses free energy as the dendrite selects presynaptic signals that conform to its expectations, specified by a generative model implicit in its intracellular kinetics. Not only does this provide a principled account of how neurons organize and selectively sample the myriad of potential presynaptic inputs they are exposed to, but it also connects the optimization of elemental neuronal (dendritic) processing to generic (surprise or evidence-based) schemes in statistics and machine learning, such as Bayesian model selection and automatic relevance determination. PMID:22013413

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca2+ activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca2+ activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13598.001 PMID:26988796

  5. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Activation and Subsequent Th1 Cell Polarization by Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Tae; Na, Hyeongjin; Ryu, Heeju; Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play an essential role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing cellular stress including pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns and by shaping the types of antigen-specific T cell immunity. Although lidocaine is widely used in clinical settings that trigger cellular stress, it remains unclear whether such treatment impacts the activation of innate immune cells and subsequent differentiation of T cells. Here we showed that lidocaine inhibited the production of IL-6, TNFα and IL-12 from dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor ligands including lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) and R837 in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the differentiation of Th1 cells was significantly suppressed by the addition of lidocaine while the same treatment had little effect on the differentiation of Th17, Th2 and regulatory T cells in vitro. Moreover, lidocaine suppressed the ovalbumin-specific Th1 cell responses in vivo induced by the adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that lidocaine inhibits the activation of dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor signals and subsequently suppresses the differentiation of Th1 cell responses. PMID:26445366

  6. GSK-3 signaling in developing cortical neurons is essential for radial migration and dendritic orientation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Smith, Meghan; Wu, Yaohong; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Pringle, Julia; Snider, William D

    2014-01-01

    GSK-3 is an essential mediator of several signaling pathways that regulate cortical development. We therefore created conditional mouse mutants lacking both GSK-3α and GSK-3β in newly born cortical excitatory neurons. Gsk3-deleted neurons expressing upper layer markers exhibited striking migration failure in all areas of the cortex. Radial migration in hippocampus was similarly affected. In contrast, tangential migration was not grossly impaired after Gsk3 deletion in interneuron precursors. Gsk3-deleted neurons extended axons and developed dendritic arbors. However, the apical dendrite was frequently branched while basal dendrites exhibited abnormal orientation. GSK-3 regulation of migration in neurons was independent of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Importantly, phosphorylation of the migration mediator, DCX, at ser327, and phosphorylation of the semaphorin signaling mediator, CRMP-2, at Thr514 were markedly decreased. Our data demonstrate that GSK-3 signaling is essential for radial migration and dendritic orientation and suggest that GSK-3 mediates these effects by phosphorylating key microtubule regulatory proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02663.001 PMID:25073924

  7. An evolutionarily conserved protein CHORD regulates scaling of dendritic arbors with body size

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Kohei; Fujishima, Kazuto; Nomura, Takafumi; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Usui, Tadao; Kengaku, Mineko; Toyoda, Atsushi; Uemura, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Most organs scale proportionally with body size through regulation of individual cell size and/or cell number. Here we addressed how postmitotic and morphologically complex cells such as neurons scale with the body size by using the dendritic arbor of one Drosophila sensory neuron as an assay system. In small adults eclosed under a limited-nutrition condition, the wild-type neuron preserved the branching complexity of the arbor, but scaled down the entire arbor, making a “miniature”. In contrast, mutant neurons for the Insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) or TORC1 pathway exhibited “undergrowth”, which was characterized by decreases in both the branching complexity and the arbor size, despite a normal diet. These contrasting phenotypes hinted that a novel regulatory mechanism contributes to the dendritic scaling in wild-type neurons. Indeed, we isolated a mutation in the gene CHORD/morgana that uncoupled the neuron size and the body size: CHORD mutant neurons generated miniature dendritic arbors regardless of the body size. CHORD encodes an evolutionarily conserved co-chaperone of HSP90. Our results support the notion that dendritic growth and branching are controlled by partly separate mechanisms. The IIS/TORC1 pathways control both growth and branching to avert underdevelopment, whereas CHORD together with TORC2 realizes proportional scaling of the entire arbor. PMID:24643112

  8. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Döring, Yvonne; Zernecke, Alma

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall and the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is initiated and maintained by innate and adaptive immunity. Accumulating evidence suggests an important contribution of autoimmune responses to this disease. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), a specialized cell type known to produce large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) in response to bacterial and viral infections, have recently been revealed to play important roles in atherosclerosis. For example, the development of autoimmune complexes consisting of self-DNA and antimicrobial peptides, which trigger chronic type I IFN production by pDCs, promote early atherosclerotic lesion formation. pDCs and pDC-derived type I IFNs can also induce the maturation of conventional DCs and macrophages, and the development of autoreactive B cells and antibody production. These mechanisms, known to play a role in the pathogenesis of other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis, may also affect the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesion formation. This review discusses emerging evidence showing a contribution of pDCs in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:22754539

  9. Perinatal opiate treatment delays growth of cortical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, A A; Hammer, R P

    1990-07-31

    Basilar dendritic arborizations of layer II-III pyramidal neurons in primary somatosensory cortex of 5-day-old male rats were reconstructed following perinatal morphine, morphine/naltrexone, or saline vehicle administration. Morphine treatment was observed to reduce total dendritic length. This effect was limited to higher order dendritic branches, with terminal dendrites manifesting the greatest reduction of length. The action of morphine was presumably mediated by opiate receptors, since concurrent naltrexone administration completely reversed morphine effects on dendritic length and branching. These results suggest that opiates act during late ontogenesis to affect dendritic growth in cerebral cortex. PMID:2172870

  10. Integrins establish dendrite-substrate relationships that promote dendritic self-avoidance and patterning in Drosophila sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michelle E.; Shrestha, Brikha R.; Blazeski, Richard; Mason, Carol A.; Grueber, Wesley B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Dendrites achieve characteristic spacing patterns during development to ensure appropriate coverage of territories. Mechanisms of dendrite positioning via repulsive dendrite-dendrite interactions are beginning to be elucidated, but the control, and importance, of dendrite positioning relative to their substrate is poorly understood. We found that dendritic branches of Drosophila dendritic arborization sensory neurons can be positioned either at the basal surface of epidermal cells, or enclosed within epidermal invaginations. We show that integrins control dendrite positioning on or within the epidermis in a cell autonomous manner by promoting dendritic retention on the basal surface. Loss of integrin function in neurons resulted in excessive self-crossing and dendrite maintenance defects, the former indicating a novel role for substrate interactions in self-avoidance. In contrast to a contact-mediated mechanism, we find that integrins prevent crossings that are non-contacting between dendrites in different three-dimensional positions, revealing a requirement for combined dendrite-dendrite and dendrite-substrate interactions in self-avoidance. PMID:22243748

  11. In silico investigation into dendritic cell regulation of CD8Treg mediated killing of Th1 cells in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis has been used extensively as an animal model of T cell mediated autoimmunity. A down-regulatory pathway through which encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells are killed by CD8 regulatory T cells (Treg) has recently been proposed. With the CD8Treg cells being primed by dendritic cells, regulation of recovery may be occuring around these antigen presenting cells. CD4Treg cells provide critical help within this process, by licensing dendritic cells to prime CD8Treg cells, however the spatial and temporal aspects of this help in the CTL response is currently unclear. Results We have previously developed a simulator of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (ARTIMMUS). We use ARTIMMUS to perform novel in silico experimentation regarding the priming of CD8Treg cells by dendritic cells, and the resulting CD8Treg mediated killing of encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells. Simulations using dendritic cells that present antigenic peptides in a mutually exclusive manner (either MBP or TCR-derived, but not both) suggest that there is no significant reliance on dendritic cells that can prime both encephalitogenic CD4Th1 and Treg cells. Further, in silico experimentation suggests that dynamics of CD8Treg priming are significantly influenced through their spatial competition with CD4Treg cells and through the timing of Qa-1 expression by dendritic cells. Conclusion There is no requirement for the encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells and cytotoxic CD8Treg cells to be primed by the same dendritic cells. We conjecture that no significant portion of CD4Th1 regulation by Qa-1 restricted CD8Treg cells occurs around individual dendritic cells, and as such, that CD8Treg mediated killing of CD4Th1 cells occurring around dendritic cells is not critical for recovery from the murine autoimmune disease. Furthermore, the timing of the CD4Treg licensing of dendritic cells and the spatial competition between CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells around the dendritic cell is

  12. MicroRNA-132, -134, and -138: a microRNA troika rules in neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Bicker, Silvia; Lackinger, Martin; Weiß, Kerstin; Schratt, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic mRNA transport and local translation in the postsynaptic compartment play an important role in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Local protein synthesis at the synapse has to be precisely orchestrated by a plethora of factors including RNA binding proteins as well as microRNAs, an extensive class of small non-coding RNAs. By binding to complementary sequences in target mRNAs, microRNAs fine-tune protein synthesis and thereby represent critical regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Research over the last years identified an entire network of dendritic microRNAs that fulfills an essential role in synapse development and physiology. Recent studies provide evidence that these small regulatory molecules are highly regulated themselves, at the level of expression as well as function. The importance of microRNAs for correct function of the nervous system is reflected by an increasing number of studies linking dysregulation of microRNA pathways to neurological disorders. By focusing on three extensively studied examples (miR-132, miR-134, miR-138), this review will attempt to illustrate the complex regulatory roles of dendritic microRNAs at the synapse and their implications for pathological conditions. PMID:25008044

  13. β-glucan restores tumor-educated dendritic cell maturation to enhance antitumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yongling; Xu, Dongqin; Zhang, Xiaohang; Bai, Yu; Ding, Jun; Feng, Tongbao; Wang, Shizhong; Xu, Ning; Qian, Keqing; Wang, Yong; Qi, Chunjian

    2016-06-01

    Tumors can induce the generation and accumulation of immunosuppressive cells such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in a tumor microenvironment, contributing to tumor escape from immunological attack. Although dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines can initiate antitumor immune responses, tumor-educated dendritic cells (TEDCs) involved in the tolerance induction have attracted much attention recently. In this study, we investigated the effect of β-glucan on TEDCs and found that β-glucan treatment could promote the maturation and migration of TEDCs and that the suppressive function of TEDCs was significantly decreased. Treatment with β-glucan drastically decreased the levels of regulatory T (Treg) cells but increased the infiltration of macrophages, granulocytes and DCs in tumor masses, thus elicited Th1 differentiation and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses and led to a delay in tumor progression. These findings reveal that β-glucan can inhibit the regulatory function of TEDCs, therefore revealing a novel function for β-glucan in immunotherapy and suggesting its potential clinical benefit. β-Glucan directly abrogated tumor-educated dendritic cells-associated immune suppression, promoted Th1 differentiation and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte priming and improved antitumor responses. PMID:26773960

  14. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a significant unmet medical need in patients with variety of injury or disease insults to the nervous system. Neuropathic pain often presents as a painful sensation described as electrical, burning, or tingling. Currently available treatments have limited effectiveness and narrow therapeutic windows for safety. More powerful analgesics, e.g., opioids, carry a high risk for chemical dependence. Thus, a major challenge for pain research is the elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie neuropathic pain and developing targeted strategies to alleviate pathological pain. The mechanistic link between dendritic spine structure and circuit function could explain why neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, since nociceptive processing pathways are adversely "hard-wired" through the reorganization of dendritic spines. Several studies in animal models of neuropathic pain have begun to reveal the functional contribution of dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain. Previous reports have demonstrated three primary changes in dendritic spine structure on nociceptive dorsal horn neurons following injury or disease, which accompany chronic intractable pain: (I) increased density of dendritic spines, particularly mature mushroom-spine spines, (II) redistribution of spines toward dendritic branch locations close to the cell body, and (III) enlargement of the spine head diameter, which generally presents as a mushroom-shaped spine. Given the important functional implications of spine distribution, density, and shape for synaptic and neuronal function, the study of dendritic spine abnormality may provide a new perspective for investigating pain, and the identification of specific molecular players that regulate spine morphology may guide the development of more effective and long-lasting therapies. PMID:25445354

  15. The Complete Reconfiguration of Dendritic Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneru, Govind; Flanders, Bret

    2014-03-01

    Reconfigurability-by-design is an important strategy in modern materials science, as materials with this capability could potentially be used to confer hydrophobic, lipophobic, or anti-corrosive character to substrates in a regenerative manner. The present work extends the directed electrochemical nanowire assembly (DENA) methodology, which is a technique that employs alternating voltages to grow single crystalline metallic nanowires and nano-dendrites from simple salt solutions, to enable the complete dissolution of macroscopic arrays of metallic dendrites following their growth. Our main finding is that structural reconfiguration of dendritic gold is induced by changes in the MHz-level frequencies of voltages that are applied to the dendrites. Cyclic voltammetry and micro-Raman spectroscopy have been used to show that dendritic gold grows and dissolves by the same chemical mechanisms as bulk gold. Hence, the redox chemistry that occurs at the crystal-solution interface is no different than the established electrochemistry of gold. What differs in this process and allows for reconfiguration to occur is the diffusive behavior of the gold chloride molecules in the solution adjacent to the interface. We will present a simple model that captures the physics of this behavior.

  16. Dendrites Inhibition in Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanfar, Asghar

    The specific high energy and power capacities of rechargeable lithium metal (Li0) batteries are ideally suited to portable devices and are valuable as storage units for intermittent renewable energy sources. Lithium, the lightest and most electropositive metal, would be the optimal anode material for rechargeable batteries if it were not for the fact that such devices fail unexpectedly by short-circuiting via the dendrites that grow across electrodes upon recharging. This phenomenon poses a major safety issue because it triggers a series of adverse events that start with overheating, potentially followed by the thermal decomposition and ultimately the ignition of the organic solvents used in such devices. In this thesis, we developed experimental platform for monitoring and quantifying the dendrite populations grown in a Li battery prototype upon charging under various conditions. We explored the effects of pulse charging in the kHz range and temperature on dendrite growth, and also on loss capacity into detached "dead" lithium particles. Simultaneously, we developed a computational framework for understanding the dynamics of dendrite propagation. The coarse-grained Monte Carlo model assisted us in the interpretation of pulsing experiments, whereas MD calculations provided insights into the mechanism of dendrites thermal relaxation. We also developed a computational framework for measuring the dead lithium crystals from the experimental images.

  17. Adaptive (T and B cells) immunity and control by dendritic cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Sage, Andrew P; Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Chronic inflammation in response to lipoprotein accumulation in the arterial wall is central in the development of atherosclerosis. Both innate and adaptive immunity are involved in this process. Adaptive immune responses develop against an array of potential antigens presented to effector T lymphocytes by antigen-presenting cells, especially dendritic cells. Functional analysis of the role of different T-cell subsets identified the Th1 responses as proatherogenic, whereas regulatory T-cell responses exert antiatherogenic activities. The effect of Th2 and Th17 responses is still debated. Atherosclerosis is also associated with B-cell activation. Recent evidence established that conventional B-2 cells promote atherosclerosis. In contrast, innate B-1 B cells offer protection through secretion of natural IgM antibodies. This review discusses the recent development in our understanding of the role of T- and B-cell subsets in atherosclerosis and addresses the role of dendritic cell subpopulations in the control of adaptive immunity. PMID:24812352

  18. Role of Dendritic Cells in the Induction of Lymphocyte Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Fabiola; Fuentes, Camila; López, Mercedes N.; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; González, Fermín E.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to trigger tolerance or immunity is dictated by the context in which an antigen is encountered. A large body of evidence indicates that antigen presentation by steady-state DCs induces peripheral tolerance through mechanisms such as the secretion of soluble factors, the clonal deletion of autoreactive T cells, and feedback control of regulatory T cells. Moreover, recent understandings on the function of DC lineages and the advent of murine models of DC depletion have highlighted the contribution of DCs to lymphocyte tolerance. Importantly, these findings are now being applied to human research in the contexts of autoimmune diseases, allergies, and transplant rejection. Indeed, DC-based immunotherapy research has made important progress in the area of human health, particularly in regards to cancer. A better understanding of several DC-related aspects including the features of DC lineages, milieu composition, specific expression of surface molecules, the control of signaling responses, and the identification of competent stimuli able to trigger and sustain a tolerogenic outcome will contribute to the success of DC-based immunotherapy in the area of lymphocyte tolerance. This review will discuss the latest advances in the biology of DC subtypes related to the induction of regulatory T cells, in addition to presenting current ex vivo protocols for tolerogenic DC production. Particular attention will be given to the molecules and signals relevant for achieving an adequate tolerogenic response for the treatment of human pathologies. PMID:26539197

  19. Suppression of zinc dendrites in zinc electrode power cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damjanovic, A.; Diggle, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    Addition of various tetraalkyl quarternary ammonium salts, to alkaline zincate electrolyte of cell, prevents formation of zinc dendrites during charging of zinc electrode. Electrode capacity is not impaired and elimination of dendrites prolongs cell life.

  20. Reduced Purkinje cell dendritic arborization and loss of dendritic spines in essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D; Lee, Michelle; Babij, Rachel; Ma, Karen; Cortés, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G; Faust, Phyllis L

    2014-12-01

    Based on accumulating post-mortem evidence of abnormalities in Purkinje cell biology in essential tremor, we hypothesized that regressive changes in dendritic morphology would be apparent in the Purkinje cell population in essential tremor cases versus age-matched controls. Cerebellar cortical tissue from 27 cases with essential tremor and 27 age-matched control subjects was processed by the Golgi-Kopsch method. Purkinje cell dendritic anatomy was quantified using a Neurolucida microscopic system interfaced with a motorized stage. In all measures, essential tremor cases demonstrated significant reductions in dendritic complexity compared with controls. Median values in essential tremor cases versus controls were: 5712.1 versus 10 403.2 µm (total dendrite length, P=0.01), 465.9 versus 592.5 µm (branch length, P=0.01), 22.5 versus 29.0 (maximum branch order, P=0.001), and 165.3 versus 311.7 (number of terminations, P=0.008). Furthermore, the dendritic spine density was reduced in essential tremor cases (medians=0.82 versus 1.02 µm(-1), P=0.03). Our demonstration of regressive changes in Purkinje cell dendritic architecture and spines in essential tremor relative to control brains provides additional evidence of a pervasive abnormality of Purkinje cell biology in this disease, which affects multiple neuronal cellular compartments including their axon, cell body, dendrites and spines. PMID:25367027

  1. Successful Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) Proves Current Theories of Dendritic Solidification are Flawed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The scientific objective of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is to test fundamental assumptions about dendritic solidification of molten materials. "Dendrites"-- from the ancient Greek word for tree--are tiny branching structures that form inside molten metal alloys when they solidify during manufacturing. The size, shape, and orientation of the dendrites have a major effect on the strength, ductility (ability to be molded or shaped), and usefulness of an alloy. Nearly all of the cast metal alloys used in everyday products (such as automobiles and airplanes) are composed of thousands to millions of tiny dendrites. Gravity, present on Earth, causes convection currents in molten alloys that disturb dendritic solidification and make its precise study impossible. In space, gravity is negated by the orbiting of the space shuttle. Consequently, IDGE (which was conducted on the space shuttle) gathered the first precise data regarding undisturbed dendritic solidification. IDGE is a microgravity materials science experiment that uses an apparatus which was designed, built, tested, and operated by people from the NASA Lewis Research Center. This experiment was conceived by the principal investigator, Professor Martin E. Glicksman, from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. The experiment was a team effort of Lewis civil servants, contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication Inc. (ADF), and personnel at Rensselaer.

  2. Dendritic cells, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and acquired immune privilege

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Baban, Babak; Johnson, Burles A; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized to stimulate T cell immunity. Paradoxically some DCs suppress T cell responses, and activate regulatory T cells. In this review we focus on a potent counter-regulatory pathway mediated by plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) expressing the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). IDO-expressing pDCs inhibit effector T cell responses, activate regulatory T cells, and attenuate pro-inflammatory responses in settings of chronic inflammation that manifest in clinical syndromes such as infectious, allergic and autoimmune diseases, cancer, and transplantation. Thus IDO-expressing pDCs create immune privilege, and provide novel opportunities to improve immunotherapy in multiple disease syndromes. PMID:20367139

  3. Isothermal dendritic growth: A low gravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Lograsso, T. A.; Rubinstein, E. R.; Selleck, M. E.; Winsa, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment is an active crystal growth experiment designed to test dendritic growth theory at low undercoolings where convection prohibits such studies at 1 g. The experiment will be essentially autonomous, though limited in-flight interaction through a computer interface is planned. One of the key components of the apparatus will be a crystal growth chamber capable of achieving oriented single crystal dendritic growth. Recent work indicates that seeding the chamber with a crystal of the proper orientation will not, in and of itself, be sufficient to meet this requirement. Additional flight hardware and software required for the STS flight experiment are currently being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

  4. Forward- and backpropagation in a silicon dendrite.

    PubMed

    Rasche, C; Douglas, R J

    2001-01-01

    We have developed an analog very-large-scale integrated (aVLSI) electronic circuit that emulates a compartmental model of a neuronal dendrite. The horizontal conductances of the compartmental model are implemented as a switched capacitor network. The transmembrane conductances are implemented as transconductance amplifiers. The electrotonic properties of our silicon cable are qualitatively similar to those of the ideal passive cable that is commonly used to model mathematically the electrotonic behavior of neurons. In particular the propagation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials is realistic, and we are easily able to emulate such classical synaptic integration models as direction selectivity. We are also able to emulate the backpropagation into the dendrite of single somatic spikes and bursts of spikes. Thus, this silicon dendrite is suitable for incorporation in detailed silicon neurons operating in real-time; in particular for the emulation of forward- and backpropagating electrical activities found in real neurons. PMID:18244392

  5. Dendritic inhomogeneity of stainless maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnikova, S.I.; Drobot, A.V.; Shmelev, A.Y.; Vukelich, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated dendritic inhomogeneity in industrial ingots 630 mm (steel I) in diameter and 500 mm (steel II) in diameter. The variation in the degree of dendritic inhomogeneity was investigated over the height of the ingots and across the sections on an MS-46 microprobe. It was established that the elements can be placed in the following order in accordance with the degree of reduction in the liquation factor: titanium, molybdenum, nickel, chromium, and cobalt. Titanium and molybdenum exhibit forward liquation in both steels, and chromium in steel II. The distribution of nickel and chromium in the steel I ingots and cobalt in the steel II ingots is unconventional. Dendritic inhomogeneity, which must be considered in assigning the heat treatment for finished articles, develops during the crystallization of stainless maraging steels.

  6. Convection Effects in Three-dimensional Dendritic Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yili; Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.

    2003-01-01

    A phase-field model is developed to simulate free dendritic growth coupled with fluid flow for a pure material in three dimensions. The preliminary results presented here illustrate the strong influence of convection on the three-dimensional (3D) dendrite growth morphology. The detailed knowledge of the flow and temperature fields in the melt around the dendrite from the simulations allows for a detailed understanding of the convection effects on dendritic growth.

  7. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy. PMID:27398454

  8. Silicon dendritic web growth thermal analysis task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.; Bhandari, P.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal analysis model is presented which describes the dendritic ribbon process. The model uses a melt-dendrite interface which projects out of the bulk melt as the basic interpretation of the ribbon production process. This is a marked departure from the interpretations of the interface phenomena which were used previously. The model was extensively illustrated with diagrams and pictures of ribbon samples. This model should have great impact on the analyses of experimental data as well as on future design modifications of ribbon-pulling equipment.

  9. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; LaCombe, J. C.; Frei, J. E.; Malarik, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) constituted a series of three NASA-supported microgravity experiments, all of which flew aboard the space shuttle, Columbia. This experimental space flight series was designed and operated to grow and record dendrite solidification in the absence of gravity-induced convective heat transfer, and thereby produce a wealth of benchmark-quality data for testing solidification scaling laws. The data and analysis performed on the dendritic growth speed and tip size in Succinontrie (SCN) demonstrates that although the theory yields predictions that are reasonably in agreement with experiment, there are significant discrepancies. However, some of these discrepancies can be explained by accurately describing the diffusion of heat. The key finding involves recognition that the actual three-dimensional shape of dendrites includes time-dependent side-branching and a tip region that is not a paraboloid of revolution. Thus, the role of heat transfer in dendritic growth is validated, with the caveat that a more realistic model of the dendrite then a paraboloid is needed to account for heat flow in an experimentally observed dendrite. We are currently conducting additional analysis to further confirm and demonstrate these conclusions. The data and analyses for the growth selection physics remain much less definitive. From the first flight, the data indicated that the selection parameter, sigma*, is not exactly a constant, but exhibits a slight dependence on the supercooling. Additional data from the second flight are being examined to investigate the selection of a unique dendrite speed, tip size and shape. The IDGE flight series is now complete. We are currently completing analyses and moving towards final data archiving. It is gratifying to see that the IDGE published results and archived data sets are being used actively by other scientists and engineers. In addition, we are also pleased to report that the techniques and IDGE

  10. The multifaceted biology of plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Swiecki, Melissa; Colonna, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a unique dendritic cell subset that specializes in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). pDCs promote antiviral immune responses and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases characterized by a type I IFN signature. However, pDCs can also induce tolerogenic immune responses. Here, we review recent progress from the field of pDC biology, focusing on: the molecular mechanisms that regulate pDC development and functions; the pathways involved in their sensing of pathogens and endogenous nucleic acids; the function of pDCs at mucosal sites; and their roles in infections, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26160613

  11. Apparatus for growing a dendritic web

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Charles S.; Piotrowski, Paul A.; Skutch, Maria E.; McHugh, James P.

    1983-06-21

    A melt system including a susceptor-crucible assembly having improved gradient control when melt replenishment is used during dendritic web growth. The improvement lies in the formation of a thermal barrier in the base of the receptor which is in the form of a vertical slot in the region of the susceptor underlying the crucible at the location of a compartmental separator dividing the crucible into a growth compartment and a melt replenishment compartment. The result achieved is a step change in temperature gradient in the melt thereby providing a more uniform temperature in the growth compartment from which the dendritic web is drawn.

  12. Dendritic microstructure in argon atomized superalloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Kumar, Mahundra

    1986-01-01

    The dendritic microstructure of atomized nickel base superalloy powders (Ni-20 pct Cr, NIMONIC-80A, ASTROALOY, and ZHS6-K) was studied. Prealloyed vacuum induction melted ingots were argon-atomized, the powders were cooled to room temperature, and various powder-size fractions were examined by optical metallography. Linear correlations were obtained for the powder size dependence of the secondary dendrite arm spacing, following the expected d-alpha (R) to the m power dependence on the particle size for all four superalloy compositions. However, the Ni-20 pct Cr alloy, which had much coarser arm spacing as compared to the other three alloys, had a much larger value of m.

  13. [Application of dendritic cells in clinical tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xian, Li-jian

    2002-04-01

    The active immunotherapy of dendritic cells is hot in tumor therapy research area. This article is a review of the source of dendritic cells, loading antigen, immunotherapy pathway, clinical application, choice of patients, and so on. It makes preparation for further research of dendritic cells. PMID:12452029

  14. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  15. Hyper-dendritic nanoporous zinc foam anodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chamoun, Mylad; Hertzberg, Benjamin J.; Gupta, Tanya; Davies, Daniel; Bhadra, Shoham; Van Tassell, Barry.; Erdonmez, Can; Steingart, Daniel A.

    2015-04-24

    The low cost, significant reducing potential, and relative safety of the zinc electrode is a common hope for a reductant in secondary batteries, but it is limited mainly to primary implementation due to shape change. In this work we exploit such shape change for the benefit of static electrodes through the electrodeposition of hyper-dendritic nanoporous zinc foam. Electrodeposition of zinc foam resulted in nanoparticles formed on secondary dendrites in a three-dimensional network with a particle size distribution of 54.1 - 96.0 nm. The nanoporous zinc foam contributed to highly oriented crystals, high surface area and more rapid kinetics in contrastmore » to conventional zinc in alkaline mediums. The anode material presented had a utilization of ~ 88% at full depth-of-discharge at various rates indicating a superb rate-capability. The rechargeability of Zn⁰/Zn²⁺ showed significant capacity retention over 100 cycles at a 40% depth-of-discharge to ensure that the dendritic core structure was imperforated. The dendritic architecture was densified upon charge-discharge cycling and presented superior performance compared to bulk zinc electrodes.« less

  16. Hyper-dendritic nanoporous zinc foam anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chamoun, Mylad; Hertzberg, Benjamin J.; Gupta, Tanya; Davies, Daniel; Bhadra, Shoham; Van Tassell, Barry.; Erdonmez, Can; Steingart, Daniel A.

    2015-04-24

    The low cost, significant reducing potential, and relative safety of the zinc electrode is a common hope for a reductant in secondary batteries, but it is limited mainly to primary implementation due to shape change. In this work we exploit such shape change for the benefit of static electrodes through the electrodeposition of hyper-dendritic nanoporous zinc foam. Electrodeposition of zinc foam resulted in nanoparticles formed on secondary dendrites in a three-dimensional network with a particle size distribution of 54.1 - 96.0 nm. The nanoporous zinc foam contributed to highly oriented crystals, high surface area and more rapid kinetics in contrast to conventional zinc in alkaline mediums. The anode material presented had a utilization of ~ 88% at full depth-of-discharge at various rates indicating a superb rate-capability. The rechargeability of Zn⁰/Zn²⁺ showed significant capacity retention over 100 cycles at a 40% depth-of-discharge to ensure that the dendritic core structure was imperforated. The dendritic architecture was densified upon charge-discharge cycling and presented superior performance compared to bulk zinc electrodes.

  17. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe; Cayzer, Steve

    The "Dendritic Cell Algorithm" (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, an abstract model of dendritic cell (DC) behavior is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm—the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory-based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population-based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an "artificial DC". Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter, the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of port scans and botnets, where it has produced impressive results with relatively low rates of false positives.

  18. Thermosolutal convection and macrosegregation in dendritic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, David R.; Heinrich, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model of solidification, that simulates the formation of channel segregates or freckles, is presented. The model simulates the entire solidification process, starting with the initial melt to the solidified cast, and the resulting segregation is predicted. Emphasis is given to the initial transient, when the dendritic zone begins to develop and the conditions for the possible nucleation of channels are established. The mechanisms that lead to the creation and eventual growth or termination of channels are explained in detail and illustrated by several numerical examples. A finite element model is used for the simulations. It uses a single system of equations to deal with the all-liquid region, the dendritic region, and the all-solid region. The dendritic region is treated as an anisotropic porous medium. The algorithm uses the bilinear isoparametric element, with a penalty function approximation and a Petrov-Galerkin formulation. The major task was to develop the solidification model. In addition, other tasks that were performed in conjunction with the modeling of dendritic solidification are briefly described.

  19. Characterization of chicken dendritic cell markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal and Natural Resources Institute, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD, USA. New mouse monoclonal antibodies which detect CD80 and CD83 were developed to characterize chicken dendritic cells (DCs). The characteristics of these molecules have been studied in human, swine, ovine, feline, and canine but not ...

  20. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  1. DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Maxwell G; Shaham, Shai

    2009-04-17

    Cells are devices whose structures delimit function. For example, in the nervous system, neuronal and glial shapes dictate paths of information flow. To understand how cells acquire their shapes, we examined the formation of a sense organ in C. elegans. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that sensory dendrites form by stationary anchoring of dendritic tips during cell-body migration. A genetic screen identified DEX-1 and DYF-7, extracellular proteins required for dendritic tip anchoring, which act cooperatively at the time and place of anchoring. DEX-1 and DYF-7 contain, respectively, zonadhesin and zona pellucida domains, and DYF-7 self-associates into multimers important for anchoring. Thus, unlike other dendrites, amphid dendritic tips are positioned by DEX-1 and DYF-7 without the need for long-range guidance cues. In sequence and function, DEX-1 and DYF-7 resemble tectorins, which anchor stereocilia in the inner ear, suggesting that a sensory dendrite anchor may have evolved into part of a mechanosensor. PMID:19344940

  2. Regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Anderson, Jorge; Contreras, Lydia M

    2013-01-01

    RNAs have many important functional properties, including that they are independently controllable and highly tunable. As a result of these advantageous properties, their use in a myriad of sophisticated devices has been widely explored. Yet, the exploitation of RNAs for synthetic applications is highly dependent on the ability to characterize the many new molecules that continue to be discovered by large-scale sequencing and high-throughput screening techniques. In this review, we present an exhaustive survey of the most recent synthetic bacterial riboswitches and small RNAs while emphasizing their virtues in gene expression management. We also explore the use of these RNA components as building blocks in the RNA synthetic biology toolbox and discuss examples of synthetic RNA components used to rewire bacterial regulatory circuitry. We anticipate that this field will expand its catalog of smart devices by mimicking and manipulating natural RNA mechanisms and functions. PMID:24356572

  3. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  4. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  5. Developmental mechanisms that regulate retinal ganglion cell dendritic morphology

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ning

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental features of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is that dendrites of individual RGCs are confined to one or a few narrow strata within the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and each RGC synapses only with a small group of presynaptic bipolar and amacrine cells with axons/dendrites ramified in the same strata to process distinct visual features. The underlying mechanisms which control the development of this laminar-restricted distribution pattern of RGC dendrites have been extensively studied, and it is still an open question whether the dendritic pattern of RGCs is determined by molecular cues or by activity-dependent refinement. Accumulating evidence suggests that both molecular cues and activity-dependent refinement might regulate RGC dendrites in a cell subtype-specific manner. However, identification of morphological subtypes of RGCs before they have achieved their mature dendritic pattern is a major challenge in the study of RGC dendritic development. This problem is now being circumvented through the use of molecular markers in genetically engineered mouse lines to identify RGC subsets early during development. Another unanswered fundamental question in the study of activity-dependent refinement of RGC dendrites is how changes in synaptic activity lead to the changes in dendritic morphology. Recent studies have started to shed light on the molecular basis of activity-dependent dendritic refinement of RGCs by showing that some molecular cascades control the cytoskeleton reorganization of RGCs. PMID:21542137

  6. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  7. Somato-dendritic Synaptic Plasticity and Error-backpropagation in Active Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Mathieu; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2016-02-01

    In the last decade dendrites of cortical neurons have been shown to nonlinearly combine synaptic inputs by evoking local dendritic spikes. It has been suggested that these nonlinearities raise the computational power of a single neuron, making it comparable to a 2-layer network of point neurons. But how these nonlinearities can be incorporated into the synaptic plasticity to optimally support learning remains unclear. We present a theoretically derived synaptic plasticity rule for supervised and reinforcement learning that depends on the timing of the presynaptic, the dendritic and the postsynaptic spikes. For supervised learning, the rule can be seen as a biological version of the classical error-backpropagation algorithm applied to the dendritic case. When modulated by a delayed reward signal, the same plasticity is shown to maximize the expected reward in reinforcement learning for various coding scenarios. Our framework makes specific experimental predictions and highlights the unique advantage of active dendrites for implementing powerful synaptic plasticity rules that have access to downstream information via backpropagation of action potentials. PMID:26841235

  8. Evaluating Local Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing Characterization Techniques Using Synthetic Directionally Solidified Dendritic Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Miller, Jonathan D.; Oppedal, Andrew L.; Solanki, Kiran N.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure characterization continues to play an important bridge to understanding why particular processing routes or parameters affect the properties of materials. This statement certainly holds true in the case of directionally solidified dendritic microstructures, where characterizing the primary dendrite arm spacing is vital to developing the process-structure-property relationships that can lead to the design and optimization of processing routes for defined properties. In this work, four series of simulations were used to examine the capability of a few Voronoi-based techniques to capture local microstructure statistics (primary dendrite arm spacing and coordination number) in controlled (synthetically generated) microstructures. These simulations used both cubic and hexagonal microstructures with varying degrees of disorder (noise) to study the effects of length scale, base microstructure, microstructure variability, and technique parameters on the local PDAS distribution, local coordination number distribution, bulk PDAS, and bulk coordination number. The Voronoi tesselation technique with a polygon-side-length criterion correctly characterized the known synthetic microstructures. By systematically studying the different techniques for quantifying local primary dendrite arm spacings, we have evaluated their capability to capture this important microstructure feature in different dendritic microstructures, which can be an important step for experimentally correlating with both processing and properties in single crystal nickel-based superalloys.

