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Sample records for da alfafa medicago

  1. CPSF30 in Medicago

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CPSF30 is a component in 3’ RNA processing that has been well characterized in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study the gene for CPSF30 has been cloned out of Medicago truncatula and Medicago sativa. A large region within the gene exhibits significant conservation between A. thalian...

  2. CPSF30 in medicago

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CPSF30 is a component in 3’ RNA processing that has been well characterized in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study the CPSF30 gene has been cloned out of Medicago truncatula and Medicago sativa. A large region within the gene exhibits significant conservation between A. thaliana an...

  3. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Fu, Chunxiang; Hernandez, Timothy; Zhou, Chuanen; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a high-quality forage crop widely grown throughout the world. This chapter describes an efficient protocol that allows for the generation of large number of transgenic alfalfa plants by sonication-assisted Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Binary vectors carrying different selectable marker genes that confer resistance to phosphinothricin (bar), kanamycin (npt II), or hygromycin (hph) were used to generate transgenic alfalfa plants. Intact trifoliates collected from clonally propagated plants in the greenhouse were sterilized with bleach and then inoculated with Agrobacterium strain EHA105. More than 80 % of infected leaf pieces could produce rooted transgenic plants in 4-5 months after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PMID:25300843

  4. SEED BIOLOGY OF MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seed of Medicago truncatula have morphological features typical of dicotyledons, and are borne in a spine-covered spiral pod. The cotyledons are rich in protein (35-45%), the major storage molecule. They accumulate approximately 10% lipids and only traces of starch. The most abundant proteins a...

  5. G-protein from Medicago sativa: functional association to photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Muschietti, J P; Martinetto, H E; Coso, O A; Farber, M D; Torres, H N; Flawia, M M

    1993-01-01

    G-protein subunits were characterized from Medicago sativa (alfalfa) seedlings. Crude membranes and GTP-Sepharose-purified fractions were electrophoresed on SDS/polyacrylamide gels and analysed by Western blotting with 9193 (anti-alpha common) and AS/7 (anti-alpha t, anti-alpha i1 and anti-alpha i2) polyclonal antibodies. These procedures led to the identification of a specific polypeptide band of about 43 kDa. Another polypeptide reacting with the SW/1 (anti-beta) antibody, of about 37 kDa, was also detected. The 43 kDa polypeptide bound specifically [alpha-32P]GTP by a photoaffinity reaction and was ADP-ribosylated by activated cholera toxin, but not by pertussis toxin. Irradiation of etiolated Medicago sativa protoplast preparations at 660 nm for 1 min produced a maximal increase in the guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[35S])-binding rate. After this period of irradiation, the binding rate tended to decrease. The effect of a red-light (660 nm) pulse on the binding rate was reversed when it was immediately followed by a period of far-red (> 730 nm) illumination. These results may suggest that activation of GTP[S]-binding rate was a consequence of conversion of phytochrome Pr into the Ptr form. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8484719

  6. Medicago truncatula transformation using cotyledonary explants.

    PubMed

    Wright, Elane; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Medicago truncatula has been developed into a model species for legumes. The M. truncatula genotype Jemalong A17 has been used for EST and genome sequencing. However, this genotype is difficult to regenerate from callus cultures. By using cotyledons as explants for Agrobacterium infection and direct shoot formation, this protocol allows for rapid production of transgenic plants from Jemalong A17 and other genotypes. Transgenic plants can be regenerated and established in the greenhouse in only 3-4 months after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Transformation frequency was in the range of 5-12 %. PMID:25300829

  7. Recent Advances in Medicago truncatula Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Ané, Jean-Michel; Zhu, Hongyan; Frugoli, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Legume rotation has allowed a consistent increase in crop yield and consequently in human population since the antiquity. Legumes will also be instrumental in our ability to maintain the sustainability of our agriculture while facing the challenges of increasing food and biofuel demand. Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus have emerged during the last decade as two major model systems for legume biology. Initially developed to dissect plant-microbe symbiotic interactions and especially legume nodulation, these two models are now widely used in a variety of biological fields from plant physiology and development to population genetics and structural genomics. This review highlights the genetic and genomic tools available to the M. truncatula community. Comparative genomic approaches to transfer biological information between model systems and legume crops are also discussed. PMID:18288239

  8. The Medicago truncatula gene expression atlas web server

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Legumes (Leguminosae or Fabaceae) play a major role in agriculture. Transcriptomics studies in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula, are instrumental in helping to formulate hypotheses about the role of legume genes. With the rapid growth of publically available Affymetrix GeneChip Medicago Genome Array GeneChip data from a great range of tissues, cell types, growth conditions, and stress treatments, the legume research community desires an effective bioinformatics system to aid efforts to interpret the Medicago genome through functional genomics. We developed the Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA) web server for this purpose. Description The Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA) web server is a centralized platform for analyzing the Medicago transcriptome. Currently, the web server hosts gene expression data from 156 Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago genome arrays in 64 different experiments, covering a broad range of developmental and environmental conditions. The server enables flexible, multifaceted analyses of transcript data and provides a range of additional information about genes, including different types of annotation and links to the genome sequence, which help users formulate hypotheses about gene function. Transcript data can be accessed using Affymetrix probe identification number, DNA sequence, gene name, functional description in natural language, GO and KEGG annotation terms, and InterPro domain number. Transcripts can also be discovered through co-expression or differential expression analysis. Flexible tools to select a subset of experiments and to visualize and compare expression profiles of multiple genes have been implemented. Data can be downloaded, in part or full, in a tabular form compatible with common analytical and visualization software. The web server will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate new gene expression data and genome annotation, and is accessible at: http

  9. Stress responses in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Kessmann, H.; Edwards, R.; Dixon, R.A. ); Geno, P.W. )

    1990-09-01

    The isoflavonoid conjugates medicarpin-3-O-glucoside-6{double prime}-O-malonate (MGM), afrormosin-7-O-glucoside (AG), and afrormosin-7-O-glucoside-6{double prime}-O-malonate (AGM) were isolated and characterized from cell suspension cultures of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), where they were the major constitutive secondary metabolites. They were also found in alfalfa roots but not in other parts of the plant. The phytoalexin medicarpin accumulated rapidly in suspension cultured cells treated with elicitor from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and this was subsequently accompanied by an increase in the levels of MGM. In contrast, net accumulation of afrormosin conjugates was not affected by elicitor treatment. Labeling studies with ({sup 14}C)phenylalanine indicated that afrormosin conjugates were the major de novo synthesized isoflavonoid products in unelicited cells. During elicitation, ({sup 14}C)phenylalanine was incorporated predominantly into medicarpin, although a significant proportion of the newly synthesized medicarpin was also conjugated. Treatment of {sup 14}C-labeled, elicited cells with L-{alpha}-aminooxy-{beta}-phenylpropionic acid, a potent inhibitor of PAL activity in vivo, resulted in the initial appearance of labeled medicarpin of very low specific activity, suggesting that the phytoalexin could be released from a preformed conjugate under these conditions. Our data draw attention to the involvement of isoflavone hydroxylases during the constitutive and elicitor-induced accumulation of isoflavonoids and their conjugates in alfalfa cell cultures.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a Rab-binding GDP-dissociation inhibitor from Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Yaneva, Ivanka Asparuhova; Niehaus, Karsten

    2005-03-01

    We have isolated and sequenced the full-length cDNA of a GDP-dissociation inhibitor (GDI) from the model legume Medicago truncatula L. The cDNA (MtGDI) contains an open reading frame of 1335 bp, coding for a protein of 444 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 49,785 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to other plant GDIs, the highest homology being found to GDI from the legume Cicer arietinum (96% identity). The MtGDI was expressed as a N-terminal FLAG-fusion protein in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Its direct interaction with a small G protein of Rab type from Medicago sativa, MsRab11f, was demonstrated in vitro by co-immunoprecipitation using a peptide-specific antibody raised against MtGDI. The dissociation constant of the MtGDI-MsRab11f complex (4 muM) was determined by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses suggested that MtGDI is ubiquitously expressed in M. truncatula. High levels of MtGDI mRNA were detected in uninfected roots, leaves and root nodules. In etiolated seedlings and cell cultures, the amount of MtGDI mRNA was much lower. In all tissues tested, the peptide-specific anti-MtGDI antibody detected the expected 50 kDa protein in the total protein extracts. MtGDI was found in the cytosol; however, a significant fraction was associated with the intracellular membranes in seedlings and roots indicating a membrane localisation of the protein. A second immunoreactive band was detected in leaves suggesting that more than one GDI isoform exist in M. truncatula. PMID:15854828

  11. The medicago genome provides insight into evolution of rhizobial symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medicago truncatula is an excellent model for the study of legume-specific biology, especially endosymbiotic interactions with bacteria and fungi. This paper describes the sequence of the euchromatic portion of the M. truncatula genome based on a recently completed BAC-based assembly supplemented by...

  12. Morphological and Molecular Variation in Perennial Medicago (Alfalfa) Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most important cultivated forage legumes worldwide. Understanding the areas of adaptation and genetic variation available in a crop species facilitates efforts to identify suitable germplasm for integration in plant breeding programs. Accessions that repr...

  13. Medicago truncatula as a Model for Dicot Cell Wall Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strong interest in renewable energy has promoted an upsurge of research on plant cell wall traits that influence the availability of lignocellulosic-derived sugars for fermentation in production of biofuels. We have initiated a genome-wide transcript profiling study using the model legume Medicago t...

  14. How rhizobial symbionts invade plants: the Sinorhizobium–Medicago model

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn M.; Kobayashi, Hajime; Davies, Bryan W.; Taga, Michiko E.; Walker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria and leguminous plants have evolved complex signal exchange mechanisms that allow a specific bacterial species to induce its host plant to form invasion structures through which the bacteria can enter the plant root. Once the bacteria have been endocytosed within a host-membrane-bound compartment by root cells, the bacteria differentiate into a new form that can convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia. Bacterial differentiation and nitrogen fixation are dependent on the microaerobic environment and other support factors provided by the plant. In return, the plant receives nitrogen from the bacteria, which allows it to grow in the absence of an external nitrogen source. Here, we review recent discoveries about the mutual recognition process that allows the model rhizobial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti to invade and differentiate inside its host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and the model host plant barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). PMID:17632573

  15. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  16. The role of CPSF30 in 3’ RNA processing of Medicago sativa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CPSF30 is a component in 3’ RNA processing that has been well characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study the gene for CPSF30 has been cloned out of Medicago truncatula and Medicago sativa. A large region within the gene exhibits significant conservation between A. thaliana and both Medicag...

  17. Implementing a gap analysis to conserve Caucasus Medicago species for ex situ conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper discusses the results of a Medicago gap analysis of the Former Soviet Union, with a focus on the Caucasus Region. A comprehensive database of 2400 accessions of Medicago crop wild relatives that had been collected in the area of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) was developed. Using the data...

  18. A comparative study of alfalfa and Medicago truncatula stem traits: morphology, chemical composition, and ruminal digestibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is an agronomically important forage, but digestibility of stem cell wall material is low. Because the tetraploid genome of alfalfa complicates genetic dissection of complex pathways, Medicago truncatula (Gaertn.) could serve as a model for stem cell wall development in ...

  19. Copper-induced modifications in early symbiotic signaling factors of Ensifer (Sinorhizobium)-Medicago interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharaff, Murali; Archana, G

    2016-09-01

    Cu is an essential micronutrient required during nitrogen fixation, but above threshold concentrations it becomes toxic. The present study was aimed at studying the effect of high Cu concentrations on the early plant-microbe interactions between Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) meliloti 1021, a symbiotic diazotrophic bacterium belonging to α-Proteobacteria, and its plant host Medicago truncatula. E. meliloti exhibited pleomorphism with elongated and branched growth at 100 µM Cu which brought about 50 % reduction in growth. Early symbiotic signaling factors like exopolysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides levels and biofilm formation were adversely affected at sublethal levels of Cu. Cu stress resulted in over-expression of proteins such as GroEL (60 kDa chaperonin) and WrbA (NAD(P)H dehydrogenase). E. meliloti was unable to show efficient attachment on the roots of M. truncatula at 3 µM Cu, which corresponds to 50 % growth inhibitory levels for the plant, indicating that plant root surface modifications may also contribute to adverse effect of Cu on early plant-microbe interactions during nodulation. PMID:27207673

  20. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Differential Root Proteins in Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula in Response to Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ruicai; Li, Mingna; Zhang, Tiejun; Kang, Junmei; Sun, Yan; Cong, Lili; Gao, Yanli; Liu, Fengqi; Yang, Qingchuan

    2016-01-01

    Salt stress is an important abiotic stress that causes decreased crop yields. Root growth and plant activities are affected by salt stress through the actions of specific genes that help roots adapt to adverse environmental conditions. For a more comprehensive understanding of proteins affected by salinity, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to characterize the proteome-level changes associated with salt stress response in Medicago sativa cv. Zhongmu-1 and Medicago truncatula cv. Jemalong A17 roots. Our physiological and phenotypic observations indicated that Zhongmu-1 was more salt tolerant than Jemalong A17. We identified 93 and 30 proteins whose abundance was significantly affected by salt stress in Zhongmu-1 and Jemalong A17 roots, respectively. The tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the differentially accumulated proteins resulted in the identification of 60 and 26 proteins in Zhongmu-1 and Jemalong A17 roots, respectively. Function analyses indicated molecule binding and catalytic activity were the two primary functional categories. These proteins have known functions in various molecular processes, including defense against oxidative stress, metabolism, photosynthesis, protein synthesis and processing, and signal transduction. The transcript levels of four identified proteins were determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicate that some of the identified proteins may play key roles in salt stress tolerance. PMID:27066057

  1. Global reprogramming of transcription and metabolism in Medicago truncatula during progressive drought and after rewatering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Yi; Cruz de Carvalho, Maria H; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Kang, Yun; Allen, Stacy N; Huhman, David V; Tang, Yuhong; Murray, Jeremy; Sumner, Lloyd W; Udvardi, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Medicago truncatula is a model legume forage crop native to the arid and semi-arid environments of the Mediterranean. Given its drought-adapted nature, it is an ideal candidate to study the molecular and biochemical mechanisms conferring drought resistance in plants. Medicago plants were subjected to a progressive drought stress over 14 d of water withholding followed by rewatering under controlled environmental conditions. Based on physiological measurements of plant water status and changes in morphology, plants experienced mild, moderate and severe water stress before rehydration. Transcriptome analysis of roots and shoots from control, mildly, moderately and severely stressed, and rewatered plants, identified many thousands of genes that were altered in expression in response to drought. Many genes with expression tightly coupled to the plant water potential (i.e. drought intensity) were identified suggesting an involvement in Medicago drought adaptation responses. Metabolite profiling of drought-stressed plants revealed the presence of 135 polar and 165 non-polar compounds in roots and shoots. Combining Medicago metabolomic data with transcriptomic data yielded insight into the regulation of metabolic pathways operating under drought stress. Among the metabolites detected in drought-stressed Medicago plants, myo-inositol and proline had striking regulatory profiles indicating involvement in Medicago drought tolerance. Global transcriptional and metabolic responses to drought and rewatering were investigated in Medicago truncatula, a naturally drought-adapted model legume species. Integration of metabolomic and transcriptomic data yielded insights into the regulation of metabolic pathways underlying drought-stress adaptation. Many genes and metabolites with expression tightly coupled to drought intensity were identified, suggesting active involvement in Medicago drought resistance. These could prove useful targets for future translational approaches to improve

  2. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins. PMID:16600295

  3. Kinetics and strain specificity of rhizosphere and endophytic colonization by enteric bacteria on seedlings of Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuemei; Iniguez, A Leonardo; Ahmer, Brian M M; Triplett, Eric W

    2003-03-01

    The presence of human-pathogenic, enteric bacteria on the surface and in the interior of raw produce is a significant health concern. Several aspects of the biology of the interaction between these bacteria and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) seedlings are addressed here. A collection of enteric bacteria associated with alfalfa sprout contaminations, along with Escherichia coli K-12, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium strain ATCC 14028, and an endophyte of maize, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, were labeled with green fluorescent protein, and their abilities to colonize the rhizosphere and the interior of the plant were compared. These strains differed widely in their endophytic colonization abilities, with K. pneumoniae 342 and E. coli K-12 being the best and worst colonizers, respectively. The abilities of the pathogens were between those of K. pneumoniae 342 and E. coli K-12. All Salmonella bacteria colonized the interiors of the seedlings in high numbers with an inoculum of 10(2) CFU, although infection characteristics were different for each strain. For most strains, a strong correlation between endophytic colonization and rhizosphere colonization was observed. These results show significant strain specificity for plant entry by these strains. Significant colonization of lateral root cracks was observed, suggesting that this may be the site of entry into the plant for these bacteria. At low inoculum levels, a symbiosis mutant of Medicago truncatula, dmi1, was colonized in higher numbers on the rhizosphere and in the interior by a Salmonella endophyte than was the wild-type host. Endophytic entry of M. truncatula appears to occur by a mechanism independent of the symbiotic infections by Sinorhizobium meliloti or mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:12620870

  4. The Medicago sativa gene index 1.2: a web-accessible gene expression atlas for investigating expression differences between Medicago sativa subspecies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the primary forage legume crop species in the United States and plays essential economic and ecological roles in agricultural systems across the country. Modern alfalfa is the result of hybridization between tetraploid M. sativa ssp. sativa and M. sativa ssp. falcata....

  5. The Medicago sativa Gene Index 1.2: A web-accessible expression atlas of two Medicago sativa sub-species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa is an important crop, both financially and ecologically, in the agricultural system of the United States. Using Illumina RNA-seq technology we have developed a de-novo transcriptome assembly from two Medicago sativa sub-species, sativa (B47) and falcata (F56). These two genotypes have proven...

  6. Bioinformatics Analysis of MAPKKK Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Xu, Hanyun; Liu, Ying; Song, Lili; Guo, Changhong; Shu, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) is a component of the MAPK cascade pathway that plays an important role in plant growth, development, and response to abiotic stress, the functions of which have been well characterized in several plant species, such as Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. In this study, we performed genome-wide and systemic bioinformatics analysis of MAPKKK family genes in Medicago truncatula. In total, there were 73 MAPKKK family members identified by search of homologs, and they were classified into three subfamilies, MEKK, ZIK, and RAF. Based on the genomic duplication function, 72 MtMAPKKK genes were located throughout all chromosomes, but they cluster in different chromosomes. Using microarray data and high-throughput sequencing-data, we assessed their expression profiles in growth and development processes; these results provided evidence for exploring their important functions in developmental regulation, especially in the nodulation process. Furthermore, we investigated their expression in abiotic stresses by RNA-seq, which confirmed their critical roles in signal transduction and regulation processes under stress. In summary, our genome-wide, systemic characterization and expressional analysis of MtMAPKKK genes will provide insights that will be useful for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes in M. truncatula. PMID:27049397

  7. A Snapshot of Functional Genetic Studies in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun; Li, Minguye; Sinharoy, Senjuti; Verdier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    In the current context of food security, increase of plant protein production in a sustainable manner represents one of the major challenges of agronomic research, which could be partially resolved by increased cultivation of legume crops. Medicago truncatula is now a well-established model for legume genomic and genetic studies. With the establishment of genomics tools and mutant populations in M. truncatula, it has become an important resource to answer some of the basic biological questions related to plant development and stress tolerance. This review has an objective to overview a decade of genetic studies in this model plant from generation of mutant populations to nowadays. To date, the three biological fields, which have been extensively studied in M. truncatula, are the symbiotic nitrogen fixation, the seed development, and the abiotic stress tolerance, due to their significant agronomic impacts. In this review, we summarize functional genetic studies related to these three major biological fields. We integrated analyses of a nearly exhaustive list of genes into their biological contexts in order to provide an overview of the forefront research advances in this important legume model plant. PMID:27555857

  8. A Snapshot of Functional Genetic Studies in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun; Li, Minguye; Sinharoy, Senjuti; Verdier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    In the current context of food security, increase of plant protein production in a sustainable manner represents one of the major challenges of agronomic research, which could be partially resolved by increased cultivation of legume crops. Medicago truncatula is now a well-established model for legume genomic and genetic studies. With the establishment of genomics tools and mutant populations in M. truncatula, it has become an important resource to answer some of the basic biological questions related to plant development and stress tolerance. This review has an objective to overview a decade of genetic studies in this model plant from generation of mutant populations to nowadays. To date, the three biological fields, which have been extensively studied in M. truncatula, are the symbiotic nitrogen fixation, the seed development, and the abiotic stress tolerance, due to their significant agronomic impacts. In this review, we summarize functional genetic studies related to these three major biological fields. We integrated analyses of a nearly exhaustive list of genes into their biological contexts in order to provide an overview of the forefront research advances in this important legume model plant. PMID:27555857

  9. Sequence analysis and homology modeling of peroxidase from Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, Vinita; Gundala, Prasada babu; Chinthala, Paramageetham

    2012-01-01

    Plant peroxidases are one of the most extensively studied group of enzymes which find applications in the environment, health, pharmaceutical, chemical and biotechnological processes. Class III secretary peroxidase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has been characterized using bioinformatics approach Physiochemical properties and topology of alfalfa peroxidase were compared with that of soybean and horseradish peroxidase, two most popular commercially available peroxidase preparations. Lower value of instability index as predicted by ProtParam and presence of extra disulphide linkages as predicted by Cys_REC suggested alfalfa peroxidase to be more stable than either of the commercial preparations. Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) with other functionally similar proteins revealed the presence of highly conserved catalytic residues. Three dimensional model of alfalfa peroxidase was constructed based on the crystal structure of soybean peroxidase (PDB Id: 1FHF A) by homology modelling approach. The model was checked for stereo chemical quality by PROCHECH, VERIFY 3D, WHAT IF, ERRAT, 3D MATCH AND ProSA servers. The best model was selected, energy minimized and used to analyze structure function relationship with substrate hydrogen peroxide by Autodock 4.0. The enzyme substrate complex was viewed with Swiss PDB viewer and one residue ASP43 was found to stabilize the interaction by hydrogen bonds. The results of the study may be a guiding point for further investigations on alfalfa peroxidase. PMID:23275690

  10. Stress Responses in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Kessmann, Helmut; Edwards, Robert; Geno, Paul W.; Dixon, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    The isoflavonoid conjugates medicarpin-3-O-glucoside-6″-O-malonate (MGM), afrormosin-7-O-glucoside (AG), and afrormosin-7-O-glucoside-6″-O-malonate (AGM) were isolated and characterized from cell suspension cultures of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), where they were the major constitutive secondary metabolites. They were also found in alfalfa roots but not in other parts of the plant. The phytoalexin medicarpin accumulated rapidly in suspension cultured cells treated with elicitor from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and this was subsequently accompanied by an increase in the levels of MGM. In contrast, net accumulation of afrormosin conjugates was not affected by elicitor treatment. Labeling studies with [14C]phenylalanine indicated that afrormosin conjugates were the major de novo synthesized isoflavonoid products in unelicited cells. During elicitation, [14C]phenylalanine was incorporated predominantly into medicarpin, although a significant proportion of the newly synthesized medicarpin was also conjugated. Treatment of 14C-labeled, elicited cells with l-α-aminooxy-β-phenylpropionic acid, a potent inhibitor of PAL activity in vivo, resulted in the initial appearance of labeled medicarpin of very low specific activity, suggesting that the phytoalexin could be released from a preformed conjugate under these conditions. Our data draw attention to the involvement of isoflavone hydroxylases during the constitutive and elicitor-induced accumulation of isoflavonoids and their conjugates in alfalfa cell cultures. PMID:16667691

  11. Bioinformatics Analysis of MAPKKK Family Genes in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Hanyun; Liu, Ying; Song, Lili; Guo, Changhong; Shu, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) is a component of the MAPK cascade pathway that plays an important role in plant growth, development, and response to abiotic stress, the functions of which have been well characterized in several plant species, such as Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. In this study, we performed genome-wide and systemic bioinformatics analysis of MAPKKK family genes in Medicago truncatula. In total, there were 73 MAPKKK family members identified by search of homologs, and they were classified into three subfamilies, MEKK, ZIK, and RAF. Based on the genomic duplication function, 72 MtMAPKKK genes were located throughout all chromosomes, but they cluster in different chromosomes. Using microarray data and high-throughput sequencing-data, we assessed their expression profiles in growth and development processes; these results provided evidence for exploring their important functions in developmental regulation, especially in the nodulation process. Furthermore, we investigated their expression in abiotic stresses by RNA-seq, which confirmed their critical roles in signal transduction and regulation processes under stress. In summary, our genome-wide, systemic characterization and expressional analysis of MtMAPKKK genes will provide insights that will be useful for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes in M. truncatula. PMID:27049397

  12. Dual Genetic Pathways Controlling Nodule Number in Medicago truncatula1

    PubMed Central

    Penmetsa, R. Varma; Frugoli, Julia A.; Smith, Lucinda S.; Long, Sharon R.; Cook, Douglas R.

    2003-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a new Medicago truncatula hyper-nodulation mutant, designated sunn (super numeric nodules). Similar to the previously described ethylene-insensitive mutant sickle, sunn exhibits a 10-fold increase in the number of nodules within the primary nodulation zone. Despite this general similarity, these two mutants are readily distinguished based on anatomical, genetic, physiological, and molecular criteria. In contrast to sickle, where insensitivity to ethylene is thought to be causal to the hyper-nodulation phenotype (R.V. Penmetsa, D.R. Cook [1997] Science 275: 527–530), nodulation in sunn is normally sensitive to ethylene. Nevertheless, sunn exhibits seedling root growth that is insensitive to ethylene, although other aspects of the ethylene triple response are normal; these observations suggest that hormonal responses might condition the sunn phenotype in a manner distinct from sickle. The two mutants also differ in the anatomy of the nodulation zone: Successful infection and nodule development in sunn occur predominantly opposite xylem poles, similar to wild type. In sickle, however, both infection and nodulation occur randomly throughout the circumference of the developing root. Genetic analysis indicates that sunn and sickle correspond to separate and unlinked loci, whereas the sunn/skl double mutant exhibits a novel and additive super-nodulation phenotype. Taken together, these results suggest a working hypothesis wherein sunn and sickle define distinct genetic pathways, with skl regulating the number and distribution of successful infection events, and sunn regulating nodule organogenesis. PMID:12644652

  13. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula during Erysiphe pisi infection

    PubMed Central

    Curto, Miguel; Krajinski, Franziska; Schlereth, Armin; Rubiales, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to powdery mildew has been studied in a number of plant species, yet the molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Transcription factors (TFs) play a critical role in the plant defense response by regulating the transcriptional machinery which coordinates the expression of a large group of genes involved in plant defense. Using high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technology more than 1000 Medicago truncatula TFs were screened in a pair of susceptible and resistant genotypes of M. truncatula after 4 h of Erysiphe pisi infection. Seventy nine TF genes, belonging to 33 families showed a significant transcriptional change in response to E. pisi infection. Forty eight TF genes were differentially expressed in the resistant genotypes compared to the susceptible one in response to E. pisi infection, including pathogenesis-related transcriptional factors, AP2/EREBP (APETALA2/ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING FACTORS), WRKY (highly conserved WRKYGQK amino-acid sequence), MYB (Myeloblastoma), homeodomain (HD) and zinc finger C2C2 (CYS2-CYS2), C2H2, (CYS2-HIS2), LIM (Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3) gene families, which are involved in known defense responses. Our results suggest that these TF genes are among the E. pisi responsive genes in resistant M. truncatula that may constitute a regulatory network which controls the transcriptional changes in defense genes involved in resistance to E. pisi. PMID:26217367

  14. Salt stress alters DNA methylation levels in alfalfa (Medicago spp).

    PubMed

    Al-Lawati, A; Al-Bahry, S; Victor, R; Al-Lawati, A H; Yaish, M W

    2016-01-01

    Modification of DNA methylation status is one of the mechanisms used by plants to adjust gene expression at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels when plants are exposed to suboptimal conditions. Under abiotic stress, different cultivars often show heritable phenotypic variation accompanied by epigenetic polymorphisms at the DNA methylation level. This variation may provide the raw materials for plant breeding programs that aim to enhance abiotic stress tolerance, including salt tolerance. In this study, methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis was used to assess cytosine methylation levels in alfalfa (Medicago spp) roots exposed to increasing NaCl concentrations (0.0, 8.0, 12.0, and 20.0 dS/m). Eleven indigenous landraces were analyzed, in addition to a salt-tolerant cultivar that was used as a control. There was a slight increase in DNA methylation upon exposure to high levels of soil salinity. Phylogenetic analysis using MSAP showed epigenetic variation within and between the alfalfa landraces when exposed to saline conditions. Based on MSAP and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results, we found that salinity increased global DNA methylation status, particularly in plants exposed to the highest level of salinity (20 dS/m). Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated that this might be mediated by the overexpression of methyltransferase homolog genes after exposure to saline conditions. DNA demethylation using 5-azacytidine reduced seedling lengths and dry and fresh weights, indicating a possible decrease in salinity tolerance. These results suggest that salinity affects DNA methylation flexibility. PMID:26985924

  15. A set of GFP organelle marker lines for intracellular localization studies in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics advances in the model legume Medicago truncatula have led to an increase in the number of identified genes encoding proteins with unknown biological function. Determining the intracellular location of uncharacterized proteins often aids in the elucidation of biological function. To expedite...

  16. Induction of peroxidases and superoxide dismutases in transformed embryogenic calli of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activities of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes were analyzed in non-regenerative transformed embryogenic lines of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) carrying wound-inducible oryzacystatin I (OC-I), wound-inducible oryzacystatin I antisense (OC-Ias) or hygromycin phosphotransferase (...

  17. Identification and Expression Analysis of BURP Domain-Containing Genes in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Chen, Xue; Chen, Zhu; Cai, Ronghao; Zhang, Hongmei; Xiang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    BURP domain-containing proteins belong to a newly identified protein class that is unique to plants and plays an important role in plant development and metabolism. Although systematic characterization of BURP domain-containing proteins have been carried out in many species, such as rice, poplar and maize, little is known about BURP domain-containing proteins in Medicago. In this study, multiple bioinformatics approaches were employed to identify all the members of BURP family genes in Medicago. A complete set of 39 BURP family genes were identified. These genes have diverse structures and were distributed on chromosome 1–8 except 7. According to phylogenetic analysis, these BURP family genes could be classified into eight classes. Motif and exon-intron organization, stress-related cis-elements in promoter regions and microarray analysis of MtBURPs were also performed. Furthermore, transcript level analysis of MtBURP genes in response to drought stress revealed that all of the 39 BURP genes were regulated by drought stress. The results of this study reveal a comprehensive overview of the Medicago BURP gene family and provide the first step toward the selection of MtBURP genes for cloning and functional analysis of the BURP gene family in Medicago truncatula. PMID:27148311

  18. Crop wild relatives of Medicago in Russia and neighboring countries: gap analysis for effective conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Medicago includes important species used for forage, fodder and land improvement. The countries of the Former Soviet Union have a wide diversity of alfalfa crop wild relatives and annual medic species. The N.I. Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry (VIR) has a long history of collecting and ...

  19. Ractopamine uptake by alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) from soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ractopamine is a beta adrenergic agonist used as a growth promoter in swine, cattle and turkeys. To test whether ractopamine has the potential to accumulate in plants grown in contaminated soil, a greenhouse study was conducted with alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) grown in t...

  20. Identification of Drought Response Genes fom Two Alfalfa Cultivars Using Medicago Truncatula Microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the first step to identify drought-responsive genes in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and understand how nitrogen fixation interacts with drought response, the alfalfa Ladak and 53V08 were studied when subjected to drought stress. A small set of genes shared by these two cultivars were identified ...

  1. Characterization of a bi-pistil mutant in Medicago truncatula Gaertn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose the name bi-pistil, bip, for a floral organ mutant observed in transgenic Medicago truncatula plants. The mutant has two separate stigmas borne on two separate styles that emerge from a single superior carpel primordium. The bip plant was crossed to a previously reported male sterile mtap...

  2. Identification of Dehydration Responsive Genes from Two Non-Nodulated Alfalfa Cultivars Using Medicago Truncatula Microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To have a comprehensive understanding of how legume plants respond to drought at the gene expression level and examine whether legume plants that are not fixing nitrogen would behave similar to non-legume plants in drought response, transcriptomes were studied in two non-nodulated alfalfa (Medicago ...

  3. INTERSEEDING MEDICAGO SATIVA SSP. FALCATA INTO RANGELANDS TO ENHANCE CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND FORAGE PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangelands of the U.S. Great Plains can generally be characterized as having low nitrogen levels, which along with water, are considered the major limiting factors in forage production. The purpose of this research was to assess the effect of interseeding Medicago sativa ssp. falcata on native range...

  4. Morphological characterization and genetic analysis of a bi-pistil mutant (bip) in Medicago truncatula Gaertn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A floral organ mutant was observed in transgenic Medicago truncatula Gaertn. plants that had two separate stigmas borne on two separate styles that emerged from a single superior carpel primordium. We propose the name bi-pistil, bip, for the mutation. We believe this is the first report of such a m...

  5. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NBS-LRR GENES IN THE MODEL PLANT MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NBS-LRR gene family accounts for the largest number of known disease resistance genes, and is one of the largest gene families in plant genomes. We describe this gene family in the model legume genome Medicago truncatula (“Medicago”). The current public draft genome sequence (Mt1.0) is estima...

  6. USE OF MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA TO MODEL THE INTERACTION BETWEEN PLANT-PARASITIC NEMATODES AND LEGUMES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are using Medicago truncatula as a model plant for examination of the interaction between plant-parasitic nematodes and legumes. One objective of this work is to identify and characterize genes from the plant that are involved in the host response to nematodes or in host resistance. Using bioinfo...

  7. Chromosomal and symbiotic relationships of rhizobia nodulating Medicago truncatula and M. laciniata.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST) is a sequence-based method used to characterize bacterial genomes. This method was used to examine the genetic structure of Medicago-nodulating rhizobia at the Amra site, which is located in an arid region of Tunisia. Here the annual medics M. laciniata and M. tru...

  8. Medicago ciliaris growing in Tunisian soils is preferentially nodulated by Sinorhizobium medicae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variation in growth of Medicago ciliaris was recorded across soils from five different regions in Tunisia that represented different soil types and climatic zones. In four of these soils (Mateur, Enfidha, Rhayet and Soliman) this variation appeared to be related to the nodule number on the roots of ...

  9. Identification and Expression Analysis of BURP Domain-Containing Genes in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Chen, Xue; Chen, Zhu; Cai, Ronghao; Zhang, Hongmei; Xiang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    BURP domain-containing proteins belong to a newly identified protein class that is unique to plants and plays an important role in plant development and metabolism. Although systematic characterization of BURP domain-containing proteins have been carried out in many species, such as rice, poplar and maize, little is known about BURP domain-containing proteins in Medicago. In this study, multiple bioinformatics approaches were employed to identify all the members of BURP family genes in Medicago. A complete set of 39 BURP family genes were identified. These genes have diverse structures and were distributed on chromosome 1-8 except 7. According to phylogenetic analysis, these BURP family genes could be classified into eight classes. Motif and exon-intron organization, stress-related cis-elements in promoter regions and microarray analysis of MtBURPs were also performed. Furthermore, transcript level analysis of MtBURP genes in response to drought stress revealed that all of the 39 BURP genes were regulated by drought stress. The results of this study reveal a comprehensive overview of the Medicago BURP gene family and provide the first step toward the selection of MtBURP genes for cloning and functional analysis of the BURP gene family in Medicago truncatula. PMID:27148311

  10. Single-Feature Polymorphism Discovery in the Transcriptome of Tetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa (L.) ssp. sativa ) has economic importance as a forage crop for livestock and potential for development as a biofuel feedstock. Advances in alfalfa breeding, genetics, and genomics have been slow because this crop is an allogamous autotetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) with complex p...

  11. Genetic dissection of resistance to anthracnose and powdery mildew in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medicago truncatula was used to characterize resistance to anthracnose and powdery mildew, respectively caused by Colletotrichum trifolii and Erysiphe pisi. Two isolates of E. pisi (Ep-p from pea and Ep-a from alfalfa) and two races of C. trifolii (races 1 and 2) were used in this study. The A17 gen...

  12. Structural and chemical insect defenses in calcium oxalate defective mutants of Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant structures can act as defense against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in leaves of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. are effective deterrents of lepidopteran feeding, and they inhibit conversion of leaves into insect ...

  13. Physical characteristics of Medicago truncatula calcium oxalate crystals determine their effectiveness in insect defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant structural traits can act as defense against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in leaves of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feeding. They ar...

  14. Identification of Novel Defense Response Genes in Medicago truncatula for Improving Disease Resistance in Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of plants by pathogens initiates a cascade of defense responses that halt or limit pathogen growth. However, the role of many of the genes induced by pathogens is unknown. Transcript profiling was used to identify genes associated with defense responses in the model legume Medicago truncat...

  15. Transcriptome profiling identified novel genes associated with aluminum toxicity, resistance and tolerance in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligonucleotide microarrays corresponding to more than 16,000 genes were used to analyze changes in transcript accumulation in root tips of the Al-sensitive Medicago truncatula cultivar Jemalong genotype A17 in response to Al stress treatment. Out of 2,782 genes with significant changes in transcrip...

  16. Physiological and molecular characterization of aluminum resistance in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Divya; Sharopova, Natasha; VandenBosch, Kathryn A; Garvin, David F; Samac, Deborah A

    2008-01-01

    Background Aluminum (Al) toxicity is an important factor limiting crop production on acid soils. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which legumes respond to and resist Al stress. To explore the mechanisms of Al toxicity and resistance in legumes, we compared the impact of Al stress in Al-resistant and Al-sensitive lines of the model legume, Medicago truncatula Gaertn. Results A screen for Al resistance in 54 M. truncatula accessions identified eight Al-resistant and eight Al-sensitive lines. Comparisons of hydroponic root growth and root tip hematoxylin staining in an Al-resistant line, T32, and an Al-sensitive line, S70, provided evidence that an inducible Al exclusion mechanism occurs in T32. Transcriptional events associated with the Al resistance response were analyzed in T32 and S70 after 12 and 48 h Al treatment using oligonucleotide microarrays. Fewer genes were differentially regulated in response to Al in T32 compared to S70. Expression patterns of oxidative stress-related genes, stress-response genes and microscopic examination of Al-treated root tips suggested a lower degree of Al-induced oxidative damage to T32 root tips compared to S70. Furthermore, genes associated with cell death, senescence, and cell wall degradation were induced in both lines after 12 h of Al treatment but preferentially in S70 after 48 h of Al treatment. A multidrug and toxin efflux (MATE) transporter, previously shown to exude citrate in Arabidopsis, showed differential expression patterns in T32 and S70. Conclusion Our results identified novel genes induced by Al in Al-resistant and sensitive M. truncatula lines. In T32, transcription levels of genes related to oxidative stress were consistent with reactive oxygen species production, which would be sufficient to initiate cell death of Al-accumulating cells thereby contributing to Al exclusion and root growth recovery. In contrast, transcriptional levels of oxidative stress-related genes were consistent with

  17. Spatio-Temporal Expression Patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula Defensin-Like Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nallu, Sumitha; Wang, Lin; Botanga, Christopher J.; Gomez, S. Karen; Costa, Liliana M.; Harrison, Maria J.; Samac, Deborah A.; Glazebrook, Jane; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose F.; VandenBosch, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL) genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species. PMID:23527067

  18. EFFECTS OF SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN ON YIELDS OF 'RAPHANUS SATIVUS', 'LACTUCA SATIVA', 'TRITICUM AESTIVUM' AND 'MEDICAGO SATIVA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to determine effects of simulated acidic rain on radishes (Raphanus sativus), wheat(Triticum aestivum) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown under greenhouse conditions. Experimental designs allowed the detection of statistically significant differences a...

  19. Regulation of compound leaf development in Medicago truncatula by Fused Compound Leaf1, a class M KNOX gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medicago truncatula is a legume species belonging to the inverted repeat lacking clade (IRLC) with trifoliolate compound leaves. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying development of trifoliolate leaves in legumes remain largely unknown. Here, we report isolation and characterization of fused...

  20. GENETIC MAPPING FORAGE YIELD, PLANT HEIGHT, AND REGROWTH AT MULTIPLE HARVESTS IN TETRAPLOID ALFALFA (MEDICAGO SATIVA L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crosses between Medicago sativa subspecies falcata and sativa result in high levels of heterosis for alfalfa forage production. However, desirable alfalfa cultivars must have acceptable performance for other agronomic traits including regrowth following harvest and appropriate autumn dormancy. In ...

  1. Expression of coordinately regulated defense response genes and analysis of their role in disease resistance in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray technology was used to identify genes associated with disease defense responses in the model legume Medicago truncatula. Transcript profiles from leaves inoculated with Colletotrichum trifolii and Erysiphe pisi and roots infected with Phytophthora medicaginis were compared to identify gen...

  2. Databases and information integration for the Medicago truncatula genome and transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Steven B; Crow, John A; Heuer, Michael L; Wang, Xiaohong; Cannon, Ethalinda K S; Dwan, Christopher; Lamblin, Anne-Francoise; Vasdewani, Jayprakash; Mudge, Joann; Cook, Andrew; Gish, John; Cheung, Foo; Kenton, Steve; Kunau, Timothy M; Brown, Douglas; May, Gregory D; Kim, Dongjin; Cook, Douglas R; Roe, Bruce A; Town, Chris D; Young, Nevin D; Retzel, Ernest F

    2005-05-01

    An international consortium is sequencing the euchromatic genespace of Medicago truncatula. Extensive bioinformatic and database resources support the marker-anchored bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequencing strategy. Existing physical and genetic maps and deep BAC-end sequencing help to guide the sequencing effort, while EST databases provide essential resources for genome annotation as well as transcriptome characterization and microarray design. Finished BAC sequences are joined into overlapping sequence assemblies and undergo an automated annotation process that integrates ab initio predictions with EST, protein, and other recognizable features. Because of the sequencing project's international and collaborative nature, data production, storage, and visualization tools are broadly distributed. This paper describes databases and Web resources for the project, which provide support for physical and genetic maps, genome sequence assembly, gene prediction, and integration of EST data. A central project Web site at medicago.org/genome provides access to genome viewers and other resources project-wide, including an Ensembl implementation at medicago.org, physical map and marker resources at mtgenome.ucdavis.edu, and genome viewers at the University of Oklahoma (www.genome.ou.edu), the Institute for Genomic Research (www.tigr.org), and Munich Information for Protein Sequences Center (mips.gsf.de). PMID:15888676

  3. Early Steps in Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yongzhen; Peel, Gregory J.; Wright, Elane; Wang, Zengyu; Dixon, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Oligomeric proanthocyanidins (PAs) composed primarily of epicatechin units accumulate in the seed coats of the model legume Medicago truncatula, reaching maximal levels at around 20 d after pollination. Genes encoding the single Medicago anthocyanidin synthase (ANS; EC 1.14.11.19) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR; EC 1.17.1.3) were cloned and the corresponding enzymes functionally identified. Recombinant MtANS converted leucocyanidin to cyanidin, and, more efficiently, dihydroquercetin to the flavonol quercetin. Levels of transcripts encoding dihydroflavonol reductase, ANS, and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR), the enzyme responsible for conversion of anthocyanidin to (−)-epicatechin, paralleled the accumulation of PAs in developing seeds, whereas LAR transcripts appeared to be more transiently expressed. LAR, ANS, and ANR proteins were localized to the cytosol in transfected tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves. Antisense down-regulation of ANS in M. truncatula resulted in reduced anthocyanin and PA levels, but had no impact on flavonol levels. Transgenic tobacco plants constitutively overexpressing MtLAR showed reduced anthocyanin content, but no catechin or increased levels of PAs were detected either in leaves or in flowers. Our results confirm previously ascribed in vivo functions for ANS and ANR. However, the apparent lack of catechin in M. truncatula PAs, the poor correlation between LAR expression and PA accumulation, and the lack of production of catechin monomers or oligomers in transgenic plants overexpressing MtLAR question the role of MtLAR in PA biosynthesis in Medicago. PMID:17885080

  4. Legume genome evolution viewed through the Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Steven B.; Sterck, Lieven; Rombauts, Stephane; Sato, Shusei; Cheung, Foo; Gouzy, Jérôme; Wang, Xiaohong; Mudge, Joann; Vasdewani, Jayprakash; Schiex, Thomas; Spannagl, Manuel; Monaghan, Erin; Nicholson, Christine; Humphray, Sean J.; Schoof, Heiko; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Rogers, Jane; Quétier, Francis; Oldroyd, Giles E.; Debellé, Frédéric; Cook, Douglas R.; Retzel, Ernest F.; Roe, Bruce A.; Town, Christopher D.; Tabata, Satoshi; Van de Peer, Yves; Young, Nevin D.

    2006-01-01

    Genome sequencing of the model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, provides an opportunity for large-scale sequence-based comparison of two genomes in the same plant family. Here we report synteny comparisons between these species, including details about chromosome relationships, large-scale synteny blocks, microsynteny within blocks, and genome regions lacking clear correspondence. The Lotus and Medicago genomes share a minimum of 10 large-scale synteny blocks, each with substantial collinearity and frequently extending the length of whole chromosome arms. The proportion of genes syntenic and collinear within each synteny block is relatively homogeneous. Medicago–Lotus comparisons also indicate similar and largely homogeneous gene densities, although gene-containing regions in Mt occupy 20–30% more space than Lj counterparts, primarily because of larger numbers of Mt retrotransposons. Because the interpretation of genome comparisons is complicated by large-scale genome duplications, we describe synteny, synonymous substitutions and phylogenetic analyses to identify and date a probable whole-genome duplication event. There is no direct evidence for any recent large-scale genome duplication in either Medicago or Lotus but instead a duplication predating speciation. Phylogenetic comparisons place this duplication within the Rosid I clade, clearly after the split between legumes and Salicaceae (poplar). PMID:17003129

  5. An improved genome release (version Mt4.0) for the model legume Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medicago truncatula, a close relative of alfalfa, is a preeminent model for studying nitrogen fixation, symbiosis, and legume genomics. The Medicago sequencing project began in 2003 with the goal to decipher sequences originated from the euchromatic portion of the genome. The initial sequencing approach was based on a BAC tiling path, culminating in a BAC-based assembly (Mt3.5) as well as an in-depth analysis of the genome published in 2011. Results Here we describe a further improved and refined version of the M. truncatula genome (Mt4.0) based on de novo whole genome shotgun assembly of a majority of Illumina and 454 reads using ALLPATHS-LG. The ALLPATHS-LG scaffolds were anchored onto the pseudomolecules on the basis of alignments to both the optical map and the genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) map. The Mt4.0 pseudomolecules encompass ~360 Mb of actual sequences spanning 390 Mb of which ~330 Mb align perfectly with the optical map, presenting a drastic improvement over the BAC-based Mt3.5 which only contained 70% sequences (~250 Mb) of the current version. Most of the sequences and genes that previously resided on the unanchored portion of Mt3.5 have now been incorporated into the Mt4.0 pseudomolecules, with the exception of ~28 Mb of unplaced sequences. With regard to gene annotation, the genome has been re-annotated through our gene prediction pipeline, which integrates EST, RNA-seq, protein and gene prediction evidences. A total of 50,894 genes (31,661 high confidence and 19,233 low confidence) are included in Mt4.0 which overlapped with ~82% of the gene loci annotated in Mt3.5. Of the remaining genes, 14% of the Mt3.5 genes have been deprecated to an “unsupported” status and 4% are absent from the Mt4.0 predictions. Conclusions Mt4.0 and its associated resources, such as genome browsers, BLAST-able datasets and gene information pages, can be found on the JCVI Medicago web site (http://www.jcvi.org/medicago). The assembly and annotation has

  6. Molecular docking of Glycine max and Medicago truncatula ureases with urea; bioinformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Filiz, Ertugrul; Vatansever, Recep; Ozyigit, Ibrahim Ilker

    2016-03-01

    Urease (EC 3.5.1.5) is a nickel-dependent metalloenzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide. It is present in many bacteria, fungi, yeasts and plants. Most species, with few exceptions, use nickel metalloenzyme urease to hydrolyze urea, which is one of the commonly used nitrogen fertilizer in plant growth thus its enzymatic hydrolysis possesses vital importance in agricultural practices. Considering the essentiality and importance of urea and urease activity in most plants, this study aimed to comparatively investigate the ureases of two important legume species such as Glycine max (soybean) and Medicago truncatula (barrel medic) from Fabaceae family. With additional plant species, primary and secondary structures of 37 plant ureases were comparatively analyzed using various bioinformatics tools. A structure based phylogeny was constructed using predicted 3D models of G. max and M. truncatula, whose crystallographic structures are not available, along with three additional solved urease structures from Canavalia ensiformis (PDB: 4GY7), Bacillus pasteurii (PDB: 4UBP) and Klebsiella aerogenes (PDB: 1FWJ). In addition, urease structures of these species were docked with urea to analyze the binding affinities, interacting amino acids and atom distances in urease-urea complexes. Furthermore, mutable amino acids which could potentially affect the protein active site, stability and flexibility as well as overall protein stability were analyzed in urease structures of G. max and M. truncatula. Plant ureases demonstrated similar physico-chemical properties with 833-878 amino acid residues and 89.39-90.91 kDa molecular weight with mainly acidic (5.15-6.10 pI) nature. Four protein domain structures such as urease gamma, urease beta, urease alpha and amidohydro 1 characterized the plant ureases. Secondary structure of plant ureases also demonstrated conserved protein architecture, with predominantly α-helix and random coil structures. In

  7. Genomic Characterization of the LEED..PEEDs, a Gene Family Unique to the Medicago Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Diana I.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Young, Nevin D.

    2014-01-01

    The LEED..PEED (LP) gene family in Medicago truncatula (A17) is composed of 13 genes coding small putatively secreted peptides with one to two conserved domains of negatively charged residues. This family is not present in the genomes of Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, or the IRLC species Cicer arietinum. LP genes were also not detected in a Trifolium pratense draft genome or Pisum sativum nodule transcriptome, which were sequenced de novo in this study, suggesting that the LP gene family arose within the past 25 million years. M. truncatula accession HM056 has 13 LP genes with high similarity to those in A17, whereas M. truncatula ssp. tricycla (R108) and M. sativa have 11 and 10 LP gene copies, respectively. In M. truncatula A17, 12 LP genes are located on chromosome 7 within a 93-kb window, whereas one LP gene copy is located on chromosome 4. A phylogenetic analysis of the gene family is consistent with most gene duplications occurring prior to Medicago speciation events, mainly through local tandem duplications and one distant duplication across chromosomes. Synteny comparisons between R108 and A17 confirm that gene order is conserved between the two subspecies, although a further duplication occurred solely in A17. In M. truncatula A17, all 13 LPs are exclusively transcribed in nodules and absent from other plant tissues, including roots, leaves, flowers, seeds, seed shells, and pods. The recent expansion of LP genes in Medicago spp. and their timing and location of expression suggest a novel function in nodulation, possibly as an aftermath of the evolution of bacteroid terminal differentiation or potentially associated with rhizobial–host specificity. PMID:25155275

  8. The Effects of Medicago Sativa and Allium Porrum on Iron Overload in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Ali; Delaviz, Hamdollah; Mirzaei, Mahsa; Tolooei, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Iron overload may occur due to regular blood transfusions and high intestinal iron absorption. Currently, there is no effective drug without side effects for the treatment of iron excess in thalassemia and other iron storage diseases, except chelation therapy, which is the only safe method for iron excretion. Thus, scientists are more focused on medicinal plants rich in phytochemical compounds for the removal of iron in thalassemia. Therefore this study was managed to discover the therapeutic potential of hydro- alcoholic extract of Allium porrum and Medicago sativa for iron chelating potential. Methods: Aerial parts of Allium porrum and Medicago sativa werecollected in Yasuj Iran. Rats were divided into seven groups each containing six. Extracts were administrated in four groups (two groups for each extract) by single doses of each plant with 200 and 400 mg / kg body weight by (i.p.) route every other day for28 days. Group 1 as negative control received saline (0.5 ml/kg) by (i.p.) route. Positive control received iron dextran 200 mg/kg body weight. Experimental groups 1 and 2 for each plant extract were fed with 200 and 400 mg/kg, hydro-alcoholic extract respectively via (i.p.) route, 1 h after the injection of iron dextran. Standard group was treated with deferoxamine (DF) 50 mg/kg by (i.p.) route1 h after the injection of iron dextran. Serum iron (SI) and serum total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were determined. The serum ferritin was then measured using enzyme immunoassay ELISA kit for rat. For Analysis of data ANOVA test was used. Results: Hydro-alcoholic extract of Medicago sativa and Allium porrum at 400 mg/kg showed significant (p<0.05) iron chelating activity compared to control. The plant extracts with dose 200 mg/kg also reduced the iron and ferritin content but the effect was lower level compared to higher doses. The plant extract effects were similar to that of standard drug deferoxamine. Iron and ferritin levels were significantly reduced in

  9. Natural occurrence of entomophthoroid fungi of aphid pests on Medicago sativa L. in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Manfrino, Romina G; Zumoffen, Leticia; Salto, César E; Lastra, Claudia C López

    2014-01-01

    Four species of entomophthoroid fungi, Pandora neoaphidis (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae), Zoophthora radicans (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae), Entomophthora planchoniana (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae) and Neozygites fresenii (Neozygitales: Neozygitaceae) were found to infect Aphis craccivora, Therioaphis trifolii, and Acyrthosiphon pisum and unidentified species of Acyrthosiphon on lucerne in Argentina. Samples were collected from five sites (Ceres, Rafaela, Sarmiento, Monte Vera and Bernardo de Irigoyen) in the province of Santa Fe. In this study, Zoophthora radicans was the most important pathogen and was recorded mainly on Acyrthosiphon sp. Zoophthora radicans was successfully isolated and maintained in pure cultures. This study is the first report of entomophthoroid fungi infecting lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) aphids in Argentina. PMID:24721275

  10. Mycorrhiza Symbiosis Increases the Surface for Sunlight Capture in Medicago truncatula for Better Photosynthetic Production

    PubMed Central

    Adolfsson, Lisa; Keresztes, Áron; Uddling, Johan; Schoefs, Benoît; Spetea, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play a prominent role in plant nutrition by supplying mineral nutrients, particularly inorganic phosphate (Pi), and also constitute an important carbon sink. AM stimulates plant growth and development, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, Medicago truncatula plants were grown with Rhizophagus irregularis BEG141 inoculum (AM), mock inoculum (control) or with Pi fertilization. We hypothesized that AM stimulates plant growth through either modifications of leaf anatomy or photosynthetic activity per leaf area. We investigated whether these effects are shared with Pi fertilization, and also assessed the relationship between levels of AM colonization and these effects. We found that increased Pi supply by either mycorrhization or fertilization led to improved shoot growth associated with increased nitrogen uptake and carbon assimilation. Both mycorrhized and Pi-fertilized plants had more and longer branches with larger and thicker leaves than the control plants, resulting in an increased photosynthetically active area. AM-specific effects were earlier appearance of the first growth axes and increased number of chloroplasts per cell section, since they were not induced by Pi fertilization. Photosynthetic activity per leaf area remained the same regardless of type of treatment. In conclusion, the increase in growth of mycorrhized and Pi-fertilized Medicago truncatula plants is linked to an increase in the surface for sunlight capture, hence increasing their photosynthetic production, rather than to an increase in the photosynthetic activity per leaf area. PMID:25615871

  11. Genetic and physical localization of an anthracnose resistance gene in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengming; Gao, Muqiang; Deshpande, Shweta; Lin, Shaoping; Roe, Bruce A; Zhu, Hongyan

    2007-12-01

    Anthracnose of alfalfa, caused by the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum trifolii, is one of the most destructive diseases of alfalfa worldwide. An improved understanding of the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying host resistance will facilitate the development of resistant alfalfa cultivars, thus providing the most efficient and environmentally sound strategy to control alfalfa diseases. Unfortunately, cultivated alfalfa has an intractable genetic system because of its tetrasomic inheritance and out-crossing nature. Nevertheless, the model legume Medicago truncatula, a close relative of alfalfa, has the potential to serve as a surrogate to map and clone the counterparts of agronomically important genes in alfalfa -- particularly, disease resistance genes against economically important pathogens. Here we describe the high-resolution genetic and physical mapping of RCT1, a host resistance gene against C. trifolii race 1 in M. truncatula. We have delimited the RCT1 locus within a physical interval spanning approximately 200 kb located on the top of M. truncatula linkage group 4. RCT1 is part of a complex locus containing numerous genes homologous to previously characterized TIR-NBS-LRR type resistance genes. The result presented in this paper will facilitate the positional cloning of RCT1 in Medicago. PMID:17891371

  12. Modulation of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis in bacteroids within Medicago sativa nodules.

    PubMed

    Bianco, C; Senatore, B; Arbucci, S; Pieraccini, G; Defez, R

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the dose-response effects of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on Medicago plant growth and dry weight production, we increased the synthesis of IAA in both free-living and symbiosis-stage rhizobial bacteroids during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. For this purpose, site-directed mutagenesis was applied to modify an 85-bp promoter sequence, driving the expression of iaaM and tms2 genes for IAA biosynthesis. A positive correlation was found between the higher expression of IAA biosynthetic genes in free-living bacteria and the increased production of IAA under both free-living and symbiotic conditions. Plants nodulated by RD65 and RD66 strains, synthetizing the highest IAA concentration, showed a significant (up to 73%) increase in the shoot fresh weight and upregulation of nitrogenase gene, nifH, compared to plants nodulated by the wild-type strain. When these plants were analyzed by confocal microscopy, using an anti-IAA antibody, the strongest signal was observed in bacteroids of Medicago sativa RD66 (Ms-RD66) plants, even when they were located in the senescent nodule zone. We show here a simple system to modulate endogenous IAA biosynthesis in bacteria nodulating legumes suitable to investigate which is the maximum level of IAA biosynthesis, resulting in the maximal increase of plant growth. PMID:24814784

  13. Exopolysaccharide production by nitrogen-fixing bacteria within nodules of Medicago plants exposed to chronic radiation in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

    PubMed

    Pawlicki-Jullian, Nathalie; Courtois, Bernard; Pillon, Michelle; Lesur, David; Le Flèche-Mateos, Anne; Laberche, Jean-Claude; Goncharova, Nadia; Courtois, Josiane

    2010-03-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from root nodules of Medicago plants growing in the 10 km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant were screened for the production of new water-soluble acidic exopolysaccharides (EPSs). The different strains belonged to the Enteriobacteriaceae family (Enterobacter ludwigii, Raoultella terrigena, Klebsiella oxytoca), except for one which belonged to the Rhizobiaceae family (Sinorhizobium meliloti). All of the bacteria produced highly viscous EPS with an average molecular weight comprised between 1 x 10(6) and 3 x 10(6) Da. Five different compositions of EPS were characterized by physico-chemical analyses and (1)H NMR spectroscopy: galactose/mannose (2/1), galactose/glucose (1/1), galactose/glucose/mannose (1/2/1), fucose/galactose/glucose (2/1/1) and fucose/galactose/glucose/mannose (2/2/1/1 or 1/1/2/4). Glucuronic acid, a charged monosaccharide, was also recovered in most of the different EPSs. PMID:20080178

  14. Genetic evidence for differences in the pathways of druse and prismatic calcium oxalate crystal formation in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current evidence supports a single pathway utilizing ascorbic acid as the precursor in oxalate biosynthesis. In this study, we address the possibility that more than one pathway of oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation occurs in Medicago truncatula. Like wildtype, developing leaves of...