  9. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Mala; Edmund, Hendia; Ennis, Darragh; Schlueter, Marissa A.; Marot, Jessica E.; Tambasco, Janet; Barlow, Ida; Sigurbjornsdottir, Sara; Mathew, Renjith; Vallés, Ana Maria; Wojciech, Waldemar; Roth, Siegfried; Davis, Ilan; Leptin, Maria; Gavis, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling. PMID:27260999

  10. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Mala; Edmund, Hendia; Ennis, Darragh; Schlueter, Marissa A; Marot, Jessica E; Tambasco, Janet; Barlow, Ida; Sigurbjornsdottir, Sara; Mathew, Renjith; Vallés, Ana Maria; Wojciech, Waldemar; Roth, Siegfried; Davis, Ilan; Leptin, Maria; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling. PMID:27260999

  11. Somato-dendritic Synaptic Plasticity and Error-backpropagation in Active Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Schiess, Mathieu; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade dendrites of cortical neurons have been shown to nonlinearly combine synaptic inputs by evoking local dendritic spikes. It has been suggested that these nonlinearities raise the computational power of a single neuron, making it comparable to a 2-layer network of point neurons. But how these nonlinearities can be incorporated into the synaptic plasticity to optimally support learning remains unclear. We present a theoretically derived synaptic plasticity rule for supervised and reinforcement learning that depends on the timing of the presynaptic, the dendritic and the postsynaptic spikes. For supervised learning, the rule can be seen as a biological version of the classical error-backpropagation algorithm applied to the dendritic case. When modulated by a delayed reward signal, the same plasticity is shown to maximize the expected reward in reinforcement learning for various coding scenarios. Our framework makes specific experimental predictions and highlights the unique advantage of active dendrites for implementing powerful synaptic plasticity rules that have access to downstream information via backpropagation of action potentials. PMID:26841235

  12. Simulation of dendritic growth reveals necessary and sufficient parameters to describe the shapes of dendritic trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trottier, Olivier; Ganguly, Sujoy; Bowne-Anderson, Hugo; Liang, Xin; Howard, Jonathon

    For the last 120 years, the development of neuronal shapes has been of great interest to the scientific community. Over the last 30 years, significant work has been done on the molecular processes responsible for dendritic development. In our ongoing research, we use the class IV sensory neurons of the Drosophila melanogaster larva as a model system to understand the growth of dendritic arbors. Our main goal is to elucidate the mechanisms that the neuron uses to determine the shape of its dendritic tree. We have observed the development of the class IV neuron's dendritic tree in the larval stage and have concluded that morphogenesis is defined by 3 distinct processes: 1) branch growth, 2) branching and 3) branch retraction. As the first step towards understanding dendritic growth, we have implemented these three processes in a computational model. Our simulations are able to reproduce the branch length distribution, number of branches and fractal dimension of the class IV neurons for a small range of parameters.

  13. Asteroid core crystallization by inward dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, Henning; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The physics of the asteroid core crystallization process in metallic asteroids is investigated, with special attention given to the initial conditions for core crystallization, the manner of crystallization, the mechanisms acting in the stirring of the liquid, and the effects of elements such as sulfur on crystallization of Fe-Ni. On the basis of theoretical considerations and the published data on iron meteorites, it is suggested that the mode of crystallization in asteroid core was different from the apparent outward concentric crystallization of the earth core, in that the crystallization of asteroidal cores commenced at the base of the mantle and proceeded inward. The inward crystallization resulted in complex dendritic growth. These dendrites may have grown to lengths of hundreds of meters or perhaps even as large as the core radius, thereby dividing the core into separate magma chambers.

  14. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies. PMID:27088097

  15. Lid for improved dendritic web growth

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Charles S.; Kochka, Edgar L.; Piotrowski, Paul A.; Seidensticker, Raymond G.

    1992-03-24

    A lid for a susceptor in which a crystalline material is melted by induction heating to form a pool or melt of molten material from which a dendritic web of essentially a single crystal of the material is pulled through an elongated slot in the lid and the lid has a pair of generally round openings adjacent the ends of the slot and a groove extends between each opening and the end of the slot. The grooves extend from the outboard surface of the lid to adjacent the inboard surface providing a strip contiguous with the inboard surface of the lid to produce generally uniform radiational heat loss across the width of the dendritic web adjacent the inboard surface of the lid to reduce thermal stresses in the web and facilitate the growth of wider webs at a greater withdrawal rate.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Menahem; Korkotian, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the role of calcium stores in dendritic spines structure, function and plasticity is still debated. The reasons for this may have to do with the multitude of overlapping calcium handling machineries in the neuron, including stores, voltage and ligand gated channels, pumps and transporters. Also, different cells in the brain are endowed with calcium stores that are activated by different receptor types, and their differential compartmentalization in dendrites, spines and presynaptic terminals complicates their analysis. In the present review we address several key issues, including the role of calcium stores in synaptic plasticity, their role during development, in stress and in neurodegenerative diseases. Apparently, there is increasing evidence for a crucial role of calcium stores, especially of the ryanodine species, in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. PMID:25071469

  17. Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the tonsil

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Tuba; Serinsoz, Ebru; Arpaci, Rabia Bozdogan; Vayisoglu, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is an uncommon tumour within the spectrum of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms that can occur at nodal and extra-nodal sites. Besides being rare, these tumours are difficult to diagnose. A 72-year-old man with a painless mass in the right tonsil was admitted to the Mersin University Hospital. Tonsillectomy was performed. Microscopically, the tumour consisted of spindle-shaped cells with large oval to polygonal nuclei. Lymphocytes were scattered among the tumour cells. Immunohistochemically, the cells were positive for CD23 and vimentin. The tumour was diagnosed as FDCS with histological and immunohistochemical findings. Recognition of extranodal FDCS requires knowledge of this entity and to consider it during the diagnosis. Confirmatory immunohistochemical staining is essential for diagnosis. Correct characterisation of this neoplasm is important because of its potential for recurrence and metastasis. PMID:23365157

  18. Impaired dendritic cell function in a spontaneous autoimmune polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Quan, Songhua; Kim, Hye-Jung; Dukala, Danuta; Sheng, Jian Rong; Soliven, Betty

    2015-05-01

    Spontaneous autoimmune polyneuropathy (SAP) in B7-2 knockout NOD mice mimics the progressive form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, and is mediated by myelin protein zero (P0)-reactive Th1 cells. In this study, we focused on the effect of B7-2 deletion on the function of dendritic cells (DCs) within the context of SAP. We found that development of SAP was associated with a preponderance or increase of CD11b(+) DCs in peripheral lymph nodes and sciatic nerves. B7-2 deletion led to altered immunophenotypic properties that differ between CD11b(+) DCs and CD8α(+) DCs. Both DC subsets from B7-2 knockout NOD mice exhibited impaired capacity to capture fluorophore-labeled myelin P0, but diminished Ag-presenting function was observed only in CD11b(+) DCs. Clinical assessment, electrophysiologic studies, and splenocyte proliferation studies revealed that absence of B7-2 on DCs was sufficient to cause impaired ability to induce tolerance to P0, which could be overcome by preconditioning with IL-10. Tolerance induction by Ag-pulsed wild-type NOD DCs was dependent on IL-10 and was associated with increased CD4(+) regulatory T cells, whereas tolerance induction by IL-10-conditioned B7-2-deficient DCs was associated with increased percentages of both regulatory T cells and B10 cells in the spleen. We conclude that B7-2 deletion has an impact on the distribution of DC subsets in lymphoid organs and alters the expression of costimulatory molecules, but functional consequences are not uniform across DC subsets. Defective tolerance induction in the absence of B7-2 can be restored by preconditioning of DCs with IL-10. PMID:25825437

  19. Epidermis-Derived Semaphorin Promotes Dendrite Self-Avoidance by Regulating Dendrite-Substrate Adhesion in Drosophila Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Shan; Yadav, Smita; Lee, Jiae; Soba, Peter; Younger, Susan H; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Wei; Parrish, Jay; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2016-02-17

    Precise patterning of dendritic arbors is critical for the wiring and function of neural circuits. Dendrite-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion ensures that the dendrites of Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) sensory neurons are properly restricted in a 2D space, and thereby facilitates contact-mediated dendritic self-avoidance and tiling. However, the mechanisms regulating dendrite-ECM adhesion in vivo are poorly understood. Here, we show that mutations in the semaphorin ligand sema-2b lead to a dramatic increase in self-crossing of dendrites due to defects in dendrite-ECM adhesion, resulting in a failure to confine dendrites to a 2D plane. Furthermore, we find that Sema-2b is secreted from the epidermis and signals through the Plexin B receptor in neighboring neurons. Importantly, we find that Sema-2b/PlexB genetically and physically interacts with TORC2 complex, Tricornered (Trc) kinase, and integrins. These results reveal a novel role for semaphorins in dendrite patterning and illustrate how epidermal-derived cues regulate neural circuit assembly. PMID:26853303

  20. The discovery of dendritic spines by Cajal

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines were considered an artifact of the Golgi method until a brash Spanish histologist, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, bet his scientific career arguing that they were indeed real, correctly deducing their key role in mediating synaptic connectivity. This article reviews the historical context of the discovery of spines and the reasons behind Cajal's obsession with them, all the way till his deathbed. PMID:25954162

  1. The discovery of dendritic spines by Cajal.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines were considered an artifact of the Golgi method until a brash Spanish histologist, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, bet his scientific career arguing that they were indeed real, correctly deducing their key role in mediating synaptic connectivity. This article reviews the historical context of the discovery of spines and the reasons behind Cajal's obsession with them, all the way till his deathbed. PMID:25954162

  2. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  3. A study of dendritic web silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu

    Dendritic web silicon is a material used in the fabrication of large-scale terrestrial solar cells. It is grown from the thin silicon liquid film supported by bounding dendrites. The growth of long and wide web silicon with low defect density is the key to lowering the cost and increasing the efficiency of a solar cell. However, the web growth may be terminated by polycrystals, especially for the growth of wide ribbons, and high density dislocations (104 cm-2) are then found in the web silicon. In this study, chemical etching, electron channeling, atomic force microscopy and transmission X-ray topography with rotating anode and synchrotron radiation sources were used to characterize web samples that were grown under different conditions. The experimental results show that the twin planes, which are important for dendrite growth, are not required for web growth. Web is grown by step flowing from dendrite regions toward the central web region on the solid/melt interface. Web growth is strongly affected by the fluctuation of thermal profile. The web position shift during growth results in the emergence of twin planes onto the web surface. It is also found that the grain boundaries were formed due to the edge dislocations aligning in the conjunctional (11¯0) planes. The mechanisms for the formation of the edge dislocations are discussed. The surface steps introduced the high local strain by blocking the slip dislocations, which also contributes to the formation of grain boundaries. The distribution of dislocations and residual strain in the web region were studied based on the X-ray topography results. The contrast reversion in the synchrotron beam X-ray topography images was observed, which indicates the change of lattice strain during web growth. Also, from those results, a new type of edge dislocation was identified at the region under high vertical strain. Recommendations for future work are discussed based on the current conclusions.

  4. Generation of immunogenic and tolerogenic clinical-grade dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Tahereh; Kamali-Sarvestani, Eskandar; Ciric, Bogoljub; Karimi, Mohamad H; Kalantari, Mohsen; Faridar, Alireza; Xu, Hui; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2011-12-01

    Immunotherapy with dendritic cells (DCs), which have been manipulated ex vivo to become immunogenic or tolerogenic, has been tested in clinical trials for disease therapy. DCs are sentinels of the immune system, which after exposure to antigenic or inflammatory signals and crosstalk with effector CD4(+) T cells express high levels of costimulatory molecules and cytokines. Upregulation of either costimulatory molecules or cytokines promotes immunologic DCs, whereas their downregulation generates tolerogenic DCs (TDCs), which induce T regulatory cells (Tregs) and a state of tolerance. Immunogenic DCs are used for the therapy of infectious diseases such as HIV-1 and cancer, whereas tolerogenic DCs are used in treating various autoimmune diseases and in transplantation. DC vaccination is still at an early stage, and improvements are mainly needed in quality control of monitoring assays to generate clinical-grade DC products and to assess the effect of DC vaccination in future clinical trials. Here, we review the recent work in DC generation and monitoring approaches for DC-based trials with immunogenic or tolerogenic DCs. PMID:22105838

  5. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy Treatment for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Guo, Geng; Niu, Xiao-yuan; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant glioma and patients diagnosed with this disease had poor outcomes even treated with the combination of conventional treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation). Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most powerful antigen presenting cells and DC-based vaccination has the potential to target and eliminate GBM cells and enhance the responses of these cells to the existing therapies with minimal damage to the healthy tissues around them. It can enhance recognition of GBM cells by the patients' immune system and activate vast, potent, and long-lasting immune reactions to eliminate them. Therefore, this therapy can prolong the survival of GBM patients and has wide and bright future in the treatment of GBM. Also, the efficacy of this therapy can be strengthened in several ways at some degree: the manipulation of immune regulatory components or costimulatory molecules on DCs; the appropriate choices of antigens for loading to enhance the effectiveness of the therapy; regulation of positive regulators or negative regulators in GBM microenvironment. PMID:26167495

  6. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: development, functions, and role in atherosclerotic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specialized subset of DCs that links innate and adaptive immunity. They sense viral and bacterial pathogens and release high levels of Type I interferons (IFN-I) in response to infection. pDCs were shown to contribute to inflammatory responses in the steady state and in pathology. In atherosclerosis, pDCs are involved in priming vascular inflammation and atherogenesis through production of IFN-I and chemokines that attract inflammatory cells to inflamed sites. pDCs also contribute to the proinflammatory activation of effector T cells, cytotoxic T cells, and conventional DCs. However, tolerogenic populations of pDCs are found that suppress atherosclerosis-associated inflammation through down-regulation of function and proliferation of proinflammatory T cell subsets and induction of regulatory T cells with potent immunomodulatory properties. Notably, atheroprotective tolerogenic DCs could be induced by certain self-antigens or bacterial antigens that suggests for great therapeutic potential of these DCs for development of DC-based anti-atherogenic vaccines. PMID:25120492

  7. The role of dendritic cells in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Alla L.; Clarkson, Benjamin D.; Ortler, Sonja; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated, central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease. Clinical and histopathological features suggest an inflammatory etiology involving resident CNS innate cells as well as invading adaptive immune cells. Encephalitogenic myelin-reactive T cells have been implicated in the initiation of an inflammatory cascade, eventually resulting in demyelination and axonal damage (the histological hallmarks of MS). Dendritic cells (DC) have recently emerged as key modulators of this immunopathological cascade, as supported by studies in humans and experimental disease models. In one such model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), CNS microvessel-associated DC have been shown to be essential for local antigen recognition by myelin-reactive T cells. Moreover, the functional state and compartmental distribution of DC derived from CNS and associated lymphatics seem to be limiting factors in both the induction and effector phases of EAE. Moreover, DC modulate and balance the recruitment of encephalitogenic and regulatory T cells into CNS tissue. This capacity is critically influenced by DC surface expression of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory molecules. The fact that DC accumulate in the CNS before T cells and can direct T-cell responses suggests that they are key determinants of CNS autoimmune outcomes. Here we provide a comprehensive review of recent advances in our understanding of CNS-derived DC and their relevance to neuroinflammation. PMID:20217033

  8. Aging and the Dendritic Cell System: Implications for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shurin, Michael R.; Shurin, Galina V.; Chatta, Gurkamal S.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system shows a decline in responsiveness to antigens both with aging, as well as in the presence of tumors. The malfunction of the immune system with age can be attributed to developmental and functional alterations in several cell populations. Previous studies have shown defects in humoral responses and abnormalities in T cell function in aged individuals, but have not distinguished between abnormalities in antigen presentation and intrinsic T cell or B cell defects in aged individuals. Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in regulating immune responses by presenting antigens to naïve T lymphocytes, modulating Th1/Th2/Treg balance, producing numerous regulatory cytokines and chemokines, and modifying survival of immune effectors. DC are receiving increased attention due to their involvement in the immunobiology of tolerance and autoimmunity, as well as their potential role as biological adjuvants in tumor vaccines. Recent advances in the molecular and cell biology of different DC populations allow for addressing the issue of DC and aging both in rodents and humans. Since DC play a crucial role in initiating and regulating immune responses, it is reasonable to hypothesize that they are directly involved in altered antitumor immunity in aging. However, the results of studies focusing on DC in the elderly are conflicting. The present review summarizes the available human and experimental animal data on quantitative and qualitative alterations of DC in aging and discusses the potential role of the DC system in the increased incidence of cancer in the elderly. PMID:17446082

  9. The Role of Dendritic Cells in Central Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaehak; Shin, Jeoung-Sook

    2015-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a significant role in establishing self-tolerance through their ability to present self-antigens to developing T cells in the thymus. DCs are predominantly localized in the medullary region of thymus and present a broad range of self-antigens, which include tissue-restricted antigens expressed and transferred from medullary thymic epithelial cells, circulating antigens directly captured by thymic DCs through coticomedullary junction blood vessels, and peripheral tissue antigens captured and transported by peripheral tissue DCs homing to the thymus. When antigen-presenting DCs make a high affinity interaction with antigen-specific thymocytes, this interaction drives the interacting thymocytes to death, a process often referred to as negative selection, which fundamentally blocks the self-reactive thymocytes from differentiating into mature T cells. Alternatively, the interacting thymocytes differentiate into the regulatory T (Treg) cells, a distinct T cell subset with potent immune suppressive activities. The specific mechanisms by which thymic DCs differentiate Treg cells have been proposed by several laboratories. Here, we review the literatures that elucidate the contribution of thymic DCs to negative selection and Treg cell differentiation, and discusses its potential mechanisms and future directions. PMID:26140042

  10. Mast Cells Condition Dendritic Cells to Mediate Allograft Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Victor C.; Pino-Lagos, Karina; Nowak, Elizabeth C.; Bennett, Kathy A.; Oliva, Carla; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Peripheral tolerance orchestrated by regulatory T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and mast cells (MCs) has been studied in several models including skin allograft tolerance. We now define a role for MCs in controlling DC behavior (“conditioning”) to facilitate tolerance. Under tolerant conditions, we show that MCs mediated a marked increase in tumor necrosis factor (TNFα)-dependent accumulation of graft-derived DCs in the dLN compared to nontolerant conditions. This increase of DCs in the dLN is due to the local production of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by MCs that induces a survival advantage of graft-derived DCs. DCs that migrated to the dLN from the tolerant allograft were tolerogenic; i.e., they dominantly suppress T cell responses and control regional immunity. This study underscores the importance of MCs in conditioning DCs to mediate peripheral tolerance and shows a functional impact of peripherally produced TNFα and GM-CSF on the migration and function of tolerogenic DCs. PMID:22035846

  11. Microheterogeneity of calcium signalling in dendrites.

    PubMed

    Pozzo-Miller, L D; Connor, J A; Andrews, S B

    2000-05-15

    Transient changes in the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) originating from voltage- or ligand-gated influx and by ligand- or Ca2+-gated release from intracellular stores, trigger or modulate many fundamental neuronal processes, including neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Of the intracellular compartments involved in Ca2+ clearance, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has received the most attention because it expresses Ca2+ pumps and Ca2+ channels, thus endowing it with the potential to act as both an intracellular calcium sink and store. We review here our ongoing work on the role of calcium sequestration into, and release from, ER cisterns and the role that this plays in the generation and termination of free [Ca2+]i transients in dendrites of pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices during and after synaptic activity. These studies have been approached by combining parallel microfluorometric measurements of free cytosolic [Ca2+]i transients with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalytical measurements of total Ca content within specific dendritic compartments at the electron microscopy level. Our observations support the emerging realization that specific subsets of dendritic ER cisterns provide spatial and temporal microheterogeneity of Ca2+ signalling, acting not only as a major intracellular Ca sink involved in active clearance mechanisms after voltage- and ligand-gated Ca2+ influx, but also as an intracellular Ca2+ source that can be mobilized by a signal cascade originating at activated synapses. PMID:10811724

  12. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27236509

  13. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth of dendrites is governed by the interplay between two simple and familiar processes---the irreversible diffusion of energy, and the reversible work done in the formation of new surface area. To advance our understanding of these processes, NASA sponsored a project that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia is 1994, 1996, and 1997 to record and analyze benchmark data in an apparent-microgravity ``laboratory.'' In this laboratory, energy transfer by gravity driven convection was essentially eliminated and one could test independently, for the first time, both components of dendritic growth theory. The analysis of this data shows that although the diffusion of energy can be properly accounted for, the results from interfacial physics appear to be in disagreement and alternate models should receive increased attention. Unfortunately, currently and for the foreseeable future, there is no access or financial support to develop and conduct additional experiments of this type. However, the benchmark data of 35mm photonegatives, video, and all supporting instrument data are now available at the IDGE Archive at the College of the Holy Cross. This data may still have considerable relevance to researchers working specifically with dendritic growth, and more generally those working in the synthesis, growth & processing of materials, multiscale computational modeling, pattern formation, and systems far from equilibrium.

  14. Dendritic NMDA receptors activate axonal calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason M.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation can alter synaptic strength by regulating transmitter release from a variety of neurons in the CNS. As NMDARs are permeable to Ca2+ and monovalent cations, they could alter release directly by increasing presynaptic Ca2+ or indirectly by axonal depolarization sufficient to activate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Using two-photon microscopy to measure Ca2+ excursions, we found that somatic depolarization or focal activation of dendritic NMDARs elicited small Ca2+ transients in axon varicosities of cerebellar stellate cell interneurons. These axonal transients resulted from Ca2+ entry through VSCCs that were opened by the electrotonic spread of the NMDAR-mediated depolarization elicited in the dendrites. In contrast, we were unable to detect direct activation of NMDARs on axons indicating an exclusive somatodendritic expression of functional NMDARs. In cerebellar stellate cells, dendritic NMDAR activation masquerades as a presynaptic phenomenon and may influence Ca2+-dependent forms of presynaptic plasticity and release. PMID:18957221

  15. Location-dependent synaptic plasticity rules by dendritic spine cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jens P.; Andrásfalvy, Bertalan K.; Polito, Marina; Magó, Ádám; Ujfalussy, Balázs B.; Makara, Judit K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear interactions between coactive synapses enable neurons to discriminate between spatiotemporal patterns of inputs. Using patterned postsynaptic stimulation by two-photon glutamate uncaging, here we investigate the sensitivity of synaptic Ca2+ signalling and long-term plasticity in individual spines to coincident activity of nearby synapses. We find a proximodistally increasing gradient of nonlinear NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated amplification of spine Ca2+ signals by a few neighbouring coactive synapses along individual perisomatic dendrites. This synaptic cooperativity does not require dendritic spikes, but is correlated with dendritic Na+ spike propagation strength. Furthermore, we show that repetitive synchronous subthreshold activation of small spine clusters produces input specific, NMDAR-dependent cooperative long-term potentiation at distal but not proximal dendritic locations. The sensitive synaptic cooperativity at distal dendritic compartments shown here may promote the formation of functional synaptic clusters, which in turn can facilitate active dendritic processing and storage of information encoded in spatiotemporal synaptic activity patterns. PMID:27098773

  16. Random positions of dendritic spines in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-07-23

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. PMID:25057209

  17. Random Positions of Dendritic Spines in Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. PMID:25057209

  18. Molecular identity of dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Andrea; Nusser, Zoltan

    2010-05-14

    Active invasion of the dendritic tree by action potentials (APs) generated in the axon is essential for associative synaptic plasticity and neuronal ensemble formation. In cortical pyramidal cells (PCs), this AP back-propagation is supported by dendritic voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channels, whose molecular identity is unknown. Using a highly sensitive electron microscopic immunogold technique, we revealed the presence of the Nav1.6 subunit in hippocampal CA1 PC proximal and distal dendrites. Here, the subunit density is lower by a factor of 35 to 80 than that found in axon initial segments. A gradual decrease in Nav1.6 density along the proximodistal axis of the dendritic tree was also detected without any labeling in dendritic spines. Our results reveal the characteristic subcellular distribution of the Nav1.6 subunit, identifying this molecule as a key substrate enabling dendritic excitability. PMID:20466935

  19. Special fractal growth of dendrite copper using a hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yan; Zhang, Zhejuan; Guo, Pingsheng; He, Pingang; Sun, Zhuo

    2011-08-01

    Special fractal dendrite Cu nanostructures have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal method, and the effects of the volume ratio between glycerol and water and the concentration of H 3PO 3 on the morphologies of dendrite Cu have been studied in detail. The Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to characterize these Cu products. The results indicate that rhombic diamond and different morphologies of fractal dendrite were prepared because of the accumulation of Cu nuclei based on the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and the nucleation-limited aggregation (NLA) model. Fortunately, symmetrical leaf-like dendrite Cu nanostructures different from Cu dendrites reported before have been obtained. Additionally, an explanation for the growth of fractal dendrite Cu has been discussed carefully.

  20. Neural pattern formation in networks with dendritic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, P. C.; De Souza, B.

    1998-04-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a recently proposed model of neural pattern formation that is based on the combined effect of diffusion along a neuron's dendritic tree and recurrent interactions along axo-dendritic synaptic connections. For concreteness, we consider a one-dimensional array of analog neurons with the dendritic tree idealized as a one-dimensional cable. Linear stability analysis and bifurcation theory together with numerical simulations are used to establish conditions for the onset of a Turing instability leading to the formation of stable spatial patterns of network output activity. It is shown that the presence of dendritic structure can induce dynamic (time-periodic) spatial pattern formation. Moreover, correlations between the dendritic location of a synapse and the relative positions of neurons in the network are shown to result in spatially oscillating patterns of activity along the dendrites of each neuron.

  1. Location-dependent synaptic plasticity rules by dendritic spine cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jens P; Andrásfalvy, Bertalan K; Polito, Marina; Magó, Ádám; Ujfalussy, Balázs B; Makara, Judit K

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear interactions between coactive synapses enable neurons to discriminate between spatiotemporal patterns of inputs. Using patterned postsynaptic stimulation by two-photon glutamate uncaging, here we investigate the sensitivity of synaptic Ca(2+) signalling and long-term plasticity in individual spines to coincident activity of nearby synapses. We find a proximodistally increasing gradient of nonlinear NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated amplification of spine Ca(2+) signals by a few neighbouring coactive synapses along individual perisomatic dendrites. This synaptic cooperativity does not require dendritic spikes, but is correlated with dendritic Na(+) spike propagation strength. Furthermore, we show that repetitive synchronous subthreshold activation of small spine clusters produces input specific, NMDAR-dependent cooperative long-term potentiation at distal but not proximal dendritic locations. The sensitive synaptic cooperativity at distal dendritic compartments shown here may promote the formation of functional synaptic clusters, which in turn can facilitate active dendritic processing and storage of information encoded in spatiotemporal synaptic activity patterns. PMID:27098773

  2. Evidence for tip velocity oscillations in dendritic solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, J. C.; Koss, M. B.; Frei, J. E.; Giummarra, C.; Lupulescu, A. O.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic growth experiments were conducted in the reduced-convection environment aboard the space shuttle Columbia on STS-87. Spectral analysis was performed on 30-frame/s video data during growths of isothermal dendrites. Results indicate that pivalic acid dendrites exhibit a subtle oscillatory behavior of the axial growth velocity near the tip, with a frequency component that is associated with the sidebranch formation process.

  3. Evidence for tip velocity oscillations in dendritic solidification.

    PubMed

    LaCombe, J C; Koss, M B; Frei, J E; Giummarra, C; Lupulescu, A O; Glicksman, M E

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic growth experiments were conducted in the reduced-convection environment aboard the space shuttle Columbia on STS-87. Spectral analysis was performed on 30-frame/s video data during growths of isothermal dendrites. Results indicate that pivalic acid dendrites exhibit a subtle oscillatory behavior of the axial growth velocity near the tip, with a frequency component that is associated with the sidebranch formation process. PMID:11909070

  4. Galectin-1 Regulates Tissue Exit of Specific Dendritic Cell Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Thiemann, Sandra; Man, Jeanette H.; Chang, Margaret H.; Lee, Benhur; Baum, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    During inflammation, dendritic cells emigrate from inflamed tissue across the lymphatic endothelium into the lymphatic vasculature and travel to regional lymph nodes to initiate immune responses. However, the processes that regulate dendritic cell tissue egress and migration across the lymphatic endothelium are not well defined. The mammalian lectin galectin-1 is highly expressed by vascular endothelial cells in inflamed tissue and has been shown to regulate immune cell tissue entry into inflamed tissue. Here, we show that galectin-1 is also highly expressed by human lymphatic endothelial cells, and deposition of galectin-1 in extracellular matrix selectively regulates migration of specific human dendritic cell subsets. The presence of galectin-1 inhibits migration of immunogenic dendritic cells through the extracellular matrix and across lymphatic endothelial cells, but it has no effect on migration of tolerogenic dendritic cells. The major galectin-1 counter-receptor on both dendritic cell populations is the cell surface mucin CD43; differential core 2 O-glycosylation of CD43 between immunogenic dendritic cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells appears to contribute to the differential effect of galectin-1 on migration. Binding of galectin-1 to immunogenic dendritic cells reduces phosphorylation and activity of the protein-tyrosine kinase Pyk2, an effect that may also contribute to reduced migration of this subset. In a murine lymphedema model, galectin-1−/− animals had increased numbers of migratory dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes, specifically dendritic cells with an immunogenic phenotype. These findings define a novel role for galectin-1 in inhibiting tissue emigration of immunogenic, but not tolerogenic, dendritic cells, providing an additional mechanism by which galectin-1 can dampen immune responses. PMID:26216879

  5. Dendritic spikes enhance stimulus selectivity in cortical neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Spencer L; Smith, Ikuko T; Branco, Tiago; Häusser, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Neuronal dendrites are electrically excitable: they can generate regenerative events such as dendritic spikes in response to sufficiently strong synaptic input. Although such events have been observed in many neuronal types, it is not well understood how active dendrites contribute to the tuning of neuronal output in vivo. Here we show that dendritic spikes increase the selectivity of neuronal responses to the orientation of a visual stimulus (orientation tuning). We performed direct patch-clamp recordings from the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the primary visual cortex of lightly anaesthetized and awake mice, during sensory processing. Visual stimulation triggered regenerative local dendritic spikes that were distinct from back-propagating action potentials. These events were orientation tuned and were suppressed by either hyperpolarization of membrane potential or intracellular blockade of NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptors. Both of these manipulations also decreased the selectivity of subthreshold orientation tuning measured at the soma, thus linking dendritic regenerative events to somatic orientation tuning. Together, our results suggest that dendritic spikes that are triggered by visual input contribute to a fundamental cortical computation: enhancing orientation selectivity in the visual cortex. Thus, dendritic excitability is an essential component of behaviourally relevant computations in neurons. PMID:24162850

  6. Bent dendrite growth in undercooled Fe-B alloy melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrasch, C.; Volkmann, T.; Valloton, J.; Kolbe, M.; Herlach, DM

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic growth is the main solidification mode in alloy casting. In order to control dendrite growth for materials design from the melt it is important to fully understand the influence of process conditions. This study stands as an experimental note observing bent dendrite growth in Fe-B alloys and suggesting possible explanations as induced by fluid flow, thermal, and concentrational diffusion or impurities. Electromagnetic levitation technique (EML) is used for containerless processing of undercooled melts under 1g and reduced gravity conditions in parabolic flight. Further investigations are needed to find a suitable explanation for the observed bent dendrite growth behaviour.

  7. Mapping homeostatic synaptic plasticity using cable properties of dendrites.

    PubMed

    Queenan, B N; Lee, K J; Tan, H; Huganir, R L; Vicini, S; Pak, D T S

    2016-02-19

    When chronically silenced, cortical and hippocampal neurons homeostatically upregulate excitatory synaptic function. However, the subcellular position of such changes on the dendritic tree is not clear. We exploited the cable-filtering properties of dendrites to derive a parameter, the dendritic filtering index (DFI), to map the spatial distribution of synaptic currents. Our analysis indicates that young rat cortical neurons globally scale AMPA receptor-mediated currents, while mature hippocampal neurons do not, revealing distinct homeostatic strategies between brain regions and developmental stages. The DFI presents a useful tool for mapping the dendritic origin of synaptic currents and the location of synaptic plasticity changes. PMID:26701298

  8. Assessing effects on dendritic arborization using novel Sholl analyses.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Kate M; Akum, Barbara F; Dhawan, Survandita T; Kwon, Munjin; Langhammer, Christopher G; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Determining the shape of cell-specific dendritic arbors is a tightly regulated process that occurs during development. When this regulation is aberrant, which occurs during disease or injury, alterations in dendritic shape result in changes to neural circuitry. There has been significant progress on characterizing extracellular and intrinsic factors that regulate dendrite number by our laboratory and others. Generally, changes to the dendritic arbor are assessed by Sholl analysis or simple dendrite counting. However, we have found that this general method often overlooks local changes to the arbor. Previously, we developed a program (titled Bonfire) to facilitate digitization of neurite morphology and subsequent Sholl analysis and to assess changes to root, intermediate, and terminal neurites. Here, we apply these different Sholl analyses, and a novel Sholl analysis, to uncover previously unknown changes to the dendritic arbor when we overexpress an important regulator of dendrite branching, cytosolic PSD-95 interactor (cypin), at two developmental time points. Our results suggest that standard Sholl analysis and simple dendrite counting are not sufficient for uncovering local changes to the dendritic arbor. PMID:26283921

  9. CTAB-Influenced Electrochemical Dissolution of Silver Dendrites.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Colm; Zhu, Xi; Zhong, Jun; Anand, Utkarsh; Lu, Jingyu; Su, Haibin; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2016-04-19

    Dendrite formation on the electrodes of a rechargeable battery during the charge-discharge cycle limits its capacity and application due to short-circuits and potential ignition. However, understanding of the underlying dendrite growth and dissolution mechanisms is limited. Here, the electrochemical growth and dissolution of silver dendrites on platinum electrodes immersed in an aqueous silver nitrate (AgNO3) electrolyte solution was investigated using in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The dissolution of Ag dendrites in an AgNO3 solution with added cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant was compared to the dissolution of Ag dendrites in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution. Significantly, when CTAB was added, dendrite dissolution proceeded in a step-by-step manner, resulting in nanoparticle formation and transient microgrowth stages due to Ostwald ripening. This resulted in complete dissolution of dendrites and "cleaning" of the cell of any silver metal. This is critical for practical battery applications because "dead" lithium is known to cause short circuits and high-discharge rates. In contrast to this, in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution, without surfactant, dendrites dissolved incompletely back into solution, leaving behind minute traces of disconnected silver particles. Finally, a mechanism for the CTAB-influenced dissolution of silver dendrites was proposed based on electrical field dependent binding energy of CTA(+) to silver. PMID:27017834

  10. Dendrite-separator interactions in lithium-based batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Aniruddha; Ely, David R.; García, R. Edwin

    2015-02-01

    The effect of separator pore size on lithium dendrite growth is assessed through the use of the phase field method (PFM). Dendrites are found to undergo concurrent electrodeposition and electrodissolution that define their local growth or shrinkage. Moreover, dendrites are observed to detach due to localized electrodissolution and generate metallic debris that is detrimental to battery performance. A critical current density exists below which dendrites are fully suppressed. An analytical model based on the performed PFM simulations allows to formulate the critical current density as a function of separator morphology and pore radius. Four distinct regimes of dendrite growth are identified: (i) the suppression regime, where dendrite growth is thermodynamically unfavorable; (ii) the permeable regime, where dendrite growth is prohibited beyond the first layer of the separator; (iii) the penetration regime, in which dendrites are stable within the channels of the separator; and (iv) the short circuit regime, where dendrites penetrate the entire width of the separator causing a short circuit. The identification of these regimes serve as a guideline to design improved separators.