  15. COMPARISON OF RHIZOBIA THAT NODULATE MEDICAGO LACINIATA AND M. TRUNCATULA PRESENT IN A SINGLE TUNISIAN ARID SOIL.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rhizobia present in a single arid-region Tunisian soil that nodulate Medicago laciniata and M. truncatula were compared. All isolates, 40 from each host, probably were more closely related to S. meliloti than to S. medicae based on 16S rRNA PCR-RFLP. There was no apparent relationship between ...

  16. Characterization of zinc transport by divalent metal transporters of the ZIP family from the model legume medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand how plants from the Fabaceae family maintain zinc (Zn) homeostasis, we have characterized the kinetics of the Zn transporting proteins from the ZIP family of divalent metal transporters in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MtZIP1, MtZIP5, and MtZIP6 were the only members from this ...

  17. Identification of molecular markers associated with verticillium wilt resistance in alfalfa (medicago sativa l.) using high-resolution melting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt (VW), caused by the soilborne fungus, Verticillium alfalfae, is one of the most serious diseases of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) worldwide. To identify loci associated with resistance to VW, an association study was conducted using autotetraploid alfalfa populations composed of 352...

  18. Growth habit and photo-synthetic activity of shoot cultures of Medicago sativa L. transformed with the oryzacystatin II gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In vitro maintained shoot cultures of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Zajeÿarska 83) that were transformed with the oryzacystatin II (OCII) gene and propagated on growth regulator-free medium were subjected to analysis of morphological characteristics and photosynthetic activity. The most striking f...

  19. MtPAR MYB transcription factor acts as an on switch for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Jerome; Zhao, Jian; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Ge, Shujun; Liu, Chenggang; He, Xianzhi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Dixon, Richard A; Udvardi, Michael K

    2012-01-31

    MtPAR (Medicago truncatula proanthocyanidin regulator) is an MYB family transcription factor that functions as a key regulator of proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MtPAR expression is confined to the seed coat, the site of PA accumulation. Loss-of-function par mutants contained substantially less PA in the seed coat than the wild type, whereas levels of anthocyanin and other specialized metabolites were normal in the mutants. In contrast, massive accumulation of PAs occurred when MtPAR was expressed ectopically in transformed hairy roots of Medicago. Transcriptome analysis of par mutants and MtPAR-expressing hairy roots, coupled with yeast one-hybrid analysis, revealed that MtPAR positively regulates genes encoding enzymes of the flavonoid-PA pathway via a probable activation of WD40-1. Expression of MtPAR in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa) resulted in detectable levels of PA in shoots, highlighting the potential of this gene for biotechnological strategies to increase PAs in forage legumes for reduction of pasture bloat in ruminant animals. PMID:22307644

  20. Evaluation of genetic diversity, population structure and identification of a Medicago truncatula core collection using SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the extent of variation in a species is crucial for successful exploitation of its natural genetic diversity. Our goals were to evaluate the genetic diversity in the collection of the model legume species Medicago truncatula available in the United States Department of Agriculture Agric...

  1. Application of Multilocus Sequence Typing To Study the Genetic Structure of Megaplasmids in Medicago-Nodulating Rhizobia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis was used to examine the relatedness and distribution of genotypic variants of the two large extrachromosomal replicons in Medicago-nodulating rhizobia (Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae). One goal was to develop a strategy for the characterization of...

  2. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ALFALFA (MEDICAGO VARIA L.) GENETICLALY ENGINEERED TO EXPRESS A HUMAN METALLOTHIONEIN (HMT) GENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of these studies were two-fold: (1) to determine efficacy of low and high expression hMT gene constructs by assessing accumulation of Cu in shoots of parental and transgenic plants of alfalfa (Medicago varia L.) exposed to different concentrations of CuSO4 by addit...

  3. Effect of wheel traffic and green manure treatments on forage yield and crown rot in alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvesting alfalfa (Medicago sativa) results in mechanical wheel traffic on plants, which may damage crowns and increase the opportunity for entry of pathogens causing crown rot. Developing resistance to crown rot is problematic due to the large number of pathogens involved. Incorporation of plant b...

  4. MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA MUTANTS DEMONSTRATE THE ROLE OF PLANT CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTALS AS AN EFFECTIVE DEFENSE AGAINST CHEWING INSECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate is the most abundant insoluble mineral found in plants and its crystals have been reported in over 200 plant families. In the barrel medic, Medicago truncatula Gaertn., these crystals accumulate predominantly in a sheath surrounding secondary veins of leaves. Mutants of M. truncatul...

  5. Effective conservation of Medicago Crop Wild Relatives in Russia and neighbouring countries: a gap analysis points the way forward

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gap analysis is an effective way to review and refine conservation strategies for crop wild relatives. We developed a comprehensive database containing over 2400 accessions of Medicago crop wild relatives that had been collected in the area of the Former Soviet Union (FSU). Using the data we develop...

  6. Fractionation of Synteny in a Genomic Region Containing Tandemly Duplicated Genes Across Glycine max, Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extended comparison of gene sequences found on homeologous soybean BACs to Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic sequences demonstrated a network of synteny within conserved regions interrupted by gene addition and/or deletions. Consolidation of gene order among all three species prov...

  7. Contrasting calcium localization and speciation in leaves of Medicago trunculata mutant COD5 analyzed via synchrotron X-ray techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalate-producing plants accumulate calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx(C)) in the range of 3-80%(w/w) of their dry weight, reducing calcium (Ca) bioavailability. The calcium oxalate deficient 5 (cod5) mutant of Medicago truncatula has been previously shown to contain similar Ca, but lower oxalate and Ca...

  8. Genetically modified Medicago truncatula lacking calcium oxalate has increased calcium bioavailability and partially rescues vitamin D receptor knockout mice phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    How the distribution and sequestered form of plant macro/micro-nutrients influence their bioavailability, and ultimately impact human health, is poorly understood. The legume Medicago truncatula has a portion of its tissue calcium sequestered in the form of the calcium oxalate crystal, which reduces...

  9. Genetic evidence for differences in the pathways of druse and prismatic calcium oxalate crystal formation in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current evidence supports a single pathway of oxalate biosynthesis utilising ascorbic acid as the precursor. In this study, we begin to address the possibility that more than one pathway of oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation occurs in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (cv. Jemalong genotyp...

  10. Medicago truncatula-derived calcium oxalate crystals have a negative impact on chewing insect performance via their physical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant structural traits often act as defenses against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (Fabaceae) leaves have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feedi...

  11. Leaf calcium oxalate crystal structure and its role in defense against a chewing insect in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate are common in plants and widely distributed among many plant families. These hard and largely insoluble crystals take on many shapes and sizes depending on the tissue and species. In Medicago truncatula, calcium oxalate crystals are abundant in leaves and accumulate in sh...

  12. Expression analysis of Medicago stem internodes identifies genes associated with regulatory control and biogenesis of plant cell walls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Legumes have many traits that make them attractive bioenergy crops, especially as components of mixed grass stands or in crop rotations with maize. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is a legume with an advantage as a biomass crop because of its ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen and the easy separation of ...

  13. Occurrence of transgenic feral alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) in alfalfa seed production areas in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetically-engineered glyphosate-resistant alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa) was commercialized in 2011. The potential risk of transgene dispersal into the environment is not clearly understood for alfalfa, a perennial crop that is cross-pollinated by insects. We gathered data on feral and tr...

  14. Genetic analysis of tolerance to Boron toxicity in the legume Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (barrel medic) is cultivated as a pasture legume for its high protein content and ability to improve soils through nitrogen fixation. Toxic concentrations of the micronutrient Boron (B) in agricultural soils hamper the production of cereal and leguminous crops. In cereals, the genetic analysis of B tolerance has led to the development of molecular selection tools to introgress and maintain the B tolerance trait in breeding lines. There is a comparable need for selection tools in legumes that grow on these toxic soils, often in rotation with cereals. Results Genetic variation for B tolerance in Medicago truncatula was utilised to generate two F2 populations from crosses between tolerant and intolerant parents. Phenotyping under B stress revealed a close correlation between B tolerance and biomass production and a segregation ratio explained by a single dominant locus. M. truncatula homologues of the Arabidopsis major intrinsic protein (MIP) gene AtNIP5;1 and the efflux-type transporter gene AtBOR1, both known for B transport, were identified and nearby molecular markers screened across F2 lines to verify linkage with the B-tolerant phenotype. Most (95%) of the phenotypic variation could be explained by the SSR markers h2_6e22a and h2_21b19a, which flank a cluster of five predicted MIP genes on chromosome 4. Three CAPS markers (MtBtol-1,-2,-3) were developed to dissect the region further. Expression analysis of the five predicted MIPs indicated that only MtNIP3 was expressed when leaf tissue and roots were assessed. MtNIP3 showed low and equal expression in the roots of tolerant and intolerant lines but a 4-fold higher expression level in the leaves of B-tolerant cultivars. The expression profile correlates closely with the B concentration measured in the leaves and roots of tolerant and intolerant plants. Whereas no significant difference in B concentration exists between roots of tolerant and intolerant plants, the B

  15. Relationships of the Woody Medicago Species (Section Dendrotelis) Assessed by Molecular Cytogenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Castro, Mercedes; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The organization of rDNA genes in the woody medic species from the agronomically important Medicago section Dendrotelis was analysed to gain insight into their taxonomic relationships, to assess the levels of infraspecific variation concerning ribosomal loci in a restricted and fragmented insular species (M. citrina) and to assess the nature of its polyploidy. Methods Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA genes in the three species of section Dendrotelis (M. arborea, M. citrina, M. strasseri) and the related M. marina from section Medicago. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to assess the genomic relationships of the polyploid M. citrina with the putatively related species from section Dendrotelis. Key Results The diploid (2n = 16) M. marina has a single 45S and two 5S rDNA loci, a pattern usually detected in previous studies of Medicago diploid species. However, polyploid species from section Dendrotelis depart from expectations. The tetraploid species (2n = 32) M. arborea and M. strasseri have one 45S rDNA locus and two 5S rDNA loci, whereas in the hexaploid (2n = 48) M. citrina four 45S rDNA and five 5S rDNA loci have been detected. No single chromosome of M. citrina was uniformly labelled after using genomic probes from M. arborea and M. strasseri. Instead, cross-hybridization signals in M. citrina were restricted to terminal chromosome arms and NOR regions. Conclusions FISH results support the close taxonomic interrelationship between M. arborea and M. strasseri. In these tetraploid species, NOR loci have experienced a diploidization event through physical loss of sequences, a cytogenetic feature so far not reported in other species of the genus. The high number of rDNA loci and GISH results support the specific status for the hexaploid M. citrina, and it is suggested that this species is not an autopolyploid derivative of M. arborea or M. strasseri. Further, molecular

  16. Possible Role of Nutritional Priming for Early Salt and Drought Stress Responses in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Staudinger, Christiana; Mehmeti, Vlora; Turetschek, Reinhard; Lyon, David; Egelhofer, Volker; Wienkoop, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Most legume species establish a symbiotic association with soil bacteria. The plant accommodates the differentiated rhizobia in specialized organs, the root nodules. In this environment, the microsymbiont reduces atmospheric nitrogen (N) making it available for plant metabolism. Symbiotic N-fixation is driven by the respiration of the host photosynthates and thus constitutes an additional carbon sink for the plant. Molecular phenotypes of symbiotic and non-symbiotic Medicago truncatula are identified. The implication of nodule symbiosis on plant abiotic stress response mechanisms is not well understood. In this study, we exposed nodulated and non-symbiotic N-fertilized plants to salt and drought conditions. We assessed the stress effects with proteomic and metabolomic methods and found a nutritionally regulated phenotypic plasticity pivotal for a differential stress adjustment strategy. PMID:23267362

  17. Immunolocalization of carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in developing seeds of Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Aivalakis, Georgios; Dimou, Maria; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Plati, Fotini; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Drossopoulos, J B

    2004-03-01

    To investigate the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) during Medicago sativa seed development, the distribution of both proteins was examined using an immunohistological approach. Both enzymes are co-localized in most ovular and embryonic tissues. In early stages of seed development, both proteins were abundant in embryo and integuments, while at subsequent stages both proteins are accumulated in endosperm, nucellus and integuments. At late stages of seed development when both endosperm and nucellus are degraded, significant accumulation of both proteins was observed in the embryo proper. Chlorophyll was found to accumulate in embryos after the heart stage and reached a maximum at mature stage. It is suggested that CA and PEPC play a role in respiratory carbon dioxide refixation while generating malate to support amino acid and/or fatty acids biosynthesis. PMID:15051041

  18. Alteration of enod40 expression modifies medicago truncatula root nodule development induced by sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Charon, C; Sousa, C; Crespi, M; Kondorosi, A

    1999-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in the control of root nodule organogenesis in the plant host are poorly understood. One of the nodulin genes associated with the earliest phases of this developmental program is enod40. We show here that transgenic Medicago truncatula plants overexpressing enod40 exhibit accelerated nodulation induced by Sinorhizobium meliloti. This resulted from increased initiation of primordia, which was accompanied by a proliferation response of the region close to the root tip and enhanced root length. The root cortex of the enod40-transformed plants showed increased sensitivity to nodulation signals. T(1) and T(2) descendants of two transgenic lines with reduced amounts of enod40 transcripts (probably from cosuppression) formed only a few and modified nodulelike structures. Our results suggest that induction of enod40 is a limiting step in primordium formation, and its function is required for appropriate nodule development. PMID:10521525

  19. Possible Role of Nutritional Priming for Early Salt and Drought Stress Responses in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Staudinger, Christiana; Mehmeti, Vlora; Turetschek, Reinhard; Lyon, David; Egelhofer, Volker; Wienkoop, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Most legume species establish a symbiotic association with soil bacteria. The plant accommodates the differentiated rhizobia in specialized organs, the root nodules. In this environment, the microsymbiont reduces atmospheric nitrogen (N) making it available for plant metabolism. Symbiotic N-fixation is driven by the respiration of the host photosynthates and thus constitutes an additional carbon sink for the plant. Molecular phenotypes of symbiotic and non-symbiotic Medicago truncatula are identified. The implication of nodule symbiosis on plant abiotic stress response mechanisms is not well understood. In this study, we exposed nodulated and non-symbiotic N-fertilized plants to salt and drought conditions. We assessed the stress effects with proteomic and metabolomic methods and found a nutritionally regulated phenotypic plasticity pivotal for a differential stress adjustment strategy. PMID:23267362

  20. Does SUNN-SYMRK Crosstalk occur in Medicago truncatula for regulating nodule organogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sudip; DasGupta, Maitrayee

    2015-01-01

    Recently we reported that overexpression of intracellular kinase domain of Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK-kd) hyperactivated spontaneous nodulation in Medicago truncatula indicating the importance of SYMRK ectodomain in restricting nodule number. To clarify whether sunn and sickle pathways were overcome by SYMRK-kd for hyperactivation of nodule organogenesis, we overexpressed SYMRK-kd in these mutants and analyzed for spontaneous nodulation in absence of rhizobia. Spontaneous nodulation in skl/SYMRK-kd roots was 2-fold higher than A17/SYMRK-kd roots indicating nodule organogenesis induced by SYMRK-kd to be ethylene sensitive. Intriguingly, sunn/SYMRK-kd roots failed to generate any spontaneous nodule which directly indicate the LRR-RLK SUNN to have a role in SYMRK-kd mediated nodule development under non-symbiotic conditions. We hypothesize a crosstalk between SUNN and SYMRK receptors for activation as well as restriction of nodule development. PMID:25893374

  1. A CDPK isoform participates in the regulation of nodule number in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Gargantini, Pablo R; Gonzalez-Rizzo, Silvina; Chinchilla, Delphine; Raices, Marcela; Giammaria, Verónica; Ulloa, Rita M; Frugier, Florian; Crespi, Martin D

    2006-12-01

    Medicago spp. are able to develop root nodules via symbiotic interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in various signalling pathways in plants, and we found that expression of MtCPK3, a CDPK isoform present in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula, is regulated during the nodulation process. Early inductions were detected 15 min and 3-4 days post-inoculation (dpi). The very early induction of CPK3 messengers was also present in inoculated M. truncatula dmi mutants and in wild-type roots subjected to salt stress, indicating that this rapid response is probably stress-related. In contrast, the later response was concomitant with cortical cell division and the formation of nodule primordia, and was not observed in wild-type roots inoculated with nod (-) strains. This late induction correlated with a change in the subcellular distribution of CDPK activities. Accordingly, an anti-MtCPK3 antibody detected two bands in soluble root extracts and one in the particulate fraction. CPK3::GFP fusions are targeted to the plasma membrane in epidermal onion cells, a localization that depends on myristoylation and palmitoylation sites of the protein, suggesting a dual subcellular localization. MtCPK3 mRNA and protein were also up-regulated by cytokinin treatment, a hormone linked to the regulation of cortical cell division and other nodulation-related responses. An RNAi-CDPK construction was used to silence CPK3 in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed roots. Although no major phenotype was detected in these roots, when infected with rhizobia, the total number of nodules was, on average, twofold higher than in controls. This correlates with the lack of MtCPK3 induction in the inoculated super-nodulator sunn mutant. Our results suggest that CPK3 participates in the regulation of the symbiotic interaction. PMID:17132148

  2. Identification of a molecular dialogue between developing seeds of Medicago truncatula and seedborne xanthomonads.

    PubMed

    Terrasson, Emmanuel; Darrasse, Armelle; Righetti, Karima; Buitink, Julia; Lalanne, David; Ly Vu, Benoit; Pelletier, Sandra; Bolingue, William; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Leprince, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria disseminate and survive mainly in association with seeds. This study addresses whether seeds are passive carriers or engage a molecular dialogue with pathogens during their development. We developed two pathosystems using Medicago truncatula with Xanthomonas alfalfae subsp. alfalfae (Xaa), the natural Medicago sp. pathogen and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a Brassicaceae pathogen. Three days after flower inoculation, the transcriptome of Xcc-infected pods showed activation of an innate immune response that was strongly limited in Xcc mutated in the type three secretion system, demonstrating an incompatible interaction of Xcc with the reproductive structures. In contrast, the presence of Xaa did not result in an activation of defence genes. Transcriptome profiling during development of infected seeds exhibited time-dependent and differential responses to Xcc and Xaa. Gene network analysis revealed that the transcriptome of Xcc-infected seeds was mainly affected during seed filling whereas that of Xaa-infected seeds responded during late maturation. The Xcc-infected seed transcriptome exhibited an activation of defence response and a repression of targeted seed maturation pathways. Fifty-one percent of putative ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 targets were deregulated by Xcc, including oleosin, cupin, legumin and chlorophyll degradation genes. At maturity, these seeds displayed decreased weight and increased chlorophyll content. In contrast, these traits were not affected by Xaa infection. These findings demonstrate the existence of a complex molecular dialogue between xanthomonads and developing seeds and provides insights into a previously unexplored trade-off between seed development and pathogen defence. PMID:25922487

  3. Genetic analysis of calcium spiking responses in nodulation mutants of Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Wais, Rebecca J.; Galera, Christine; Oldroyd, Giles; Catoira, Romy; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas; Gough, Clare; Dénarié, Jean; Long, Sharon R.

    2000-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti results in the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the host plant. The early stages of nodule formation are induced by bacteria via lipochitooligosaccharide signals known as Nod factors (NFs). These NFs are structurally specific for bacterium–host pairs and are sufficient to cause a range of early responses involved in the host developmental program. Early events in the signal transduction of NFs are not well defined. We have previously reported that Medicago sativa root hairs exposed to NF display sharp oscillations of cytoplasmic calcium ion concentration (calcium spiking). To assess the possible role of calcium spiking in the nodulation response, we analyzed M. truncatula mutants in five complementation groups. Each of the plant mutants is completely Nod− and is blocked at early stages of the symbiosis. We defined two genes, DMI1 and DMI2, required in common for early steps of infection and nodulation and for calcium spiking. Another mutant, altered in the DMI3 gene, has a similar mutant phenotype to dmi1 and dmi2 mutants but displays normal calcium spiking. The calcium behavior thus implies that the DMI3 gene acts either downstream of calcium spiking or downstream of a common branch point for the calcium response and the later nodulation responses. Two additional mutants, altered in the NSP and HCL genes, which show root hair branching in response to NF, are normal for calcium spiking. This system provides an opportunity to use genetics to study ligand-stimulated calcium spiking as a signal transduction event. PMID:11078514

  4. The LOB-like transcription factor Mt LBD1 controls Medicago truncatula root architecture under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Federico D; Diet, Anouck; Crespi, Martin; Chan, Raquel L

    2010-12-01

    Lateral root (LR) formation and emergence are influenced by the environment and determines the architecture of the root system in the soil. Whereas auxins appear as the main hormone controlling LR initiation, patterning and emergence, abscisic acid (ABA) is the key hormone mediating the effect of the environment on root architecture. Hormone signaling act through transcription factors (TFs) and the Medicago truncatula LOB-like TF LBD1 was shown to be auxin-inducible but repressed by the HD-Zip I TF MtHB1 in response to salt stress and ABA during LR formation. Here, we demonstrate that the constitutive expression of Mt LBD1 in Medicago roots alters their global architecture when the plant is subjected to salt stress. Hence, LBD1 may control the final form of the root system in the soil environment. PMID:21150260

  5. Genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM1369; an effective microsymbiont of the annual legume Medicago sphaerocarpos

    PubMed Central

    Terpolilli, Jason; Garau, Giovanni; Hill, Yvette; Tian, Rui; Howieson, John; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Ensifer medicae WSM1369 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago. WSM1369 was isolated in 1993 from a nodule recovered from the roots of Medicago sphaerocarpos growing at San Pietro di Rudas, near Aggius in Sardinia (Italy). WSM1369 is an effective microsymbiont of the annual forage legumes M. polymorpha and M. sphaerocarpos. Here we describe the features of E. medicae WSM1369, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,402,557 bp standard draft genome is arranged into 307 scaffolds of 307 contigs containing 6,656 protein-coding genes and 79 RNA-only encoding genes. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:24976897

  6. Genomic and Coexpression Analyses Predict Multiple Genes Involved in Triterpene Saponin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Naoumkina, Marina A.; Modolo, Luzia V.; Huhman, David V.; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Tang, Yuhong; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Saponins, an important group of bioactive plant natural products, are glycosides of triterpenoid or steroidal aglycones (sapogenins). Saponins possess many biological activities, including conferring potential health benefits for humans. However, most of the steps specific for the biosynthesis of triterpene saponins remain uncharacterized at the molecular level. Here, we use comprehensive gene expression clustering analysis to identify candidate genes involved in the elaboration, hydroxylation, and glycosylation of the triterpene skeleton in the model legume Medicago truncatula. Four candidate uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferases were expressed in Escherichia coli, one of which (UGT73F3) showed specificity for multiple sapogenins and was confirmed to glucosylate hederagenin at the C28 position. Genetic loss-of-function studies in M. truncatula confirmed the in vivo function of UGT73F3 in saponin biosynthesis. This report provides a basis for future studies to define genetically the roles of multiple cytochromes P450 and glycosyltransferases in triterpene saponin biosynthesis in Medicago. PMID:20348429

  7. Response of Medicago truncatula Seedlings to Colonization by Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Kaspar, Charles W.; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Disease outbreaks due to the consumption of legume seedlings contaminated with human enteric bacterial pathogens like Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica are reported every year. Besides contaminations occurring during food processing, pathogens present on the surface or interior of plant tissues are also responsible for such outbreaks. In the present study, surface and internal colonization of Medicago truncatula, a close relative of alfalfa, by Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were observed even with inoculum levels as low as two bacteria per plant. Furthermore, expression analyses revealed that approximately 30% of Medicago truncatula genes were commonly regulated in response to both of these enteric pathogens. This study highlights that very low inoculum doses trigger responses from the host plant and that both of these human enteric pathogens may in part use similar mechanisms to colonize legume seedlings. PMID:24551073

  8. Microgravity Effects on the Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael

    2012-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species for th legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early biomolecular events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFU's).

  9. The impact of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots in cells of Medicago sativa in suspension culture

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nanotechnology has the potential to provide agriculture with new tools that may be used in the rapid detection and molecular treatment of diseases and enhancement of plant ability to absorb nutrients, among others. Data on nanoparticle toxicity in plants is largely heterogeneous with a diversity of physicochemical parameters reported, which difficult generalizations. Here a cell biology approach was used to evaluate the impact of Quantum Dots (QDs) nanocrystals on plant cells, including their effect on cell growth, cell viability, oxidative stress and ROS accumulation, besides their cytomobility. Results A plant cell suspension culture of Medicago sativa was settled for the assessment of the impact of the addition of mercaptopropanoic acid coated CdSe/ZnS QDs. Cell growth was significantly reduced when 100 mM of mercaptopropanoic acid -QDs was added during the exponential growth phase, with less than 50% of the cells viable 72 hours after mercaptopropanoic acid -QDs addition. They were up taken by Medicago sativa cells and accumulated in the cytoplasm and nucleus as revealed by optical thin confocal imaging. As part of the cellular response to internalization, Medicago sativa cells were found to increase the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in a dose and time dependent manner. Using the fluorescent dye H2DCFDA it was observable that mercaptopropanoic acid-QDs concentrations between 5-180 nM led to a progressive and linear increase of ROS accumulation. Conclusions Our results showed that the extent of mercaptopropanoic acid coated CdSe/ZnS QDs cytotoxicity in plant cells is dependent upon a number of factors including QDs properties, dose and the environmental conditions of administration and that, for Medicago sativa cells, a safe range of 1-5 nM should not be exceeded for biological applications. PMID:20929583

  10. Effects of simulated acidic rain on yields of Raphanus sativus, Lactuca sativa, Triticum aestivum and Medicago sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Gmur, N.F.; Mancini, D.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine effects of simulated acidic rain on radishes (Raphanus sativus), wheat(Triticum aestivum) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown under greenhouse conditions. Experimental designs allowed the detection of statistically significant differences among means that differed by less than 10%. These results suggest that the efficiency of radish foliage in increasing; root mass decreases with increased rainfall acidity since only foliage was exposed to the treatments.

  11. Sapogenin content variation in Medicago inter-specific hybrid derivatives highlights some aspects of saponin synthesis and control.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Maria; Biazzi, Elisa; Tava, Aldo; Losini, Ilaria; Abbruscato, Pamela; Depedro, Claudia; Scotti, Carla

    2015-04-01

    In the Medicago genus, saponins are a complex mixture of triterpene glycosides showing a broad spectrum of biological properties. Here we analyzed the variation in the sapogenin content and composition of inter-specific hybrid Medicago sativa × Medicago arborea derivatives to highlight the pattern of this variation in plant organs (leaves/roots) and the possible mechanisms underlying it. In Sativa Arborea Cross (SAC) leaves and roots, saponins and sapogenins were evaluated using chromatographic methods. Phenotypic correlations between sapogenin content and bio-agronomic traits were examined. Expression studies on β-amyrin synthase and four cytochromes P450 (CYPs) involved in sapogenin biosynthesis and sequence analysis of the key gene of the hemolytic sapogenin pathway (CYP716A12) were performed. Chromatographic analyses revealed a different pattern of among-family variation for hemolytic and nonhemolytic sapogenins and saponins and for the two organs/tissues. Different correlation patterns of gene expression in roots and leaves were found. Diachronic analysis revealed a relationship between sapogenin content and gene transcriptional levels in the early stages of the productive cycle. The results suggest that there are different control mechanisms acting on sapogenin biosynthesis for leaves and roots, which are discussed. A key role for medicagenic acid in the control of sapogenin content in both the tissues is proposed and discussed. PMID:25406544

  12. A sequence-based genetic map of Medicago truncatula and comparison of marker colinearity with M. sativa.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Dongjin; Uhm, Taesik; Limpens, Eric; Lim, Hyunju; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Kalo, Peter; Penmetsa, R Varma; Seres, Andrea; Kulikova, Olga; Roe, Bruce A; Bisseling, Ton; Kiss, Gyorgy B; Cook, Douglas R

    2004-01-01

    A core genetic map of the legume Medicago truncatula has been established by analyzing the segregation of 288 sequence-characterized genetic markers in an F(2) population composed of 93 individuals. These molecular markers correspond to 141 ESTs, 80 BAC end sequence tags, and 67 resistance gene analogs, covering 513 cM. In the case of EST-based markers we used an intron-targeted marker strategy with primers designed to anneal in conserved exon regions and to amplify across intron regions. Polymorphisms were significantly more frequent in intron vs. exon regions, thus providing an efficient mechanism to map transcribed genes. Genetic and cytogenetic analysis produced eight well-resolved linkage groups, which have been previously correlated with eight chromosomes by means of FISH with mapped BAC clones. We anticipated that mapping of conserved coding regions would have utility for comparative mapping among legumes; thus 60 of the EST-based primer pairs were designed to amplify orthologous sequences across a range of legume species. As an initial test of this strategy, we used primers designed against M. truncatula exon sequences to rapidly map genes in M. sativa. The resulting comparative map, which includes 68 bridging markers, indicates that the two Medicago genomes are highly similar and establishes the basis for a Medicago composite map. PMID:15082563

  13. Alternative oxidase pathway is involved in the exogenous SNP-elevated tolerance of Medicago truncatula to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wei; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Shuo-Xun; Pu, Xiao-Jun; Deng, Xing-Guang; Luo, Shi-Shuai; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-04-01

    Exogenous application of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) would enhance the tolerance of plants to stress conditions. Some evidences suggested that nitric oxide (NO) could induce the expression of alternative oxidase (AOX). In this study, Medicago truncatula (Medicago) was chosen to study the role of AOX in the SNP-elevated resistance to salt stress. Our results showed that the expression of AOX genes (especially AOX1 and AOX2b1) and cyanide-resistant respiration rate (Valt) could be significantly induced by salt stress. Exogenous application of SNP could further enhance the expression of AOX genes and Valt. Exogenous application of SNP could alleviate the oxidative damage and photosynthetic damage caused by salt stress. However, the stress resistance was significantly decreased in the plants which were pretreated with n-propyl gallate (nPG). More importantly, the damage in nPG-pretreated plants could not be alleviated by application of SNP. Further study showed that effects of nPG on the activities of antioxidant enzymes were minor. These results showed that AOX pathway played an important role in the SNP-elevated resistance of Medicago to salt stress. AOX could contribute to regulating the accumulation of reactive oxygen (ROS) and protect of photosystem, and we proposed that all these were depend on the ability of maintaining the homeostasis of redox state. PMID:26962709

  14. Evolution by gene duplication of Medicago truncatula PISTILLATA-like transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Roque, Edelín; Fares, Mario A; Yenush, Lynne; Rochina, Mari Cruz; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Gómez-Mena, Concepción; Beltrán, José Pío; Cañas, Luis A

    2016-04-01

    PISTILLATA (PI) is a member of the B-function MADS-box gene family, which controls the identity of both petals and stamens in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Medicago truncatula (Mt), there are two PI-like paralogs, known as MtPI and MtNGL9. These genes differ in their expression patterns, but it is not known whether their functions have also diverged. Describing the evolution of certain duplicated genes, such as transcription factors, remains a challenge owing to the complex expression patterns and functional divergence between the gene copies. Here, we report a number of functional studies, including analyses of gene expression, protein-protein interactions, and reverse genetic approaches designed to demonstrate the respective contributions of each M. truncatula PI-like paralog to the B-function in this species. Also, we have integrated molecular evolution approaches to determine the mode of evolution of Mt PI-like genes after duplication. Our results demonstrate that MtPI functions as a master regulator of B-function in M. truncatula, maintaining the overall ancestral function, while MtNGL9 does not seem to have a role in this regard, suggesting that the pseudogenization could be the functional evolutionary fate for this gene. However, we provide evidence that purifying selection is the primary evolutionary force acting on this paralog, pinpointing the conservation of its biochemical function and, alternatively, the acquisition of a new role for this gene. PMID:26773809

  15. Adaptation to climate through flowering phenology: a case study in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Burgarella, Concetta; Chantret, Nathalie; Gay, Laurène; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Bonhomme, Maxime; Tiffin, Peter; Young, Nevin D; Ronfort, Joelle

    2016-07-01

    Local climatic conditions likely constitute an important selective pressure on genes underlying important fitness-related traits such as flowering time, and in many species, flowering phenology and climatic gradients strongly covary. To test whether climate shapes the genetic variation on flowering time genes and to identify candidate flowering genes involved in the adaptation to environmental heterogeneity, we used a large Medicago truncatula core collection to examine the association between nucleotide polymorphisms at 224 candidate genes and both climate variables and flowering phenotypes. Unlike genome-wide studies, candidate gene approaches are expected to enrich for the number of meaningful trait associations because they specifically target genes that are known to affect the trait of interest. We found that flowering time mediates adaptation to climatic conditions mainly by variation at genes located upstream in the flowering pathways, close to the environmental stimuli. Variables related to the annual precipitation regime reflected selective constraints on flowering time genes better than the other variables tested (temperature, altitude, latitude or longitude). By comparing phenotype and climate associations, we identified 12 flowering genes as the most promising candidates responsible for phenological adaptation to climate. Four of these genes were located in the known flowering time QTL region on chromosome 7. However, climate and flowering associations also highlighted largely distinct gene sets, suggesting different genetic architectures for adaptation to climate and flowering onset. PMID:27144929

  16. Expression Analysis of PIN Genes in Root Tips and Nodules of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Sańko-Sawczenko, Izabela; Łotocka, Barbara; Czarnocka, Weronika

    2016-01-01

    Polar auxin transport is dependent on the family of PIN-formed proteins (PINs), which are membrane transporters of anionic indole-3-acetic acid (IAA(-)). It is assumed that polar auxin transport may be essential in the development and meristematic activity maintenance of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) root nodules. However, little is known about the involvement of specific PIN proteins in M. truncatula nodulation. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we analyzed the expression patterns of all previously identified MtPIN genes and compared them between root nodules and root tips of M. truncatula. Our results demonstrated significant differences in the expression level of all 11 genes (MtPIN1-MtPIN11) between examined organs. Interestingly, MtPIN9 was the only PIN gene with higher expression level in root nodules compared to root tips. This result is the first indication of PIN9 transporter potential involvement in M. truncatula nodulation. Moreover, relatively high expression level in root nodules was attributed to MtPINs encoding orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana PIN5 subclade. PIN proteins from this subclade have been found to localize in the endoplasmic reticulum, which may indicate that the development and meristematic activity maintenance of M. truncatula root nodules is associated with intracellular homeostasis of auxins level and their metabolism in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:27463709

  17. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuelo, Iker

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N2 fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N2-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were carried out. It is shown that the inhibition of nitrogenase activity caused by water restriction was accompanied by concerted alterations in metabolic pathways in nodules, leaves, and roots. The data suggest that nodule metabolism and metabolic exchange between plant organs nearly reached homeostasis in asparagine synthesis and partitioning, as well as the N demand from leaves. Typically, there was (i) a stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway to sustain the provision of C skeletons for amino acid (e.g. glutamate and proline) synthesis; (ii) re-allocation of glycolytic products to alanine and serine/glycine; and (iii) subtle changes in redox metabolites suggesting the implication of a slight oxidative stress. Furthermore, water restriction caused little change in both photosynthetic efficiency and respiratory cost of N2 fixation by nodules. In other words, the results suggest that under water stress, nodule metabolism follows a compromise between physiological imperatives (N demand, oxidative stress) and the lower input to sustain catabolism. PMID:23440170

  18. Medicago truncatula Mtha1-2 mutants loose metabolic responses to mycorrhizal colonization.

    PubMed

    Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Sieh, Daniela; Zöller, Daniela; Hoefgen, Rainer; Krajinski, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    Bidirectional nutrient transfer is one of the key features of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Recently we were able to identify a Medicago truncatula mutant (mtha1-2) that is defective in the uptake of phosphate from the periarbuscular space due to a lack of the energy providing proton gradient provided by the symbiosis specific proton ATPase MtHA1 In order to further characterize the impact of fungal colonization on the plant metabolic status, without the beneficial aspect of improved mineral nutrition, we performed leaf ion analyses in mutant and wildtype plants with and without fungal colonization. Although frequency of fungal colonization was unaltered, the mutant did not show a positive growth response to mycorrhizal colonization. This indicates that nutrient transfer into the plant cell fails in the truncated arbuscules due to lacking expression of a functional MtHA1 protein. The leaves of wildtype plants showed clear metabolic responses to root mycorrhizal colonization, whereas no changes of leaf metabolite levels of mycorrhizal mtha1-2 plants were detected, even though they were colonized. These results show that MtHa1 is indispensable for a functional mycorrhizal symbiosis and, moreover, suggest that fungal root colonization per se does not depend on nutrient transfer to the plant host. PMID:25751449

  19. Crystal Structures of a Multifunctional Triterpene/Flavonoid Glycosyltransferase from Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hui; He, Xianzhi; Achnine, Lahoucine; Blount, Jack W.; Dixon, Richard A.; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2005-01-01

    Glycosylation is a ubiquitous reaction controlling the bioactivity and storage of plant natural products. Glycosylation of small molecules is catalyzed by a superfamily of glycosyltransferases (GTs) in most plant species studied to date. We present crystal structures of the UDP flavonoid/triterpene GT UGT71G1 from Medicago truncatula bound to UDP or UDP-glucose. The structures reveal the key residues involved in the recognition of donor substrate and, by comparison with other GT structures, suggest His-22 as the catalytic base and Asp-121 as a key residue that may assist deprotonation of the acceptor by forming an electron transfer chain with the catalytic base. Mutagenesis confirmed the roles of these key residues in donor substrate binding and enzyme activity. Our results provide an initial structural basis for understanding the complex substrate specificity and regiospecificity underlying the glycosylation of plant natural products and other small molecules. This information will direct future attempts to engineer bioactive compounds in crop plants to improve plant, animal, and human health and to facilitate the rational design of GTs to improve the storage and stability of novel engineered bioactive compounds. PMID:16214900

  20. Genome-wide identification and characterization of the Dof gene family in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Shu, Y J; Song, L L; Zhang, J; Liu, Y; Guo, C H

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding one zinc finger (Dof) family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family, which is involved in many important processes, including seed maturation and germination, plant growth and development, and light responses. Investigation of the Medicago truncatula genome revealed 42 putative Dof genes, each of which holds one Dof domain. These genes were classified into four groups based on phylogenetic analysis, which are similar to the groups reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Based on genome duplication analysis, it was found that the MtDof genes were distributed on all chromosomes and had expanded through tandem gene duplication and segmental duplication events. Two main duplication regions were identified, one from tandem duplication and another from segmental duplication. By analyzing high-throughput sequencing data from M. truncatula, we found that most of the MtDof genes showed specific expression patterns in different tissues. According to cis-regulatory element analysis, these MtDof genes are regulated by different cis-acting motifs, which are important for the functional divergence of the MtDof genes in different processes. Thus, using genome-wide identification, evolution, and expression pattern analysis of the Dof genes in M. truncatula, our study provides valuable information for understanding the potential function of the Dof genes in regulating the growth and development of M. truncatula. PMID:26400295

  1. Mixed Nodule Infection in Sinorhizobium meliloti–Medicago sativa Symbiosis Suggest the Presence of Cheating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Checcucci, Alice; Azzarello, Elisa; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Galardini, Marco; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Mancuso, Stefano; Marti, Lucia; Marzano, Maria C.; Mocali, Stefano; Squartini, Andrea; Zanardo, Marina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    In the symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes, host plants can form symbiotic root nodules with multiple rhizobial strains, potentially showing different symbiotic performances in nitrogen fixation. Here, we investigated the presence of mixed nodules, containing rhizobia with different degrees of mutualisms, and evaluate their relative fitness in the Sinorhizobium meliloti–Medicago sativa model symbiosis. We used three S. meliloti strains, the mutualist strains Rm1021 and BL225C and the non-mutualist AK83. We performed competition experiments involving both in vitro and in vivo symbiotic assays with M. sativa host plants. We show the occurrence of a high number (from 27 to 100%) of mixed nodules with no negative effect on both nitrogen fixation and plant growth. The estimation of the relative fitness as non-mutualist/mutualist ratios in single nodules shows that in some nodules the non-mutualist strain efficiently colonized root nodules along with the mutualist ones. In conclusion, we can support the hypothesis that in S. meliloti–M. sativa symbiosis mixed nodules are formed and allow non-mutualist or less-mutualist bacterial partners to be less or not sanctioned by the host plant, hence allowing a potential form of cheating behavior to be present in the nitrogen fixing symbiosis. PMID:27379128

  2. Molecular Signals Controlling the Inhibition of Nodulation by Nitrate in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    van Noorden, Giel E.; Verbeek, Rob; Dinh, Quy Dung; Jin, Jian; Green, Alexandra; Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula roots after treatment with either 0 or 2.5 mM nitrate in the presence or absence of its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti after 1, 2 and 5 days following inoculation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to identify 106 differentially accumulated proteins responding to nitrate addition, inoculation or time point. While flavonoid-related proteins were less abundant in the presence of nitrate, addition of Nod gene-inducing flavonoids to the Sinorhizobium culture did not rescue nodulation. Accumulation of auxin in response to rhizobia, which is also controlled by flavonoids, still occurred in the presence of nitrate, but did not localize to a nodule initiation site. Several of the changes included defense- and redox-related proteins, and visualization of reactive oxygen species indicated that their induction in root hairs following Sinorhizobium inoculation was inhibited by nitrate. In summary, the presence of nitrate appears to inhibit nodulation via multiple pathways, including changes to flavonoid metabolism, defense responses and redox changes. PMID:27384556

  3. MicroRNA166 controls root and nodule development in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Boualem, Adnane; Laporte, Philippe; Jovanovic, Mariana; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Combier, Jean-Philippe; Niebel, Andreas; Crespi, Martin; Frugier, Florian

    2008-06-01

    Legume root architecture is characterized by the development of two de novo meristems, leading to the formation of lateral roots or symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules. Organogenesis involves networks of transcription factors, the encoding mRNAs of which are frequently targets of microRNA (miRNA) regulation. Most plant miRNAs, in contrast with animal miRNAs, are encoded as single entities in an miRNA precursor. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, we have identified the MtMIR166a precursor containing tandem copies of MIR166 in a single transcriptional unit. These miRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate a new family of transcription factors associated with nodule development, the class-III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP III) genes. In situ expression analysis revealed that these target genes are spatially co-expressed with MIR166 in vascular bundles, and in apical regions of roots and nodules. Overexpression of the tandem miRNA precursor correlated with MIR166 accumulation and the downregulation of several class-III HD-ZIP genes, indicating its functionality. MIR166 overexpression reduced the number of symbiotic nodules and lateral roots, and induced ectopic development of vascular bundles in these transgenic roots. Hence, plant polycistronic miRNA precursors, although rare, can be processed, and MIR166-mediated post-transcriptional regulation is a new regulatory pathway involved in the regulation of legume root architecture. PMID:18298674

  4. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control. PMID:22325887

  5. Nodule and Leaf Nitrate Reductases and Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago sativa L. under Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio-Tejo, P.; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel

    1982-01-01

    The effect of water stress on patterns of nitrate reductase activity in the leaves and nodules and on nitrogen fixation were investigated in Medicago sativa L. plants watered 1 week before drought with or without NO3−. Nitrogen fixation was decreased by water stress and also inhibited strongly by the presence of NO3−. During drought, leaf nitrate reductase activity (NRA) decreased significantly particularly in plants watered with NO3−, while with rewatering, leaf NRA recovery was quite important especially in the NO3−-watered plants. As water stress progressed, the nodular NRA increased both in plants watered with NO3− and in those without NO3− contrary to the behavior of the leaves. Beyond −15.105 pascal, nodular NRA began to decrease in plants watered with NO3−. This phenomenon was not observed in nodules of plants given water only. Upon rewatering, it was observed that in plants watered with NO3− the nodular NRA increased again, while in plants watered but not given NO3−, such activity began to decrease. Nitrogen fixation increased only in plants without NO3−. PMID:16662233

  6. Association Mapping for Fiber-Related Traits and Digestibility in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zan; Qiang, Haiping; Zhao, Haiming; Xu, Ruixuan; Zhang, Zhengli; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin; Liu, Guibo; Zhang, Yingjun

    2016-01-01

    Association mapping is a powerful approach for exploring the molecular genetic basis of complex quantitative traits. An alfalfa (Medicago sativa) association panel comprised of 336 genotypes from 75 alfalfa accessions represented by four to eight genotypes for each accession. Each genotype was genotyped using 85 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and phenotyped for five fiber-related traits in four different environments. A model-based structure analysis was used to group all genotypes into two groups. Most of the genotypes have a low relative kinship (<0.3), suggesting population stratification not be an issue for association analysis. Generally, the Q + K model exhibited the best performance to eliminate the false associated positives. In total, 124 marker-trait associations were predicted (p < 0.005). Among these, eight associations were predicted in two environments repeatedly and 20 markers were predicted to be associated with multiple traits. These trait-associated markers will greatly help marker-assisted breeding programs to improve fiber-related quality traits in alfalfa. PMID:27047512

  7. Ractopamine up take by alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) from soil.

    PubMed

    Shelver, Weilin L; DeSutter, Thomas M

    2015-08-01

    Ractopamine is a beta adrenergic agonist used as a growth promoter in swine, cattle and turkeys. To test whether ractopamine has the potential to accumulate in plants grown in contaminated soil, a greenhouse study was conducted with alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) grown in two soils having different concentrations of organic matter (1.3% and 2.1%), amended with 0, 0.5, and 10 μg/g of ractopamine. Plant growth ranged from 2.7 to 8.8 g dry weight (dw) for alfalfa, and 8.7 to 40 g dw for wheat and was generally greater in the higher organic matter content soil. The uptake of ractopamine in plant tissues ranged from non-detectable to 897 ng/g and was strongly dependent on soil ractopamine concentration across soil and plant tissue. When adjusted to the total fortified quantities, the amount of ractopamine taken up by the plant tissue was low, <0.01% for either soil. PMID:26257350

  8. Water transfer in an alfalfa/maize association. [Medicago sativa; Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Corak, S.J.; Blevins, D.G.; Pallardy, S.G.

    1987-07-01

    The authors investigated the possibility of interspecific water transfer in an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) association. An alfalfa plant was grown through two vertically stacked plastic tubes. A 5 centimeter air gap between tubes was bridged by alfalfa roots. Five-week old maize plants with roots confined to the top tube were not watered, while associated alfalfa roots had free access to water in the bottom tube (the -/+ treatment). Additional treatments included: top and bottom tubes watered (+/+), top and bottom tubes droughted (-/-), and top tube droughted after removal of alfalfa root bridges and routine removal of alfalfa tillers (-*). Predawn leaf water potential of maize in the -/+ treatment fell to -1.5 megapascals 13 days after the start of drought; thereafter, predawn and midday potentials were maintained near -1.9 megapascals. Leaf water potentials of maize in the -/- and -* treatments declined steadily; all plants in these treatments were completely desiccated before day 50. High levels of tritium activity were detected in water extracted from both alfalfa and maize leaves after /sup 3/H/sub 2/O was injected into the bottom -/+ tube at day 70 or later. Maize in the -/+ treatment was able to survive an otherwise lethal period of drought by utilizing water lost by alfalfa roots.

  9. Photosynthate partitioning and nitrogen fixation of alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil. [Lotus corniculatus L. ; Medicago sativa L

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Nodule mass and number are usually correlated with rates of nitrogen fixation in legumes. Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) with more than twice the nodule number and mass, however, fixes far less nitrogen than alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) at the same age. In this research, photosynthesis and photosynthate partitioning and utilization in relation to nitrogen fixation of alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil were examined in order to determine their relationship to nitrogen fixation potential. Photosynthate to nodules was studied using /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ labeling techniques. Partitioning patterns were altered by shading and dark depletion treatments. Efficiency of photosynthate utilization was examined by determining turnover of /sup 14/C photosynthate in nodule metabolites and by studying rates of cyanide-resistant and cyanide-sensitive O/sub 2/ uptake. Alfalfa nodule activity was greater than trefoil expressed on a hole pot or nodule dry weight basis. Both shading and dark treatments significantly reduced nodule activity as estimated by the acetylene reduction assay. Shoots of both species were found to be the dominant sinks for photosynthate. Percentage /sup 14/C recovered in alfalfa roots was more than twice that of trefoil at 1,2,3,4 and 24 h after labeling. Greater relative specific radioactivity (RSA) in nodules of both species suggests that they were stronger sinks for current photosynthate than roots.

  10. Identification and expression analysis of multiple FRO gene copies in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Del C Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma; Santoyo, G; Farías-Rodríguez, R; Macías-Rodríguez, L; Valencia-Cantero, E

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant growth. Commonly, this element is found in an oxidized form in soil, which is poorly available for plants. Therefore, plants have evolved ferric-chelate reductase enzymes (FRO) to reduce iron into a more soluble ferrous form. Fe scarcity in plants induce the FRO enzyme activity. Although the legume Medicago truncatula has been employed as a model for FRO activity studies, only one copy of the M. truncatula MtFRO1 gene has been characterized so far. In this study, we identified multiple gene copies of the MtFRO gene in the genome of M. truncatula by an in silico search, using BLAST analysis in the database of the M. truncatula Genome Sequencing Project and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and also determined whether they are functional. We identified five genes apart from MtFRO1, which had been already characterized. All of the MtFRO genes exhibited high identity with homologous FRO genes from Lycopersicon esculentum, Citrus junos and Arabidopsis thaliana. The gene copies also presented characteristic conserved FAD and NADPH motifs, transmembrane regions and oxidoreductase signature motifs. We also detected expression in five of the putative MtFRO sequences by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis, performed with mRNA from root and shoot tissues. Iron scarcity might be a condition for an elevated expression of the MtFRO genes observed in different M. truncatula tissues. PMID:23096909

  11. Molecular Signals Controlling the Inhibition of Nodulation by Nitrate in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    van Noorden, Giel E; Verbeek, Rob; Dinh, Quy Dung; Jin, Jian; Green, Alexandra; Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula roots after treatment with either 0 or 2.5 mM nitrate in the presence or absence of its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti after 1, 2 and 5 days following inoculation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to identify 106 differentially accumulated proteins responding to nitrate addition, inoculation or time point. While flavonoid-related proteins were less abundant in the presence of nitrate, addition of Nod gene-inducing flavonoids to the Sinorhizobium culture did not rescue nodulation. Accumulation of auxin in response to rhizobia, which is also controlled by flavonoids, still occurred in the presence of nitrate, but did not localize to a nodule initiation site. Several of the changes included defense- and redox-related proteins, and visualization of reactive oxygen species indicated that their induction in root hairs following Sinorhizobium inoculation was inhibited by nitrate. In summary, the presence of nitrate appears to inhibit nodulation via multiple pathways, including changes to flavonoid metabolism, defense responses and redox changes. PMID:27384556

  12. Micromonospora from nitrogen fixing nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). A new promising Plant Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación; Igual, José M.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio

    2014-01-01

    Biotic interactions can improve agricultural productivity without costly and environmentally challenging inputs. Micromonospora strains have recently been reported as natural endophytes of legume nodules but their significance for plant development and productivity has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity and function of Micromonospora isolated from Medicago sativa root nodules. Micromonospora-like strains from field alfalfa nodules were characterized by BOX-PCR fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The ecological role of the interaction of the 15 selected representative Micromonospora strains was tested in M. sativa. Nodulation, plant growth and nutrition parameters were analyzed. Alfalfa nodules naturally contain abundant and highly diverse populations of Micromonospora, both at the intra- and at interspecific level. Selected Micromonospora isolates significantly increase the nodulation of alfalfa by Ensifer meliloti 1021 and also the efficiency of the plant for nitrogen nutrition. Moreover, they promote aerial growth, the shoot-to-root ratio, and raise the level of essential nutrients. Our results indicate that Micromonospora acts as a Rhizobia Helper Bacteria (RHB) agent and has probiotic effects, promoting plant growth and increasing nutrition efficiency. Its ecological role, biotechnological potential and advantages as a plant probiotic bacterium (PPB) are also discussed. PMID:25227415

  13. Stoichiometric Characteristics of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus in Leaves of Differently Aged Lucerne (Medicago sativa) Stands

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhennan; Lu, Jiaoyun; Yang, Mei; Yang, Huimin; Zhang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Element concentration within a plant which is vital to function maintenance and adaptation to environment, may change with plant growth. However, how carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) vary stoichiometrically with stand growth, i.e., ages or cuts, was still untouched in perennial species. This study tested the hypothesis that lucerne (Medicago sativa) C:N, C:P, and N:P should change with stand age and cut. Leaf C:N, C:P, and N:P changed with stand age, showing various trends in different cuts of lucerne. Generally the greatest stoichiometric ratios were measured in 8 year stand and in the second cut. They were affected significantly and negatively by total N and P concentrations of leaf, but not by organic C concentration. There were significantly positive correlations among leaf C:N, C:P, and N:P. However, leaf C:N, C:P, and N:P were hardly affected by soil features. Conclusively, lucerne C, N, and P stoichiometry are age- and cut-specific, and regulated mainly by leaf N, P concentrations and stoichiometry. There are few correlations with soil fertility. To our knowledge, it is the first try to elucidate the stoichiometry in the viewpoint of age and cut with a perennial herbaceous legume. PMID:26697029

  14. Complete genome sequence of the Medicago microsymbiont Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) medicae strain WSM419

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Wayne; Chain, Patrick S. G.; O'Hara, Graham; Ardley, Julie; Nandesena, Kemanthi; Brau, Lambert; Tiwari, Ravi; Malfatti, Stephanie; Kiss, Hajnalka; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Gollagher, Margaret; Yates, Ron; Dilworth, Michael; Howieson, John

    2010-01-01

    Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) medicae is an effective nitrogen fixing microsymbiont of a diverse range of annual Medicago (medic) species. Strain WSM419 is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod isolated from a M. murex root nodule collected in Sardinia, Italy in 1981. WSM419 was manufactured commercially in Australia as an inoculant for annual medics during 1985 to 1993 due to its nitrogen fixation, saprophytic competence and acid tolerance properties. Here we describe the basic features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report of a complete genome sequence for a microsymbiont of the group of annual medic species adapted to acid soils. We reveal that its genome size is 6,817,576 bp encoding 6,518 protein-coding genes and 81 RNA only encoding genes. The genome contains a chromosome of size 3,781,904 bp and 3 plasmids of size 1,570,951 bp, 1,245,408 bp and 219,313 bp. The smallest plasmid is a feature unique to this medic microsymbiont.

  15. Accumulation and residue of napropamide in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and soil involved in toxic response.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li E; Yang, Hong

    2011-06-15

    Napropamide belongs to the amide herbicide family and widely used to control weeds in farmland. Intensive use of the herbicide has resulted in widespread contamination to ecosystems. The present study demonstrated an analysis on accumulation of the toxic pesticide napropamide in six genotypes of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), along with biological parameters and its residues in soils. Soil was treated with napropamide at 3 mg kg(-1) dry soil and alfalfa plants were cultured for 10 or 30 d, respectively. The maximum value for napropamide accumulation is 0.426 mg kg(-1) in shoots and 2.444 mg kg(-1) in roots. The napropamide-contaminated soil with alfalfa cultivation had much lower napropamide concentrations than the control (soil without alfalfa cultivation). Also, the content of napropamide residue in the rhizosphere was significantly lower than that in the non-rhizosphere soil. M. sativa exposed to 3 mg kg(-1) napropamide showed inhibited growth. Further analysis revealed that plants treated with napropamide accumulated more reactive oxygen species (O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2)) and less amounts of chlorophyll. However, not all cultivars showed oxidative injury, suggesting that the alfalfa cultivars display different tolerance to napropamide. PMID:21439724

  16. Characterization of a novel Medicago sativa NAC transcription factor gene involved in response to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Xin

    2013-11-01

    Relying on the regulation of transcription factors, plants resist to various abiotic and biotic stresses. NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2, CUC2) are one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors and known to play important roles in plant development and response to environmental stresses. A new NAC gene was cloned on the basis of 503 bp EST fragment from the SSH cDNA library of Medicago sativa. It was 1,115 bp including an 816 bp ORF and encodes 271 amino acids. A highly conserved region is located from the 7th amino acid to the 315th amino acid in its N-terminal domain. The NAC protein is subcellularly localized in the nucleus of onion epidemical cells and possible functions as a transcription factor. The relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed at different stress time. The results revealed that the transcription expression of NAC gene could be induced by drought, high salinity and ABA. The transgenic Arabidopsis with NAC gene has the drought tolerance better than the wild-type. PMID:24057250

  17. The Effects of Clinorotation on the Host Plant, Medicago truncatula, and Its Microbial Symbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauzart, Ariel; Vandenbrink, Joshua; Kiss, John

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the outcome of the plant-microbe symbiosis in altered gravity is vital to developing life support systems for long-distance space travel and colonization of other planets. Thus, the aim of this research was to understand mutualistic relationships between plants and endophytic microbes under the influence of altered gravity. This project utilized the model tripartite relationship among Medicago truncatula ¬– Sinorhizobium meliloti – Rhizophagus irregularis. Plants were inoculated with rhizobial bacteria (S. meliloti), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (R. irregularis), or both microbes, and placed on a rotating clinostat. Vertical and horizontal static controls were also performed. Clinorotation significantly reduced M. truncatula dry mass and fresh mass compared to the static controls. The addition of rhizobia treatments under clinorotation also altered total root length and root-to-shoot fresh mass ratio. Nodule size decreased under rhizobia + clinorotation treatment, and nodule density was significantly decreased compared to the vertical treatment. However, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was shown to increase biomass accumulation and nodule size. Thus, clinorotation significantly affected M. truncatula and its symbiotic relationships with S. meliloti and R. irregularis. In the long term, the results observed in this clinostat study on the changes of plant-microbe mutualism need to be investigated in spaceflight experiments. Thus, careful consideration of the symbiotic microbes of plants should be included in the design of bioregenerative life support systems needed for space travel.

  18. Cotyledon damage affects seed number through final plant size in the annual grassland species Medicago lupulina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiting; Zhao, Chuan; Lamb, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The effects of cotyledon damage on seedling growth and survival are relatively well established, but little is known about the effects on aspects of plant fitness such as seed number and size. Here the direct and indirect mechanisms linking cotyledon damage and plant fitness in the annual species Medicago lupulina are examined. Methods Growth and reproductive traits, including mature plant size, time to first flowering, flower number, seed number and individual seed mass were monitored in M. lupulina plants when zero, one or two cotyledons were removed at 7 d old. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to examine the mechanisms linking cotyledon damage to seed number and seed mass. Key Results Cotyledon damage reduced seed number but not individual seed mass. The primary mechanism was a reduction in plant biomass with cotyledon damage that in turn reduced seed number primarily through a reduction in flower numbers. Although cotyledon damage delayed flower initiation, it had little effect on seed number. Individual seed mass was not affected by cotyledon removal, but there was a trade-off between seed number and seed mass. Conclusions It is shown how a network of indirect mechanisms link damage to cotyledons and fitness in M. lupulina. Cotyledon damage had strong direct effects on both plant size and flowering phenology, but an analysis of the causal relationships among plant traits and fitness components showed that a reduction in plant size associated with cotyledon damage was an important mechanism influencing fitness. PMID:21196450

  19. Association Mapping for Fiber-Related Traits and Digestibility in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zan; Qiang, Haiping; Zhao, Haiming; Xu, Ruixuan; Zhang, Zhengli; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin; Liu, Guibo; Zhang, Yingjun

    2016-01-01

    Association mapping is a powerful approach for exploring the molecular genetic basis of complex quantitative traits. An alfalfa (Medicago sativa) association panel comprised of 336 genotypes from 75 alfalfa accessions represented by four to eight genotypes for each accession. Each genotype was genotyped using 85 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and phenotyped for five fiber-related traits in four different environments. A model-based structure analysis was used to group all genotypes into two groups. Most of the genotypes have a low relative kinship (<0.3), suggesting population stratification not be an issue for association analysis. Generally, the Q + K model exhibited the best performance to eliminate the false associated positives. In total, 124 marker-trait associations were predicted (p < 0.005). Among these, eight associations were predicted in two environments repeatedly and 20 markers were predicted to be associated with multiple traits. These trait-associated markers will greatly help marker-assisted breeding programs to improve fiber-related quality traits in alfalfa. PMID:27047512

  20. Nod Factor Elicits Two Separable Calcium Responses in Medicago truncatula Root Hair Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Sidney L.; Long, Sharon R.

    2003-01-01

    Modulation of intracellular calcium levels plays a key role in the transduction of many biological signals. Here, we characterize early calcium responses of wild-type and mutant Medicago truncatula plants to nodulation factors produced by the bacterial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti using a dual-dye ratiometric imaging technique. When presented with 1 nm Nod factor, root hair cells exhibited only the previously described calcium spiking response initiating 10 min after application. Nod factor (10 nm) elicited an immediate increase in calcium levels that was temporally earlier and spatially distinct from calcium spikes occurring later in the same cell. Nod factor analogs that were structurally related, applied at 10 nm, failed to initiate this calcium flux response. Cells induced to spike with low Nod factor concentrations show a calcium flux response when Nod factor is raised from 1 to 10 nm. Plant mutants previously shown to be deficient for the calcium spiking response (dmi1 and dmi2) exhibited an immediate, truncated calcium flux with 10 nm Nod factor, demonstrating a competence to respond to Nod factor but an impaired ability to generate a full biphasic response. These results demonstrate that the legume root hair cell exhibits two independent calcium responses to Nod factor triggered at different agonist concentrations and suggests an early branch point in the Nod factor signal transduction pathway. PMID:12644650

  1. Caesium inhibits the colonization of Medicago truncatula by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Wiesel, Lea; Dubchak, Sergiy; Turnau, Katarzyna; Broadley, Martin R; White, Philip J

    2015-03-01

    Contamination of soils with radioisotopes of caesium (Cs) is of concern because of their emissions of harmful β and γ radiation. Radiocaesium enters the food chain through vegetation and the intake of Cs can affect the health of organisms. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form mutualistic symbioses with plants through colonization of the roots and previous studies on the influence of AM on Cs concentrations in plants have given inconsistent results. These studies did not investigate the influence of Cs on AM fungi and it is therefore not known if Cs has a direct effect on AM colonization. Here, we investigated whether Cs influences AM colonization and if this effect impacts on the influence of Rhizophagus intraradices on Cs accumulation by Medicago truncatula. M. truncatula was grown with or without R. intraradices in pots containing different concentrations of Cs. Here, we present the first evidence that colonization of plants by AM fungi can be negatively affected by increasing Cs concentrations in the soil. Mycorrhizal colonization had little effect on root or shoot Cs concentrations. In conclusion, the colonization by AM fungi is impaired by high Cs concentrations and this direct effect of soil Cs on AM colonization might explain the inconsistent results reported in literature that have shown increased, decreased or unaffected Cs concentrations in AM plants. PMID:25540940

  2. Early somatic embryo induction events in alfalfa callus cultures. [Medicago sativa

    SciTech Connect

    El-Bakry, A.A.; Hildebrand, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    High and low regenerating alfalfa Medicago sativa L. cv Regen S full sibs were isolated from a callus culture screen on modified Blaydes medium. The average number of embryos per ovary were thirty and zero for the high and low genotypes respectively after six weeks in culture. Proembryonic cell masses (4-8 celled) were observed after 4-5 days in culture and maximum meristematic activity was at 6-7 days in culture, for the high regenerating genotypes. Well formed globular embryos, both epidermal and subepidermal in origin, were observed after 2 weeks is culture. Samples in culture for 3, 6 and 14 days from the high and low regenerating genotypes were radiolabeled in vivo with /sup 35/S-methionine and run both on one and two dimension gels. The results will be discussed in relation to differences in proteins between the high and low regenerating genotypes at the stage of maximum meristematic activity (day 6) and differences occurring relative to the appearance of globular stage embryos (day 14) will be presented.

  3. Asymmetric somatic hybrid plants between Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa, lucerne) and Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. (sainfoin).

    PubMed

    Li, Y G; Tanner, G J; Delves, A C; Larkin, P J

    1993-12-01

    This paper reports on the production of intergeneric somatic hybrid plants between two sexually incompatible legume species. Medicago sativa (alfalfa, lucerne) leaf protoplasts were inactivated by lethal doses of iodoacetamide. Onobrychis viciifolia (sainfoin) suspension-cell protoplasts were gamma-irradiated at lethal doses. Following electrofusion under optimized conditions about 50,000 viable heterokaryons were produced in each test. The fusion products were cultured with the help of alfalfa nurse protoplasts. Functional complementation permitted only the heterokaryons to survive. A total of 706 putative heterokaryon-derived plantlets were regenerated and 570 survived transplantation to soil. Experimentation was aimed at the introduction of proanthocyanidins (condensed tannins) from sainfoin, a bloat-safe plant, to alfalfa, a bloat-causing forage crop; however, no tannin-positive regenerant plants were detected. Most regenerant plants have shown morphological differences from the fusion parents, although, as expected, all resembled the "recipient" parent, alfalfa. Southern analysis using an improved total-genomic probing technique has shown low levels of sainfoin-specific DNA in 43 out of 158 tested regenerants. Cytogenetic analysis of these asymmetric hybrids has confirmed the existence of euploid (2n=32; 17%) as well as aneuploid (2n=30, 33-78; 83%) plants. Pollen germination tests have indicated that the majority of the hybrids were fertile, while 35% had either reduced fertility or were completely sterile. PMID:24190318

  4. Mapping the Genetic Basis of Symbiotic Variation in Legume-Rhizobium Interactions in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, Amanda J.; Heath, Katy D.; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Mutualisms are known to be genetically variable, where the genotypes differ in the fitness benefits they gain from the interaction. To date, little is known about the loci that underlie such genetic variation in fitness or whether the loci influencing fitness are partner specific, and depend on the genotype of the interaction partner. In the legume-rhizobium mutualism, one set of potential candidate genes that may influence the fitness benefits of the symbiosis are the plant genes involved in the initiation of the signaling pathway between the two partners. Here we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in Medicago truncatula in two different rhizobium strain treatments to locate regions of the genome influencing plant traits, assess whether such regions are dependent on the genotype of the rhizobial mutualist (QTL × rhizobium strain), and evaluate the contribution of sequence variation at known symbiosis signaling genes. Two of the symbiotic signaling genes, NFP and DMI3, colocalized with two QTL affecting average fruit weight and leaf number, suggesting that natural variation in nodulation genes may potentially influence plant fitness. In both rhizobium strain treatments, there were QTL that influenced multiple traits, indicative of either tight linkage between loci or pleiotropy, including one QTL with opposing effects on growth and reproduction. There was no evidence for QTL × rhizobium strain or genotype × genotype interactions, suggesting either that such interactions are due to small-effect loci or that more genotype-genotype combinations need to be tested in future mapping studies. PMID:23173081

  5. Microbiote shift in the Medicago sativa rhizosphere in response to cyanotoxins extract exposure.

    PubMed

    El Khalloufi, Fatima; Oufdou, Khalid; Bertrand, Marie; Lahrouni, Majida; Oudra, Brahim; Ortet, Philippe; Barakat, Mohamed; Heulin, Thierry; Achouak, Wafa

    2016-01-01

    The bloom-containing water bodies may have an impact due to cyanotoxins production on other microorganisms and aquatic plants. Where such water is being used for crops irrigation, the presence of cyanotoxins may also have a toxic impact on terrestrial plants and their rhizosphere microbiota. For that purpose, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing was applied to phylogenetically characterize the bacterial community of Medicago sativa rhizosphere in response to cyanotoxins extract. This analysis revealed a wide diversity at species level, which decreased from unplanted soil to root tissues indicating that only some populations were able to compete for nutrients and niches in this selective habitat. Gemmatimonas, Actinobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Opitutae mainly inhabited the bulk soil, whereas, the root-adhering soil and the root tissues were inhabited by Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. The proportion of these populations fluctuated in response to cyanotoxins extract exposure. Betaproteobacteria proportion increased in the three studied compartments, whereas Gammaproteobacteria proportion decreased except in the bulk soil. This study revealed the potential toxicity of cyanotoxins extract towards Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonas, Deltaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria, however Clostridia, Opitutae and bacteria related with Betaproteobacteria, were stimulated denoting their tolerance. Altogether, these data indicate that crop irrigation using cyanotoxins containing water might alter the rhizosphere functioning. PMID:26356186

  6. Mixed Nodule Infection in Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa Symbiosis Suggest the Presence of Cheating Behavior.

    PubMed

    Checcucci, Alice; Azzarello, Elisa; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Galardini, Marco; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Mancuso, Stefano; Marti, Lucia; Marzano, Maria C; Mocali, Stefano; Squartini, Andrea; Zanardo, Marina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    In the symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes, host plants can form symbiotic root nodules with multiple rhizobial strains, potentially showing different symbiotic performances in nitrogen fixation. Here, we investigated the presence of mixed nodules, containing rhizobia with different degrees of mutualisms, and evaluate their relative fitness in the Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa model symbiosis. We used three S. meliloti strains, the mutualist strains Rm1021 and BL225C and the non-mutualist AK83. We performed competition experiments involving both in vitro and in vivo symbiotic assays with M. sativa host plants. We show the occurrence of a high number (from 27 to 100%) of mixed nodules with no negative effect on both nitrogen fixation and plant growth. The estimation of the relative fitness as non-mutualist/mutualist ratios in single nodules shows that in some nodules the non-mutualist strain efficiently colonized root nodules along with the mutualist ones. In conclusion, we can support the hypothesis that in S. meliloti-M. sativa symbiosis mixed nodules are formed and allow non-mutualist or less-mutualist bacterial partners to be less or not sanctioned by the host plant, hence allowing a potential form of cheating behavior to be present in the nitrogen fixing symbiosis. PMID:27379128

  7. Comparative sequence and expression analysis of tapetum specific male sterility related genes in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Shao, L H; Zheng, X W; Yi, D X; Li, C

    2016-01-01

    Heterosis, or enhancement through outbreeding, is one of the most promising approaches for increasing crop yield. Male sterility (MS), which promotes heterosis, has been widely applied in hybrid crop production. Medicago truncatula is a model legume species and is closely related to M. sativa, an important legume forage plant. Although the molecular mechanisms of MS in M. truncatula and M. sativa remain unclear, several studies of MS have been conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous research has shown that MS is associated with the destruction of tapetal cell layers. Disruption of tapetum developmental processes may result in pollen abortion. In an effort to identify genes useful for breeding in M. sativa, we identified MS related genes in M. truncatula using BLAST and homology to A. thaliana genes. In this study, we identified 63 tapetum specific male sterility (TSMS) related genes. The length of TSMS genes varied from 225 to 3747 bp. We identified 15 conserved domains and 8 cis-elements associated with TSMS related genes. Analysis of the phylogenetic relationships among these genes allowed them to be classified into three groups, MtTsms A, MtTsms B, and MtTsms C. Expression analyses revealed that these genes may be involved in developmental processes and response to abiotic stress. PMID:27421020

  8. [Determination of Hard Rate of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Seeds with Near Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-xun; Chen, Ling-ling; Zhang, Yun-wei; Mao, Pei-sheng

    2016-03-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the most commonly grown forage crop due to its better quality characteristics and high adaptability in China. However, there was 20%-80% hard seeds in alfalfa which could not be identified easily from non hard seeds which would cause the loss of seed utilization value and plant production. This experiment was designed for 121 samples of alfalfa. Seeds were collected according to different regions, harvested year and varieties. 31 samples were artificial matched as hard rates ranging from 20% to 80% to establish a model for hard seed rate by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with Partial Least Square (PLS). The objective of this study was to establish a model and to estimate the efficiency of NIRS for determining hard rate of alfalfa seeds. The results showed that the correlation coefficient (R2(cal)) of calibration model was 0.981 6, root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) was 5.32, and the ratio of prediction to deviation (RPD) was 3.58. The forecast model in this experiment presented the satisfied precision. The proposed method using NIRS technology is feasible for identification and classification of hard seed in alfalfa. A new method, as nondestructive testing of hard seed rate, was provided to theoretical basis for fast nondestructive detection of hard seed rates in alfalfa. PMID:27400509

  9. Ethylene Signaling Modulates Herbivore-Induced Defense Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Jamuna Risal; Bede, Jacqueline C

    2015-05-01

    One or more effectors in the labial saliva (LS) of generalist Noctuid caterpillars activate plant signaling pathways to modulate jasmonate (JA)-dependent defense responses; however, the exact mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. A potential candidate in this phytohormone interplay is the ethylene (ET) signaling pathway. We compared the biochemical and molecular responses of the model legume Medicago truncatula and the ET-insensitive skl mutant to herbivory by fourth instar Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) caterpillars with intact or impaired LS secretions. Cellular oxidative stress increases rapidly after herbivory, as evidenced by changes in oxidized-to-reduced ascorbate (ASC) and glutathione (GSH) ratios. The caterpillar-specific increase in GSH ratios and the LS-specific increase in ASC ratios are alleviated in the skl mutant, indicating that ET signaling is required. Ten hours postherbivory, markers of the JA and JA/ET pathways are differentially expressed; MtVSP is induced and MtHEL is repressed in a caterpillar LS- and ET-independent manner. In contrast, expression of the classic marker of the systemic acquired resistance pathway, MtPR1, is caterpillar LS-dependent and requires ET signaling. Caterpillar LS further suppresses the induction of JA-related trypsin inhibitor activity in an ET-dependent manner. Findings suggest that ET is involved in the caterpillar LS-dependent, salicylic acid/NPR1-mediated attenuation of JA-dependent induced responses. PMID:25608182

  10. Evaluation of Medicago sativa L. sprouts as antihyperlipidemic and antihyperglycemic agent.

    PubMed

    Seida, Ahmed; El-Hefnawy, Hala; Abou-Hussein, Dina; Mokhtar, Fatma Alzahraa; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf

    2015-11-01

    Medicago sativa L. (Alfalfa) is traditionally used to treat diabetes. This study was designed to investigate the potential antihyperlipidemic and antihyperglycemic activity of M. sativa sprouts in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes via i.p. injection of 55 mg/kg of STZ. Experimental animals were divided into the following groups: GP1 (normal), GP2 (STZ-hyperlipidemic), GP3 (rouvastatin), GP4 (metformin), GP 5-9 (diabetic treated with methanolic, petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol extracts). The administration of the total methanolic extract (500 mg/kg), the petroleum ether (32.5mg) and butanol fractions (60 mg) for 4 weeks significantly decreased (p<0.05) triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in comparison to rouvastatin. Petroleum ether fraction proved to exhibit the best activity as antihyperlipidemic agent (12.23%). On the other hand, ethyl acetate fraction retained the best activity (vs. metformin) as antihyperglycemic agent. Histopathological evidences on liver, pancreas and spleen were in agreement with the above mentioned results. Purification, characterization, and identification of isolated compounds from the active fractions afforded 9 compounds: β-sitosterol and stigmasterol from the petroleum ether fraction; 10-hydroxy-coumestrol, apigenin, genistein, p-hydroxy-benzoic-acid, 7, 4'- dihydroxyflavone, quercetin-3-glucoside and sissotrin from the ethyl acetate fraction. PMID:26639479

  11. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Seabra, Ana R.; Carvalho, Helena G.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of GS isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context. PMID:26284094

  12. Role of motility and chemotaxis in efficiency of nodulation by Rhizobium meliloti. [Medicago sation

    SciTech Connect

    Caetano-Anolles, G.; Wall, L.G.; De Micheli, A.T.; Macchi, E.M.; Bauer, W.D.; Favelukes, G. )

    1988-04-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Rhizobium meliloti L5-30 defective in motility or chemotaxis were isolated and compared against the parent with respect to symbiotic competence. Each of the mutants were able to generate normal nodules on the host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa), but had slightly delayed nodule formation, diminished nodulation int he initially susceptible region of the host root, and relatively low representation in nodules following co-inoculation with equal numbers of the parent. When inoculated in growth pouches with increasing dosages of the parental strain, the number of nodules formed in the initially susceptible region of the root increased sigmoidally, with an optimum concentration of about 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} bacteria/plant. The dose-response behavior of the nonmotile and nonchemotactic mutants was similar, but they required 10- to 30-fold higher concentrations of bacteria to generate the same number of nodules. The distribution frequencies of nodules at different positions along the primary root were very similar for the mutants and parent, indicating that reduced nodulation by the mutants in dose-response experiments probably reflects reduced efficiency of nodule initiation rather than developmentally delayed nodule initiation. The number of bacteria that firmly adsorbed to the host root surface during several hours of incubation was 5- to 20-fold greater for the parent than the mutants.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine stress

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fuqiang; Li, Jize; Fan, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Quan; Chang, Wei; Yang, Fengshan; Geng, Gui

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) protect host plants against diverse biotic and abiotic stresses, and promote biodegradation of various contaminants. In this study effect of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine degradation was investigated. It was observed that the atrazine degradation rates with any addition level in mycorrhizal treatments were all significantly higher than those in non- mycorrhizal treatments. When atrazine was applied at 20 mg kg−1, the removal efficiency was up to 74.65%. Therefore, G. mosseae can be considered as ideal inhabitants of technical installations to facilitate phytoremediation. Furthermore, a total of 10.4 Gb was used for de novo transcriptome assembly, resulting in a comprehensive data set for the identification of genes corresponding to atrazine stress in the AM association. After comparative analysis with edgeR, a total of 2,060 differential expressed genes were identified, including 570 up-regulated genes and 1490 down-regulated genes. After excluding ‘function unknown’ and ‘general function predictions only’ genes, 172 up-regulated genes were obtained. The differentially expressed genes in AM association with and without atrazine stress were associated with molecular processes/other proteins, zinc finger protein, intracellular/extracellular enzymes, structural proteins, anti-stress/anti-disease protein, electron transport-related protein, and plant growth associated protein. Our results not only prove AMF has important ecological significance on atrazine degradation but also provide evidence for the molecular mechanisms of atrazine degradation by AMF. PMID:26833403

  14. MtSWEET11, a Nodule-Specific Sucrose Transporter of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Kryvoruchko, Igor S; Sinharoy, Senjuti; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Sosso, Davide; Pislariu, Catalina I; Guan, Dian; Murray, Jeremy; Benedito, Vagner A; Frommer, Wolf B; Udvardi, Michael K

    2016-05-01

    Optimization of nitrogen fixation by rhizobia in legumes is a key area of research for sustainable agriculture. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) occurs in specialized organs called nodules and depends on a steady supply of carbon to both plant and bacterial cells. Here we report the functional characterization of a nodule-specific Suc transporter, MtSWEET11 from Medicago truncatula MtSWEET11 belongs to a clade of plant SWEET proteins that are capable of transporting Suc and play critical roles in pathogen susceptibility. When expressed in mammalian cells, MtSWEET11 transported sucrose (Suc) but not glucose (Glc). The MtSWEET11 gene was found to be expressed in infected root hair cells, and in the meristem, invasion zone, and vasculature of nodules. Expression of an MtSWEET11-GFP fusion protein in nodules resulted in green fluorescence associated with the plasma membrane of uninfected cells and infection thread and symbiosome membranes of infected cells. Two independent Tnt1-insertion sweet11 mutants were uncompromised in SNF Therefore, although MtSWEET11 appears to be involved in Suc distribution within nodules, it is not crucial for SNF, probably because other Suc transporters can fulfill its role(s). PMID:27021190

  15. NODULES WITH ACTIVATED DEFENSE 1 is required for maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Haixiang; Luo, Li; Duan, Liujian; Cai, Liuyang; He, Xinxing; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Li, Guoliang; Xiao, Aifang; Duanmu, Deqiang; Cao, Yangrong; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming

    2016-10-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legume plants and rhizobia results in the formation of root nodules, in which symbiotic plant cells host and harbor thousands of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Here, a Medicago truncatula nodules with activated defense 1 (nad1) mutant was identified using reverse genetics methods. The mutant phenotype was characterized using cell and molecular biology approaches. An RNA-sequencing technique was used to analyze the transcriptomic reprogramming of nad1 mutant nodules. In the nad1 mutant plants, rhizobial infection and propagation in infection threads are normal, whereas rhizobia and their symbiotic plant cells become necrotic immediately after rhizobia are released from infection threads into symbiotic cells of nodules. Defense-associated responses were detected in nad1 nodules. NAD1 is specifically present in root nodule symbiosis plants with the exception of Morus notabilis, and the transcript is highly induced in nodules. NAD1 encodes a small uncharacterized protein with two predicted transmembrane helices and is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Our data demonstrate a positive role for NAD1 in the maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis during nodulation. PMID:27245091

  16. Evolution by gene duplication of Medicago truncatula PISTILLATA-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Edelín; Fares, Mario A.; Yenush, Lynne; Rochina, Mari Cruz; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Gómez-Mena, Concepción; Beltrán, José Pío; Cañas, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    PISTILLATA (PI) is a member of the B-function MADS-box gene family, which controls the identity of both petals and stamens in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Medicago truncatula (Mt), there are two PI-like paralogs, known as MtPI and MtNGL9. These genes differ in their expression patterns, but it is not known whether their functions have also diverged. Describing the evolution of certain duplicated genes, such as transcription factors, remains a challenge owing to the complex expression patterns and functional divergence between the gene copies. Here, we report a number of functional studies, including analyses of gene expression, protein–protein interactions, and reverse genetic approaches designed to demonstrate the respective contributions of each M. truncatula PI-like paralog to the B-function in this species. Also, we have integrated molecular evolution approaches to determine the mode of evolution of Mt PI-like genes after duplication. Our results demonstrate that MtPI functions as a master regulator of B-function in M. truncatula, maintaining the overall ancestral function, while MtNGL9 does not seem to have a role in this regard, suggesting that the pseudogenization could be the functional evolutionary fate for this gene. However, we provide evidence that purifying selection is the primary evolutionary force acting on this paralog, pinpointing the conservation of its biochemical function and, alternatively, the acquisition of a new role for this gene. PMID:26773809

  17. Exploring root symbiotic programs in the model legume Medicago truncatula using EST analysis

    PubMed Central

    Journet, Etienne-Pascal; van Tuinen, Diederik; Gouzy, Jérome; Crespeau, Hervé; Carreau, Véronique; Farmer, Mary-Jo; Niebel, Andreas; Schiex, Thomas; Jaillon, Olivier; Chatagnier, Odile; Godiard, Laurence; Micheli, Fabienne; Kahn, Daniel; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Gamas, Pascal

    2002-01-01

    We report on a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing and analysis program aimed at characterizing the sets of genes expressed in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula during interactions with either of two microsymbionts, the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti or the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. We have designed specific tools for in silico analysis of EST data, in relation to chimeric cDNA detection, EST clustering, encoded protein prediction, and detection of differential expression. Our 21 473 5′- and 3′-ESTs could be grouped into 6359 EST clusters, corresponding to distinct virtual genes, along with 52 498 other M.truncatula ESTs available in the dbEST (NCBI) database that were recruited in the process. These clusters were manually annotated, using a specifically developed annotation interface. Analysis of EST cluster distribution in various M.truncatula cDNA libraries, supported by a refined R test to evaluate statistical significance and by ‘electronic northern’ representation, enabled us to identify a large number of novel genes predicted to be up- or down-regulated during either symbiotic root interaction. These in silico analyses provide a first global view of the genetic programs for root symbioses in M.truncatula. A searchable database has been built and can be accessed through a public interface. PMID:12490726

  18. Exploring root symbiotic programs in the model legume Medicago truncatula using EST analysis.

    PubMed

    Journet, Etienne-Pascal; van Tuinen, Diederik; Gouzy, Jérome; Crespeau, Hervé; Carreau, Véronique; Farmer, Mary-Jo; Niebel, Andreas; Schiex, Thomas; Jaillon, Olivier; Chatagnier, Odile; Godiard, Laurence; Micheli, Fabienne; Kahn, Daniel; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Gamas, Pascal

    2002-12-15

    We report on a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing and analysis program aimed at characterizing the sets of genes expressed in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula during interactions with either of two microsymbionts, the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti or the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. We have designed specific tools for in silico analysis of EST data, in relation to chimeric cDNA detection, EST clustering, encoded protein prediction, and detection of differential expression. Our 21 473 5'- and 3'-ESTs could be grouped into 6359 EST clusters, corresponding to distinct virtual genes, along with 52 498 other M.truncatula ESTs available in the dbEST (NCBI) database that were recruited in the process. These clusters were manually annotated, using a specifically developed annotation interface. Analysis of EST cluster distribution in various M.truncatula cDNA libraries, supported by a refined R test to evaluate statistical significance and by 'electronic northern' representation, enabled us to identify a large number of novel genes predicted to be up- or down-regulated during either symbiotic root interaction. These in silico analyses provide a first global view of the genetic programs for root symbioses in M.truncatula. A searchable database has been built and can be accessed through a public interface. PMID:12490726

  19. An essential role of caffeoyl shikimate esterase in monolignol biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Ha, Chan Man; Escamilla-Trevino, Luis; Yarce, Juan Carlos Serrani; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical and genetic analyses have previously identified caffeoyl shikimate esterase (CSE) as an enzyme in the monolignol biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana, although the generality of this finding has been questioned. Here we show the presence of CSE genes and associated enzyme activity in barrel medic (Medicago truncatula, dicot, Leguminosae), poplar (Populus deltoides, dicot, Salicaceae), and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, monocot, Poaceae). Loss of function of CSE in transposon insertion lines of M. truncatula results in severe dwarfing, altered development, reduction in lignin content, and preferential accumulation of hydroxyphenyl units in lignin, indicating that the CSE enzyme is critical for normal lignification in this species. However, the model grass Brachypodium distachyon and corn (Zea mays) do not possess orthologs of the currently characterized CSE genes, and crude protein extracts from stems of these species exhibit only a weak esterase activity with caffeoyl shikimate. Our results suggest that the reaction catalyzed by CSE may not be essential for lignification in all plant species. PMID:27037613

  20. Rapid inactivation of the maize transposable element En/Spm in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    d'Erfurth, I; Cosson, V; Eschstruth, A; Rippa, S; Messinese, E; Durand, P; Trinh, H; Kondorosi, A; Ratet, P

    2003-09-01

    Transposable elements have been widely used as mutagens in many organisms. Among them, the maize transposable element En/Spm has been shown to transpose efficiently in several plant species including the model plant Arabidopsis, where it has been used for large-scale mutagenesis. To determine whether we could use this transposon as a mutagen in the model legume plant Medicago truncatula, we tested the activity of the autonomous element, as well as two defective elements, in this plant, and in Arabidopsis as a positive control. In agreement with previous reports, we observed efficient excision of the autonomous En/Spm element in A. thaliana. This element was also active in M. truncatula, but the transposition activity was low and was apparently restricted to the tissue culture step necessary for the production of transgenic plants. The activity of one of the defective transposable elements, dSpm, was very low in A. thaliana and even lower in M. truncatula. The use of different sources of transposases suggested that this defect in transposition was associated with the dSpm element itself. Transposition of the other defective element, I6078, was also detected in M. truncatula, but, as observed with the autonomous element, transposition events were very rare and occurred during tissue culture. These results suggest that the En/Spm element is rapidly inactivated in the regenerated plants and their progeny, and therefore is not suitable for routine insertion mutagenesis in M. truncatula. PMID:12905070

  1. MtSWEET11, a Nodule-Specific Sucrose Transporter of Medicago truncatula1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Sosso, Davide; Guan, Dian; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of nitrogen fixation by rhizobia in legumes is a key area of research for sustainable agriculture. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) occurs in specialized organs called nodules and depends on a steady supply of carbon to both plant and bacterial cells. Here we report the functional characterization of a nodule-specific Suc transporter, MtSWEET11 from Medicago truncatula. MtSWEET11 belongs to a clade of plant SWEET proteins that are capable of transporting Suc and play critical roles in pathogen susceptibility. When expressed in mammalian cells, MtSWEET11 transported sucrose (Suc) but not glucose (Glc). The MtSWEET11 gene was found to be expressed in infected root hair cells, and in the meristem, invasion zone, and vasculature of nodules. Expression of an MtSWEET11-GFP fusion protein in nodules resulted in green fluorescence associated with the plasma membrane of uninfected cells and infection thread and symbiosome membranes of infected cells. Two independent Tnt1-insertion sweet11 mutants were uncompromised in SNF. Therefore, although MtSWEET11 appears to be involved in Suc distribution within nodules, it is not crucial for SNF, probably because other Suc transporters can fulfill its role(s). PMID:27021190

  2. Effect of salt stress on glycine betaine biosynthesis and catabolism by Medicago sativa bacteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Fougere, F.; Poggi, M.-C.; Le Rudulier, D. )

    1990-05-01

    Previous works have shown that glycine betaine (GB) and choline (Cho) are actively taken up by Medicago sativa bacteroids isolated from 4-week-old nodules. Here, we have investigated the effects of NaCl on the fte of Cho and GB. Bacteroids were incubated in low- or high-salt-medium (0.4 M NaCl) and supplemented with {sup 14}C 1,2-Cho or {sup 14}C 1,2-GB. After 3 hours, radioactivity was measured in CO{sub 2} released, in ethanol-soluble and insoluble fractions. In absence of salt, a low proportion of the labelling was found in soluble fraction: 47 and 19% after Cho or GB supply, respectively. On the contrary, in high-salt-medium, the soluble fraction still contained 85% of the radioactivity with GB corresponding to 92-98%. Both enzymes involved in GB biosynthesis from Cho were studied. Choline oxidase activity was enhanced by 59%, while betainal dehydrogenase activity remained unchanged after bacteroid incubation in high-salt-medium. Thus, GB accumulation in salt-stressed bacteroids would be likely a consequence of a decrease of its catabolism rather than an increase of its biosynthesis.

  3. Transcriptional analysis of highly syntenic regions between Medicago truncatula and Glycine max using tiling microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; He, Hang; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Xiangfeng; Bai, Sulan; Stolc, Viktor; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Young, Nevin D; Yu, Oliver; Deng, Xing-Wang

    2008-01-01

    Background Legumes are the third largest family of flowering plants and are unique among crop species in their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. As a result of recent genome sequencing efforts, legumes are now one of a few plant families with extensive genomic and transcriptomic data available in multiple species. The unprecedented complexity and impending completeness of these data create opportunities for new approaches to discovery. Results We report here a transcriptional analysis in six different organ types of syntenic regions totaling approximately 1 Mb between the legume plants barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) and soybean (Glycine max) using oligonucleotide tiling microarrays. This analysis detected transcription of over 80% of the predicted genes in both species. We also identified 499 and 660 transcriptionally active regions from barrel medic and soybean, respectively, over half of which locate outside of the predicted exons. We used the tiling array data to detect differential gene expression in the six examined organ types and found several genes that are preferentially expressed in the nodule. Further investigation revealed that some collinear genes exhibit different expression patterns between the two species. Conclusion These results demonstrate the utility of genome tiling microarrays in generating transcriptomic data to complement computational annotation of the newly available legume genome sequences. The tiling microarray data was further used to quantify gene expression levels in multiple organ types of two related legume species. Further development of this method should provide a new approach to comparative genomics aimed at elucidating genome organization and transcriptional regulation. PMID:18348734

  4. Conserved genetic determinant of motor organ identity in Medicago truncatula and related legumes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianghua; Moreau, Carol; Liu, Yu; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Hofer, Julie; Ellis, Noel; Chen, Rujin

    2012-01-01

    Plants exhibit various kinds of movements that have fascinated scientists and the public for centuries. Physiological studies in plants with the so-called motor organ or pulvinus suggest that cells at opposite sides of the pulvinus mediate leaf or leaflet movements by swelling and shrinking. How motor organ identity is determined is unknown. Using a genetic approach, we isolated a mutant designated elongated petiolule1 (elp1) from Medicago truncatula that fails to fold its leaflets in the dark due to loss of motor organs. Map-based cloning indicated that ELP1 encodes a putative plant-specific LOB domain transcription factor. RNA in situ analysis revealed that ELP1 is expressed in primordial cells that give rise to the motor organ. Ectopic expression of ELP1 resulted in dwarf plants with petioles and rachises reduced in length, and the epidermal cells gained characteristics of motor organ epidermal cells. By identifying ELP1 orthologs from other legume species, namely pea (Pisum sativum) and Lotus japonicus, we show that this motor organ identity is regulated by a conserved molecular mechanism. PMID:22689967

  5. Nodule carbohydrate catabolism is enhanced in the Medicago truncatula A17-Sinorhizobium medicae WSM419 symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Seminario, Amaia; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; González, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic association between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti is a well-established model system in the legume–Rhizobium community. Despite its wide use, the symbiotic efficiency of this model has been recently questioned and an alternative microsymbiont, S. medicae, has been proposed. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms behind the higher symbiotic efficiency of S. medicae WSM419. In the present study, we inoculated M. truncatula Jemalong A17 with either S. medicae WSM419 or S. meliloti 2011 and compared plant growth, photosynthesis, N2-fixation rates, and plant nodule carbon and nitrogen metabolic activities in the two systems. M. truncatula plants in symbiosis with S. medicae showed increased biomass and photosynthesis rates per plant. Plants grown in symbiosis with S. medicae WSM419 also showed higher N2-fixation rates, which were correlated with a larger nodule biomass, while nodule number was similar in both systems. In terms of plant nodule metabolism, M. truncatula–S. medicae WSM419 nodules showed increased sucrose-catabolic activity, mostly associated with sucrose synthase, accompanied by a reduced starch content, whereas nitrogen-assimilation activities were comparable to those measured in nodules infected with S. meliloti 2011. Taken together, these results suggest that S. medicae WSM419 is able to enhance plant carbon catabolism in M. truncatula nodules, which allows for the maintaining of high symbiotic N2-fixation rates, better growth and improved general plant performance. PMID:25221545

  6. Expression Analysis of PIN Genes in Root Tips and Nodules of Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Sańko-Sawczenko, Izabela; Łotocka, Barbara; Czarnocka, Weronika

    2016-01-01

    Polar auxin transport is dependent on the family of PIN-formed proteins (PINs), which are membrane transporters of anionic indole-3-acetic acid (IAA−). It is assumed that polar auxin transport may be essential in the development and meristematic activity maintenance of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) root nodules. However, little is known about the involvement of specific PIN proteins in M. truncatula nodulation. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we analyzed the expression patterns of all previously identified MtPIN genes and compared them between root nodules and root tips of M. truncatula. Our results demonstrated significant differences in the expression level of all 11 genes (MtPIN1–MtPIN11) between examined organs. Interestingly, MtPIN9 was the only PIN gene with higher expression level in root nodules compared to root tips. This result is the first indication of PIN9 transporter potential involvement in M. truncatula nodulation. Moreover, relatively high expression level in root nodules was attributed to MtPINs encoding orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana PIN5 subclade. PIN proteins from this subclade have been found to localize in the endoplasmic reticulum, which may indicate that the development and meristematic activity maintenance of M. truncatula root nodules is associated with intracellular homeostasis of auxins level and their metabolism in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:27463709

  7. The Medicago Genome Provides Insight into the Evolution of Rhizobial Symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Young, Nevin D.; Debellé, Frédéric; Oldroyd, Giles E. D.; Geurts, Rene; Cannon, Steven B.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Benedito, Vagner A.; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Gouzy, Jérôme; Schoof, Heiko; Van de Peer, Yves; Proost, Sebastian; Cook, Douglas R.; Meyers, Blake C.; Spannagl, Manuel; Cheung, Foo; De Mita, Stéphane; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Gundlach, Heidrun; Zhou, Shiguo; Mudge, Joann; Bharti, Arvind K.; Murray, Jeremy D.; Naoumkina, Marina A.; Rosen, Benjamin; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Tang, Haibao; Rombauts, Stephane; Zhao, Patrick X.; Zhou, Peng; Barbe, Valérie; Bardou, Philippe; Bechner, Michael; Bellec, Arnaud; Berger, Anne; Bergès, Hélène; Bidwell, Shelby; Bisseling, Ton; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Denny, Roxanne; Deshpande, Shweta; Dai, Xinbin; Doyle, Jeff; Dudez, Anne-Marie; Farmer, Andrew D.; Fouteau, Stéphanie; Franken, Carolien; Gibelin, Chrystel; Gish, John; Goldstein, Steven; González, Alvaro J.; Green, Pamela J.; Hallab, Asis; Hartog, Marijke; Hua, Axin; Humphray, Sean; Jeong, Dong-Hoon; Jing, Yi; Jöcker, Anika; Kenton, Steve M.; Kim, Dong-Jin; Klee, Kathrin; Lai, Hongshing; Lang, Chunting; Lin, Shaoping; Macmil, Simone L; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Matthews, Lucy; McCorrison, Jamison; Monaghan, Erin L.; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Najar, Fares Z.; Nicholson, Christine; Noirot, Céline; O’Bleness, Majesta; Paule, Charles R.; Poulain, Julie; Prion, Florent; Qin, Baifang; Qu, Chunmei; Retzel, Ernest F.; Riddle, Claire; Sallet, Erika; Samain, Sylvie; Samson, Nicolas; Sanders, Iryna; Saurat, Olivier; Scarpelli, Claude; Schiex, Thomas; Segurens, Béatrice; Severin, Andrew J.; Sherrier, D. Janine; Shi, Ruihua; Sims, Sarah; Singer, Susan R.; Sinharoy, Senjuti; Sterck, Lieven; Viollet, Agnès; Wang, Bing-Bing; Wang, Keqin; Wang, Mingyi; Wang, Xiaohong; Warfsmann, Jens; Weissenbach, Jean; White, Doug D.; White, Jim D.; Wiley, Graham B.; Wincker, Patrick; Xing, Yanbo; Yang, Limei; Yao, Ziyun; Ying, Fu; Zhai, Jixian; Zhou, Liping; Zuber, Antoine; Dénarié, Jean; Dixon, Richard A.; May, Gregory D.; Schwartz, David C.; Rogers, Jane; Quétier, Francis; Town, Christopher D.; Roe, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Legumes (Fabaceae or Leguminosae) are unique among cultivated plants for their ability to carry out endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation with rhizobial bacteria, a process that takes place in a specialized structure known as the nodule. Legumes belong to one of the two main groups of eurosids, the Fabidae, which includes most species capable of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation 1. Legumes comprise several evolutionary lineages derived from a common ancestor 60 million years ago (Mya). Papilionoids are the largest clade, dating nearly to the origin of legumes and containing most cultivated species 2. Medicago truncatula (Mt) is a long-established model for the study of legume biology. Here we describe the draft sequence of the Mt euchromatin based on a recently completed BAC-assembly supplemented with Illumina-shotgun sequence, together capturing ~94% of all Mt genes. A whole-genome duplication (WGD) approximately 58 Mya played a major role in shaping the Mt genome and thereby contributed to the evolution of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. Subsequent to the WGD, the Mt genome experienced higher levels of rearrangement than two other sequenced legumes, Glycine max (Gm) and Lotus japonicus (Lj). Mt is a close relative of alfalfa (M. sativa), a widely cultivated crop with limited genomics tools and complex autotetraploid genetics. As such, the Mt genome sequence provides significant opportunities to expand alfalfa’s genomic toolbox. PMID:22089132

  8. MtVRN2 is a Polycomb VRN2-like gene which represses the transition to flowering in the model legume Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Jaudal, Mauren; Zhang, Lulu; Che, Chong; Hurley, Daniel G; Thomson, Geoffrey; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Putterill, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Optimising the timing of flowering contributes to successful sexual reproduction and yield in agricultural plants. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) genes, first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), promote flowering universally, but the upstream flowering regulatory pathways can differ markedly among plants. Flowering in the model legume, Medicago truncatula (Medicago) is accelerated by winter cold (vernalisation) followed by long day (LD) photoperiods leading to elevated expression of the floral activator, FT-like gene FTa1. However, Medicago, like some other plants, lacks the activator CONSTANS (CO) and the repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) genes which directly regulate FT and are key to LD and vernalisation responses in Arabidopsis. Conversely, Medicago has a VERNALISATION2-LIKE VEFS-box gene (MtVRN2). In Arabidopsis AtVRN2 is a key member of a Polycomb complex involved in stable repression of Arabidopsis FLC after vernalisation. VRN2-like genes have been identified in other eudicot plants, but their function has never been reported. We show that Mtvrn2 mutants bypass the need for vernalisation for early flowering in LD conditions in Medicago. Investigation of the underlying mechanism by transcriptome analysis reveals that Mtvrn2 mutants precociously express FTa1 and other suites of genes including floral homeotic genes. Double-mutant analysis indicates that early flowering is dependent on functional FTa1. The broad significance of our study is that we have demonstrated a function for a VRN2-like VEFS gene beyond the Brassicaceae. In particular, MtVRN2 represses the transition to flowering in Medicago by regulating the onset of expression of the potent floral activator, FTa1. PMID:26947149

  9. Flavone Synthases from Medicago truncatula Are Flavanone-2-Hydroxylases and Are Important for Nodulation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Subramanian, Senthil; Zhang, Yansheng; Yu, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Flavones are important copigments found in the flowers of many higher plants and play a variety of roles in plant adaptation to stress. In Medicago species, flavones also act as signal molecules during symbiotic interaction with the diazotropic bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. They are the most potent nod gene inducers found in root exudates. However, flavone synthase II (FNS II), the key enzyme responsible for flavone biosynthesis, has not been characterized in Medicago species. We cloned two FNS II genes from Medicago truncatula using known FNS II sequences from other species and named them MtFNSII-1 and MtFNSII-2. Functional assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suggested that the catalytic mechanisms of both cytochrome P450 monooxygenases were similar to the other known legume FNS II from licorice (Glycyrrhiza echinata). MtFNSII converted flavanones to 2-hydroxyflavanones instead of flavones whereas FNS II from the nonlegume Gerbera hybrida, converted flavanones to flavones directly. The two MtFNSII genes had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. MtFNSII-1 was highly expressed in roots and seeds whereas MtFNSII-2 was highly expressed in flowers and siliques. In addition, MtFNSII-2 was inducible by S. meliloti and methyl jasmonate treatment, whereas MtFNSII-1 was not. Histochemical staining of transgenic hairy roots carrying the promoter-reporter constructs indicated that the MtFNSII-2 induction was tissue specific, mostly localized to vascular tissues and root hairs. RNA interference-mediated suppression of MtFNSII genes resulted in flavone depleted roots and led to significantly reduced nodulation when inoculated with S. meliloti. Our results provide genetic evidence supporting that flavones are important for nodulation in M. truncatula. PMID:17434990

  10. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Cerebroprotective Effect of Medicago sativa Linn. against Ischemia and Reperfusion Insult

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Kundan Singh; Sharma, Anupam

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidants have been the focus of studies for developing neuroprotective agents to be used in the therapy for stroke, which is an acute and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Medicago sativa (MS) has a long tradition of use as ayurvedic and homoeopathic medicine in central nervous system disorders. The plant has been reported to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic effects. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of methanol extract of MS on ischemia and reperfusion-induced cerebral injury in mice. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO) for 15 min followed by 24-h reperfusion, resulted in significant elevation in infarct size, xanthine oxidase (XO) activity, superoxide anion (O•−2) production and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels, and significant depletion in endogenous antioxidant [reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total tissue sulfhydryl (T-SH) groups] systems in mice brain. Further, BCAO led to impairment in short-term memory and motor coordination. Pre-treatment with MS (100 or 200 mg kg−1, p.o.) markedly reduced cerebral infarct size, XO, O•−2 and TBARS levels, significantly restored GSH, SOD and T-SH levels and attenuated impairment in short-term memory and motor coordination. In addition, MS directly scavenged free radicals generated against a stable radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and O•−2 generated in phenazine methosulphate-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide systems, and also inhibited XD/XO conversion and resultant O•−2 production. The data from this study suggest that treatment with MS enhances the antioxidant defense against BCAO-induced global cerebral ischemia and exhibits neuroprotective activity. PMID:21785631

  11. Sexual Polyploidization in Medicago sativa L.: Impact on the Phenotype, Gene Transcription, and Genome Methylation.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, Daniele; Ferradini, Nicoletta; Allegrucci, Stefano; Capomaccio, Stefano; Zago, Elisa Debora; Leonetti, Paola; Balech, Bachir; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico; Reale, Lara; Veronesi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidization as the consequence of 2n gamete formation is a prominent mechanism in plant evolution. Studying its effects on the genome, and on genome expression, has both basic and applied interest. We crossed two diploid (2n = 2x = 16) Medicago sativa plants, a subsp. falcata seed parent, and a coerulea × falcata pollen parent that form a mixture of n and 2n eggs and pollen, respectively. Such a cross produced full-sib diploid and tetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) hybrids, the latter being the result of bilateral sexual polyploidization (BSP). These unique materials allowed us to investigate the effects of BSP, and to separate the effect of intraspecific hybridization from those of polyploidization by comparing 2x with 4x full sib progeny plants. Simple sequence repeat marker segregation demonstrated tetrasomic inheritance for all chromosomes but one, demonstrating that these neotetraploids are true autotetraploids. BSP brought about increased biomass, earlier flowering, higher seed set and weight, and larger leaves with larger cells. Microarray analyses with M. truncatula gene chips showed that several hundred genes, related to diverse metabolic functions, changed their expression level as a consequence of polyploidization. In addition, cytosine methylation increased in 2x, but not in 4x, hybrids. Our results indicate that sexual polyploidization induces significant transcriptional novelty, possibly mediated in part by DNA methylation, and phenotypic novelty that could underpin improved adaptation and reproductive success of tetraploid M. sativa with respect to its diploid progenitor. These polyploidy-induced changes may have promoted the adoption of tetraploid alfalfa in agriculture. PMID:26858330

  12. Two euAGAMOUS Genes Control C-Function in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Mena, Concepción; Constantin, Gabriela D.; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lund, Ole S.; Johansen, Elisabeth; Beltrán, José Pío; Cañas, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    C-function MADS-box transcription factors belong to the AGAMOUS (AG) lineage and specify both stamen and carpel identity and floral meristem determinacy. In core eudicots, the AG lineage is further divided into two branches, the euAG and PLE lineages. Functional analyses across flowering plants strongly support the idea that duplicated AG lineage genes have different degrees of subfunctionalization of the C-function. The legume Medicago truncatula contains three C-lineage genes in its genome: two euAG genes (MtAGa and MtAGb) and one PLENA-like gene (MtSHP). This species is therefore a good experimental system to study the effects of gene duplication within the AG subfamily. We have studied the respective functions of each euAG genes in M. truncatula employing expression analyses and reverse genetic approaches. Our results show that the M. truncatula euAG- and PLENA-like genes are an example of subfunctionalization as a result of a change in expression pattern. MtAGa and MtAGb are the only genes showing a full C-function activity, concomitant with their ancestral expression profile, early in the floral meristem, and in the third and fourth floral whorls during floral development. In contrast, MtSHP expression appears late during floral development suggesting it does not contribute significantly to the C-function. Furthermore, the redundant MtAGa and MtAGb paralogs have been retained which provides the overall dosage required to specify the C-function in M. truncatula. PMID:25105497

  13. Genomic Signature of Selective Sweeps Illuminates Adaptation of Medicago truncatula to Root-Associated Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bonhomme, Maxime; Boitard, Simon; San Clemente, Hélène; Dumas, Bernard; Young, Nevin; Jacquet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Medicago truncatula is a model legume species used to investigate plant–microorganism interactions, notably root symbioses. Massive population genomic and transcriptomic data now available for this species open the way for a comprehensive investigation of genomic variations associated with adaptation of M. truncatula to its environment. Here we performed a fine-scale genome scan of selective sweep signatures in M. truncatula using more than 15 million single nucleotide polymorphisms identified on 283 accessions from two populations (Circum and Far West), and exploited annotation and published transcriptomic data to identify biological processes associated with molecular adaptation. We identified 58 swept genomic regions with a 15 kb average length and comprising 3.3 gene models on average. The unimodal sweep state probability distribution in these regions enabled us to focus on the best single candidate gene per region. We detected two unambiguous species-wide selective sweeps, one of which appears to underlie morphological adaptation. Population genomic analyses of the remaining 56 sweep signatures indicate that sweeps identified in the Far West population are less population-specific and probably more ancient than those identified in the Circum population. Functional annotation revealed a predominance of immunity-related adaptations in the Circum population. Transcriptomic data from accessions of the Far West population allowed inference of four clusters of coregulated genes putatively involved in the adaptive control of symbiotic carbon flow and nodule senescence, as well as in other root adaptations upon infection with soil microorganisms. We demonstrate that molecular adaptations in M. truncatula were primarily triggered by selective pressures from root-associated microorganisms. PMID:25901015

  14. Biosorption of cadmium, chromium, lead, and zinc by biomass of Medicago sativa (alfalfa)

    SciTech Connect

    Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Gonzalez, J.H.; Tiemann, K.J.; Rodriguez, O.

    1996-12-31

    Previous laboratory batch experiments of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) indicated that the African shoots population had an excellent ability to bind copper(II) and nickel(II) ions from aqueous solution. Batch laboratory pH profile, time dependency, and capacity experiments were performed to determine the binding ability of the African shoots to cadmium(II), chromium(III), chromium(VI), lead(II), and zinc(II). Batch pH profile experiments for the mentioned ions indicated that the optimum pH for metal binding is approximately 5.0. Time dependency experiments for the metal ions showed that for all the metals studied, binding to the African alfalfa shoots occurred within five minutes. Binding capacity experiments revealed the following amounts of metal ions bound per gram of biomass: 7.1 mg Cd, 7.7 mg Cr(III), 43 mg Pb(II), and 4.9 mg Zn(II). However, no binding occurred for chromium(VI). Nearly all of the metals studied were recovered by treatment with 0.1M HCl, with the exception of chromium(III). Column experiments were performed to study the binding of Cd(II), Cr(III), Cr(VI), Pb(II), and Zn(II) to silica-immobilized African alfalfa shoots under flow conditions. These experiments showed that the silica-immobilized African alfalfa shoots were effective for removing metal ions from solution, and over 90% of the bound Pb(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II), and over 70% Cd(II), were recovered after treatment with four bed volumes of 0.1M HCl. The results from these studies will be useful for a novel phytofiltration technology to remove and recover heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  15. Novel MtCEP1 peptides produced in vivo differentially regulate root development in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A; Binos, Steve; Truong, Thy T; Imin, Nijat; Mariani, Michael; Djordjevic, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Small, post-translationally modified and secreted peptides regulate diverse plant developmental processes. Due to low natural abundance, it is difficult to isolate and identify these peptides. Using an improved peptide isolation protocol and Orbitrap mass spectrometry, nine 15-amino-acid CEP peptides were identified that corresponded to the two domains encoded by Medicago truncatula CEP1 (MtCEP1). Novel arabinosylated and hydroxylated peptides were identified in root cultures overexpressing MtCEP1. The five most abundant CEP peptides were hydroxylated and these species were detected also in low amounts in vector control samples. Synthetic peptides with different hydroxylation patterns differentially affected root development. Notably, the domain 1 peptide hydroxylated at Pro4 and Pro11 (D1:HyP4,11) imparted the strongest inhibition of lateral root emergence when grown with 5mM KNO3 and stimulated the highest increase in nodule number when grown with 0mM KNO3. Inhibition of lateral root emergence by D1:HyP4,11 was not alleviated by removing peptide exposure. In contrast, the domain 2 peptide hydroxylated at Pro11 (D2:HyP11) increased stage III-IV lateral root primordium numbers by 6-fold (P < 0.001) which failed to emerge. Auxin addition at levels which stimulated lateral root formation in wild-type plants had little or no ameliorating effect on CEP peptide-mediated inhibition of lateral root formation or emergence. Both peptides increased and altered the root staining pattern of the auxin-responsive reporter GH3:GUS suggesting CEPs alter auxin sensitivity or distribution. The results showed that CEP primary sequence and post-translational modifications influence peptide activities and the improved isolation procedure effectively and reproducibly identifies and characterises CEPs. PMID:25711701

  16. The alternative Medicago truncatula defense proteome of ROS—defective transgenic roots during early microbial infection

    PubMed Central

    Kiirika, Leonard M.; Schmitz, Udo; Colditz, Frank

    2014-01-01

    ROP-type GTPases of plants function as molecular switches within elementary signal transduction pathways such as the regulation of ROS synthesis via activation of NADPH oxidases (RBOH-respiratory burst oxidase homolog in plants). Previously, we reported that silencing of the Medicago truncatula GTPase MtROP9 led to reduced ROS production and suppressed induction of ROS-related enzymes in transgenic roots (MtROP9i) infected with pathogenic (Aphanomyces euteiches) and symbiotic microorganisms (Glomus intraradices, Sinorhizobium meliloti). While fungal infections were enhanced, S. meliloti infection was drastically impaired. In this study, we investigate the temporal proteome response of M. truncatula MtROP9i transgenic roots during the same microbial interactions under conditions of deprived potential to synthesize ROS. In comparison with control roots (Mtvector), we present a comprehensive proteomic analysis using sensitive MS protein identification. For four early infection time-points (1, 3, 5, 24 hpi), 733 spots were found to be different in abundance: 213 spots comprising 984 proteins (607 unique) were identified after S. meliloti infection, 230 spots comprising 796 proteins (580 unique) after G. intraradices infection, and 290 spots comprising 1240 proteins (828 unique) after A. euteiches infection. Data evaluation by GelMap in combination with a heatmap tool allowed recognition of key proteome changes during microbial interactions under conditions of hampered ROS synthesis. Overall, the number of induced proteins in MtROP9i was low as compared with controls, indicating a dual function of ROS in defense signaling as well as alternative response patterns activated during microbial infection. Qualitative analysis of induced proteins showed that enzymes linked to ROS production and scavenging were highly induced in control roots, while in MtROP9i the majority of proteins were involved in alternative defense pathways such as cell wall and protein degradation. PMID

  17. Nonphotosynthetic CO2 Fixation by Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Roots and Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael P.; Heichel, Gary H.; Vance, Carroll P.