  11. The Evolution of Dendrite Morphology during Isothermal Coarsening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkemper, Jens; Mendoza, Roberto; Kammer, Dimitris; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2003-01-01

    Dendrite coarsening is a common phenomenon in casting processes. From the time dendrites are formed until the inter-dendritic liquid is completely solidified dendrites are changing shape driven by variations in interfacial curvature along the dendrite and resulting in a reduction of total interfacial area. During this process the typical length-scale of the dendrite can change by orders of magnitude and the final microstructure is in large part determined by the coarsening parameters. Dendrite coarsening is thus crucial in setting the materials parameters of ingots and of great commercial interest. This coarsening process is being studied in the Pb-Sn system with Sn-dendrites undergoing isothermal coarsening in a Pb-Sn liquid. Results are presented for samples of approximately 60% dendritic phase, which have been coarsened for different lengths of times. Presented are three-dimensional microstructures obtained by serial-sectioning and an analysis of these microstructures with regard to interface orientation and interfacial curvatures. These graphs reflect the evolution of not only the microstructure itself, but also of the underlying driving forces of the coarsening process. As a visualization of the link between the microstructure and the driving forces a three-dimensional microstructure with the interfaces colored according to the local interfacial mean curvature is shown.

  12. Supramolecular dendritic polymers: from synthesis to applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruijiao; Zhou, Yongfeng; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Supramolecular dendritic polymers (SDPs), which perfectly combine the advantages of dendritic polymers with those of supramolecular polymers, are a novel class of non-covalently bonded, highly branched macromolecules with three-dimensional globular topology. Because of their dynamic/reversible nature, unique topological structure, and exceptional physical/chemical properties (e.g., low viscosity, high solubility, and a large number of functional terminal groups), SDPs have attracted increasing attention in recent years in both academic and industrial fields. In particular, the reversibility of non-covalent interactions endows SDPs with the ability to undergo dynamic switching of structure, morphology, and function in response to various external stimuli, such as pH, temperature, light, stress, and redox agents, which further provides a flexible and robust platform for designing and developing smart supramolecular polymeric materials and functional supramolecular devices. The existing SDPs can be systematically classified into the following six major types according to their topological features: supramolecular dendrimers, supramolecular dendronized polymers, supramolecular hyperbranched polymers, supramolecular linear-dendritic block copolymers, supramolecular dendritic-dendritic block copolymers, and supramolecular dendritic multiarm copolymers. These different types of SDPs possess distinct morphologies, unique architectures, and specific functions. Benefiting from their versatile topological structures as well as stimuli-responsive properties, SDPs have displayed not only unique characteristics or advantages in supramolecular self-assembly behaviors (e.g., controllable morphologies, specific performance, and facile functionalization) but also great potential to be promising candidates in various fields. In this Account, we summarize the recent progress in the synthesis, functionalization, and self-assembly of SDPs as well as their potential

  13. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties.

    PubMed

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendritesdendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations. PMID:25903891

  14. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendritesdendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  15. Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Inhibits Microglial Activation and Reduces Hippocampal CA1 Dendritic Spine Morphology Deficits.

    PubMed

    Maysinger, Dusica; Gröger, Dominic; Lake, Andrew; Licha, Kai; Weinhart, Marie; Chang, Philip K-Y; Mulvey, Rose; Haag, Rainer; McKinney, R Anne

    2015-09-14

    Hyperactivity of microglia and loss of functional circuitry is a common feature of many neurological disorders including those induced or exacerbated by inflammation. Herein, we investigate the response of microglia and changes in hippocampal dendritic postsynaptic spines by dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) treatment. Mouse microglia and organotypic hippocampal slices were exposed to dPGS and an inflammogen (lipopolysaccharides). Measurements of intracellular fluorescence and confocal microscopic analyses revealed that dPGS is avidly internalized by microglia but not CA1 pyramidal neurons. Concentration and time-dependent response studies consistently showed no obvious toxicity of dPGS. The adverse effects induced by proinflammogen LPS exposure were reduced and dendritic spine morphology was normalized with the addition of dPGS. This was accompanied by a significant reduction in nitrite and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) from hyperactive microglia suggesting normalized circuitry function with dPGS treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that dPGS acts anti-inflammatory, inhibits inflammation-induced degenerative changes in microglia phenotype and rescues dendritic spine morphology. PMID:26218295

  16. Plasticity of Dendritic Spines: Subcompartmentalization of Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Lesley A.; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce and study neuronal plasticity in single dendritic spines has greatly advanced our understanding of the signaling mechanisms that mediate long-term potentiation. It is now clear that in addition to compartmentalization by the individual spine, subcompartmentalization of biochemical signals occurs at specialized microdomains within the spine. The spatiotemporal coordination of these complex cascades allows for the concomitant remodeling of the postsynaptic density actin spinoskeleton and for the regulation of membrane traffic to express functional and structural plasticity. Here, we highlight recent findings in the signaling cascades at spine microdomains as well as the challenges and approaches to studying plasticity at the spine level. PMID:24215443

  17. Plasticity of dendritic spines: subcompartmentalization of signaling.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Lesley A; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce and study neuronal plasticity in single dendritic spines has greatly advanced our understanding of the signaling mechanisms that mediate long-term potentiation. It is now clear that in addition to compartmentalization by the individual spine, subcompartmentalization of biochemical signals occurs at specialized microdomains within the spine. The spatiotemporal coordination of these complex cascades allows for the concomitant remodeling of the postsynaptic density and actin spinoskeleton and for the regulation of membrane traffic to express functional and structural plasticity. Here, we highlight recent findings in the signaling cascades at spine microdomains as well as the challenges and approaches to studying plasticity at the spine level. PMID:24215443

  18. Immunometabolism governs dendritic cell and macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on intracellular metabolism in dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages provide new insights on the functioning of these critical controllers of innate and adaptive immunity. Both cell types undergo profound metabolic reprogramming in response to environmental cues, such as hypoxia or nutrient alterations, but importantly also in response to danger signals and cytokines. Metabolites such as succinate and citrate have a direct impact on the functioning of macrophages. Immunogenicity and tolerogenicity of DCs is also determined by anabolic and catabolic processes, respectively. These findings provide new prospects for therapeutic manipulation in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:26694970

  19. Mucosal dendritic cells shape mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun-Young; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key modulators that shape the immune system. In mucosal tissues, DCs act as surveillance systems to sense infection and also function as professional antigen-presenting cells that stimulate the differentiation of naive T and B cells. On the basis of their molecular expression, DCs can be divided into several subsets with unique functions. In this review, we focus on intestinal DC subsets and their function in bridging the innate signaling and adaptive immune systems to maintain the homeostasis of the intestinal immune environment. We also review the current strategies for manipulating mucosal DCs for the development of efficient mucosal vaccines to protect against infectious diseases. PMID:24626170

  20. Buoyancy effects of a growing, isolated dendrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, D.; Davis, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    The buoyancy effect of a growing isolated dendrite on the solidification process in the undercooling liquid material was investigated by developing an analytic solution to the growth/convection problem in powers of a buoyancy parameter G. The solution depends on the Prandtl number P and the Stefan number S (undercooling) for the local velocity and thermal fields and also the buoyant alteration of the interface shape. Results suggest that buoyancy effect for metals (low P) may be qualitatively different from that for organics (high P).

  1. Dendritic Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Heather M.; Matsushima, Glenn K.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) persists as a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease and is characterized by the production of autoantibodies and immune complexes that affects multiple organs. The underlying mechanism that triggers and sustain disease are complex and involves certain susceptibility genes and environmental factors. There have been several immune mediators linked to SLE including cytokines and chemokines that have been reviewed elsewhere(1–3). A number of articles have reviewed the role of B cells and T cells in SLE(4–10). Here, we focus on role of dendritic cells (DC) and innate immune factors that may regulate autoreactive B cells. PMID:20367140

  2. Organization of TNIK in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Burette, Alain C; Phend, Kristen D; Burette, Susan; Lin, Qingcong; Liang, Musen; Foltz, Gretchen; Taylor, Noël; Wang, Qi; Brandon, Nicholas J; Bates, Brian; Ehlers, Michael D; Weinberg, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2)- and noncatalytic region of tyrosine kinase (NCK)-interacting kinase (TNIK) has been identified as an interactor in the psychiatric risk factor, Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1). As a step toward deciphering its function in the brain, we performed high-resolution light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. We demonstrate here that TNIK is expressed in neurons throughout the adult mouse brain. In striatum and cerebral cortex, TNIK concentrates in dendritic spines, especially in the vicinity of the lateral edge of the synapse. Thus, TNIK is highly enriched at a microdomain critical for glutamatergic signaling. PMID:25753355

  3. Recent Advances in Simulation of Dendritic Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Cagin, Tahir; Miklis, Paul J.; Wang, Guofeng; Zamanakos, Georgios; Martin, Ryan; Li, Hao; Mainz, Daniel T.; Nagarajan, V.; Goddard, William A.

    1999-05-11

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers represent a revolution in methodology for directed synthesis of monodisperse polymers with enormous possibility of novel architectures. They demonstrate the ability to attain micelle-like structures with distinct internal and external character. Furthermore, the polyfunctional character of dendrimers allows varied response to environment and promise as selective sensors, carrier for drugs, encapsulation of toxic chemicals and metals. One of the key problems is the characterization of the structures. Theory and simulation can be essential to provide and predict structure and properties. We present some recent advances in theory, modeling and simulation of dendritic polymers.

  4. Mechanisms underlying subunit independence in pyramidal neuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Behabadi, Bardia F; Mel, Bartlett W

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal neuron (PN) dendrites compartmentalize voltage signals and can generate local spikes, which has led to the proposal that their dendrites act as independent computational subunits within a multilayered processing scheme. However, when a PN is strongly activated, back-propagating action potentials (bAPs) sweeping outward from the soma synchronize dendritic membrane potentials many times per second. How PN dendrites maintain the independence of their voltage-dependent computations, despite these repeated voltage resets, remains unknown. Using a detailed compartmental model of a layer 5 PN, and an improved method for quantifying subunit independence that incorporates a more accurate model of dendritic integration, we first established that the output of each dendrite can be almost perfectly predicted by the intensity and spatial configuration of its own synaptic inputs, and is nearly invariant to the rate of bAP-mediated "cross-talk" from other dendrites over a 100-fold range. Then, through an analysis of conductance, voltage, and current waveforms within the model cell, we identify three biophysical mechanisms that together help make independent dendritic computation possible in a firing neuron, suggesting that a major subtype of neocortical neuron has been optimized for layered, compartmentalized processing under in-vivo-like spiking conditions. PMID:24357611

  5. Musical representation of dendritic spine distribution: a new exploratory tool.

    PubMed

    Toharia, Pablo; Morales, Juan; de Juan, Octavio; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions along the dendrites of many types of neurons in the central nervous system and represent the major target of excitatory synapses. For this reason, numerous anatomical, physiological and computational studies have focused on these structures. In the cerebral cortex the most abundant and characteristic neuronal type are pyramidal cells (about 85 % of all neurons) and their dendritic spines are the main postsynaptic target of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Thus, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the cerebral cortex largely depends on the knowledge regarding synaptic inputs to dendritic spines of pyramidal cells. Much of the structural data on dendritic spines produced by modern neuroscience involves the quantitative analysis of image stacks from light and electron microscopy, using standard statistical and mathematical tools and software developed to this end. Here, we present a new method with musical feedback for exploring dendritic spine morphology and distribution patterns in pyramidal neurons. We demonstrate that audio analysis of spiny dendrites with apparently similar morphology may "sound" quite different, revealing anatomical substrates that are not apparent from simple visual inspection. These morphological/music translations may serve as a guide for further mathematical analysis of the design of the pyramidal neurons and of spiny dendrites in general. PMID:24395057

  6. Special fractal growth of dendrite copper using a hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yan; Zhang Zhejuan; Guo Pingsheng; He Pingang; Sun Zhuo

    2011-08-15

    Special fractal dendrite Cu nanostructures have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal method, and the effects of the volume ratio between glycerol and water and the concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} on the morphologies of dendrite Cu have been studied in detail. The Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to characterize these Cu products. The results indicate that rhombic diamond and different morphologies of fractal dendrite were prepared because of the accumulation of Cu nuclei based on the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and the nucleation-limited aggregation (NLA) model. Fortunately, symmetrical leaf-like dendrite Cu nanostructures different from Cu dendrites reported before have been obtained. Additionally, an explanation for the growth of fractal dendrite Cu has been discussed carefully. - Graphical abstract: Uniform dendritic Cu are grown through controlling V{sub glycerol/water} in range of 0.6-1.2 and the concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} in range of 0.06-0.3 M. The rhombic cluster Cu are obtained by decreasing the amount of glycerol. Highlights: > Volume ratio of glycerol/water and concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} were varied, respectively. > Morphologies of dendritic Cu have some changes. > Leaf-like and rhombic cluster Cu were obtained. > The concentration changes affect the aggregation of Cu crystallites. > The aggregation and crystallographic orientation cause leaf-like Cu nanostructures.

  7. BC1 RNA motifs required for dendritic transport in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Robeck, Thomas; Skryabin, Boris V.; Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S.; Skryabin, Anastasiya B.; Brosius, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    BC1 RNA is a small brain specific non-protein coding RNA. It is transported from the cell body into dendrites where it is involved in the fine-tuning translational control. Due to its compactness and established secondary structure, BC1 RNA is an ideal model for investigating the motifs necessary for dendritic localization. Previously, microinjection of in vitro transcribed BC1 RNA mutants into the soma of cultured primary neurons suggested the importance of RNA motifs for dendritic targeting. These ex vivo experiments identified a single bulged nucleotide (U22) and a putative K-turn (GA motif) structure required for dendritic localization or distal transport, respectively. We generated six transgenic mouse lines (three founders each) containing neuronally expressing BC1 RNA variants on a BC1 RNA knockout mouse background. In contrast to ex vivo data, we did not find indications of reduction or abolition of dendritic BC1 RNA localization in the mutants devoid of the GA motif or the bulged nucleotide. We confirmed the ex vivo data, which showed that the triloop terminal sequence had no consequence on dendritic transport. Interestingly, changing the triloop supporting structure completely abolished dendritic localization of BC1 RNA. We propose a novel RNA motif important for dendritic transport in vivo. PMID:27350115

  8. Measles Virus Induces Functional TRAIL Production by Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Lamouille, Barbara; Astier, Anne; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Servet-Delprat, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Measles virus infection induces a profound immunosuppression that can lead to serious secondary infections. Here we demonstrate that measles virus induces tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA and protein expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Moreover, measles virus-infected dendritic cells are shown to be cytotoxic via the TRAIL pathway. PMID:10590149

  9. Contribution of sublinear and supralinear dendritic integration to neuronal computations.

    PubMed

    Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Cazé, Romain D; Abrahamsson, Therése; Cathala, Laurence; Gutkin, Boris S; DiGregorio, David A

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear dendritic integration is thought to increase the computational ability of neurons. Most studies focus on how supralinear summation of excitatory synaptic responses arising from clustered inputs within single dendrites result in the enhancement of neuronal firing, enabling simple computations such as feature detection. Recent reports have shown that sublinear summation is also a prominent dendritic operation, extending the range of subthreshold input-output (sI/O) transformations conferred by dendrites. Like supralinear operations, sublinear dendritic operations also increase the repertoire of neuronal computations, but feature extraction requires different synaptic connectivity strategies for each of these operations. In this article we will review the experimental and theoretical findings describing the biophysical determinants of the three primary classes of dendritic operations: linear, sublinear, and supralinear. We then review a Boolean algebra-based analysis of simplified neuron models, which provides insight into how dendritic operations influence neuronal computations. We highlight how neuronal computations are critically dependent on the interplay of dendritic properties (morphology and voltage-gated channel expression), spiking threshold and distribution of synaptic inputs carrying particular sensory features. Finally, we describe how global (scattered) and local (clustered) integration strategies permit the implementation of similar classes of computations, one example being the object feature binding problem. PMID:25852470

  10. Astrocyte-derived phosphatidic acid promotes dendritic branching

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan-Bing; Gao, Weizhen; Zhang, Yongbo; Jia, Feng; Zhang, Hai-Long; Liu, Ying-Zi; Sun, Xue-Fang; Yin, Yuhua; Yin, Dong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play critical roles in neural circuit formation and function. Recent studies have revealed several secreted and contact-mediated signals from astrocytes which are essential for neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of dendritic branching by astrocytes remain elusive. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) to generate phosphatidic acid (PA) and choline, has been implicated in the regulation of neurite outgrowth. Here we showed that knockdown of PLD1 selectively in astrocytes reduced dendritic branching of neurons in neuron-glia mixed culture. Further studies from sandwich-like cocultures and astrocyte conditioned medium suggested that astrocyte PLD1 regulated dendritic branching through secreted signals. We later demonstrated that PA was the key mediator for astrocyte PLD1 to regulate dendritic branching. Moreover, PA itself was sufficient to promote dendritic branching of neurons. Lastly, we showed that PA could activate protein kinase A (PKA) in neurons and promote dendritic branching through PKA signaling. Taken together, our results demonstrate that astrocyte PLD1 and its lipid product PA are essential regulators of dendritic branching in neurons. These results may provide new insight into mechanisms underlying how astrocytes regulate dendrite growth of neurons. PMID:26883475

  11. Dendrites and Cognition: A Negative Pilot Study in the Rat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Britt

    1995-01-01

    The dendritic structure of layer II-III pyramidal neurons of the parietal cortex in 41 Long-Evans rats was compared to behavioral assessments of attention to novelty, response flexibility, and reasoning. A significant correlation between dendritic arborization and behavioral performance was not demonstrated. (SLD)

  12. BC1 RNA motifs required for dendritic transport in vivo.

    PubMed

    Robeck, Thomas; Skryabin, Boris V; Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S; Skryabin, Anastasiya B; Brosius, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    BC1 RNA is a small brain specific non-protein coding RNA. It is transported from the cell body into dendrites where it is involved in the fine-tuning translational control. Due to its compactness and established secondary structure, BC1 RNA is an ideal model for investigating the motifs necessary for dendritic localization. Previously, microinjection of in vitro transcribed BC1 RNA mutants into the soma of cultured primary neurons suggested the importance of RNA motifs for dendritic targeting. These ex vivo experiments identified a single bulged nucleotide (U22) and a putative K-turn (GA motif) structure required for dendritic localization or distal transport, respectively. We generated six transgenic mouse lines (three founders each) containing neuronally expressing BC1 RNA variants on a BC1 RNA knockout mouse background. In contrast to ex vivo data, we did not find indications of reduction or abolition of dendritic BC1 RNA localization in the mutants devoid of the GA motif or the bulged nucleotide. We confirmed the ex vivo data, which showed that the triloop terminal sequence had no consequence on dendritic transport. Interestingly, changing the triloop supporting structure completely abolished dendritic localization of BC1 RNA. We propose a novel RNA motif important for dendritic transport in vivo. PMID:27350115

  13. Contribution of sublinear and supralinear dendritic integration to neuronal computations

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Cazé, Romain D.; Abrahamsson, Therése; Cathala, Laurence; Gutkin, Boris S.; DiGregorio, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear dendritic integration is thought to increase the computational ability of neurons. Most studies focus on how supralinear summation of excitatory synaptic responses arising from clustered inputs within single dendrites result in the enhancement of neuronal firing, enabling simple computations such as feature detection. Recent reports have shown that sublinear summation is also a prominent dendritic operation, extending the range of subthreshold input-output (sI/O) transformations conferred by dendrites. Like supralinear operations, sublinear dendritic operations also increase the repertoire of neuronal computations, but feature extraction requires different synaptic connectivity strategies for each of these operations. In this article we will review the experimental and theoretical findings describing the biophysical determinants of the three primary classes of dendritic operations: linear, sublinear, and supralinear. We then review a Boolean algebra-based analysis of simplified neuron models, which provides insight into how dendritic operations influence neuronal computations. We highlight how neuronal computations are critically dependent on the interplay of dendritic properties (morphology and voltage-gated channel expression), spiking threshold and distribution of synaptic inputs carrying particular sensory features. Finally, we describe how global (scattered) and local (clustered) integration strategies permit the implementation of similar classes of computations, one example being the object feature binding problem. PMID:25852470

  14. Two Clathrin Adaptor Protein Complexes Instruct Axon-Dendrite Polarity.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengpeng; Merrill, Sean A; Jorgensen, Erik M; Shen, Kang

    2016-05-01

    The cardinal feature of neuronal polarization is the establishment and maintenance of axons and dendrites. How axonal and dendritic proteins are sorted and targeted to different compartments is poorly understood. Here, we identified distinct dileucine motifs that are necessary and sufficient to target transmembrane proteins to either the axon or the dendrite through direct interactions with the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complexes (APs) in C. elegans. Axonal targeting requires AP-3, while dendritic targeting is mediated by AP-1. The axonal dileucine motif binds to AP-3 with higher efficiency than to AP-1. Both AP-3 and AP-1 are localized to the Golgi but occupy adjacent domains. We propose that AP-3 and AP-1 directly select transmembrane proteins and target them to axon and dendrite, respectively, by sorting them into distinct vesicle pools. PMID:27151641

  15. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by mRNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA. PMID:27236804

  16. Regulation of Th2 Cell Immunity by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyeongjin

    2016-01-01

    Th2 cell immunity is required for host defense against helminths, but it is detrimental in allergic diseases in humans. Unlike Th1 cell and Th17 cell subsets, the mechanism by which dendritic cells modulate Th2 cell responses has been obscure, in part because of the inability of dendritic cells to provide IL-4, which is indispensable for Th2 cell lineage commitment. In this regard, immune cells other than dendritic cells, such as basophils and innate lymphoid cells, have been suggested as Th2 cell inducers. More recently, multiple independent researchers have shown that specialized subsets of dendritic cells mediate Th2 cell responses. This review will discuss the current understanding related to the regulation of Th2 cell responses by dendritic cells and other immune cells. PMID:26937227

  17. Dendrite coherency of Al-Si-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldman, Natalia L. M.; Dahle, Arne K.; Stjohn, David H.; Arnberg, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The dendrite coherency point of Al-Si-Cu alloys was determined by thermal analysis and rheological measurement methods by performing parallel measurements at two cooling rates for aluminum alloys across a wide range of silicon and copper contents. Contrary to previous findings, the two methods yield significantly different values for the fraction solid at the dendrite coherency point. This disparity is greatest for alloys of low solute concentration. The results from this study also contradict previously reported trends in the effect of cooling rate on the dendritic coherency point. Consideration of the results shows that thermal analysis is not a valid technique for the measurement of coherency. Analysis of the results from rheological testing indicates that silicon concentration has a dominant effect on grain size and dendritic morphology, independent of cooling rate and copper content, and thus is the factor that determines the fraction solid at dendrite coherency for Al-Si-Cu alloys.

  18. Dendrite coherency during equiaxed solidification in binary aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, G.; Baeckerud, L.; Roelland, T.; Arnberg, L.

    1995-04-01

    Dendrite coherency, or dendrite impingement, is important to the formation of the solidification structure and castability of alloys. Dendrite coherency in the systems Al-xMn, Al-xCu, Al-xFe, and Al-xSi (x = 0 to 5 wt pct) has been studied by continuous torque measurement in solidifying samples. The fraction solid at the dendrite coherency point, fs*, varies with the alloy system and the solute concentration in the alloy, from 18 to 56 pct for the present alloys investigated. An increase in solute concentration decreases the coherency fraction solid, fs*. An alloy system with a large slope of the liquidus line has a high coherency fraction solid. A theoretical approach has been developed to account for the effects of the alloy system and solute concentration on the dendrite coherency in the alloy. The grain sizes of the alloys were evaluated using the parameters at coherency point.

  19. Synthesis and field emission properties of Cu dendritic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwen; Yu, Ke; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2010-03-01

    Cu dendritic nanostructures were synthesized on ITO glass substructure by electrochemical deposition. SEM images showed that these Cu dendritic nanostuctures revealed a clear and well-defined dendritic fractal structure with a pronounced trunk and highly ordered branches distributed on both sides of the trunk. The diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model was used to explain the fractal growth of Cu dendritic nanostructures. Field emission properties of these Cu dendritic nanostructures were measured, which have possessed good performance with the turn-on field of 7.5 V/μm (defined as the electric field required to be detected at a current density of 0.1 mA/cm 2) and the field enhancement factor β of 1094.

  20. Structural and Morphological Evolution of Lead Dendrites during Electrochemical Migration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Minghua; Liao, Hong-Gang; Niu, Kaiyang; Zheng, Haimei

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical deposition and dissolution of lead on gold electrodes immersed in an aqueous solution of lead nitrate were studied in situ using a biasing liquid cell by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We investigate in real time the growth mechanisms of lead dendrites as deposited on the electrodes under an applied potential. TEM images reveal that lead dendrites are developed by the fast protrusion of lead branches in the electrolyte and tip splitting. And, the fast growing tip of the dendritic branch is composed of polycrystalline nanograins and it develops into a single crystalline branch eventually. This study demonstrated unique electrochemical growth of single crystal dendrites through nucleation, aggregation, alignment and attachment of randomly oriented small grains. Additionally, we found the lead concentration in the electrolyte drastically influences the morphology of dendritic formation. PMID:24233151

  1. Astrocytes refine cortical connectivity at dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Risher, W Christopher; Patel, Sagar; Kim, Il Hwan; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Bhagat, Srishti; Wilton, Daniel K; Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Singh Alvarado, Jonnathan; Calhan, Osman Y; Silver, Debra L; Stevens, Beth; Calakos, Nicole; Soderling, Scott H; Eroglu, Cagla

    2014-01-01

    During cortical synaptic development, thalamic axons must establish synaptic connections despite the presence of the more abundant intracortical projections. How thalamocortical synapses are formed and maintained in this competitive environment is unknown. Here, we show that astrocyte-secreted protein hevin is required for normal thalamocortical synaptic connectivity in the mouse cortex. Absence of hevin results in a profound, long-lasting reduction in thalamocortical synapses accompanied by a transient increase in intracortical excitatory connections. Three-dimensional reconstructions of cortical neurons from serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) revealed that, during early postnatal development, dendritic spines often receive multiple excitatory inputs. Immuno-EM and confocal analyses revealed that majority of the spines with multiple excitatory contacts (SMECs) receive simultaneous thalamic and cortical inputs. Proportion of SMECs diminishes as the brain develops, but SMECs remain abundant in Hevin-null mice. These findings reveal that, through secretion of hevin, astrocytes control an important developmental synaptic refinement process at dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04047.001 PMID:25517933

  2. Increased Dendrite Branching in AβPP/PS1 Mice and Elongation of Dendrite Arbors by Fasudil Administration

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Brian A.; DeMarco, George J.; Gourley, Shannon L.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) overproduction and dendrite arbor atrophy are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease. The RhoA GTPase (Rho) signals through Rho kinase (ROCK) to control cytoskeletal dynamics and regulate neuron structure. Hyperactive Rho signaling destabilizes neurons leading to dendritic regression that can be rescued by genetic or pharmacological reduction of ROCK signaling. To understand what effect reduced ROCK signaling has on the dendrite arbors of mice that overproduce Aβ, we administered the ROCK inhibitor fasudil to AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. We report that increased dendrite branching occurs in AβPP/PS1 mice and that fasudil promotes lengthening of the dendrite arbors of CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:20413901

  3. Effects of TCDD on the Fate of Naive Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bankoti, Jaishree; Burnett, Andrea; Navarro, Severine; Miller, Andrea K.; Rase, Ben; Shepherd, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), causes immune suppression via activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-presenting cells in the immune system, are adversely affected by TCDD. We hypothesized that TCDD alters DC homeostasis, resulting in a loss of DCs in naive mice. To test this hypothesis, C57Bl/6 mice were gavaged with either vehicle or an immunosuppressive dose of TCDD (15 μg/kg). TCDD exposure decreased the frequency and number of splenic CD11chigh DCs on day 7 when compared with vehicle-treated controls. TCDD increased the expression of CD86 and CD54, while decreasing the frequency of splenic CD11chigh DCs expressing CD11a and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II. Moreover, TCDD selectively decreased the CD11chighCD8α−33D1+ splenic DCs specialized at activating CD4+ T cells but did not affect the regulatory CD11chighCD8α+DEC205+ splenic DCs. TCDD did not alter the number or frequency of CD11clow splenic DCs but decreased their MHC class II and CD11a expression. Loss of splenic CD11chigh DCs was independent of Fas-mediated apoptosis and was not due to alterations in the numbers of common DC precursors in the bone marrow or their ability to generate steady-state DCs in vitro. Instead, increased CCR7 expression on CD11chigh DCs suggested involvement of a migratory event. Popliteal and brachial lymph node CD11c+ cells showed elevated levels of MHC class II and CD40 following TCDD exposure. Collectively, this study shows the presence of a TCDD-sensitive splenic DC subpopulation in naive mice, suggesting that TCDD may induce suppression of T-cell-mediated immunity by disrupting DC homeostasis. PMID:20211938

  4. 3 CFR - Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory Review Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 30, 2009 Regulatory Review Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies For well over two decades, the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) at the Office of Management...

  5. Statistical Physics of Neural Systems with Nonadditive Dendritic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, David; Timme, Marc; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin

    2014-01-01

    How neurons process their inputs crucially determines the dynamics of biological and artificial neural networks. In such neural and neural-like systems, synaptic input is typically considered to be merely transmitted linearly or sublinearly by the dendritic compartments. Yet, single-neuron experiments report pronounced supralinear dendritic summation of sufficiently synchronous and spatially close-by inputs. Here, we provide a statistical physics approach to study the impact of such nonadditive dendritic processing on single-neuron responses and the performance of associative-memory tasks in artificial neural networks. First, we compute the effect of random input to a neuron incorporating nonlinear dendrites. This approach is independent of the details of the neuronal dynamics. Second, we use those results to study the impact of dendritic nonlinearities on the network dynamics in a paradigmatic model for associative memory, both numerically and analytically. We find that dendritic nonlinearities maintain network convergence and increase the robustness of memory performance against noise. Interestingly, an intermediate number of dendritic branches is optimal for memory functionality.

  6. NMDA spike/plateau potentials in dendrites of thalamocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Augustinaite, Sigita; Kuhn, Bernd; Helm, Paul Johannes; Heggelund, Paul

    2014-08-13

    Dendritic NMDA spike/plateau potentials, first discovered in cortical pyramidal neurons, provide supralinear integration of synaptic inputs on thin and distal dendrites, thereby increasing the impact of these inputs on the soma. The more specific functional role of these potentials has been difficult to clarify, partly due to the complex circuitry of cortical neurons. Thalamocortical (TC) neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus participate in simpler circuits. They receive their primary afferent input from retina and send their output to visual cortex. Cortex, in turn, regulates this output through massive feedback to distal dendrites of the TC neurons. The TC neurons can operate in two modes related to behavioral states: burst mode prevailing during sleep, when T-type calcium bursts largely disrupt the transfer of signals from retina to cortex, and tonic mode, which provides reliable transfer of retinal signals to cortex during wakefulness. We studied dendritic potentials in TC neurons with combined two-photon calcium imaging and whole-cell recording of responses to local dendritic glutamate iontophoresis in acute brain slices from mice. We found that NMDA spike/plateaus can be elicited locally at distal dendrites of TC neurons. We suggest that these dendritic potentials have important functions in the cortical regulation of thalamocortical transmission. NMDA spike/plateaus can induce shifts in the functional mode from burst to tonic by blockade of T-type calcium conductances. Moreover, in tonic mode, they can facilitate the transfer of retinal signals to cortex by depolarization of TC neurons. PMID:25122891

  7. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike. PMID:25520626

  8. Axin Regulates Dendritic Spine Morphogenesis through Cdc42-Dependent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Liang, Zhuoyi; Fei, Erkang; Chen, Yuewen; Zhou, Xiaopu; Fang, Weiqun; Fu, Wing-Yu; Fu, Amy K. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2015-01-01

    During development, scaffold proteins serve as important platforms for orchestrating signaling complexes to transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular responses that regulate dendritic spine morphology and function. Axin (“axis inhibitor”) is a key scaffold protein in canonical Wnt signaling that interacts with specific synaptic proteins. However, the cellular functions of these protein–protein interactions in dendritic spine morphology and synaptic regulation are unclear. Here, we report that Axin protein is enriched in synaptic fractions, colocalizes with the postsynaptic marker PSD-95 in cultured hippocampal neurons, and interacts with a signaling protein Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in synaptosomal fractions. Axin depletion by shRNA in cultured neurons or intact hippocampal CA1 regions significantly reduced dendritic spine density. Intriguingly, the defective dendritic spine morphogenesis in Axin-knockdown neurons could be restored by overexpression of the small Rho-GTPase Cdc42, whose activity is regulated by CaMKII. Moreover, pharmacological stabilization of Axin resulted in increased dendritic spine number and spontaneous neurotransmission, while Axin stabilization in hippocampal neurons reduced the elimination of dendritic spines. Taken together, our findings suggest that Axin promotes dendritic spine stabilization through Cdc42-dependent cytoskeletal reorganization. PMID:26204446

  9. A multiphase solute diffusion model for dendritic alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Beckermann, C.

    1993-12-01

    A solute diffusion model, aimed at predicting microstructure formation in metal castings, is proposed for dendritic solidification of alloys. The model accounts for the different length scales existing in a dendritic structure. This is accomplished by utilizing a multiphase approach, in which not only the various physical phases but also phases associated with different length scales are considered separately. The macroscopic conservation equations are derived for each phase using the volume averaging technique, with constitutive relations developed for the interfacial transfer terms. It is shown that the multiphase model can rigorously incorporate the growth of dendrite tips and coarsening of dendrite arms. In addition, the distinction of different length scales enables the inclusion of realistic descriptions of the dendrite topology and relations to key metallurgical parameters. Another novel aspect of the model is that a single set of conservation equations for solute diffusion is developed for both equiaxed and columnar dendritic solidification. Finally, illustrative calculations for equiaxed, columnar, and mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification are carried out to provide quantitative comparisons with previous studies, and a variety of fundamental phenomena such as recalescence, dendrite tip undercooling, and columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) are predicted.

  10. Dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Faits, Michelle C; Zhang, Chunmeng; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria move throughout neuronal dendrites and localize to sites of energy demand. The prevailing view of dendritic mitochondria as highly motile organelles whose distribution is continually adjusted by neuronal activity via Ca2+-dependent arrests is based on observations in cultured neurons exposed to artificial stimuli. Here, we analyze the movements of mitochondria in ganglion cell dendrites in the intact retina. We find that whereas during development 30% of mitochondria are motile at any time, as dendrites mature, mitochondria all but stop moving and localize stably to synapses and branch points. Neither spontaneous nor sensory-evoked activity and Ca2+ transients alter motility of dendritic mitochondria; and pathological hyperactivity in a mouse model of retinal degeneration elevates rather than reduces motility. Thus, our findings indicate that dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during a critical developmental period of high motility, and challenge current views about the role of activity in regulating mitochondrial transport in dendrites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11583.001 PMID:26742087

  11. PHENOTYPE AND POLARIZATION OF AUTOLOGOUS T CELLS BY BIOMATERIAL-TREATED DENDRITIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaehyung; Gerber, Michael H.; Babensee, Julia E.

    2014-01-01

    Given the central role of dendritic cells (DCs) in directing T cell phenotypes, the ability of biomaterial-treated DCs to dictate autologous T cell phenotype was investigated. Here, we demonstrate that differentially biomaterial-treated DCs differentially directed autologous T cell phenotype and polarization, depending on the biomaterial used to pre-treat the DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes, and treated with biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), followed by co-culture of these biomaterial-treated DCs and autologous T cells. When autologous T cells were co-cultured with DCs treated with biomaterial film/antigen (ovalbumin, OVA) combinations, different biomaterial films induced differential levels of T cell marker (CD4, CD8, CD25, CD69) expression, as well as differential cytokine profiles [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, IL-4] in the polarization of T helper types. Dendritic cells treated with agarose films/OVA induced CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (T regulatory cells) expression, comparable to untreated iDCs, on autologous T cells in the DC-T co-culture system. Furthermore, in this co-culture, agarose treatment induced release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 at higher levels, as compared to DC treatment with other biomaterial films/OVA, suggesting Th1 and Th2 polarization, respectively. Dendritic cells treated with PLGA film/OVA treatment induced release of IFN-γ at higher levels compared to that observed for co-cultures with iDCs or DCs treated with all other biomaterial films. These results indicate that DC treatment with different biomaterial films has potential as a tool for immunomodulation by directing autologous T cell responses. PMID:24616366

  12. Regulatory affairs administration as regulatory policy determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Forcier, J.R.