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) root and nodule nonphotosynthetic CO2 fixation on the supply of currently produced photosynthate and nodule nitrogenase activity was examined at various times after phloem-girdling and exposure of nodules to Ar:O2. Phloemgirdling was effected 20 hours and exposure to Ar:O2 was effected 2 to 3 hours before initiation of experiments. Nodule and root CO2 fixation rates of phloem-girdled plants were reduced to 38 and 50%, respectively, of those of control plants. Exposure to Ar:O2 decreased nodule CO2 fixation rates to 45%, respiration rates to 55%, and nitrogenase activities to 51% of those of the controls. The products of nodule CO2 fixation were exported through the xylem to the shoot mainly as amino acids within 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 14CO2. In contrast to nodules, roots exported very little radioactivity, and most of the 14C was exported as organic acids. The nonphotosynthetic CO2 fixation rate of roots and nodules averaged 26% of the gross respiration rate, i.e. the sum of net respiration and nonphotosynthetic CO2 assimilation. Nodules fixed CO2 at a rate 5.6 times that of roots, but since nodules comprised a small portion of root system mass, roots accounted for 76% of the nodulated root system CO2 fixation. The results of this study showed that exposure of nodules to Ar:O2 reduced nodule-specific respiration and nitrogenase activity by similar amounts, and that phloem-girdling significantly reduced nodule CO2 fixation, nitrogenase activity, nodule-specific respiration, and transport of 14C photoassimilate to nodules. These results indicate that nodule CO2 fixation in alfalfa is associated with N assimilation. PMID:16665671

  18. Concerted modulation of alanine and glutamate metabolism in young Medicago truncatula seedlings under hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Limami, Anis M.; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Ricoult, Claudie; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Planchet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The modulation of primary nitrogen metabolism by hypoxic stress was studied in young Medicago truncatula seedlings. Hypoxic seedlings were characterized by the up-regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase (mAlaAT), and down-regulation of glutamine synthetase 1b (GS1b), NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase 3 (GDH3), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) gene expression. Hypoxic stress severely inhibited GS activity and stimulated NADH-GOGAT activity. GDH activity was lower in hypoxic seedlings than in the control, however, under either normoxia or hypoxia, the in vivo activity was directed towards glutamate deamination. 15NH4 labelling showed for the first time that the adaptive reaction of the plant to hypoxia consisted of a concerted modulation of nitrogen flux through the pathways of both alanine and glutamate synthesis. In hypoxic seedlings, newly synthesized 15N-alanine increased and accumulated as the major amino acid, asparagine synthesis was inhibited, while 15N-glutamate was synthesized at a similar rate to that in the control. A discrepancy between the up-regulation of GDH1 expression and the down-regulation of GDH activity by hypoxic stress highlighted for the first time the complex regulation of this enzyme by hypoxia. Higher rates of glycolysis and ethanol fermentation are known to cause the fast depletion of sugar stores and carbon stress. It is proposed that the expression of GDH1 was stimulated by hypoxia-induced carbon stress, while the enzyme protein might be involved during post-hypoxic stress contributing to the regeneration of 2-oxoglutarate via the GDH shunt. PMID:18508812

  19. Salinity Adaptation and the Contribution of Parental Environmental Effects in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Moriuchi, Ken S.; Friesen, Maren L.; Cordeiro, Matilde A.; Badri, Mounawer; Vu, Wendy T.; Main, Bradley J.; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.; Strauss, Sharon Y.; von Wettberg, Eric J. B.

    2016-01-01

    High soil salinity negatively influences plant growth and yield. Some taxa have evolved mechanisms for avoiding or tolerating elevated soil salinity, which can be modulated by the environment experienced by parents or offspring. We tested the contribution of the parental and offspring environments on salinity adaptation and their potential underlying mechanisms. In a two-generation greenhouse experiment, we factorially manipulated salinity concentrations for genotypes of Medicago truncatula that were originally collected from natural populations that differed in soil salinity. To compare population level adaptation to soil salinity and to test the potential mechanisms involved we measured two aspects of plant performance, reproduction and vegetative biomass, and phenological and physiological traits associated with salinity avoidance and tolerance. Saline-origin populations had greater biomass and reproduction under saline conditions than non-saline populations, consistent with local adaptation to saline soils. Additionally, parental environmental exposure to salt increased this difference in performance. In terms of environmental effects on mechanisms of salinity adaptation, parental exposure to salt spurred phenological differences that facilitated salt avoidance, while offspring exposure to salt resulted in traits associated with greater salt tolerance. Non-saline origin populations expressed traits associated with greater growth in the absence of salt while, for saline adapted populations, the ability to maintain greater performance in saline environments was also associated with lower growth potential in the absence of salt. Plastic responses induced by parental and offspring environments in phenology, leaf traits, and gas exchange contribute to salinity adaptation in M. truncatula. The ability of plants to tolerate environmental stress, such as high soil salinity, is likely modulated by a combination of parental effects and within-generation phenotypic

  20. Sexual Polyploidization in Medicago sativa L.: Impact on the Phenotype, Gene Transcription, and Genome Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Rosellini, Daniele; Ferradini, Nicoletta; Allegrucci, Stefano; Capomaccio, Stefano; Zago, Elisa Debora; Leonetti, Paola; Balech, Bachir; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico; Reale, Lara; Veronesi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidization as the consequence of 2n gamete formation is a prominent mechanism in plant evolution. Studying its effects on the genome, and on genome expression, has both basic and applied interest. We crossed two diploid (2n = 2x = 16) Medicago sativa plants, a subsp. falcata seed parent, and a coerulea × falcata pollen parent that form a mixture of n and 2n eggs and pollen, respectively. Such a cross produced full-sib diploid and tetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) hybrids, the latter being the result of bilateral sexual polyploidization (BSP). These unique materials allowed us to investigate the effects of BSP, and to separate the effect of intraspecific hybridization from those of polyploidization by comparing 2x with 4x full sib progeny plants. Simple sequence repeat marker segregation demonstrated tetrasomic inheritance for all chromosomes but one, demonstrating that these neotetraploids are true autotetraploids. BSP brought about increased biomass, earlier flowering, higher seed set and weight, and larger leaves with larger cells. Microarray analyses with M. truncatula gene chips showed that several hundred genes, related to diverse metabolic functions, changed their expression level as a consequence of polyploidization. In addition, cytosine methylation increased in 2x, but not in 4x, hybrids. Our results indicate that sexual polyploidization induces significant transcriptional novelty, possibly mediated in part by DNA methylation, and phenotypic novelty that could underpin improved adaptation and reproductive success of tetraploid M. sativa with respect to its diploid progenitor. These polyploidy-induced changes may have promoted the adoption of tetraploid alfalfa in agriculture. PMID:26858330

  1. [Responses of Medicago sativa and Astragalus adsurgens seedlings growth and water use to soil moisture regime].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingcheng; Shan, Lun; Li, Fengmin

    2005-12-01

    In the semi-arid area of Loess Plateau, seasonal drought often occurs during the vegetative stage of grass plants, leading to the subsequent serious reduction of their yield. Aimed to study the responses of the seedlings growth and water use of two perennial leguminous grasses Medicago sativa and Astragalus adsurgens to different soil moisture regimes, a pot experiment was installed with five treatments, i.e., adequate water supply (HW), moderate water stress (LW), soil drying gradually from HW (DHW) and LW (DLW), and refilling water to LW after soil drying from LW (RWL). The results showed that under HW, the seedlings of both M. sativa and A. adsurgens had the highest biomass and transpiration water use efficiency (TWUE), and M. sativa had a significantly higher biomass than A. adsurgens (P < 0.05). When the soil moisture content declined, M. sativa had a higher reduction rate in biomass and TWUE than A. adsurgens, and after the soil moisture regime changed from LW and DLW to RWL, the biomass of M. sativa and A. adsurgens was reduced by 47.8% and 27.9%, respectively, as compared to LW (P < 0.05). At the same time, the root/shoot ratio (R/S) of M. sativa and its water consumption per unit root increased significantly, while the TWUE decreased significantly (P < 0.05); but for A. adsurgens, its R/S decreased significantly (P < 0.05), while the TWUE and the water consumption per unit root had no significant change. PMID:16515181

  2. Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics reveal enhanced specialized metabolism in Medicago truncatula root border cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Bonnie S; Bedair, Mohamed F; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V; Yang, Dong Sik; Allen, Stacy N; Li, Wensheng; Tang, Yuhong; Sumner, Lloyd W

    2015-04-01

    Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics of Medicago truncatula seedling border cells and root tips revealed substantial metabolic differences between these distinct and spatially segregated root regions. Large differential increases in oxylipin-pathway lipoxygenases and auxin-responsive transcript levels in border cells corresponded to differences in phytohormone and volatile levels compared with adjacent root tips. Morphological examinations of border cells revealed the presence of significant starch deposits that serve as critical energy and carbon reserves, as documented through increased β-amylase transcript levels and associated starch hydrolysis metabolites. A substantial proportion of primary metabolism transcripts were decreased in border cells, while many flavonoid- and triterpenoid-related metabolite and transcript levels were increased dramatically. The cumulative data provide compounding evidence that primary and secondary metabolism are differentially programmed in border cells relative to root tips. Metabolic resources normally destined for growth and development are redirected toward elevated accumulation of specialized metabolites in border cells, resulting in constitutively elevated defense and signaling compounds needed to protect the delicate root cap and signal motile rhizobia required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Elevated levels of 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone were further increased in border cells of roots exposed to cotton root rot (Phymatotrichopsis omnivora), and the value of 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone as an antimicrobial compound was demonstrated using in vitro growth inhibition assays. The cumulative and pathway-specific data provide key insights into the metabolic programming of border cells that strongly implicate a more prominent mechanistic role for border cells in plant-microbe signaling, defense, and interactions than envisioned previously. PMID:25667316

  3. Integrated Metabolomics and Transcriptomics Reveal Enhanced Specialized Metabolism in Medicago truncatula Root Border Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Bonnie S.; Bedair, Mohamed F.; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V.; Yang, Dong Sik; Allen, Stacy N.; Li, Wensheng; Tang, Yuhong; Sumner, Lloyd W.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics of Medicago truncatula seedling border cells and root tips revealed substantial metabolic differences between these distinct and spatially segregated root regions. Large differential increases in oxylipin-pathway lipoxygenases and auxin-responsive transcript levels in border cells corresponded to differences in phytohormone and volatile levels compared with adjacent root tips. Morphological examinations of border cells revealed the presence of significant starch deposits that serve as critical energy and carbon reserves, as documented through increased β-amylase transcript levels and associated starch hydrolysis metabolites. A substantial proportion of primary metabolism transcripts were decreased in border cells, while many flavonoid- and triterpenoid-related metabolite and transcript levels were increased dramatically. The cumulative data provide compounding evidence that primary and secondary metabolism are differentially programmed in border cells relative to root tips. Metabolic resources normally destined for growth and development are redirected toward elevated accumulation of specialized metabolites in border cells, resulting in constitutively elevated defense and signaling compounds needed to protect the delicate root cap and signal motile rhizobia required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Elevated levels of 7,4′-dihydroxyflavone were further increased in border cells of roots exposed to cotton root rot (Phymatotrichopsis omnivora), and the value of 7,4′-dihydroxyflavone as an antimicrobial compound was demonstrated using in vitro growth inhibition assays. The cumulative and pathway-specific data provide key insights into the metabolic programming of border cells that strongly implicate a more prominent mechanistic role for border cells in plant-microbe signaling, defense, and interactions than envisioned previously. PMID:25667316

  4. Speciation Matters: Bioavailability of Silver and Silver Sulfide Nanoparticles to Alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed

    Stegemeier, John P; Schwab, Fabienne; Colman, Benjamin P; Webb, Samuel M; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Winkler, Christopher; Wiesner, Mark R; Lowry, Gregory V

    2015-07-21

    Terrestrial crops are directly exposed to silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and their environmentally transformed analog silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag2S-NPs) when wastewater treatment biosolids are applied as fertilizer to agricultural soils. This leads to a need to understand their bioavailability to plants. In the present study, the mechanisms of uptake and distribution of silver in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were quantified and visualized upon hydroponic exposure to Ag-NPs, Ag2S-NPs, and AgNO3 at 3 mg total Ag/L. Total silver uptake was measured in dried roots and shoots, and the spatial distribution of elements was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and synchrotron-based X-ray imaging techniques. Despite large differences in release of Ag(+) ions from the particles, Ag-NPs, Ag2S-NPs, and Ag(+) became associated with plant roots to a similar degree, and exhibited similarly limited (<1%) amounts of translocation of silver into the shoot system. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping revealed differences in the distribution of Ag into roots for each treatment. Silver nanoparticles mainly accumulated in the (columella) border cells and elongation zone, whereas Ag(+) accumulated more uniformly throughout the root. In contrast, Ag2S-NPs remained largely adhered to the root exterior, and the presence of cytoplasmic nano-SixOy aggregates was observed. Exclusively in roots exposed to particulate silver, NPs smaller than the originally dosed NPs were identified by TEM in the cell walls. The apparent accumulation of Ag in the root apoplast determined by XRF, and the presence of small NPs in root cell walls suggests uptake of partially dissolved NPs and translocation along the apoplast. PMID:26106801

  5. Legume adaptation to sulfur deficiency revealed by comparing nutrient allocation and seed traits in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Hélène; Poignavent, Germain; Le Signor, Christine; Aimé, Delphine; Vieren, Eric; Tadla, Charlène; Lugan, Raphaël; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Santoni, Anne-Lise; Wipf, Daniel; Buitink, Julia; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Salon, Christophe; Gallardo, Karine

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions and the use of sulfur-free mineral fertilizers are decreasing soil sulfur levels and threaten the adequate fertilization of most crops. To provide knowledge regarding legume adaptation to sulfur restriction, we subjected Medicago truncatula, a model legume species, to sulfur deficiency at various developmental stages, and compared the yield, nutrient allocation and seed traits. This comparative analysis revealed that sulfur deficiency at the mid-vegetative stage decreased yield and altered the allocation of nitrogen and carbon to seeds, leading to reduced levels of major oligosaccharides in mature seeds, whose germination was dramatically affected. In contrast, during the reproductive period, sulfur deficiency had little influence on yield and nutrient allocation, but the seeds germinated slowly and were characterized by low levels of a biotinylated protein, a putative indicator of germination vigor that has not been previously related to sulfur nutrition. Significantly, plants deprived of sulfur at an intermediary stage (flowering) adapted well by remobilizing nutrients from source organs to seeds, ensuring adequate quantities of carbon and nitrogen in seeds. This efficient remobilization of photosynthates may be explained by vacuolar sulfate efflux to maintain leaf metabolism throughout reproductive growth, as suggested by transcript and metabolite profiling. The seeds from these plants, deprived of sulfur at the floral transition, contained normal levels of major oligosaccharides but their germination was delayed, consistent with low levels of sucrose and the glycolytic enzymes required to restart seed metabolism during imbibition. Overall, our findings provide an integrative view of the legume response to sulfur deficiency. PMID:24118112

  6. Novel MtCEP1 peptides produced in vivo differentially regulate root development in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A.; Binos, Steve; Truong, Thy T.; Imin, Nijat; Mariani, Michael; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Small, post-translationally modified and secreted peptides regulate diverse plant developmental processes. Due to low natural abundance, it is difficult to isolate and identify these peptides. Using an improved peptide isolation protocol and Orbitrap mass spectrometry, nine 15-amino-acid CEP peptides were identified that corresponded to the two domains encoded by Medicago truncatula CEP1 (MtCEP1). Novel arabinosylated and hydroxylated peptides were identified in root cultures overexpressing MtCEP1. The five most abundant CEP peptides were hydroxylated and these species were detected also in low amounts in vector control samples. Synthetic peptides with different hydroxylation patterns differentially affected root development. Notably, the domain 1 peptide hydroxylated at Pro4 and Pro11 (D1:HyP4,11) imparted the strongest inhibition of lateral root emergence when grown with 5mM KNO3 and stimulated the highest increase in nodule number when grown with 0mM KNO3. Inhibition of lateral root emergence by D1:HyP4,11 was not alleviated by removing peptide exposure. In contrast, the domain 2 peptide hydroxylated at Pro11 (D2:HyP11) increased stage III–IV lateral root primordium numbers by 6-fold (P < 0.001) which failed to emerge. Auxin addition at levels which stimulated lateral root formation in wild-type plants had little or no ameliorating effect on CEP peptide-mediated inhibition of lateral root formation or emergence. Both peptides increased and altered the root staining pattern of the auxin-responsive reporter GH3:GUS suggesting CEPs alter auxin sensitivity or distribution. The results showed that CEP primary sequence and post-translational modifications influence peptide activities and the improved isolation procedure effectively and reproducibly identifies and characterises CEPs. PMID:25711701

  7. Medicago truncatula ecotypes A17 and R108 differed in their response to iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Gen; Wang, Baolan; Tian, Qiuying; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2014-05-01

    Medicago truncatula Gaertn is a model legume species with a wide genetic diversity. To evaluate the responses of the two M. truncatula ecotypes, the effect of Fe deficiency on ecotype A17 and ecotype R108, which have been widely used in physiological and molecular studies, was investigated. A greater reduction in shoot Fe concentration of R108 plants than that of A17 plants was observed under Fe-deficient conditions. Exposure to Fe-deficient medium led to a greater increase in ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity in roots of A17 than those of R108 plants, while expression of genes encoding FCR in roots of A17 and R108 plants was similarly up-regulated by Fe deficiency. Exposure of A17 plants to Fe-deficient medium evoked an ethylene evolution from roots, while the same treatment had no effect on ethylene evolution from R108 roots. There was a significant increase in expression of MtIRT encoding a Fe transporter in A17, but not in R108 plants, upon exposure to Fe-deficient medium. Transcripts of MtFRD3 that is responsible for loading of iron chelator citrate into xylem were up-regulated by Fe deficiency in A17, but not in R108 plants. These results suggest that M. truncatula ecotypes A17 and R108 differed in their response and adaptation to Fe deficiency, and that ethylene may play an important role in regulation of greater tolerance of A17 plant to Fe deficiency. These findings provide important clues for further elucidation of molecular mechanism by which legume plants respond and adapt to low soil Fe availability. PMID:24709157

  8. Complete nucleotide sequence of Alfalfa mosaic virus isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Bejerman, Nicolás; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) isolate infecting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina, AMV-Arg, was determined. The virus genome has the typical organization described for AMV, and comprises 3,643, 2,593, and 2,038 nucleotides for RNA1, 2 and 3, respectively. The whole genome sequence and each encoding region were compared with those of other four isolates that have been completely sequenced from China, Italy, Spain and USA. The nucleotide identity percentages ranged from 95.9 to 99.1 % for the three RNAs and from 93.7 to 99 % for the protein 1 (P1), protein 2 (P2), movement protein and coat protein (CP) encoding regions, whereas the amino acid identity percentages of these proteins ranged from 93.4 to 99.5 %, the lowest value corresponding to P2. CP sequences of AMV-Arg were compared with those of other 25 available isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene was carried out. The highest percentage of nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene was 98.3 % with a Chinese isolate and 98.6 % at the amino acid level with four isolates, two from Italy, one from Brazil and the remaining one from China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that AMV-Arg is closely related to subgroup I of AMV isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete nucleotide sequence of AMV from South America and the first worldwide report of complete nucleotide sequence of AMV isolated from alfalfa as natural host. PMID:24510307

  9. Influence of pCO2 on carbon allocation in nodulated Medicago sativa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, Gabriela; Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Michalzik, Beate; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel; Trumbore, Susan

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations (pCO_2) have been related to changes in plant carbon (C) availability and photosynthetic capacity, yet there is no clear consensus as to the effect of pCO2 on the plant C balance and on nitrogen fixation in symbiotic systems. We investigated how different pCO2 (Pleistocene: 170 ppm, ambient: 400 ppm and projected future: 700 ppm) influence C allocation in nodulated Medicago sativa L. We labeled 17 week old plants with depleted 13C (-34.7±1.2‰) and traced the label over a 9-day period, to assess the redistribution of newly assimilated C across different sinks, including nodules. We analyzed N concentrations in plant tissues and found no significant differences in leaves and roots across treatments. However, growth and C fixation rates increased with pCO_2, and differences were greatest between 170 ppm and 700 ppm. Across pCO2 treatments we observed a 13C-enrichment in roots compared to leaves. We further observed the highest 13C depletion of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) and respired CO2 in tissues of plants grown at 700 ppm, especially in leaves and nodules. Our preliminary results suggest that sink organs like roots and nodules are fed with newly-assimilated NSCs from leaves to support respiration, and especially in 170 ppm plants represented a major respiratory loss of newly assimilated C (≈ 35{%} of the total plant respiration). Our results suggest that although plant metabolic processes like photosynthesis and respiration are affected by changes in pCO_2, nitrogen acquisition in such a symbiotic system is not.

  10. The Hybridization Barrier between Herbaceous Medicago sativa and Woody M. arborea Is Weakened by Selection of Seed Parents

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Edwin; Armour, David; Irwin, John

    2013-01-01

    Medicago sativa, alfalfa or lucerne, and M. arborea were considered reproductively isolated until recently. Then, in 2003, an alfalfa genotype was identified that produced a few seeds and progeny with hybrid traits after a large number of pollinations by M. arborea. A derivative of this alfalfa genotype also produced a low frequency of progeny with hybrid traits. Thus, the hybridization barrier was weakened by selection of seed parents. Hybrids from both events expressed traits from M. arborea and M. arborea-specific DNA bands, although more of the M. sativa genome was retained, based on the DNA results. Thus, there was chromatin elimination during embryogenesis, resulting in partial hybrids (hereafter hybrids). However, more than 30 hybrids with an array of M. arborea traits have been obtained thus far, and research continues on the nature of the hybrids. Traits have been genetically transmitted in crosses, and selected traits are in use for alfalfa breeding. This paper reviews the first hybrids and then focuses on further weakening of the hybridization barrier with the discovery of a more efficient hybridizer derived from crossing Medicago sativa subspecies, sativa, coerulea and falcata. This genotype was found to have reproductive abnormalities associated with its complex subspecies origin that are best described as hybrid breakdown. In effect, this subspecies derivative is a bridge-cross parent that consistently produces hybrids. Reproductive abnormalities in the bridge-cross parent are reported and discussed. PMID:27137379

  11. How grow-and-switch gravitropism generates root coiling and root waving growth responses in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tzer Han; Silverberg, Jesse L.; Floss, Daniela S.; Harrison, Maria J.; Henley, Christopher L.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies show that plant root morphologies can vary widely from straight gravity-aligned primary roots to fractal-like root architectures. However, the opaqueness of soil makes it difficult to observe how environmental factors modulate these patterns. Here, we combine a transparent hydrogel growth medium with a custom built 3D laser scanner to directly image the morphology of Medicago truncatula primary roots. In our experiments, root growth is obstructed by an inclined plane in the growth medium. As the tilt of this rigid barrier is varied, we find Medicago transitions between randomly directed root coiling, sinusoidal root waving, and normal gravity-aligned morphologies. Although these root phenotypes appear morphologically distinct, our analysis demonstrates the divisions are less well defined, and instead, can be viewed as a 2D biased random walk that seeks the path of steepest decent along the inclined plane. Features of this growth response are remarkably similar to the widely known run-and-tumble chemotactic behavior of Escherichia coli bacteria, where biased random walks are used as optimal strategies for nutrient uptake. PMID:26432881

  12. How grow-and-switch gravitropism generates root coiling and root waving growth responses in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tzer Han; Silverberg, Jesse L; Floss, Daniela S; Harrison, Maria J; Henley, Christopher L; Cohen, Itai

    2015-10-20

    Experimental studies show that plant root morphologies can vary widely from straight gravity-aligned primary roots to fractal-like root architectures. However, the opaqueness of soil makes it difficult to observe how environmental factors modulate these patterns. Here, we combine a transparent hydrogel growth medium with a custom built 3D laser scanner to directly image the morphology of Medicago truncatula primary roots. In our experiments, root growth is obstructed by an inclined plane in the growth medium. As the tilt of this rigid barrier is varied, we find Medicago transitions between randomly directed root coiling, sinusoidal root waving, and normal gravity-aligned morphologies. Although these root phenotypes appear morphologically distinct, our analysis demonstrates the divisions are less well defined, and instead, can be viewed as a 2D biased random walk that seeks the path of steepest decent along the inclined plane. Features of this growth response are remarkably similar to the widely known run-and-tumble chemotactic behavior of Escherichia coli bacteria, where biased random walks are used as optimal strategies for nutrient uptake. PMID:26432881

  13. Medicago truncatula CYP716A12 Is a Multifunctional Oxidase Involved in the Biosynthesis of Hemolytic Saponins[W

    PubMed Central

    Carelli, Maria; Biazzi, Elisa; Panara, Francesco; Tava, Aldo; Scaramelli, Laura; Porceddu, Andrea; Graham, Neil; Odoardi, Miriam; Piano, Efisio; Arcioni, Sergio; May, Sean; Scotti, Carla; Calderini, Ornella

    2011-01-01

    Saponins, a group of glycosidic compounds present in several plant species, have aglycone moieties that are formed using triterpenoid or steroidal skeletons. In spite of their importance as antimicrobial compounds and their possible benefits for human health, knowledge of the genetic control of saponin biosynthesis is still poorly understood. In the Medicago genus, the hemolytic activity of saponins is related to the nature of their aglycone moieties. We have identified a cytochrome P450 gene (CYP716A12) involved in saponin synthesis in Medicago truncatula using a combined genetic and biochemical approach. Genetic loss-of-function analysis and complementation studies showed that CYP716A12 is responsible for an early step in the saponin biosynthetic pathway. Mutants in CYP716A12 were unable to produce hemolytic saponins and only synthetized soyasaponins, and were thus named lacking hemolytic activity (lha). In vitro enzymatic activity assays indicate that CYP716A12 catalyzes the oxidation of β-amyrin and erythrodiol at the C-28 position, yielding oleanolic acid. Transcriptome changes in the lha mutant showed a modulation in the main steps of triterpenic saponin biosynthetic pathway: squalene cyclization, β-amyrin oxidation, and glycosylation. The analysis of CYP716A12 expression in planta is reported together with the sapogenin content in different tissues and stages. This article provides evidence for CYP716A12 being a key gene in hemolytic saponin biosynthesis. PMID:21821776

  14. Patterns of divergence of a large family of nodule cysteine-rich peptides in accessions of Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Nallu, Sumitha; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Zhou, Peng; Young, Nevin D; VandenBosch, Kathryn A

    2014-01-01

    The nodule cysteine-rich (NCR) groups of defensin-like (DEFL) genes are one of the largest gene families expressed in the nodules of some legume plants. They have only been observed in the inverted repeat loss clade (IRLC) of legumes, which includes the model legume Medicago truncatula. NCRs are reported to play an important role in plant–microbe interactions. To understand their diversity we analyzed their expression and sequence polymorphisms among four accessions of M. truncatula. A significant expression and nucleotide variation was observed among the genes. We then used 26 accessions to estimate the selection pressures shaping evolution among the accessions by calculating the nucleotide diversity at non-synonymous and synonymous sites in the coding region. The mature peptides of the orthologous NCRs had signatures of both purifying and diversifying selection pressures, unlike the seed DEFLs, which predominantly exhibited purifying selection. The expression, sequence variation and apparent diversifying selection in NCRs within the Medicago species indicates rapid and recent evolution, and suggests that this family of genes is actively evolving to adapt to different environments and is acquiring new functions. PMID:24635121

  15. Multifaceted Investigation of Metabolites During Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago via High Resolution MALDI-MS Imaging and ESI-MS

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed the unique ability to establish a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. This interaction results in the formation of root nodules in which rhizobia thrive and reduce atmospheric dinitrogen into plant-usable ammonium through biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Due to the availability of genetic information for both of the symbiotic partners, the Medicago truncatula–Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for examining the BNF process. Although metabolites are important in this symbiotic association, few studies have investigated the array of metabolites that influence this process. Of these studies, most target only a few specific metabolites, the roles of which are either well known or are part of a well-characterized metabolic pathway. Here, we used a multifaceted mass spectrometric (MS) approach to detect and identify the key metabolites that are present during BNF using the Medicago truncatula–Sinorhizobium meliloti association as the model system. High mass accuracy and high resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) Orbitrap instruments were used in this study and provide complementary results for more in-depth characterization of the nitrogen-fixation process. We used well-characterized plant and bacterial mutants to highlight differences between the metabolites that are present in functional vs. non-functional nodules. Our study highlights the benefits of using a combination of mass spectrometric techniques to detect differences in metabolite composition and the distributions of these metabolites in plant biology. PMID:25323862

  16. Natural diversity in the model legume Medicago truncatula allows identifying distinct genetic mechanisms conferring partial resistance to Verticillium wilt

    PubMed Central

    Gentzbittel, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is a major threat to alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and many other crops. The model legume Medicago truncatula was used as a host for studying resistance and susceptibility to Verticillium albo-atrum. In addition to presenting well-established genetic resources, this wild plant species enables to investigate biodiversity of the response to the pathogen and putative crosstalk between disease and symbiosis. Symptom scoring after root inoculation and modelling of disease curves allowed assessing susceptibility levels in recombinant lines of three crosses between susceptible and resistant lines, in a core collection of 32 lines, and in mutants affected in symbiosis with rhizobia. A GFP-expressing V. albo-atrum strain was used to study colonization of susceptible plants. Symptoms and colonization pattern in infected M. truncatula plants were typical of Verticillium wilt. Three distinct major quantitative trait loci were identified using a multicross, multisite design, suggesting that simple genetic mechanisms appear to control Verticillium wilt resistance in M. truncatula lines A17 and DZA45.5. The disease functional parameters varied largely in lines of the core collection. This biodiversity with regard to disease response encourages the development of association genetics and ecological approaches. Several mutants of the resistant line, impaired in different steps of rhizobial symbiosis, were affected in their response to V. albo-atrum, which suggests that mechanisms involved in the establishment of symbiosis or disease might have some common regulatory control points. PMID:23213135

  17. Multifaceted Investigation of Metabolites During Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago via High Resolution MALDI-MS Imaging and ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemperline, Erin; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have developed the unique ability to establish a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. This interaction results in the formation of root nodules in which rhizobia thrive and reduce atmospheric dinitrogen into plant-usable ammonium through biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Owing to the availability of genetic information for both of the symbiotic partners, the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for examining the BNF process. Although metabolites are important in this symbiotic association, few studies have investigated the array of metabolites that influence this process. Of these studies, most target only a few specific metabolites, the roles of which are either well known or are part of a well-characterized metabolic pathway. Here, we used a multifaceted mass spectrometric (MS) approach to detect and identify the key metabolites that are present during BNF using the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association as the model system. High mass accuracy and high resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) Orbitrap instruments were used in this study and provide complementary results for more in-depth characterization of the nitrogen-fixation process. We used well-characterized plant and bacterial mutants to highlight differences between the metabolites that are present in functional versus nonfunctional nodules. Our study highlights the benefits of using a combination of mass spectrometric techniques to detect differences in metabolite composition and the distributions of these metabolites in plant biology.

  18. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stem vascular tissue suggests a role for invertase in cell wall cellulose synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants were transformed with two constructs: (1) a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase promoter isolated from alfalfa nodules (PEPC-4) fused to GUS; and (2) PEPC-4 fused with sucrose synthase (SUS) isolated from alfalfa nodules. Histochemical staining for GUS in st...

  19. Control of Dissected Leaf Morphology by a Cys(2)His(2) Zinc Finger Transcription Factor in the Model Legume Medicago Truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different plants may have different leaf types. Diversity in leaf types contributes to a large degree of plant diversity in the natural environment. How different leaf morphology is determined is not yet understood. The leguminous plant Medicago truncatula exhibits dissected leaves with three leafl...

  20. Genetic transformation and analysis of rice OsAPx2 gene in Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qingjie; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2012-01-01

    The OsAPx2 gene from rice was cloned to produce PBI121::OsAPx2 dual-expression plants, of which expression level would be increasing under stressful conditions. The enzyme ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in the leaves and roots of the plants increased with increasing exposure time to different sodium chloride (NaCl) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))concentrations, as indicated by protein gel blot analysis. The increased enzyme yield improved the ability of the plants to resist the stress treatments. The OsAPx2 gene was localized in the cytoplasm of epidermal onion cells as indicated by the instantaneous expression of green fluorescence. An 80% regeneration rate was observed in Medicago sativa L. plants transformed with the OsAPx2 gene using Agrobacterium tumefaciens, as indicated by specific primer PCR. The OsAPx2 gene was expressed at the mRNA level and the individual M. sativa (T#1,T#2,T#5) were obtained through assaying the generation of positive T2 using RNA gel blot analysis. When the seeds of the wild type (WT) and the T2 (T#1,T#5) were incubated in culture containing MS with NaCl for 7 days, the results as shown of following: the root length of transgenic plant was longer than WT plants, the H(2)O(2) content in roots of WT was more than of transgenic plants, the APX activity under stresses increased by 2.89 times compared with the WT, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the WT was higher than the transgenic plants, the leaves of the WT turned yellow, but those of the transgenic plants remained green and remained healthy. The chlorophyll content in the WT leaves was less than in the transgenic plants, after soaking in solutions of H(2)O(2), sodium sulfite (Na(2)SO(3)), and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)). Therefore, the OsAPx2 gene overexpression in transgenic M. sativa improves the removal of H(2)O(2) and the salt-resistance compared with WT plants. A novel strain of M. sativa carrying a salt-resistance gene was obtained. PMID:22848448

  1. Exploring the plant-associated bacterial communities in Medicago sativa L

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant-associated bacterial communities caught the attention of several investigators which study the relationships between plants and soil and the potential application of selected bacterial species in crop improvement and protection. Medicago sativa L. is a legume crop of high economic importance as forage in temperate areas and one of the most popular model plants for investigations on the symbiosis with nitrogen fixing rhizobia (mainly belonging to the alphaproteobacterial species Sinorhizobium meliloti). However, despite its importance, no studies have been carried out looking at the total bacterial community associated with the plant. In this work we explored for the first time the total bacterial community associated with M. sativa plants grown in mesocosms conditions, looking at a wide taxonomic spectrum, from the class to the single species (S. meliloti) level. Results Results, obtained by using Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, quantitative PCR and sequencing of 16 S rRNA gene libraries, showed a high taxonomic diversity as well as a dominance by members of the class Alphaproteobacteria in plant tissues. Within Alphaproteobacteria the families Sphingomonadaceae and Methylobacteriaceae were abundant inside plant tissues, while soil Alphaproteobacteria were represented by the families of Hyphomicrobiaceae, Methylocystaceae, Bradyirhizobiaceae and Caulobacteraceae. At the single species level, we were able to detect the presence of S. meliloti populations in aerial tissues, nodules and soil. An analysis of population diversity on nodules and soil showed a relatively low sharing of haplotypes (30-40%) between the two environments and between replicate mesocosms, suggesting drift as main force shaping S. meliloti population at least in this system. Conclusions In this work we shed some light on the bacterial communities associated with M. sativa plants, showing that Alphaproteobacteria may constitute an important

  2. QTL analysis of seed germination and pre-emergence growth at extreme temperatures in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Dias, Paula Menna Barreto; Brunel-Muguet, Sophie; Dürr, Carolyne; Huguet, Thierry; Demilly, Didier; Wagner, Marie-Helene; Teulat-Merah, Béatrice

    2011-02-01

    Enhancing the knowledge on the genetic basis of germination and heterotrophic growth at extreme temperatures is of major importance for improving crop establishment. A quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was carried out at sub- and supra-optimal temperatures at these early stages in the model Legume Medicago truncatula. On the basis of an ecophysiological model framework, two populations of recombinant inbred lines were chosen for the contrasting behaviours of parental lines: LR5 at sub-optimal temperatures (5 or 10°C) and LR4 at a supra-optimal temperature (20°C). Seed masses were measured in all lines. For LR5, germination rates and hypocotyl growth were measured by hand, whereas for LR4, imbibition and germination rates as well as early embryonic axis growth were measured using an automated image capture and analysis device. QTLs were found for all traits. The phenotyping framework we defined for measuring variables, distinguished stages and enabled identification of distinct QTLs for seed mass (chromosomes 1, 5, 7 and 8), imbibition (chromosome 4), germination (chromosomes 3, 5, 7 and 8) and heterotrophic growth (chromosomes 1, 2, 3 and 8). The three QTL identified for hypocotyl length at sub-optimal temperature explained the largest part of the phenotypic variation (60% together). One digenic interaction was found for hypocotyl width at sub-optimal temperature and the loci involved were linked to additive QTLs for hypocotyl elongation at low temperature. Together with working on a model plant, this approach facilitated the identification of genes specific to each stage that could provide reliable markers for assisting selection and improving crop establishment. With this aim in view, an initial set of putative candidate genes was identified in the light of the role of abscissic acid/gibberellin balance in regulating germination at high temperatures (e.g. ABI4, ABI5), the molecular cascade in response to cold stress (e.g. CBF1, ICE1) and hypotheses on

  3. The utilization of chopped and pelleted lucerne (Medicago sativa) by growing lambs.

    PubMed

    Thomson, D J; Cammell, S B

    1979-03-01

    1. The efficiency of utilization of the dietary energy and nitrogen contained in a dried lucerne (Medicago sativa cv. Chartainvilliers) given either chopped (CL) or ground (1.96 mm screen) and pelleted (PL), was measured in a comparative slaughter experiment. Growing lambs were given equal amounts of digestible energy in the chopped or pelleted form at each of the three planes of nutrition for a period of 100 d. 2. The initial energy, fat and protein content of both the carcass and the total body of the test lambs was estimated from regression equations between fasted (18 h) live weight and these components, derived from a group of twenty-three comparable lambs. The final energy, fat and protein content of the test lambs was determined directly by chemical analyses. 3. The metabolizable energy (ME) content of the diets was derived at each plane of nutrition from measured faecal and urinary losses and estimated methane losses. The depression in ME content with grinding and pelleting the dried lucerne was small (CL 8.69 MJ/kg dry matter (DM), PL 8.42 MG/kg DM). 4. The efficiency of utilization of the ME of the dried lucerne for growth and fattening was higher (P less than 0.01) when given in the ground pelleted form (0.533), than in the chopped form (0.284). The net energy value of the PL (3.5 MJ/kg DM) was higher than that of CL (2.2 MJ/kg DM). 5. Thus lambs fed on PL grew faster and had a higher caracass weight gain, carcass protein and fat retention than lambs fed on CL. The composition of the carcass was not altered by the physical processing treatment. 6. Digestion studies with these same CL and PL diets had shown that grinding and pelleting depressed digestion in the forestomachs and increased digestion in the small intestine compared with the chopped form. The increased efficiency of utilization of the gross energy and ME and the higher net energy value of PL was attributed primarily to a change in the site of digestion within the alimentary tract. Associated

  4. QTL analysis of seed germination and pre-emergence growth at extreme temperatures in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Paula Menna Barreto; Brunel-Muguet, Sophie; Dürr, Carolyne; Huguet, Thierry; Demilly, Didier; Wagner, Marie-Helene

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing the knowledge on the genetic basis of germination and heterotrophic growth at extreme temperatures is of major importance for improving crop establishment. A quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was carried out at sub- and supra-optimal temperatures at these early stages in the model Legume Medicago truncatula. On the basis of an ecophysiological model framework, two populations of recombinant inbred lines were chosen for the contrasting behaviours of parental lines: LR5 at sub-optimal temperatures (5 or 10°C) and LR4 at a supra-optimal temperature (20°C). Seed masses were measured in all lines. For LR5, germination rates and hypocotyl growth were measured by hand, whereas for LR4, imbibition and germination rates as well as early embryonic axis growth were measured using an automated image capture and analysis device. QTLs were found for all traits. The phenotyping framework we defined for measuring variables, distinguished stages and enabled identification of distinct QTLs for seed mass (chromosomes 1, 5, 7 and 8), imbibition (chromosome 4), germination (chromosomes 3, 5, 7 and 8) and heterotrophic growth (chromosomes 1, 2, 3 and 8). The three QTL identified for hypocotyl length at sub-optimal temperature explained the largest part of the phenotypic variation (60% together). One digenic interaction was found for hypocotyl width at sub-optimal temperature and the loci involved were linked to additive QTLs for hypocotyl elongation at low temperature. Together with working on a model plant, this approach facilitated the identification of genes specific to each stage that could provide reliable markers for assisting selection and improving crop establishment. With this aim in view, an initial set of putative candidate genes was identified in the light of the role of abscissic acid/gibberellin balance in regulating germination at high temperatures (e.g. ABI4, ABI5), the molecular cascade in response to cold stress (e.g. CBF1, ICE1) and hypotheses on

  5. Keel petal incision: a simple and efficient method for genetic crossing in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic crossing is an essential tool in both forward and reverse genetic approaches to understand the biological functions of genes. For Medicago truncatula (barrel medic) various crossing techniques have been used which differ in the methods used to dissect the female parent’s unopened flower bud to remove immature anthers for prevention of self-pollination. Previously described methods including front, side or back incision methods may damage the flower bud, impeding successful fertilization and/or seed development because they may allow pollen to dislodge and floral organs to desiccate after crossing, all of which diminish the success rates of crossing. Results We report the keel petal incision method for genetic crossing in M. truncatula ecotype R108 and demonstrate successful crosses with two other M. truncatula ecotypes, A17 and A20. In the method presented here, an incision is made along the central line of the keel petal from the bottom 1/3rd of the female parent’s flower bud to its distal end. This allows easy removal of anthers from the flower bud and access for cross-pollination. After pollination, the stigma and the deposited pollen from the male donor are covered by the keel petal, wing petals and standard petal, forming a natural pouch. The pouch prevents dislodging of deposited pollen from the stigma and protects the internal floral organs from drying out, without using cling-film or water-containing chambers to maintain a humid environment. The keel petal incision method showed an approximate 80% success rate in the M. truncatula R108 ecotype and also in other ecotypes including Jemalong A17 and A20. Conclusions Our keel petal incision protocol shows marked improvement over existing methods with respect to the ease of crossing and the percentage of successful crosses. Developed for the M. truncatula R108 ecotype, the protocol has been demonstrated with A17 and A20 ecotypes and is expected to work with other ecotypes. Investigators of

  6. LTR retrotransposon landscape in Medicago truncatula: more rapid removal than in rice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Jin-Song

    2008-01-01

    Background Long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR elements) are ubiquitous Eukaryotic TEs that transpose through RNA intermediates. Accounting for significant proportion of many plant genomes, LTR elements have been well established as one of the major forces underlying the evolution of plant genome size, structure and function. The accessibility of more than 40% of genomic sequences of the model legume Medicago truncatula (Mt) has made the comprehensive study of its LTR elements possible. Results We use a newly developed tool LTR_FINDER to identify LTR retrotransposons in the Mt genome and detect 526 full-length elements as well as a great number of copies related to them. These elements constitute about 9.6% of currently available genomic sequences. They are classified into 85 families of which 64 are reported for the first time. The majority of the LTR retrotransposons belong to either Copia or Gypsy superfamily and the others are categorized as TRIMs or LARDs by their length. We find that the copy-number of Copia-like families is 3 times more than that of Gypsy-like ones but the latter contribute more to the genome. The analysis of PBS and protein-coding domain structure of the LTR families reveals that they tend to use only 4–5 types of tRNAs and many families have quite conservative ORFs besides known TE domains. For several important families, we describe in detail their abundance, conservation, insertion time and structure. We investigate the amplification-deletion pattern of the elements and find that the detectable full-length elements are relatively young and most of them were inserted within the last 0.52 MY. We also estimate that more than ten million bp of the Mt genomic sequences have been removed by the deletion of LTR elements and the removal of the full-length structures in Mt has been more rapid than in rice. Conclusion This report is the first comprehensive description and analysis of LTR retrotransposons in the Mt genome. Many important

  7. A nitrogen-dependent switch in the high affinity ammonium transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Straub, Daniel; Ludewig, Uwe; Neuhäuser, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are crucial for the high affinity primary uptake and translocation of ammonium in plants. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the genomic set of AMT-type ammonium transporters comprises eight members. Only four genes were abundantly expressed in young seedlings, both in roots and shoots. While the expression of all AMTs in the shoot was not affected by the nitrogen availability, the dominating MtAMT1;1 gene was repressed by nitrogen in roots, despite that cellular nitrogen concentrations were far above deficiency levels. A contrasting de-repression by nitrogen was observed for MtAMT1;4 and MtAMT2;1, which were both expressed at intermediate level. Weak expression was found for MtAMT1;2 and MtAMT2;3, while the other AMTs were not detected in young seedlings. When expressed from their endogenous promoters, translational fusion proteins of MtAMT1;1 and MtAMT2;1 with green fluorescent protein were co-localized in the plasma membrane of rhizodermal cells, but also detected in cortical root layers. Both transporter proteins similarly functionally complemented a yeast strain that is deficient in high affinity ammonium transport, both at acidic and neutral pH. The uptake into yeast mediated by these transporters saturated with Km AMT1;1 = 89 µM and Km AMT2;1 = 123 µM, respectively. When expressed in oocytes, MtAMT1;1 mediated much larger (15)N-ammonium uptake than MtAMT2;1, but NH4 (+) currents were only recorded for MtAMT1;1. These currents saturated with a voltage-dependent Km = 90 µM at -80 mV. The cellular localization and regulation of the AMTs suggests that MtAMT1;1 encodes the major high affinity ammonium transporter gene in low nitrogen grown young M. truncatula roots and despite the similar localization and substrate affinity, MtAMT2;1 appears functionally distinct and more important at higher nitrogen supply. PMID:25164101

  8. Repression of AS2 by WOX family transcription factors is required for leaf development in Medicago and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fei; Tadege, Million

    2015-01-01

    WOX transcription factors are key regulators of meristematic activity in plants. The Medicago WOX gene, STF, functions in maintenance of leaf marginal meristem, analogous to the function of WUS in the shoot apical meristem. Both STF and WUS directly repress AS2 expression in their respective domains. Ectopic expression of AS2 with WUS promoter leads to a narrow leaf phenotype and other phenotypes similar to the wus mutant. We also found that a wox1 prs wus triple mutant produces much narrower leaf blades than the wox1 prs double mutant, indicating that WUS genetically interacts with WOX1 and PRS in Arabidopsis leaf blade development. Our data points to a general requirement for AS2 repression in meristematic regions to allow cell proliferation. PMID:25807065

  9. Repression of AS2 by WOX family transcription factors is required for leaf development in Medicago and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Tadege, Million

    2015-01-01

    WOX transcription factors are key regulators of meristematic activity in plants. The Medicago WOX gene, STF, functions in maintenance of leaf marginal meristem, analogous to the function of WUS in the shoot apical meristem. Both STF and WUS directly repress AS2 expression in their respective domains. Ectopic expression of AS2 with WUS promoter leads to a narrow leaf phenotype and other phenotypes similar to the wus mutant. We also found that a wox1 prs wus triple mutant produces much narrower leaf blades than the wox1 prs double mutant, indicating that WUS genetically interacts with WOX1 and PRS in Arabidopsis leaf blade development. Our data points to a general requirement for AS2 repression in meristematic regions to allow cell proliferation. PMID:25807065

  10. Potential regulatory phosphorylation sites in a Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump implicated during early symbiotic signaling in roots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T; Volkening, Jeremy D; Rose, Christopher M; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Ané, Jean-Michel; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    In plants and fungi the plasma membrane proton pump generates a large proton-motive force that performs essential functions in many processes, including solute transport and the control of cell elongation. Previous studies in yeast and higher plants have indicated that phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory domain is involved in regulating pump activity. In this report we examine the Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump gene family, and in particular MtAHA5. Yeast complementation assays with phosphomimetic mutations at six candidate sites support a phosphoregulatory role for two residues, suggesting a molecular model to explain early Nod factor-induced changes in the plasma membrane proton-motive force of legume root cells. PMID:26188545

  11. MuTAnT: a family of Mutator-like transposable elements targeting TA microsatellites in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Stawujak, Krzysztof; Startek, Michał; Gambin, Anna; Grzebelus, Dariusz

    2015-08-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile DNA segments, abundant and dynamic in plant genomes. Because their mobility can be potentially deleterious to the host, a variety of mechanisms evolved limiting that negative impact, one of them being preference for a specific target insertion site. Here, we describe a family of Mutator-like DNA transposons in Medicago truncatula targeting TA microsatellites. We identified 218 copies of MuTAnTs and an element carrying a complete ORF encoding a mudrA-like transposase. Most insertion sites are flanked by a variable number of TA tandem repeats, indicating that MuTAnTs are specifically targeting TA microsatellites. Other TE families flanked by TA repeats (e.g. TAFT elements in maize) were described previously, however we identified the first putative autonomous element sharing that characteristics with a related group of short non-autonomous transposons. PMID:25981486

  12. A temperature induced lipocalin gene from Medicago falcata (MfTIL1) confers tolerance to cold and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    He, Xueying; Sambe, Mame Abdou Nahr; Zhuo, Chunliu; Tu, Qinghua; Guo, Zhenfei

    2015-04-01

    Temperature-induced lipocalins (TIL) are plasmalemma-localized proteins and responsive to environmental stresses. Physiological functions of MfTIL1 from Medicago sativa subsp. falcata (L.) Arcang. (hereafter falcata), a forage legume with cold and drought tolerance, were investigated in this study. MfTIL1 expression was greatly induced by 4-96 h of cold treatment, while transcript levels of the orthologs in Medicago truncatula, a model legume plant with lower cold tolerance than falcata, were reduced or not altered within 48-96 h. MfTIL1 expression was not responsive to dehydration and salinity. Compared to the wild type, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing MfTIL1 had lower temperature (LT50) that resulted in 50 % lethal and elevated survival rate in response to freezing, elevated F v/F m and decreased ion leakage after treatments with chilling, high light and methyl viologen (MV). H2O2 and O2 (-) were less accumulated in transgenic plants than in the wild type after treatments with chilling, high light and MV, while antioxidant enzyme activities showed no difference between the two types of plants prior to or following treatments. Higher transcript levels of NtDREB3 and NtDREB4 genes were observed in transgenic plants than in the wild type under non-stressed conditions, but higher transcript levels of NtDREB1, NtDREB2, NtDREB4 and NtCOR15a genes under chilling conditions. It is suggested that MfTIL1 plays an important role in plant tolerance to cold and oxidative stress through promoted scavenging of reactive oxygen species and up-regulating expression of multiple cold responsive genes. PMID:25744207

  13. Haustorium Formation in Medicago truncatula Roots Infected by Phytophthora palmivora Does Not Involve the Common Endosymbiotic Program Shared by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Rik; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Brattinga, Marijke; Govers, Francine; Bisseling, Ton; Limpens, Erik

    2015-12-01

    In biotrophic plant-microbe interactions, microbes infect living plant cells, in which they are hosted in a novel membrane compartment, the host-microbe interface. To create a host-microbe interface, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and rhizobia make use of the same endosymbiotic program. It is a long-standing hypothesis that pathogens make use of plant proteins that are dedicated to mutualistic symbiosis to infect plants and form haustoria. In this report, we developed a Phytophthora palmivora pathosystem to study haustorium formation in Medicago truncatula roots. We show that P. palmivora does not require host genes that are essential for symbiotic infection and host-microbe interface formation to infect Medicago roots and form haustoria. Based on these findings, we conclude that P. palmivora does not hijack the ancient intracellular accommodation program used by symbiotic microbes to form a biotrophic host-microbe interface. PMID:26313411

  14. Variation in rDNA locus number and position among legume species and detection of 2 linked rDNA loci in the model Medicago truncatula by FISH.

    PubMed

    Abirached-Darmency, Mona; Prado-Vivant, Emilce; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Pouthier, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Within Fabaceae, legume species have a variable genome size, chromosome number, and ploidy level. The genome distribution of ribosomal genes, easily detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), is a good tool for anchoring physical and genetic comparative maps. The organisation of 45S rDNA and 5S loci was analysed by FISH in the 4 closely related species: Pisum sativum, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa (2 diploid taxa), and Lathyrus sativus. The 2 types of rDNA arrays displayed interspecific variation in locus number and location, but little intraspecific variation was detected. In the model legume, M. truncatula, the presence of 2 adjacent 45S rDNA loci was demonstrated, and the location of the rDNA loci was independent of the general evolution of the genome DNA. The different parameters relative to clustering of the rDNA loci in specific chromosome regions and the possible basis of rDNA instability are discussed. PMID:16121252

  15. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM244, a microsymbiont isolated from Medicago polymorpha growing in alkaline soil

    SciTech Connect

    Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; O’Hara, Graham; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-12-01

    We report that Ensifer medicae WSM244 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago species. WSM244 was isolated in 1979 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the annual Medicago polymorpha L. growing in alkaline soil (pH 8.0) in Tel Afer, Iraq. WSM244 is the only acid-sensitive E. medicae strain that has been sequenced to date. It is effective at fixing nitrogen with M. polymorpha L., as well as with more alkaline-adapted Medicago spp. such as M. littoralis Loisel., M. scutellata (L.) Mill., M. tornata (L.) Mill. and M. truncatula Gaertn. This strain is also effective with the perennial M. sativa L. Here we describe the features of E. medicae WSM244, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,650,282 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 91 scaffolds of 91 contigs containing 6,427 protein-coding genes and 68 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.