    1984-05-10

    It is the thesis of this article that the processing of a utility company's regulation-related work, the supporting tasks and the manner in which they are completed, can and does have a significant impact on the final results or work product of the regulatory affairs function, including even, potentially, the action of the regulatory agency. The article is therefore full of practical pointers on how the interface with the regulatory authority can best be organized, managed, and carried through to the attainment of optimum results for the utility. 2 references.

  13. Strategies to reduce dendritic cell activation through functional biomaterial design

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Patrick S.; He, Jing; Haskins, Kathryn; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a key role in determining adaptive immunity, and there is growing interest in characterizing and manipulating the interactions between dendritic cells and biomaterial surfaces. Contact with several common biomaterials can induce the maturation of immature dendritic cells, but substrates that reduce dendritic cell maturation are of particular interest within the field of cell-based therapeutics where the goal is to reduce the immune response to cell-laden material carriers. In this study, we use a materials-based strategy to functionalize poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with immobilized immunosuppressive factors (TGF-β1 and IL-10) to reduce the maturation of immature dendritic cells. TGF-β1 and IL-10 are commonly employed as soluble factors to program dendritic cells in vitro, and we demonstrate that these proteins retain bioactivity towards dendritic cells when immobilized on hydrogel surfaces. Following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or cytokines, a dendritic cell line interacting with the surfaces of immunosuppressive hydrogels expressed reduced markers of maturation, including IL-12 and MHCII. The bioactivity of these immunomodulatory hydrogels was further confirmed with primary bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) isolated from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, as quantified by a decrease in activation markers and a significantly reduced capacity to activate T cells. Furthermore, by introducing a second signal to promote BMDC-material interactions combined with the presentation of tolerizing signals, the mulitfunctional PEG hydrogels were found to further increase signaling towards BMDCs, as evidenced by greater reductions in maturation markers. PMID:22361099

  14. Fractal structures of dendrites in GaSe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, N. N.; Borisenko, E. B.; Borisenko, D. N.; Bozhko, S. I.

    2008-07-01

    Solidification of melts at substantial supercooling is associated with instability on the growth front. This causes growth of dendrites, which form as a branched tree in a crystal. In the layered melt-grown GaSe crystals dendrites are observed, if growth rates are rather high [N.N. Kolesnikov, E.B. Borisenko, D.N. Borisenko, V.K. Gartman, Influence of growth conditions on microstructure and properties of GaSe crystals, J. Crystal Growth 300 (2) (2007) 294-298]. Models based on solution of the thermal diffusion problem are traditionally used to describe dendrite growth. Solution of this problem requires information about several physical parameters, such as diffusion coefficient, heat conductivity coefficient and supercooling at the solid/liquid interface. The study of scale invariance of dendrites formed in a crystal provides a new approach to solution of the dynamic growth problem. The calculated fractal dimensionality of the experimentally observed dendrites in GaSe crystals is D=1.7. It coincides with dimensionality of the clusters obtained through computer simulation in terms of the model of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). This result provides a new approach to description of the dynamics of dendrite growth. We have shown that the dendrite growth mechanism in the layered semiconductor crystals can be described by a two-dimensional DLA model. It is shown that probabilistic simulation can be used to show the development of a dendrite in any material. In contrast to the classical theories of dendrite growth, this approach does not require information on physical parameters.

  15. Fundamentals of dendritic solidification. I - Steady-state tip growth. II - Development of sidebranch structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.-C.; Glicksman, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    Systematic measurements of dendrite tip radius and growth velocity in succinonitrile reveal that consideration of dendrite tip stability should be incorporated into the heat transfer theory to determine the steady-state dendritic growth condition. The dendritic stability criterion measured is 2 alpha d0/VR squared = 0.0195, where V is the dendritic growth velocity, R is the dendritic tip radius, alpha is the liquid thermal diffusivity, and d0 is a capillary length defined in the text. Several dendritic stability models are reviewed and discussed in comparison to the present experimental results.

  16. The Dark Side of Dendritic Cells: Development and Exploitation of Tolerogenic Activity That Favor Tumor Outgrowth and Immune Escape

    PubMed Central

    Seliger, Barbara; Massa, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in the regulation of the immune responses by providing the information needed to decide between tolerance, ignorance, or active responses. For this reason different therapies aim at manipulating DC to obtain the desired response, such as enhanced cell-mediated toxicity against tumor and infected cells or the induction of tolerance in autoimmunity and transplantation. In the last decade studies performed in these settings have started to identify (some) molecules/factors involved in the acquisition of a tolerogenic DC phenotype as well as the underlying mechanisms of their regulatory function on different immune cell populations. PMID:24348482

  17. Quantifying the Number of Discriminable Coincident Dendritic Input Patterns through Dendritic Tree Morphology.

    PubMed

    Zippo, Antonio G; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2015-01-01

    Current developments in neuronal physiology are unveiling novel roles for dendrites. Experiments have shown mechanisms of non-linear synaptic NMDA dependent activations, able to discriminate input patterns through the waveforms of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Contextually, the synaptic clustering of inputs is the principal cellular strategy to separate groups of common correlated inputs. Dendritic branches appear to work as independent discriminating units of inputs potentially reflecting an extraordinary repertoire of pattern memories. However, it is unclear how these observations could impact our comprehension of the structural correlates of memory at the cellular level. This work investigates the discrimination capabilities of neurons through computational biophysical models to extract a predicting law for the dendritic input discrimination capability (M). By this rule we compared neurons from a neuron reconstruction repository (neuromorpho.org). Comparisons showed that primate neurons were not supported by an equivalent M preeminence and that M is not uniformly distributed among neuron types. Remarkably, neocortical neurons had substantially less memory capacity in comparison to those from non-cortical regions. In conclusion, the proposed rule predicts the inherent neuronal spatial memory gathering potentially relevant anatomical and evolutionary considerations about the brain cytoarchitecture. PMID:26100354

  18. Quantifying the Number of Discriminable Coincident Dendritic Input Patterns through Dendritic Tree Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Zippo, Antonio G.; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Current developments in neuronal physiology are unveiling novel roles for dendrites. Experiments have shown mechanisms of non-linear synaptic NMDA dependent activations, able to discriminate input patterns through the waveforms of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Contextually, the synaptic clustering of inputs is the principal cellular strategy to separate groups of common correlated inputs. Dendritic branches appear to work as independent discriminating units of inputs potentially reflecting an extraordinary repertoire of pattern memories. However, it is unclear how these observations could impact our comprehension of the structural correlates of memory at the cellular level. This work investigates the discrimination capabilities of neurons through computational biophysical models to extract a predicting law for the dendritic input discrimination capability (M). By this rule we compared neurons from a neuron reconstruction repository (neuromorpho.org). Comparisons showed that primate neurons were not supported by an equivalent M preeminence and that M is not uniformly distributed among neuron types. Remarkably, neocortical neurons had substantially less memory capacity in comparison to those from non-cortical regions. In conclusion, the proposed rule predicts the inherent neuronal spatial memory gathering potentially relevant anatomical and evolutionary considerations about the brain cytoarchitecture. PMID:26100354

  19. Growing dendrites and axons differ in their reliance on the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Bing; Zhang, Ye; Song, Wei; Younger, Susan H.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about how the distinct architectures of dendrites and axons are established. From a genetic screen, we isolated dendritic arbor reduction (dar) mutants with reduced dendritic arbors but normal axons of Drosophila neurons. We identified dar2, dar3, and dar6 genes as the homologs of Sec23, Sar1, and Rab1 of the secretory pathway. In both Drosophila and rodent neurons, defects in Sar1 expression preferentially affected dendritic growth, revealing evolutionarily conserved difference between dendritic and axonal development in the sensitivity to limiting membrane supply from the secretory pathway. Whereas limiting ER to Golgi transport resulted in decreased membrane supply from soma to dendrites, membrane supply to axons remained sustained. We also show that dendritic growth is contributed by Golgi outposts, which are found predominantly in dendrites. The distinct dependence between dendritic and axonal growth on the secretory pathway helps to establish different morphology of dendrites and axons. PMID:17719548

  20. Differential regulation of apical-basolateral dendrite outgrowth by activity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Seong, Eunju; Yuan, Li; Singh, Dipika; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons have characteristic dendrite asymmetry, characterized by structurally and functionally distinct apical and basolateral dendrites. The ability of the neuron to generate and maintain dendrite asymmetry is vital, since synaptic inputs received are critically dependent on dendrite architecture. Little is known about the role of neuronal activity in guiding maintenance of dendrite asymmetry. Our data indicate that dendrite asymmetry is established and maintained early during development. Further, our results indicate that cell intrinsic and global alterations of neuronal activity have differential effects on net extension of apical and basolateral dendrites. Thus, apical and basolateral dendrite extension may be independently regulated by cell intrinsic and network neuronal activity during development, suggesting that individual dendrites may have autonomous control over net extension. We propose that regulated individual dendrite extension in response to cell intrinsic and neuronal network activity may allow temporal control of synapse specificity in the developing hippocampus. PMID:26321915

  1. Dendrites, viscous fingers, and the theory of pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of pattern formation in dendritic crystal growth and viscous fingering in fluids are reviewed. Consideration is given to the discovery that weak capillary forces act as singular perturbations which lead to selection mechanisms in dendritic crystal growth and fingering patterns. Other topics include the conventional thermodynamic model of the solidification of a pure substance from its melt, fingering instability, pattern selection, the solvability theory, dendritic growth rates, the bubble effect discovered by Couder et al. (1986), the dynamics of pattern-forming systems, and snowflake formation.

  2. Quantitative phase-field modeling of dendritic electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Cogswell, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    A thin-interface phase-field model of electrochemical interfaces is developed based on Marcus kinetics for concentrated solutions, and used to simulate dendrite growth during electrodeposition of metals. The model is derived in the grand electrochemical potential to permit the interface to be widened to reach experimental length and time scales, and electroneutrality is formulated to eliminate the Debye length. Quantitative agreement is achieved with zinc Faradaic reaction kinetics, fractal growth dimension, tip velocity, and radius of curvature. Reducing the exchange current density is found to suppress the growth of dendrites, and screening electrolytes by their exchange currents is suggested as a strategy for controlling dendrite growth in batteries. PMID:26274118

  3. Quantitative phase-field modeling of dendritic electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogswell, Daniel A.

    2015-07-01

    A thin-interface phase-field model of electrochemical interfaces is developed based on Marcus kinetics for concentrated solutions, and used to simulate dendrite growth during electrodeposition of metals. The model is derived in the grand electrochemical potential to permit the interface to be widened to reach experimental length and time scales, and electroneutrality is formulated to eliminate the Debye length. Quantitative agreement is achieved with zinc Faradaic reaction kinetics, fractal growth dimension, tip velocity, and radius of curvature. Reducing the exchange current density is found to suppress the growth of dendrites, and screening electrolytes by their exchange currents is suggested as a strategy for controlling dendrite growth in batteries.

  4. Dendritic signal transmission induced by intracellular charge inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarevich, Ivan A.; Kazantsev, Victor B.

    2013-12-01

    Signal propagation in neuronal dendrites represents the basis for interneuron communication and information processing in the brain. Here we take into account charge inhomogeneities arising in the vicinity of ion channels in cytoplasm and obtain a modified cable equation. We show that charge inhomogeneities acting on a millisecond time scale can lead to the appearance of propagating waves with wavelengths of hundreds of micrometers. They correspond to a certain frequency band predicting the appearance of resonant properties in brain neuron signaling. We also show that membrane potential in spiny dendrites obeys the modified cable equation suggesting a crucial role of the spines in dendritic subthreshold resonance.

  5. Dendritic Growth of Hard-Sphere Crystals. Experiment 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Meyer, W. V.; Rogers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observations of the disorder-order transition for colloidal hard spheres under microgravity revealed dendritic crystallites roughly 1-2 mm in size for samples in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Order-of-magnitude estimates rationalize the absence of large or dendritic crystals under normal gravity and their stability to annealing in microgravity. A linear stability analysis of the Ackerson and Schaetzel model for crystallization of hard spheres establishes the domain of instability for diffusion-limited growth at small supersaturations. The relationship between hard-sphere and molecular crystal growth is established and exploited to relate the predicted linear instability to the well-developed dendrites observed.

  6. Communications: Mechanical Deformation of Dendrites by Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilling, J.; Hellawell, A.

    1996-01-01

    It is generally accepted that liquid agitation during alloy solidification assists in crystal multiplication, as in dendrite fragmentation and the detachment of side arms in the mushy region of a casting. Even without deliberate stirring by electromagnetic or mechanical means, there is often vigorous interdendritic fluid flow promoted by natural thermosolutal convection. In this analysis, we shall estimate the stress at the root of a secondary dendrite arm of aluminum arising from the action of a flow of molten metal past the dendrite arm.

  7. In vivo imaging of dendritic pruning in dentate granule cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J Tiago; Bloyd, Cooper W; Shtrahman, Matthew; Johnston, Stephen T; Schafer, Simon T; Parylak, Sarah L; Tran, Thanh; Chang, Tina; Gage, Fred H

    2016-06-01

    We longitudinally imaged the developing dendrites of adult-born mouse dentate granule cells (DGCs) in vivo and found that they underwent over-branching and pruning. Exposure to an enriched environment and constraint of dendritic growth by disrupting Wnt signaling led to increased branch addition and accelerated growth, which were, however, counteracted by earlier and more extensive pruning. Our results indicate that pruning is regulated in a homeostatic fashion to oppose excessive branching and promote a similar dendrite structure in DGCs. PMID:27135217

  8. Adenosine deaminase regulates Treg expression in autologous T cell-dendritic cell cocultures from patients infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Naval-Macabuhay, Isaac; Casanova, Víctor; Navarro, Gemma; García, Felipe; León, Agathe; Miralles, Laia; Rovira, Cristina; Martinez-Navio, José M; Gallart, Teresa; Mallol, Josefa; Gatell, José M; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; McCormick, Peter J; Climent, Núria

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells have an important role in immune suppression during HIV-1 infection. As regulatory T cells produce the immunomodulatory molecule adenosine, our aim here was to assess the potential of adenosine removal to revert the suppression of anti-HIV responses exerted by regulatory T cells. The experimental setup consisted of ex vivo cocultures of T and dendritic cells, to which adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, was added. In cells from healthy individuals, adenosine hydrolysis decreased CD4(+)CD25(hi) regulatory T cells. Addition of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, significantly decreased CD4(+)CD25(lo) cells, confirming a modulatory role of adenosine acting via adenosine receptors. In autologous cocultures of T cells with HIV-1-pulsed dendritic cells, addition of adenosine deaminase led to a significant decrease of HIV-1-induced CD4(+)CD25(hi) forkhead box p3(+) cells and to a significant enhancement of the HIV-1-specific CD4(+) responder T cells. An increase in the effector response was confirmed by the enhanced production of CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD25(-)CD45RO(+) memory cell generation and secretion of Th1 cytokines, including IFN-γ and IL-15 and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, and RANTES/CCL5. These ex vivo results show, in a physiologically relevant model, that adenosine deaminase is able to enhance HIV-1 effector responses markedly. The possibility to revert regulatory T cell-mediated inhibition of immune responses by use of adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, merits attention for restoring T lymphocyte function in HIV-1 infection. PMID:26310829

  9. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Tian, Dongliang; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ˜4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  10. Regulation of Dendritic Cell Function in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Said, André; Weindl, Günther

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells and link the innate and adaptive immune system. During steady state immune surveillance in skin, DC act as sentinels against commensals and invading pathogens. Under pathological skin conditions, inflammatory cytokines, secreted by surrounding keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts, and immune cells, influence the activation and maturation of different DC populations including Langerhans cells (LC) and dermal DC. In this review we address critical differences in human DC subtypes during inflammatory settings compared to steady state. We also highlight the functional characteristics of human DC subsets in inflammatory skin environments and skin diseases including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Understanding the complex immunoregulatory role of distinct DC subsets in inflamed human skin will be a key element in developing novel strategies in anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:26229971

  11. Comparative dendritic cell biology of veterinary mammals.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Artur; Auray, Gael; Ricklin, Meret

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have a main function in innate immunity in that they sense infections and environmental antigens at the skin and mucosal surfaces and thereby critically influence decisions about immune activation or tolerance. As professional antigen-presenting cells, they are essential for induction of adaptive immune responses. Consequently, knowledge on this cell type is required to understand the immune systems of veterinary mammals, including cattle, sheep, pigs, dogs, cats, and horses. Recent ontogenic studies define bona fide DC as an independent lineage of hematopoietic cells originating from a common precursor. Distinct transcription factors control the development into the two subsets of classical DC and plasmacytoid DC. These DC subsets express a distinguishable transcriptome, which differs from that of monocyte-derived DC. Using a comparative approach based on phenotype and function, this review attempts to classify DC of veterinary mammals and to describe important knowledge gaps. PMID:25387110

  12. Dendritic web silicon photovoltaic cell research

    SciTech Connect

    Easoz, J.A.; Rosey, R.; Campbell, R.B.; Rupnik, R.; Sprecace, R.P.; Piotrowski, P.A. . Advanced Energy Systems Div.); McHugh, J.P.; Seidensticker, R.G. . Science and Technology Center)

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the evaluation of a checkpoint demonstration of the throughout capability of the silicon dendritic web growth process as of January 1989. The demonstrated throughput of about 20,000 sq.cm/furnace/week was less than desired for a commercial production facility, however the results clearly indicated that the desired 35,000 sq.cm/furnace/week would be reached with continuous melt replenishment during growth. Improvements in seeding and increase in crystal length would increase the throughput even more. Solar cells subsequently fabricated on the material grown during the demonstration had average efficiency levels (14%) equivalent to cells fabricated on web produced prior to the demonstration run. Finally, a business analysis based on the present results gave estimated photovoltaic module costs in agreement with potential commercial viability. 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Dendritic cell control of tolerogenic responses

    PubMed Central

    Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Pulendran, Bali

    2011-01-01

    Summary One of the most fundamental problems in immunology is the seemingly schizophrenic ability of the immune system to launch robust immunity against pathogens, while acquiring and maintaining a state of tolerance to the body’s own tissues and the trillions of commensal microorganisms and food antigens that confront it every day. A fundamental role for the innate immune system, particularly dendritic cells (DCs), in orchestrating immunological tolerance has been appreciated, but emerging studies have highlighted the nature of the innate receptors and the signaling pathways that program DCs to a tolerogenic state. Furthermore, several studies have emphasized the major role played by cellular interactions, and the microenvironment in programming tolerogenic DCs. Here we review these studies and suggest that the innate control of tolerogenic responses can be viewed as different hierarchies of organization, in which DCs, their innate receptors and signaling networks, and their interactions with other cells and local microenvironments represent different levels of the hierarchy. PMID:21488899

  14. Dendritic cell defects in the colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Legitimo, Annalisa; Consolini, Rita; Failli, Alessandra; Orsini, Giulia; Spisni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic alterations of the genome. However, also the formation of an inflammatory milieu plays a pivotal role in tumor development and progression. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a relevant role in tumor by exerting differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions, depending on the local milieu. Quantitative and functional impairments of DCs have been widely observed in several types of cancer, including CRC, representing a tumor-escape mechanism employed by cancer cells to elude host immunosurveillance. Understanding the interactions between DCs and tumors is important for comprehending the mechanisms of tumor immune surveillance and escape, and provides novel approaches to therapy of cancer. This review summarizes updated information on the role of the DCs in colon cancer development and/or progression. PMID:25483675

  15. Functions of fascin in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Shigeko

    2012-01-01

    Fascin-1 is an actin-bundling protein that shares no homology with other actin-bundling proteins. It is greatly induced upon maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). However, fascin-1 is not expressed in other primary blood cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, indicating a unique role of fascin-1 in the function of DCs upon maturation. An increasing body of evidence has shown that fascin-1 plays critical roles in maturation-associated DC functions, including dynamic assembly of veil-like membrane protrusions, disassembly of podosomes, migration to lymph nodes, and the assembly of the immunological synapse. Pathological analyses of fascin-1 expression revealed that fascin-1 is a useful marker of diseases of immune cells, including Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin diseases. Furthermore, attempts have been made to explore the use of a fascin-1 promoter for DNA vaccination because it is strong and specific to DCs. PMID:22428853

  16. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue; Tian, Dongliang

    2014-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  17. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  18. Dendritic cells as therapeutic targets in neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Lüssi, Felix; Zipp, Frauke; Witsch, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system characterized by infiltration of immune cells and progressive damage to myelin sheaths and neurons. There is still no cure for the disease, but drug regimens can reduce the frequency of relapses and slightly delay progression. Myeloid cells or antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, and resident microglia, are key players in both mediating immune responses and inducing immune tolerance. Mounting evidence indicates a contribution of these myeloid cells to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and to the effects of treatment, the understanding of which might provide strategies for more potent novel therapeutic interventions. Here, we review recent insights into the role of APCs, with specific focus on DCs in the modulation of neuroinflammation in MS. PMID:26970979

  19. Alarmins Link Neutrophils and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Tewary, Poonam; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first major population of leukocyte to infiltrate infected or injured tissues and are crucial for initiating host innate defense and adaptive immunity. Although the contribution of neutrophils to innate immune defense is mediated predominantly by phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms, neutrophils also participate in the induction of adaptive immune responses. At sites of infection and/or injury, neutrophils release numerous mediators upon degranulation or death, among these are alarmins which have a characteristic dual capacity to mobilize and activate antigen-presenting cells. We describe here how alarmins released by neutrophil degranulation and/or death can link neutrophils to dendritic cells by promoting their recruitment and activation, resulting in the augmentation of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:19699678

  20. Unsteady growth of ammonium chloride dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, L. M.; Terentiev, P. S.; Soboleva, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Growth of ammonium chloride dendrites from aqueous solution is experimentally investigated. The growth rate υ and the radius ρ of curvature of branches are measured as a function of the relative supersaturation Δ for steady and unsteady growth conditions. It is shown that the experimental results are quantitatively described by the dependences ρ=a/Δ+b, υ=сΔ2, where the factors for primary branches are a=(1.3±0.2)·10-7 m, b=(2.5±0.4)·10-7 m, and c=(2.2±0.3)·10-4 m/s. The factor c is found to be approximately 7 times smaller for the side branches than that for the primary branches.

  1. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    PubMed

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease. PMID:20357073

  2. Growth of a Dendritic Channel Network (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, D.; Abrams, D. M.; Devauchelle, O.; Petroff, A. P.; Lobkovsky, A. E.; Straub, K. M.; McElroy, B.; Mohrig, D. C.; Kudrolli, A.

    2009-12-01

    Dendritic channel networks are a ubiquitous feature of Earth's topography. A half century of work has detailed their scale-invariant geometry. But relatively little is known about how such networks grow, especially in natural settings at geologic time scales. This talk addresses the growth of a particularly simple class of channel networks: those which drain groundwater. We focus on a pristine field site in the Florida Panhandle, in which channels extending for kilometers have been incised vertically through tens of meters of ancient beach sands. We first show how the flow of subsurface water interacts with the planform geometry of the network. Ground-penetrating radar images of the water table shape near a highly-ramified section of the network provide a qualitative view of groundwater focusing. Noting that the water table represents a balance between water input via rain and water flowing into the channel network, we solve for the steady state shape of the water table around the entire network and the associated water fluxes. Comparison of predicted and measured fluxes shows that the ramified structure of the Florida network is consistent with uniformly forced unstable growth through a homogeneous medium. In other words, the dendritic pattern results intrinsically from growth dynamics rather than geologic heterogeneity. We then use these observations to show that the growth of groundwater-driven networks can be described by two linear response laws. Remarkably, one of these growth laws is reversible, which allows us to reconstruct network history and estimate network age. A particularly striking feature of the Florida network is the existence of a characteristic length scale between channels. Our theory predicts how this length scale evolves, thereby linking network growth to geometric form. Reference: D. M. Abrams, A. E. Lobkovsky, A. P. Petroff, K. M. Straub, B. McElroy, D. C. Mohrig, A. Kudrolli, and D. H. Rothman,, Growth laws for channel networks incised by

  3. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-07-28

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin(-)Sca-1(+)Kit(+) cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte-related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  4. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  5. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning.

    PubMed

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  6. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning

    PubMed Central

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  7. Secretory IgA induces tolerogenic dendritic cells through SIGNR1 dampening autoimmunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Diana, Julien; Moura, Ivan C; Vaugier, Céline; Gestin, Aurélie; Tissandie, Emilie; Beaudoin, Lucie; Corthésy, Blaise; Hocini, Hakim; Lehuen, Agnès; Monteiro, Renato C

    2013-09-01

    IgA plays ambivalent roles in the immune system. The balance between inhibitory and activating responses relies on the multimerization status of IgA and interaction with their cognate receptors. In mucosal sites, secretory IgA (SIgA) protects the host through immune-exclusion mechanisms, but its function in the bloodstream remains unknown. Using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, we found that both human and mouse SIgA induce tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) following binding to specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin receptor 1. This interaction was dependent on Ca(2+) and mannose residues. SIgA-primed DCs (SIgA-DCs) are resistant to TLR-dependent maturation. Although SIgA-DCs fail to induce efficient proliferation and Th1 differentiation of naive responder T cells, they generate the expansion of regulatory T cells through IL-10 production. SIgA-DCs are highly potent in inhibiting autoimmune responses in mouse models of type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. This discovery may offer new insights about mucosal-derived DC immunoregulation through SIgA opening new therapeutic approaches to autoimmune diseases. PMID:23926325

  8. Role of natural killer and dendritic cell crosstalk in immunomodulation by commensal bacteria probiotics.

    PubMed

    Rizzello, Valeria; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Dongarrà, Maria Luisa; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2011-01-01

    A cooperative dialogue between natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) has been elucidated in the last years. They help each other to acquire their complete functions, both in the periphery and in the secondary lymphoid organs. Thus, NK cells' activation by dendritic cells allows the killing of transformed or infected cells in the periphery but may also be important for the generation of adaptive immunity. Indeed, it has been shown that NK cells may play a key role in polarizing a Th1 response upon interaction with DCs exposed to microbial products. This regulatory role of DC/NK cross-talk is of particular importance at mucosal surfaces such as the intestine, where the immune system exists in intimate association with commensal bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB). We here review NK/DC interactions in the presence of gut-derived commensal bacteria and their role in bacterial strain-dependent immunomodulatory effects. We particularly aim to highlight the ability of distinct species of commensal bacterial probiotics to differently affect the outcome of DC/NK cross-talk and consequently to differently influence the polarization of the adaptive immune response. PMID:21660136

  9. A case of fatal idiopathic enteritis and multiple opportunistic infections associated with dendritic cell deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Lord, James D; Chen, Janice; Kozarek, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    We present a case of an adult patient with new-onset severe, idiopathic, protein-wasting enteropathy, in whom an extensive immunological workup was performed. We found a lack of dendritic cell (DC) subsets in the blood and bowel, as well as elevated circulating TGF-beta levels and decreased numbers of circulating FOXP3+ regulatory T cells with diminished CTLA4 expression. She failed to respond to glucocorticoids and infliximab, and instead developed a constellation of opportunistic infections, including CMV ileitis, Mucormycosis, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, and ultimately passed away. While the cause of her lack of DCs is unknown, this data suggests a key role for these cells in both regulating mucosal immunity and promoting effective cell-mediated immunity against pathogens in humans. PMID:23539396

  10. Analysis of dendritic cell subpopulations in follicular lymphoma with respect to the tumor immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nina; Mueller, Michael; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Ihorst, Gabriele; Marks, Reinhard; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Veelken, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    The immune cell composition of the follicular lymphoma (FL) tumor microenvironment is increasingly recognized as an important determinant for clinical outcome. Here, we explored frequency and distribution of dendritic cell (DC) subtypes in relation to regulatory T cells (Treg) by immunohistochemistry in lymph node biopsies from patients with de novo FL. We found that neoplastic follicles contained lower DC and higher Treg frequencies than hyperplastic follicles in control lymph nodes. Treg numbers particularly correlated with the subset of conventional CD11c(+ )DCs. Additionally, both a high intra- to interfollicular ratio of CD11c(+ )DCs and increased intrafollicular Treg frequencies were associated with decreased overall survival. This suggests that functional interactions between these cells may be relevant for FL progression/recurrence. The presence of CD11c(+ )DCs in the tumor microenvironment may assist tumor infiltration by Tregs, thus contributing to the suppression of an otherwise beneficial T-cell-dominated FL microenvironment. PMID:26757600

  11. Polarized Dendritic Cells as Cancer Vaccines: Directing Effector-type T Cells to Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kalinski, Pawel; Okada, Hideho

    2010-01-01

    Ex-vivo-generation and antigen loading of dendritic cells (DCs) from cancer patients helps to bypass the dysfunction of endogenous DCs. It also allows to control the process of DC maturation and to imprint in maturing DCs several functions essential for induction of effective forms of cancer immunity. Recent reports from several groups including ours demonstrate that distinct conditions of DC generation and maturation can prime DCs for preferential interaction with different (effector versus regulatory) subsets of immune cells. Moreover, differentially-generated DCs have been shown to imprint different effector mechanisms in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (delivery of “signal three”) and to induce their different homing properties (delivery of “signal four”). These developments allow for selective induction of tumor-specific T cells with desirable effector functions and tumor-relevant homing properties and to direct the desirable types of immune cells to tumors. PMID:20409732

  12. Perspectives on Reprograming Cancer-Associated Dendritic Cells for Anti-Tumor Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Benencia, Fabian; Muccioli, Maria; Alnaeeli, Mawadda

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the relevance of the tumor microenvironment (TME) in the progression of cancer has gained considerable attention. It has been shown that the TME is capable of inactivating various components of the immune system responsible for tumor clearance, thus favoring cancer cell growth and tumor metastasis. In particular, effects of the TME on antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs) include rendering these cells unable to promote specific immune responses or transform them into suppressive cells capable of inducing regulatory T cells. In addition, under the influence of the TME, DCs can produce growth factors that induce neovascularization, therefore further contributing to tumor development. Interestingly, cancer-associated DCs harbor tumor antigens and thus have the potential to become anti-tumor vaccines in situ if properly reactivated. This perspective article provides an overview of the scientific background and experimental basis for reprograming cancer-associated DCs in situ to generate anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:24778991

  13. Dendritic Spines as Tunable Regulators of Synaptic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Nägerl, U. Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are perpetually receiving vast amounts of information in the form of synaptic input from surrounding cells. The majority of input occurs at thousands of dendritic spines, which mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain, and is integrated by the dendritic and somatic compartments of the postsynaptic neuron. The functional role of dendritic spines in shaping biochemical and electrical signals transmitted via synapses has long been intensely studied. Yet, many basic questions remain unanswered, in particular regarding the impact of their nanoscale morphology on electrical signals. Here, we review our current understanding of the structure and function relationship of dendritic spines, focusing on the controversy of electrical compartmentalization and the potential role of spine structural changes in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27340393

  14. The Three-Dimensional Morphology of Growing Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, J. W.; Mohan, K. A.; Gulsoy, E. B.; Shahani, A. J.; Xiao, X.; Bouman, C. A.; De Graef, M.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-01-01

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphology is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth. PMID:26139473

  15. The three-dimensional morphology of growing dendrites

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, J. W.; Mohan, K. A.; Gulsoy, E. B.; Shahani, A. J.; Xiao, X.; Bouman, C. A.; De Graef, M.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-07-03

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphology is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth.

  16. The three-dimensional morphology of growing dendrites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gibbs, J. W.; Mohan, K. A.; Gulsoy, E. B.; Shahani, A. J.; Xiao, X.; Bouman, C. A.; De Graef, M.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-07-03

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphologymore » is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth.« less

  17. The Three-Dimensional Morphology of Growing Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, J W; Mohan, K A; Gulsoy, E B; Shahani, A J; Xiao, X; Bouman, C A; De Graef, M; Voorhees, P W

    2015-01-01

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphology is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth. PMID:26139473

  18. CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 regulates dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Tomoharu; Kohno, Takao; Hattori, Mitsuharu

    2016-09-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 (CSMD3) is a large protein expressed in fetal and adult brain. Recently, mutations of the CSMD3 gene were identified in schizophrenia and autism patients. However, biochemical properties and functions of the CSMD3 protein remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CSMD3 is an oligomeric type I transmembrane protein localized in the apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in the postnatal brain. In cultured hippocampal neurons, CSMD3 is expressed only after 7 days in vitro. Overexpression of CSMD3 induced dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons. Regulation of dendritic morphology by CSMD3 depended on the presence of its extracellular region, while CSMD3 intracellular region was dispensable for this activity. These results suggest that CSMD3 acts as a co-receptor of an unidentified membrane protein to regulate dendrite development. Therefore, malfunctions of CSMD3 may be one of the factors in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:27033969

  19. A simple transfer function for nonlinear dendritic integration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Matthew F.; Zald, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Relatively recent advances in patch clamp recordings and iontophoresis have enabled unprecedented study of neuronal post-synaptic integration (“dendritic integration”). Findings support a separate layer of integration in the dendritic branches before potentials reach the cell's soma. While integration between branches obeys previous linear assumptions, proximal inputs within a branch produce threshold nonlinearity, which some authors have likened to the sigmoid function. Here we show the implausibility of a sigmoidal relation and present a more realistic transfer function in both an elegant artificial form and a biophysically derived form that further considers input locations along the dendritic arbor. As the distance between input locations determines their ability to produce nonlinear interactions, models incorporating dendritic topology are essential to understanding the computational power afforded by these early stages of integration. We use the biophysical transfer function to emulate empirical data using biophysical parameters and describe the conditions under which the artificial and biophysically derived forms are equivalent. PMID:26321940

  20. Regulatory T cell effects in antitumor laser immunotherapy: a mathematical model and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawkins, Bryan A.; Laverty, Sean M.

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have tremendous influence on treatment outcomes in patients receiving immunotherapy for cancerous tumors. We present a mathematical model incorporating the primary cellular and molecular components of antitumor laser immunotherapy. We explicitly model developmental classes of dendritic cells (DCs), cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), primary and metastatic tumor cells, and tumor antigen. Regulatory T cells have been shown to kill antigen presenting cells, to influence dendritic cell maturation and migration, to kill activated killer CTLs in the tumor microenvironment, and to influence CTL proliferation. Since Tregs affect explicitly modeled cells, but we do not explicitly model dynamics of Treg themselves, we use model parameters to analyze effects of Treg immunosuppressive activity. We will outline a systematic method for assigning clinical outcomes to model simulations and use this condition to associate simulated patient treatment outcome with Treg activity.

  1. Bifidobacterium bifidum actively changes the gene expression profile induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth; Jarmer, Hanne; Nøhr Nielsen, Birgit; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-beta, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate immune response. Moreover, B. bifidum Z9 inhibited the expression of the Th1-promoting genes induced by L. acidophilus NCFM and had an additive effect on genes of the innate immune response and Th2 skewing genes. The gene encoding Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a transcription factor regulating the activation of JNK, was one of the few genes only induced by B. bifidum Z9. Neutralization of IFN-beta abrogated L. acidophilus NCFM-induced expression of Th1-skewing genes, and blocking of the JNK pathway completely inhibited the expression of IFN-beta. Our results indicate that B. bifidum Z9 actively inhibits the expression of genes related to the adaptive immune system in murine dendritic cells and that JPD2 via blocking of IFN-beta plays a central role in this regulatory mechanism. PMID:20548777

  2. Dendrites impact the encoding capabilities of the axon.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Guy; Mansvelder, Huibert D; de Kock, Christiaan P J; Segev, Idan

    2014-06-11

    This study highlights a new and powerful direct impact of the dendritic tree (the input region of neurons) on the encoding capability of the axon (the output region). We show that the size of the dendritic arbors (its impedance load) strongly modulates the shape of the action potential (AP) onset at the axon initial segment; it is accelerated in neurons with larger dendritic surface area. AP onset rapidness is key in determining the capability of the axonal spikes to encode (phase lock to) rapid changes in synaptic inputs. Hence, our findings imply that neurons with larger dendritic arbors have improved encoding capabilities. This "dendritic size effect" was explored both analytically as well as numerically, in simplified and detailed models of 3D reconstructed layer 2/3 cortical pyramidal cells of rats and humans. The cutoff frequency of spikes phase locking to modulated inputs increased from 100 to 200 Hz in pyramidal cells of young rats to 400-600 Hz in human cells. In the latter case, phase locking reached close to 1 KHz in in vivo-like conditions. This work highlights new and functionally profound cross talk between the dendritic tree and the axon initial segment, providing new understanding of neurons as sophisticated nonlinear input/output devices. PMID:24920612

  3. The unfolded protein response is required for dendrite morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xing; Howell, Audrey S; Dong, Xintong; Taylor, Caitlin A; Cooper, Roshni C; Zhang, Jianqi; Zou, Wei; Sherwood, David R; Shen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Precise patterning of dendritic fields is essential for the formation and function of neuronal circuits. During development, dendrites acquire their morphology by exuberant branching. How neurons cope with the increased load of protein production required for this rapid growth is poorly understood. Here we show that the physiological unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced in the highly branched Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neuron PVD during dendrite morphogenesis. Perturbation of the IRE1 arm of the UPR pathway causes loss of dendritic branches, a phenotype that can be rescued by overexpression of the ER chaperone HSP-4 (a homolog of mammalian BiP/ grp78). Surprisingly, a single transmembrane leucine-rich repeat protein, DMA-1, plays a major role in the induction of the UPR and the dendritic phenotype in the UPR mutants. These findings reveal a significant role for the physiological UPR in the maintenance of ER homeostasis during morphogenesis of large dendritic arbors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06963.001 PMID:26052671

  4. An extracellular adhesion molecule complex patterns dendritic branching and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xintong; Liu, Oliver W.; Howell, Audrey S.; Shen, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Robust dendrite morphogenesis is a critical step in the development of reproducible neural circuits. However, little is known about the extracellular cues that pattern complex dendrite morphologies. In the model nematode C. elegans, the sensory neuron PVD establishes stereotypical, highly-branched dendrite morphology. Here, we report the identification of a tripartite ligand-receptor complex of membrane adhesion molecules that is both necessary and sufficient to instruct spatially restricted growth and branching of PVD dendrites. The ligand complex SAX-7/L1CAM and MNR-1 function at defined locations in the surrounding hypodermal tissue, while DMA-1 acts as the cognate receptor on PVD. Mutations in this complex lead to dramatic defects in the formation, stabilization, and organization of the dendritic arbor. Ectopic expression of SAX-7 and MNR-1 generates a predictable, unnaturally patterned dendritic tree in a DMA-1 dependent manner. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments indicate that all three molecules are needed for interaction. PMID:24120131

  5. The chromatin remodeling factor Bap55 functions through the TIP60 complex to regulate olfactory projection neuron dendrite targeting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Drosophila olfactory system exhibits very precise and stereotyped wiring that is specified predominantly by genetic programming. Dendrites of olfactory projection neurons (PNs) pattern the developing antennal lobe before olfactory receptor neuron axon arrival, indicating an intrinsic wiring mechanism for PN dendrites. These wiring decisions are likely determined through a transcriptional program. Results We find that loss of Brahma associated protein 55 kD (Bap55) results in a highly specific PN mistargeting phenotype. In Bap55 mutants, PNs that normally target to the DL1 glomerulus mistarget to the DA4l glomerulus with 100% penetrance. Loss of Bap55 also causes derepression of a GAL4 whose expression is normally restricted to a small subset of PNs. Bap55 is a member of both the Brahma (BRM) and the Tat interactive protein 60 kD (TIP60) ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes. The Bap55 mutant phenotype is partially recapitulated by Domino and Enhancer of Polycomb mutants, members of the TIP60 complex. However, distinct phenotypes are seen in Brahma and Snf5-related 1 mutants, members of the BRM complex. The Bap55 mutant phenotype can be rescued by postmitotic expression of Bap55, or its human homologs BAF53a and BAF53b. Conclusions Our results suggest that Bap55 functions through the TIP60 chromatin remodeling complex to regulate dendrite wiring specificity in PNs. The specificity of the mutant phenotypes suggests a position for the TIP60 complex at the top of a regulatory hierarchy that orchestrates dendrite targeting decisions. PMID:21284845

  6. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells.

    PubMed

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  7. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  8. Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells for Aberrant Class II Expression in Exocrine Glands from Estrogen-Deficient Mice of Healthy Background

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Rieko; Nagaoka, Ai; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Yamada, Akiko; Yoshida, Satoko; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Although it has been well documented that aberrant major histocompatibility complex class II molecules may contribute to the development of autoimmune disorders, the precise mechanisms responsible for their tissue-specific expression remain unknown. Here we show that estrogen deficiency induces aberrant class II major histocompatibility complex expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Relatively modest but functionally significant expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class II and class II transactivator molecules were observed in the exocrine glands of ovariectomized (Ovx) C57BL/6 (B6) mice, but were not seen in the exocrine glands of control B6 mice. We observed that the salivary dendritic cells adjacent to the apoptotic epithelial cells positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling, were activated in Ovx mice, but were not activated in control mice. We obtained evidence that the salivary gland cells express both interferon regulatory factor-1 and class II transactivator type IV molecules in Ovx mice. Salivary gland cells from Ovx mice were also capable of inducing the activation of antigen-specific T cells from OT-II transgenic mice. These findings indicate that estrogen deficiency initiates class II transactivator type IV mRNA expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, suggesting that plasmacytoid dendritic cells play a pivotal role in gender-based autoimmune disorders in postmenopausal women. PMID:19359524

  9. Numerical Simulation of Dendritic Growth of Continuously Cast High Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiling; Luo, Sen; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2015-01-01

    Considering the influence of the latent heat released during the solidification of high carbon liquid steel, a cellular automaton (CA) model coupled with the heat transfer was developed to investigate the growth of equiaxed dendrites which is controlled by the solute diffusion during the continuous casting process. Additionally, the growth of columnar dendrites and primary dendrite arm spacings were predicted and measured. The results show that the CA model is able to describe the growth behavior of equiaxed dendrites, especially at 5 K to 7 K melt undercoolings, and the approach adjusting the cooling medium temperature is reliable to keep the undercooling condition stable for equiaxed dendrites although its hysteresis is reinforced as the pre-set undercooling increases. With the increase of the melt undercooling, the growth of equiaxed dendrites becomes faster, and the thickness of dendritic arms increases slightly, however, the thickness of the diffusion layer in front of dendritic tips keeps constant. The growth of thin and tiny columnar dendrites will be confined due to the competition and absorbed by neighboring strong columnar dendrites, giving rise to the coarsening of columnar dendrites, which is observed both from the experimental observation and the numerical simulation. With the decrease of the cooling intensity, columnar dendrites get sparser, primary dendrite arm spacings increase, and secondary dendritic arms become undeveloped.

  10. DENDRIFT - CALCULATION OF DENDRITE SETTLING VELOCITIES 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, H. C.

    1994-01-01

    The convective transport and gravitational settling of unattached equiaxed grains and dendrite fragments can cause macrosegregation and influence the structure of the equiaxed zone in a variety of solidification arrangements. An understanding of how the highly nonspherical geometry of the dendrite influences its settling and transport characteristics is needed to determine the motion of unattached dendrites and predict structure and segregation in castings. The empirical results of previous studies have been used to develop DENDRIFT, which calculates the settling velocity of various dendritic shapes and a number of other parameters of interest such as the volume and surface area of the dendrite. As input, the program requires the physical properties of the system and some geometric parameters of the dendrite being considered, such as the average radius of the primary arm. DENDRIFT uses the concept of an envelope around the dendrite to enable the calculation of an effective sphericity. The settling velocities predicted by the code have been compared to experiments and were on average within 5% of those measured for model dendrites, and were consistent and in good agreement with three other experimental investigations. Thus, the code's use of the empirical relationships among velocity, sphericity, and envelope permeability appear valid, as do the wall and inertial correction factors developed. At this time, DENDRIFT does not account for gradients in composition or density, particle-particle interactions, tertiary dendrite arms, or the possible influences of off axis (tilted) dendrite settling. This program can also be used to estimate the settling velocities of spheres and cylinders with hemispherical ends. The code can be useful as a subprogram in a comprehensive solidification/casting code. The concepts demonstrated in DENDRIFT may also have wide application in the chemical processing industry by helping to describe the settling, or floating, of precipitates and

  11. Phenotype and function of nasal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haekyung; Ruane, Darren; Law, Kenneth; Ho, Yan; Garg, Aakash; Rahman, Adeeb; Esterházy, Daria; Cheong, Cheolho; Goljo, Erden; Sikora, Andrew G.; Mucida, Daniel; Chen, Benjamin; Govindraj, Satish; Breton, Gaëlle; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal vaccination generates immunity across local, regional and distant sites. However, nasal dendritic cells (DC), pivotal for the induction of intranasal vaccine- induced immune responses, have not been studied in detail. Here, using a variety of parameters, we define nasal DCs in mice and humans. Distinct subsets of “classical” DCs, dependent on the transcription factor zbtb46 were identified in the murine nose. The murine nasal DCs were FLT3 ligand-responsive and displayed unique phenotypic and functional characteristics including the ability to present antigen, induce an allogeneic T cell response and migrate in response to LPS or live bacterial pathogens. Importantly, in a cohort of human volunteers, BDCA-1+ DCs were observed to be the dominant nasal DC population at steady state. During chronic inflammation, the frequency of both BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3hi DCs was reduced in the nasal tissue, associating the loss of these immune sentinels with chronic nasal inflammation. The present study is the first detailed description of the phenotypic, ontogenetic and functional properties of nasal DCs and will inform the design of preventative immunization strategies as well as therapeutic modalities against chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25669151

  12. Dendritic cells in inflammatory sinonasal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cao, P-P; Shi, L-L; Xu, K; Yao, Y; Liu, Z

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical in linking the innate and adaptive immune responses, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many immune and inflammatory diseases as well as the development of tumours. The role of DCs in the pathophysiology of lung diseases has been widely studied. However, the phenotype, subset and function of DCs in upper airways under physiological or pathological conditions remain largely undefined. Allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) are two important upper airway diseases with a high worldwide prevalence. Aberrant innate and adaptive immune responses have been considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of AR and CRS. To this end, understanding the function of DCs in shaping the immune responses in sinonasal mucosa is critical in exploring the pathogenic mechanisms underlying AR and CRS as well as in developing novel therapeutic strategies. This review summarizes the phenotype, subset, function and regulation of DCs in sinonasal mucosa, particularly in the setting of AR and CRS. Furthermore, this review discusses the perspectives for future research and potential clinical utility focusing on DC pathways in the context of AR and CRS. PMID:27159777

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Dendritic Cell Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Michaël; Allan, Rhys S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration, and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These findings open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle – identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man – now sets the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection. PMID:22566910

  14. Mechanisms regulating dendritic cell specification and development

    PubMed Central

    Watowich, Stephanie S.; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Summary Understanding the diversification of dendritic cell (DC) lineages is one of the last frontiers in mapping the developmental hierarchy of the hematopoietic system. DCs are a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune responses, thus elucidating their developmental pathways is crucial for insight into the generation of natural immunity and for learning how to regulate DCs in clinical settings. DCs arise from hematopoietic stem cells through specialized progenitor subsets under the direction of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and Flt3L receptor (Flt3) signaling. Recent studies have revealed important contributions from granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and type I interferons (IFNs) in vivo. Furthermore, DC development is guided by lineage-restricted transcription factors such as IRF8, E2-2, and Batf3. A critical question centers on how cytokines and lineage-restricted transcription factors operate molecularly to direct DC diversification. Here we review recent findings that provide new insight into the DC developmental process. PMID:20969586

  15. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B-cell receptors for Ag (BCRs). FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6, and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal center (GC) reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T-cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases, and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23049531

  16. Brain dendritic cells: biology and pathology.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Paul M; Gottfried-Blackmore, Andres; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Bulloch, Karen

    2012-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. In their quiescent and mature form, the presentation of self-antigens by DC leads to tolerance; whereas, antigen presentation by mature DC, after stimulation by pathogen-associated molecular patterns, leads to the onset of antigen-specific immunity. DC have been found in many of the major organs in mammals (e.g. skin, heart, lungs, intestines and spleen); while the brain has long been considered devoid of DC in the absence of neuroinflammation. Consequently, microglia, the resident immune cell of the brain, have been charged with many functional attributes commonly ascribed to DC. Recent evidence has challenged the notion that DC are either absent or minimal players in brain immune surveillance. This review will discuss the recent literature examining DC involvement within both the young and aged steady-state brain. We will also examine DC contributions during various forms of neuroinflammation resulting from neurodegenerative autoimmune disease, injury, and CNS infections. This review also touches upon DC trafficking between the central nervous system and peripheral immune compartments during viral infections, the new molecular technologies that could be employed to enhance our current understanding of brain DC ontogeny, and some potential therapeutic uses of DC within the CNS. PMID:22825593

  17. Dendritic cell interactions with Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Thind, Sharanjeet K; Taborda, Carlos P; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are among the most common microbes encountered by humans. More than 100, 000 fungal species have been described in the environment to date, however only a few species cause disease in humans. Fungal infections are of particular importance to immunocompromised hosts in whom disease is often more severe, especially in those with impaired cell-mediated immunity such as individuals with HIV infection, hematologic malignancies, or those receiving TNF-α inhibitors. Nevertheless, environmental disturbances through natural processes or as a consequence of deforestation or construction can expose immunologically competent people to a large number of fungal spores resulting in asymptomatic acquisition to life-threatening disease. In recent decades, the significance of the innate immune system and more importantly the role of dendritic cells (DC) have been found to play a fundamental role in the resolution of fungal infections, such as in dimorphic fungi like Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides. In this review article the general role of DCs will be illustrated as the bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as their specific interactions with these 2 dimorphic fungi. PMID:25933034

  18. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Imaging Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobukai, Saho; Baheza, Richard; Cobb, Jared G.; Virostko, Jack; Xie, Jingping; Gillman, Amelie; Koktysh, Dmitry; Kerns, Denny; Does, Mark; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIOs) nanoparticles and investigate the migration of SPIO-labeled dendritic cells (DCs) in a syngeneic mouse model using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The size of the dextran-coated SPIO is roughly 30 nm, and the DCs are capable of independent uptake of these particles, although not at levels comparable to particle uptake in the presence of a transfecting reagent. On average, with the assistance of polylysine, the particles were efficiently delivered inside DCs within one hour of incubation. The SPIO particles occupy approximately 0.35% of cell surface and are equivalent to 34.6 pg of iron per cell. In vivo imaging demonstrated that the labeled cells migrated from the injection site in the footpad to the corresponding popliteal lymph node. The homing of labeled cells in the lymph nodes resulted in a signal drop of up to 79%. Furthermore, labeling DCs with SPIO particles did not compromise cell function, we demonstrated that SPIO-enhanced MR imaging can be used to track the migration of DCs effectively in vivo. Magn Reson Med 63:1383–1390, 2010. PMID:20432309

  19. Sodium pump organization in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Blom, Hans; Bernhem, Kristoffer; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in fluorescence imaging with the invention of several super-resolution microscopy modalities (e.g., PALM/STORM and STED) has opened up the possibility of deciphering molecular distributions on the nanoscale. In our quest to better elucidate postsynaptic protein distribution in dendritic spines, we have applied these nanoscopy methods, where generated results could help improve our understanding of neuronal functions. In particular, we have investigated the principal energy transformer in the brain, i.e., the [Formula: see text]-ATPase (or sodium pump), an essential protein responsible for maintaining resting membrane potential and a major controller of intracellular ion homeostasis. In these investigations, we have focused on estimates of protein amount, giving assessments of how variations may depend on labeling strategies, sample analysis, and choice of nanoscopic imaging method, concluding that all can be critical factors for quantification. We present a comparison of these results and discuss the influences this may have for homeostatic sodium regulation in neurons and energy consumption. PMID:27175374

  20. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B-cell receptors for Ag (BCRs). FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6, and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal center (GC) reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T-cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases, and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23049531

  1. Distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saraga, Fernanda; Ng, Leo; Skinner, Frances K

    2006-03-01

    Gap junctions allow direct electrical communication between CNS neurons. From theoretical and modeling studies, it is well known that although gap junctions can act to synchronize network output, they can also give rise to many other dynamic patterns including antiphase and other phase-locked states. The particular network pattern that arises depends on cellular, intrinsic properties that affect firing frequencies as well as the strength and location of the gap junctions. Interneurons or GABAergic neurons in hippocampus are diverse in their cellular characteristics and have been shown to have active dendrites. Furthermore, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic neurons, also known as basket cells, can contact one another via gap junctions on their distal dendrites. Using two-cell network models, we explore how distal electrical connections affect network output. We build multi-compartment models of hippocampal basket cells using NEURON and endow them with varying amounts of active dendrites. Two-cell networks of these model cells as well as reduced versions are explored. The relationship between intrinsic frequency and the level of active dendrites allows us to define three regions based on what sort of network dynamics occur with distal gap junction coupling. Weak coupling theory is used to predict the delineation of these regions as well as examination of phase response curves and distal dendritic polarization levels. We find that a nonmonotonic dependence of network dynamic characteristics (phase lags) on gap junction conductance occurs. This suggests that distal electrical coupling and active dendrite levels can control how sensitive network dynamics are to gap junction modulation. With the extended geometry, gap junctions located at more distal locations must have larger conductances for pure synchrony to occur. Furthermore, based on simulations with heterogeneous networks, it may be that one requires active dendrites if phase-locking is to occur in networks formed

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...) 2010, less the amounts appropriated from the Nuclear Waste Fund, amounts appropriated for Waste... agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). For this edition of the NRC's regulatory agenda, the most... publication of the last NRC semiannual agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). Within each group, the...

  3. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  4. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  5. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  6. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  7. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  8. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  9. Plant Regulatory Organizations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chapter on Plant Regulatory Organizations is part of a book titled Pest Management and Phytosanitary Trade Barriers authored by Neil Heather (Australia) and Guy Hallman. It covers the role of plant regulatory organizations from the international to state level in protecting plant health. At on...

  10. The Battle Against Immunopathology: Infectious Tolerance Mediated by Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gravano, David M.; Vignali, Dario A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious tolerance is a process whereby one regulatory lymphoid population confers suppressive capacity on another. Diverse immune responses are induced following infection or inflammatory insult that can protect the host, or potentially cause damage if not properly controlled. Thus, the process of infectious tolerance may be critical in vivo for exerting effective immune control and maintaining immune homeostasis by generating specialized regulatory subpopulations with distinct mechanistic capabilities. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a central mediator of infectious tolerance through their ability to convert conventional T cells into induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) directly by secretion of the suppressive cytokines TGF-β, IL-10 or IL-35, or indirectly via dendritic cells. In this review we will discuss the mechanisms and cell populations that mediate and contribute to infectious tolerance, with a focus on the intestinal environment, where tolerance induction to foreign material is critical. PMID:22205213

  11. PARP6 is a Regulator of Hippocampal Dendritic Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jeffrey Y.; Wang, Kang; Vermehren-Schmaedick, Anke; Adelman, John P.; Cohen, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation (MARylation) of mammalian proteins was first described as a post-translational modification catalyzed by bacterial toxins. It is now known that endogenous MARylation occurs in mammalian cells and is catalyzed by 11 members of the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) family of proteins (17 in humans). The physiological roles of these PARPs remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that PARP6, a neuronally enriched PARP that catalyzes MARylation, regulates hippocampal dendrite morphogenesis, a process that is critical for proper neural circuit formation during development. Knockdown of PARP6 significantly decreased dendritic complexity in embryonic rat hippocampal neurons in culture and in vivo. Expression of wild-type PARP6 increased dendritic complexity; conversely, expression of a catalytically inactive PARP6 mutant, or a cysteine-rich domain deletion mutant that has significantly reduced catalytic activity, decreased dendritic complexity. The identification of PARP6 as a regulator of dendrite morphogenesis supports a role for MARylation in neurons during development. PMID:26725726

  12. A novel theoretical approach to the analysis of dendritic transients.

    PubMed Central

    Agmon-Snir, H

    1995-01-01

    A novel theoretical framework for analyzing dendritic transients is introduced. This approach, called the method of moments, is an extension of Rall's cable theory for dendrites. It provides analytic investigation of voltage attenuation, signal delay, and synchronization problems in passive dendritic trees. In this method, the various moments of a transient signal are used to characterize the properties of the transient. The strength of the signal is measured by the time integral of the signal, its characteristic time is determined by its centroid ("center of gravity"), and the width of the signal is determined by a measure similar to the standard deviation in probability theory. Using these signal properties, the method of moments provides theorems, expressions, and efficient algorithms for analyzing the voltage response in arbitrary passive trees. The method yields new insights into spatiotemporal integration, coincidence detection mechanisms, and the properties of local interactions between synaptic inputs in dendritic trees. The method can also be used for matching dendritic neuron models to experimental data and for the analysis of synaptic inputs recorded experimentally. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8580308

  13. Mammalian Pumilio 2 regulates dendrite morphogenesis and synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Schoderboeck, Lucia; Gingl, Ewald; Luzi, Ettore; Riefler, Julia; Di Leva, Francesca; Karra, Daniela; Thomas, Sabine; Kiebler, Michael A.; Macchi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila, Pumilio (Pum) is important for neuronal homeostasis as well as learning and memory. We have recently characterized a mammalian homolog of Pum, Pum2, which is found in discrete RNA-containing particles in the somatodendritic compartment of polarized neurons. In this study, we investigated the role of Pum2 in developing and mature neurons by RNA interference. In immature neurons, loss of Pum2 led to enhanced dendritic outgrowth and arborization. In mature neurons, Pum2 down-regulation resulted in a significant reduction in dendritic spines and an increase in elongated dendritic filopodia. Furthermore, we observed an increase in excitatory synapse markers along dendritic shafts. Electrophysiological analysis of synaptic function of neurons lacking Pum2 revealed an increased miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequency. We then identified two specific mRNAs coding for a known translational regulator, eIF4E, and for a voltage-gated sodium channel, Scn1a, which interacts with Pum2 in immunoprecipitations from brain lysates. Finally, we show that Pum2 regulates translation of the eIF4E mRNA. Taken together, our data reveal a previously undescribed role for Pum2 in dendrite morphogenesis, synapse function, and translational control. PMID:20133610

  14. Tropomodulin isoforms utilize specific binding functions to modulate dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kevin T; Suchowerska, Alexandra K; Bland, Tyler; Colpan, Mert; Wayman, Gary; Fath, Thomas; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2016-06-01

    Tropomodulins (Tmods) cap F-actin pointed ends and have altered expression in the brain in neurological diseases. The function of Tmods in neurons has been poorly studied and their role in neurological diseases is entirely unknown. In this article, we show that Tmod1 and Tmod2, but not Tmod3, are positive regulators of dendritic complexity and dendritic spine morphology. Tmod1 increases dendritic branching distal from the cell body and the number of filopodia/thin spines. Tmod2 increases dendritic branching proximal to the cell body and the number of mature dendritic spines. Tmods utilize two actin-binding sites and two tropomyosin (Tpm)-binding sites to cap F-actin. Overexpression of Tmods with disrupted Tpm-binding sites indicates that Tmod1 and Tmod2 differentially utilize their Tpm- and actin-binding sites to affect morphology. Disruption of Tmod1's Tpm-binding sites abolished the overexpression phenotype. In contrast, overexpression of the mutated Tmod2 caused the same phenotype as wild type overexpression. Proximity ligation assays indicate that the mutated Tmods are shuttled similarly to wild type Tmods. Our data begins to uncover the roles of Tmods in neural development and the mechanism by which Tmods alter neural morphology. These observations in combination with altered Tmod expression found in several neurological diseases also suggest that dysregulation of Tmod expression may be involved in the pathology of these diseases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27126680

  15. A dendrite-suppressing composite ion conductor from aramid nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Tung, Siu-On; Ho, Szushen; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ruilin; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Dendrite growth threatens the safety of batteries by piercing the ion-transporting separators between the cathode and anode. Finding a dendrite-suppressing material that combines high modulus and high ionic conductance has long been considered a major technological and materials science challenge. Here we demonstrate that these properties can be attained in a composite made from Kevlar-derived aramid nanofibres assembled in a layer-by-layer manner with poly(ethylene oxide). Importantly, the porosity of the membranes is smaller than the growth area of the dendrites so that aramid nanofibres eliminate 'weak links' where the dendrites pierce the membranes. The aramid nanofibre network suppresses poly(ethylene oxide) crystallization detrimental for ion transport, giving a composite that exhibits high modulus, ionic conductivity, flexibility, ion flux rates and thermal stability. Successful suppression of hard copper dendrites by the composite ion conductor at extreme discharge conditions is demonstrated, thereby providing a new approach for the materials engineering of solid ion conductors. PMID:25626170

  16. Facile synthesis of size controllable dendritic mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ye-Jun; Xing, Jun-Ling; Pang, Jun-Ling; Jiang, Shu-Hua; Lam, Koon-Fung; Yang, Tai-Qun; Xue, Qing-Song; Zhang, Kun; Wu, Peng

    2014-12-24

    The synthesis of highly uniform mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSNs) with dendritic pore channels, particularly ones with particle sizes below 200 nm, is extremely difficult and remains a grand challenge. By a combined synthetic strategy using imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) with different alkyl lengths as cosurfactants and Pluronic F127 nonionic surfactants as inhibitors of particle growth, the preparation of dendritic MSNs with controlled diameter between 40 and 300 nm was successfully realized. An investigation of dendritic MSNs using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nitrogen physisorption revealed that the synthesis of dendritic MSNs at larger size (100-300 nm) strongly depends on the alkyl lengths of cationic imidazolium ILs; while the average size of dendritic MSNs can be controlled within the range of 40-100 nm by varying the amount of Pluronic F127. The Au@MSNs can be used as a catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by NaBH4 into 4-aminophenol and exhibit excellent catalytic performance. The present discovery of the extended synthesis conditions offers reproducible, facile, and large-scale synthesis of the monodisperse spherical MSNs with precise size control and, thus, has vast prospects for future applications of ultrafine mesostructured nanoparticle materials in catalysis and biomedicine. PMID:25454255

  17. Location-Dependent Excitatory Synaptic Interactions in Pyramidal Neuron Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Behabadi, Bardia F.; Polsky, Alon; Jadi, Monika; Schiller, Jackie; Mel, Bartlett W.

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical pyramidal neurons (PNs) receive thousands of excitatory synaptic contacts on their basal dendrites. Some act as classical driver inputs while others are thought to modulate PN responses based on sensory or behavioral context, but the biophysical mechanisms that mediate classical-contextual interactions in these dendrites remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. Distal excitation lowers the local spike threshold for more proximal inputs, while having little effect on peak responses at the soma. In contrast, proximal excitation lowers the threshold, but also substantially increases the gain of distally-driven responses. Our findings support the view that PN basal dendrites possess significant analog computing capabilities, and suggest that the diverse forms of nonlinear response modulation seen in the neocortex, including uni-modal, cross-modal, and attentional effects, could depend in part on pathway-specific biases in the spatial distribution of excitatory synaptic contacts onto PN basal dendritic arbors. PMID:22829759

  18. Follicular dendritic cell function and murine AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, A; Burton, G F; Fuchs, B A; Bhogal, B S; Rupper, R; Szakal, A K; Tew, J G

    1994-01-01

    Infection of mice with LP-BM5 elicits an immunodeficiency state referred to as murine acquired immune deficiency syndrome (MAIDS). Shortly after infection, retrovirus particles become associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and this study was undertaken to determine whether retroviruses alter FDC functions. The FDC functions examined included the ability to: (1) retain antigen (Ag) trapped prior to infection; (2) trap new Ag after infection; (3) maintain specific IgG responses; and (4) provide co-stimulatory signals to B cells. Mice were infected with LP-BM5 and the ability of their FDC to trap and retain 125I-Ag (HSA) was assessed. Serum anti-HSA levels were monitored and FDC co-stimulatory activity was indicated by increased B-cell proliferation. HSA trapped on FDC prior to infection began to disappear by 3 weeks and was practically gone by 6 weeks. Serum anti-HSA titres were maintained normally for about 3 weeks after infection and then declined precipitously. The ability of FDC to trap new Ag began to disappear around the second and third week of infection and was markedly depressed by the fourth week. However, FDC recovered from infected mice retained their ability to co-stimulate anti-mu- and interleukin-4 (IL-4)-activated B cells throughout a 5-week period. In short, the ability of FDC to trap and retain specific Ag and maintain specific antibody levels was markedly depressed after retrovirus infection. However, FDC from infected mice continued to provide co-stimulatory signals and these signals may contribute to the lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly characteristic of MAIDS. Images Figure 4 PMID:8132218

  19. Noise tolerant dendritic lattice associative memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Gerhard X.; Schmalz, Mark S.; Hayden, Eric; Tucker, Marc

    2011-09-01

    Linear classifiers based on computation over the real numbers R (e.g., with operations of addition and multiplication) denoted by (R, +, x), have been represented extensively in the literature of pattern recognition. However, a different approach to pattern classification involves the use of addition, maximum, and minimum operations over the reals in the algebra (R, +, maximum, minimum) These pattern classifiers, based on lattice algebra, have been shown to exhibit superior information storage capacity, fast training and short convergence times, high pattern classification accuracy, and low computational cost. Such attributes are not always found, for example, in classical neural nets based on the linear inner product. In a special type of lattice associative memory (LAM), called a dendritic LAM or DLAM, it is possible to achieve noise-tolerant pattern classification by varying the design of noise or error acceptance bounds. This paper presents theory and algorithmic approaches for the computation of noise-tolerant lattice associative memories (LAMs) under a variety of input constraints. Of particular interest are the classification of nonergodic data in noise regimes with time-varying statistics. DLAMs, which are a specialization of LAMs derived from concepts of biological neural networks, have successfully been applied to pattern classification from hyperspectral remote sensing data, as well as spatial object recognition from digital imagery. The authors' recent research in the development of DLAMs is overviewed, with experimental results that show utility for a wide variety of pattern classification applications. Performance results are presented in terms of measured computational cost, noise tolerance, classification accuracy, and throughput for a variety of input data and noise levels.

  20. Expansion of a BDCA1+CD14+ Myeloid Cell Population in Melanoma Patients May Attenuate the Efficacy of Dendritic Cell Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bakdash, Ghaith; Buschow, Sonja I; Gorris, Mark A J; Halilovic, Altuna; Hato, Stanleyson V; Sköld, Annette E; Schreibelt, Gerty; Sittig, Simone P; Torensma, Ruurd; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Schröder, Christoph; Smits, Evelien L; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2016-08-01

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by regulatory T cells, type II macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and other immunosuppressive cells that promote malignant progression. Here we report the identification of a novel BDCA1(+)CD14(+) population of immunosuppressive myeloid cells that are expanded in melanoma patients and are present in dendritic cell-based vaccines, where they suppress CD4(+) T cells in an antigen-specific manner. Mechanistic investigations showed that BDCA1(+)CD14(+) cells expressed high levels of the immune checkpoint molecule PD-L1 to hinder T-cell proliferation. While this BDCA1(+)CD14(+) cell population expressed markers of both BDCA1(+) dendritic cells and monocytes, analyses of function, transcriptome, and proteome established their unique nature as exploited by tumors for immune escape. We propose that targeting these cells may improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4332-46. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325645

  1. Activation of natural killer cells and dendritic cells upon recognition of a novel CD99-like ligand by paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Ikuo; Ogasawara, Kouetsu; Saito, Takashi; Lanier, Lewis L; Arase, Hisashi

    2004-02-16

    Paired receptors that consist of highly related activating and inhibitory receptors are widely involved in the regulation of the immune system. Here, we report a mouse orthologue of the human activating paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor (PILR) beta, which was cloned from a cDNA library of natural killer (NK) cells based on its ability to associate with the DAP12 signaling adaptor protein. The activating PILRbeta was expressed not only on NK cells but also on dendritic cells and macrophages. Furthermore, we have identified a novel CD99-like molecule as a ligand for the activating PILRbeta and inhibitory PILRalpha receptors. Transcripts of PILR ligand are present in many tissues, including some T cell lines. Cells expressing the PILR ligand specifically activated NK cells and dendritic cells that express the activating PILRbeta. Our findings reveal a new regulatory mechanism of innate immunity by PILR and its CD99-like ligand. PMID:14970179

  2. Regulatory guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

  3. Cysticerci Drive Dendritic Cells to Promote In Vitro and In Vivo Tregs Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Arce-Sillas, Asiel; Fragoso, Gladis; Cárdenas, Graciela; Rosetti, Marcos; Casanova-Hernández, Didier; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Fleury, Agnes; Sciutto, Edda

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in immune homeostasis. Treg induction is a strategy that parasites have evolved to modulate the host's inflammatory environment, facilitating their establishment and permanence. In human Taenia solium neurocysticercosis (NC), the concurrence of increased peripheral and central Treg levels and their capacity to inhibit T cell activation and proliferation support their role in controlling neuroinflammation. This study is aimed at identifing possible mechanisms of Treg induction in human NC. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) from healthy human donors, cocultivated with autologous CD4+ naïve cells either in the presence or absence of cysticerci, promoted CD25highFoxp3+ Treg differentiation. An increased Treg induction was observed when cysticerci were present. Moreover, an augmentation of suppressive-related molecules (SLAMF1, B7-H1, and CD205) was found in parasite-induced DC differentiation. Increased Tregs and a higher in vivo DC expression of the regulatory molecules SLAMF1 and CD205 in NC patients were also found. SLAMF1 gene was downregulated in NC patients with extraparenchymal cysticerci, exhibiting higher inflammation levels than patients with parenchymal parasites. Our findings suggest that cysticerci may modulate DC to favor a suppressive environment, which may help parasite establishment, minimizing the excessive inflammation, which may lead to tissue damage. PMID:23762101

  4. Control of T Helper 2 Responses by Transcription Factor IRF4-Dependent Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Nish, Simone A.; Jiang, Ruoyi; Hou, Lin; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S.; Zhao, Hongyu; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY CD4+ T cell differentiation is regulated by specialized antigen-presenting cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) produce cytokines that promote naive CD4+ T cell differentiation into T helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and inducible T regulatory (iTreg) cells. However, the initiation of Th2 cell responses remains poorly understood, although it is likely that more than one mechanism might be involved. Here we have defined a specific DC subset that is involved in Th2 cell differentiation in vivo in response to a protease allergen, as well as infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. We have demonstrated that this subset is controlled by the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4), which is required for their differentiation and Th2 cell-inducing function. IRF4 is known to control Th2 cell differentiation and Th2 cell-associated suppressing function in Treg cells. Our finding suggests that IRF4 also plays a role in DCs where it controls the initiation of Th2 cell responses. PMID:24076050

  5. Native cellulose nanofibrills induce immune tolerance in vitro by acting on dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Sergej; Kokol, Vanja; Mihajlović, Dušan; Mirčić, Aleksandar; Čolić, Miodrag

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose nanofibrills (CNFs) are attractive biocompatible, natural nanomaterials for wide biomedical applications. However, the immunological mechanisms of CNFs have been poorly investigated. Considering that dendritic cells (DCs) are the key immune regulatory cells in response to nanomaterials, our aim was to investigate the immunological mechanisms of CNFs in a model of DC-mediated immune response. We found that non-toxic concentrations of CNFs impaired the differentiation, and subsequent maturation of human monocyte-derived (mo)-DCs. In a co-culture with CD4(+)T cells, CNF-treated mo-DCs possessed a weaker allostimulatory and T helper (Th)1 and Th17 polarizing capacity, but a stronger capacity to induce Th2 cells and CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(hi) regulatory T cells. This correlated with an increased immunoglobulin-like transcript-4 and indolamine dioxygenase-1 expression by CNF-treated mo-DCs, following the partial internalization of CNFs and the accumulation of CD209 and actin bundles at the place of contacts with CNFs. Cumulatively, we showed that CNFs are able to induce an active immune tolerance by inducing tolerogenic DCs, which could be beneficial for the application of CNFs in wound healing and chronic inflammation therapies. PMID:27558765

  6. Modulation of Dendritic-Epithelial Cell Responses against Sphingomonas Paucimobilis by Dietary Fibers.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli, such as Sphingomonas paucimobilis (S.paucimobilis), are among the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections. Up to now, no definitive guidelines exist for antimicrobial therapy for S. paucimobilis infections. As we have shown that some dietary fibers exhibit pronounced immune-regulatory properties, we hypothesized that specific immune active dietary fibers might modulate the responses against S. paucimobilis. We studied the immunomodulatory effects of dietary fibers against S. paucimobilis on cytokine release and maturation of human dendritic cells (DCs) in co-cultures of DCs and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). S. paucimobilis infection resulted in increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by DCs/IECs; these effects were strongly attenuated by specific dietary fibers. Chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, and both starches had the strongest regulatory effects. IL-12 and TNF-α were drastically diminished upon exposure to chicory inulin and sugar beet pectin, or both starches. High-maize 260, was more effective in the reduction of chemokine release than the others fibers tested. In summary, chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, High-maize 260, and Novelose 330 attenuate S. paucimobilis-induced cytokines. These results demonstrate that dietary fibers with a specific chemical composition can be used to manage immune responses against pathogens such as S. paucimobilis. PMID:27452116

  7. Dendritic Cells Regulate GPR34 through Mitogenic Signals and Undergo Apoptosis in Its Absence.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Elisabeth; Schulz, Angela; Lede, Vera; Lin, Chen-Ching; Schöneberg, Torsten; Le Duc, Diana

    2016-03-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specifically equipped with the G protein-coupled receptor 34 (GPR34). Tight regulation of GPR34 gene expression seems highly important for proper immunological functions, because the absence of this receptor leads to an alteration of the immune response, whereas overexpression was reported to be involved in neuroinflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of GPR34 expression has not yet been investigated. Whole-transcriptome RNA sequencing analysis from spleens and DCs of GPR34 knockout and wild-type mice, combined with protein-protein interaction data, revealed functional modules affected by the absence of this receptor. Among these, NF-κB, MAPK, and apoptosis-signaling pathways showed high significance. Using murine DCs we experimentally show that NF-κB and MAPK pathways are involved in the downregulation of GPR34. DCs lacking GPR34 have a higher caspase-3/7 activity and increased apoptosis levels. Our study reveals a novel role of GPR34 in the fate of DCs and identifies a regulatory mechanism that could be relevant for treatment of GPR34-overexpressing pathologies, such as neuroinflammatory or cancer conditions. PMID:26851221

  8. Native cellulose nanofibrills induce immune tolerance in vitro by acting on dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomić, Sergej; Kokol, Vanja; Mihajlović, Dušan; Mirčić, Aleksandar; Čolić, Miodrag

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose nanofibrills (CNFs) are attractive biocompatible, natural nanomaterials for wide biomedical applications. However, the immunological mechanisms of CNFs have been poorly investigated. Considering that dendritic cells (DCs) are the key immune regulatory cells in response to nanomaterials, our aim was to investigate the immunological mechanisms of CNFs in a model of DC-mediated immune response. We found that non-toxic concentrations of CNFs impaired the differentiation, and subsequent maturation of human monocyte-derived (mo)-DCs. In a co-culture with CD4+T cells, CNF-treated mo-DCs possessed a weaker allostimulatory and T helper (Th)1 and Th17 polarizing capacity, but a stronger capacity to induce Th2 cells and CD4+CD25hiFoxP3hi regulatory T cells. This correlated with an increased immunoglobulin-like transcript-4 and indolamine dioxygenase-1 expression by CNF-treated mo-DCs, following the partial internalization of CNFs and the accumulation of CD209 and actin bundles at the place of contacts with CNFs. Cumulatively, we showed that CNFs are able to induce an active immune tolerance by inducing tolerogenic DCs, which could be beneficial for the application of CNFs in wound healing and chronic inflammation therapies. PMID:27558765

  9. Granzyme B produced by human plasmacytoid dendritic cells suppresses T-cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Angelika; Blackwell, Sue E.; Maier, Julia; Sontheimer, Kai; Beyer, Thamara; Mandel, Birgit; Lunov, Oleg; Tron, Kyrylo; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Simmet, Thomas; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Weiner, George J.