  16. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM244, a microsymbiont isolated from Medicago polymorpha growing in alkaline soil

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; O’Hara, Graham; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; et al

    2015-12-01

    We report that Ensifer medicae WSM244 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago species. WSM244 was isolated in 1979 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the annual Medicago polymorpha L. growing in alkaline soil (pH 8.0) in Tel Afer, Iraq. WSM244 is the only acid-sensitive E. medicae strain that has been sequenced to date. It is effective at fixing nitrogen with M. polymorpha L., as well as with more alkaline-adapted Medicago spp. such as M. littoralis Loisel., M. scutellata (L.) Mill., M. tornata (L.)more » Mill. and M. truncatula Gaertn. This strain is also effective with the perennial M. sativa L. Here we describe the features of E. medicae WSM244, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,650,282 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 91 scaffolds of 91 contigs containing 6,427 protein-coding genes and 68 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.« less

  17. Cold-dependent alternative splicing of a Jumonji C domain-containing gene MtJMJC5 in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yingfang; Wu, Xiaopei; Liu, Demei; Song, Shengjing; Liu, Dengcai; Wang, Haiqing

    2016-05-27

    Histone methylation is an epigenetic modification mechanism that regulates gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Jumonji C domain-containing demethylases are involved in removal of methyl groups at lysine or arginine residues. The JmjC domain-only member, JMJ30/JMJD5 of Arabidopsis, is a component of the plant circadian clock. Although some plant circadian clock genes undergo alternative splicing in response to external cues, there is no evidence that JMJ30/JMJD5 is regulated by alternative splicing. In this study, the expression of an Arabidopsis JMJ30/JMJD5 ortholog in Medicago truncatula, MtJMJC5, in response to circadian clock and abiotic stresses were characterized. The results showed that MtJMJC5 oscillates with a circadian rhythm, and undergoes cold specifically induced alternative splicing. The cold-induced alternative splicing could be reversed after ambient temperature returning to the normal. Sequencing results revealed four alternative splicing RNA isoforms including a full-length authentic protein encoding variant, and three premature termination condon-containing variants due to alternative 3' splice sites at the first and second intron. Under cold treatment, the variants that share a common 3' alternative splicing site at the second intron were intensively up-regulated while the authentic protein encoding variant and the premature termination condon-containing variant only undergoing a 3' alternative splicing at the first intron were down regulated. Although all the premature termination condon-harboring alternative splicing variants were sensitive to nonsense-mediated decay, the premature termination codon-harboring alternative splicing variants sharing the 3' alternative splicing site at the second intron showed less sensitivity than the one only containing the 3' alternative slicing site at the first intron under cold treatment. These results suggest that the cold-dependent alternative splicing of MtJMJC5 is likely a species or genus

  18. Medicago truncatula and Glomus intraradices gene expression in cortical cells harboring arbuscules in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, S Karen; Javot, Hélène; Deewatthanawong, Prasit; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Tang, Yuhong; Blancaflor, Elison B; Udvardi, Michael K; Harrison, Maria J

    2009-01-01

    Background Most vascular flowering plants have the capacity to form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The symbiosis develops in the roots where AM fungi colonize the root cortex and form arbuscules within the cortical cells. Arbuscules are enveloped in a novel plant membrane and their establishment requires the coordinated cellular activities of both symbiotic partners. The arbuscule-cortical cell interface is the primary functional interface of the symbiosis and is of central importance in nutrient exchange. To determine the molecular events the underlie arbuscule development and function, it is first necessary to identify genes that may play a role in this process. Toward this goal we used the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array to document the M. truncatula transcript profiles associated with AM symbiosis, and then developed laser microdissection (LM) of M. truncatula root cortical cells to enable analyses of gene expression in individual cell types by RT-PCR. Results This approach led to the identification of novel M. truncatula and G. intraradices genes expressed in colonized cortical cells and in arbuscules. Within the arbuscule, expression of genes associated with the urea cycle, amino acid biosynthesis and cellular autophagy was detected. Analysis of gene expression in the colonized cortical cell revealed up-regulation of a lysine motif (LysM)-receptor like kinase, members of the GRAS transcription factor family and a symbiosis-specific ammonium transporter that is a likely candidate for mediating ammonium transport in the AM symbiosis. Conclusion Transcript profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array provided new insights into gene expression in M. truncatula roots during AM symbiosis and revealed the existence of several G. intraradices genes on the M. truncatula GeneChip®. A laser microdissection protocol that incorporates low-melting temperature Steedman's wax, was developed to enable laser

  19. Genome-Wide Identification of Different Dormant Medicago sativa L. MicroRNAs in Response to Fall Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongqi; Sun, Xiaoge; Shi, Yinghua; Wang, Chengzhang

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) that regulate gene post-transcriptional expression in plants and animals. High-throughput sequencing technology is capable of identifying small RNAs in plant species. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated perennial forage legumes worldwide, and fall dormancy is an adaptive characteristic related to the biomass production and winter survival in alfalfa. Here, we applied high-throughput sRNA sequencing to identify some miRNAs that were responsive to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101) of alfalfa. Results Four sRNA libraries were generated and sequenced from alfalfa leaves in two typical varieties at distinct seasons. Through integrative analysis, we identified 51 novel miRNA candidates of 206 families. Additionally, we identified 28 miRNAs associated with fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101), including 20 known miRNAs and eight novel miRNAs. Both high-throughput sequencing and RT-qPCR confirmed that eight known miRNA members were up-regulated and six known miRNA members were down-regulated in response to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101). Among the 51 novel miRNA candidates, five miRNAs were up-regulated and three miRNAs were down-regulated in response to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101), and five of them were confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Conclusion We identified 20 known miRNAs and eight new miRNA candidates that were responsive to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101) by high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from Medicago sativa. Our data provide a useful resource for investigating miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms of fall dormancy in alfalfa, and these findings are important for our understanding of the roles played by miRNAs in the response of plants to abiotic stress in general and fall dormancy in alfalfa. PMID:25473944

  20. Characterization of the plant growth promoting bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae MSR1, isolated from roots of non-nodulating Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Ashraf Y.Z.; Alsyeeh, Abdel-Moneium; Almalki, Mohammed A.; Saleh, Farag A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the endophytic bacterial strain designated MSR1 that was isolated from inside the non-nodulating roots of Medicago sativa after surface-sterilization. MSR1 was identified as Enterobacter cloacae using both 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis and API20E biochemical identification system (Biomerieux, France). Furthermore, this bacterium was characterized using API50CH kit (Biomerieux, France) and tested for antibacterial activities against some food borne pathogens. The results showed that E. cloacae consumed certain carbohydrates such as glycerol, d-xylose, d-maltose and esculin melibiose as a sole carbon source and certain amino acids such as arginine, tryptophan ornithine as nitrogen source. Furthermore, MSR1 possessed multiple plant-growth promoting characteristics; phosphate solubility, production of phytohormones acetoin and bioactive compounds. Inoculation of Pisum sativum with MSR1 significantly improved the growth parameters (the length and dry weight) of this economically important grain legume compared to the non-treated plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report addressing E. cloacae which exist in roots of alfalfa growing in Al-Ahsaa region. The results confirmed that E. cloacae exhibited traits for plant growth promoting and could be developed as an eco-friendly biofertilizer for P. sativum and probably for other important plant species in future. PMID:26858542

  1. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses identify a role for chlorophyll catabolism and phytoalexin during Medicago nonhost resistance against Asian soybean rust.

    PubMed

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Gill, Upinder S; Huhman, David; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-01-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating foliar disease affecting soybean production worldwide. Understanding nonhost resistance against ASR may provide an avenue to engineer soybean to confer durable resistance against ASR. We characterized a Medicago truncatula-ASR pathosystem to study molecular mechanisms of nonhost resistance. Although urediniospores formed appressoria and penetrated into epidermal cells of M. truncatula, P. pachyrhizi failed to sporulate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the induction of phenylpropanoid, flavonoid and isoflavonoid metabolic pathway genes involved in the production of phytoalexin medicarpin in M. truncatula upon infection with P. pachyrhizi. Furthermore, genes involved in chlorophyll catabolism were induced during nonhost resistance. We further characterized one of the chlorophyll catabolism genes, Stay-green (SGR), and demonstrated that the M. truncatula sgr mutant and alfalfa SGR-RNAi lines showed hypersensitive-response-like enhanced cell death upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. Consistent with transcriptomic analysis, metabolomic analysis also revealed the accumulation of medicarpin and its intermediate metabolites. In vitro assay showed that medicarpin inhibited urediniospore germination and differentiation. In addition, several triterpenoid saponin glycosides accumulated in M. truncatula upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. In summary, using multi-omic approaches, we identified a correlation between phytoalexin production and M. truncatula defense responses against ASR. PMID:26267598

  2. Medicago truncatula natural resistance-associated macrophage Protein1 is required for iron uptake by rhizobia-infected nodule cells.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Jiménez, Manuel; Castro-Rodríguez, Rosario; Kryvoruchko, Igor; Lucas, M Mercedes; Udvardi, Michael; Imperial, Juan; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Iron is critical for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) as a key component of multiple ferroproteins involved in this biological process. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, iron is delivered by the vasculature to the infection/maturation zone (zone II) of the nodule, where it is released to the apoplast. From there, plasma membrane iron transporters move it into rhizobia-containing cells, where iron is used as the cofactor of multiple plant and rhizobial proteins (e.g. plant leghemoglobin and bacterial nitrogenase). MtNramp1 (Medtr3g088460) is the M. truncatula Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein family member, with the highest expression levels in roots and nodules. Immunolocalization studies indicate that MtNramp1 is mainly targeted to the plasma membrane. A loss-of-function nramp1 mutant exhibited reduced growth compared with the wild type under symbiotic conditions, but not when fertilized with mineral nitrogen. Nitrogenase activity was low in the mutant, whereas exogenous iron and expression of wild-type MtNramp1 in mutant nodules increased nitrogen fixation to normal levels. These data are consistent with a model in which MtNramp1 is the main transporter responsible for apoplastic iron uptake by rhizobia-infected cells in zone II. PMID:25818701

  3. Concurrent synthesis and release of nod-gene-inducing flavonoids from alfalfa roots. [Medicago sativa L. ; Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, C.A.; Phillips, D.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. Alfalfa roots release three major nod-gene inducers: 4{prime},7-dihydroxyflavanone, 4{prime},7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4,4{prime}-dihydroxy-2{prime}-methoxychalcone. The objective of the present study was to define temporal relationships between synthesis and exudation for those flavonoids. Requirements for concurrent flavonoid biosynthesis were assessed by treating roots of intact alfalfa seedlings with (U-{sup 14}C)-L-phenylalanine in the presence or absence of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase inhibitor L-2-aminoxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP). In the absence of AOPP, each of the three flavonoids in exudates contained {sup 14}C. In the presence of AOPP, {sup 14}C labeling and release of all the exuded nod-gene inducers were reduced significantly. AOPP inhibited labeling and release of the strongest nod-gene inducer, methoxychalcone, by more than 90%. The release process responsible for exudation of nod-gene inducers appears to be specific rather than a general phenomenon such as a sloughing off of cells during root growth.

  4. Medicago truncatula and Glycine max: Different Drought Tolerance and Similar Local Response of the Root Nodule Proteome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Legume crops present important agronomical and environmental advantages mainly due to their capacity to reduce atmospheric N2 to ammonium via symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). This process is very sensitive to abiotic stresses such as drought, but the mechanism underlying this response is not fully understood. The goal of the current work is to compare the drought response of two legumes with high economic impact and research importance, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, by characterizing their root nodule proteomes. Our results show that, although M. truncatula exhibits lower water potential values under drought conditions compared to G. max, SNF declined analogously in the two legumes. Both of their nodule proteomes are very similar, and comparable down-regulation responses in the diverse protein functional groups were identified (mainly proteins related to the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur). We suggest lipoxygenases and protein turnover as newly recognized players in SNF regulation. Partial drought conditions applied to a split-root system resulted in the local down-regulation of the entire proteome of drought-stressed nodules in both legumes. The high degree of similarity between both legume proteomes suggests that the vast amount of research conducted on M. truncatula could be applied to economically important legume crops, such as soybean. PMID:26503705

  5. Combined genetic and transcriptomic analysis reveals three major signalling pathways activated by Myc-LCOs in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Camps, Céline; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Rengel, David; Carrère, Sébastien; Hervé, Christine; Debellé, Frédéric; Gamas, Pascal; Bensmihen, Sandra; Gough, Clare

    2015-10-01

    Myc-LCOs are newly identified symbiotic signals produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Like rhizobial Nod factors, they are lipo-chitooligosaccharides that activate the common symbiotic signalling pathway (CSSP) in plants. To increase our limited understanding of the roles of Myc-LCOs we aimed to analyse Myc-LCO-induced transcriptional changes and their genetic control. Whole genome RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on roots of Medicago truncatula wild-type plants, and dmi3 and nsp1 symbiotic mutants affected in nodulation and mycorrhizal signalling. Plants were treated separately with the two major types of Myc-LCOs, sulphated and nonsulphated. Generalized linear model analysis identified 2201 differentially expressed genes and classified them according to genotype and/or treatment effects. Three genetic pathways for Myc-LCO-regulation of transcriptomic reprogramming were highlighted: DMI3- and NSP1-dependent; DMI3-dependent and NSP1-independent; and DMI3- and NSP1-independent. Comprehensive analysis revealed overlaps with previous AM studies, and highlighted certain functions, especially signalling components and transcription factors. These data provide new insights into mycorrhizal signalling mechanisms, supporting a role for NSP1, and specialisation for NSP1-dependent and -independent pathways downstream of DMI3. Our data also indicate significant Myc-LCO-activated signalling upstream of DMI3 and/or parallel to the CSSP and some constitutive activity of the CSSP. PMID:25919491

  6. Adjustment of host cells for accommodation of symbiotic bacteria: vacuole defunctionalization, HOPS suppression, and TIP1g retargeting in Medicago.

    PubMed

    Gavrin, Aleksandr; Kaiser, Brent N; Geiger, Dietmar; Tyerman, Stephen D; Wen, Zhengyu; Bisseling, Ton; Fedorova, Elena E

    2014-09-01

    In legume-rhizobia symbioses, the bacteria in infected cells are enclosed in a plant membrane, forming organelle-like compartments called symbiosomes. Symbiosomes remain as individual units and avoid fusion with lytic vacuoles of host cells. We observed changes in the vacuole volume of infected cells and thus hypothesized that microsymbionts may cause modifications in vacuole formation or function. To examine this, we quantified the volumes and surface areas of plant cells, vacuoles, and symbiosomes in root nodules of Medicago truncatula and analyzed the expression and localization of VPS11 and VPS39, members of the HOPS vacuole-tethering complex. During the maturation of symbiosomes to become N2-fixing organelles, a developmental switch occurs and changes in vacuole features are induced. For example, we found that expression of VPS11 and VPS39 in infected cells is suppressed and host cell vacuoles contract, permitting the expansion of symbiosomes. Trafficking of tonoplast-targeted proteins in infected symbiotic cells is also altered, as shown by retargeting of the aquaporin TIP1g from the tonoplast membrane to the symbiosome membrane. This retargeting appears to be essential for the maturation of symbiosomes. We propose that these alterations in the function of the vacuole are key events in the adaptation of the plant cell to host intracellular symbiotic bacteria. PMID:25217511

  7. Identification of transcriptome involved in atrazine detoxification and degradation in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) exposed to realistic environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing Jing; Lu, Yi Chen; Zhang, Shu Hao; Lu, Feng Fan; Yang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of toxic compounds (or xenobiotics) such as pesticides (or herbicides). Atrazine (ATZ) as herbicide has become one of the environmental contaminants due to its intensive use during crop production. Plants have evolved strategies to cope with the adverse impact of ATZ. However, the mechanism for ATZ degradation and detoxification in plants is largely unknown. Here we employed a global RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) strategy to dissect transcriptome variation in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) exposed to ATZ. Four libraries were constructed including Root-ATZ (root control, ATZ-free), Shoot-ATZ, Root+ATZ (root treated with ATZ) and Shoot+ATZ. Hierarchical clustering was performed to display the expression patterns for all differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under ATZ exposure. Transcripts involved in ATZ detoxification, stress responses (e.g. oxidation and reduction, conjugation and hydrolytic reactions), and regulations of cysteine biosynthesis were identified. Several genes encoding glycosyltransferases, glutathione S-transferases or ABC transporters were up-regulated notably. Also, many other genes involved in oxidation-reduction, conjugation, and hydrolysis for herbicide degradation were differentially expressed. These results suggest that ATZ in alfalfa can be detoxified or degraded through different pathways. The expression patterns of some DEGs by high-throughput sequencing were well confirmed by qRT-PCR. Our results not only highlight the transcriptional complexity in alfalfa exposed to ATZ but represent a major improvement for analyzing transcriptional changes on a large scale as well. PMID:27092973

  8. Allelopathic Potential of Switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.) on Perennial Ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.) and Alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Junfeng; An, Yu; Ma, Yongqing; Ichizen, Nobumasa

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated allelopathy and its chemical basis in nine switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.) accessions. Perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.) and alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.) were used as test species. Undiluted aqueous extracts (5 g plant tissue in 50 ml water) from the shoots and roots of most of the switchgrass accessions inhibited the germination and growth of the test species. However, the allelopathic effect of switchgrass declined when extracts were diluted 5- or 50-fold. Seedling growth was more sensitive than seed germination as an indicator of allelopathic effect. Allelopathic effect was related to switchgrass ecotype but not related to ploidy level. Upland accessions displayed stronger allelopathic potential than lowland accessions. The aqueous extract from one switchgrass accession was separated into phenols, organic acids, neutral chemicals, and alkaloids, and then these fractions were bioassayed to test for allelopathic potential. Alkaloids had the strongest allelopathic effect among the four chemical fractions. In summary, the results indicated that switchgrass has allelopathic potential; however, there is not enough evidence to conclude that allelopathic advantage is the main factor that has contributed to the successful establishment of switchgrass on China’s Loess Plateau.

  9. Increase in 4-coumaryl alcohol units during lignification in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) alters the extractability and molecular weight of lignin.

    PubMed

    Ziebell, Angela; Gracom, Kristen; Katahira, Rui; Chen, Fang; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Art; Dixon, Richard A; Davis, Mark

    2010-12-10

    The lignin content of biomass can impact the ease and cost of biomass processing. Lignin reduction through breeding and genetic modification therefore has potential to reduce costs in biomass-processing industries (e.g. pulp and paper, forage, and lignocellulosic ethanol). We investigated compositional changes in two low-lignin alfalfa (Medicago sativa) lines with antisense down-regulation of p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) or hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT). We investigated whether the difference in reactivity during lignification of 4-coumaryl alcohol (H) monomers versus the naturally dominant sinapyl alcohol and coniferyl alcohol lignin monomers alters the lignin structure. Sequential base extraction readily reduced the H monomer content of the transgenic lines, leaving a residual lignin greatly enriched in H subunits; the extraction profile highlighted the difference between the control and transgenic lines. Gel permeation chromatography of isolated ball-milled lignin indicated significant changes in the weight average molecular weight distribution of the control versus transgenic lines (CTR1a, 6000; C3H4a, 5500; C3H9a, 4000; and HCT30a, 4000). PMID:20921228

  10. Toxic Effects of Copper-based Nanoparticles or Compounds to Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jie; Rico, Cyren; Zhao, Lijuan; Adeleye, Adeyemi S.; Keller, Arturo A.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2014-01-01

    The increased production and use of nanoparticles (NPs) has generated concerns about their impact on living organisms. In this study, nCu, bulk Cu, nCuO, bulk CuO, Cu(OH)2 (CuPRO 2005, Kocide 3000), and CuCl2 were exposed for 15 days to 10 day-old hydroponically grown lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Each compound was applied at 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/L. At harvest, we measured the size of the plants and determined the concentration of Cu, macro and microelements by using ICP-OES. Catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activity was also determined. Results showed that all Cu NPs/compounds reduced the root length by 49% in both plant species. All Cu NPs/compounds increased Cu, P, and S (>100%, >50%, and >20%, respectively) in alfalfa shoots and decreased P and Fe in lettuce shoot (>50% and >50%, respectively, excluding Fe in CuCl2 treatment). Biochemical assays showed reduced catalase activity in alfalfa (root and shoot) and increased ascorbate peroxidase activity in roots of both plant species. Results suggest that Cu NPs/compounds not only reduced the size of the plants but altered nutrient content and enzyme activity in both plant species. PMID:25474419

  11. Stimulation of Defense Reactions in Medicago truncatula by Antagonistic Lipopeptides from Paenibacillus sp. Strain B2▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Sameh; Negrel, Jonathan; Wendehenne, David; Ochatt, Sergio; Gianinazzi, Silvio; van Tuinen, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of obtaining new strategies to control plant diseases, we investigated the ability of antagonistic lipopolypeptides (paenimyxin) from Paenibacillus sp. strain B2 to elicit hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and several defense-related genes in the model legume Medicago truncatula. For this purpose, M. truncatula cell suspensions were used and a pathosystem between M. truncatula and Fusarium acuminatum was established. In M. truncatula cell cultures, the induction of H2O2 reached a maximum 20 min after elicitation with paenimyxin, whereas concentrations higher than 20 μM inhibited H2O2 induction and this was correlated with a lethal effect. In plant roots incubated with different concentrations of paenimyxin for 24 h before inoculation with F. acuminatum, paenimyxin at a low concentration (ca. 1 μM) had a protective effect and suppressed 95% of the necrotic symptoms, whereas a concentration higher than 10 μM had an inhibitory effect on plant growth. Gene responses were quantified in M. truncatula by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Genes involved in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, chalcone synthase, chalcone reductase), antifungal activity (pathogenesis-related proteins, chitinase), or cell wall (invertase) were highly upregulated in roots or cells after paenimyxin treatment. The mechanisms potentially involved in plant protection are discussed. PMID:20870792

  12. Genetic Mapping of a Major Resistance Gene to Pea Aphid (Acyrthosipon pisum) in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Lars G; Guo, Su-Min; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to the Australian pea aphid (PA; Acyrthosiphon pisum) biotype in cultivar Jester of the model legume Medicago truncatula is mediated by a single dominant gene and is phloem-mediated. The genetic map position for this resistance gene, APR (Acyrthosiphon pisum resistance), is provided and shows that APR maps 39 centiMorgans (cM) distal of the A. kondoi resistance (AKR) locus, which mediates resistance to a closely related species of the same genus bluegreen aphid (A. kondoi). The APR region on chromosome 3 is dense in classical nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeats (NLRs) and overlaps with the region harbouring the RAP1 gene which confers resistance to a European PA biotype in the accession Jemalong A17. Further screening of a core collection of M. truncatula accessions identified seven lines with strong resistance to PA. Allelism experiments showed that the single dominant resistance to PA in M. truncatula accessions SA10481 and SA1516 are allelic to SA10733, the donor of the APR locus in cultivar Jester. While it remains unclear whether there are multiple PA resistance genes in an R-gene cluster or the resistance loci identified in the other M. truncatula accessions are allelic to APR, the introgression of APR into current M. truncatula cultivars will provide more durable resistance to PA. PMID:27483247

  13. Genome-wide association of drought-related and biomass traits with HapMap SNPs in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun; Sakiroglu, Muhammet; Krom, Nicholas; Stanton-Geddes, John; Wang, Mingyi; Lee, Yi-Ching; Young, Nevin D; Udvardi, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Improving drought tolerance of crop plants is a major goal of plant breeders. In this study, we characterized biomass and drought-related traits of 220 Medicago truncatula HapMap accessions. Characterized traits included shoot biomass, maximum leaf size, specific leaf weight, stomatal density, trichome density and shoot carbon-13 isotope discrimination (δ(13) C) of well-watered M. truncatula plants, and leaf performance in vitro under dehydration stress. Genome-wide association analyses were carried out using the general linear model (GLM), the standard mixed linear model (MLM) and compressed MLM (CMLM) in TASSEL, which revealed significant overestimation of P-values by CMLM. For each trait, candidate genes and chromosome regions containing SNP markers were found that are in significant association with the trait. For plant biomass, a 0.5 Mbp region on chromosome 2 harbouring a plasma membrane intrinsic protein, PIP2, was discovered that could potentially be targeted to increase dry matter yield. A protein disulfide isomerase-like protein was found to be tightly associated with both shoot biomass and leaf size. A glutamate-cysteine ligase and an aldehyde dehydrogenase family protein with Arabidopsis homologs strongly expressed in the guard cells were two of the top genes identified by stomata density genome-wide association studies analysis. PMID:25707512

  14. STENOFOLIA Regulates Blade Outgrowth and Leaf Vascular Patterning in Medicago truncatula and Nicotiana sylvestris[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tadege, Million; Lin, Hao; Bedair, Mohamed; Berbel, Ana; Wen, Jiangqi; Rojas, Clemencia M.; Niu, Lifang; Tang, Yuhong; Sumner, Lloyd; Ratet, Pascal; McHale, Neil A.; Madueño, Francisco; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2011-01-01

    Dicot leaf primordia initiate at the flanks of the shoot apical meristem and extend laterally by cell division and cell expansion to form the flat lamina, but the molecular mechanism of lamina outgrowth remains unclear. Here, we report the identification of STENOFOLIA (STF), a WUSCHEL-like homeobox transcriptional regulator, in Medicago truncatula, which is required for blade outgrowth and leaf vascular patterning. STF belongs to the MAEWEST clade and its inactivation by the transposable element of Nicotiana tabacum cell type1 (Tnt1) retrotransposon insertion leads to abortion of blade expansion in the mediolateral axis and disruption of vein patterning. We also show that the classical lam1 mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris, which is blocked in lamina formation and stem elongation, is caused by deletion of the STF ortholog. STF is expressed at the adaxial–abaxial boundary layer of leaf primordia and governs organization and outgrowth of lamina, conferring morphogenetic competence. STF does not affect formation of lateral leaflets but is critical to their ability to generate a leaf blade. Our data suggest that STF functions by modulating phytohormone homeostasis and crosstalk directly linked to sugar metabolism, highlighting the importance of coordinating metabolic and developmental signals for leaf elaboration. PMID:21719692

  15. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the 14-3-3 Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Cheng, Linming; Shen, Jingqin; Zhang, Yunhong; Cao, Huimin; Lu, Dan; Shen, Chenjia

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 gene family, which is conserved in eukaryotes, is involved in protein-protein interactions and mediates signal transduction. However, detailed investigations of the 14-3-3 gene family in Medicago truncatula are largely unknown. In this study, the identification and study of M. truncatula 14-3-3-family genes were performed based on the latest M. truncatula genome. In the M. truncatula genome, 10 14-3-3 family genes were identified, and they can be grouped into ε and non-ε groups. An exon-intron analysis showed that the gene structures are conserved in the same group. The protein structure analysis showed that 14-3-3 proteins in M. truncatula are composed of nine typical antiparallel α-helices. The expression patterns of Mt14-3-3 genes indicated that they are expressed in all tissues. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of Mt14-3-3 under hormone treatment and Sinorhizobium meliloti infection showed that the Mt14-3-3 genes were involve in nodule formation. Our findings lay a solid foundation for further functional studies of 14-3-3 in M. truncatula. PMID:27047505

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis influences arsenic accumulation and speciation in Medicago truncatula L. in arsenic-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Ren, Bai-Hui; Wu, Song-Lin; Sun, Yu-Qing; Lin, Ge; Chen, Bao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In two pot experiments, wild type and a non-mycorrhizal mutant (TR25:3-1) of Medicago truncatula were grown in arsenic (As)-contaminated soil to investigate the influences of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on As accumulation and speciation in host plants. The results indicated that the plant biomass of M. truncatula was dramatically increased by AM symbiosis. Mycorrhizal colonization significantly increased phosphorus concentrations and decreased As concentrations in plants. Moreover, mycorrhizal colonization generally increased the percentage of arsenite in total As both in shoots and roots, while dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) was only detected in shoots of mycorrhizal plants. The results suggested that AMF are most likely to get involved in the methylating of inorganic As into less toxic organic DMA and also in the reduction of arsenate to arsenite. The study allowed a deeper insight into the As detoxification mechanisms in AM associations. By using the mutant M. truncatula, we demonstrated the importance of AMF in plant As tolerance under natural conditions. PMID:25016555

  17. Identification of Molecular Markers Associated with Verticillium Wilt Resistance in Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa L.) Using High-Resolution Melting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiejun; Yu, Long-Xi; McCord, Per; Miller, David; Bhamidimarri, Suresh; Johnson, David; Monteros, Maria J.; Ho, Julie; Reisen, Peter; Samac, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Verticillium wilt, caused by the soilborne fungus, Verticillium alfalfae, is one of the most serious diseases of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) worldwide. To identify loci associated with resistance to Verticillium wilt, a bulk segregant analysis was conducted in susceptible or resistant pools constructed from 13 synthetic alfalfa populations, followed by association mapping in two F1 populations consisted of 352 individuals. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were used for genotyping. Phenotyping was done by manual inoculation of the pathogen to replicated cloned plants of each individual and disease severity was scored using a standard scale. Marker-trait association was analyzed by TASSEL. Seventeen SNP markers significantly associated with Verticillium wilt resistance were identified and they were located on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 7 and 8. SNP markers identified on chromosomes 2, 4 and 7 co-locate with regions of Verticillium wilt resistance loci reported in M. truncatula. Additional markers identified on chromosomes 1 and 8 located the regions where no Verticillium resistance locus has been reported. This study highlights the value of SNP genotyping by high resolution melting to identify the disease resistance loci in tetraploid alfalfa. With further validation, the markers identified in this study could be used for improving resistance to Verticillium wilt in alfalfa breeding programs. PMID:25536106

  18. The Transcriptional Repressor MYB2 Regulates Both Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Proanthocyandin and Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Jun, Ji Hyung; Liu, Chenggang; Xiao, Xirong; Dixon, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) is limited to specific cell types and developmental stages, but little is known about how antagonistically acting transcriptional regulators work together to determine temporal and spatial patterning of pigmentation at the cellular level, especially for PAs. Here, we characterize MYB2, a transcriptional repressor regulating both anthocyanin and PA biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MYB2 was strongly upregulated by MYB5, a major regulator of PA biosynthesis in M. truncatula and a component of MYB-basic helix loop helix-WD40 (MBW) activator complexes. Overexpression of MYB2 abolished anthocyanin and PA accumulation in M. truncatula hairy roots and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, respectively. Anthocyanin deposition was expanded in myb2 mutant seedlings and flowers accompanied by increased anthocyanin content. PA mainly accumulated in the epidermal layer derived from the outer integument in the M. truncatula seed coat, starting from the hilum area. The area of PA accumulation and ANTHOCYANIDIN REDUCTASE expression was expanded into the seed body at the early stage of seed development in the myb2 mutant. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological evidence suggests that MYB2 functions as part of a multidimensional regulatory network to define the temporal and spatial pattern of anthocyanin and PA accumulation linked to developmental processes. PMID:26410301

  19. Calcium and magnesium interference studies for the binding of heavy metal ions in solution by Medicago sativa (alfalfa)

    SciTech Connect

    Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Tiemann, K.J.; Gonzalez, J.H.; Henning, J.A.; Townsend, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    Previous batch laboratory experiments performed to determine the potential ability of seven different varieties of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) revealed that the African shoots population was able to efficiently bind copper(II) and nickel(II) from aqueous solutions. Batch laboratory interference studies were performed with various calcium and magnesium concentrations (0.1 mM to 1 M) in order to ascertain the effects of these ions on the heavy metal binding ability of African alfalfa shoots. Results from these studies have shown that calcium and magnesium did not seriously reduce the binding of copper(II) and lead(II) to African alfalfa shoots. However, high concentrations of calcium and magnesium significantly reduced chromium(III), cadmium(II), nickel(II), and zinc(II) binding to African shoots. In addition, all these experiments were repeated maintaining the ionic strength constant, and similar results were obtained. Interference studies were also conducted in order to determine the effects of hard cations under flow conditions with silica-immobilized African alfalfa shoots. The information obtained from these studies will be useful for an innovative method of heavy metal ion removal and recovery from contaminated waters.

  20. Microgravity Effects on the Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-02-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of μg on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species for the legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early biomolecular events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFU’s). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiments were designed to determine if S. meliloti would infect M. truncatula and initiate biomolecular changes associated with nodule formation and if the μg environment altered the host plant and/or bacteria to induce nodule formation upon return to 1g. Initial analysis results demonstrate that the legumes and bacteria cultivated in μg have potential to develop a symbiotic interaction, but suggest that μg alters their ability to form nodules upon return to 1g. (Research supported by NASA ESMD/ Advance Capabilities Division grant NNX10AR09A)

  1. Characterization of the plant growth promoting bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae MSR1, isolated from roots of non-nodulating Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Ashraf Y Z; Alsyeeh, Abdel-Moneium; Almalki, Mohammed A; Saleh, Farag A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the endophytic bacterial strain designated MSR1 that was isolated from inside the non-nodulating roots of Medicago sativa after surface-sterilization. MSR1 was identified as Enterobacter cloacae using both 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis and API20E biochemical identification system (Biomerieux, France). Furthermore, this bacterium was characterized using API50CH kit (Biomerieux, France) and tested for antibacterial activities against some food borne pathogens. The results showed that E. cloacae consumed certain carbohydrates such as glycerol, d-xylose, d-maltose and esculin melibiose as a sole carbon source and certain amino acids such as arginine, tryptophan ornithine as nitrogen source. Furthermore, MSR1 possessed multiple plant-growth promoting characteristics; phosphate solubility, production of phytohormones acetoin and bioactive compounds. Inoculation of Pisum sativum with MSR1 significantly improved the growth parameters (the length and dry weight) of this economically important grain legume compared to the non-treated plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report addressing E. cloacae which exist in roots of alfalfa growing in Al-Ahsaa region. The results confirmed that E. cloacae exhibited traits for plant growth promoting and could be developed as an eco-friendly biofertilizer for P. sativum and probably for other important plant species in future. PMID:26858542

  2. A novel RNA-binding peptide regulates the establishment of the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Philippe; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Velasco, Isabel; Csorba, Tibor; Van de Velde, Willem; Campalans, Anna; Burgyan, Joszef; Arevalo-Rodriguez, Miguel; Crespi, Martin

    2010-04-01

    Plants use a variety of small peptides for cell to cell communication during growth and development. Leguminous plants are characterized by their ability to develop nitrogen-fixing nodules via an interaction with symbiotic bacteria. During nodule organogenesis, several so-called nodulin genes are induced, including large families that encode small peptides. Using a three-hybrid approach in yeast cells, we identified two new small nodulins, MtSNARP1 and MtSNARP2 (for small nodulin acidic RNA-binding protein), which interact with the RNA of MtENOD40, an early induced nodulin gene showing conserved RNA secondary structures. The SNARPs are acidic peptides showing single-stranded RNA-binding activity in vitro and are encoded by a small gene family in Medicago truncatula. These peptides exhibit two new conserved motifs and a putative signal peptide that redirects a GFP fusion to the endoplasmic reticulum both in protoplasts and during symbiosis, suggesting they are secreted. MtSNARP2 is expressed in the differentiating region of the nodule together with several early nodulin genes. MtSNARP2 RNA interference (RNAi) transgenic roots showed aberrant early senescent nodules where differentiated bacteroids degenerate rapidly. Hence, a functional symbiotic interaction may be regulated by secreted RNA-binding peptides. PMID:20042020

  3. DASH transcription factor impacts Medicago truncatula seed size by its action on embryo morphogenesis and auxin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Noguero, Mélanie; Le Signor, Christine; Vernoud, Vanessa; Bandyopadhyay, Kaustav; Sanchez, Myriam; Fu, Chunxiang; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Gallardo, Karine; Udvardi, Michael; Thompson, Richard; Verdier, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The endosperm plays a pivotal role in the integration between component tissues of molecular signals controlling seed development. It has been shown to participate in the regulation of embryo morphogenesis and ultimately seed size determination. However, the molecular mechanisms that modulate seed size are still poorly understood especially in legumes. DASH (DOF Acting in Seed embryogenesis and Hormone accumulation) is a DOF transcription factor (TF) expressed during embryogenesis in the chalazal endosperm of the Medicago truncatula seed. Phenotypic characterization of three independent dash mutant alleles revealed a role for this TF in the prevention of early seed abortion and the determination of final seed size. Strong loss-of-function alleles cause severe defects in endosperm development and lead to embryo growth arrest at the globular stage. Transcriptomic analysis of dash pods versus wild-type (WT) pods revealed major transcriptional changes and highlighted genes that are involved in auxin transport and perception as mainly under-expressed in dash mutant pods. Interestingly, the exogenous application of auxin alleviated the seed-lethal phenotype, whereas hormonal dosage revealed a much higher auxin content in dash pods compared with WT. Together these results suggested that auxin transport/signaling may be affected in the dash mutant and that aberrant auxin distribution may contribute to the defect in embryogenesis resulting in the final seed size phenotype. PMID:25492260

  4. Medicago truncatula and Glycine max: Different Drought Tolerance and Similar Local Response of the Root Nodule Proteome.

    PubMed

    Gil-Quintana, Erena; Lyon, David; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; González, Esther M

    2015-12-01

    Legume crops present important agronomical and environmental advantages mainly due to their capacity to reduce atmospheric N2 to ammonium via symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). This process is very sensitive to abiotic stresses such as drought, but the mechanism underlying this response is not fully understood. The goal of the current work is to compare the drought response of two legumes with high economic impact and research importance, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, by characterizing their root nodule proteomes. Our results show that, although M. truncatula exhibits lower water potential values under drought conditions compared to G. max, SNF declined analogously in the two legumes. Both of their nodule proteomes are very similar, and comparable down-regulation responses in the diverse protein functional groups were identified (mainly proteins related to the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur). We suggest lipoxygenases and protein turnover as newly recognized players in SNF regulation. Partial drought conditions applied to a split-root system resulted in the local down-regulation of the entire proteome of drought-stressed nodules in both legumes. The high degree of similarity between both legume proteomes suggests that the vast amount of research conducted on M. truncatula could be applied to economically important legume crops, such as soybean. PMID:26503705

  5. Flavonoids and Auxin Transport Inhibitors Rescue Symbiotic Nodulation in the Medicago truncatula Cytokinin Perception Mutant cre1

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Hassan, Samira; Truong, Thy T.; Hocart, Charles H.; Laffont, Carole; Frugier, Florian; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of symbiotic nodules in legumes requires cytokinin signaling, but its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Here, we tested whether the failure to initiate nodules in the Medicago truncatula cytokinin perception mutant cre1 (cytokinin response1) is due to its altered ability to regulate auxin transport, auxin accumulation, and induction of flavonoids. We found that in the cre1 mutant, symbiotic rhizobia cannot locally alter acro- and basipetal auxin transport during nodule initiation and that these mutants show reduced auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) accumulation and auxin responses compared with the wild type. Quantification of flavonoids, which can act as endogenous auxin transport inhibitors, showed a deficiency in the induction of free naringenin, isoliquiritigenin, quercetin, and hesperetin in cre1 roots compared with wild-type roots 24 h after inoculation with rhizobia. Coinoculation of roots with rhizobia and the flavonoids naringenin, isoliquiritigenin, and kaempferol, or with the synthetic auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5,-triiodobenzoic acid, rescued nodulation efficiency in cre1 mutants and allowed auxin transport control in response to rhizobia. Our results suggest that CRE1-dependent cytokinin signaling leads to nodule initiation through the regulation of flavonoid accumulation required for local alteration of polar auxin transport and subsequent auxin accumulation in cortical cells during the early stages of nodulation. PMID:26253705

  6. MATE2 Mediates Vacuolar Sequestration of Flavonoid Glycosides and Glycoside Malonates in Medicago truncatula[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Huhman, David; Shadle, Gail; He, Xian-Zhi; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of flavonoids, such as anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, and isoflavones, are stored in the central vacuole, but the molecular basis of flavonoid transport is still poorly understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of a multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter (MATE2), from Medicago truncatula. MATE 2 is expressed primarily in leaves and flowers. Despite its high similarity to the epicatechin 3′-O-glucoside transporter MATE1, MATE2 cannot efficiently transport proanthocyanidin precursors. In contrast, MATE2 shows higher transport capacity for anthocyanins and lower efficiency for other flavonoid glycosides. Three malonyltransferases that are coexpressed with MATE2 were identified. The malonylated flavonoid glucosides generated by these malonyltransferases are more efficiently taken up into MATE2-containing membrane vesicles than are the parent glycosides. Malonylation increases both the affinity and transport efficiency of flavonoid glucosides for uptake by MATE2. Genetic loss of MATE2 function leads to the disappearance of leaf anthocyanin pigmentation and pale flower color as a result of drastic decreases in the levels of various flavonoids. However, some flavonoid glycoside malonates accumulate to higher levels in MATE2 knockouts than in wild-type controls. Deletion of MATE2 increases seed proanthocyanidin biosynthesis, presumably via redirection of metabolic flux from anthocyanin storage. PMID:21467581

  7. Nitrogen Fixation Mutants of Medicago truncatula Fail to Support Plant and Bacterial Symbiotic Gene Expression1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Starker, Colby G.; Parra-Colmenares, Adriana L.; Smith, Lucinda; Mitra, Raka M.; Long, Sharon R.

    2006-01-01

    The Rhizobium-legume symbiosis culminates in the exchange of nutrients in the root nodule. Bacteria within the nodule reduce molecular nitrogen for plant use and plants provide bacteria with carbon-containing compounds. Following the initial signaling events that lead to plant infection, little is known about the plant requirements for establishment and maintenance of the symbiosis. We screened 44,000 M2 plants from fast neutron-irradiated Medicago truncatula seeds and isolated eight independent mutant lines that are defective in nitrogen fixation. The eight mutants are monogenic and represent seven complementation groups. To monitor bacterial status in mutant nodules, we assayed Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis gene promoters (nodF, exoY, bacA, and nifH) in the defective in nitrogen fixation mutants. Additionally, we used an Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray to monitor gene expression changes in wild-type and three mutant plants during the nodulation process. These analyses suggest the mutants can be separated into three classes: one class that supports little to no nitrogen fixation and minimal bacterial expression of nifH; another class that supports no nitrogen fixation and minimal bacterial expression of nodF, bacA, and nifH; and a final class that supports low levels of both nitrogen fixation and bacterial nifH expression. PMID:16407449

  8. EFD Is an ERF Transcription Factor Involved in the Control of Nodule Number and Differentiation in Medicago truncatula[W

    PubMed Central

    Vernié, Tatiana; Moreau, Sandra; de Billy, Françoise; Plet, Julie; Combier, Jean-Philippe; Rogers, Christian; Oldroyd, Giles; Frugier, Florian; Niebel, Andreas; Gamas, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating legume root nodule development are still poorly understood, and very few regulatory genes have been cloned and characterized. Here, we describe EFD (for ethylene response factor required for nodule differentiation), a gene that is upregulated during nodulation in Medicago truncatula. The EFD transcription factor belongs to the ethylene response factor (ERF) group V, which contains ERN1, 2, and 3, three ERFs involved in Nod factor signaling. The role of EFD in the regulation of nodulation was examined through the characterization of a null deletion mutant (efd-1), RNA interference, and overexpression studies. These studies revealed that EFD is a negative regulator of root nodulation and infection by Rhizobium and that EFD is required for the formation of functional nitrogen-fixing nodules. EFD appears to be involved in the plant and bacteroid differentiation processes taking place beneath the nodule meristem. We also showed that EFD activated Mt RR4, a cytokinin primary response gene that encodes a type-A response regulator. We propose that EFD induction of Mt RR4 leads to the inhibition of cytokinin signaling, with two consequences: the suppression of new nodule initiation and the activation of differentiation as cells leave the nodule meristem. Our work thus reveals a key regulator linking early and late stages of nodulation and suggests that the regulation of the cytokinin pathway is important both for nodule initiation and development. PMID:18978033

  9. Genetic Mapping of a Major Resistance Gene to Pea Aphid (Acyrthosipon pisum) in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Lars G.; Guo, Su-Min; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to the Australian pea aphid (PA; Acyrthosiphon pisum) biotype in cultivar Jester of the model legume Medicago truncatula is mediated by a single dominant gene and is phloem-mediated. The genetic map position for this resistance gene, APR (Acyrthosiphon pisum resistance), is provided and shows that APR maps 39 centiMorgans (cM) distal of the A. kondoi resistance (AKR) locus, which mediates resistance to a closely related species of the same genus bluegreen aphid (A. kondoi). The APR region on chromosome 3 is dense in classical nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeats (NLRs) and overlaps with the region harbouring the RAP1 gene which confers resistance to a European PA biotype in the accession Jemalong A17. Further screening of a core collection of M. truncatula accessions identified seven lines with strong resistance to PA. Allelism experiments showed that the single dominant resistance to PA in M. truncatula accessions SA10481 and SA1516 are allelic to SA10733, the donor of the APR locus in cultivar Jester. While it remains unclear whether there are multiple PA resistance genes in an R-gene cluster or the resistance loci identified in the other M. truncatula accessions are allelic to APR, the introgression of APR into current M. truncatula cultivars will provide more durable resistance to PA. PMID:27483247

  10. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses identify a role for chlorophyll catabolism and phytoalexin during Medicago nonhost resistance against Asian soybean rust

    PubMed Central

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Rao Uppalapati, Srinivasa; Gill, Upinder S.; Huhman, David; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2015-01-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating foliar disease affecting soybean production worldwide. Understanding nonhost resistance against ASR may provide an avenue to engineer soybean to confer durable resistance against ASR. We characterized a Medicago truncatula-ASR pathosystem to study molecular mechanisms of nonhost resistance. Although urediniospores formed appressoria and penetrated into epidermal cells of M. truncatula, P. pachyrhizi failed to sporulate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the induction of phenylpropanoid, flavonoid and isoflavonoid metabolic pathway genes involved in the production of phytoalexin medicarpin in M. truncatula upon infection with P. pachyrhizi. Furthermore, genes involved in chlorophyll catabolism were induced during nonhost resistance. We further characterized one of the chlorophyll catabolism genes, Stay-green (SGR), and demonstrated that the M. truncatula sgr mutant and alfalfa SGR-RNAi lines showed hypersensitive-response-like enhanced cell death upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. Consistent with transcriptomic analysis, metabolomic analysis also revealed the accumulation of medicarpin and its intermediate metabolites. In vitro assay showed that medicarpin inhibited urediniospore germination and differentiation. In addition, several triterpenoid saponin glycosides accumulated in M. truncatula upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. In summary, using multi-omic approaches, we identified a correlation between phytoalexin production and M. truncatula defense responses against ASR. PMID:26267598

  11. Jasmonate Signalling and Defence Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula—A Focus on Responses to Fusarium Wilt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Louise F.; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA)-mediated defences play important roles in host responses to pathogen attack, in particular to necrotrophic fungal pathogens that kill host cells in order to extract nutrients and live off the dead plant tissue. The root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum initiates a necrotrophic growth phase towards the later stages of its lifecycle and is responsible for devastating Fusarium wilt disease on numerous legume crops worldwide. Here we describe the use of the model legume Medicago truncatula to study legume–F. oxysporum interactions and compare and contrast this against knowledge from other model pathosystems, in particular Arabidopsis thaliana–F. oxysporum interactions. We describe publically-available genomic, transcriptomic and genetic (mutant) resources developed in M. truncatula that enable dissection of host jasmonate responses and apply aspects of these herein during the M. truncatula-–F. oxysporum interaction. Our initial results suggest not all components of JA-responses observed in M. truncatula are shared with Arabidopsis in response to F. oxysporum infection. PMID:27135231

  12. Relationship between photosynthetic capacity, nitrogen assimilation and nodule metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown with sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Antolín, M Carmen; Fiasconaro, M Laura; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel

    2010-10-15

    Sewage sludge has been used as N fertilizer because it contains some of inorganic N, principally as nitrate and ammonium ions. However, sewage sludge addition to legumes could result in impaired nodule metabolism due to the presence of inorganic N from sludge. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to examine the effects of sewage sludge on growth, photosynthesis, nitrogen assimilation and nodule metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Aragón). Plants were grown in pots with a mixture of perlite and vermiculite (2:1, v/v). The experiment included three treatments: (1) plants inoculated with rhizobia and amended with sewage sludge at rate of 10% (w/w) (RS); (2) plants inoculated with rhizobia without any amendment (R); and (3) non-inoculated plants fed with ammonium nitrate (N). N(2)-fixing plants had lower growth and sucrose phosphate synthase activity but higher photosynthesis than nitrate-fed plants because they compensated the carbon cost of the rhizobia. However, sewage sludge-treated plants evidenced a loss of carbon sink strength due to N(2) fixation by means of decreased photosynthetic capacity, leaf chlorophylls and N concentration in comparison to untreated plants. Sewage sludge did no affect nodulation but decreased nodule enzyme activities involved in carbon and N metabolisms that may lead to accumulation of toxic N-compounds. PMID:20591568

  13. Deep-sequencing transcriptome analysis of field-grown Medicago sativa L. crown buds acclimated to freezing stress.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Yue; Shu, Yongjun; Bai, Yan; Guo, Changhong

    2016-09-01

    Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) 'Zhaodong' is an important forage legume that can safely survive in northern China where winter temperatures reach as low as -30 °C. Survival of alfalfa following freezing stress depends on the amount and revival ability of crown buds. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms of frost tolerance in alfalfa, we used transcriptome sequencing technology and bioinformatics strategies to analyze crown buds of field-grown alfalfa during winter. We statistically identified a total of 5605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in freezing stress including 1900 upregulated and 3705 downregulated DEGs. We validated 36 candidate DEGs using qPCR to confirm the accuracy of the RNA-seq data. Unlike other recent studies, this study employed alfalfa plants grown in the natural environment. Our results indicate that not only the CBF orthologs but also membrane proteins, hormone signal transduction pathways, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathways indicate the presence of a special freezing adaptation mechanism in alfalfa. The antioxidant defense system may rapidly confer freezing tolerance to alfalfa. Importantly, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and phenylalanine metabolism, which is of potential importance in coordinating freezing tolerance with growth and development, were downregulated in subzero temperatures. The adaptive mechanism for frost tolerance is a complex multigenic process that is not well understood. This systematic analysis provided an in-depth view of stress tolerance mechanisms in alfalfa. PMID:27272950

  14. Silencing the flavonoid pathway in Medicago truncatula inhibits root nodule formation and prevents auxin transport regulation by rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Wasson, Anton P; Pellerone, Flavia I; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2006-07-01

    Legumes form symbioses with rhizobia, which initiate the development of a new plant organ, the nodule. Flavonoids have long been hypothesized to regulate nodule development through their action as auxin transport inhibitors, but genetic proof has been missing. To test this hypothesis, we used RNA interference to silence chalcone synthase (CHS), the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of the flavonoid pathway, in Medicago truncatula. Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformation was used to create hairy roots that showed strongly reduced CHS transcript levels and reduced levels of flavonoids in silenced roots. Flavonoid-deficient roots were unable to initiate nodules, even though normal root hair curling was observed. Nodule formation and flavonoid accumulation could be rescued by supplementation of plants with the precursor flavonoids naringenin and liquiritigenin. The flavonoid-deficient roots showed increased auxin transport compared with control roots. Inoculation with rhizobia reduced auxin transport in control roots after 24 h, similar to the action of the auxin transport inhibitor N-(1-naphthyl)phthalamic acid (NPA). Rhizobia were unable to reduce auxin transport in flavonoid-deficient roots, even though NPA inhibited auxin transport. Our results present genetic evidence that root flavonoids are necessary for nodule initiation in M. truncatula and suggest that they act as auxin transport regulators. PMID:16751348

  15. The compact root architecture1 gene regulates lignification, flavonoid production, and polar auxin transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Carole; Blanchet, Sandrine; Lapierre, Catherine; Brocard, Lysiane; Ratet, Pascal; Crespi, Martin; Mathesius, Ulrike; Frugier, Florian

    2010-08-01

    The root system architecture is crucial to adapt plant growth to changing soil environmental conditions and consequently to maintain crop yield. In addition to root branching through lateral roots, legumes can develop another organ, the nitrogen-fixing nodule, upon a symbiotic bacterial interaction. A mutant, cra1, showing compact root architecture was identified in the model legume Medicago truncatula. cra1 roots were short and thick due to defects in cell elongation, whereas densities of lateral roots and symbiotic nodules were similar to the wild type. Grafting experiments showed that a lengthened life cycle in cra1 was due to the smaller root system and not to the pleiotropic shoot phenotypes observed in the mutant. Analysis of the cra1 transcriptome at a similar early developmental stage revealed few significant changes, mainly related to cell wall metabolism. The most down-regulated gene in the cra1 mutant encodes a Caffeic Acid O-Methyl Transferase, an enzyme involved in lignin biosynthesis; accordingly, whole lignin content was decreased in cra1 roots. This correlated with differential accumulation of specific flavonoids and decreased polar auxin transport in cra1 mutants. Exogenous application of the isoflavone formononetin to wild-type plants mimicked the cra1 root phenotype, whereas decreasing flavonoid content through silencing chalcone synthases restored the polar auxin transport capacity of the cra1 mutant. The CRA1 gene, therefore, may control legume root growth through the regulation of lignin and flavonoid profiles, leading to changes in polar auxin transport. PMID:20522723

  16. Elevated CO2 Modifies N Acquisition of Medicago truncatula by Enhancing N Fixation and Reducing Nitrate Uptake from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Li, Yuefei; Liu, Xianghui; Ren, Qin; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Ge, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 (750 ppm vs. 390 ppm) were evaluated on nitrogen (N) acquisition and assimilation by three Medicago truncatula genotypes, including two N-fixing-deficient mutants (dnf1-1 and dnf1-2) and their wild-type (Jemalong). The proportion of N acquisition from atmosphere and soil were quantified by 15N stable isotope, and N transportation and assimilation-related genes and enzymes were determined by qPCR and biochemical analysis. Elevated CO2 decreased nitrate uptake from soil in all three plant genotypes by down-regulating nitrate reductase (NR), nitrate transporter NRT1.1 and NR activity. Jemalong plant, however, produced more nodules, up-regulated N-fixation-related genes and enhanced percentage of N derived from fixation (%Ndf) to increase foliar N concentration and N content in whole plant (Ntotal Yield) to satisfy the requirement of larger biomass under elevated CO2. In contrast, both dnf1 mutants deficient in N fixation consequently decreased activity of glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) and N concentration under elevated CO2. Our results suggest that elevated CO2 is likely to modify N acquisition of M. truncatula by simultaneously increasing N fixation and reducing nitrate uptake from soil. We propose that elevated CO2 causes legumes to rely more on N fixation than on N uptake from soil to satisfy N requirements. PMID:24339920

  17. Jasmonate Signalling and Defence Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula-A Focus on Responses to Fusarium Wilt Disease.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Louise F; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA)-mediated defences play important roles in host responses to pathogen attack, in particular to necrotrophic fungal pathogens that kill host cells in order to extract nutrients and live off the dead plant tissue. The root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum initiates a necrotrophic growth phase towards the later stages of its lifecycle and is responsible for devastating Fusarium wilt disease on numerous legume crops worldwide. Here we describe the use of the model legume Medicago truncatula to study legume-F. oxysporum interactions and compare and contrast this against knowledge from other model pathosystems, in particular Arabidopsis thaliana-F. oxysporum interactions. We describe publically-available genomic, transcriptomic and genetic (mutant) resources developed in M. truncatula that enable dissection of host jasmonate responses and apply aspects of these herein during the M. truncatula--F. oxysporum interaction. Our initial results suggest not all components of JA-responses observed in M. truncatula are shared with Arabidopsis in response to F. oxysporum infection. PMID:27135231

  18. The NIN Transcription Factor Coordinates Diverse Nodulation Programs in Different Tissues of the Medicago truncatula Root[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung; Frances, Lisa; Ding, Yiliang; Sun, Jongho; Guan, Dian; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation in legumes occurs in nodules that are initiated in the root cortex following Nod factor recognition at the root surface, and this requires coordination of diverse developmental programs in these different tissues. We show that while early Nod factor signaling associated with calcium oscillations is limited to the root surface, the resultant activation of Nodule Inception (NIN) in the root epidermis is sufficient to promote cytokinin signaling and nodule organogenesis in the inner root cortex. NIN or a product of its action must be associated with the transmission of a signal between the root surface and the cortical cells where nodule organogenesis is initiated. NIN appears to have distinct functions in the root epidermis and the root cortex. In the epidermis, NIN restricts the extent of Early Nodulin 11 (ENOD11) expression and does so through competitive inhibition of ERF Required for Nodulation (ERN1). In contrast, NIN is sufficient to promote the expression of the cytokinin receptor Cytokinin Response 1 (CRE1), which is restricted to the root cortex. Our work in Medicago truncatula highlights the complexity of NIN action and places NIN as a central player in the coordination of the symbiotic developmental programs occurring in differing tissues of the root that combined are necessary for a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. PMID:26672071

  19. Strigolactones contribute to shoot elongation and to the formation of leaf margin serrations in Medicago truncatula R108.

    PubMed

    Lauressergues, Dominique; André, Olivier; Peng, Jianling; Wen, Jiangqi; Chen, Rujin; Ratet, Pascal; Tadege, Million; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Rochange, Soizic F

    2015-03-01

    Strigolactones were recently identified as a new class of plant hormones involved in the control of shoot branching. The characterization of strigolactone mutants in several species has progressively revealed their contribution to several other aspects of development in roots and shoots. In this article, we characterize strigolactone-deficient and strigolactone-insensitive mutants of the model legume Medicago truncatula for aerial developmental traits. The most striking mutant phenotype observed was compact shoot architecture. In contrast with what was reported in other species, this could not be attributed to enhanced shoot branching, but was instead due to reduced shoot elongation. Another notable feature was the modified leaf shape in strigolactone mutants: serrations at the leaf margin were smaller in the mutants than in wild-type plants. This phenotype could be rescued in a dose-dependent manner by exogenous strigolactone treatments of strigolactone-deficient mutants, but not of strigolactone-insensitive mutants. Treatment with the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphtalamic acid resulted in smooth leaf margins, opposite to the effect of strigolactone treatment. The contribution of strigolactones to the formation of leaf serrations in M. truncatula R108 line represents a novel function of these hormones, which has not been revealed by the analysis of strigolactone mutants in other species. PMID:25472976

  20. Regulatory Patterns of a Large Family of Defensin-Like Genes Expressed in Nodules of Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Nallu, Sumitha; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Samac, Deborah A.; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Vance, Carroll P.; VandenBosch, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Root nodules are the symbiotic organ of legumes that house nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Many genes are specifically induced in nodules during the interactions between the host plant and symbiotic rhizobia. Information regarding the regulation of expression for most of these genes is lacking. One of the largest gene families expressed in the nodules of the model legume Medicago truncatula is the nodule cysteine-rich (NCR) group of defensin-like (DEFL) genes. We used a custom Affymetrix microarray to catalog the expression changes of 566 NCRs at different stages of nodule development. Additionally, bacterial mutants were used to understand the importance of the rhizobial partners in induction of NCRs. Expression of early NCRs was detected during the initial infection of rhizobia in nodules and expression continued as nodules became mature. Late NCRs were induced concomitantly with bacteroid development in the nodules. The induction of early and late NCRs was correlated with the number and morphology of rhizobia in the nodule. Conserved 41 to 50 bp motifs identified in the upstream 1,000 bp promoter regions of NCRs were required for promoter activity. These cis-element motifs were found to be unique to the NCR family among all annotated genes in the M. truncatula genome, although they contain sub-regions with clear similarity to known regulatory motifs involved in nodule-specific expression and temporal gene regulation. PMID:23573247

  1. Strigolactones contribute to shoot elongation and to the formation of leaf margin serrations in Medicago truncatula R108

    PubMed Central

    Lauressergues, Dominique; André, Olivier; Peng, Jianling; Wen, Jiangqi; Chen, Rujin; Ratet, Pascal; Tadege, Million; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Rochange, Soizic F.

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones were recently identified as a new class of plant hormones involved in the control of shoot branching. The characterization of strigolactone mutants in several species has progressively revealed their contribution to several other aspects of development in roots and shoots. In this article, we characterize strigolactone-deficient and strigolactone-insensitive mutants of the model legume Medicago truncatula for aerial developmental traits. The most striking mutant phenotype observed was compact shoot architecture. In contrast with what was reported in other species, this could not be attributed to enhanced shoot branching, but was instead due to reduced shoot elongation. Another notable feature was the modified leaf shape in strigolactone mutants: serrations at the leaf margin were smaller in the mutants than in wild-type plants. This phenotype could be rescued in a dose-dependent manner by exogenous strigolactone treatments of strigolactone-deficient mutants, but not of strigolactone-insensitive mutants. Treatment with the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphtalamic acid resulted in smooth leaf margins, opposite to the effect of strigolactone treatment. The contribution of strigolactones to the formation of leaf serrations in M. truncatula R108 line represents a novel function of these hormones, which has not been revealed by the analysis of strigolactone mutants in other species. PMID:25472976

  2. Combined phosphate and nitrogen limitation generates a nutrient stress transcriptome favorable for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Laurent; Huguet, Stéphanie; Wipf, Daniel; Pauly, Nicolas; Truong, Hoai-Nam

    2013-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is stimulated by phosphorus (P) limitation and contributes to P and nitrogen (N) acquisition. However, the effects of combined P and N limitation on AM formation are largely unknown. Medicago truncatula plants were cultivated in the presence or absence of Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly Glomus intraradices) in P-limited (LP), N-limited (LN) or combined P- and N-limited (LPN) conditions, and compared with plants grown in sufficient P and N. The highest AM formation was observed in LPN, linked to systemic signaling by the plant nutrient status. Plant free phosphate concentrations were higher in LPN than in LP, as a result of cross-talk between P and N. Transcriptome analyses suggest that LPN induces the activation of NADPH oxidases in roots, concomitant with an altered profile of plant defense genes and a coordinate increase in the expression of genes involved in the methylerythritol phosphate and isoprenoid-derived pathways, including strigolactone synthesis genes. Taken together, these results suggest that low P and N fertilization systemically induces a physiological state of plants favorable for AM symbiosis despite their higher P status. Our findings highlight the importance of the plant nutrient status in controlling plant-fungus interaction. PMID:23506613

  3. Aphanomyces euteiches cell wall fractions containing novel glucan-chitosaccharides induce defense genes and nuclear calcium oscillations in the plant host Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nars, Amaury; Lafitte, Claude; Chabaud, Mireille; Drouillard, Sophie; Mélida, Hugo; Danoun, Saïda; Le Costaouëc, Tinaig; Rey, Thomas; Benedetti, Julie; Bulone, Vincent; Barker, David George; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Dumas, Bernard; Jacquet, Christophe; Heux, Laurent; Fliegmann, Judith; Bottin, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine-based saccharides (chitosaccharides) are components of microbial cell walls and act as molecular signals during host-microbe interactions. In the legume plant Medicago truncatula, the perception of lipochitooligosaccharide signals produced by symbiotic rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi involves the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) lysin motif receptor-like protein and leads to the activation of the so-called common symbiotic pathway. In rice and Arabidopsis, lysin motif receptors are involved in the perception of chitooligosaccharides released by pathogenic fungi, resulting in the activation of plant immunity. Here we report the structural characterization of atypical chitosaccharides from the oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, and their biological activity on the host Medicago truncatula. Using a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these chitosaccharides are linked to β-1,6-glucans, and contain a β-(1,3;1,4)-glucan backbone whose β-1,3-linked glucose units are substituted on their C-6 carbon by either glucose or N-acetylglucosamine residues. This is the first description of this type of structural motif in eukaryotic cell walls. Glucan-chitosaccharide fractions of A. euteiches induced the expression of defense marker genes in Medicago truncatula seedlings independently from the presence of a functional Nod Factor Perception protein. Furthermore, one of the glucan-chitosaccharide fractions elicited calcium oscillations in the nucleus of root cells. In contrast to the asymmetric oscillatory calcium spiking induced by symbiotic lipochitooligosaccharides, this response depends neither on the Nod Factor Perception protein nor on the common symbiotic pathway. These findings open new perspectives in oomycete cell wall biology and elicitor recognition and signaling in legumes. PMID:24086432

  4. Aphanomyces euteiches Cell Wall Fractions Containing Novel Glucan-Chitosaccharides Induce Defense Genes and Nuclear Calcium Oscillations in the Plant Host Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Nars, Amaury; Lafitte, Claude; Chabaud, Mireille; Drouillard, Sophie; Mélida, Hugo; Danoun, Saïda; Le Costaouëc, Tinaig; Rey, Thomas; Benedetti, Julie; Bulone, Vincent; Barker, David George; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Dumas, Bernard; Jacquet, Christophe; Heux, Laurent; Fliegmann, Judith; Bottin, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine-based saccharides (chitosaccharides) are components of microbial cell walls and act as molecular signals during host-microbe interactions. In the legume plant Medicago truncatula, the perception of lipochitooligosaccharide signals produced by symbiotic rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi involves the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) lysin motif receptor-like protein and leads to the activation of the so-called common symbiotic pathway. In rice and Arabidopsis, lysin motif receptors are involved in the perception of chitooligosaccharides released by pathogenic fungi, resulting in the activation of plant immunity. Here we report the structural characterization of atypical chitosaccharides from the oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, and their biological activity on the host Medicago truncatula. Using a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these chitosaccharides are linked to β-1,6-glucans, and contain a β-(1,3;1,4)-glucan backbone whose β-1,3-linked glucose units are substituted on their C-6 carbon by either glucose or N-acetylglucosamine residues. This is the first description of this type of structural motif in eukaryotic cell walls. Glucan-chitosaccharide fractions of A. euteiches induced the expression of defense marker genes in Medicago truncatula seedlings independently from the presence of a functional Nod Factor Perception protein. Furthermore, one of the glucan-chitosaccharide fractions elicited calcium oscillations in the nucleus of root cells. In contrast to the asymmetric oscillatory calcium spiking induced by symbiotic lipochitooligosaccharides, this response depends neither on the Nod Factor Perception protein nor on the common symbiotic pathway. These findings open new perspectives in oomycete cell wall biology and elicitor recognition and signaling in legumes. PMID:24086432

  5. Nodule-specific modulation of glutamine synthetase in transgenic Medicago truncatula leads to inverse alterations in asparagine synthetase expression.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Helena G; Lopes-Cardoso, Inês A; Lima, Ligia M; Melo, Paula M; Cullimore, Julie V

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic Medicago truncatula plants were produced harboring chimeric gene constructs of the glutamine synthetase (GS) cDNA clones (MtGS1a or MtGS1b) fused in sense or antisense orientation to the nodule-specific leghemoglobin promoter Mtlb1. A series of transgenic plants were obtained showing a 2- to 4-fold alteration in nodule GS activity when compared with control plants. Western and northern analyses revealed that the increased or decreased levels of GS activity correlate with the amount of cytosolic GS polypeptides and transcripts present in the nodule extracts. An analysis of the isoenzyme composition showed that the increased or decreased levels of GS activity were attributable to major changes in the homo-octameric isoenzyme GS1a. Nodules of plants transformed with antisense GS constructs showed an increase in the levels of both asparagine synthetase (AS) polypeptides and transcripts when compared with untransformed control plants, whereas the sense GS transformants showed decreased AS transcript levels but polypeptide levels similar to control plants. The polypeptide abundance of other nitrogen metabolic enzymes NADH-glutamic acid synthase and aspartic acid amino-transferase as well as those of major carbon metabolic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, carbonic anhydrase, and sucrose synthase were not affected by the GS-gene manipulations. Increased levels of AS polypeptides and transcripts were also transiently observed in nodules by inhibiting GS activity with phosphinothricin. Taken together, the results presented here suggest that GS activity negatively regulates the level of AS in root nodules of M. truncatula. The potential role of AS in assimilating ammonium when GS becomes limiting is discussed. PMID:12970490

  6. Structural Investigations of N-carbamoylputrescine Amidohydrolase from Medicago truncatula: Insights into the Ultimate Step of Putrescine Biosynthesis in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sekula, Bartosz; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Putrescine, 1,4-diaminobutane, is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of more complexed polyamines, spermidine and spermine. Unlike other eukaryotes, plants have evolved a multistep pathway for putrescine biosynthesis that utilizes arginine. In the final reaction, N-carbamoylputrescine is hydrolyzed to putrescine by N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA, EC 3.5.1.53). During the hydrolysis, consecutive nucleophilic attacks on the substrate by Cys158 and water lead to formation of putrescine and two by-products, ammonia and carbon dioxide. CPA from the model legume plant, Medicago truncatula (MtCPA), was investigated in this work. Four crystal structures were determined: the wild-type MtCPA in complex with the reaction intermediate, N-(dihydroxymethyl)putrescine as well as with cadaverine, which is a longer analog of putrescine; and also structures of MtCPA-C158S mutant unliganded and with putrescine. MtCPA assembles into octamers, which resemble an incomplete left-handed helical twist. The active site of MtCPA is funnel-like shaped, and its entrance is walled with a contribution of the neighboring protein subunits. Deep inside the catalytic cavity, Glu48, Lys121, and Cys158 form the catalytic triad. In this studies, we have highlighted the key residues, highly conserved among the plant kingdom, responsible for the activity and selectivity of MtCPA toward N-carbamoylputrescine. Moreover, since, according to previous reports, a close MtCPA relative from Arabidopsis thaliana, along with several other nitrilase-like proteins, are subjected to allosteric regulation by substrates, we have used the structural information to indicate a putative secondary binding site. Based on the docking experiment, we postulate that this site is adjacent to the entrance to the catalytic pocket. PMID:27066023

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal mediation of biomass-density relationship of Medicago sativa L. under two water conditions in a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Xu, Liming; Tang, Jianjun; Bai, Minge; Chen, Xin

    2011-05-01

    The biomass-density relationship (whereby the biomass of individual plants decreases as plant density increases) has generally been explained by competition for resources. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are able to affect plant interactions by mediating resource utilization, but whether this AMF-mediated interaction will change the biomass-density relationship is unclear. We conducted an experiment to test the hypothesis that AMF will shift the biomass-density relationship by affecting intraspecific competition. Four population densities (10, 100, 1,000, or 10,000 seedlings per square meter) of Medicago sativa L. were planted in field plots. Water application (1,435 or 327.7 mm/year) simulated precipitation in wet areas (sufficient water) and arid areas (insufficient water). The fungicide benomyl was applied to suppress AMF in some plots ("low-AMF" treatment) and not in others ("high-AMF" treatment). The effect of the AMF treatment on the biomass-density relationship depended on water conditions. High AMF enhanced the decrease of individual biomass with increasing density (the biomass-density line had a steeper slope) when water was sufficient but not when water was insufficient. AMF treatment did not affect plant survival rate or population size but did affect absolute competition intensity (ACI). When water was sufficient, ACI was significantly higher in the high-AMF treatment than in the low-AMF treatment, but ACI was unaffected by AMF treatment when water was insufficient. Our results suggest that AMF status did not impact survival rate and population size but did shift the biomass-density relationship via effects on intraspecific competition. This effect of AMF on the biomass-density relationship depended on the availability of water. PMID:20652365

  8. Distribution of hydrogen-metabolizing bacteria in alfalfa field soil. [Medicago sativa L. ; Convolvulus arvensis L. ; Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, S.D.; Kapulnik, Y.; Phillips, D.A.

    1986-11-01

    H/sub 2/ evolved by alfalfa root nodules during the process of N/sub 2/ fixation may be an important factor influencing the distribution of soil bacteria. To test this hypothesis under field conditions, over 700 bacterial isolates were obtained from fallow soil or from the 3-mm layer of soil surrounding alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) root nodules, alfalfa roots, or bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis L.) roots. Bacteria were isolated under either aerobic or microaerophilic conditions and were tested for their capacity to metabolize H/sub 2/. Isolates showing net H/sub 2/ uptake and /sup 3/H/sub 2/ incorporation activity under laboratory conditions were assigned a Hup/sup +/ phenotype, whereas organisms with significant H/sub 2/ output capacity were designated as a Hout/sup +/ phenotype. Under aerobic isolation conditions two Hup/sup +/ isolates were obtained, whereas under microaerophilic conditions five Hup/sup +/ and two Hout/sup +/ isolates were found. The nine isolates differed on the basis of 24 standard bacteriological characteristics or fatty acid composition. Five of the nine organisms were isolated from soil around root nodules, whereas the other four were found distributed among the other three soil environments. On the basis of the microaerophilic isolations, 4.8% of the total procaryotic isolates from soil around root nodules were capable of oxidizing H/sub 2/, and 1.2% could produce H/sub 2/. Two of the Hup/sup +/ isolates were identified as Rhizobium meliloti by root nodulation tests, but the fact that none of the isolates reduced C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ under the assay conditions suggested that the H/sub 2/ metabolism traits were associated with various hydrogenase systems rather than with nitrogenase activity.

  9. Pleiotropic effect of fluoranthene on anthocyanin synthesis and nodulation of Medicago sativa is reversed by the plant flavone luteolin

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, A.; Parniske, M.; Werner, D.

    1995-05-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and soil bacteria of the genus Rhizobium is of considerable agronominal importance. Recently it has been found, that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; e.g. anthracene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene), occurring as ubiquitous environmental contaminants can inhibit nodulation of Medicago sativa. Fluoranthene is one of the dominant PAHs found in urban particulate matter, sewage sludge or beside motorways. Several organisms have been shown to be able to metabolize and mineralize fluoranthene but the uptake of fluoranthene is limited due to low solubility of fluoranthene in water and strong adsorption to humic substances in soil. Rhizobium meliloti cannot degrade fluoranthene. Toxic effects of fluoranthene on bacterial growth have never been observed. In contrast to their rhizobial symbiotic partners, alfalfa plants grown on a solidified fluoranthene-containing medium, exhibited symptoms of toxicity. They showed a dose-responsive decrease in shoot length and, if inoculated with R. meliloti, inhibition of nodule formation. Growth retardation is accompanied by a decrease in anthocyanin pigmentation of shoots, and an atypical accumulation of anthocyanins in roots. Plant flavonoids are known to play a central role in the signal exchange of the Legume-Rhizobium symbiosis. Phenylpropane derived compounds and flavonoids have been implicated in nodule development. Since fluoranthene impairs nodulation and induces the production of anthocyanins, it is possible that these events are causally linked via phenylpropanoid metabolism. These experiments attempt to overcome the inhibitory effects of fluoranthene by exogeneous application of the flavonoid luteolin. This paper demonstrates that luteolin antagonizes the fluoranthene mediated inhibition of nodule formation and prevents the accumulation of anthocyanins in roots. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Drought and Recovery: Independently Regulated Processes Highlighting the Importance of Protein Turnover Dynamics and Translational Regulation in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Lyon, David; Castillejo, Maria Angeles; Mehmeti-Tershani, Vlora; Staudinger, Christiana; Kleemaier, Christoph; Wienkoop, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Climate change in conjunction with population growth necessitates a systems biology approach to characterize plant drought acclimation as well as a more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress recovery. Plants are exposed to a continuously changing environment. Extremes such as several weeks of drought are followed by rain. This requires a molecular plasticity of the plant enabling drought acclimation and the necessity of deacclimation processes for recovery and continuous growth.During drought stress and subsequent recovery, the metabolome and proteome are regulated through a sequence of molecular processes including synthesis and degradation and molecular interaction networks are part of this regulatory process. In order to study this complex regulatory network, a comprehensive analysis is presented for the first time, investigating protein turnover and regulatory classes of proteins and metabolites during a stress recovery scenario in the model legume Medicago truncatula The data give novel insights into the molecular capacity and differential processes required for acclimation and deacclimation of severe drought stressed plants.Functional cluster and network analyses unraveled independent regulatory mechanisms for stress and recovery with different dynamic phases that during the course of recovery define the plants deacclimation from stress. The combination of relative abundance levels and turnover analysis revealed an early transition phase that seems key for recovery initiation through water resupply and is independent from renutrition. Thus, a first indication for a metabolite and protein-based load capacity was observed necessary for the recovery from drought, an important but thus far ignored possible feature toward tolerance. The data indicate that apart from the plants molecular stress response mechanisms, plasticity may be related to the nutritional status of the plant prior to stress initiation. A new perspective and possible new

  11. Identification of a group of XTHs genes responding to heavy metal mercury, salinity and drought stresses in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yun; Zhou, Zhao Sheng; Li, Hai Bo; Yang, Zhi Min

    2016-10-01

    Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases (XTH) are one of the key enzymes regulating cell wall construction, extension and metabolism. In the study, 44 XTH protein genes from Medicago truncatula genome were identified using bioinformatics, microarray and RT-PCR. Each XTH was showed to possess a highly conserved domain ((D/N)-E-(I/L/F/V)-D-(F/I/L)-E-(F/L)-L-G), and most of XTHs possess four Cys in the C terminal region, which suggests the potential for generating disulfide bonds. Based on the XTH protein sequences, these XTHscan be classified into three major families and each family can be subdivided into more groups. Examination of the genomic location of XTH genes on M. truncatula chromosomes showed that the evolutional expansion of the genes was possibly attributed to localized gene duplications. To investigate the possible involvement of the XTHs responding to heavy metals and other abiotic stresses, the XTH genes were exposed to heavy metal (Hg or Cu), salt and drought stresses. There were 28, 21 and 21 MtXTH genes found to respond to HgCl2, salt and drought stresses, respectively, but their expression were different under the stresses. Some of the XTH genes were well confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). We further specified expression of a XTH gene Medtr4g128580 (MtXTH3) under different environmental stresses, and showed that MtXTH3 was induced by Hg exposure. These results indicated that a group of MtXTHs could be differentially expressed under the environmental stresses. PMID:27318197

  12. The bHLH Transcription Factors TSAR1 and TSAR2 Regulate Triterpene Saponin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jan; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Goossens, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to stresses by producing a broad spectrum of bioactive specialized metabolites. Hormonal elicitors, such as jasmonates, trigger a complex signaling circuit leading to the concerted activation of specific metabolic pathways. However, for many specialized metabolic pathways, the transcription factors involved remain unknown. Here, we report on two homologous jasmonate-inducible transcription factors of the basic helix-loop-helix family, TRITERPENE SAPONIN BIOSYNTHESIS ACTIVATING REGULATOR1 (TSAR1) and TSAR2, which direct triterpene saponin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula. TSAR1 and TSAR2 are coregulated with and transactivate the genes encoding 3-HYDROXY-3-METHYLGLUTARYL-COENZYME A REDUCTASE1 (HMGR1) and MAKIBISHI1, the rate-limiting enzyme for triterpene biosynthesis and an E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls HMGR1 levels, respectively. Transactivation is mediated by direct binding of TSARs to the N-box in the promoter of HMGR1. In transient expression assays in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts, TSAR1 and TSAR2 exhibit different patterns of transactivation of downstream triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes, hinting at distinct functionalities within the regulation of the pathway. Correspondingly, overexpression of TSAR1 or TSAR2 in M. truncatula hairy roots resulted in elevated transcript levels of known triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes and strongly increased the accumulation of triterpene saponins. TSAR2 overexpression specifically boosted hemolytic saponin biosynthesis, whereas TSAR1 overexpression primarily stimulated nonhemolytic soyasaponin biosynthesis. Both TSARs also activated all genes of the precursor mevalonate pathway but did not affect sterol biosynthetic genes, pointing to their specific role as regulators of specialized triterpene metabolism in M. truncatula. PMID:26589673

  13. Medicago truncatula Mutants Demonstrate the Role of Plant Calcium Oxalate Crystals as an Effective Defense against Chewing Insects1

    PubMed Central

    Korth, Kenneth L.; Doege, Sarah J.; Park, Sang-Hyuck; Goggin, Fiona L.; Wang, Qin; Gomez, S. Karen; Liu, Guangjie; Jia, Lingling; Nakata, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Calcium oxalate is the most abundant insoluble mineral found in plants and its crystals have been reported in more than 200 plant families. In the barrel medic Medicago truncatula Gaertn., these crystals accumulate predominantly in a sheath surrounding secondary veins of leaves. Mutants of M. truncatula with decreased levels of calcium oxalate crystals were used to assess the defensive role of this mineral against insects. Caterpillar larvae of the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua Hübner show a clear feeding preference for tissue from calcium oxalate-defective (cod) mutant lines cod5 and cod6 in choice test comparisons with wild-type M. truncatula. Compared to their performance on mutant lines, larvae feeding on wild-type plants with abundant calcium oxalate crystals suffer significantly reduced growth and increased mortality. Induction of wound-responsive genes appears to be normal in cod5 and cod6, indicating that these lines are not deficient in induced insect defenses. Electron micrographs of insect mouthparts indicate that the prismatic crystals in M. truncatula leaves act as physical abrasives during feeding. Food utilization measurements show that, after consumption, calcium oxalate also interferes with the conversion of plant material into insect biomass during digestion. In contrast to their detrimental effects on a chewing insect, calcium oxalate crystals do not negatively affect the performance of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris, a sap-feeding insect with piercing-sucking mouthparts. The results confirm a long-held hypothesis for the defensive function of these crystals and point to the potential value of genes controlling crystal formation and localization in crop plants. PMID:16514014

  14. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Two cDNA Clones Encoding Dihydroflavonol-4-Reductase from Medicago truncatula1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, De-Yu; Jackson, Lisa A.; Cooper, John D.; Ferreira, Daneel; Paiva, Nancy L.

    2004-01-01

    Dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR; EC1.1.1.219) catalyzes a key step late in the biosynthesis of anthocyanins, condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins), and other flavonoids important to plant survival and human nutrition. Two DFR cDNA clones (MtDFR1 and MtDFR2) were isolated from the model legume Medicago truncatula cv Jemalong. Both clones were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, confirming that both encode active DFR proteins that readily reduce taxifolin (dihydroquercetin) to leucocyanidin. M. truncatula leaf anthocyanins were shown to be cyanidin-glucoside derivatives, and the seed coat proanthocyanidins are known catechin and epicatechin derivatives, all biosynthesized from leucocyanidin. Despite high amino acid similarity (79% identical), the recombinant DFR proteins exhibited differing pH and temperature profiles and differing relative substrate preferences. Although no pelargonidin derivatives were identified in M. truncatula, MtDFR1 readily reduced dihydrokaempferol, consistent with the presence of an asparagine residue at a location known to determine substrate specificity in other DFRs, whereas MtDFR2 contained an aspartate residue at the same site and was only marginally active on dihydrokaempferol. Both recombinant DFR proteins very efficiently reduced 5-deoxydihydroflavonol substrates fustin and dihydrorobinetin, substances not previously reported as constituents of M. truncatula. Transcript accumulation for both genes was highest in young seeds and flowers, consistent with accumulation of condensed tannins and leucoanthocyanidins in these tissues. MtDFR1 transcript levels in developing leaves closely paralleled leaf anthocyanin accumulation. Overexpression of MtDFR1 in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) resulted in visible increases in anthocyanin accumulation in flowers, whereas MtDFR2 did not. The data reveal unexpected properties and differences in two DFR proteins from a single species. PMID:14976232

  15. Dual involvement of a Medicago truncatula NAC transcription factor in root abiotic stress response and symbiotic nodule senescence.

    PubMed

    de Zélicourt, Axel; Diet, Anouck; Marion, Jessica; Laffont, Carole; Ariel, Federico; Moison, Michaël; Zahaf, Ons; Crespi, Martin; Gruber, Véronique; Frugier, Florian

    2012-04-01

    Legume crops related to the model plant Medicago truncatula can adapt their root architecture to environmental conditions, both by branching and by establishing a symbiosis with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing nodules. Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress affecting plant yield and root growth. Previous transcriptomic analyses identified several transcription factors linked to the M. truncatula response to salt stress in roots, including NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC)-encoding genes. Over-expression of one of these transcription factors, MtNAC969, induced formation of a shorter and less-branched root system, whereas RNAi-mediated MtNAC969 inactivation promoted lateral root formation. The altered root system of over-expressing plants was able to maintain its growth under high salinity, and roots in which MtNAC969 was down-regulated showed improved growth under salt stress. Accordingly, expression of salt stress markers was decreased or induced in MtNAC969 over-expressing or RNAi roots, respectively, suggesting a repressive function for this transcription factor in the salt-stress response. Expression of MtNAC969 in central symbiotic nodule tissues was induced by nitrate treatment, and antagonistically affected by salt in roots and nodules, similarly to senescence markers. MtNAC969 RNAi nodules accumulated amyloplasts in the nitrogen-fixing zone, and were prematurely senescent. Therefore, the MtNAC969 transcription factor, which is differentially affected by environmental cues in root and nodules, participates in several pathways controlling adaptation of the M. truncatula root system to the environment. PMID:22098255

  16. Ectopic Expression of GsPPCK3 and SCMRP in Medicago sativa Enhances Plant Alkaline Stress Tolerance and Methionine Content

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Chaoyue; DuanMu, Huizi; Yu, Yang; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    So far, it has been suggested that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases (PEPCs) and PEPC kinases (PPCKs) fulfill several important non-photosynthetic functions. However, the biological functions of soybean PPCKs, especially in alkali stress response, are not yet well known. In previous studies, we constructed a Glycine soja transcriptional profile, and identified three PPCK genes (GsPPCK1, GsPPCK2 and GsPPCK3) as potential alkali stress responsive genes. In this study, we confirmed the induced expression of GsPPCK3 under alkali stress and investigated its tissue expression specificity by using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Then we ectopically expressed GsPPCK3 in Medicago sativa and found that GsPPCK3 overexpression improved plant alkali tolerance, as evidenced by lower levels of relative ion leakage and MDA content and higher levels of chlorophyll content and root activity. In this respect, we further co-transformed the GsPPCK3 and SCMRP genes into alfalfa, and demonstrated the increased alkali tolerance of GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines. Further investigation revealed that GsPPCK3-SCMRP co-overexpression promoted the PEPC activity, net photosynthetic rate and citric acid content of transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. Moreover, we also observed the up-regulated expression of PEPC, CS (citrate synthase), H+-ATPase and NADP-ME genes in GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. As expected, we demonstrated that GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines displayed higher methionine content than wild type alfalfa. Taken together, results presented in this study supported the positive role of GsPPCK3 in plant response to alkali stress, and provided an effective way to simultaneously improve plant alkaline tolerance and methionine content, at least in legume crops. PMID:24586886

  17. Symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and Medicago truncatula is not significantly affected by silver and silver sulfide nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Judy, Jonathan D; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Mike J; McNear, David; Bertsch, Paul M

    2016-07-01

    Silver (Ag) engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are being released into waste streams and are being discharged, largely as Ag2S aged-ENMs (a-ENMs), into agroecosystems receiving biosolids amendments. Recent research has demonstrated that biosolids containing an environmentally relevant mixture of ZnO, TiO2, and Ag ENMs and their transformation products, including Ag2S a-ENMs, disrupted the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes. However, this study was unable to unequivocally determine which ENM or combination of ENMs and a-ENMs was responsible for the observed inhibition. Here, we examined further the effects of polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP) coated pristine Ag ENMs (PVP-Ag), Ag2S a-ENMs, and soluble Ag (as AgSO4) at 1, 10, and 100 mg Ag kg(-1) on the symbiosis between the legume Medicago truncatula and the nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium melliloti in biosolids-amended soil. Nodulation frequency, nodule function, glutathione reductase production, and biomass were not significantly affected by any of the Ag treatments, even at 100 mg kg(-1), a concentration analogous to a worst-case scenario resulting from long-term, repeated biosolids amendments. Our results provide additional evidence that the disruption of the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes in response to a mixture of ENMs in biosolids-amended soil reported previously may not be attributable to Ag ENMs or their transformation end-products. We anticipate these findings will provide clarity to regulators and industry regarding potential unintended consequences to terrestrial ecosystems resulting from of the use of Ag ENMs in consumer products. PMID:27149150

  18. MYB5 and MYB14 Play Pivotal Roles in Seed Coat Polymer Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenggang; Jun, Ji Hyung; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the major MYB protein regulating proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis is TT2, named for the transparent testa phenotype of tt2 mutant seeds that lack PAs in their coats. In contrast, the MYB5 transcription factor mainly regulates seed mucilage biosynthesis and trichome branching, with only a minor role in PA biosynthesis. We here characterize MYB5 and MYB14 (a TT2 homolog) in the model legume Medicago truncatula. Overexpression of MtMYB5 or MtMYB14 strongly induces PA accumulation in M. truncatula hairy roots, and both myb5 and myb14 mutants of M. truncatula exhibit darker seed coat color than wild-type plants, with myb5 also showing deficiency in mucilage biosynthesis. myb5 mutant seeds have a much stronger seed color phenotype than myb14. The myb5 and myb14 mutants accumulate, respectively, about 30% and 50% of the PA content of wild-type plants, and PA levels are reduced further in myb5 myb14 double mutants. Transcriptome analyses of overexpressing hairy roots and knockout mutants of MtMYB5 and MtMYB14 indicate that MtMYB5 regulates a broader set of genes than MtMYB14. Moreover, we demonstrate that MtMYB5 and MtMYB14 physically interact and synergistically activate the promoters of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase, the key structural genes leading to PA biosynthesis, in the presence of MtTT8 and MtWD40-1. Our results provide new insights into the complex regulation of PA and mucilage biosynthesis in M. truncatula. PMID:24948832

  19. Large-Scale Phosphoprotein Analysis in Medicago truncatula Roots Provides Insight into in Vivo Kinase Activity in Legumes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Paul A.; den Os, Désirée; Wenger, Craig D.; Swaney, Danielle L.; Schwartz, Daniel; Sussman, Michael R.; Ané, Jean-Michel; Coon, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legumes requires the development of root organs called nodules and their infection by symbiotic rhizobia. Over the last decade, Medicago truncatula has emerged as a major model plant for the analysis of plant-microbe symbioses and for addressing questions pertaining to legume biology. While the initiation of symbiosis and the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules depend on the activation of a protein phosphorylation-mediated signal transduction cascade in response to symbiotic signals produced by the rhizobia, few sites of in vivo phosphorylation have previously been identified in M. truncatula. We have characterized sites of phosphorylation on proteins from M. truncatula roots, from both whole cell lysates and membrane-enriched fractions, using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Here, we report 3,457 unique phosphopeptides spanning 3,404 nonredundant sites of in vivo phosphorylation on 829 proteins in M. truncatula Jemalong A17 roots, identified using the complementary tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation methods electron transfer dissociation and collision-activated dissociation. With this being, to our knowledge, the first large-scale plant phosphoproteomic study to utilize electron transfer dissociation, analysis of the identified phosphorylation sites revealed phosphorylation motifs not previously observed in plants. Furthermore, several of the phosphorylation motifs, including LxKxxs and RxxSxxxs, have yet to be reported as kinase specificities for in vivo substrates in any species, to our knowledge. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were identified on several key proteins involved in initiating rhizobial symbiosis, including SICKLE, NUCLEOPORIN133, and INTERACTING PROTEIN OF DMI3. Finally, we used these data to create an open-access online database for M. truncatula phosphoproteomic data. PMID:19923235

  20. Large-scale phosphoprotein analysis in Medicago truncatula roots provides insight into in vivo kinase activity in legumes.

    PubMed

    Grimsrud, Paul A; den Os, Désirée; Wenger, Craig D; Swaney, Danielle L; Schwartz, Daniel; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legumes requires the development of root organs called nodules and their infection by symbiotic rhizobia. Over the last decade, Medicago truncatula has emerged as a major model plant for the analysis of plant-microbe symbioses and for addressing questions pertaining to legume biology. While the initiation of symbiosis and the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules depend on the activation of a protein phosphorylation-mediated signal transduction cascade in response to symbiotic signals produced by the rhizobia, few sites of in vivo phosphorylation have previously been identified in M. truncatula. We have characterized sites of phosphorylation on proteins from M. truncatula roots, from both whole cell lysates and membrane-enriched fractions, using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Here, we report 3,457 unique phosphopeptides spanning 3,404 nonredundant sites of in vivo phosphorylation on 829 proteins in M. truncatula Jemalong A17 roots, identified using the complementary tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation methods electron transfer dissociation and collision-activated dissociation. With this being, to our knowledge, the first large-scale plant phosphoproteomic study to utilize electron transfer dissociation, analysis of the identified phosphorylation sites revealed phosphorylation motifs not previously observed in plants. Furthermore, several of the phosphorylation motifs, including LxKxxs and RxxSxxxs, have yet to be reported as kinase specificities for in vivo substrates in any species, to our knowledge. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were identified on several key proteins involved in initiating rhizobial symbiosis, including SICKLE, NUCLEOPORIN133, and INTERACTING PROTEIN OF DMI3. Finally, we used these data to create an open-access online database for M. truncatula phosphoproteomic data. PMID:19923235

  1. Nodule-Specific Modulation of Glutamine Synthetase in Transgenic Medicago truncatula Leads to Inverse Alterations in Asparagine Synthetase Expression1

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Helena G.; Lopes-Cardoso, Inês A.; Lima, Ligia M.; Melo, Paula M.; Cullimore, Julie V.

    2003-01-01

    Transgenic Medicago truncatula plants were produced harboring chimeric gene constructs of the glutamine synthetase (GS) cDNA clones (MtGS1a or MtGS1b) fused in sense or antisense orientation to the nodule-specific leghemoglobin promoter Mtlb1. A series of transgenic plants were obtained showing a 2- to 4-fold alteration in nodule GS activity when compared with control plants. Western and northern analyses revealed that the increased or decreased levels of GS activity correlate with the amount of cytosolic GS polypeptides and transcripts present in the nodule extracts. An analysis of the isoenzyme composition showed that the increased or decreased levels of GS activity were attributable to major changes in the homo-octameric isoenzyme GS1a. Nodules of plants transformed with antisense GS constructs showed an increase in the levels of both asparagine synthetase (AS) polypeptides and transcripts when compared with untransformed control plants, whereas the sense GS transformants showed decreased AS transcript levels but polypeptide levels similar to control plants. The polypeptide abundance of other nitrogen metabolic enzymes NADH-glutamic acid synthase and aspartic acid amino-transferase as well as those of major carbon metabolic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, carbonic anhydrase, and sucrose synthase were not affected by the GS-gene manipulations. Increased levels of AS polypeptides and transcripts were also transiently observed in nodules by inhibiting GS activity with phosphinothricin. Taken together, the results presented here suggest that GS activity negatively regulates the level of AS in root nodules of M. truncatula. The potential role of AS in assimilating ammonium when GS becomes limiting is discussed. PMID:12970490

  2. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V.; Carvalho, Helena G.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  3. The bHLH Transcription Factors TSAR1 and TSAR2 Regulate Triterpene Saponin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to stresses by producing a broad spectrum of bioactive specialized metabolites. Hormonal elicitors, such as jasmonates, trigger a complex signaling circuit leading to the concerted activation of specific metabolic pathways. However, for many specialized metabolic pathways, the transcription factors involved remain unknown. Here, we report on two homologous jasmonate-inducible transcription factors of the basic helix-loop-helix family, TRITERPENE SAPONIN BIOSYNTHESIS ACTIVATING REGULATOR1 (TSAR1) and TSAR2, which direct triterpene saponin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula. TSAR1 and TSAR2 are coregulated with and transactivate the genes encoding 3-HYDROXY-3-METHYLGLUTARYL-COENZYME A REDUCTASE1 (HMGR1) and MAKIBISHI1, the rate-limiting enzyme for triterpene biosynthesis and an E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls HMGR1 levels, respectively. Transactivation is mediated by direct binding of TSARs to the N-box in the promoter of HMGR1. In transient expression assays in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts, TSAR1 and TSAR2 exhibit different patterns of transactivation of downstream triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes, hinting at distinct functionalities within the regulation of the pathway. Correspondingly, overexpression of TSAR1 or TSAR2 in M. truncatula hairy roots resulted in elevated transcript levels of known triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes and strongly increased the accumulation of triterpene saponins. TSAR2 overexpression specifically boosted hemolytic saponin biosynthesis, whereas TSAR1 overexpression primarily stimulated nonhemolytic soyasaponin biosynthesis. Both TSARs also activated all genes of the precursor mevalonate pathway but did not affect sterol biosynthetic genes, pointing to their specific role as regulators of specialized triterpene metabolism in M. truncatula. PMID:26589673

  4. LOOSE FLOWER, a WUSCHEL-like Homeobox gene, is required for lateral fusion of floral organs in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lifang; Lin, Hao; Zhang, Fei; Watira, Tezera W; Li, Guifen; Tang, Yuhong; Wen, Jiangqi; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Tadege, Million

    2015-02-01

    The Medicago truncatula WOX gene, STENOFOLIA (STF), and its orthologs in Petunia, pea, and Nicotiana sylvestris are required for leaf blade outgrowth and floral organ development as demonstrated by severe phenotypes in single mutants. But the Arabidopsis wox1 mutant displays a narrow leaf phenotype only when combined with the prs/wox3 mutant. In maize and rice, WOX3 homologs are major regulators of leaf blade development. Here we investigated the role of WOX3 in M. truncatula development by isolating the lfl/wox3 loss-of-function mutant and performing genetic crosses with the stf mutant. Lack of WOX3 function in M. truncatula leads to a loose-flower (lfl) phenotype, where defects are observed in sepal and petal development, but leaf blades are apparently normal. The stf lfl double mutant analysis revealed that STF and LFL act mainly independently with minor redundant functions in flower development, but LFL has no obvious role in leaf blade outgrowth in M. truncatula on its own or in combination with STF. Interestingly, LFL acts as a transcriptional repressor by recruiting TOPLESS in the same manner as STF does, and can substitute for STF function in leaf blade and flower development if expressed under the STF promoter. STF also complements the lfl mutant phenotype in the flower if expressed under the LFL promoter. Our data suggest that the STF/WOX1 and LFL/WOX3 genes of M. truncatula employ a similar mechanism of action in organizing cell proliferation for lateral outgrowth but may have evolved different cis elements to acquire distinct functions. PMID:25492397

  5. Structural Investigations of N-carbamoylputrescine Amidohydrolase from Medicago truncatula: Insights into the Ultimate Step of Putrescine Biosynthesis in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sekula, Bartosz; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Putrescine, 1,4-diaminobutane, is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of more complexed polyamines, spermidine and spermine. Unlike other eukaryotes, plants have evolved a multistep pathway for putrescine biosynthesis that utilizes arginine. In the final reaction, N-carbamoylputrescine is hydrolyzed to putrescine by N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA, EC 3.5.1.53). During the hydrolysis, consecutive nucleophilic attacks on the substrate by Cys158 and water lead to formation of putrescine and two by-products, ammonia and carbon dioxide. CPA from the model legume plant, Medicago truncatula (MtCPA), was investigated in this work. Four crystal structures were determined: the wild-type MtCPA in complex with the reaction intermediate, N-(dihydroxymethyl)putrescine as well as with cadaverine, which is a longer analog of putrescine; and also structures of MtCPA-C158S mutant unliganded and with putrescine. MtCPA assembles into octamers, which resemble an incomplete left-handed helical twist. The active site of MtCPA is funnel-like shaped, and its entrance is walled with a contribution of the neighboring protein subunits. Deep inside the catalytic cavity, Glu48, Lys121, and Cys158 form the catalytic triad. In this studies, we have highlighted the key residues, highly conserved among the plant kingdom, responsible for the activity and selectivity of MtCPA toward N-carbamoylputrescine. Moreover, since, according to previous reports, a close MtCPA relative from Arabidopsis thaliana, along with several other nitrilase-like proteins, are subjected to allosteric regulation by substrates, we have used the structural information to indicate a putative secondary binding site. Based on the docking experiment, we postulate that this site is adjacent to the entrance to the catalytic pocket. PMID:27066023

  6. Temporal effects on the composition of a population of Sinorhizobium meliloti associated with Medicago sativa and Melilotus alba.

    PubMed

    Bromfield, E S; Butler, G; Barran, L R

    2001-06-01

    An assessment was made of the impact of temporal separation on the composition of a population of Sinorhizobium meliloti associated with Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and Melilotus alba (sweet clover) grown at a single site that had no known history of alfalfa cultivation. Root nodules were sampled on six occasions over two seasons, and a total of 1620 isolates of S. meliloti were characterized on the basis of phage sensitivity using 16 typing phages. Plant infection tests indicated that symbiotic S. meliloti were deficient in the soil at the time of planting and that these bacteria were present at low density during the first season (<10(2)/g of soil); in the second season numbers increased markedly to about 10(5)/g of soil. Overall, 37 and 51 phage types, respectively, were encountered among the nodule isolates from M. sativa and M. alba. The data indicate significant temporal shifts in the frequency and diversity of types associated with the two legume species. Apparent temporal variation with respect to the frequency of types appeared largely unpredictable and was not attributable to any one sampling time. The results indicate an apparent reduction in phenotypic diversity over the course of the experiment. Differential host plant selection of specific types with respect to nodule occupancy was indicated by significant interactions between legume species and either the frequency or diversity of phage types. Isolates from M. sativa that were resistant to lysis by all typing phages (type 14) were unusual in that they were predominant on this host at all sampling times (between 53% and 82% nodule occupancy) and were relatively homogeneous on the basis of DNA hybridization with 98% of the isolates analysed sharing the same nod EFG hybridization profile. In contrast, those isolates from M. alba comprising type 14 were encountered at low total frequency (2%) and were genetically heterogeneous on the basis of Southern hybridization. The implications of the observed

  7. Altered callose deposition during embryo sac formation of multi-pistil mutant (mp1) in Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H C; Jin, L; Li, J; Wang, X J

    2016-01-01

    Whether callose deposition is the cause or result of ovule sterility in Medicago sativa remains controversial, because it is unclear when and where changes in callose deposition and dissolution occur during fertile and sterile embryo sac formation. Here, alfalfa spontaneous multi-pistil mutant (mp1) and wild-type plants were used to compare the dynamics of callose deposition during embryo sac formation using microscopy. The results showed that both mutant and wild-type plants experienced megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis, and there was no significant difference during megasporogenesis. In contrast to the wild-type plants, in which the mature embryo sac was observed after three continuous cycles of mitosis, functional megaspores of mutant plants developed abnormally after the second round of mitosis, leading to degeneration of synergid, central, and antipodal cells. Callose deposition in both mutant and wild-type plants was first observed in the walls of megasporocytes, and then in the megaspore tetrad walls. After meiosis, the callose wall began to degrade as the functional megaspore underwent mitosis, and almost no callose was observed in the mature embryo sac in wild-type plants. However, callose deposition was observed in mp1 plants around the synergid, and increased with the development of the embryo sac, and was mainly deposited at the micropylar end. Our results indicate that synergid, central, and antipodal cells, which are surrounded by callose, may degrade owing to lack of nutrition. Callose accumulation around the synergid and at the micropylar end may hinder signals required for the pollen tube to enter the embryo sac, leading to abortion. PMID:27323128

  8. Responses of lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) and rhizobia to copper-based fungicide application in two contrasting soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Martin; Dober, Melanie; Jöchlinger, Lisa; Keiblinger, Katharina; Soja, Gerhard; Mentler, Axel; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Bruckner, Alexander; Golestani Fard, Alireza; Wenzel, Walter; Zehetner, Franz

    2016-04-01

    For more than 120 years, salts of copper (Cu) have been used in viticulture to prevent damages by fungal diseases. Due to restrictions in the use of synthetic fungicides and mineral fertilizers, organic viticulture depends on Cu as well as on biological nitrogen fixation. Here, we conducted an eco-toxicological pot experiment with an acidic, sandy soil and a calcareous, loamy soil and incrementally increasing fungicide application rates from 0 to 5000 mg Cu kg-1 soil. Lucerne (Medicago sativa L. cultivar. Plato) was grown in the pots for 3 months under greenhouse conditions. Acetylene reduction assays performed with harvested nodules showed no response to elevated soil Cu concentrations indicating that the nitrogen fixing capacity of rhizobia was not compromised by Cu in our experiment. Nevertheless, the nodule biomass was very sensitive to Cu and strongly decreased due to reduced amounts of fine roots and less energy supply by the plant. Legumes are known to be Cu-sensitive, and our contribution also showed a decrease in harvest by 50 % (EC50) at 21 mg kg-1 plant Cu tissue concentration in the acidic soil and at 30 mg kg-1 in the calcareous soil. This corresponded to diffusional fluxes measured by diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) of 202 and 368 fmol cm-2 s-1, respectively. DGT measurements showed that in the acidic soil, Cu was 2 to 10 times more available for plants, depending on the concentration applied, than in the calcareous soil. A modeling approach for estimating the effective concentration (EC) by including the DGT-estimated plant Cu content and the pH produced more accurate values (NRMSE of 21.9 to 20.1 %) than EC directly estimated from DGT.

  9. Rhizobial strains isolated from nodules of Medicago marina in southwest Spain are abiotic-stress tolerant and symbiotically diverse.

    PubMed

    Alías-Villegas, Cynthia; Cubo, M Teresa; Lara-Dampier, Victoria; Bellogín, Ramón A; Camacho, María; Temprano, Francisco; Espuny, M Rosario

    2015-10-01

    The isolation and characterisation of nitrogen-fixing root nodule bacteria from Medicago marina, a tolerant legume species, were studied in two areas from southwest Spain. A total of 30 out of 82 isolates with distinct ERIC-PCR fingerprints were analysed on the basis of molecular (PCR-RFLP of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS) with two endonucleases, analysis of the 16S rDNA and symbiotic nodC gene sequences, plasmid profiles and SDS-PAGE of LPS, including the partial sequence of the housekeeping gene glnII and the symbiotic gene nodA of some representatives), physiological (utilisation of sole carbon sources, tolerance to antibiotics, NaCl, heavy metals, temperature and pH) and symbiotic parameters (efficacy on M. marina, M. minima, M. murex, M. orbicularis, M. polymorpha, M. sativa and M. truncatula). All the bacteria isolated from M. marina nodules belonged to Ensifer meliloti, except for one strain that belonged to E. medicae. To determine the nodulation range of M. marina, 10 different Ensifer species were tested for their ability to nodulate on this plant. E. kummerowiae CCBAU 71714 and the E. medicae control strain M19.1 were the only Ensifer species tested that developed nitrogen-fixing nodules on this plant. Most of the M. marina-nodulating strains showed tolerance to stress factors and all of them shared the presence of a gene similar to cadA, a gene that encodes for a PIB-type ATPase, which is a transporter belonging to the large superfamily of ATP-driven pumps involved in the transport of metals across cell membranes. PMID:26299372

  10. Morphological and genetic changes induced by excess Zn in roots of Medicago truncatula A17 and a Zn accumulating mutant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nutrient fluxes associated with legume-rhizobia symbioses are poorly understood and little is known regarding the influence of abiotic stresses on development and maintenance of N-fixing nodules and root system architecture (RSA). We examined effects of Zn on nodule development and structure, root architecture, and expression of nodulation-related miRNAs in Medicago truncatula and the mutant, raz (requires additional Zn). Findings Excess Zn increased root and shoot associated Zn in both genotypes, however, raz plants had lower root associated Zn than WT plants. Roots of raz plants exposed to excess Zn had less volume, surface area, and total length compared to WT plants. Raz plants had lower lateral root number than WT plants. Excess Zn was found to increase root diameter in both genotypes. The Mn Translocation Factor (TfMn) increased in response to Zn in both genotypes; this was more pronounced in raz plants. TfZn was higher in raz plants and reduced in both genotypes in response to Zn. Nodulation was not influenced by Zn treatment or plant genotype. MicroRNA166 was upregulated under excess Zn in WT plants. Conclusions Neither the raz mutation nor Zn treatment affected nodulation, however, raz plants had altered RSA compared with WT and responded differently to Zn, implying the mutation potentially modulates RSA responses to Zn but doesn’t play a direct role in nodulation. MicroRNA166 was significantly induced in WT plants by excess Zn, warranting further investigation into the potential role it plays in controlling RSA. PMID:23191938

  11. Regulation of anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthesis by Medicago truncatula bHLH transcription factor MtTT8.

    PubMed

    Li, Penghui; Chen, Beibei; Zhang, Gaoyang; Chen, Longxiang; Dong, Qiang; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Zhao, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The MYB- basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-WD40 complexes regulating anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in plants are not fully understood. Here Medicago truncatula bHLH MtTT8 was characterized as a central component of these ternary complexes that control anthocyanin and PA biosynthesis. Mttt8 mutant seeds have a transparent testa phenotype with reduced PAs and anthocyanins. MtTT8 restores PA and anthocyanin productions in Arabidopsis tt8 mutant. Ectopic expression of MtTT8 restores anthocyanins and PAs in mttt8 plant and hairy roots and further enhances both productions in wild-type hairy roots. Transcriptomic analyses and metabolite profiling of mttt8 mutant seeds and M. truncatula hairy roots (mttt8 mutant, mttt8 mutant complemented with MtTT8, or MtTT8 overexpression lines) indicate that MtTT8 regulates a subset of genes involved in PA and anthocyanin biosynthesis. MtTT8 is genetically regulated by MtLAP1, MtPAR and MtWD40-1. Combinations of MtPAR, MtLAP1, MtTT8 and MtWD40-1 activate MtTT8 promoter in yeast assay. MtTT8 interacts with these transcription factors to form regulatory complexes. MtTT8, MtWD40-1 and an MYB factor, MtPAR or MtLAP1, interacted and activated promoters of anthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin synthase to regulate PA and anthocyanin biosynthesis, respectively. Our results provide new insights into the complex regulation of PA and anthocyanin biosynthesis in M. truncatula. PMID:26725247

  12. Occurrence of Transgenic Feral Alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) in Alfalfa Seed Production Areas in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Stephanie L.; Kesoju, Sandya R.; Martin, Ruth C.; Kramer, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The potential environmental risks of transgene exposure are not clear for alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa), a perennial crop that is cross-pollinated by insects. We gathered data on feral alfalfa in major alfalfa seed-production areas in the western United States to (1) evaluate evidence that feral transgenic plants spread transgenes and (2) determine environmental and agricultural production factors influencing the location of feral alfalfa, especially transgenic plants. Road verges in Fresno, California; Canyon, Idaho; and Walla Walla, Washington were surveyed in 2011 and 2012 for feral plants, and samples were tested for the CP4 EPSPS protein that conveys resistance to glyphosate. Of 4580 sites surveyed, feral plants were observed at 404 sites. Twenty-seven percent of these sites had transgenic plants. The frequency of sites having transgenic feral plants varied among our study areas. Transgenic plants were found in 32.7%, 21.4.7% and 8.3% of feral plant sites in Fresno, Canyon and Walla Walla, respectively. Spatial analysis suggested that feral populations started independently and tended to cluster in seed and hay production areas, places where seed tended to drop. Significant but low spatial auto correlation suggested that in some instances, plants colonized nearby locations. Neighboring feral plants were frequently within pollinator foraging range; however, further research is needed to confirm transgene flow. Locations of feral plant clusters were not well predicted by environmental and production variables. However, the likelihood of seed spillage during production and transport had predictive value in explaining the occurrence of transgenic feral populations. Our study confirms that genetically engineered alfalfa has dispersed into the environment, and suggests that minimizing seed spillage and eradicating feral alfalfa along road sides would be effective strategies to minimize transgene dispersal. PMID:26699337

  13. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-07-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with (33)P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake. PMID:25944927

  14. Functional assessment of the Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD protein demonstrates that it is a high-affinity nitrate transporter.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Rammyani; Salehin, Mohammad; Adeyemo, O Sarah; Salazar, Carolina; Shulaev, Vladimir; Sherrier, D Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2012-10-01

    The Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD (for Numerous Infections and Polyphenolics/Lateral root-organ Defective) gene encodes a protein found in a clade of nitrate transporters within the large NRT1(PTR) family that also encodes transporters of dipeptides and tripeptides, dicarboxylates, auxin, and abscisic acid. Of the NRT1(PTR) members known to transport nitrate, most are low-affinity transporters. Here, we show that M. truncatula nip/latd mutants are more defective in their lateral root responses to nitrate provided at low (250 μm) concentrations than at higher (5 mm) concentrations; however, nitrate uptake experiments showed no discernible differences in uptake in the mutants. Heterologous expression experiments showed that MtNIP/LATD encodes a nitrate transporter: expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes conferred upon the oocytes the ability to take up nitrate from the medium with high affinity, and expression of MtNIP/LATD in an Arabidopsis chl1(nrt1.1) mutant rescued the chlorate susceptibility phenotype. X. laevis oocytes expressing mutant Mtnip-1 and Mtlatd were unable to take up nitrate from the medium, but oocytes expressing the less severe Mtnip-3 allele were proficient in nitrate transport. M. truncatula nip/latd mutants have pleiotropic defects in nodulation and root architecture. Expression of the Arabidopsis NRT1.1 gene in mutant Mtnip-1 roots partially rescued Mtnip-1 for root architecture defects but not for nodulation defects. This suggests that the spectrum of activities inherent in AtNRT1.1 is different from that possessed by MtNIP/LATD, but it could also reflect stability differences of each protein in M. truncatula. Collectively, the data show that MtNIP/LATD is a high-affinity nitrate transporter and suggest that it could have another function. PMID:22858636

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Superfamily Genes and their Responses to Abiotic Stress in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yongjun; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Song, Lili; Guo, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily is a large, plant-specific transcription factor family that is involved in many important processes, including plant growth, development, and stress responses. Using Medicago truncatula genome information, we identified and characterized 123 putative AP2/ERF genes, which were named as MtERF1–123. These genes were classified into four families based on phylogenetic analysis, which is consistent with the results of other plant species. MtERF genes are distributed throughout all chromosomes but are clustered on various chromosomes due to genomic tandem and segmental duplication. Using transcriptome, high-throughput sequencing data, and qRT-PCR analysis, we assessed the expression patterns of the MtERF genes in tissues during development and under abiotic stresses. In total, 87 MtERF genes were expressed in plant tissues, most of which were expressed in specific tissues during development or under specific abiotic stress treatments. These results support the notion that MtERF genes are involved in developmental regulation and environmental responses in M. truncatula. Furthermore, a cluster of DREB subfamily members on chromosome 6 was induced by both cold and freezing stress, representing a positive gene regulatory response under low temperature stress, which suggests that these genes might contribute to freezing tolerance to M. truncatula. In summary, our genome-wide characterization, evolutionary analysis, and expression pattern analysis of MtERF genes in M. truncatula provides valuable information for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes and utilizing them to improve stress tolerance in plants. PMID:26834762

  16. A WD40 Repeat Protein from Medicago truncatula Is Necessary for Tissue-Specific Anthocyanin and Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis But Not for Trichome Development1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yongzhen; Wenger, Jonathan P.; Saathoff, Katie; Peel, Gregory J.; Wen, Jiangqi; Huhman, David; Allen, Stacy N.; Tang, Yuhong; Cheng, Xiaofei; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Marks, M. David; Dixon, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    WD40 repeat proteins regulate biosynthesis of anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins (PAs), and mucilage in the seed and the development of trichomes and root hairs. We have cloned and characterized a WD40 repeat protein gene from Medicago truncatula (MtWD40-1) via a retrotransposon-tagging approach. Deficiency of MtWD40-1 expression blocks accumulation of mucilage and a range of phenolic compounds, including PAs, epicatechin, other flavonoids, and benzoic acids, in the seed, reduces epicatechin levels without corresponding effects on other flavonoids in flowers, reduces isoflavone levels in roots, but does not impair trichome or root hair development. MtWD40-1 is expressed constitutively, with highest expression in the seed coat, where its transcript profile temporally parallels those of PA biosynthetic genes. Transcript profile analysis revealed that many genes of flavonoid biosynthesis were down-regulated in a tissue-specific manner in M. truncatula lines harboring retrotransposon insertions in the MtWD40-1 gene. MtWD40-1 complemented the anthocyanin, PA, and trichome phenotypes of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transparent testa glabrous1 mutant. We discuss the function of MtWD40-1 in natural product formation in M. truncatula and the potential use of the gene for engineering PAs in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa). PMID:19710231

  17. A WD40 repeat protein from Medicago truncatula is necessary for tissue-specific anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthesis but not for trichome development.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yongzhen; Wenger, Jonathan P; Saathoff, Katie; Peel, Gregory J; Wen, Jiangqi; Huhman, David; Allen, Stacy N; Tang, Yuhong; Cheng, Xiaofei; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Sumner, Lloyd W; Marks, M David; Dixon, Richard A

    2009-11-01

    WD40 repeat proteins regulate biosynthesis of anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins (PAs), and mucilage in the seed and the development of trichomes and root hairs. We have cloned and characterized a WD40 repeat protein gene from Medicago truncatula (MtWD40-1) via a retrotransposon-tagging approach. Deficiency of MtWD40-1 expression blocks accumulation of mucilage and a range of phenolic compounds, including PAs, epicatechin, other flavonoids, and benzoic acids, in the seed, reduces epicatechin levels without corresponding effects on other flavonoids in flowers, reduces isoflavone levels in roots, but does not impair trichome or root hair development. MtWD40-1 is expressed constitutively, with highest expression in the seed coat, where its transcript profile temporally parallels those of PA biosynthetic genes. Transcript profile analysis revealed that many genes of flavonoid biosynthesis were down-regulated in a tissue-specific manner in M. truncatula lines harboring retrotransposon insertions in the MtWD40-1 gene. MtWD40-1 complemented the anthocyanin, PA, and trichome phenotypes of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transparent testa glabrous1 mutant. We discuss the function of MtWD40-1 in natural product formation in M. truncatula and the potential use of the gene for engineering PAs in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa). PMID:19710231

  18. Activation of the cell cycle machinery and the isoflavonoid biosynthesis pathway by active Rhizobium meliloti Nod signal molecules in Medicago microcallus suspensions.