    2010-01-01

    Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are crucially involved in the modulation of adaptive T-cell responses in the course of neoplastic, viral, and autoimmune disorders. In several of these diseases elevated extracellular levels of the serine protease granzyme B (GrB) are observed. Here we demonstrate that human pDCs can be an abundant source of GrB and that such GrB+ pDCs potently suppress T-cell proliferation in a GrB-dependent, perforin-independent manner, a process reminiscent of regulatory T cells. Moreover, we show that GrB expression is strictly regulated on a transcriptional level involving Janus kinase 1 (JAK1), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and STAT5 and that interleukin-3 (IL-3), a cytokine secreted by activated T cells, plays a central role for GrB induction. Moreover, we find that the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 enhances, while Toll-like receptor agonists and CD40 ligand strongly inhibit, GrB secretion by pDCs. GrB-secreting pDCs may play a regulatory role for immune evasion of tumors, antiviral immune responses, and autoimmune processes. Our results provide novel information about the complex network of pDC–T-cell interactions and may contribute to an improvement of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations. PMID:19965634

  10. Modulation of Dendritic-Epithelial Cell Responses against Sphingomonas Paucimobilis by Dietary Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli, such as Sphingomonas paucimobilis (S.paucimobilis), are among the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections. Up to now, no definitive guidelines exist for antimicrobial therapy for S. paucimobilis infections. As we have shown that some dietary fibers exhibit pronounced immune-regulatory properties, we hypothesized that specific immune active dietary fibers might modulate the responses against S. paucimobilis. We studied the immunomodulatory effects of dietary fibers against S. paucimobilis on cytokine release and maturation of human dendritic cells (DCs) in co-cultures of DCs and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). S. paucimobilis infection resulted in increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by DCs/IECs; these effects were strongly attenuated by specific dietary fibers. Chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, and both starches had the strongest regulatory effects. IL-12 and TNF-α were drastically diminished upon exposure to chicory inulin and sugar beet pectin, or both starches. High-maize 260, was more effective in the reduction of chemokine release than the others fibers tested. In summary, chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, High-maize 260, and Novelose 330 attenuate S. paucimobilis-induced cytokines. These results demonstrate that dietary fibers with a specific chemical composition can be used to manage immune responses against pathogens such as S. paucimobilis. PMID:27452116

  11. Epidermal cells are the primary phagocytes in the fragmentation and clearance of degenerating dendrites in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hui; Wang, Denan; Franc, Nathalie C.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During developmental remodeling, neurites destined for pruning often degenerate on-site. Physical injury also induces degeneration of neurites distal to the injury site. Prompt clearance of degenerating neurites is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis and preventing inflammatory responses. Here we show that in both dendrite pruning and dendrite injury of Drosophila sensory neurons, epidermal cells rather than hemocytes are the primary phagocytes in clearing degenerating dendrites. Epidermal cells act via Draper-mediated recognition to facilitate dendrite degeneration and to engulf and degrade degenerating dendrites. Using multiple dendritic membrane markers to trace phagocytosis, we show that two members of the CD36 family, croquemort (crq) and debris buster (dsb), act at distinct stages of phagosome maturation for dendrite clearance. Our finding reveals the physiological importance of coordination between neurons and their surrounding epidermis, for both dendrite fragmentation and clearance. PMID:24412417

  12. Dendrite characteristics in directionally solidified Pb-8 pct Au and Pb-3 pct Pd alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    The dendritic microstructure and solute compression profiles for Pb-8 pct Au and Pb-3 pct Pd alloy samples are examined. Two groups of models, the minimum undercooled dendrite tip model of Burden and Hunt (1974) and Laxmanan (1974, 1984) and marginal stability at the dendrite tip models of Trivedi (1980) and Laxmanan (1974) are used to predict growth behavior of the alloy samples. The experimentally observed dendrite tip radius, primary arm spacing, and liquid composition at the dendrite tip are compared with theoretical predictions. It is observed that the modified minimum undercooling dendrite tip model and both of the marginal stability models accurately predict dendritic behavior. It is concluded that quantitative comparison of the primary arm spacing measurements can not form the basis for distinguishing among the various dendrite growth models in a positive temperature gradient.

  13. Progress in Modeling Nonlinear Dendritic Evolution in Two and Three Dimensions, and Its Mathematical Justification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, S.; Foster, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    We report progress in three areas of investigation related to dendritic crystal growth. Those items include: 1. Selection of tip features dendritic crystal growth; 2) Investigation of nonlinear evolution for two-sided model; and 3) Rigorous mathematical justification.

  14. 78 FR 44279 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...The Department of Justice is publishing its spring 2013 regulatory agenda pursuant to Executive Order 12866, ``Regulatory Planning and Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. sections 601 to 612...

  15. The ensembl regulatory build.

    PubMed

    Zerbino, Daniel R; Wilder, Steven P; Johnson, Nathan; Juettemann, Thomas; Flicek, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Most genomic variants associated with phenotypic traits or disease do not fall within gene coding regions, but in regulatory regions, rendering their interpretation difficult. We collected public data on epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding in human cell types and used it to construct an intuitive summary of regulatory regions in the human genome. We verified it against independent assays for sensitivity. The Ensembl Regulatory Build will be progressively enriched when more data is made available. It is freely available on the Ensembl browser, from the Ensembl Regulation MySQL database server and in a dedicated track hub. PMID:25887522

  16. Dendritic connectivity controls biodiversity patterns in experimental metacommunities

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Francesco; Altermatt, Florian; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Biological communities often occur in spatially structured habitats where connectivity directly affects dispersal and metacommunity processes. Recent theoretical work suggests that dispersal constrained by the connectivity of specific habitat structures, such as dendrites like river networks, can explain observed features of biodiversity, but direct evidence is still lacking. We experimentally show that connectivity per se shapes diversity patterns in microcosm metacommunities at different levels. Local dispersal in isotropic lattice landscapes homogenizes local species richness and leads to pronounced spatial persistence. On the contrary, dispersal along dendritic landscapes leads to higher variability in local diversity and among-community composition. Although headwaters exhibit relatively lower species richness, they are crucial for the maintenance of regional biodiversity. Our results establish that spatially constrained dendritic connectivity is a key factor for community composition and population persistence. PMID:22460788

  17. Ternary dendritic nanowires as highly active and stable multifunctional electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoojin; Jin, Haneul; Kim, Ho Young; Yoon, Jisun; Park, Jongsik; Baik, Hionsuck; Joo, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2016-08-18

    Multimetallic nanocatalysts with a controlled structure can provide enhanced catalytic activity and durability by exploiting electronic, geometric, and strain effects. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel ternary nanocatalyst based on Mo doped PtNi dendritic nanowires (Mo-PtNi DNW) and its bifunctional application in the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) at the anode and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode for direct methanol fuel cells. An unprecedented Mo-PtNi DNW structure can combine multiple structural attributes of the 1D nanowire morphology and dendritic surfaces. In the MOR, Mo-PtNi DNW exhibits superior activity to Pt/C and Mo doped Pt dendritic nanowires (Mo-Pt DNW), and excellent durability. Furthermore, Mo-PtNi DNW demonstrates excellent activity and durability for the ORR. This work highlights the important role of compositional and structural control in nanocatalysts for boosting catalytic performances. PMID:27507777

  18. A Model of Dendritic Cell Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    DePillis, Lisette; Gallegos, Angela; Radunskaya, Ami

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual’s antigen-specific immune response to cancer. We develop a mathematical model using differential and delay-differential equations to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells, and tumor cells. We account for the trafficking of immune cells between lymph, blood, and tumor compartments. Our model reflects experimental results both for dendritic cell trafficking and for immune suppression of tumor growth in mice. In addition, in silico experiments suggest more effective immunotherapy treatment protocols can be achieved by modifying dose location and schedule. A sensitivity analysis of the model reveals which patient-specific parameters have the greatest impact on treatment efficacy. PMID:23516248

  19. MicroRNA-9 controls dendritic development by targeting REST

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Sebastian A; Vogl, Annette M; Brockmann, Marisa M; Vercelli, Claudia A; Rein, Martin L; Trümbach, Dietrich; Wurst, Wolfgang; Cazalla, Demian; Stein, Valentin; Deussing, Jan M; Refojo, Damian

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are conserved noncoding RNAs that function as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. miR-9 is one of the most abundant miRNAs in the brain. Although the function of miR-9 has been well characterized in neural progenitors, its role in dendritic and synaptic development remains largely unknown. In order to target miR-9 in vivo, we developed a transgenic miRNA sponge mouse line allowing conditional inactivation of the miR-9 family in a spatio-temporal-controlled manner. Using this novel approach, we found that miR-9 controls dendritic growth and synaptic transmission in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-9-mediated downregulation of the transcriptional repressor REST is essential for proper dendritic growth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02755.001 PMID:25406064

  20. Regulation of Dendritic Cell Function by Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Barragan, Myriam; Good, Misty; Kolls, Jay K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies over the last two decades have revealed profound immunomodulatory aspects of vitamin D on various aspects of the immune system. This review will provide an overview of Vitamin D metabolism, a description of dendritic cell subsets, and highlight recent advances on the effects of vitamin D on dendritic cell function, maturation, cytokine production and antigen presentation. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, has important immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Specifically, the 1,25(OH)2D3-Vitamin D3 complex can affect the maturation and migration of many dendritic cell subsets, conferring a special immunoregulatory role as well as tolerogenic properties affecting cytokine and chemokine production. Furthermore, there have been many recent studies demonstrating the effects of Vitamin D on allergic disease and autoimmunity. A clear understanding of the effects of the various forms of Vitamin D will provide new opportunities to improve human health. PMID:26402698

  1. Robust Type-specific Hemisynapses Induced by Artificial Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Joong; Jeon, Chang Su; Lee, Soo Youn; Hwang, Inseong; Chung, Taek Dong

    2016-01-01

    Type-specificity of synapses, excitatory and inhibitory, regulates information process in neural networks via chemical neurotransmitters. To lay a foundation of synapse-based neural interfaces, artificial dendrites are generated by covering abiotic substrata with ectodomains of type-specific synaptogenic proteins that are C-terminally tagged with biotinylated fluorescent proteins. The excitatory artificial synapses displaying engineered ectodomains of postsynaptic neuroligin-1 (NL1) induce the formation of excitatory presynapses with mixed culture of neurons in various developmental stages, while the inhibitory artificial dendrites displaying engineered NL2 and Slitrk3 induce inhibitory presynapses only with mature neurons. By contrast, if the artificial dendrites are applied to the axonal components of micropatterned neurons, correctly-matched synaptic specificity emerges regardless of the neuronal developmental stages. The hemisynapses retain their initially established type-specificity during neuronal development and maintain their synaptic strength provided live neurons, implying the possibility of durable synapse-based biointerfaces. PMID:27072994

  2. Multiphoton imaging approaches for studying striatal dendritic excitability.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Joshua L; Surmeier, D James

    2014-01-01

    As the main input nucleus to the basal ganglia, the striatum is responsible for receiving and integrating highly convergent afferents to ultimately guide action selection and movement initiation. Although the majority of this synaptic integration occurs in the dendrites of striatal projection neurons (SPNs), their thin diameter makes them inaccessible with traditional recording electrodes. Recent advances in optical imaging technologies have allowed us and others to start lifting the veil on the mechanisms governing synaptic integration in the striatum by enabling direct dendritic measurements and manipulations. Here we describe how our lab has approached combining 2-photon imaging and photolysis with electrophysiological recordings to study dendritic excitability and synaptic integration in the striatum. PMID:25023308

  3. Shape Parameter for a Non-Axisymmetric Isothermal Dendrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, G. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Sekerka, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    In previous work, we found approximate solutions for paraboloids having perturbations with four-fold axial symmetry in order to model dendritic growth in cubic materials. These solutions provide self-consistent corrections through second order in a shape parameter e to the Peclet number-supercooling relation of the Ivantsov solution. The parameter e is proportional to the amplitude of the four-fold correction to the dendrite shape, as measured from the Ivantsov paraboloid of revolution. We calculate e by comparing the dendrite tip shape to the portion of the equilibrium shape near the growth direction, (001), for anisotropic surface free energy, where the ni are components of the unit normal of the crystal surface. This comparison results in epsilon = -2(epsilon 4), independent of the Peclet number. From the experimental value of epsilon 4, we find epsilon approximately 0.011, in good agreement with the measured value epsilon approximately 0.008 of LaCombe et al.

  4. Dendritic growth of undercooled nickel-tin. I, II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.; Piccone, T. J.; Shiohara, Y.; Flemings, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison is made between high speed cinematography and optical temperature measurements of the solidification of an undercooled Ni-25 wt pct Sn alloy. The first part of this study notes that solidification during the recalescence period at all undercoolings studied occurred in the form of a dendritelike front moving across the sample surface, and that the growth velocities observed agree with calculation results for the dendrite growth model of Lipton et al. (1986); it is concluded that the coarse structure observed comprises an array of much finer, solute-controlled dendrites. In the second part, attention is given to the solidification of levitated metal samples within a transparent glass medium for the cases of two undercooled Ni-Sn alloys, one of which is eutectic and another hypoeutectic. The data obtained suggest a solidification model involving dendrites of very fine structure growing into the melt at temperatures near the bulk undercooling temperature.

  5. Estimation of primary dendrite arm spacings in continuous casting products

    SciTech Connect

    Cicutti, C.; Bilmes, P.; Boeri, R.

    1997-09-01

    The proportion of steels produced by continuous casting has grown drastically during the last two decades, increasing to such an extent that in some countries, several grades of steel are exclusively made by this process. Many investigations recognized the significant influence of the solidification structure on the quality of cast products, and pointed out the importance of the development of appropriate tools to predict the microstructure as a function of thermal and physical parameters. The estimation of secondary dendrite arm spacings in continuously cast steel products has received some attention. However, very little effort has been focused on the prediction of primary dendrite arm spacings, to the best of the authors` knowledge. The main objective of this study is to develop simple expressions to estimate the variation of primary dendrite arm spacings through the section of continuous casting steel products.

  6. A Dendritic Golgi Satellite between ERGIC and Retromer.

    PubMed

    Mikhaylova, Marina; Bera, Sujoy; Kobler, Oliver; Frischknecht, Renato; Kreutz, Michael R

    2016-01-12

    The local synthesis of transmembrane proteins underlies functional specialization of dendritic microdomains in neuronal plasticity. It is unclear whether these proteins have access to the complete machinery of the secretory pathway following local synthesis. In this study, we describe a probe called pGolt that allows visualization of Golgi-related organelles for live imaging in neurons. We show that pGolt labels a widespread microsecretory Golgi satellite (GS) system that is, in contrast to Golgi outposts, present throughout basal and apical dendrites of all pyramidal neurons. The GS system contains glycosylation machinery and is localized between ERGIC and retromer. Synaptic activity restrains lateral movement of ERGIC, GS, and retromer close to one another, allowing confined processing of secretory cargo. Several synaptic transmembrane proteins pass through and recycle back to the GS system. Thus, the presence of an ER-ERGIC-GS-retromer microsecretory system in all neuronal dendrites enables autonomous local control of transmembrane protein synthesis and processing. PMID:26748700

  7. Electrical behaviour of dendritic spines as revealed by voltage imaging

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Marko A.; Carnevale, Nicholas; Rozsa, Balazs; Zecevic, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of dendritic spines on individual neurons process information and mediate plasticity by generating electrical input signals using a sophisticated assembly of transmitter receptors and voltage-sensitive ion channel molecules. Our understanding, however, of the electrical behaviour of spines is limited because it has not been possible to record input signals from these structures with adequate sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution. Current interpretation of indirect data and speculations based on theoretical considerations are inconclusive. Here we use an electrochromic voltage-sensitive dye which acts as a transmembrane optical voltmeter with a linear scale to directly monitor electrical signals from individual spines on thin basal dendrites. The results show that synapses on these spines are not electrically isolated by the spine neck to a significant extent. Electrically, they behave as if they are located directly on dendrites. PMID:26436431

  8. Robust Type-specific Hemisynapses Induced by Artificial Dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun Joong; Jeon, Chang Su; Lee, Soo Youn; Hwang, Inseong; Chung, Taek Dong

    2016-04-01

    Type-specificity of synapses, excitatory and inhibitory, regulates information process in neural networks via chemical neurotransmitters. To lay a foundation of synapse-based neural interfaces, artificial dendrites are generated by covering abiotic substrata with ectodomains of type-specific synaptogenic proteins that are C-terminally tagged with biotinylated fluorescent proteins. The excitatory artificial synapses displaying engineered ectodomains of postsynaptic neuroligin-1 (NL1) induce the formation of excitatory presynapses with mixed culture of neurons in various developmental stages, while the inhibitory artificial dendrites displaying engineered NL2 and Slitrk3 induce inhibitory presynapses only with mature neurons. By contrast, if the artificial dendrites are applied to the axonal components of micropatterned neurons, correctly-matched synaptic specificity emerges regardless of the neuronal developmental stages. The hemisynapses retain their initially established type-specificity during neuronal development and maintain their synaptic strength provided live neurons, implying the possibility of durable synapse-based biointerfaces.

  9. Robust Type-specific Hemisynapses Induced by Artificial Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Joong; Jeon, Chang Su; Lee, Soo Youn; Hwang, Inseong; Chung, Taek Dong

    2016-01-01

    Type-specificity of synapses, excitatory and inhibitory, regulates information process in neural networks via chemical neurotransmitters. To lay a foundation of synapse-based neural interfaces, artificial dendrites are generated by covering abiotic substrata with ectodomains of type-specific synaptogenic proteins that are C-terminally tagged with biotinylated fluorescent proteins. The excitatory artificial synapses displaying engineered ectodomains of postsynaptic neuroligin-1 (NL1) induce the formation of excitatory presynapses with mixed culture of neurons in various developmental stages, while the inhibitory artificial dendrites displaying engineered NL2 and Slitrk3 induce inhibitory presynapses only with mature neurons. By contrast, if the artificial dendrites are applied to the axonal components of micropatterned neurons, correctly-matched synaptic specificity emerges regardless of the neuronal developmental stages. The hemisynapses retain their initially established type-specificity during neuronal development and maintain their synaptic strength provided live neurons, implying the possibility of durable synapse-based biointerfaces. PMID:27072994

  10. Long-term depression is differentially expressed in distinct lamina of hippocampal CA1 dendrites.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Binu; Ahmed, Saheeb; Dean, Camin

    2015-01-01

    Information storage in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons is compartmentalized in proximal vs. distal apical dendrites, cell bodies, and basal dendrites. This compartmentalization is thought to be essential for synaptic integration. Differences in the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP) in each of these compartments have been described, but less is known regarding potential differences in long-term depression (LTD). Here, to directly compare LTD expression in each compartment and to bypass possible differences in input-specificity and stimulation of presynaptic inputs, we used global application of NMDA to induce LTD. We then examined LTD expression in each dendritic sub-region-proximal and distal apical, and basal dendrites-and in cell bodies. Interestingly, we found that distal apical dendrites exhibited the greatest magnitude of LTD of all areas tested and this LTD was maintained, whereas LTD in proximal apical dendrites was not maintained. In basal dendrites, LTD was also maintained, but the magnitude of LTD was less than in distal apical dendrites. Blockade of inhibition blocked LTD maintenance in both distal apical and basal dendrites. Population spikes recorded from the cell body layer correlated with apical dendrite field EPSP (fEPSP), where LTD was maintained in distal dendrites and decayed in proximal dendrites. On the other hand, LTD of basal dendrite fEPSPs was maintained but population spike responses were not. Thus E-S coupling was distinct in basal and apical dendrites. Our data demonstrate cell autonomous differential information processing in somas and dendritic sub-regions of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus, where LTD expression is intrinsic to distinct dendritic regions, and does not depend on the nature of stimulation and input specificity. PMID:25767434

  11. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition.

  12. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition.

  13. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition.

  14. How a silver dendritic mesocrystal converts to a single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.; Ding, B.; Song, X.; Han, Y.

    2008-05-02

    In this paper, we demonstrate how a silver dendrite transforms from mesocrystal into single crystal and the stability for a dendritic silver mesocrystal within a Sn/AgNO3 galvanic replacement reaction. Our findings provide the direct evidence and visible picture of the transformation from mesocrystal to single crystalline structure and further confirm the particle-mediated crystallization mechanism. At the initial stage of the transformation, there is a crystallographic fusion process, dominated by oriented attachment mechanism. Ostwald ripening also plays an important role in forming smooth surface and regular shape of the final nanocrystal.

  15. Electrical and Structural Characterization of Web Dendrite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, G. H.; Koliwad, K.; Dumas, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime distributions in silicon web dendrites are measured. Emphasis is placed on measuring areal homogeneity of lifetime, show its dependency on structural defects, and its unique change during hot processing. The internal gettering action of defect layers present in web crystals and their relation to minority carrier lifetime distributions is discussed. Minority carrier lifetime maps of web dendrites obtained before and after high temperature heat treatment are compared to similar maps obtained from 100 mm diameter Czochralski silicon wafers. Such maps indicate similar or superior areal homogeneity of minority carrier lifetime in webs.

  16. Impairments in dendrite morphogenesis as etiology for neurodevelopmental disorders and implications for therapeutic treatments.

    PubMed

    Copf, Tijana

    2016-09-01

    Dendrite morphology is pivotal for neural circuitry functioning. While the causative relationship between small-scale dendrite morphological abnormalities (shape, density of dendritic spines) and neurodevelopmental disorders is well established, such relationship remains elusive for larger-scale dendrite morphological impairments (size, shape, branching pattern of dendritic trees). Here, we summarize published data on dendrite morphological irregularities in human patients and animal models for neurodevelopmental disorders, with focus on autism and schizophrenia. We next discuss high-risk genes for these disorders and their role in dendrite morphogenesis. We finally overview recent developments in therapeutic attempts and we discuss how they relate to dendrite morphology. We find that both autism and schizophrenia are accompanied by dendritic arbor morphological irregularities, and that majority of their high-risk genes regulate dendrite morphogenesis. Thus, we present a compelling argument that, along with smaller-scale morphological impairments in dendrites (spines and synapse), irregularities in larger-scale dendrite morphology (arbor shape, size) may be an important part of neurodevelopmental disorders' etiology. We suggest that this should not be ignored when developing future therapeutic treatments. PMID:27143622

  17. Sex Differences in the Dendritic Arbor of Hypothalamic Ventromedial Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Gerald D.; Flanagan-Cato, Loretta M.

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMH) displays sexual dichotomies in its overall size, neurochemistry, and neuronal morphology. These differences may underlie the sex differences observed in functions mediated by the VMH, such as reproductive behaviors and energy balance. A previous Golgi impregnation analysis of VMH dendrites reported sex differences in total dendrite length the ventrolateral region of the VMH [15]. The present study tested the hypothesis that this sex difference is localized to a specific dendrite type. VMH neurons were visualized with Golgi impregnation. Overall, male rats displayed significantly longer dendrites than females for VMH neurons. This sex difference was apparent in both the dorsomedial and the ventrolateral subdivisions of the VMH. When neurons were classified based on dendrite type, namely long primary, short primary and secondary dendrites, the increased length for males was observed for all dendrite types. Furthermore, when long primary dendrites were categorized according to whether they extended in the dorsomedial, ventrolateral, ventromedial or dorsolateral direction, the sex difference in length occurred for all directions. These results indicate that the previously identified dendrite categories for VMH neurons are integral to VMH circuitry for both males and females. Given that the sex difference in dendrite length applied to all dendrite types, the elongated male VMH dendrites may provide additional sites to process input from both local interneurons and extranuclear afferents. PMID:19254731

  18. Liquid metal feeding through dendritic region in Ni-Hard white iron

    SciTech Connect

    Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Dogan, Omer N.

    2005-01-01

    Liquid permeability in the dendritic regions is one of the factors that determine porosity formation and macro segregation in castings. Permeability in the dendritic structure of Ni-Hard white iron was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of microstructural coarsening on the permeability was also investigated. Permeability increased with coarsening dendritic structure in Ni-Hard white iron.

  19. Canadian drug regulatory framework.

    PubMed

    Kelly, L; Lazzaro, M; Petersen, C

    2007-03-01

    The role of regulatory drug submission evaluators in Canada is to critically assess both the data submitted and the sponsor's interpretation of the data in order to reach an evidence-, and context-based recommendation as to the potential benefits and potential harms (i.e., risks) associated with taking the drug under the proposed conditions of use. The purpose of this document is to outline the regulatory framework in which this assessment occurs, including: defining what "authorization to market a drug in Canada" means, in terms of the role of the sponsor, the responsibility of Health Canada in applying the Food and Drugs Act prior to and after marketing authorization, and the distinction between regulatory authorization versus physician authorization; highlighting organizational, process and legal factors within Health Canada related to authorization of clinical trials and authorization to market a drug; considerations during the review process, such as regulatory and scientific issues related to the drug, patient populations and trial designs; application of international guidelines, and decisions from other jurisdictions; regulatory realities regarding drug authorization, including the requirement for wording in the Product Monograph to accurately reflect the information currently available on the safe and effective use of a drug, and that hypothesis-confirming studies are essential to regulatory endorsement; current issues related to the review of therapies for dementia, such as assessing preventative treatments, and therapies that have symptomatic versus disease-modifying effects, statistical issues regarding missing data, and trial design issues. PMID:17469674

  20. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 3-Deficient Dendritic Cells Modulate Splenic Responses to Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Amandeep; Huang, Liping; Kurmaeva, Elvira; Gigliotti, Joseph C; Ye, Hong; Miller, Jacqueline; Rosin, Diane L; Lobo, Peter I; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    The plasticity of dendritic cells (DCs) permits phenotypic modulationex vivoby gene expression or pharmacologic agents, and these modified DCs can exert therapeutic immunosuppressive effectsin vivothrough direct interactions with T cells, either inducing T regulatory cells (TREGs) or causing anergy. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid and the natural ligand for five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5), and S1PR agonists reduce kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in mice.S1pr3(-/-)mice are protected from kidney IRI, because DCs do not mature. We tested the therapeutic advantage ofS1pr3(-/-)bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC) transfers in kidney IRI. IRI produced a rise in plasma creatinine (PCr) levels in mice receiving no cells (NCs) and mice pretreated with wild-type (WT) BMDCs. However,S1pr3(-/-)BMDC-pretreated mice were protected from kidney IRI.S1pr3(-/-)BMDC-pretreated mice had significantly higher numbers of splenic TREGs compared with NC and WT BMDC-pretreated mice.S1pr3(-/-)BMDCs did not attenuate IRI in splenectomized,Rag-1(-/-), or CD11c(+)DC-depleted mice. Additionally,S1pr3(-/-)BMDC-dependent protection required CD169(+)marginal zone macrophages and the macrophage-derived chemokine CCL22 to increase splenic CD4(+)Foxp3(+)TREGs. Pretreatment withS1pr3(-/-)BMDCs also induced TREG-dependent protection against IRI in an allogeneic mouse model. In summary, adoptively transferredS1pr3(-/-)BMDCs prevent kidney IRI through interactions within the spleen and expansion of splenic CD4(+)Foxp3(+)TREGs. We conclude that genetically induced deficiency ofS1pr3in allogenic BMDCs could serve as a therapeutic approach to prevent IRI-induced AKI. PMID:26286732

  1. Suppression of Th1-Mediated Autoimmunity by Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Tokunori; Hirata, Shinya; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Haruta, Miwa; Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Ito, Takaaki; Uchino, Makoto; Ando, Yukio; Nagafuchi, Seiho; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs) using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:25522369

  2. Tolerogen-induced interferon-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDCs) protect against EAE

    PubMed Central

    Huarte, Eduardo; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Riccardi, Carol; Skyberg, Jerod A.; Golden, Sarah; Rollins, MaryClare F.; Ramstead, Andrew; Jackiw, Larissa O.; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to link the innate and adaptive immune systems. Likewise, a new innate cell subset, interferon-producing killer DCs (IKDCs), shares phenotypic and functional characteristics with both DCs and NK cells. Here, we show IKDCs play an essential role in the resolution of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) upon treatment with the tolerizing agent, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), genetically fused to reovirus protein σ1 (termed MOG-pσ1). Activated IKDCs were recruited subsequent MOG-pσ1 treatment of EAE, and disease resolution was abated upon NK1.1 cell depletion. These IKDCs were able to kill activated CD4+ T cells and mature dendritic DCs, thus, contributing to EAE remission. In addition, IKDCs were responsible for MOG-pσ1-mediated MOG-specific regulatory T cell recruitment to the CNS. The IKDCs induced by MOG-pσ1 expressed elevated levels of HVEM for interactions with cognate ligand-positive cells: LIGHT+ NK and Teff cells and BTLA+ B cells. Further characterization revealed these activated IKDCs being MHC class IIhigh, and upon their adoptive transfer (CD11c+NK1.1+MHC class IIhigh), IKDCs, but not CD11c+NK1.1+MHC class IIintermediate/low (unactivated) cells, conferred protection against EAE. These activated IKDCs showed enhanced CD107a, PD-L1, and granzyme B expression and could present OVA, unlike unactivated IKDCs. Thus, these results demonstrate the interventional potency induced HVEM+ IKDCs to resolve autoimmune disease. PMID:22018711

  3. Suppression of Th1-mediated autoimmunity by embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tokunori; Hirata, Shinya; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Haruta, Miwa; Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Ito, Takaaki; Uchino, Makoto; Ando, Yukio; Nagafuchi, Seiho; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs) using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:25522369

  4. Methods of analysis of dendritic cell-derived exosome-shuttle microRNA and its horizontal propagation between dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Montecalvo, Angela; Larregina, Adriana T; Morelli, Adrian E

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are extremely small (<100 nm) membrane vesicles, generated in the endocytic compartment that are released to the extracellular milieu by living cells. Although the biological function of exosomes in vivo remains unclear, they seem to function as mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication for horizontal transfer of proteins, antigens, prions, morphogens, mRNA, and noncoding regulatory RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs) (also known as exosome-shuttle miRNAs). Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent professional antigen-presenting leukocytes of the immune system, release relatively high levels of exosomes and also interact with free exosomes present in the extracellular space. Therefore, DCs constitute a good model for the analysis of exosome-shuttle miRNAs and their horizontal propagation between cells. This chapter provides basic protocols for purification of exosomes released by mouse bone marrow-derived DCs, analysis of their miRNA content, and assessment of the function of exosome-shuttle miRNAs, once they are transferred to target/acceptor DCs. PMID:23719940

  5. Dendritic orientation and branching distinguish a class of multifunctional turtle spinal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Jonathan R.; Berkowitz, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Spinal interneurons can integrate diverse propriospinal and supraspinal inputs that trigger or modulate locomotion and other limb movements. These synaptic inputs can occur on distal dendrites and yet must remain effective at the soma. Active dendritic conductances may amplify distal dendritic inputs, but appear to play a minimal role during scratching, at least. Another possibility is that spinal interneurons that integrate inputs on distal dendrites have unusually simple dendritic trees that effectively funnel current to the soma. We previously described a class of spinal interneurons, called transverse interneurons (or T neurons), in adult turtles. T neurons were defined as having dendrites that extend further in the transverse plane than rostrocaudally and a soma that extends further mediolaterally than rostrocaudally. T neurons are multifunctional, as they were activated during both swimming and scratching motor patterns. T neurons had higher peak firing rates and larger membrane potential oscillations during scratching than scratch-activated interneurons with different dendritic morphologies (“non-T” neurons). These characteristics make T neurons good candidates to play an important role in integrating diverse inputs and generating or relaying rhythmic motor patterns. Here, we quantitatively investigated additional dendritic morphological characteristics of T neurons as compared to non-T neurons. We found that T neurons have less total dendritic length, a greater proportion of dendritic length in primary dendrites, and dendrites that are oriented more mediolaterally. Thus, T neuron dendritic trees extend far mediolaterally, yet are unusually simple, which may help channel synaptic current from distal dendrites in the lateral and ventral funiculi to the soma. In combination with T neuron physiological properties, these dendritic properties may help integrate supraspinal and propriospinal inputs and generate and/or modulate rhythmic limb movements. PMID

  6. The role of ongoing dendritic oscillations in single-neuron dynamics.

    PubMed

    Remme, Michiel W H; Lengyel, Máté; Gutkin, Boris S

    2009-09-01

    The dendritic tree contributes significantly to the elementary computations a neuron performs while converting its synaptic inputs into action potential output. Traditionally, these computations have been characterized as both temporally and spatially localized. Under this localist account, neurons compute near-instantaneous mappings from their current input to their current output, brought about by somatic summation of dendritic contributions that are generated in functionally segregated compartments. However, recent evidence about the presence of oscillations in dendrites suggests a qualitatively different mode of operation: the instantaneous phase of such oscillations can depend on a long history of inputs, and under appropriate conditions, even dendritic oscillators that are remote may interact through synchronization. Here, we develop a mathematical framework to analyze the interactions of local dendritic oscillations and the way these interactions influence single cell computations. Combining weakly coupled oscillator methods with cable theoretic arguments, we derive phase-locking states for multiple oscillating dendritic compartments. We characterize how the phase-locking properties depend on key parameters of the oscillating dendrite: the electrotonic properties of the (active) dendritic segment, and the intrinsic properties of the dendritic oscillators. As a direct consequence, we show how input to the dendrites can modulate phase-locking behavior and hence global dendritic coherence. In turn, dendritic coherence is able to gate the integration and propagation of synaptic signals to the soma, ultimately leading to an effective control of somatic spike generation. Our results suggest that dendritic oscillations enable the dendritic tree to operate on more global temporal and spatial scales than previously thought; notably that local dendritic activity may be a mechanism for generating on-going whole-cell voltage oscillations. PMID:19730677

  7. Nectin-1 spots as a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell lateral dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takahito; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Maruo, Tomohiko; Mandai, Kenji; Kimura, Kazushi; Kayahara, Tetsuro; Wang, Shujie; Itoh, Yu; Sai, Kousyoku; Mori, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku; Mizoguchi, Akira; Takai, Yoshimi

    2015-08-15

    Mitral cells project lateral dendrites that contact the lateral and primary dendrites of other mitral cells and granule cell dendrites in the external plexiform layer (EPL) of the olfactory bulb. These dendritic structures are critical for odor information processing, but it remains unknown how they are formed. In immunofluorescence microscopy, the immunofluorescence signal for the cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 was concentrated on mitral cell lateral dendrites in the EPL of the developing mouse olfactory bulb. In electron microscopy, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically localized on the plasma membranes at the contacts between mitral cell lateral dendrites, which showed bilateral darkening without dense cytoskeletal undercoats characteristic of puncta adherentia junctions. We named the contacts where the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically accumulated "nectin-1 spots." The nectin-1 spots were 0.21 μm in length on average and the distance between the plasma membranes was 20.8 nm on average. In 3D reconstruction of serial sections, clusters of the nectin-1 spots formed a disc-like structure. In the mitral cell lateral dendrites of nectin-1-knockout mice, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were undetectable and the plasma membrane darkening was electron-microscopically normalized, but the plasma membranes were partly separated from each other. The nectin-1 spots were further identified between mitral cell lateral and primary dendrites and between mitral cell lateral dendrites and granule cell dendritic spine necks. These results indicate that the nectin-1 spots constitute a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb. PMID:25967681

  8. Interactions of bacterial pathogens with dendritic cells during invasion of mucosal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Granucci, Francesca; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2003-02-01

    Recent studies of mucosal immunity suggest a key role for dendritic cells in the regulation of gut immune responses, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Dendritic cells are widely distributed in the lamina propria of the gut and are involved in direct bacterial uptake across mucosal surfaces, which questions the role of dendritic cells in innate mucosal responses. Approximately 400 commensal microbial species are present in the gut lumen. So how do dendritic cells distinguish pathogens from luminal microflora? Are the cytokines and chemokines induced in dendritic cells tailored to the class of microbes being recognized? Several very important questions still need to be addressed. PMID:12615223

  9. Coordination of dendritic inhibition through local disinhibitory circuits

    PubMed Central

    Francavilla, Ruggiero; Luo, Xiao; Magnin, Elise; Tyan, Leonid; Topolnik, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time that different subtypes of cortical inhibitory interneurons innervate specific dendritic domains of principal cells and release GABA at particular times during behaviorally relevant network oscillations. However, the lack of basic information on how the activity of interneurons can be controlled by GABA released in particular behavioral states has hindered our understanding of the rules that govern the spatio-temporal organization and function of dendritic inhibition. Similar to principal cells, any given interneuron may receive several functionally distinct inhibitory inputs that target its specific subcellular domains. We recently found that local circuitry of the so-called interneuron-specific (IS) interneurons is responsible for dendritic inhibition of different subtypes of hippocampal interneurons with a great impact on cell output. Here, we will review the properties and the specificity of connections of IS interneurons in the CA1 hippocampus and neocortex, and discuss their possible role in the activity-dependent regulation of dendritic inhibition received by pyramidal neurons. PMID:25767448

  10. Synthesis, magnetic and microwave electromagnetic properties of dendritic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Gongqin; He, Fei; Zhao, Guanlin; Wei, Pengwan; Jiang, Anbang

    2015-09-01

    Iron dendritic micropines are synthesized by a hydrogen reduction, where the hematite dendritic micropines prepared by a hydrothermal method are used as starting materials. The as-obtained dendritic iron exhibits enhanced coercivity and remanent magnetization at room temperature and high complex permittivity at 2-18 GHz due to the peculiar shape anisotropy and good crystallinity. The negative imaginary permeability is observed at 14.5-18.0 GHz, suggesting it has a potential as a left-handed material. The paraffin-based composites containing 30 wt% dendritic irons show large permittivity resulting from the charge polarization and the conductivity and have a minimal reflection loss (RL) of -37.4 dB at 7.4 GHz when the thickness ( d) is 2.0 mm. The RL values less than -20 dB are obtained in the frequency range of 5.5-12.9 GHz when d increases from 0.9 to 3.0 mm.

  11. Some properties of dendritic macrophages from peripheral lymph.

    PubMed Central

    Barfoot, R; Denham, S; Gyure, L A; Hall, J G; Hobbs, S M; Jackson, L E; Robertson, D

    1989-01-01

    Peripheral lymph was collected from the skin and liver of sheep, and from the intestine of rats. The dendritic macrophages contained in it were isolated by centrifuging the lymph over a layer of 'Nycodenz'. Similar cells were produced by culturing mononuclear cells from venous blood, but the yields were very small. The numbers of dendritic cells in the lymph from the legs of sheep increased five-fold after xylene had been applied to the skin. Dendritic macrophages displayed abundant class II histocompatibility antigens on their surfaces, as well as immunoglobulins. Although the latter were probably acquired passively, they remained present for several days on cells cultured in vitro. When in vitro, dendritic cells could be shown to phagocytose marker particles, such as latex beads, but their performance was unimpressive compared to macrophages from the peritoneal cavities of rats. In contrast, their ability to phagocytose rapidly T4 phage or influenza viruses unequivocal and striking. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2807381

  12. Lithium Dendrite Suppression with UV-Curable Polysilsesquioxane Separator Binders.

    PubMed

    Na, Wonjun; Lee, Albert S; Lee, Jin Hong; Hwang, Seung Sang; Kim, Eunkyoung; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2016-05-25

    For the first time, an inorganic-organic hybrid polymer binder was used for the coating of hybrid composites on separators to enhance thermal stability and to prevent formation of lithium dendrite in lithium metal batteries. The fabricated hybrid-composite-coated separators exhibited minimal thermal shrinkage compared with the previous composite separators (<5% change in dimension), maintenance of porosity (Gurley number ∼400 s/100 cm(3)), and high ionic conductivity (0.82 mS/cm). Lithium metal battery cell examinations with our hybrid-composite-coated separators revealed excellent C-rate and cyclability performance due to the prevention of lithium dendrite growth on the lithium anode even after 200 cycles under 0.2-5C (charge-discharge) conditions. The mechanism for lithium dendrite prevention was attributed to exceptional nanoscale surface mechanical properties of the hybrid composite coating layer compared with the lithium metal anode, as the elastic modulus of the hybrid-composite-coated separator far exceeded those of both the lithium metal anode and the required threshold for lithium metal dendrite prevention. PMID:27148625

  13. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hui; Li, Ming-Xing; Xu, Chang; Chen, Hui-Bin; An, Shu-Cheng; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have been used to recapitulate depression-like behaviors in rodents and study the underlying mechanisms. In comparison with CRS, CUMS overcomes the stress habituation and has been widely used to model depression-like behaviors. CSDS is one of the most frequently used models for depression, but it is limited to the study of male mice. Generally, chronic stress causes dendritic atrophy and spine loss in the neurons of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Meanwhile, neurons of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens exhibit an increase in spine density. These alterations induced by chronic stress are often accompanied by depression-like behaviors. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This review summarizes our current understanding of the chronic stress-induced remodeling of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens and also discusses the putative underlying mechanisms. PMID:26881133

  14. Lithium dendrite growth through solid polymer electrolyte membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, Katherine; Schauser, Nicole; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Replacing the graphite-based anode in current batteries with a lithium foil will result in a qualitative increase in the energy density of lithium batteries. The primary reason for not adopting lithium-foil anodes is the formation of dendrites during cell charging. In this study, stop-motion X-ray microtomography experiments were used to directly monitor the growth of lithium dendrites during electrochemical cycling of symmetric lithium-lithium cells with a block copolymer electrolyte. In an attempt to understand the relationship between viscoelastic properties of the electrolyte on dendrite formation, a series of complementary experiments including cell cycling, tomography, ac impedance, and rheology, were conducted above and below the glass transition temperature of the non-conducting poly(styrene) block; the conducting phase is a mixture of rubbery poly(ethylene oxide) and a lithium salt. The tomography experiments enable quantification of the evolution of strain in the block copolymer electrolyte. Our work provides fundamental insight into the dynamics of electrochemical deposition of metallic films in contact with high modulus polymer electrolytes. Rational approaches for slowing down and, perhaps, eliminating dendrite growth are proposed.

  15. Dendritic and Axonal Wiring Optimization of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    The way in which a neuronal tree expands plays an important role in its functional and computational characteristics. We aimed to study the existence of an optimal neuronal design for different types of cortical GABAergic neurons. To do this, we hypothesized that both the axonal and dendritic trees of individual neurons optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. We took the branching points of real three-dimensional neuronal reconstructions of the axonal and dendritic trees of different types of cortical interneurons and searched for the minimal wiring arborization structure that respects the branching points. We compared the minimal wiring arborization with real axonal and dendritic trees. We tested this optimization problem using a new approach based on graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques. We concluded that neuronal wiring is near-optimal in most of the tested neurons, although the wiring length of dendritic trees is generally nearer to the optimum. Therefore, wiring economy is related to the way in which neuronal arborizations grow irrespective of the marked differences in the morphology of the examined interneurons. PMID:27345531

  16. Neurogranin regulates CaM dynamics at dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Amber; Gerges, Nashaat Z.

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) plays a key role in synaptic function and plasticity due to its ability to mediate Ca2+ signaling. Therefore, it is essential to understand the dynamics of CaM at dendritic spines. In this study we have explored CaM dynamics using live-cell confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to study CaM diffusion. We find that only a small fraction of CaM in dendritic spines is immobile. Furthermore, the diffusion rate of CaM was regulated by neurogranin (Ng), a CaM-binding protein enriched at dendritic spines. Interestingly, Ng did not influence the immobile fraction of CaM at recovery plateau. We have previously shown that Ng enhances synaptic strength in a CaM-dependent manner. Taken together, these data indicate that Ng-mediated enhancement of synaptic strength is due to its ability to target, rather than sequester, CaM within dendritic spines. PMID:26084473

  17. Conical Gradient Junctions of Dendritic Viologen Arrays on Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Takehiro; Oguchi, Yuki; Nagai, Keiji; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2015-06-01

    The three-dimensional construction of arrays of functional molecules on an electrode surface, such as organic semiconductors and redox-active molecules, is a considerable challenge in the fabrication of sophisticated junctions for molecular devices. In particular, well-defined organic layers with precise molecular gradients are anticipated to function as novel metal/organic interfaces with specific electrical properties, such as a space charge layer at the metal/semiconductor interface. Here, we report a strategy for the construction of a three-dimensional molecular array with an electrical connection to a metal electrode by exploiting dendritic molecular architecture. Newly designed dendritic molecules consisting of viologens (1,1‧-disubstituted-4,4‧-bipyridilium salts) as the framework and mercapto groups as anchor units form unique self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a gold surface reflecting the molecular design. The dendritic molecules exhibit a conical shape and closely pack to form cone arrays on the substrate, whereas, in solution, they expand into more flexible conformations. Differences in the introduction position of the anchor units in the dendritic structure result in apical- and basal-type cone arrays in which the spatial concentration of the viologen units can be precisely configured in the cones. The concentration in apical-type SAMs increases away from the substrate, whereas the opposite is true in basal-type SAMs.

  18. Conical Gradient Junctions of Dendritic Viologen Arrays on Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kawauchi, Takehiro; Oguchi, Yuki; Nagai, Keiji; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional construction of arrays of functional molecules on an electrode surface, such as organic semiconductors and redox-active molecules, is a considerable challenge in the fabrication of sophisticated junctions for molecular devices. In particular, well-defined organic layers with precise molecular gradients are anticipated to function as novel metal/organic interfaces with specific electrical properties, such as a space charge layer at the metal/semiconductor interface. Here, we report a strategy for the construction of a three-dimensional molecular array with an electrical connection to a metal electrode by exploiting dendritic molecular architecture. Newly designed dendritic molecules consisting of viologens (1,1′-disubstituted-4,4′-bipyridilium salts) as the framework and mercapto groups as anchor units form unique self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a gold surface reflecting the molecular design. The dendritic molecules exhibit a conical shape and closely pack to form cone arrays on the substrate, whereas, in solution, they expand into more flexible conformations. Differences in the introduction position of the anchor units in the dendritic structure result in apical- and basal-type cone arrays in which the spatial concentration of the viologen units can be precisely configured in the cones. The concentration in apical-type SAMs increases away from the substrate, whereas the opposite is true in basal-type SAMs. PMID:26057120

  19. Variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic spread with map scale.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Millecchia, R; Culberson, J L; Gladfelter, W; Covalt-Dunning, D

    1996-10-21

    Cells in laminae III, IV, and V of cat dorsal horn were injected with horseradish peroxidase or neurobiotin. Dorsal views of the dendritic domains were constructed in order to measure their lengths, widths, areas, and length/width ratios in the horizontal plane (the plane of the somatotopic map). Dendritic domain width and area in the horizontal plane were negatively correlated with fractional distance between the medial and lateral edges of the dorsal horn. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that dendritic domain width varies with map scale, which is maximal in the medial dorsal horn. This is similar to the variation in widths of primary afferent bouton distributions. The parallel variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic domain width and primary afferent bouton distribution width with map scale suggests that there is a causal relation between morphology and map scale in the dorsal horn representation of the hindlimb. This variation of adult morphology with map scale must reflect mechanisms responsible for the assembly of receptive fields. PMID:8906504

  20. Thermodynamic-kinetic simulation of constrained dendrite growth in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, J.

    2000-04-01

    A model of constrained dendritic growth for steels, based on thermodynamic and kinetic theory, is presented. The model links thermodynamic chemical potential-equality equations to an existing, approximate treatment of constrained dendritic growth in multicomponent steels, taking into account the deviation from the local thermodynamic equilibrium of the phase interface caused by interface friction, capillarity, and solute trapping. Due to the thermodynamic approach, with a thermodynamic model and recently assessed data, the present treatment yields a more accurate determination of phase stabilities than the earlier methods. Depending on the steel composition and the growth conditions (growth rate and temperature gradient), the model determines the dendrite tip undercooling, the primary solid phase (ferrite or austenite), the stability of that phase, certain dimensions of the microstructure, and the solute accumulation ahead of the dendrite tip. A special optional calculations is that of the equally probable formation of ferrite and austenite in stainless steels. Calculations for testing the model and for validation it with experimental data are presented.

  1. Manipulation of dendritic cell functions by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, John

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the mammalian immune system and are central to the initiation and maintenance of the adaptive immune response. They are crucial for the presentation of antigen to T cells and B cells, as well as the induction of chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines, which orchestrate the balance of the cell-mediated (Th1) and antibody (Th2) response. This ability of dendritic cells to present antigen and release chemokines and cytokines also bridges the innate and adaptive immune responses by driving T cell activation. These cells thus possess key immunological functions that make them the front line of defence for the targeting and clearance of any invading pathogen and, as such, they underpin the host immune response to infection. For efficient infection, invading pathogens often need to overcome these sentinel immune functions. It is therefore not surprising that pathogens have evolved numerous mechanisms to target dendritic cell functions directly or indirectly during infection, and at least one herpesvirus--human cytomegalovirus--has evolved a life cycle that hijacks dendritic cells for its long-term persistence in the infected host. PMID:19025715

  2. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN): a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming Sheng; Lemmert, Karla; Enjeti, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare and aggressive haematological malignancy in the elderly, with a high frequency of cutaneous and bone marrow involvement and poor prognosis. We report a case of BPDCN with classic presentation and discuss its treatment and the value of different investigation tools used in diagnosis and response assessment. PMID:26791132

  3. Glucocorticoids Reduce Sepsis by Diminishing Dendritic Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Richard

    2015-10-01

    How does the body's immune system strike the delicate balance between under- and over-response? A new study shows that glucocorticoids limit the production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 by dendritic cells in response to invading bacteria, thereby helping to avoid sepsis. Read the Research Article. PMID:26441144

  4. Protocadherins branch out: Multiple roles in dendrite development

    PubMed Central

    Keeler, Austin B; Molumby, Michael J; Weiner, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    The proper formation of dendritic arbors is a critical step in neural circuit formation, and as such defects in arborization are associated with a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. Among the best gene candidates are those encoding cell adhesion molecules, including members of the diverse cadherin superfamily characterized by distinctive, repeated adhesive domains in their extracellular regions. Protocadherins (Pcdhs) make up the largest group within this superfamily, encompassing over 80 genes, including the ∼60 genes of the α-, β-, and γ-Pcdh gene clusters and the non-clustered δ-Pcdh genes. An additional group includes the atypical cadherin genes encoding the giant Fat and Dachsous proteins and the 7-transmembrane cadherins. In this review we highlight the many roles that Pcdhs and atypical cadherins have been demonstrated to play in dendritogenesis, dendrite arborization, and dendritic spine regulation. Together, the published studies we discuss implicate these members of the cadherin superfamily as key regulators of dendrite development and function, and as potential therapeutic targets for future interventions in neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25869446

  5. Computational implications of cooperative plasticity induction at nearby dendritic sites.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that plasticity is not regulated independently at individual synapses but rather that there is cooperativity or associativity between nearby synapses in the dendritic tree of individual cortical pyramidal cells. Here, I summarize experimental results regarding such cooperative plasticity and its underlying mechanisms and consider their computational implications. PMID:19126862

  6. Dendritic spine geometry can localize GTPase signaling in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Samuel A.; Raghavachari, Sridhar; Lew, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic terminals of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Learning and memory are associated with long-lasting structural remodeling of dendritic spines through an actin-mediated process regulated by the Rho-family GTPases RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42. These GTPases undergo sustained activation after synaptic stimulation, but whereas Rho activity can spread from the stimulated spine, Cdc42 activity remains localized to the stimulated spine. Because Cdc42 itself diffuses rapidly in and out of the spine, the basis for the retention of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine long after synaptic stimulation has ceased is unclear. Here we model the spread of Cdc42 activation at dendritic spines by means of reaction-diffusion equations solved on spine-like geometries. Excitable behavior arising from positive feedback in Cdc42 activation leads to spreading waves of Cdc42 activity. However, because of the very narrow neck of the dendritic spine, wave propagation is halted through a phenomenon we term geometrical wave-pinning. We show that this can account for the localization of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine, and, of interest, retention is enhanced by high diffusivity of Cdc42. Our findings are broadly applicable to other instances of signaling in extreme geometries, including filopodia and primary cilia. PMID:26337387

  7. Search for a solute-drag effect in dendritic solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Eckler, K.; Herlach, D.M. ); Aziz, M.J. . Div. of Applied Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    The authors report the results of an indirect experimental test for the solute-drag effect in alloy solidification by fitting the data of Eckler et.al. for Ni-B dendrite tip velocities vs undercooling to models in several ways. The unknown equilibrium partition coefficient, k[sub e], was varied as a fitting parameter. When they combine the dendrite growth model of Boettinger et al. with the Continuous Growth Model (CGM) of Aziz and Kaplan with solute drag, they cannot fit the data for any value of k[sub e]. When they combine dendrite growth theory with the CGM without solute drag, they obtain a reasonable fit to the data for k[sub e] = 4 [times] 10[sup [minus]6]. When they combine dendrite growth theory with a new partial-solute-drag interpolation between the with-solute-drag and the without-solute-drag versions of the CGM, they obtain a still better fit to the data for k[sub e] = 2.8 [times] 10[sup [minus

  8. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Hui; Li, Ming-Xing; Xu, Chang; Chen, Hui-Bin; An, Shu-Cheng; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have been used to recapitulate depression-like behaviors in rodents and study the underlying mechanisms. In comparison with CRS, CUMS overcomes the stress habituation and has been widely used to model depression-like behaviors. CSDS is one of the most frequently used models for depression, but it is limited to the study of male mice. Generally, chronic stress causes dendritic atrophy and spine loss in the neurons of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Meanwhile, neurons of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens exhibit an increase in spine density. These alterations induced by chronic stress are often accompanied by depression-like behaviors. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This review summarizes our current understanding of the chronic stress-induced remodeling of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens and also discusses the putative underlying mechanisms. PMID:26881133

  9. Dendritic assembly of gold nanoparticles during fuel-forming electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Manthiram, Karthish; Surendranath, Yogesh; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2014-05-21

    We observe the dendritic assembly of alkanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles on a glassy carbon support during electrochemical reduction of protons and CO2. We find that the primary mechanism by which surfactant-ligated gold nanoparticles lose surface area is by taking a random walk along the support, colliding with their neighbors, and fusing to form dendrites, a type of fractal aggregate. A random walk model reproduces the fractal dimensionality of the dendrites observed experimentally. The rate at which the dendrites form is strongly dependent on the solubility of the surfactant in the electrochemical double layer under the conditions of electrolysis. Since alkanethiolate surfactants reductively desorb at potentials close to the onset of CO2 reduction, they do not poison the catalytic activity of the gold nanoparticles. Although catalyst mobility is typically thought to be limited for room-temperature electrochemistry, our results demonstrate that nanoparticle mobility is significant under conditions at which they electrochemically catalyze gas evolution, even in the presence of a high surface area carbon and binder. A careful understanding of the electrolyte- and polarization-dependent nanoparticle aggregation kinetics informs strategies for maintaining catalyst dispersion during fuel-forming electrocatalysis. PMID:24766431

  10. Synaptic integration in dendrites: exceptional need for speed.

    PubMed

    Golding, Nace L; Oertel, Donata

    2012-11-15

    Some neurons in the mammalian auditory system are able to detect and report the coincident firing of inputs with remarkable temporal precision. A strong, low-voltage-activated potassium conductance (g(KL)) at the cell body and dendrites gives these neurons sensitivity to the rate of depolarization by EPSPs, allowing neurons to assess the coincidence of the rising slopes of unitary EPSPs. Two groups of neurons in the brain stem, octopus cells in the posteroventral cochlear nucleus and principal cells of the medial superior olive (MSO), extract acoustic information by assessing coincident firing of their inputs over a submillisecond timescale and convey that information at rates of up to 1000 spikes s(-1). Octopus cells detect the coincident activation of groups of auditory nerve fibres by broadband transient sounds, compensating for the travelling wave delay by dendritic filtering, while MSO neurons detect coincident activation of similarly tuned neurons from each of the two ears through separate dendritic tufts. Each makes use of filtering that is introduced by the spatial distribution of inputs on dendrites. PMID:22930273

  11. Avian dendritic cells: Phenotype and ontogeny in lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nándor; Bódi, Ildikó; Oláh, Imre

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are critically important accessory cells in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Avian DCs were originally identified in primary and secondary lymphoid organs by their typical morphology, displaying long cell processes with cytoplasmic granules. Several subtypes are known. Bursal secretory dendritic cells (BSDC) are elongated cells which express vimentin intermediate filaments, MHC II molecules, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), and produce 74.3+ secretory granules. Avian follicular dendritic cells (FDC) highly resemble BSDC, express the CD83, 74.3 and CSF1R molecules, and present antigen in germinal centers. Thymic dendritic cells (TDC), which express 74.3 and CD83, are concentrated in thymic medulla while interdigitating DC are found in T cell-rich areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Avian Langerhans cells are a specialized 74.3-/MHC II+ cell population found in stratified squamous epithelium and are capable of differentiating into 74.3+ migratory DCs. During organogenesis hematopoietic precursors of DC colonize the developing lymphoid organ primordia prior to immigration of lymphoid precursor cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the ontogeny, cytoarchitecture, and immunophenotype of avian DC, and offers an antibody panel for the in vitro and in vivo identification of these heterogeneous cell types. PMID:26751596

  12. Preparation and SERS Study of Silver Microstructures with Dendritic Shape.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-tong; Zhao, Chun-liu; Zhou, Yu-meng; Dong, Qian-min; Lang, Ting-ting; Jin, Shang-zhong

    2015-10-01

    In the surface ehanced Raman scattering (SERS) technology, not only to improve the making process of SERS substrates, to be fast and easily, but also to enhance the SERS enhance factor, an easy replacement reaction between zinc and silver nitrate solution has been adopted to prepare silver micro-structures SERS-active substrate. The silver micro-substrates have many advantages. These substrates have good stability, well preservation, an easy making method and a fast making process. The surface profile of the silver microparticles is investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The silver microstructures are dendritic shape in a symmetrical fashion with symmetrical distribution. When the time of the replace reaction is 40, 50 and 60 s, respectively, the average lengths of "trunks" in the silver dendritic microsubstractes are about 3, 5 and 10 μm, and the lengths of the "branches" are about 700 nm, 2 μm and 3 μm, respectively. The result shows that the longer time the replacement reaction takes, the longer lengths of the "trunks" and "branches" in the silver dendritic microsubstractes become. With the time of replace reaction increasing, the "trunk" and "branch" in the silver dendritic microsubstractes grow longer and a large amount of nano-level "leaves" grow out from the "branches" of the silver dendritic microsubstractes, so the silver micro size dendrates have nano level structure on surface. In order to investigate the SERS-active substrates application in SERS, a Fourier transform Raman spectrograph with a 1 064 nm laser wavelength is used to measure the SERS spectra. And good SERS spectra have been obtained by using dendritic silver microsubstrates on the silicon chip as a SERS substract, and Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a molecule probe. It is found that the silver micro-substrates have good Raman characteristics. And comparing these SERS spectra, it gets the conclution that the spectra with best SERS enhance effect are obtained when R6G is obsorbed on the

  13. The tight relationship between asymmetric signaling and locational excitability in motoneuron dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hojeong; Heckman, C J

    2015-01-01

    Spinal motoneurons possess large, highly branching dendritic structures that contain thousands of synaptic contacts and various voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs). Research has indicated that dendritic arborization and cable properties provide the basis for foundational dendritic processing, which is characterized by direction-dependent signal propagation and location-dependent channel activation in dendritic arbors. Due to these arbors' complex structure, signals attenuate differentially depending on whether propagation occurs from the soma to the dendrite or in the opposite direction. In addition, current thresholds for the activation of dendritic ion channels differ depending on the location of these channels within dendrites. However, whether and how these foundational properties for dendritic signaling and excitability are related in motoneurons remains unclear. Based on our analyses of anatomically reconstructed motoneurons and novel reduced models, we propose that 1) directional signal propagation is similar across spinal motoneurons, regardless of cell type-specific structures; 2) reduced models that retain dendritic signaling asymmetry can accurately replicate anatomical dendritic excitability in both passive and active modes; and 3) asymmetric signal propagation and locational dendritic excitability are closely related, irrespective of motoneurons' arbor structures. PMID:27066175

  14. The tight relationship between asymmetric signaling and locational excitability in motoneuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojeong; Heckman, C J

    2015-01-01

    Spinal motoneurons possess large, highly branching dendritic structures that contain thousands of synaptic contacts and various voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs). Research has indicated that dendritic arborization and cable properties provide the basis for foundational dendritic processing, which is characterized by direction-dependent signal propagation and location-dependent channel activation in dendritic arbors. Due to these arbors' complex structure, signals attenuate differentially depending on whether propagation occurs from the soma to the dendrite or in the opposite direction. In addition, current thresholds for the activation of dendritic ion channels differ depending on the location of these channels within dendrites. However, whether and how these foundational properties for dendritic signaling and excitability are related in motoneurons remains unclear. Based on our analyses of anatomically reconstructed motoneurons and novel reduced models, we propose that 1) directional signal propagation is similar across spinal motoneurons, regardless of cell type-specific structures; 2) reduced models that retain dendritic signaling asymmetry can accurately replicate anatomical dendritic excitability in both passive and active modes; and 3) asymmetric signal propagation and locational dendritic excitability are closely related, irrespective of motoneurons' arbor structures. PMID:27066175

  15. Dynamic regulation of spine-dendrite coupling in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Korkotian, Eduard; Holcman, David; Segal, Menahem

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the role of dendritic spine morphology in spine-dendrite calcium communication using novel experimental and theoretical approaches. A transient rise in [Ca2+]i was produced in individual spine heads of Fluo-4-loaded cultured hippocampal neurons by flash photolysis of caged calcium. Following flash photolysis in the spine head, a delayed [Ca2+]i transient was detected in the parent dendrites of only short, but not long, spines. Delayed elevated fluorescence in the dendrite of the short spines was also seen with a membrane-bound fluorophore and fluorescence recovery from bleaching of a calcium-bound fluorophore had a much slower kinetics, indicating that the dendritic fluorescence change reflects a genuine diffusion of free [Ca2+]i from the spine head to the parent dendrite. Calcium diffusion between spine head and the parent dendrite was regulated by calcium stores as well as by a Na-Ca exchanger. Spine length varied with the recent history of the [Ca2+]i variations in the spine, such that small numbers of calcium transients resulted in elongation of spines whereas large numbers of calcium transients caused shrinkage of the spines. Consequently, spine elongation resulted in a complete isolation of the spine from the dendrite, while shrinkage caused an enhanced coupling with the parent dendrite. These studies highlight a dynamically regulated coupling between a dendritic spine head and its parent dendrite. PMID:15548208

  16. The "conscious pilot"-dendritic synchrony moves through the brain to mediate consciousness.

    PubMed

    Hameroff, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive brain functions including sensory processing and control of behavior are understood as "neurocomputation" in axonal-dendritic synaptic networks of "integrate-and-fire" neurons. Cognitive neurocomputation with consciousness is accompanied by 30- to 90-Hz gamma synchrony electroencephalography (EEG), and non-conscious neurocomputation is not. Gamma synchrony EEG derives largely from neuronal groups linked by dendritic-dendritic gap junctions, forming transient syncytia ("dendritic webs") in input/integration layers oriented sideways to axonal-dendritic neurocomputational flow. As gap junctions open and close, a gamma-synchronized dendritic web can rapidly change topology and move through the brain as a spatiotemporal envelope performing collective integration and volitional choices correlating with consciousness. The "conscious pilot" is a metaphorical description for a mobile gamma-synchronized dendritic web as vehicle for a conscious agent/pilot which experiences and assumes control of otherwise non-conscious auto-pilot neurocomputation. PMID:19669425

  17. Differential Dendritic Integration of Synaptic Potentials and Calcium in Cerebellar Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Abrahamsson, Therése; Cathala, Laurence; DiGregorio, David A

    2016-08-17

    Dendritic voltage integration determines the transformation of synaptic inputs into output firing, while synaptic calcium integration drives plasticity mechanisms thought to underlie memory storage. Dendritic calcium integration has been shown to follow the same synaptic input-output relationship as dendritic voltage, but whether similar operations apply to neurons exhibiting sublinear voltage integration is unknown. We examined the properties and cellular mechanisms of these dendritic operations in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons using dendritic voltage and calcium imaging, in combination with synaptic stimulation or glutamate uncaging. We show that, while synaptic potentials summate sublinearly, concomitant dendritic calcium signals summate either linearly or supralinearly depending on the number of synapses activated. The supralinear dendritic calcium triggers a branch-specific, short-term suppression of neurotransmitter release that alters the pattern of synaptic activation. Thus, differential voltage and calcium integration permits dynamic regulation of neuronal input-output transformations without altering intrinsic nonlinear integration mechanisms. PMID:27537486

  18. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 acts in skin cells to promote sensory dendrite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianzhuang; Wang, Xiangming; Shen, Kang

    2016-05-01

    Sensory dendrite morphogenesis is directed by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The extracellular environment plays instructive roles in patterning dendrite growth and branching. However, the molecular mechanism is not well understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the proprioceptive neuron PVD forms highly branched sensory dendrites adjacent to the hypodermis. We report that receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 functions in the hypodermis to pattern the PVD dendritic branches. Mutations in clr-1 lead to loss of quaternary branches, reduced secondary branches and increased ectopic branches. CLR-1 is necessary for the dendrite extension but not for the initial filopodia formation. Its role is dependent on the intracellular phosphatase domain but not the extracellular adhesion domain, indicating that it functions through dephosphorylating downstream factors but not through direct adhesion with neurons. Genetic analysis reveals that clr-1 also functions in parallel with SAX-7/DMA-1 pathway to control PVD primary dendrite development. We provide evidence of a new environmental factor for PVD dendrite morphogenesis. PMID:26968353

  19. Morphological analysis of dendrites and spines by hybridization of ridge detection with twin support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuihua; Chen, Mengmeng; Li, Yang; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Yudong; Du, Sidan; Wu, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are described as neuronal protrusions. The morphology of dendritic spines and dendrites has a strong relationship to its function, as well as playing an important role in understanding brain function. Quantitative analysis of dendrites and dendritic spines is essential to an understanding of the formation and function of the nervous system. However, highly efficient tools for the quantitative analysis of dendrites and dendritic spines are currently undeveloped. In this paper we propose a novel three-step cascaded algorithm-RTSVM- which is composed of ridge detection as the curvature structure identifier for backbone extraction, boundary location based on differences in density, the Hu moment as features and Twin Support Vector Machine (TSVM) classifiers for spine classification. Our data demonstrates that this newly developed algorithm has performed better than other available techniques used to detect accuracy and false alarm rates. This algorithm will be used effectively in neuroscience research. PMID:27547530

  20. Effects of Effective Dendrite Size on Dynamic Tensile Properties of Ti-Based Amorphous Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Changwoo; Park, Jaeyeong; Kim, Choongnyun Paul; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-04-01

    In this study, dynamic tensile properties of dendrite-containing Ti-based amorphous matrix composites were examined, and effects of dendrite size on dynamic deformation were investigated. The composites contained 73 to 76 vol pct of dendrites whose effective sizes were varied from 63 to 103 μm. The dynamic tensile test results indicated that the ultimate tensile strength increased up to 1.25 GPa, whereas the elongation decreased to 1 pct, although the overall strength and elongation trends followed those of the quasi-static tensile test. According to the observation of dynamic tensile deformation behavior, very few deformation bands were observed beneath the fracture surface in the composite containing large dendrites. In the composite containing small dendrites, deformation bands initiated inside small dendrites propagated into adjacent dendrites through the amorphous matrix, and were crossly intersect perpendicularly in widely deformed areas, which beneficially worked for elongation as well as strength.