    PubMed Central

    Savouré, A; Magyar, Z; Pierre, M; Brown, S; Schultze, M; Dudits, D; Kondorosi, A; Kondorosi, E

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that treatment of Medicago microcallus suspensions with the cognate Rhizobium meliloti Nod signal molecule NodRm-IV(C16:2,S) can modify gene expression both qualitatively and quantitatively. At concentrations of 10(-6) - 10(-9) M, this host specific plant morphogen but not the inactive non-sulfated molecule stimulated cell cycle progression as indicated by the significantly enhanced thymidine incorporation, elevated number of S phase cells, increase in kinase activity of the p34cdc2-related complexes and enhancement of the level of expression of several cell cycle marker genes, the histone H3-1, the cdc2Ms and the cyclin cycMs2. The presented data suggest that at least part of the physiological role of the Nod factor may be linked to molecular events involved in the control of the plant cell division cycle. In situ hybridization experiments with antisense H3-1 RNA probe indicated that only certain cells of the calli were able to respond to the Nod factor. High (10(-6) M) but not low (10(-9) M) concentrations of the active Nod factors induced the expression of the isoflavone reductase gene (IFR), a marker gene of the isoflavonoid biosynthesis pathway in most callus cells. Our results indicate that Medicago cell responses to the Nod signal molecules can be investigated in suspension cultures. Images PMID:8131743

  19. Sinorhizobium meliloti strains TII7 and A5 by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) have chromsomes identical with Rm1021 and form an effective and ineffective symbiosis with Medicago truncatula line Jemalong A17, respectively

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strains TII7 and A5 formed an effective and ineffective symbiosis with Medicago truncatula Jemalong A17, respectively. Both were shown to have identical chromsomes with strains Rm1021 and RCR2011 using a Multilocus Sequence Typing method. The 2260 bp segments of DNA stretching from the 3’ end ...

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis elicits shoot proteome changes that are modified during cadmium stress alleviation in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, which engage a mutualistic symbiosis with the roots of most plant species, have received much attention for their ability to alleviate heavy metal stress in plants, including cadmium (Cd). While the molecular bases of Cd tolerance displayed by mycorrhizal plants have been extensively analysed in roots, very little is known regarding the mechanisms by which legume aboveground organs can escape metal toxicity upon AM symbiosis. As a model system to address this question, we used Glomus irregulare-colonised Medicago truncatula plants, which were previously shown to accumulate and tolerate heavy metal in their shoots when grown in a substrate spiked with 2 mg Cd kg-1. Results The measurement of three indicators for metal phytoextraction showed that shoots of mycorrhizal M. truncatula plants have a capacity for extracting Cd that is not related to an increase in root-to-shoot translocation rate, but to a high level of allocation plasticity. When analysing the photosynthetic performance in metal-treated mycorrhizal plants relative to those only Cd-supplied, it turned out that the presence of G. irregulare partially alleviated the negative effects of Cd on photosynthesis. To test the mechanisms by which shoots of Cd-treated mycorrhizal plants avoid metal toxicity, we performed a 2-DE/MALDI/TOF-based comparative proteomic analysis of the M. truncatula shoot responses upon mycorrhization and Cd exposure. Whereas the metal-responsive shoot proteins currently identified in non-mycorrhizal M. truncatula indicated that Cd impaired CO2 assimilation, the mycorrhiza-responsive shoot proteome was characterised by an increase in photosynthesis-related proteins coupled to a reduction in glugoneogenesis/glycolysis and antioxidant processes. By contrast, Cd was found to trigger the opposite response coupled the up-accumulation of molecular chaperones in shoot of mycorrhizal plants relative to those metal-free. Conclusion Besides drawing a

  1. Integration of novel SSR and gene-based SNP marker loci in the chickpea genetic map and establishment of new anchor points with Medicago truncatula genome

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Spurthi N.; Zhu, Hongyan; Varghese, Nicy; Datta, Subhojit; Choi, Hong-Kyu; Horres, Ralf; Jüngling, Ruth; Singh, Jagbir; Kavi Kishor, P. B.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Hoisington, Dave A.; Kahl, Günter; Winter, Peter; Cook, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the development and mapping of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in chickpea. The mapping population is based on an inter-specific cross between domesticated and non-domesticated genotypes of chickpea (Cicer arietinum ICC 4958 × C. reticulatum PI 489777). This same population has been the focus of previous studies, permitting integration of new and legacy genetic markers into a single genetic map. We report a set of 311 novel SSR markers (designated ICCM—ICRISAT chickpea microsatellite), obtained from an SSR-enriched genomic library of ICC 4958. Screening of these SSR markers on a diverse panel of 48 chickpea accessions provided 147 polymorphic markers with 2–21 alleles and polymorphic information content value 0.04–0.92. Fifty-two of these markers were polymorphic between parental genotypes of the inter-specific population. We also analyzed 233 previously published (H-series) SSR markers that provided another set of 52 polymorphic markers. An additional 71 gene-based SNP markers were developed from transcript sequences that are highly conserved between chickpea and its near relative Medicago truncatula. By using these three approaches, 175 new marker loci along with 407 previously reported marker loci were integrated to yield an improved genetic map of chickpea. The integrated map contains 521 loci organized into eight linkage groups that span 2,602 cM, with an average inter-marker distance of 4.99 cM. Gene-based markers provide anchor points for comparing the genomes of Medicago and chickpea, and reveal extended synteny between these two species. The combined set of genetic markers and their integration into an improved genetic map should facilitate chickpea genetics and breeding, as well as translational studies between chickpea and Medicago. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1265-1) contains supplementary material, which is

  2. Compatibility of a wild type and its genetically modified Sinorhizobium strain with two mycorrhizal fungi on Medicago species as affected by drought stress.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M M.; Azcón, R; Barea, J M.

    2001-07-01

    The effect of double inoculation with two strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti [the wild type (WT) strain GR4 and its genetically modified (GM) derivative GR4(pCK3)], and two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomus deserticola and Glomus intraradices) was examined in a microcosm system on three species of Medicago (M. nolana, M. rigidula, M. rotata). Two water regimes (80 and 100% water holding capacity, WHC) were assayed. The efficiency of each AM fungus increasing plant growth, nutrient content, nodulation and water-stress tolerance was related to the Sinorhizobium strains and Medicago species. This indicates selective and specific compatibilities between microsymbionts and the common host plant. Differential effects of the mycorrhizal isolates were not associated with their colonizing ability. Nodulation and mycorrhizal dependency (MD) changed in each plant genotype in accordance with the Sinorhizobium strain and AM fungi involved. Generally, Medicago sp. MD decreased under water-stress conditions even when these conditions did not affect AM colonization (%). Proline accumulation in non-mycorrhizal plant leaves was increased by water stress, except in M. rotata plants. Differences in proline accumulation in AM-colonized plants suggest that both the AM fungus and the Sinorhizobium strain were able to induce different degrees of osmotic adjustment. Mycorrhizal plants nodulated by the WT strain accumulated more proline in M. rigidula and M. rotata under water stress than non-mycorrhizal plants. Conversely, mycorrhizal plants nodulated by the GM strain accumulated less proline in response to both AM colonization and drought. These results indicated changes in the synthesis of this nitrogenous osmoregulator product associated with microbial inoculation and drought tolerance. Mycorrhizal plants nodulated by the GM Sinorhizobium strain seem to suffer less from the detrimental effect of water stress, since under water limitation relative plant growth

  3. Seed shape in model legumes: approximation by a cardioid reveals differences in ethylene insensitive mutants of Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Emilio; Martín, José Javier; Chan, Pick Kuen; Gresshoff, Peter M; Tocino, Ángel

    2012-09-15

    Seed shape in the model legumes Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula is described. Based in previous work with Arabidopsis, the outline of the longitudinal sections of seeds is compared with a cardioid curve. L. japonicus seeds adjust well to an unmodified cardioid, whereas accurate adjustment in M. truncatula is obtained by the simple transformation of scaling the vertical axis by a factor equal to the Golden Ratio. Adjustments of seed shape measurements with simple geometrical forms are essential tools for the statistical analysis of variations in seed shape under different conditions or in mutants. The efficiency of the adjustment to a cardioid in the model plants suggests that seed morphology may be related to genome complexity. Seeds of ethylene insensitive mutants present differences in size and shape as well as altered responses to imbibition. The biological implication and meaning of these relationships are discussed. PMID:22809828

  4. LYR3, a high-affinity LCO-binding protein of Medicago truncatula, interacts with LYK3, a key symbiotic receptor.

    PubMed

    Fliegmann, Judith; Jauneau, Alain; Pichereaux, Carole; Rosenberg, Charles; Gasciolli, Virginie; Timmers, Antonius C J; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Cullimore, Julie; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2016-05-01

    LYR3, LYK3, and NFP are lysin motif-containing receptor-like kinases (LysM-RLKs) from Medicago truncatula, involved in perception of symbiotic lipo-chitooligosaccharide (LCO) signals. Here, we show that LYR3, a high-affinity LCO-binding protein, physically interacts with LYK3, a key player regulating symbiotic interactions. In vitro, LYR3 is phosphorylated by the active kinase domain of LYK3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging/Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM/FRET) experiments in tobacco protoplasts show that the interaction between LYR3 and LYK3 at the plasma membrane is disrupted or inhibited by addition of LCOs. Moreover, LYR3 attenuates the cell death response, provoked by coexpression of NFP and LYK3 in tobacco leaves. PMID:27129432

  5. Isolation and characterization of genetic variability in bacteria with β-hemolytic and antifungal activity isolated from the rhizosphere of Medicago truncatula plants.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salmerón, J E; Prieto-Barajas, C M; Valencia-Cantero, E; Moreno-Hagelsieb, G; Santoyo, G

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of hemolytic and antifungal activities in bacterial isolates from the rhizosphere of Medicago truncatula plants. Of the 2000 bacterial colonies, 96 showed β-hemolytic activities (frequency, 4.8 x 10(-2)). Hemolytic isolates were analyzed for their genetic diversity by using random amplification of polymorphic DNA, yielding 88 haplotypes. The similarity coefficient of Nei and Li showed a polymorphic diversity ranging from 0.3 to 1. Additionally, 8 of the hemolytic isolates showed antifungal activity toward plant pathogens, Diaporthe phaseolorum, Colletotrichum acutatum, Rhizoctonia solani, and Fusarium oxysporum. The 16S ribosomal sequencing analysis showed that antagonistic bacterial isolates corresponded to Bacillus subtilis (UM15, UM33, UM42, UM49, UM52, and UM91), Bacillus pumilus (UM24), and Bacillus licheniformis (UM88). The present results revealed a higher genetic diversity among hemolytic isolates compared to that of isolates with antifungal action. PMID:25062484

  6. A Medicago truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like Domain-Containing Protein Is Required for Rhizobial Infection and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation.

    PubMed

    Sinharoy, Senjuti; Liu, Chengwu; Breakspear, Andrew; Guan, Dian; Shailes, Sarah; Nakashima, Jin; Zhang, Shulan; Wen, Jiangqi; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Oldroyd, Giles; Murray, Jeremy D; Udvardi, Michael K

    2016-04-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and soil rhizobia culminates in the formation of nitrogen-fixing organs called nodules that support plant growth. Two Medicago truncatula Tnt1-insertion mutants were identified that produced small nodules, which were unable to fix nitrogen effectively due to ineffective rhizobial colonization. The gene underlying this phenotype was found to encode a protein containing a putative membrane-localized domain of unknown function (DUF21) and a cystathionine-β-synthase domain. The cbs1 mutants had defective infection threads that were sometimes devoid of rhizobia and formed small nodules with greatly reduced numbers of symbiosomes. We studied the expression of the gene, designated M truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like1 (MtCBS1), using a promoter-β-glucuronidase gene fusion, which revealed expression in infected root hair cells, developing nodules, and in the invasion zone of mature nodules. An MtCBS1-GFP fusion protein localized itself to the infection thread and symbiosomes. Nodulation factor-induced Ca(2+) responses were observed in the cbs1 mutant, indicating that MtCBS1 acts downstream of nodulation factor signaling. MtCBS1 expression occurred exclusively during Medicago-rhizobium symbiosis. Induction of MtCBS1 expression during symbiosis was found to be dependent on Nodule Inception (NIN), a key transcription factor that controls both rhizobial infection and nodule organogenesis. Interestingly, the closest homolog of MtCBS1, MtCBS2, was specifically induced in mycorrhizal roots, suggesting common infection mechanisms in nodulation and mycorrhization. Related proteins in Arabidopsis have been implicated in cell wall maturation, suggesting a potential role for CBS1 in the formation of the infection thread wall. PMID:26884486

  7. Evaluation of three endemic Mediterranean plant species Atriplex halimus, Medicago lupulina and Portulaca oleracea for Phytoremediation of Ni, Pb and Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chami, Ziad Al; Amer, Nasser; Bitar, Lina Al; Mondelli, Donato; Dumontet, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    The success of phytoremediation depends upon the identification of suitable plants species that hyperaccumulate/tolerate heavy metals and produce large amounts of biomass. In this study, three endemic Mediterranean plant species Atriplex halimus, Medicago lupulina and Portulaca oleracea, were grown hydroponically to assess their potential use in phytoremediation of Ni, Pb and Zn and biomass production. The objective of this research is to improve phytoremediation procedures by searching for a new endemic Mediterranean plant species which can be used for phytoremediation of low/moderate contamination in the Mediterranean arid and semiarid conditions and bioenergy production. The hydroponics experiment was carried out in a growth chamber using half strength Hoagland's solution as control (CTR) and 5 concentrations for Pb and Zn (5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 mg L-1) and 3 concentrations for Ni (1, 2, and 5 mg L-1). Complete randomized design with five replications was adopted. Main growth parameters (shoot and root dry weight, shoot and root length and chlorophyll content) were determined. Shoots and roots were analyzed for their metals contents. Some interesting contributions of this research are: (i) plant metal uptake efficiency ranked as follows: A. halimus > M. lupulina > P. oleracea, whereas heavy metal toxicity ranked as follows: Ni > Zn > Pb, (ii) none of the plant species was identified as hyperaccumulator, (iii) Atriplex halimus and Medicago lupulina can accumulate Ni, Pb and Zn in their roots, (iv) translocate small fraction to their above ground biomass, and (v) indicate moderate pollution levels of the environment. In addition, as they are a good biomass producer, they can be used in phytostabilisation of marginal lands and their above ground biomass can be used for livestock feeding as well for bioenergy production.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Loci for Salt Tolerance during Germination in Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Long-Xi; Liu, Xinchun; Boge, William; Liu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is one of major abiotic stresses limiting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) production in the arid and semi-arid regions in US and other counties. In this study, we used a diverse panel of alfalfa accessions previously described by Zhang et al. (2015) to identify molecular markers associated with salt tolerance during germination using genome-wide association study (GWAS) and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS). Phenotyping was done by germinating alfalfa seeds under different levels of salt stress. Phenotypic data of adjusted germination rates and SNP markers generated by GBS were used for marker-trait association. Thirty six markers were significantly associated with salt tolerance in at least one level of salt treatments. Alignment of sequence tags to the Medicago truncatula genome revealed genetic locations of the markers on all chromosomes except chromosome 3. Most significant markers were found on chromosomes 1, 2, and 4. BLAST search using the flanking sequences of significant markers identified 14 putative candidate genes linked to 23 significant markers. Most of them were repeatedly identified in two or three salt treatments. Several loci identified in the present study had similar genetic locations to the reported QTL associated with salt tolerance in M. truncatula. A locus identified on chromosome 6 by this study overlapped with that by drought in our previous study. To our knowledge, this is the first report on mapping loci associated with salt tolerance during germination in autotetraploid alfalfa. Further investigation on these loci and their linked genes would provide insight into understanding molecular mechanisms by which salt and drought stresses affect alfalfa growth. Functional markers closely linked to the resistance loci would be useful for MAS to improve alfalfa cultivars with enhanced resistance to drought and salt stresses. PMID:27446182

  9. A Medicago truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like Domain-Containing Protein Is Required for Rhizobial Infection and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Breakspear, Andrew; Guan, Dian; Nakashima, Jin; Zhang, Shulan; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Oldroyd, Giles; Murray, Jeremy D.; Udvardi, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and soil rhizobia culminates in the formation of nitrogen-fixing organs called nodules that support plant growth. Two Medicago truncatula Tnt1-insertion mutants were identified that produced small nodules, which were unable to fix nitrogen effectively due to ineffective rhizobial colonization. The gene underlying this phenotype was found to encode a protein containing a putative membrane-localized domain of unknown function (DUF21) and a cystathionine-β-synthase domain. The cbs1 mutants had defective infection threads that were sometimes devoid of rhizobia and formed small nodules with greatly reduced numbers of symbiosomes. We studied the expression of the gene, designated M. truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like1 (MtCBS1), using a promoter-β-glucuronidase gene fusion, which revealed expression in infected root hair cells, developing nodules, and in the invasion zone of mature nodules. An MtCBS1-GFP fusion protein localized itself to the infection thread and symbiosomes. Nodulation factor-induced Ca2+ responses were observed in the cbs1 mutant, indicating that MtCBS1 acts downstream of nodulation factor signaling. MtCBS1 expression occurred exclusively during Medicago-rhizobium symbiosis. Induction of MtCBS1 expression during symbiosis was found to be dependent on Nodule Inception (NIN), a key transcription factor that controls both rhizobial infection and nodule organogenesis. Interestingly, the closest homolog of MtCBS1, MtCBS2, was specifically induced in mycorrhizal roots, suggesting common infection mechanisms in nodulation and mycorrhization. Related proteins in Arabidopsis have been implicated in cell wall maturation, suggesting a potential role for CBS1 in the formation of the infection thread wall. PMID:26884486

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Loci for Salt Tolerance during Germination in Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Long-Xi; Liu, Xinchun; Boge, William; Liu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is one of major abiotic stresses limiting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) production in the arid and semi-arid regions in US and other counties. In this study, we used a diverse panel of alfalfa accessions previously described by Zhang et al. (2015) to identify molecular markers associated with salt tolerance during germination using genome-wide association study (GWAS) and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS). Phenotyping was done by germinating alfalfa seeds under different levels of salt stress. Phenotypic data of adjusted germination rates and SNP markers generated by GBS were used for marker-trait association. Thirty six markers were significantly associated with salt tolerance in at least one level of salt treatments. Alignment of sequence tags to the Medicago truncatula genome revealed genetic locations of the markers on all chromosomes except chromosome 3. Most significant markers were found on chromosomes 1, 2, and 4. BLAST search using the flanking sequences of significant markers identified 14 putative candidate genes linked to 23 significant markers. Most of them were repeatedly identified in two or three salt treatments. Several loci identified in the present study had similar genetic locations to the reported QTL associated with salt tolerance in M. truncatula. A locus identified on chromosome 6 by this study overlapped with that by drought in our previous study. To our knowledge, this is the first report on mapping loci associated with salt tolerance during germination in autotetraploid alfalfa. Further investigation on these loci and their linked genes would provide insight into understanding molecular mechanisms by which salt and drought stresses affect alfalfa growth. Functional markers closely linked to the resistance loci would be useful for MAS to improve alfalfa cultivars with enhanced resistance to drought and salt stresses. PMID:27446182

  11. The molecular genetic linkage map of the model legume Medicago truncatula: an essential tool for comparative legume genomics and the isolation of agronomically important genes

    PubMed Central

    Thoquet, Philippe; Ghérardi, Michele; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Kereszt, Attila; Ané, Jean-Michel; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Huguet, Thierry

    2002-01-01

    Background The legume Medicago truncatula has emerged as a model plant for the molecular and genetic dissection of various plant processes involved in rhizobial, mycorrhizal and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions. Aiming to develop essential tools for such genetic approaches, we have established the first genetic map of this species. Two parental homozygous lines were selected from the cultivar Jemalong and from the Algerian natural population (DZA315) on the basis of their molecular and phenotypic polymorphism. Results An F2 segregating population of 124 individuals between these two lines was obtained using an efficient manual crossing technique established for M. truncatula and was used to construct a genetic map. This map spans 1225 cM (average 470 kb/cM) and comprises 289 markers including RAPD, AFLP, known genes and isoenzymes arranged in 8 linkage groups (2n = 16). Markers are uniformly distributed throughout the map and segregation distortion is limited to only 3 linkage groups. By mapping a number of common markers, the eight linkage groups are shown to be homologous to those of diploid alfalfa (M. sativa), implying a good level of macrosynteny between the two genomes. Using this M. truncatula map and the derived F3 populations, we were able to map the Mtsym6 symbiotic gene on linkage group 8 and the SPC gene, responsible for the direction of pod coiling, on linkage group 7. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Medicago truncatula is amenable to diploid genetic analysis and they open the way to map-based cloning of symbiotic or other agronomically-important genes using this model plant. PMID:11825338

  12. Enhanced triterpene saponin biosynthesis and root nodulation in transgenic barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaertn.) expressing a novel beta-amyrin synthase (AsOXA1) gene.

    PubMed

    Confalonieri, Massimo; Cammareri, Maria; Biazzi, Elisa; Pecchia, Paola; Fevereiro, Manuel Pedro Salema; Balestrazzi, Alma; Tava, Aldo; Conicella, Clara

    2009-02-01

    Triterpene saponins are a group of bioactive compounds abundant in the genus Medicago, and have been studied extensively for their biological and pharmacological properties. In this article, we evaluated the effects of the ectopic expression of AsOXA1 cDNA from Aster sedifolius on the production of triterpene saponins in barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaertn.). AsOXA1 cDNA encodes beta-amyrin synthase, a key enzyme involved in triterpene saponin biosynthesis. One of the four transgenic lines expressing AsOXA1 accumulated significantly larger amounts of some triterpenic compounds in leaf and root than did control plants. In particular, the leaf exhibited significantly higher levels of bayogenin, medicagenic acid and zanhic acid. The amounts of medicagenic acid and zanhic acid, which represent the core of the M. truncatula leaf saponins, were 1.7 and 2.1 times higher, respectively, than the amounts extracted from the control line. In root, the production of bayogenin, hederagenin, soyasapogenol E and 2beta-hydroxyoleanolic acid was increased significantly. The increase in the total amounts of triterpenic compounds observed in the leaves of transgenic lines correlated with the AsOXA1 expression level. Interestingly, the plants expressing AsOXA1 showed, under different growth conditions, improved nodulation when compared with the control line. Nodulation enhancement was also accompanied by a significant change in the soyasapogenol B content. Our results indicate that the ectopic expression of AsOXA1 in barrel medic leads to a greater accumulation of triterpene saponins and enhanced root nodulation. PMID:19055609

  13. Influence of atmospheric [CO2] on growth, carbon allocation and cost of plant tissues on leaf nitrogen concentration maintenance in nodulated Medicago sativa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, Gabriela; Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Michalzik, Beate; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Plant carbon (C) allocation and plant metabolic processes (i.e. photosynthesis and respiration) can be affected by changes in C availability, for example from changing atmospheric [CO2]. In nodulated plants, C availability may also influence nitrogen (N) fixation by bacteriods. But C allocation and N fixation are often studied independently and hence do not allow elucidating interactive effects. We investigated how different atmospheric [CO2] (Pleistocene: 170 ppm, ambient: 400 ppm and projected future: 700 ppm) influence plant growth, allocation to nodules, and the ratio of photosynthesis-to-respiration (R:A) as an indicator of C cost in Medicago sativa inoculated with Ensifer meliloti. M. sativa grew c. 38% more nodules at 400 ppm and 700 ppm than at 170 ppm. However, ratios of above- and belowground plant biomass to nodule biomass were constant over time and independent of atmospheric [CO2]. Total non-structural carbohydrate concentrations were not significantly different between plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, but were four to five-fold higher than in 170 ppm plants. Leaf level N concentration was similar across treatments, but N-based photosynthetic rates were 82% and 93% higher in leaves of plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, respectively, than plants grown at 170 ppm. In addition, leaf R:A was greater (48% or 55%) in plants grown at 170 ppm than plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm. Similarly, the greatest proportion of assimilated CO2 released by root respiration occurred in rhizobial plants growing at 170 ppm. Our results suggest that C limitation in nodulated Medicago sativa plants did not influence C allocation to nodule biomass but caused a proportionally greater allocation of C to belowground respiration, most likely to bacteriods. This suggests that N tissue concentration was maintained at low [CO2] by revving up bacteriod metabolism and at the expense of non-structural carbohydrate reserves.

  14. Two alternative recessive quantitative trait loci influence resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Lars G; Lichtenzveig, Judith; Oliver, Richard P; Ellwood, Simon R

    2008-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the genetic basis of plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens is incomplete and has been characterised in relatively few pathosystems. In this study, the cytology and genetics of resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot caused by Phoma medicaginis, an economically important necrotrophic pathogen of Medicago spp., was examined in the model legume M. truncatula. Results Macroscopically, the resistant response of accession SA27063 was characterised by small, hypersensitive-like spots following inoculation while the susceptible interaction with accessions A17 and SA3054 showed necrotic lesions and spreading chlorosis. No unique cytological differences were observed during early infection (<48 h) between the resistant and susceptible genotypes, except pathogen growth was restricted to one or a few host cells in SA27063. In both interactions reactive oxygen intermediates and phenolic compounds were produced, and cell death occurred. Two F2 populations segregating for resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot were established between SA27063 and the two susceptible accessions, A17 and SA3054. The cross between SA27063 and A17 represented a wider cross than between SA27063 and SA3054, as evidenced by higher genetic polymorphism, reduced fertility and aberrant phenotypes of F2 progeny. In the SA27063 × A17 F2 population a highly significant quantitative trait locus (QTL, LOD = 7.37; P < 0.00001) named resistance to the necrotroph Phoma medicaginis one (rnpm1) genetically mapped to the top arm of linkage group 4 (LG4). rnpm1 explained 33.6% of the phenotypic variance in the population's response to infection depicted on a 1–5 scale and was tightly linked to marker AW256637. A second highly significant QTL (LOD = 6.77; P < 0.00001), rnpm2, was located on the lower arm of LG8 in the SA27063 × SA3054 map. rnpm2 explained 29.6% of the phenotypic variance and was fine mapped to a 0.8 cM interval between markers h2_16a6a and h2_21h11d. rnpm1

  15. Decomposition of olive mill waste compost, goat manure and Medicago sativa in Lebanese soils using the litterbag technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atallah, Therese

    2014-05-01

    Organic amendments, green manure and plant residues incorporation are the main sources of nutrients in organic farming, their decomposition rate is crucial for the accumulation and long-term storage of organic matter in soils. In this study the decomposition of compost from olive mill waste (N: 29.3 g kg-1; total dissolved nitrogen or TDN: 3.82 g kg-1), goat manure (N: 31.5 g kg-1; TDN: 0.94 g kg-1), the shoots (N: 33.6 g kg-1; TDN: 17.57 g kg-1) and roots (N: 22.12 g kg-1; TDN: 8.87 g kg-1) of Medicago sativa was followed in three Lebanese soils. The nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium released were followed over one year, starting in early winter (December-January). The mild sub-humid Mediterranean conditions allowed a rapid mass loss in alfalfa shoots 30 days after incorporation. Manure and compost were more persistent. Between 80 and 90% of TDN were released, after 30 days of in-situ incubation for compost, the release was over 90% for alfalfa shoots. The movement of P was slower, as the compost (6.99 g kg-1 of P) and manure (9.81 g kg-1 of P) lost 33% and 22%, respectively, during 30 days of incubation. After one year, 15 to 35% of P remained in the soils. The manure was the richest in potassium (19.66 g kg-1) followed by the alfalfa shoots (15.56 g kg-1), the compost (8.19 g kg-1) and the roots (5.96 g kg-1). The loss of potassium was important, as over 88% had disappeared over the year. All decomposition curves followed an exponential model. The calculated coefficients of decomposition for total nitrogen (lnfinal - lninitial/days) were significantly higher for alfalfa shoots (0.00547 day-1) and similar for the compost (0.00184 day-1) and the manure (0.00175 day-1). The ANOVA test showed a difference between two of the sites (Site A: 521 g kg-1 of clay and 42 g kg-1 of calcium carbonate; Site S: 260 g kg-1 of clay and 269 g kg-1 of CaCO3) and the third one (Site L: 315 g kg-1 of clay and 591 g kg-1 of CaCO3). The relationships between the soil calcium

  16. Medicago truncatula Stock Center

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As outlined in this chapter a number of genetic stock collections carry out activities that curate and supply a subset of the genetic and genomic resources in M. truncatula. While the activities of these centres are invaluable, they are not integrated and do not provide the full extent of resources ...

  17. The structure of Medicago truncatula δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase provides new insights into regulation of proline biosynthesis in plants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Boguslaw; Forlani, Giuseppe; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2015-10-30

    The two pathways for proline biosynthesis in higher plants share the last step, the conversion of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) to L-proline, which is catalyzed by P5C reductase (P5CR, EC 1.5.1.2) with the use of NAD(P)H as a coenzyme. There is increasing amount of evidence to suggest a complex regulation of P5CR activity at the post-translational level, yet the molecular basis of these mechanisms is unknown. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of the P5CR enzyme from the model legume Medicago truncatula (Mt). The crystal structures of unliganded MtP5CR decamer, and its complexes with the products NAD+, NADP+, and L-proline were refinedmore » using x-ray diffraction data (at 1.7, 1.85, 1.95, and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively). Based on the presented structural data, the coenzyme preference for NADPH over NADH was explained, and NADPH is suggested to be the only coenzyme used by MtP5CR in vivo. Moreover, the insensitivity of MtP5CR to feed-back inhibition by proline, revealed by enzymatic analysis, was correlated with structural features. Additionally, a mechanism for the modulation of enzyme activity by chloride anions is discussed, as well as the rationale for the possible development of effective enzyme inhibitors.« less

  18. The Small GTPase ROP10 of Medicago truncatula Is Required for Both Tip Growth of Root Hairs and Nod Factor-Induced Root Hair Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ming-Juan; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Aimin; Luo, Li; Xie, Yajun; Li, Guan; Luo, Da; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Wen, Jiangqi; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian; Wang, Yan-Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia preferentially enter legume root hairs via infection threads, after which root hairs undergo tip swelling, branching, and curling. However, the mechanisms underlying such root hair deformation are poorly understood. Here, we showed that a type II small GTPase, ROP10, of Medicago truncatula is localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of root hair tips to regulate root hair tip growth. Overexpression of ROP10 and a constitutively active mutant (ROP10CA) generated depolarized growth of root hairs, whereas a dominant negative mutant (ROP10DN) inhibited root hair elongation. Inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti, the depolarized swollen and ballooning root hairs exhibited extensive root hair deformation and aberrant infection symptoms. Upon treatment with rhizobia-secreted nodulation factors (NFs), ROP10 was transiently upregulated in root hairs, and ROP10 fused to green fluorescent protein was ectopically localized at the PM of NF-induced outgrowths and curls around rhizobia. ROP10 interacted with the kinase domain of the NF receptor NFP in a GTP-dependent manner. Moreover, NF-induced expression of the early nodulin gene ENOD11 was enhanced by the overexpression of ROP10 and ROP10CA. These data suggest that NFs spatiotemporally regulate ROP10 localization and activity at the PM of root hair tips and that interactions between ROP10 and NF receptors are required for root hair deformation and continuous curling during rhizobial infection. PMID:25794934

  19. Loss of the nodule-specific cysteine rich peptide, NCR169, abolishes symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula dnf7 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Beatrix; Domonkos, Ágota; Szűcs, Attila; Ábrahám, Edit; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Bóka, Károly; Chen, Yuhui; Chen, Rujin; Murray, Jeremy D.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Kondorosi, Éva; Kaló, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Host compatible rhizobia induce the formation of legume root nodules, symbiotic organs within which intracellular bacteria are present in plant-derived membrane compartments termed symbiosomes. In Medicago truncatula nodules, the Sinorhizobium microsymbionts undergo an irreversible differentiation process leading to the development of elongated polyploid noncultivable nitrogen fixing bacteroids that convert atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia. This terminal differentiation is directed by the host plant and involves hundreds of nodule specific cysteine-rich peptides (NCRs). Except for certain in vitro activities of cationic peptides, the functional roles of individual NCR peptides in planta are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the inability of M. truncatula dnf7 mutants to fix nitrogen is due to inactivation of a single NCR peptide, NCR169. In the absence of NCR169, bacterial differentiation was impaired and was associated with early senescence of the symbiotic cells. Introduction of the NCR169 gene into the dnf7-2/NCR169 deletion mutant restored symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Replacement of any of the cysteine residues in the NCR169 peptide with serine rendered it incapable of complementation, demonstrating an absolute requirement for all cysteines in planta. NCR169 was induced in the cell layers in which bacteroid elongation was most pronounced, and high expression persisted throughout the nitrogen-fixing nodule zone. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of NCR169 in the differentiation and persistence of nitrogen fixing bacteroids in M. truncatula. PMID:26401023

  20. Loss of the nodule-specific cysteine rich peptide, NCR169, abolishes symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula dnf7 mutant.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Beatrix; Domonkos, Ágota; Kereszt, Attila; Szűcs, Attila; Ábrahám, Edit; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Bóka, Károly; Chen, Yuhui; Chen, Rujin; Murray, Jeremy D; Udvardi, Michael K; Kondorosi, Éva; Kaló, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Host compatible rhizobia induce the formation of legume root nodules, symbiotic organs within which intracellular bacteria are present in plant-derived membrane compartments termed symbiosomes. In Medicago truncatula nodules, the Sinorhizobium microsymbionts undergo an irreversible differentiation process leading to the development of elongated polyploid noncultivable nitrogen fixing bacteroids that convert atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia. This terminal differentiation is directed by the host plant and involves hundreds of nodule specific cysteine-rich peptides (NCRs). Except for certain in vitro activities of cationic peptides, the functional roles of individual NCR peptides in planta are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the inability of M. truncatula dnf7 mutants to fix nitrogen is due to inactivation of a single NCR peptide, NCR169. In the absence of NCR169, bacterial differentiation was impaired and was associated with early senescence of the symbiotic cells. Introduction of the NCR169 gene into the dnf7-2/NCR169 deletion mutant restored symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Replacement of any of the cysteine residues in the NCR169 peptide with serine rendered it incapable of complementation, demonstrating an absolute requirement for all cysteines in planta. NCR169 was induced in the cell layers in which bacteroid elongation was most pronounced, and high expression persisted throughout the nitrogen-fixing nodule zone. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of NCR169 in the differentiation and persistence of nitrogen fixing bacteroids in M. truncatula. PMID:26401023

  1. Suppression of Arbuscule Degeneration in Medicago truncatula phosphate transporter4 Mutants Is Dependent on the Ammonium Transporter 2 Family Protein AMT2;3

    PubMed Central

    Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Floss, Daniela S.; Gomez, S. Karen; Pumplin, Nathan; Ding, Yi; Levesque-Tremblay, Veronique; Noar, Roslyn D.; Daniels, Dierdra A.; Bravo, Armando; Eaglesham, James B.; Benedito, Vagner A.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Harrison, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, the plant gains access to phosphate (Pi) and nitrogen delivered by its fungal symbiont. Transfer of mineral nutrients occurs at the interface between branched hyphae called arbuscules and root cortical cells. In Medicago truncatula, a Pi transporter, PT4, is required for symbiotic Pi transport, and in pt4, symbiotic Pi transport fails, arbuscules degenerate prematurely, and the symbiosis is not maintained. Premature arbuscule degeneration (PAD) is suppressed when pt4 mutants are nitrogen-deprived, possibly the result of compensation by PT8, a second AM-induced Pi transporter. However, PAD is also suppressed in nitrogen-starved pt4 pt8 double mutants, negating this hypothesis and furthermore indicating that in this condition, neither of these symbiotic Pi transporters is required for symbiosis. In M. truncatula, three AMT2 family ammonium transporters are induced during AM symbiosis. To test the hypothesis that suppression of PAD involves AMT2 transporters, we analyzed double and triple Pi and ammonium transporter mutants. ATM2;3 but not AMT2;4 was required for suppression of PAD in pt4, while AMT2;4, but not AMT2;3, complemented growth of a yeast ammonium transporter mutant. In summary, arbuscule life span is influenced by PT4 and ATM2;3, and their relative importance varies with the nitrogen status of the plant. PMID:25841038

  2. Suppression of Arbuscule Degeneration in Medicago truncatula phosphate transporter4 Mutants is Dependent on the Ammonium Transporter 2 Family Protein AMT2;3.

    PubMed

    Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Floss, Daniela S; Gomez, S Karen; Pumplin, Nathan; Ding, Yi; Levesque-Tremblay, Veronique; Noar, Roslyn D; Daniels, Dierdra A; Bravo, Armando; Eaglesham, James B; Benedito, Vagner A; Udvardi, Michael K; Harrison, Maria J

    2015-04-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, the plant gains access to phosphate (Pi) and nitrogen delivered by its fungal symbiont. Transfer of mineral nutrients occurs at the interface between branched hyphae called arbuscules and root cortical cells. In Medicago truncatula, a Pi transporter, PT4, is required for symbiotic Pi transport, and in pt4, symbiotic Pi transport fails, arbuscules degenerate prematurely, and the symbiosis is not maintained. Premature arbuscule degeneration (PAD) is suppressed when pt4 mutants are nitrogen-deprived, possibly the result of compensation by PT8, a second AM-induced Pi transporter. However, PAD is also suppressed in nitrogen-starved pt4 pt8 double mutants, negating this hypothesis and furthermore indicating that in this condition, neither of these symbiotic Pi transporters is required for symbiosis. In M. truncatula, three AMT2 family ammonium transporters are induced during AM symbiosis. To test the hypothesis that suppression of PAD involves AMT2 transporters, we analyzed double and triple Pi and ammonium transporter mutants. ATM2;3 but not AMT2;4 was required for suppression of PAD in pt4, while AMT2;4, but not AMT2;3, complemented growth of a yeast ammonium transporter mutant. In summary, arbuscule life span is influenced by PT4 and ATM2;3, and their relative importance varies with the nitrogen status of the plant. PMID:25841038

  3. The small GTPase ROP10 of Medicago truncatula is required for both tip growth of root hairs and nod factor-induced root hair deformation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming-Juan; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Aimin; Luo, Li; Xie, Yajun; Li, Guan; Luo, Da; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Wen, Jiangqi; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian; Wang, Yan-Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Rhizobia preferentially enter legume root hairs via infection threads, after which root hairs undergo tip swelling, branching, and curling. However, the mechanisms underlying such root hair deformation are poorly understood. Here, we showed that a type II small GTPase, ROP10, of Medicago truncatula is localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of root hair tips to regulate root hair tip growth. Overexpression of ROP10 and a constitutively active mutant (ROP10CA) generated depolarized growth of root hairs, whereas a dominant negative mutant (ROP10DN) inhibited root hair elongation. Inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti, the depolarized swollen and ballooning root hairs exhibited extensive root hair deformation and aberrant infection symptoms. Upon treatment with rhizobia-secreted nodulation factors (NFs), ROP10 was transiently upregulated in root hairs, and ROP10 fused to green fluorescent protein was ectopically localized at the PM of NF-induced outgrowths and curls around rhizobia. ROP10 interacted with the kinase domain of the NF receptor NFP in a GTP-dependent manner. Moreover, NF-induced expression of the early nodulin gene ENOD11 was enhanced by the overexpression of ROP10 and ROP10CA. These data suggest that NFs spatiotemporally regulate ROP10 localization and activity at the PM of root hair tips and that interactions between ROP10 and NF receptors are required for root hair deformation and continuous curling during rhizobial infection. PMID:25794934

  4. Control of dissected leaf morphology by a Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger transcription factor in the model legume Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianbin; Ge, Liangfa; Wang, Hongliang; Berbel, Ana; Liu, Yu; Chen, Yuhui; Li, Guangming; Tadege, Million; Wen, Jiangqi; Cosson, Viviane; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Ratet, Pascal; Madueño, Francisco; Bai, Guihua; Chen, Rujin

    2010-01-01

    Plant leaves are diverse in their morphology, reflecting to a large degree the plant diversity in the natural environment. How different leaf morphology is determined is not yet understood. The leguminous plant Medicago truncatula exhibits dissected leaves with three leaflets at the tip. We show that development of the trifoliate leaves is determined by the Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger transcription factor PALM1. Loss-of-function mutants of PALM1 develop dissected leaves with five leaflets clustered at the tip. We demonstrate that PALM1 binds a specific promoter sequence and down-regulates the expression of the M. truncatula LEAFY/UNIFOLIATA orthologue SINGLE LEAFLET1 (SGL1), encoding an indeterminacy factor necessary for leaflet initiation. Our data indicate that SGL1 is required for leaflet proliferation in the palm1 mutant. Interestingly, ectopic expression of PALM1 effectively suppresses the lobed leaf phenotype from overexpression of a class 1 KNOTTED1-like homeobox protein in Arabidopsis plants. Taken together, our results show that PALM1 acts as a determinacy factor, regulates the spatial-temporal expression of SGL1 during leaf morphogenesis and together with the LEAFY/UNIFOLIATA orthologue plays an important role in orchestrating the compound leaf morphology in M. truncatula. PMID:20498057

  5. The structure of Medicago truncatula δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase provides new insights into regulation of proline biosynthesis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Boguslaw; Forlani, Giuseppe; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    The two pathways for proline biosynthesis in higher plants share the last step, the conversion of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) to L-proline, which is catalyzed by P5C reductase (P5CR, EC 1.5.1.2) with the use of NAD(P)H as a coenzyme. There is increasing amount of evidence to suggest a complex regulation of P5CR activity at the post-translational level, yet the molecular basis of these mechanisms is unknown. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of the P5CR enzyme from the model legume Medicago truncatula (Mt). The crystal structures of unliganded MtP5CR decamer, and its complexes with the products NAD+, NADP+, and L-proline were refined using x-ray diffraction data (at 1.7, 1.85, 1.95, and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively). Based on the presented structural data, the coenzyme preference for NADPH over NADH was explained, and NADPH is suggested to be the only coenzyme used by MtP5CR in vivo. Furthermore, the insensitivity of MtP5CR to feed-back inhibition by proline, revealed by enzymatic analysis, was correlated with structural features. Additionally, a mechanism for the modulation of enzyme activity by chloride anions is discussed, as well as the rationale for the possible development of effective enzyme inhibitors. PMID:26579138

  6. Dissection of Bacterial Wilt on Medicago truncatula Revealed Two Type III Secretion System Effectors Acting on Root Infection Process and Disease Development[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Marie; Jauneau, Alain; Genin, Stéphane; Tavella, Marie-José; Vailleau, Fabienne; Gentzbittel, Laurent; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise

    2009-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of the devastating bacterial wilt disease, which colonizes susceptible Medicago truncatula via the intact root tip. Infection involves four steps: appearance of root tip symptoms, root tip cortical cell invasion, vessel colonization, and foliar wilting. We examined this pathosystem by in vitro inoculation of intact roots of susceptible or resistant M. truncatula with the pathogenic strain GMI1000. The infection process was type III secretion system dependent and required two type III effectors, Gala7 and AvrA, which were shown to be involved at different stages of infection. Both effectors were involved in development of root tip symptoms, and Gala7 was the main determinant for bacterial invasion of cortical cells. Vessel invasion depended on the host genetic background and was never observed in the resistant line. The invasion of the root tip vasculature in the susceptible line caused foliar wilting. The avrA mutant showed reduced aggressiveness in all steps of the infection process, suggesting a global role in R. solanacearum pathogenicity. The roles of these two effectors in subsequent stages were studied using an assay that bypassed the penetration step; with this assay, the avrA mutant showed no effect compared with the GMI1000 strain, indicating that AvrA is important in early stages of infection. However, later disease symptoms were reduced in the gala7 mutant, indicating a key role in later stages of infection. PMID:19493968

  7. Both Free Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Photosynthetic Performance are Important Players in the Response of Medicago truncatula to Urea and Ammonium Nutrition Under Axenic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Raquel; Royo, Beatriz; Urarte, Estibaliz; Zamarreño, Ángel M; Garcia-Mina, José M; Moran, Jose F

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify the early stress response and plant performance of Medicago truncatula growing in axenic medium with ammonium or urea as the sole source of nitrogen, with respect to nitrate-based nutrition. Biomass measurements, auxin content analyses, root system architecture (RSA) response analyses, and physiological parameters were determined. Both ammonium and ureic nutrition severely affected the RSA, resulting in changes in the main elongation rate, lateral root development, and insert position from the root base. The auxin content decreased in both urea- and ammonium-treated roots; however, only the ammonium-treated plants were affected at the shoot level. The analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients showed that ammonium affected photosystem II, but urea did not impair photosynthetic activity. Superoxide dismutase isoenzymes in the plastids were moderately affected by urea and ammonium in the roots. Overall, our results showed that low N doses from different sources had no remarkable effects on M. truncatula, with the exception of the differential phenotypic root response. High doses of both ammonium and urea caused great changes in plant length, auxin contents and physiological measurements. Interesting correlations were found between the shoot auxin pool and both plant length and the "performance index" parameter, which is obtained from measurements of the kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence. Taken together, these data demonstrate that both the indole-3-acetic acid pool and performance index are important components of the response of M. truncatula under ammonium or urea as the sole N source. PMID:26909089

  8. STENOFOLIA Recruits TOPLESS to Repress ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 at the Leaf Margin and Promote Leaf Blade Outgrowth in Medicago truncatula[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fei; Wang, Yewei; Li, Guifen; Tang, Yuhong; Kramer, Elena M.; Tadege, Million

    2014-01-01

    The Medicago truncatula WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) gene, STENOFOLIA (STF), plays a key role in leaf blade outgrowth by promoting cell proliferation at the adaxial-abaxial junction. STF functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Here, we report the identification of a protein interaction partner and a direct target, shedding light on the mechanism of STF function. Two highly conserved motifs in the C-terminal domain of STF, the WUSCHEL (WUS) box and the STF box, cooperatively recruit TOPLESS (Mt-TPL) family corepressors, and this recruitment is required for STF function, as deletion of these two domains (STFdel) impaired blade outgrowth whereas fusing Mt-TPL to STFdel restored function. The homeodomain motif is required for direct repression of ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (Mt-AS2), silencing of which partially rescues the stf mutant phenotype. STF and LAMINALESS1 (LAM1) are functional orthologs. A single amino acid (Asn to Ile) substitution in the homeodomain abolished the repression of Mt-AS2 and STF’s ability to complement the lam1 mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris. Our data together support a model in which STF recruits corepressors to transcriptionally repress its targets during leaf blade morphogenesis. We propose that recruitment of TPL/TPL-related proteins may be a common mechanism in the repressive function of modern/WUS clade WOX genes. PMID:24585835

  9. Genome-wide Medicago truncatula small RNA analysis revealed novel microRNAs and isoforms differentially regulated in roots and nodules.

    PubMed

    Lelandais-Brière, Christine; Naya, Loreto; Sallet, Erika; Calenge, Fanny; Frugier, Florian; Hartmann, Caroline; Gouzy, Jérome; Crespi, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of a variety of mRNAs by small 21- to 24-nucleotide RNAs, notably the microRNAs (miRNAs), is emerging as a novel developmental mechanism. In legumes like the model Medicago truncatula, roots are able to develop a de novo meristem through the symbiotic interaction with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. We used deep sequencing of small RNAs from root apexes and nodules of M. truncatula to identify 100 novel candidate miRNAs encoded by 265 hairpin precursors. New atypical precursor classes producing only specific 21- and 24-nucleotide small RNAs were found. Statistical analysis on sequencing reads abundance revealed specific miRNA isoforms in a same family showing contrasting expression patterns between nodules and root apexes. The differentially expressed conserved and nonconserved miRNAs may target a large variety of mRNAs. In root nodules, which show diverse cell types ranging from a persistent meristem to a fully differentiated central region, we discovered miRNAs spatially enriched in nodule meristematic tissues, vascular bundles, and bacterial infection zones using in situ hybridization. Spatial regulation of miRNAs may determine specialization of regulatory RNA networks in plant differentiation processes, such as root nodule formation. PMID:19767456

  10. Comparative analysis of the tubulin cytoskeleton organization in nodules of Medicago truncatula and Pisum sativum: bacterial release and bacteroid positioning correlate with characteristic microtubule rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Kitaeva, Anna B; Demchenko, Kirill N; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Timmers, Antonius C J; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyzed and compared the organization of the tubulin cytoskeleton in nodules of Medicago truncatula and Pisum sativum. We combined antibody labeling and green fluorescent protein tagging with laser confocal microscopy to observe microtubules (MTs) in nodules of both wild-type (WT) plants and symbiotic plant mutants blocked at different steps of nodule development. The 3D MT organization of each histological nodule zone in both M. truncatula and P. sativum is correlated to specific developmental processes. Endoplasmic MTs appear to support infection thread growth, infection droplet formation and bacterial release into the host cytoplasm in nodules of both species. No differences in the organization of the MT cytoskeleton between WT and bacterial release mutants were apparent, suggesting both that the phenotype is not linked to a defect in MT organization and that the growth of hypertrophied infection threads is supported by MTs. Strikingly, bacterial release coincides with a change in the organization of cortical MTs from parallel arrays into an irregular, crisscross arrangement. After release, the organization of endoplasmic MTs is linked to the distribution of symbiosomes. The 3D MT organization of each nodule histological zone in M. truncatula and P. sativum was analyzed and linked to specific developmental processes. PMID:26682876

  11. Regulation of Compound Leaf Development in Medicago truncatula by Fused Compound Leaf1, a Class M KNOX Gene[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianling; Yu, Jianbin; Wang, Hongliang; Guo, Yingqing; Li, Guangming; Bai, Guihua; Chen, Rujin

    2011-01-01

    Medicago truncatula is a legume species belonging to the inverted repeat lacking clade (IRLC) with trifoliolate compound leaves. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying development of trifoliolate leaves in legumes remain largely unknown. Here, we report isolation and characterization of fused compound leaf1 (fcl1) mutants of M. truncatula. Phenotypic analysis suggests that FCL1 plays a positive role in boundary separation and proximal-distal axis development of compound leaves. Map-based cloning indicates that FCL1 encodes a class M KNOX protein that harbors the MEINOX domain but lacks the homeodomain. Yeast two-hybrid assays show that FCL1 interacts with a subset of Arabidopsis thaliana BEL1-like proteins with slightly different substrate specificities from the Arabidopsis homolog KNATM-B. Double mutant analyses with M. truncatula single leaflet1 (sgl1) and palmate-like pentafoliata1 (palm1) leaf mutants show that fcl1 is epistatic to palm1 and sgl1 is epistatic to fcl1 in terms of leaf complexity and that SGL1 and FCL1 act additively and are required for petiole development. Previous studies have shown that the canonical KNOX proteins are not involved in compound leaf development in IRLC legumes. The identification of FCL1 supports the role of a truncated KNOX protein in compound leaf development in M. truncatula. PMID:22080596

  12. Molecular Diversity and Population Structure of a Worldwide Collection of Cultivated Tetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) Germplasm as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Haiping; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengli; Wang, Xuemin; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Zan

    2015-01-01

    Information on genetic diversity and population structure of a tetraploid alfalfa collection might be valuable in effective use of the genetic resources. A set of 336 worldwide genotypes of tetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) was genotyped using 85 genome-wide distributed SSR markers to reveal the genetic diversity and population structure in the alfalfa. Genetic diversity analysis identified a total of 1056 alleles across 85 marker loci. The average expected heterozygosity and polymorphism information content values were 0.677 and 0.638, respectively, showing high levels of genetic diversity in the cultivated tetraploid alfalfa germplasm. Comparison of genetic characteristics across chromosomes indicated regions of chromosomes 2 and 3 had the highest genetic diversity. A higher genetic diversity was detected in alfalfa landraces than that of wild materials and cultivars. Two populations were identified by the model-based population structure, principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses, corresponding to China and other parts of the world. However, lack of strictly correlation between clustering and geographic origins suggested extensive germplasm exchanges of alfalfa germplasm across diverse geographic regions. The quantitative analysis of the genetic diversity and population structure in this study could be useful for genetic and genomic analysis and utilization of the genetic variation in alfalfa breeding. PMID:25901573

  13. Identification of genes that regulate phosphate acquisition and plant performance during arbuscular my corrhizal symbiosis in medicago truncatula and brachypodium distachyon

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Maria J; Hudson, Matthew E

    2015-11-24

    Most vascular flowering plants have the ability to form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The symbiosis develops in the roots and can have a profound effect on plant productivity, largely through improvements in plant mineral nutrition. Within the root cortical cells, the plant and fungus create novel interfaces specialized for nutrient transfer, while the fungus also develops a network of hyphae in the rhizosphere. Through this hyphal network, the fungus acquires and delivers phosphate and nitrogen to the root. In return, the plant provides the fungus with carbon. In addition, to enhancing plant mineral nutrition, the AM symbiosis has an important role in the carbon cycle, and positive effects on soil health. Here we identified and characterized plant genes involved in the regulation and functioning of the AM symbiosis in Medicago truncatula and Brachypodium distachyon. This included the identification and and characterization of a M. truncatula transcription factors that are required for symbiosis. Additionally, we investigated the molecular basis of functional diversity among AM symbioses in B. distachyon and analysed the transcriptome of Brachypodium distachyon during symbiosis.

  14. Palmate-like pentafoliata1 encodes a novel Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger transcription factor essential for compound leaf morphogenesis in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As the primary site for photosynthetic carbon fixation and the interface between plants and the environment, plant leaves play a key role in plant growth, biomass production and survival, and global carbon and oxygen cycles. Leaves can be simple with a single blade or compound with multiple units of blades known as leaflets. In a palmate-type compound leaf, leaflets are clustered at the tip of the leaf. In a pinnate-type compound leaf, on the other hand, leaflets are placed on a rachis in distance from each other. Higher orders of complexities such as bipinnate compound leaves of the “sensitive” plant, Mimosa pudica, also occur in nature. However, how different leaf morphologies are determined is still poorly understood. Medicago truncatula is a model legume closely related to alfalfa and soybean with trifoliate compound leaves. Recently, we have shown that Palmate-like Pentafoliata1 (PALM1) encodes a putative Cys(2) His(2) zinc finger transcription factor essential for compound leaf morphogenesis in M. truncatula. Here, we present our phylogenetic relationship analysis of PALM1 homologs from different species and demonstrate that PALM1 has transcriptional activity in the transactivation assay in yeast. PMID:20724826

  15. Co-downregulation of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase and coumarate 3-hydroxylase significantly increases cellulose content in transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongyong; Li, Heng; Zhang, Rongxue; Ma, Lei; Dong, Jiangli; Wang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Lignin is a component of the cell wall that is essential for growth, development, structure and pathogen resistance in plants, but high lignin is an obstacle to the conversion of cellulose to ethanol for biofuel. Genetically modifying lignin and cellulose contents can be a good approach to overcoming that obstacle. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is rich in lignocellulose biomass and used as a model plant for the genetic modification of lignin in this study. Two key enzymes in the lignin biosynthesis pathway-hydroxycinnamoyl -CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) and coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H)-were co-downregulated. Compared to wild-type plants, the lignin content in the modified strain was reduced by 38%, cellulose was increased by 86.1%, enzyme saccharification efficiency was increased by 10.9%, and cell wall digestibility was increased by 13.0%. The modified alfalfa exhibited a dwarf phenotype, but normal above ground biomass. This approach provides a new strategy for reducing lignin and increasing cellulose contents and creates a new genetically modified crop with enhanced value for biofuel. PMID:26398807

  16. Effect of application rate of commercial lignite-derived amendments on early-stage growth of Medicago sativa and soil health, in acidic soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patti, Antonio; Little, Karen; Rose, Michael; Jackson, Roy; Cavagnaro, Tim

    2013-04-01

    Commercially available lignite-derived amendments, sold mainly as humate preparations, have been promoted as plant growth stimulants leading to higher crop yields. These products are also claimed to improve soil properties such as pH. This study investigated the effect of application rate of three lignite-derived amendments on the early-stage growth of a pasture legume, lucerne (Medicago sativa), and soil health in a soil type common to south eastern Australia, in a glasshouse setting. An organic-mineral humate product and 'run of mine' lignite coal did not improve shoot or root growth despite application at a range of rates at, and in excess of, the manufacturers recommendation. Application of soluble K-humate product at 20 kg/ha (9.5 kg/ha C equivalent) produced an observable positive effect in shoot growth. At this application rate, a significant delay in the appearance of chlorotic symptoms was observed along with an increase in soil pH concurrent with decreased availability of soil Mn and Al. Higher root dry weight was associated with lower microbial biomass carbon which may indicate an effect on allocation of resources between the microbial community and the plant. An assessment of the effectiveness of lignite-derived amendments on plant growth, as well as their potential to improve the health of an acidic soil will assist farmers in making decisions regarding the use of these products.