  1. Morphological analysis of dendrites and spines by hybridization of ridge detection with twin support vector machine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuihua; Chen, Mengmeng; Li, Yang; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are described as neuronal protrusions. The morphology of dendritic spines and dendrites has a strong relationship to its function, as well as playing an important role in understanding brain function. Quantitative analysis of dendrites and dendritic spines is essential to an understanding of the formation and function of the nervous system. However, highly efficient tools for the quantitative analysis of dendrites and dendritic spines are currently undeveloped. In this paper we propose a novel three-step cascaded algorithm–RTSVM— which is composed of ridge detection as the curvature structure identifier for backbone extraction, boundary location based on differences in density, the Hu moment as features and Twin Support Vector Machine (TSVM) classifiers for spine classification. Our data demonstrates that this newly developed algorithm has performed better than other available techniques used to detect accuracy and false alarm rates. This algorithm will be used effectively in neuroscience research. PMID:27547530

  2. Dendritic Organization of Olfactory Inputs to Medial Amygdala Neurons.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Sepideh; Power, John M; Albers, Eva H H; Sullivan, Robert K S; Sah, Pankaj

    2015-09-23

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is a central hub in the olfactory neural network. It receives vomeronasal information directly from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and main olfactory information largely via odor-processing regions such as the olfactory cortical amygdala (CoA). How these inputs are processed by MeA neurons is poorly understood. Using the GAD67-GFP mouse, we show that MeA principal neurons receive convergent AOB and CoA inputs. Somatically recorded AOB synaptic inputs had slower kinetics than CoA inputs, suggesting that they are electrotonically more distant. Field potential recording, pharmacological manipulation, and Ca(2+) imaging revealed that AOB synapses are confined to distal dendrites and segregated from the proximally located CoA synapses. Moreover, unsynchronized AOB inputs had significantly broader temporal summation that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These findings show that MeA principal neurons process main and accessory olfactory inputs differentially in distinct dendritic compartments. Significance statement: In most vertebrates, olfactory cues are processed by two largely segregated neural pathways, the main and accessory olfactory systems, which are specialized to detect odors and nonvolatile chemosignals, respectively. Information from these two pathways ultimately converges at higher brain regions, one of the major hubs being the medial amygdala. Little is known about how olfactory inputs are processed by medial amygdala neurons. This study shows that individual principal neurons in this region receive input from both pathways and that these synapses are spatially segregated on their dendritic tree. We provide evidence suggesting that this dendritic segregation leads to distinct input integration and impact on neuronal output; hence, dendritic mechanisms control olfactory processing in the amygdala. PMID:26400933

  3. Deterministic side-branching during thermal dendritic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullis, Andrew M.

    2015-06-01

    The accepted view on dendritic side-branching is that side-branches grow as the result of selective amplification of thermal noise and that in the absence of such noise dendrites would grow without the development of side-arms. However, recently there has been renewed speculation about dendrites displaying deterministic side-branching [see e.g. ME Glicksman, Metall. Mater. Trans A 43 (2012) 391]. Generally, numerical models of dendritic growth, such as phase-field simulation, have tended to display behaviour which is commensurate with the former view, in that simulated dendrites do not develop side-branches unless noise is introduced into the simulation. However, here we present simulations at high undercooling that show that under certain conditions deterministic side-branching may occur. We use a model formulated in the thin interface limit and a range of advanced numerical techniques to minimise the numerical noise introduced into the solution, including a multigrid solver. Not only are multigrid solvers one of the most efficient means of inverting the large, but sparse, system of equations that results from implicit time-stepping, they are also very effective at smoothing noise at all wavelengths. This is in contrast to most Jacobi or Gauss-Seidel iterative schemes which are effective at removing noise with wavelengths comparable to the mesh size but tend to leave noise at longer wavelengths largely undamped. From an analysis of the tangential thermal gradients on the solid-liquid interface the mechanism for side-branching appears to be consistent with the deterministic model proposed by Glicksman.

  4. A Comparison between Growth Morphology of "Eutectic" Cells/Dendrites and Single-Phase Cells/Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Raj, S. V.; Locci, I. E.

    2003-01-01

    Directionally solidified (DS) intermetallic and ceramic-based eutectic alloys with an in-situ composite microstructure containing finely distributed, long aspect ratio, fiber, or plate reinforcements are being seriously examined for several advanced aero-propulsion applications. In designing these alloys, additional solutes need to be added to the base eutectic composition in order to improve heir high-temperature strength, and provide for adequate toughness and resistance to environmental degradation. Solute addition, however, promotes instability at the planar liquid-solid interface resulting in the formation of two-phase eutectic "colonies." Because morphology of eutectic colonies is very similar to the single-phase cells and dendrites, the stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka has been extended to describe their formation. Onset of their formation shows a good agreement with this approach; however, unlike the single-phase cells and dendrites, there is limited examination of their growth speed dependence of spacing, morphology, and spatial distribution. The purpose of this study is to compare the growth speed dependence of the morphology, spacing, and spatial distribution of eutectic cells and dendrites with that for the single-phase cells and dendrites.

  5. Dynamics of intrinsic dendritic calcium signaling during tonic firing of thalamic reticular neurons.

    PubMed

    Chausson, Patrick; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C

    2013-01-01

    The GABAergic neurons of the nucleus reticularis thalami that control the communication between thalamus and cortex are interconnected not only through axo-dendritic synapses but also through gap junctions and dendro-dendritic synapses. It is still unknown whether these dendritic communication processes may be triggered both by the tonic and the T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent high frequency burst firing of action potentials displayed by nucleus reticularis neurons during wakefulness and sleep, respectively. Indeed, while it is known that activation of T-type Ca(2+) channels actively propagates throughout the dendritic tree, it is still unclear whether tonic action potential firing can also invade the dendritic arborization. Here, using two-photon microscopy, we demonstrated that dendritic Ca(2+) responses following somatically evoked action potentials that mimic wake-related tonic firing are detected throughout the dendritic arborization. Calcium influx temporally summates to produce dendritic Ca(2+) accumulations that are linearly related to the duration of the action potential trains. Increasing the firing frequency facilitates Ca(2+) influx in the proximal but not in the distal dendritic compartments suggesting that the dendritic arborization acts as a low-pass filter in respect to the back-propagating action potentials. In the more distal compartment of the dendritic tree, T-type Ca(2+) channels play a crucial role in the action potential triggered Ca(2+) influx suggesting that this Ca(2+) influx may be controlled by slight changes in the local dendritic membrane potential that determine the T-type channels' availability. We conclude that by mediating Ca(2+) dynamic in the whole dendritic arborization, both tonic and burst firing of the nucleus reticularis thalami neurons might control their dendro-dendritic and electrical communications. PMID:23991078

  6. Somatic spikes regulate dendritic signaling in small neurons in the absence of backpropagating action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Myoga, Michael H.; Beierlein, Michael; Regehr, Wade G.

    2010-01-01

    Somatic spiking is known to regulate dendritic signaling and associative synaptic plasticity in many types of large neurons, but it is unclear whether somatic action potentials play similar roles in small neurons. Here we ask whether somatic action potentials can also influence dendritic signaling in an electrically compact neuron, the cerebellar stellate cell (SC). Experiments were conducted in rat brain slices using a combination of imaging and electrophysiology. We find that somatic action potentials elevate dendritic calcium levels in SCs. There was little attenuation of calcium signals with distance from the soma in SCs from P17-19 rats, which had dendrites that averaged 60 µm in length and in short SC dendrites from P30-33 rats. Somatic action potentials evoke dendritic calcium increases that are not affected by blocking dendritic sodium channels. This indicates that dendritic signals in SCs do not rely on dendritic sodium channels, which differs from many types of large neurons where dendritic sodium channels and backpropagating action potentials allow somatic spikes to control dendritic calcium signaling. Despite the lack of active backpropagating action potentials, we find that trains of somatic action potentials elevate dendritic calcium sufficiently to release endocannabinoids and retrogradely suppress parallel fiber to SC synapses in P17-19 rats. Prolonged SC firing at physiologically realistic frequencies produces retrograde suppression when combined with low-level group I metabotropic glutamate receptor activation. Somatic spiking also interacts with synaptic stimulation to promote associative plasticity. These findings indicate that in small neurons the passive spread of potential within dendrites can allow somatic spiking to regulate dendritic calcium signaling and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19535592

  7. Effect of the environment on the dendritic morphology of the rat auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Mitali; Muñoz-Llancao, Pablo; Roychowdhury, Swagata; Nichols, Justin A.; Jakkamsetti, Vikram; Porter, Benjamin; Byrapureddy, Rajasekhar; Salgado, Humberto; Kilgard, Michael P.; Aboitiz, Francisco; Dagnino-Subiabre, Alexies; Atzori, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify morphological correlates of environment-induced changes at excitatory synapses of the primary auditory cortex (A1). We used the Golgi-Cox stain technique to compare pyramidal cells dendritic properties of Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to different environmental manipulations. Sholl analysis, dendritic length measures, and spine density counts were used to monitor the effects of sensory deafness and an auditory version of environmental enrichment (EE). We found that deafness decreased apical dendritic length leaving basal dendritic length unchanged, whereas EE selectively increased basal dendritic length without changing apical dendritic length. On the contrary, deafness decreased while EE increased spine density in both basal and apical dendrites of A1 layer 2/3 (LII/III) neurons. To determine whether stress contributed to the observed morphological changes in A1, we studied neural morphology in a restraint-induced model that lacked behaviorally relevant acoustic cues. We found that stress selectively decreased apical dendritic length in the auditory but not in the visual primary cortex. Similar to the acoustic manipulation, stress-induced changes in dendritic length possessed a layer specific pattern displaying LII/III neurons from stressed animals with normal apical dendrites but shorter basal dendrites, while infragranular neurons (layers V and VI) displayed shorter apical dendrites but normal basal dendrites. The same treatment did not induce similar changes in the visual cortex, demonstrating that the auditory cortex is an exquisitely sensitive target of neocortical plasticity, and that prolonged exposure to different acoustic as well as emotional environmental manipulation may produce specific changes in dendritic shape and spine density. PMID:19771593

  8. Rationales for regulatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Perhac, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    The author provides an outline which touches on the types of concerns about risk evaluation which are addressed in the process of establishing regulatory guides. Broadly he says regulatory activity serves three broad constituents: (1) Paternalism (private risk); (2) Promotion of social welfare (public risks); (3) Protection of individual rights (public risks). He then discusses some of the major issues encountered in reaching a decision on what is an acceptable level of risk within each of these areas, and how one establishes such a level.

  9. Interaction of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes for the therapeutic effect of Dangguiliuhuang decoction to autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Cao, Hui; Ji, Yachun; Pei, Yufeng; Yu, Zhihong; Quan, Yihong; Xiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Dangguiliuhuang decoction (DGLHD) is an effective treatment of autoimmune diabetes. Here, we studied potential anti-diabetic mechanisms of DGLHD in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. In vitro, DGLHD and individual active ingredients enhanced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells, inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation, and suppressed dendritic cells (DCs) function. In vivo, DGLHD significantly inhibited insulitis, delayed the onset and development of diabetes, promoted insulin secretion and sensitivity, and balanced partially normalized Th1 and Th2 cytokines in NOD mice. In addition, DGLHD increased α1-antitrypsin (AAT-1), Bcl-2, and CyclinD1, and decreased Bax levels in pancreas, spleen, thymus, DCs, and a NIT-1 cell line, all consistent with protecting and repairing islet β cell. More detailed studies indicated that DGLHD regulated the maturation and function of DCs, decreased the percentage of merocytic dendritic cells (mcDCs) subset, and increased programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression in DCs. DGLHD also impeded T lymphocyte proliferation and promoted regulatory T cells (T(regs)) differentiation in vivo. A JAK2-STAT3-dependent pathway was involved in the suppression by DGLHD of interactions between DCs and T lymphocyte. The experiments implicated five active ingredients in specific anti-diabetic actions of DGLHD. The results demonstrated the reasonable composition of the formula. PMID:26358493

  10. State-dependent diffusion of actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin underlies the enlargement and shrinkage of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Jun; Hayama, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Yagishita, Sho; Takahashi, Noriko; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, and spine enlargement and shrinkage give rise to long-term potentiation and depression of synapses, respectively. Because spine structural plasticity is accompanied by remodeling of actin scaffolds, we hypothesized that the filamentous actin regulatory protein cofilin plays a crucial role in this process. Here we investigated the diffusional properties of cofilin, the actin-severing and depolymerizing actions of which are activated by dephosphorylation. Cofilin diffusion was measured using fluorescently labeled cofilin fusion proteins and two-photon imaging. We show that cofilins are highly diffusible along dendrites in the resting state. However, during spine enlargement, wild-type cofilin and a phosphomimetic cofilin mutant remain confined to the stimulated spine, whereas a nonphosphorylatable mutant does not. Moreover, inhibition of cofilin phosphorylation with a competitive peptide disables spine enlargement, suggesting that phosphorylated-cofilin accumulation is a key regulator of enlargement, which is localized to individual spines. Conversely, spine shrinkage spreads to neighboring spines, even though triggered by weaker stimuli than enlargement. Diffusion of exogenous cofilin injected into a pyramidal neuron soma causes spine shrinkage and reduced PSD95 in spines, suggesting that diffusion of dephosphorylated endogenous cofilin underlies the spreading of spine shrinkage and long-term depression. PMID:27595610

  11. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal-placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+)CD1a(-) phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  12. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  13. Airborne pollutant ROFA enhances the allergic airway inflammation through direct modulation of dendritic cells in an uptake-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Arantes-Costa, Fernanda Magalhaes; Grund, Lidiane Zito; Martins, Milton Arruda; Lima, Carla

    2014-09-01

    Studies suggest that airborne pollutants are important cofactors in the exacerbation of lung diseases. The role of DC on the exacerbation of lung inflammation induced by particulate matter pollutants is unclear. We evaluated the effects of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) on the phenotype and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) in vitro and lung dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, and the subsequent T-cell response. In a model of asthma, exposure to ROFA exacerbated pulmonary inflammation, which was attributed to the increase of eosinophils, IL-5- and IFN-γ-producing T cells, and goblet cells as well as decreased number of Treg and pDC. However, the ROFA showed no ability to modulate the production of anaphylactic IgE. In vitro studies showed that ROFA directly induced the maturation of DCs up-regulating the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines and MMP production in an uptake-dependent and oxidative stress-dependent manner. Furthermore, ROFA-pulsed BMDC transferred to allergic mice exacerbated eosinophilic inflammation as well as promoted increased epithelial and goblet cells changes. Thus, pollutants may constitute an important and risk factor in the exacerbation of asthma with inhibition of the negative regulatory signals in the lung, with enhanced mDC activation that sustains the recruitment of effector T lymphocytes and eosinophil. PMID:24975839

  14. MiR-130a regulates neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine density by targeting MeCP2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunjia; Chen, Mengmeng; Qiu, Zilong; Hu, Keping; McGee, Warren; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Jianghong; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jane Y

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical for both development and function of the central nervous system. Significant evidence suggests that abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. MeCP2 protein is an epigenetic regulator repressing or activating gene transcription by binding to methylated DNA. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in the MECP2 gene lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome, autism and MECP2 duplication syndrome. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-130a inhibits neurite outgrowth and reduces dendritic spine density as well as dendritic complexity. Bioinformatics analyses, cell cultures and biochemical experiments indicate that miR-130a targets MECP2 and down-regulates MeCP2 protein expression. Furthermore, expression of the wild-type MeCP2, but not a loss-of-function mutant, rescues the miR-130a-induced phenotype. Our study uncovers the MECP2 gene as a previous unknown target for miR-130a, supporting that miR-130a may play a role in neurodevelopment by regulating MeCP2. Together with data from other groups, our work suggests that a feedback regulatory mechanism involving both miR-130a and MeCP2 may serve to ensure their appropriate expression and function in neural development. PMID:27245166

  15. State-dependent diffusion of actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin underlies the enlargement and shrinkage of dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Jun; Hayama, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Yagishita, Sho; Takahashi, Noriko; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, and spine enlargement and shrinkage give rise to long-term potentiation and depression of synapses, respectively. Because spine structural plasticity is accompanied by remodeling of actin scaffolds, we hypothesized that the filamentous actin regulatory protein cofilin plays a crucial role in this process. Here we investigated the diffusional properties of cofilin, the actin-severing and depolymerizing actions of which are activated by dephosphorylation. Cofilin diffusion was measured using fluorescently labeled cofilin fusion proteins and two-photon imaging. We show that cofilins are highly diffusible along dendrites in the resting state. However, during spine enlargement, wild-type cofilin and a phosphomimetic cofilin mutant remain confined to the stimulated spine, whereas a nonphosphorylatable mutant does not. Moreover, inhibition of cofilin phosphorylation with a competitive peptide disables spine enlargement, suggesting that phosphorylated-cofilin accumulation is a key regulator of enlargement, which is localized to individual spines. Conversely, spine shrinkage spreads to neighboring spines, even though triggered by weaker stimuli than enlargement. Diffusion of exogenous cofilin injected into a pyramidal neuron soma causes spine shrinkage and reduced PSD95 in spines, suggesting that diffusion of dephosphorylated endogenous cofilin underlies the spreading of spine shrinkage and long-term depression. PMID:27595610

  16. Induction of Regulatory T Cells by Intravenous Immunoglobulin: A Bridge between Adaptive and Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Gabriel N.; Massoud, Amir H.; Dembele, Marieme; Yona, Madelaine; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A.; Mazer, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is a polyclonal immunoglobulin G preparation with potent immunomodulatory properties. The mode of action of IVIg has been investigated in multiple disease states, with various mechanisms described to account for its benefits. Recent data indicate that IVIg increases both the number and the suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells, a subpopulation of T cells that are essential for immune homeostasis. IVIg alters dendritic cell function, cytokine and chemokine networks, and T lymphocytes, leading to development of regulatory T cells. The ability of IVIg to influence Treg induction has been shown both in animal models and in human diseases. In this review, we discuss data on the potential mechanisms contributing to the interaction between IVIg and the regulatory T-cell compartment. PMID:26441974

  17. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2-12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells "foamy DCs" and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  18. miR-9 and miR-124 synergistically affect regulation of dendritic branching via the AKT/GSK3β pathway by targeting Rap2a

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Qian; Yu, Caiyong; Wang, Yan; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Kun; Fang, Chao; Liu, Fangfang; Bian, Ganlan; Song, Bing; Yang, Angang; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    A single microRNA (miRNA) can regulate expression of multiple proteins, and expression of an individual protein may be controlled by numerous miRNAs. This regulatory pattern strongly suggests that synergistic effects of miRNAs play critical roles in regulating biological processes. miR-9 and miR-124, two of the most abundant miRNAs in the mammalian nervous system, have important functions in neuronal development. In this study, we identified the small GTP-binding protein Rap2a as a common target of both miR-9 and miR-124. miR-9 and miR-124 together, but neither miRNA alone, strongly suppressed Rap2a, thereby promoting neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) and dendritic branching of differentiated neurons. Rap2a also diminished the dendritic complexity of mature neurons by decreasing the levels of pAKT and pGSK3β. Our results reveal a novel pathway in which miR-9 and miR-124 synergistically repress expression of Rap2a to sustain homeostatic dendritic complexity during neuronal development and maturation. PMID:27221778

  19. Pathological Mobilization and Activities of Dendritic Cells in Tumor-Bearing Hosts: Challenges and Opportunities for Immunotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tesone, Amelia J.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Allegrezza, Michael J.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2013-01-01

    A common characteristic of solid tumors is the pathological recruitment of immunosuppressive myeloid cells, which in certain tumors includes dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are of particular interest in the field of cancer immunotherapy because they induce potent and highly specific anti-tumor immune responses, particularly in the early phase of tumorigenesis. However, as tumors progress, these cells can be transformed into regulatory cells that contribute to an immunosuppressive microenvironment favoring tumor growth. Therefore, controlling DC phenotype has the potential to elicit effective anti-tumor responses while simultaneously weakening the tumor’s ability to protect itself from immune attack. This review focuses on the dual nature of DCs in the tumor microenvironment, the regulation of DC phenotype, and the prospect of modifying DCs in situ as a novel immunotherapeutic approach. PMID:24339824

  20. Toxicogenomics in Regulatory Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential utility of toxicogenomics in toxicological research and regulatory activities has been the subject of scientific discussions, and as with any new technology, there is a wide range of opinion. The purpose of this feature article is to consider roles of toxicogenomic...

  1. The regulatory horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, ED

    1987-01-01

    The author briefly discusses the FAA's position as it relates to cockpit resource management. For example, if Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is a positive concept, why isn't everyone required to implement it? The regulatory practice of the FAA is discussed and questions and answers are presented.

  2. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  3. REFINE WETLAND REGULATORY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tribes will work toward refining a regulatory program by taking a draft wetland conservation code with permitting incorporated to TEB for review. Progress will then proceed in developing a permit tracking system that will track both Tribal and fee land sites within reservati...

  4. REGULATORY AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix W to 40CFR Part 51 (Guideline on Air Quality Models) specifies the models to be used for purposes of permitting, PSD, and SIPs. Through a formal regulatory process this modeling guidance is periodically updated to reflect current science. In the most recent action, thr...

  5. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This document is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considered action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  6. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This document provides a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  7. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This document compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rule making which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  8. Deciphering cis-regulatory control in inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2013-01-01

    In innate immune system cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, deployment of inducible gene expression programmes in response to microbes and danger signals requires highly precise regulatory mechanisms. The inflammatory response has to be tailored based on both the triggering stimulus and its dose, and it has to be unfolded in a kinetically complex manner that suits the different phases of the inflammatory process. Genomic characterization of regulatory elements in this context indicated that transcriptional regulators involved in macrophage specification act as pioneer transcription factors (TFs) that generate regions of open chromatin that enable the recruitment of TFs activated in response to external inputs. Therefore, competence for responses to a specific stimulus is programmed at an early stage of differentiation by factors involved in lineage commitment and maintenance of cell identity, which are responsible for the organization of a cell-type-specific cis-regulatory repertoire. The basic functional and organizational principles that regulate inflammatory gene expression in professional cells of the innate immune system provide general paradigms on the interplay between differentiation and environmental responses. PMID:23650641

  9. A gene regulatory network armature for T-lymphocyte specification

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Elizabeth-sharon

    2008-01-01

    Choice of a T-lymphoid fate by hematopoietic progenitor cells depends on sustained Notch-Delta signaling combined with tightly-regulated activities of multiple transcription factors. To dissect the regulatory network connections that mediate this process, we have used high-resolution analysis of regulatory gene expression trajectories from the beginning to the end of specification; tests of the short-term Notchdependence of these gene expression changes; and perturbation analyses of the effects of overexpression of two essential transcription factors, namely PU.l and GATA-3. Quantitative expression measurements of >50 transcription factor and marker genes have been used to derive the principal components of regulatory change through which T-cell precursors progress from primitive multipotency to T-lineage commitment. Distinct parts of the path reveal separate contributions of Notch signaling, GATA-3 activity, and downregulation of PU.l. Using BioTapestry, the results have been assembled into a draft gene regulatory network for the specification of T-cell precursors and the choice of T as opposed to myeloid dendritic or mast-cell fates. This network also accommodates effects of E proteins and mutual repression circuits of Gfil against Egr-2 and of TCF-l against PU.l as proposed elsewhere, but requires additional functions that remain unidentified. Distinctive features of this network structure include the intense dose-dependence of GATA-3 effects; the gene-specific modulation of PU.l activity based on Notch activity; the lack of direct opposition between PU.l and GATA-3; and the need for a distinct, late-acting repressive function or functions to extinguish stem and progenitor-derived regulatory gene expression.

  10. Signal delay and input synchronization in passive dendritic structures.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Snir, H; Segev, I

    1993-11-01

    1. A novel approach for analyzing transients in passive structures called "the method of moments" is introduced. It provides, as a special case, an analytic method for calculating the time delay and speed of propagation of electrical signals in any passive dendritic tree without the need for numerical simulations. 2. Total dendritic delay (TD) between two points (y, x) is defined as the difference between the centroid (the center of gravity) of the transient current input, I, at point y[tI(y)] and the centroid of the transient voltage response, V, at point x [tV(x)]. The TD measured at the input points is nonzero and is called the local delay (LD). Propagation delay, PD(y, x), is then defined as TD(y, x)--LD(y) whereas the net dendritic delay, NDD(y, 0), of an input point, y, is defined as TD(y, 0) - LD(0), where 0 is the target point, typically the soma. The signal velocity at a point x0 in the tree, theta(x0), is defined as [1/(dtv(x)/dx)[x = x0. 3. With the use of these definitions, several properties of dendritic delay exist. First, the delay between any two points in a given tree is independent of the properties (shape and duration) of the transient current input. Second, the velocity of the signal at any given point (y) in a given direction from (y) does not depend on the morphology of the tree "behind" the signal, and of the input location. Third, TD(y, x) = TD(x, y), for any two points, x, y. 4. Two additional properties are useful for efficiently calculating delays in arbitrary passive trees. 1) The subtrees connected at the ends of any dendritic segment can each be functionally lumped into an equivalent isopotential R-C compartment. 2) The local delay at any given point (y) in a tree is the mean of the local delays of the separate structures (subtrees) connected at y, weighted by the relative input conductance of the corresponding subtrees. 5. Because the definitions for delays utilize difference between centroids, the local delay and the total delay can

  11. Noncrystallographic calcite dendrites from hot-spring deposits at Lake Bogoria, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Renaut, R.W.

    1995-01-02

    Complex calcite crystals are an integral component of precipitates that form around the orifices of the Loburu and Mawe Moto hot springs on the shores of Lake bogoria, Kenya. Two types of large (up to 4 cm long) noncrystallographic dendrites are important components of these deposits. Feather dendrites are characterized by multiple levels of branching with individual branches developed through crystal splitting and spherulitic growth. Scandulitic (from Latin meaning shingle) dendrites are formed of stacked calcite crystals and are generally more compact than feather dendrites. These developed through the incremental stacking of rectangular-shaped calcite crystals that initially grew as skeletal crystals. Feather and scandulitic dendrites precipitated from the same waters in the same springs. The difference in morphology is therefore related to microenvironments in which they grew. Feather dendrites grew in any direction in pools of free-standing water provided that they were in constant contact with the solute. Conversely, scandulitic dendrites grew on rims of dams where water flowed over the surface in concert with the pulses of spring water. Thus, each calcite crystal in these dendrites represents one episode of crystal growth. The orientation of the component crystals in scandulitic dendrites is controlled by the topography of the dam or surface, not crystallographic criteria. The noncrystallographic dendrites formed from spring waters with initial temperatures of 90--99 C. Surficial water cooling, loss of CO{sub 2}, and presence of other elements that can interfere with crystal growth contributed to the formation of these unusual crystals.

  12. Investigating the Effects of Anisotropic Mass Transport on Dendrite Growth in High Energy Density Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jinwang; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ferris, Kim F.; Ryan, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendrite formation on the electrode surface of high energy density lithium (Li) batteries causes safety problems and limits their applications. Suppressing dendrite growth could significantly improve Li battery performance. Dendrite growth and morphology is a function of the mixing in the electrolyte near the anode interface. Most research into dendrites in batteries focuses on dendrite formation in isotropic electrolytes (i.e., electrolytes with isotropic diffusion coefficient). In this work, an anisotropic diffusion reaction model is developed to study the anisotropic mixing effect on dendrite growth in Li batteries. The model uses a Lagrangian particle-based method to model dendrite growth in an anisotropic electrolyte solution. The model is verified by comparing the numerical simulation results with analytical solutions, and its accuracy is shown to be better than previous particle-based anisotropic diffusion models. Several parametric studies of dendrite growth in an anisotropic electrolyte are performed and the results demonstrate the effects of anisotropic transport on dendrite growth and morphology, and show the possible advantages of anisotropic electrolytes for dendrite suppression.

  13. Genetic and Dietary Effects on Dendrites in the Rat Hypothalamic Ventromedial Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    LaBelle, Denise R.; Cox, Julia M.; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A.; Levin, Barry E.; Flanagan-Cato, Loretta M.

    2009-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to individual differences in body weight regulation. The present study examined a possible role for the dendritic arbor of hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMH) neurons in a model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) in male rats. Rats were screened and selectively bred for being either susceptible, i.e., exhibiting DIO, or diet resistant (DR) when exposed to a 31% fat diet. A 2×2 experimental design was used, based on these two strains of rats and exposure to rat chow versus the 31% fat diet for seven weeks. Golgi-impregnated neurons were measured for soma size and dendrite parameters, including number, length, and direction. As previously observed, each VMH neuron had a single long primary dendrite. Genetic background and diet did not affect soma size or the number of dendrites of VMH neurons. However, genetic background exerted a main effect on the length of the long primary dendrites. In particular, the long primary dendrites were approximately 12.5% shorter on the VMH neurons in the DIO rats compared with DR rats regardless of diet. This effect was isolated to the long primary dendrites extending in the dorsolateral direction, with these long primary dendrites 19% shorter for the DIO group compared with the DR group. This finding implicates the connectivity of the long primary dendrites on VMH neurons in the control of energy balance. The functional significance of these shortened dendrites and their afferents warrants further study. PMID:19698729

  14. Computational study of electro-convection effects on dendrite growth in batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jinwang; Ryan, Emily M.

    2016-08-01

    Dendrite formation on the anode surface of a battery is closely related to the safety and capacity of high energy density batteries, thus suppressing dendrite growth will significantly improve the performance of batteries. Many experimental reports reveal that convection near the dendrite nucleation site can change the local mass transport, and ultimately affect dendrite growth. Investigation of the convection effect in batteries will guide the development of strategies to suppress dendrite growth in a convective electrolyte. Most of the existing electro-convection computational models for dendrite growth studies are based on Eulerian frameworks. These methods have difficulty modeling the moving boundaries associated with dendrite growth and are less computationally efficient in simulating convective fluid motion. In this paper we adopt a mesh-free particle based Lagrangian method to address the challenges of previous grid based Eulerian electro-convection models. The developed model is verified by comparison to analytical solutions, including verification of ion migration and the electric potential. Simulation results show that the predicted dendrite growth and electro-convective flow patterns compare well with experimental results during early dendrite growth stages. Parametric studies reveal that low viscosity electrolytes suppress the dendrite growth by increasing the mass transport of ions near the anode/electrolyte interface.

  15. CTLA-4 control over Foxp3+ regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Wing, Kajsa; Onishi, Yasushi; Prieto-Martin, Paz; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Miyara, Makoto; Fehervari, Zoltan; Nomura, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2008-10-10

    Naturally occurring Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for maintaining immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Here, we show that a specific deficiency of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) in Tregs results in spontaneous development of systemic lymphoproliferation, fatal T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, and hyperproduction of immunoglobulin E in mice, and it also produces potent tumor immunity. Treg-specific CTLA-4 deficiency impairs in vivo and in vitro suppressive function of Tregs-in particular, Treg-mediated down-regulation of CD80 and CD86 expression on dendritic cells. Thus, natural Tregs may critically require CTLA-4 to suppress immune responses by affecting the potency of antigen-presenting cells to activate other T cells. PMID:18845758

  16. INTERFERON REGULATORY FACTOR 4 AND 8 IN B CELL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Runqing

    2010-01-01

    IRF4 and 8 are members of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors and have been shown to be essential for the development and function of T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. A series of recent studies have further demonstrated critical functions for IRF4 and 8 at several stages of B cell development including pre-B cell development, receptor editing, germinal center reaction and plasma cell generation. Collectively, these new studies provide molecular insights into the function of IRF4 and 8 and underscore a requirement for IRF4 and 8 throughout B cell development. This review focuses on the recent advances on roles of IRF4 and 8 in B cell development. PMID:18775669

  17. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pizzolla, Angela; Oh, Ding Yuan; Luong, Suzanne; Prickett, Sara R.; Henstridge, Darren C.; Febbraio, Mark A.; O’Hehir, Robyn E.; Rolland, Jennifer M.; Hardy, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a ‘western’ diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND). Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n.) administration of ovalbumin (OVA), prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation. PMID:27483441

  18. A plasmacytoid dendritic cell (CD123+/CD11c-) based assay system to predict contact allergenicity of chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Ayehunie, Seyoum; Snell, Maureen; Child, Matthew; Klausner, Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    A predictive allergenicity test system for assessing the contact allergenicity of chemicals is needed by the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry to monitor product safety in the marketplace. Development of such non-animal alternative assay systems for skin sensitization and hazard identification has been pursued by policy makers and regulatory agencies. We investigated whether phenotypic and functional changes to a subset of dendritic cells (DC), plasmacytoid DC (pDC), could be used to identify contact allergens. To achieve this goal, normal human DC were generated from CD34+ progenitor cells and cryopreserved. Frozen DC were thawed and the pDC fraction (CD123+/CD11c-) was harvested using FACS sorting. The pDC were cultured, expanded, and exposed to chemical allergens (N=26) or non-allergens (N=22). Concentrations of each chemical that resulted in >50% viability was determined using FACS analysis of propidium iodide stained cells using pDC from 2-5 donors. Expression of the surface marker, CD86, which has been implicated in dendritic cell maturation, was used as a marker of allergenicity. CD86 expression increased (≥ 1.5 fold) for 25 of 26 allergens (sensitivity = 96%) but did not increase for 19 of 22 non-allergens (specificity = 86%). In a direct comparison to historical data for the regulatory approved, mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA) for 23 allergens and 22 non-allergens, the pDC method had sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 86%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of the LLNA assay was 83% and 82%, respectively. In conclusion, CD86 expression in pDC appears to be a sensitive and specific indicator to identify contact allergenicity. Such an assay method utilizing normal human cells will be useful for high throughput screening of chemicals for allergenicity. PMID:19665512

  19. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pizzolla, Angela; Oh, Ding Yuan; Luong, Suzanne; Prickett, Sara R; Henstridge, Darren C; Febbraio, Mark A; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Rolland, Jennifer M; Hardy, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a 'western' diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND). Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n.) administration of ovalbumin (OVA), prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation. PMID:27483441

  20. Spiny neurons of amygdala, striatum, and cortex use dendritic plateau potentials to detect network UP states

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Singh, Mandakini B.; Sterjanaj, Enas V.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2014-01-01

    Spiny neurons of amygdala, striatum, and cerebral cortex share four interesting features: (1) they are the most abundant cell type within their respective brain area, (2) covered by thousands of thorny protrusions (dendritic spines), (3) possess high levels of dendritic NMDA conductances, and (4) experience sustained somatic depolarizations in vivo and in vitro (UP states). In all spiny neurons of the forebrain, adequate glutamatergic inputs generate dendritic plateau potentials (“dendritic UP states”) characterized by (i) fast rise, (ii) plateau phase lasting several hundred milliseconds, and (iii) abrupt decline at the end of the plateau phase. The dendritic plateau potential propagates toward the cell body decrementally to induce a long-lasting (longer than 100 ms, most often 200–800 ms) steady depolarization (∼20 mV amplitude), which resembles a neuronal UP state. Based on voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the plateau depolarization in the soma is precisely time-locked to the regenerative plateau potential taking place in the dendrite. The somatic plateau rises after the onset of the dendritic voltage transient and collapses with the breakdown of the dendritic plateau depolarization. We hypothesize that neuronal UP states in vivo reflect the occurrence of dendritic plateau potentials (dendritic UP states). We propose that the somatic voltage waveform during a neuronal UP state is determined by dendritic plateau potentials. A mammalian spiny neuron uses dendritic plateau potentials to detect and transform coherent network activity into a ubiquitous neuronal UP state. The biophysical properties of dendritic plateau potentials allow neurons to quickly attune to the ongoing network activity, as well as secure the stable amplitudes of successive UP states. PMID:25278841