  17. Protocols for Obtaining Zygotic and Somatic Embryos for Studying the Regulation of Early Embryo Development in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Kurdyukov, Sergey; Song, Youhong; Tiew, Terence W-Y; Wang, Xin-Ding; Nolan, Kim E; Rose, Ray J

    2015-01-01

    Early embryogenesis starting from a single cell zygote goes through rapid cell division and morphogenesis, and is morphologically characterized by pre-globular, globular, heart, torpedo and cotyledon stages. This progressive development is under the tight regulation of a complex molecular network. Harvesting sufficient early embryos at a similar stage of development is essential for investigating the cellular and molecular regulation of early embryogenesis. This is not straightforward since early embryogenesis undergoes rapid morphogenesis in a short while e.g. 8 days for Medicago truncatula to reach the early cotyledon stage. Here, we address the issue by two approaches. The first one establishes a linkage between embryo development and pod morphology in helping indicate the stage of the zygotic embryo. This is particularly based on the number of pod spirals and development of the spines. An alternative way to complement the in vivo studies is via culturing leaf explants to produce somatic embryos. The medium includes an unusual hormone combination - an auxin (1-naphthaleneacetic acid), a cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine), abscisic acid and gibberellic acid. The different stages can be discerned growing out of the callus without dissection. PMID:26131626

  18. Fixed-Precision Sequential Sampling Plans for Estimating Alfalfa Caterpillar, Colias lesbia, Egg Density in Alfalfa, Medicago sativa, Fields in Córdoba, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Gerardo V.; Porta, Norma C. La; Avalos, Susana; Mazzuferi, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    The alfalfa caterpillar, Colias lesbia (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), is a major pest of alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), crops in Argentina. Its management is based mainly on chemical control of larvae whenever the larvae exceed the action threshold. To develop and validate fixed-precision sequential sampling plans, an intensive sampling programme for C. lesbia eggs was carried out in two alfalfa plots located in the Province of Córdoba, Argentina, from 1999 to 2002. Using Resampling for Validation of Sampling Plans software, 12 additional independent data sets were used to validate the sequential sampling plan with precision levels of 0.10 and 0.25 (SE/mean), respectively. For a range of mean densities of 0.10 to 8.35 eggs/sample, an average sample size of only 27 and 26 sample units was required to achieve a desired precision level of 0.25 for the sampling plans of Green and Kuno, respectively. As the precision level was increased to 0.10, average sample size increased to 161 and 157 sample units for the sampling plans of Green and Kuno, respectively. We recommend using Green's sequential sampling plan because it is less sensitive to changes in egg density. These sampling plans are a valuable tool for researchers to study population dynamics and to evaluate integrated pest management strategies. PMID:23909840

  19. Unexpectedly low nitrogen acquisition and absence of root architecture adaptation to nitrate supply in a Medicago truncatula highly branched root mutant

    PubMed Central

    Bourion, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    To complement N2 fixation through symbiosis, legumes can efficiently acquire soil mineral N through adapted root architecture. However, root architecture adaptation to mineral N availability has been little studied in legumes. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of nitrate availability on root architecture in Medicago truncatula and assessed the N-uptake potential of a new highly branched root mutant, TR185. The effects of varying nitrate supply on both root architecture and N uptake were characterized in the mutant and in the wild type. Surprisingly, the root architecture of the mutant was not modified by variation in nitrate supply. Moreover, despite its highly branched root architecture, TR185 had a permanently N-starved phenotype. A transcriptome analysis was performed to identify genes differentially expressed between the two genotypes. This analysis revealed differential responses related to the nitrate acquisition pathway and confirmed that N starvation occurred in TR185. Changes in amino acid content and expression of genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway were associated with differences in root architecture between the mutant and the wild type. PMID:24706718

  20. Genetic mapping of legume orthologs reveals high conservation of synteny between lentil species and the sequenced genomes of Medicago and chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gujaria-Verma, Neha; Vail, Sally L.; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas R.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E.

    2014-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a global food crop with increasing importance for food security in south Asia and other regions. Lens ervoides, a wild relative of cultivated lentil, is an important source of agronomic trait variation. Lens is a member of the galegoid clade of the Papilionoideae family, which includes other important dietary legumes such as chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and pea (Pisum sativum), and the sequenced model legume Medicago truncatula. Understanding the genetic structure of Lens spp. in relation to more fully sequenced legumes would allow leveraging of genomic resources. A set of 1107 TOG-based amplicons were identified in L. ervoides and a subset thereof used to design SNP markers for mapping. A map of L. ervoides consisting of 377 SNP markers spread across seven linkage groups was developed using a GoldenGate genotyping array and single SNP marker assays. Comparison with maps of M. truncatula and L. culinaris documented considerable shared synteny and led to the identification of a few major translocations and a major inversion that distinguish Lens from M. truncatula, as well as a translocation that distinguishes L. culinaris from L. ervoides. The identification of chromosome-level differences among Lens spp. will aid in the understanding of introgression of genes from L. ervoides into cultivated L. culinaris, furthering genetic research and breeding applications in lentil. PMID:25538716

  1. Kresoxim-methyl primes Medicago truncatula plants against abiotic stress factors via altered reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling leading to downstream transcriptional and metabolic readjustment.

    PubMed

    Filippou, Panagiota; Antoniou, Chrystalla; Obata, Toshihiro; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Kanetis, Loukas; Aidinis, Vassilis; Van Breusegem, Frank; Fernie, Alisdair R; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2016-03-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses, such as fungal infection and drought, cause major yield losses in modern agriculture. Kresoxim-methyl (KM) belongs to the strobilurins, one of the most important classes of agricultural fungicides displaying a direct effect on several plant physiological and developmental processes. However, the impact of KM treatment on salt and drought stress tolerance is unknown. In this study we demonstrate that KM pre-treatment of Medicago truncatula plants results in increased protection to drought and salt stress. Foliar application with KM prior to stress imposition resulted in improvement of physiological parameters compared with stressed-only plants. This protective effect was further supported by increased proline biosynthesis, modified reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling, and attenuation of cellular damage. In addition, comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a number of transcripts that are differentially accumulating in drought- and salinity-stressed plants (646 and 57, respectively) after KM pre-treatment compared with stressed plants with no KM pre-treatment. Metabolomic analysis suggests that the priming role of KM in drought- and to a lesser extent in salinity-stressed plants can be attributed to the regulation of key metabolites (including sugars and amino acids) resulting in protection against abiotic stress factors. Overall, the present study highlights the potential use of this commonly used fungicide as a priming agent against key abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26712823

  2. Absolute quantification of Medicago truncatula sucrose synthase isoforms and N-metabolism enzymes in symbiotic root nodules and the detection of novel nodule phosphoproteins by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wienkoop, Stefanie; Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Glinski, Mirko; González, Esther M.; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become increasingly important for tissue specific protein quantification at the isoform level, as well as for the analysis of protein post-translational regulation mechanisms and turnover rates. Thanks to the development of high accuracy mass spectrometers, peptide sequencing without prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence—de novo sequencing—can be performed. In this work, absolute quantification of a set of key enzymes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Medicago truncatula ‘Jemalong A17’ root nodules is presented. Among them, sucrose synthase (SuSy; EC 2.4.1.13), one of the central enzymes in sucrose cleavage in root nodules, has been further characterized and the relative phosphorylation state of the three most abundant isoforms has been quantified. De novo sequencing provided sequence information of a so far unidentified peptide, most probably belonging to SuSy2, the second most abundant isoform in M. truncatula root nodules. TiO2-phosphopeptide enrichment led to the identification of not only a phosphorylation site at Ser11 in SuSy1, but also of several novel phosphorylation sites present in other root nodule proteins such as alkaline invertase (AI; EC 3.2.1.26) and an RNA-binding protein. PMID:18772307

  3. An unusual abscisic acid and gibberellic acid synergism increases somatic embryogenesis, facilitates its genetic analysis and improves transformation in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Kim E; Song, Youhong; Liao, Siyang; Saeed, Nasir A; Zhang, Xiyi; Rose, Ray J

    2014-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) can be readily induced in leaf explants of the Jemalong 2HA genotype of the model legume Medicago truncatula by auxin and cytokinin, but rarely in wild-type Jemalong. Gibberellic acid (GA), a hormone not included in the medium, appears to act in Arabidopsis as a repressor of the embryonic state such that low ABA (abscisic acid): GA ratios will inhibit SE. It was important to evaluate the GA effect in M. truncatula in order to formulate generic SE mechanisms, given the Arabidopsis information. It was surprising to find that low ABA:GA ratios in M. truncatula acted synergistically to stimulate SE. The unusual synergism between GA and ABA in inducing SE has utility in improving SE for regeneration and transformation in M. truncatula. Expression of genes previously shown to be important in M. truncatula SE was not increased. In investigating genes previously studied in GA investigations of Arabidopsis SE, there was increased expression of GA2ox and decreased expression of PICKLE, a negative regulator of SE in Arabidopsis. We suggest that in M. truncatula there are different ABA:GA ratios required for down-regulating the PICKLE gene, a repressor of the embryonic state. In M. truncatula it is a low ABA:GA ratio while in Arabidopsis it is a high ABA:GA ratio. In different species the expression of key genes is probably related to differences in how the hormone networks optimise their expression. PMID:24937316

  4. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary Analysis and Expression Profiles of LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN Gene Family in Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianquan; Fang, Genwang yue; He, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) gene family has been well-studied in Arabidopsis and play crucial roles in the diverse growth and development processes including establishment and maintenance of boundary of developmental lateral organs. In this study we identified and characterized 38 LBD genes in Lotus japonicus (LjLBD) and 57 LBD genes in Medicago truncatula (MtLBD), both of which are model legume plants that have some specific development features absent in Arabidopsis. The phylogenetic relationships, their locations in the genome, genes structure and conserved motifs were examined. The results revealed that all LjLBD and MtLBD genes could be distinctly divided into two classes: Class I and II. The evolutionary analysis showed that Type I functional divergence with some significantly site-specific shifts may be the main force for the divergence between Class I and Class II. In addition, the expression patterns of LjLBD genes uncovered the diverse functions in plant development. Interestingly, we found that two LjLBD proteins that were highly expressed during compound leaf and pulvinus development, can interact via yeast two-hybrid assays. Taken together, our findings provide an evolutionary and genetic foundation in further understanding the molecular basis of LBD gene family in general, specifically in L. japonicus and M. truncatula. PMID:27560982

  5. Nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining soil alleviates Cd toxicity and increases Cd-phytoextraction in Medicago sativa L.

    PubMed Central

    Ghnaya, Tahar; Mnassri, Majda; Ghabriche, Rim; Wali, Mariem; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Lutts, Stanley; Abdelly, Chedly

    2015-01-01

    Besides their role in nitrogen supply to the host plants as a result of symbiotic N fixation, the association between legumes and Rhizobium could be useful for the rehabilitation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction. A major limitation presents the metal-sensitivity of the bacterial strains. The aim of this work was to explore the usefulness of Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining site for Cd phytoextraction by Medicago sativa. Inoculated and non-inoculated plants were cultivated for 60 d on soils containing 50 and/or 100 mg Cd kg−1 soil. The inoculation hindered the occurrence of Cd- induced toxicity symptoms that appeared in the shoots of non-inoculated plants. This positive effect of S. meliloti colonization was accompanied by an increase in biomass production and improved nutrient acquisition comparatively to non-inoculated plants. Nodulation enhanced Cd absorption by the roots and Cd translocation to the shoots. The increase of plant biomass concomitantly with the increase of Cd shoot concentration in inoculated plants led to higher potential of Cd-phytoextraction in these plants. In the presence of 50 mg Cd kg−1 in the soil, the amounts of Cd extracted in the shoots were 58 and 178 μg plant−1 in non-inoculated and inoculated plants, respectively. This study demonstrates that this association M. sativa-S. meliloti may be an efficient biological system to extract Cd from contaminated soils. PMID:26528320

  6. Both Free Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Photosynthetic Performance are Important Players in the Response of Medicago truncatula to Urea and Ammonium Nutrition Under Axenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Raquel; Royo, Beatriz; Urarte, Estibaliz; Zamarreño, Ángel M.; Garcia-Mina, José M.; Moran, Jose F.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify the early stress response and plant performance of Medicago truncatula growing in axenic medium with ammonium or urea as the sole source of nitrogen, with respect to nitrate-based nutrition. Biomass measurements, auxin content analyses, root system architecture (RSA) response analyses, and physiological parameters were determined. Both ammonium and ureic nutrition severely affected the RSA, resulting in changes in the main elongation rate, lateral root development, and insert position from the root base. The auxin content decreased in both urea- and ammonium-treated roots; however, only the ammonium-treated plants were affected at the shoot level. The analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients showed that ammonium affected photosystem II, but urea did not impair photosynthetic activity. Superoxide dismutase isoenzymes in the plastids were moderately affected by urea and ammonium in the roots. Overall, our results showed that low N doses from different sources had no remarkable effects on M. truncatula, with the exception of the differential phenotypic root response. High doses of both ammonium and urea caused great changes in plant length, auxin contents and physiological measurements. Interesting correlations were found between the shoot auxin pool and both plant length and the “performance index” parameter, which is obtained from measurements of the kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence. Taken together, these data demonstrate that both the indole-3-acetic acid pool and performance index are important components of the response of M. truncatula under ammonium or urea as the sole N source. PMID:26909089

  7. Kresoxim-methyl primes Medicago truncatula plants against abiotic stress factors via altered reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling leading to downstream transcriptional and metabolic readjustment

    PubMed Central

    Filippou, Panagiota; Antoniou, Chrystalla; Obata, Toshihiro; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Kanetis, Loukas; Aidinis, Vassilis; Van Breusegem, Frank; Fernie, Alisdair R; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2016-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses, such as fungal infection and drought, cause major yield losses in modern agriculture. Kresoxim-methyl (KM) belongs to the strobilurins, one of the most important classes of agricultural fungicides displaying a direct effect on several plant physiological and developmental processes. However, the impact of KM treatment on salt and drought stress tolerance is unknown. In this study we demonstrate that KM pre-treatment of Medicago truncatula plants results in increased protection to drought and salt stress. Foliar application with KM prior to stress imposition resulted in improvement of physiological parameters compared with stressed-only plants. This protective effect was further supported by increased proline biosynthesis, modified reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling, and attenuation of cellular damage. In addition, comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a number of transcripts that are differentially accumulating in drought- and salinity-stressed plants (646 and 57, respectively) after KM pre-treatment compared with stressed plants with no KM pre-treatment. Metabolomic analysis suggests that the priming role of KM in drought- and to a lesser extent in salinity-stressed plants can be attributed to the regulation of key metabolites (including sugars and amino acids) resulting in protection against abiotic stress factors. Overall, the present study highlights the potential use of this commonly used fungicide as a priming agent against key abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26712823

  8. The H+-ATPase HA1 of Medicago truncatula Is Essential for Phosphate Transport and Plant Growth during Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Krajinski, Franziska; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Sieh, Daniela; Franken, Philipp; Zhang, Haoqiang; Bucher, Marcel; Gerlach, Nina; Kryvoruchko, Igor; Zoeller, Daniela; Udvardi, Michael; Hause, Bettina

    2014-04-29

    A key feature of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is improved phosphorus nutrition of the host plant via the mycorrhizal pathway, i.e., the fungal uptake of Pi from the soil and its release from arbuscules within root cells. Efficient transport of Pi from the fungus to plant cells is thought to require a proton gradient across the periarbuscular membrane (PAM) that separates fungal arbuscules from the host cell cytoplasm. Previous studies showed that the H(+)-ATPase gene HA1 is expressed specifically in arbuscule-containing root cells of Medicago truncatula. We isolated a ha1-2 mutant of M. truncatula and found it to be impaired in the development of arbuscules but not in root colonization by Rhizophagus irregularis hyphae. Artificial microRNA silencing of HA1 recapitulated this phenotype, resulting in small and truncated arbuscules. Unlike the wild type, the ha1-2 mutant failed to show a positive growth response to mycorrhizal colonization under Pi-limiting conditions. Uptake experiments confirmed that ha1-2 mutants are unable to take up phosphate via the mycorrhizal pathway. Increased pH in the apoplast of abnormal arbuscule-containing cells of the ha1-2 mutant compared with the wild type suggests that HA1 is crucial for building a proton gradient across the PAM and therefore is indispensible for the transfer of Pi from the fungus to the plant. PMID:24781114

  9. Screening of saponins and sapogenins from Medicago species as potential PPARγ agonists and X-ray structure of the complex PPARγ/caulophyllogenin.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Roberta; Capelli, Davide; Tava, Aldo; Galli, Andrea; Laghezza, Antonio; Tortorella, Paolo; Loiodice, Fulvio; Pochetti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    A series of saponins and sapogenins from Medicago species were tested for their ability to bind and activate the nuclear receptor PPARγ by SPR experiments and transactivation assay, respectively. The SPR analysis proved to be a very powerful and fast technique for screening a large number of compounds for their affinity to PPARγ and selecting the better candidates for further studies. Based on the obtained results, the sapogenin caulophyllogenin was proved to be a partial agonist towards PPARγ and the X-ray structure of its complex with PPARγ was also solved, in order to investigate the binding mode in the ligand binding domain of the nuclear receptor. This is the first known crystal structure of a sapogenin directly interacting with PPARγ. Another compound of the series, the echinocistic acid, showed antagonist activity towards PPARγ, a property that could be useful to inhibit the adipocyte differentiation which is a typical adverse effect of PPARγ agonists. This study confirms the interest on saponins and sapogenins as a valuable natural resource exploitable in the medical and food industry for ameliorating the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27283034

  10. The Transcriptional Repressor MYB2 Regulates Both Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Proanthocyandin and Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Medicago truncatula[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) is limited to specific cell types and developmental stages, but little is known about how antagonistically acting transcriptional regulators work together to determine temporal and spatial patterning of pigmentation at the cellular level, especially for PAs. Here, we characterize MYB2, a transcriptional repressor regulating both anthocyanin and PA biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MYB2 was strongly upregulated by MYB5, a major regulator of PA biosynthesis in M. truncatula and a component of MYB-basic helix loop helix-WD40 (MBW) activator complexes. Overexpression of MYB2 abolished anthocyanin and PA accumulation in M. truncatula hairy roots and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, respectively. Anthocyanin deposition was expanded in myb2 mutant seedlings and flowers accompanied by increased anthocyanin content. PA mainly accumulated in the epidermal layer derived from the outer integument in the M. truncatula seed coat, starting from the hilum area. The area of PA accumulation and ANTHOCYANIDIN REDUCTASE expression was expanded into the seed body at the early stage of seed development in the myb2 mutant. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological evidence suggests that MYB2 functions as part of a multidimensional regulatory network to define the temporal and spatial pattern of anthocyanin and PA accumulation linked to developmental processes. PMID:26410301

  11. Medicago truncatula Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein1 Is Required for Iron Uptake by Rhizobia-Infected Nodule Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tejada-Jiménez, Manuel; Castro-Rodríguez, Rosario; Kryvoruchko, Igor; Lucas, M. Mercedes; Udvardi, Michael; Imperial, Juan; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Iron is critical for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) as a key component of multiple ferroproteins involved in this biological process. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, iron is delivered by the vasculature to the infection/maturation zone (zone II) of the nodule, where it is released to the apoplast. From there, plasma membrane iron transporters move it into rhizobia-containing cells, where iron is used as the cofactor of multiple plant and rhizobial proteins (e.g. plant leghemoglobin and bacterial nitrogenase). MtNramp1 (Medtr3g088460) is the M. truncatula Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein family member, with the highest expression levels in roots and nodules. Immunolocalization studies indicate that MtNramp1 is mainly targeted to the plasma membrane. A loss-of-function nramp1 mutant exhibited reduced growth compared with the wild type under symbiotic conditions, but not when fertilized with mineral nitrogen. Nitrogenase activity was low in the mutant, whereas exogenous iron and expression of wild-type MtNramp1 in mutant nodules increased nitrogen fixation to normal levels. These data are consistent with a model in which MtNramp1 is the main transporter responsible for apoplastic iron uptake by rhizobia-infected cells in zone II. PMID:25818701

  12. Abscisic Acid and LATERAL ROOT ORGAN DEFECTIVE/NUMEROUS INFECTIONS AND POLYPHENOLICS Modulate Root Elongation via Reactive Oxygen Species in Medicago truncatula1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chang; Bousquet, Amanda; Harris, Jeanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) modulates root growth in plants grown under normal and stress conditions and can rescue the root growth defects of the Medicago truncatula lateral root-organ defective (latd) mutant. Here, we demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) function downstream of ABA in the regulation of root growth by controlling cell elongation. We also show that the MtLATD/NUMEROUS INFECTIONS AND POLYPHENOLICS (NIP) nitrate transporter is required for ROS homeostasis and cell elongation in roots and that this balance is perturbed in latd mutants, leading to an excess of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide and a corresponding decrease in cell elongation. We found that expression of the superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase genes, MtRbohA and MtRbohC (for respiratory burst oxidase homologs), is increased in latd roots and that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity pharmacologically can both reduce latd root ROS levels and increase cell length, implicating NADPH oxidase function in latd root growth defects. Finally, we demonstrate that ABA treatment alleviates ectopic ROS accumulation in latd roots, restores MtRbohC expression to wild-type levels, and promotes an increase in cell length. Reducing the expression of MtRbohC using RNA interference leads to increased root elongation in both wild-type and latd roots. These results reveal a mechanism by which the MtLATD/NIP nitrate transporter and ABA modulate root elongation via superoxide generation by the MtRbohC NADPH oxidase. PMID:25192698

  13. Analysis of Large Seeds from Three Different Medicago truncatula Ecotypes Reveals a Potential Role of Hormonal Balance in Final Size Determination of Legume Grains.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Kaustav; Uluçay, Orhan; Şakiroğlu, Muhammet; Udvardi, Michael K; Verdier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Legume seeds are important as protein and oil source for human diet. Understanding how their final seed size is determined is crucial to improve crop yield. In this study, we analyzed seed development of three accessions of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, displaying contrasted seed size. By comparing two large seed accessions to the reference accession A17, we described mechanisms associated with large seed size determination and potential factors modulating the final seed size. We observed that early events during embryogenesis had a major impact on final seed size and a delayed heart stage embryo development resulted to large seeds. We also observed that the difference in seed growth rate was mainly due to a difference in embryo cell number, implicating a role of cell division rate. Large seed accessions could be explained by an extended period of cell division due to a longer embryogenesis phase. According to our observations and recent reports, we observed that auxin (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) ratio could be a key determinant of cell division regulation at the end of embryogenesis. Overall, our study highlights that timing of events occurring during early seed development play decisive role for final seed size determination. PMID:27618017

  14. Elevated CO2 decreases the response of the ethylene signaling pathway in Medicago truncatula and increases the abundance of the pea aphid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Li, Yuefei; Liu, Xianghui; Zhang, Wenhao; Ge, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The performance of herbivorous insects is greatly affected by plant nutritional quality and resistance, which are likely to be altered by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 . We previously reported that elevated CO2 enhanced biological nitrogen (N) fixation of Medicago truncatula, which could result in an increased supply of amino acids to the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). The current study examined the N nutritional quality and aphid resistance of sickle, an ethylene-insensitive mutant of M. truncatula with supernodulation, and its wild-type control A17 under elevated CO2 in open-top field chambers. Regardless of CO2 concentration, growth and amino acid content were greater and aphid resistance was lower in sickle than in A17. Elevated CO2 up-regulated N assimilation and transamination-related enzymes activities and increased phloem amino acids in both genotypes. Furthermore, elevated CO2 down-regulated expression of 1-amino-cyclopropane-carboxylic acid (ACC), sickle gene (SKL) and ethylene response transcription factors (ERF) genes in the ethylene signaling pathway of A17 when infested by aphids and decreased resistance against aphids in terms of lower activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). Our results suggest that elevated CO2 suppresses the ethylene signaling pathway in M. truncatula, which results in an increase in plant nutritional quality for aphids and a decrease in plant resistance against aphids. PMID:24015892

  15. Loss of function of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1 leads to unconventional lignin and a temperature-sensitive growth defect in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiao; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Zhou, Rui; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Fu, Chunxiang; Jackson, Lisa A; Hahn, Michael G; Kim, Hoon; Chen, Fang; Ralph, John; Dixon, Richard A

    2013-08-13

    There is considerable debate over the capacity of the cell wall polymer lignin to incorporate unnatural monomer units. We have identified Tnt1 retrotransposon insertion mutants of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) that show reduced lignin autofluorescence under UV microscopy and red coloration in interfascicular fibers. The phenotype is caused by insertion of retrotransposons into a gene annotated as encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, here designated M. truncatula CAD1. NMR analysis indicated that the lignin is derived almost exclusively from coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde and is therefore strikingly different from classical lignins, which are derived mainly from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. Despite such a major alteration in lignin structure, the plants appear normal under standard conditions in the greenhouse or growth chamber. However, the plants are dwarfed when grown at 30 °C. Glycome profiling revealed an increased extractability of some xylan and pectin epitopes from the cell walls of the cad1-1 mutant but decreased extractability of others, suggesting that aldehyde-dominant lignin significantly alters cell wall structure. PMID:23901113

  16. CRISPR/Cas mutagenesis of soybean and Medicago truncatula using a new web-tool and a modified Cas9 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Michno, Jean-Michel; Wang, Xiaobo; Liu, Junqi; Curtin, Shaun J; Kono, Thomas Jy; Stupar, Robert M

    2015-10-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is rapidly becoming the reagent of choice for targeted mutagenesis and gene editing in crop species. There are currently intense research efforts in the crop sciences to identify efficient CRISPR/Cas9 platforms to carry out targeted mutagenesis and gene editing projects. These efforts typically result in the incremental tweaking of various platform components including the identification of crop-specific promoters and terminators for optimal expression of the Cas9 enzyme and identification of promoters for expression of the CRISPR guide RNA. In this report, we demonstrate the development of an online web tool for fast identification of CRISPR/Cas9 target loci within soybean gene models, and generic DNA sequences. The web-tool described in this work can quickly identify a high number of potential CRISPR/Cas9 target sites, including restriction enzyme sites that can facilitate the detection of new mutations. In conjunction with the web tool, a soybean codon-optimized CRISPR/Cas9 platform was designed to direct double-stranded breaks to the targeted loci in hairy root transformed cells. The modified Cas9 enzyme was shown to successfully mutate target genes in somatic cells of 2 legume species, soybean and Medicago truncatula. These new tools may help facilitate targeted mutagenesis in legume and other plant species. PMID:26479970

  17. Screening of saponins and sapogenins from Medicago species as potential PPARγ agonists and X-ray structure of the complex PPARγ/caulophyllogenin

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Roberta; Capelli, Davide; Tava, Aldo; Galli, Andrea; Laghezza, Antonio; Tortorella, Paolo; Loiodice, Fulvio; Pochetti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    A series of saponins and sapogenins from Medicago species were tested for their ability to bind and activate the nuclear receptor PPARγ by SPR experiments and transactivation assay, respectively. The SPR analysis proved to be a very powerful and fast technique for screening a large number of compounds for their affinity to PPARγ and selecting the better candidates for further studies. Based on the obtained results, the sapogenin caulophyllogenin was proved to be a partial agonist towards PPARγ and the X-ray structure of its complex with PPARγ was also solved, in order to investigate the binding mode in the ligand binding domain of the nuclear receptor. This is the first known crystal structure of a sapogenin directly interacting with PPARγ. Another compound of the series, the echinocistic acid, showed antagonist activity towards PPARγ, a property that could be useful to inhibit the adipocyte differentiation which is a typical adverse effect of PPARγ agonists. This study confirms the interest on saponins and sapogenins as a valuable natural resource exploitable in the medical and food industry for ameliorating the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27283034

  18. Co-transforming bar and CsLEA enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress in transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiyu; Duan, Zhen; Zhang, Daiyu; Zhang, Jianquan; Di, Hongyan; Wu, Fan; Wang, Yanrong

    2016-03-25

    Drought and high salinity are two major abiotic factors that restrict alfalfa productivity. A dehydrin protein, CsLEA, from the desert grass Cleistogenes songorica was transformed into alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using the bar gene as a selectable marker, and the drought and salt stress tolerances of the transgenic plants were assessed. Thirty-nine of 119 transformants were positive, as screened by Basta, and further molecularly authenticated using PCR and RT-PCR. Phenotype observations revealed that the transgenic plants grew better than the wild-type (WT) plants after 15d of drought stress and 10d of salt stress: the leaves of WT alfalfa turned yellow, whereas the transgenic alfalfa leaves only wilted; after rewatering, the transgenic plants returned to a normal state, though the WT plants could not be restored. Evaluation of physiologic and biochemical indices during drought and salt stresses showed a relatively lower Na(+) content in the leaves of the transgenic plants, which would reduce toxic ion effects. In addition, the transgenic plants were able to maintain a higher relative water content (RWC), higher shoot biomass, fewer photosystem changes, decreased membrane injury, and a lower level of osmotic stress injury. These results demonstrate that overexpression of the CsLEA gene can enhance the drought and salt tolerance of transgenic alfalfa; in addition, carrying the bar gene in the genome may increase herbicide resistance. PMID:26906624

  19. A Medicago truncatula H+-pyrophosphatase gene, MtVP1, improves sucrose accumulation and anthocyanin biosynthesis in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, J W; Wang, H Q; Xiang, W W; Chai, T Y

    2014-01-01

    We recently cloned MtVP1, a type I vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatase from Medicago truncatula. In the present study, we investigated the cellular location and the function of this H(+)-PPase in Arabidopsis and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). An MtVP1::enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion was constructed, which localized to the plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing MtVP1 had more robust root systems and redder shoots than wild-type (WT) plants under conditions of cold stress. Furthermore, overexpression of MtVP1 in potato accelerated the formation and growth of vegetative organs. The tuber buds and stem base of transgenic potatoes became redder than those of WT plants, but flowering was delayed by approximately half a month. Interestingly, anthocyanin biosynthesis was promoted in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings and potato tuber buds. The sucrose concentration of transgenic potato tubers and tuber buds was enhanced compared with that of WT plants. Furthermore, sucrose concentration in tubers was higher than that in tuber buds. Although there was no direct evidence to support Fuglsang's hypothetical model regarding the effects of H(+)-PPase on sucrose phloem loading, we speculated that sucrose concentration was increased in tuber buds owing to the increased concentration in tubers. Therefore, overexpressed MtVP1 enhanced sucrose accumulation of source organs, which might enhance sucrose transport to sink organs, thus affecting anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:24854441

  20. The CRE1 Cytokinin Pathway Is Differentially Recruited Depending on Medicago truncatula Root Environments and Negatively Regulates Resistance to a Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Laffont, Carole; Rey, Thomas; André, Olivier; Novero, Mara; Kazmierczak, Théophile; Debellé, Frédéric; Bonfante, Paola; Jacquet, Christophe; Frugier, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins are phytohormones that regulate many developmental and environmental responses. The Medicago truncatula cytokinin receptor MtCRE1 (Cytokinin Response 1) is required for the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobia. As several cytokinin signaling genes are modulated in roots depending on different biotic and abiotic conditions, we assessed potential involvement of this pathway in various root environmental responses. Phenotyping of cre1 mutant roots infected by the Gigaspora margarita arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiotic fungus, the Aphanomyces euteiches root oomycete, or subjected to an abiotic stress (salt), were carried out. Detailed histological analysis and quantification of cre1 mycorrhized roots did not reveal any detrimental phenotype, suggesting that MtCRE1 does not belong to the ancestral common symbiotic pathway shared by rhizobial and AM symbioses. cre1 mutants formed an increased number of emerged lateral roots compared to wild-type plants, a phenotype which was also observed under non-stressed conditions. In response to A. euteiches, cre1 mutants showed reduced disease symptoms and an increased plant survival rate, correlated to an enhanced formation of lateral roots, a feature previously linked to Aphanomyces resistance. Overall, we showed that the cytokinin CRE1 pathway is not only required for symbiotic nodule organogenesis but also affects both root development and resistance to abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. PMID:25562779

  1. Global gene expression profiling during Medicago truncatula-Phymatotrichopsis omnivora interaction reveals a role for jasmonic acid, ethylene, and the flavonoid pathway in disease development.

    PubMed

    Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Marek, Stephen M; Lee, Hee-Kyung; Nakashima, Jin; Tang, Yuhong; Sledge, Mary K; Dixon, Richard A; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2009-01-01

    Phymatotrichopsis omnivora (Duggar) Hennebert causes a destructive root rot in cotton, alfalfa (Medicago sativa), and many other dicot species. No consistently effective control measures or resistant host germplasm for Phymatotrichum root rot (PRR) are known. The relative genetic intractability of cotton and alfalfa precludes their use as model pathosystem hosts for P. omnivora. Therefore, we used the model legume M. truncatula and its available genetic and genomic resources to investigate PRR. Confocal imaging of P. omnivora interactions with M. truncatula roots revealed that the mycelia do not form any specialized structures for penetration and mainly colonize cortical cells and, eventually, form a mycelial mantle covering the root's surfaces. Expression profiling of M. truncatula roots infected by P. omnivora identified several upregulated genes, including the pathogenesis-related class I and class IV chitinases and genes involved in reactive oxygen species generation and phytohormone (jasmonic acid and ethylene) signaling. Genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis were induced (2.5- to 10-fold over mock-inoculated controls) at 3 days postinoculation (dpi) in response to fungal penetration. However, the expression levels of flavonoid biosynthesis genes returned to the basal levels with the progress of the disease at 5 dpi. These transcriptome results, confirmed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses, showed that P. omnivora apparently evades induced host defenses and may downregulate phytochemical defenses at later stages of infection to favor pathogenesis. PMID:19061398

  2. Expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) peroxidase gene in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana enhances resistance to NaCl and H2O2.

    PubMed

    Teng, K; Xiao, G Z; Guo, W E; Yuan, J B; Li, J; Chao, Y H; Han, L B

    2016-01-01

    Peroxidases (PODs) are enzymes that play important roles in catalyzing the reduction of H2O2 and the oxidation of various substrates. They function in many different and important biological processes, such as defense mechanisms, immune responses, and pathogeny. The POD genes have been cloned and identified in many plants, but their function in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is not known, to date. Based on the POD gene sequence (GenBank accession No. L36157.1), we cloned the POD gene in alfalfa, which was named MsPOD. MsPOD expression increased with increasing H2O2. The gene was expressed in all of the tissues, including the roots, stems, leaves, and flowers, particularly in stems and leaves under light/dark conditions. A subcellular analysis showed that MsPOD was localized outside the cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis with MsPOD exhibited increased resistance to H2O2 and NaCl. Moreover, POD activity in the transgenic plants was significantly higher than that in wild-type Arabidopsis. These results show that MsPOD plays an important role in resistance to H2O2 and NaCl. PMID:27323080

  3. Assessing quality of Medicago sativa silage by monitoring bacterial composition with single molecule, real-time sequencing technology and various physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weichen; Mi, Zhihui; Xu, Haiyan; Zheng, Yi; Kwok, Lai Yu; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    The present study applied the PacBio single molecule, real-time sequencing technology (SMRT) in evaluating the quality of silage production. Specifically, we produced four types of Medicago sativa silages by using four different lactic acid bacteria-based additives (AD-I, AD-II, AD-III and AD-IV). We monitored the changes in pH, organic acids (including butyric acid, the ratio of acetic acid/lactic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, 4-hyroxy benzoic acid and phenyl lactic acid), mycotoxins, and bacterial microbiota during silage fermentation. Our results showed that the use of the additives was beneficial to the silage fermentation by enhancing a general pH and mycotoxin reduction, while increasing the organic acids content. By SMRT analysis of the microbial composition in eight silage samples, we found that the bacterial species number and relative abundances shifted apparently after fermentation. Such changes were specific to the LAB species in the additives. Particularly, Bacillus megaterium was the initial dominant species in the raw materials; and after the fermentation process, Pediococcus acidilactici and Lactobacillus plantarum became the most prevalent species, both of which were intrinsically present in the LAB additives. Our data have demonstrated that the SMRT sequencing platform is applicable in assessing the quality of silage. PMID:27340760

  4. Effect of Medicago sativa L. and compost on organic and inorganic pollutant removal from a mixed contaminated soil and risk assessment using ecotoxicological tests.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Charlotte; Hogland, William; Kaczala, Fabio; Jani, Yahya; Marchand, Lilian; Augustsson, Anna; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Several Gentle Remediation Options (GRO), e.g., plant-based options (phytoremediation), singly and combined with soil amendments, can be simultaneously efficient for degrading organic pollutants and either stabilizing or extracting trace elements (TEs). Here, a 5-month greenhouse trial was performed to test the efficiency of Medicago sativa L., singly and combined with a compost addition (30% w/w), to treat soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC), Co and Pb collected at an auto scrap yard. After 5 months, total soil Pb significantly decreased in the compost-amended soil planted with M. sativa, but not total soil Co. Compost incorporation into the soil promoted PHC degradation, M. sativa growth and survival, and shoot Pb concentrations [3.8 mg kg(-1) dry weight (DW)]. Residual risk assessment after the phytoremediation trial showed a positive effect of compost amendment on plant growth and earthworm development. The O2 uptake by soil microorganisms was lower in the compost-amended soil, suggesting a decrease in microbial activity. This study underlined the benefits of the phytoremediation option based on M. sativa cultivation and compost amendment for remediating PHC- and Pb-contaminated soils. PMID:27216854

  5. The photosynthetic and stomatal response of Medicago sativa cv. saranac to free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (F.A.C.E.) and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bridson, N.P.

    1996-08-01

    Plots of Medicago sativa cv. saranac were grown in the field at ambient (355 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1} air) or elevated (600{mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1} air) CO{sub 2} concentrations. High (200kg yr{sup -1}) or low (20kg yr{sup -1}) nitrogen levels were applied to two isogeneic lines, one able and one unable to use nitrogen fixing bacteria. Plants were in the second year of field growth. Exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} was via a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment System (FACE). Elevated CO{sub 2} increased diurnal assimilation by between 12% and 92%. Analysis of A/C{sub i} responses showed that effective nitrogen fertilisation was more important to rubisCO and RuBP activity than elevated CO{sub 2}. No acclimation was consistently observed. Leaves lower down the canopy were found to have lower Vc{sub max} and J{sub max} values, though age may be the cause of the latter effect. FACE conditions have only a small effect on these responses. There was some evidence found for the down-regulation of photosynthesis in the late afternoon. The FACE conditions had no affect on stomatal density but did increase epidermal cell density.

  6. Overexpression of Medicago sativa TMT elevates the α-tocopherol content in Arabidopsis seeds, alfalfa leaves, and delays dark-induced leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jishan; Jia, Huili; Feng, Guangyan; Wang, Zan; Li, Jun; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin

    2016-08-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a major forage legume for livestock and a target for improving their dietary quality. Vitamin E is an essential vitamin that animals must obtain from their diet for proper growth and development. γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (γ-TMT), which catalyzes the conversion of δ- and γ-tocopherols (or tocotrienols) to β- and α-tocopherols (or tocotrienols), respectively, is the final enzyme involved in the vitamin E biosynthetic pathway. The overexpression of M. sativa L.'s γ-TMT (MsTMT) increased the α-tocopherol content 10-15 fold above that of wild type Arabidopsis seeds without altering the total content of vitamin E. Additionally, in response to osmotic stress, the biomass and the expression levels of several osmotic marker genes were significantly higher in the transgenic lines compared with wild type. Overexpression of MsTMT in alfalfa led to a modest, albeit significant, increase in α-tocopherol in leaves and was also responsible for a delayed leaf senescence phenotype. Additionally, the crude protein content was increased, while the acid and neutral detergent fiber contents were unchanged in these transgenic lines. Thus, increased α-tocopherol content occurred in transgenic alfalfa without compromising the nutritional qualities. The targeted metabolic engineering of vitamin E biosynthesis through MsTMT overexpression provides a promising approach to improve the α-tocopherol content of forage crops. PMID:27297993

  7. Loss of function of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1 leads to unconventional lignin and a temperature-sensitive growth defect in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiao; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Zhou, Rui; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Fu, Chunxiang; Jackson, Lisa A.; Hahn, Michael G.; Kim, Hoon; Chen, Fang; Ralph, John; Dixon, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable debate over the capacity of the cell wall polymer lignin to incorporate unnatural monomer units. We have identified Tnt1 retrotransposon insertion mutants of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) that show reduced lignin autofluorescence under UV microscopy and red coloration in interfascicular fibers. The phenotype is caused by insertion of retrotransposons into a gene annotated as encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, here designated M. truncatula CAD1. NMR analysis indicated that the lignin is derived almost exclusively from coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde and is therefore strikingly different from classical lignins, which are derived mainly from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. Despite such a major alteration in lignin structure, the plants appear normal under standard conditions in the greenhouse or growth chamber. However, the plants are dwarfed when grown at 30 °C. Glycome profiling revealed an increased extractability of some xylan and pectin epitopes from the cell walls of the cad1-1 mutant but decreased extractability of others, suggesting that aldehyde-dominant lignin significantly alters cell wall structure. PMID:23901113

  8. The root hair "infectome" of Medicago truncatula uncovers changes in cell cycle genes and reveals a requirement for Auxin signaling in rhizobial infection.

    PubMed

    Breakspear, Andrew; Liu, Chengwu; Roy, Sonali; Stacey, Nicola; Rogers, Christian; Trick, Martin; Morieri, Giulia; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Wen, Jiangqi; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Downie, J Allan; Murray, Jeremy D

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen-fixing rhizobia colonize legume roots via plant-made intracellular infection threads. Genetics has identified some genes involved but has not provided sufficient detail to understand requirements for infection thread development. Therefore, we transcriptionally profiled Medicago truncatula root hairs prior to and during the initial stages of infection. This revealed changes in the responses to plant hormones, most notably auxin, strigolactone, gibberellic acid, and brassinosteroids. Several auxin responsive genes, including the ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana Auxin Response Factor 16, were induced at infection sites and in nodule primordia, and mutation of ARF16a reduced rhizobial infection. Associated with the induction of auxin signaling genes, there was increased expression of cell cycle genes including an A-type cyclin and a subunit of the anaphase promoting complex. There was also induction of several chalcone O-methyltransferases involved in the synthesis of an inducer of Sinorhizobium meliloti nod genes, as well as a gene associated with Nod factor degradation, suggesting both positive and negative feedback loops that control Nod factor levels during rhizobial infection. We conclude that the onset of infection is associated with reactivation of the cell cycle as well as increased expression of genes required for hormone and flavonoid biosynthesis and that the regulation of auxin signaling is necessary for initiation of rhizobial infection threads. PMID:25527707

  9. Elevated CO2 alters the feeding behaviour of the pea aphid by modifying the physical and chemical resistance of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Li, Yuefei; Liu, Xianghui; Wang, Pingyan; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Ge, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Elevated CO(2) compromises the resistance of leguminous plants against chewing insects, but little is known about whether elevated CO(2) modifies the resistance against phloem-sucking insects or whether it has contrasting effects on the resistance of legumes that differ in biological nitrogen fixation. We tested the hypothesis that the physical and chemical resistance against aphids would be increased in Jemalong (a wild type of Medicago truncatula) but would be decreased in dnf1 (a mutant without biological nitrogen fixation) by elevated CO(2). The non-glandular and glandular trichome density of Jemalong plants increased under elevated CO(2), resulting in prolonged aphid probing. In contrast, dnf1 plants tended to decrease foliar trichome density under elevated CO(2), resulting in less surface and epidermal resistance to aphids. Elevated CO(2) enhanced the ineffective salicylic acid-dependent defence pathway but decreased the effective jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent defence pathway in aphid-infested Jemalong plants. Therefore, aphid probing time decreased and the duration of phloem sap ingestion increased on Jemalong under elevated CO(2), which, in turn, increased aphid growth rate. Overall, our results suggest that elevated CO(2) decreases the chemical resistance of wild-type M. truncatula against aphids, and that the host's biological nitrogen fixation ability is central to this effect. PMID:24697655

  10. Loss of Abaxial Leaf Epicuticular Wax in Medicago truncatula irg1/palm1 Mutants Results in Reduced Spore Differentiation of Anthracnose and Nonhost Rust Pathogens[W

    PubMed Central

    Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Doraiswamy, Vanthana; Bedair, Mohamed; Mittal, Shipra; Chen, Jianghua; Nakashima, Jin; Tang, Yuhong; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Chen, Rujin; Schultheiss, Holger; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2012-01-01

    To identify genes that confer nonhost resistance to biotrophic fungal pathogens, we did a forward-genetics screen using Medicago truncatula Tnt1 retrotransposon insertion lines. From this screen, we identified an inhibitor of rust germ tube differentation1 (irg1) mutant that failed to promote preinfection structure differentiation of two rust pathogens, Phakopsora pachyrhizi and Puccinia emaculata, and one anthracnose pathogen, Colletotrichum trifolii, on the abaxial leaf surface. Cytological and chemical analyses revealed that the inhibition of rust preinfection structures in irg1 mutants is due to complete loss of the abaxial epicuticular wax crystals and reduced surface hydrophobicity. The composition of waxes on abaxial leaf surface of irg1 mutants had >90% reduction of C30 primary alcohols and a preferential increase of C29 and C31 alkanes compared with the wild type. IRG1 encodes a Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger transcription factor, PALM1, which also controls dissected leaf morphology in M. truncatula. Transcriptome analysis of irg1/palm1 mutants revealed downregulation of eceriferum4, an enzyme implicated in primary alcohol biosynthesis, and MYB96, a major transcription factor that regulates wax biosynthesis. Our results demonstrate that PALM1 plays a role in regulating epicuticular wax metabolism and transport and that epicuticular wax influences spore differentiation of host and nonhost fungal pathogens. PMID:22294617

  11. In vivo Characterization of the Effects of Abscisic Acid and Drying Protocols Associated with the Acquisition of Desiccation Tolerance in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Somatic Embryos

    PubMed Central

    SREEDHAR, LEKHA; WOLKERS, WILLEM F.; HOEKSTRA, FOLKERT A.; BEWLEY, J. DEREK

    2002-01-01

    Although somatic embryos of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) had acquired some tolerance to desiccation at the cotyledonary stage of development (22 d after plating), additional culturing in 20 μm abscisic acid (ABA) for 8 d induced greater desiccation tolerance, as determined by increased germination. Compared with fast drying, slow drying of the ABA‐treated embryos improved desiccation tolerance. However, slow drying of non‐ABA‐treated embryos led to the complete loss of germination capacity, while some fast‐dried embryos survived. An electron paramagnetic resonance spin probe technique and in vivo Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy revealed that cellular membrane integrity and α‐helical protein secondary structure were maintained during drying in embryos cultured in media enriched with 20 μm ABA, but not in embryos cultured in the absence of ABA. Slow‐dried, non‐ABA‐treated embryos had low oligosaccharide to sucrose ratios, an increased proportion of β‐sheet protein secondary structures and broad membrane phase transitions extending over a temperature range of more than 60 °C, suggestive of irreversible phase separations. The spin probe study showed evidence of imbibitional damage, which could be alleviated by prehydration in humid air. These observations emphasize the importance of appropriate drying and prehydration protocols for the survival and storage of somatic embryos. It is suggested that ABA also plays a role in suppressing metabolism, thus increasing the level of desiccation tolerance; this is particularly evident under stressful conditions such as slow drying. PMID:12096799

  12. In vivo characterization of the effects of abscisic acid and drying protocols associated with the acquisition of desiccation tolerance in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Lekha; Wolkers, Willem F; Hoekstra, Folkert A; Bewley, J Derek

    2002-04-01

    Although somatic embryos of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) had acquired some tolerance to desiccation at the cotyledonary stage of development (22 d after plating), additional culturing in 20 microm abscisic acid (ABA) for 8 d induced greater desiccation tolerance, as determined by increased germination. Compared with fast drying, slow drying of the ABA-treated embryos improved desiccation tolerance. However, slow drying of non-ABA-treated embryos led to the complete loss of germination capacity, while some fast-dried embryos survived. An electron paramagnetic resonance spin probe technique and in vivo Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy revealed that cellular membrane integrity and a-helical protein secondary structure were maintained during drying in embryos cultured in media enriched with 20 microM ABA, but not in embryos cultured in the absence of ABA. Slow-dried, non-ABA-treated embryos had low oligosaccharide to sucrose ratios, an increased proportion of beta-sheet protein secondary structures and broad membrane phase transitions extending over a temperature range of more than 60 degrees C, suggestive of irreversible phase separations. The spin probe study showed evidence of imbibitional damage, which could be alleviated by prehydration in humid air. These observations emphasize the importance of appropriate drying and prehydration protocols for the survival and storage of somatic embryos. It is suggested that ABA also plays a role in suppressing metabolism, thus increasing the level of desiccation tolerance; this is particularly evident under stressful conditions such as slow drying. PMID:12096799

  13. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary Analysis and Expression Profiles of LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN Gene Family in Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianquan; Fang, Genwang Yue; He, Hua; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    The LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) gene family has been well-studied in Arabidopsis and play crucial roles in the diverse growth and development processes including establishment and maintenance of boundary of developmental lateral organs. In this study we identified and characterized 38 LBD genes in Lotus japonicus (LjLBD) and 57 LBD genes in Medicago truncatula (MtLBD), both of which are model legume plants that have some specific development features absent in Arabidopsis. The phylogenetic relationships, their locations in the genome, genes structure and conserved motifs were examined. The results revealed that all LjLBD and MtLBD genes could be distinctly divided into two classes: Class I and II. The evolutionary analysis showed that Type I functional divergence with some significantly site-specific shifts may be the main force for the divergence between Class I and Class II. In addition, the expression patterns of LjLBD genes uncovered the diverse functions in plant development. Interestingly, we found that two LjLBD proteins that were highly expressed during compound leaf and pulvinus development, can interact via yeast two-hybrid assays. Taken together, our findings provide an evolutionary and genetic foundation in further understanding the molecular basis of LBD gene family in general, specifically in L. japonicus and M. truncatula. PMID:27560982

  14. Assessing quality of Medicago sativa silage by monitoring bacterial composition with single molecule, real-time sequencing technology and various physiological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Weichen; Mi, Zhihui; Xu, Haiyan; Zheng, Yi; Kwok, Lai Yu; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    The present study applied the PacBio single molecule, real-time sequencing technology (SMRT) in evaluating the quality of silage production. Specifically, we produced four types of Medicago sativa silages by using four different lactic acid bacteria-based additives (AD-I, AD-II, AD-III and AD-IV). We monitored the changes in pH, organic acids (including butyric acid, the ratio of acetic acid/lactic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, 4-hyroxy benzoic acid and phenyl lactic acid), mycotoxins, and bacterial microbiota during silage fermentation. Our results showed that the use of the additives was beneficial to the silage fermentation by enhancing a general pH and mycotoxin reduction, while increasing the organic acids content. By SMRT analysis of the microbial composition in eight silage samples, we found that the bacterial species number and relative abundances shifted apparently after fermentation. Such changes were specific to the LAB species in the additives. Particularly, Bacillus megaterium was the initial dominant species in the raw materials; and after the fermentation process, Pediococcus acidilactici and Lactobacillus plantarum became the most prevalent species, both of which were intrinsically present in the LAB additives. Our data have demonstrated that the SMRT sequencing platform is applicable in assessing the quality of silage. PMID:27340760

  15. Nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining soil alleviates Cd toxicity and increases Cd-phytoextraction in Medicago sativa L.

    PubMed

    Ghnaya, Tahar; Mnassri, Majda; Ghabriche, Rim; Wali, Mariem; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Lutts, Stanley; Abdelly, Chedly

    2015-01-01

    Besides their role in nitrogen supply to the host plants as a result of symbiotic N fixation, the association between legumes and Rhizobium could be useful for the rehabilitation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction. A major limitation presents the metal-sensitivity of the bacterial strains. The aim of this work was to explore the usefulness of Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining site for Cd phytoextraction by Medicago sativa. Inoculated and non-inoculated plants were cultivated for 60 d on soils containing 50 and/or 100 mg Cd kg(-1) soil. The inoculation hindered the occurrence of Cd- induced toxicity symptoms that appeared in the shoots of non-inoculated plants. This positive effect of S. meliloti colonization was accompanied by an increase in biomass production and improved nutrient acquisition comparatively to non-inoculated plants. Nodulation enhanced Cd absorption by the roots and Cd translocation to the shoots. The increase of plant biomass concomitantly with the increase of Cd shoot concentration in inoculated plants led to higher potential of Cd-phytoextraction in these plants. In the presence of 50 mg Cd kg(-1) in the soil, the amounts of Cd extracted in the shoots were 58 and 178 μg plant(-1) in non-inoculated and inoculated plants, respectively. This study demonstrates that this association M. sativa-S. meliloti may be an efficient biological system to extract Cd from contaminated soils. PMID:26528320

  16. A vapBC-type toxin-antitoxin module of Sinorhizobium meliloti influences symbiotic efficiency and nodule senescence of Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Lipuma, Justine; Cinege, Gyöngyi; Bodogai, Monica; Oláh, Boglárka; Kiers, Aurélie; Endre, Gabriella; Dupont, Laurence; Dusha, Ilona

    2014-12-01

    The symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti carries a large number of toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules both on the chromosome and megaplasmids. One of them, the vapBC-5 module that belongs to the type II systems was characterized here. It encodes an active toxin vapC-5, and was shown to be controlled negatively by the complex of its own proteins. Different mutants of the vapBC-5 genes exhibited diverse effects on symbiotic efficiency during interaction with the host plant Medicago sativa. The absence of the entire vapBC-5 region had no influence on nodule formation and nitrogen fixation properties. The strain carrying an insertion in the antitoxin gene showed a reduced nitrogen fixation capacity resulting in a lower plant yield. In contrast, when the toxin gene was mutated, the strain developed more efficient symbiosis with the host plant. The nitrogen fixing root nodules had a delayed senescent phenotype and contained elevated level of plant-derived molecules characteristic of later steps of nodule development. The longer bacteroid viability and abundance of active nitrogen fixing zone resulted in increased production of plant material. These data indicate that modification of the toxin/antitoxin production may influence bacteroid metabolism and may have an impact on the adaptation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:25156344

  17. Soluble methionine enhances accumulation of a 15 kDa zein, a methionine-rich storage protein, in transgenic alfalfa but not in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Amira, Golan; Ifat, Matityahu; Tal, Avraham; Hana, Badani; Shmuel, Galili; Rachel, Amir

    2005-09-01

    With the general aim of elevating the content of the essential amino acid methionine in vegetative tissues of plants, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and tobacco plants, as well as BY2 tobacco suspension cells, were transformed with a beta-zein::3HA gene under the 35S promoter of cauliflower mosaic virus encoding a rumen-stable methionine-rich storage protein of 15 kDa zein. To examine whether soluble methionine content limited the accumulation of the 15 kDa zein::3HA, methionine was first added to the growth medium of the different transgenic plants and the level of the alien protein was determined. Results demonstrated that the added methionine enhanced the accumulation of the 15 kDa zein::3HA in transgenic alfalfa and tobacco BY2 cells, but not in whole transgenic tobacco plants. Next, the endogenous levels of methionine were elevated in the transgenic tobacco and alfalfa plants by crossing them with plants expressing the Arabidopsis cystathionine gamma-synthase (AtCGS) having significantly higher levels of soluble methionine in their leaves. Compared with plants expressing only the 15 kDa zein::3HA, transgenic alfalfa co-expressing both alien genes showed significantly enhanced levels of this protein concurrently with a reduction in the soluble methionine content, thus implying that soluble methionine was incorporated into the 15 kDa zein::3HA. Similar phenomena also occurred in tobacco, but were considerably less pronounced. The results demonstrate that the accumulation of the 15 kDa zein::3HA is regulated in a species-specific manner and that soluble methionine plays a major role in the accumulation of the 15 kDa zein in some plant species but less so in others. PMID:16061510

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of the MsHSP17.7 gene from Medicago sativa L.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Yi; Long, Rui-Cai; Zhang, Tie-Jun; Yang, Qing-Chuan; Kang, Jun-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are ubiquitous protective proteins that play crucial roles in plant development and adaptation to stress, and the aim of this study is to characterize the HSP gene in alfalfa. Here we isolated a small heat shock protein gene (MsHSP17.7) from alfalfa by homology-based cloning. MsHSP17.7 contains a 477-bp open reading frame and encodes a protein of 17.70-kDa. The amino acid sequence shares high identity with MtHSP (93.98 %), PsHSP17.1 (83.13 %), GmHSP17.9 (74.10 %) and SlHSP17.6 (79.25 %). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MsHSP17.7 belongs to the group of cytosolic class II small heat shock proteins (sHSP), and likely localizes to the cytoplasm. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that MsHSP17.7 was induced by heat shock, high salinity, peroxide and drought stress. Prokaryotic expression indicated that the salt and peroxide tolerance of Escherichia coli was remarkably enhanced. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing MsHSP17.7 exhibited increased root length of transgenic Arabidopsis lines under salt stress compared to the wild-type line. The malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the transgenic lines were significantly lower than in wild-type, although proline levels were similar between transgenic and wild-type lines. MsHSP17.7 was induced by heat shock, high salinity, oxidative stress and drought stress. Overexpression analysis suggests that MsHSP17.7 might play a key role in response to high salinity stress. PMID:27193169

  19. De Novo Characterization of Fall Dormant and Nondormant Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Leaf Transcriptome and Identification of Candidate Genes Related to Fall Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ningning; Du, Hongqi; Fan, Wenna; Wang, Chengzhang

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated perennial forage legumes worldwide. Fall dormancy is an adaptive character related to the biomass production and winter survival in alfalfa. The physiological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms causing fall dormancy and the related genes have not been well studied. In this study, we sequenced two standard varieties of alfalfa (dormant and non-dormant) at two time points and generated approximately 160 million high quality paired-end sequence reads using sequencing by synthesis (SBS) technology. The de novo transcriptome assembly generated a set of 192,875 transcripts with an average length of 856 bp representing about 165.1 Mb of the alfalfa leaf transcriptome. After assembly, 111,062 (57.6%) transcripts were annotated against the NCBI non-redundant database. A total of 30,165 (15.6%) transcripts were mapped to 323 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. We also identified 41,973 simple sequence repeats, which can be used to generate markers for alfalfa, and 1,541 transcription factors were identified across 1,350 transcripts. Gene expression between dormant and non-dormant alfalfa at different time points were performed, and we identified several differentially expressed genes potentially related to fall dormancy. The Gene Ontology and pathways information were also identified. We sequenced and assembled the leaf transcriptome of alfalfa related to fall dormancy, and also identified some genes of interest involved in the fall dormancy mechanism. Thus, our research focused on studying fall dormancy in alfalfa through transcriptome sequencing. The sequencing and gene expression data generated in this study may be used further to elucidate the complete mechanisms governing fall dormancy in alfalfa. PMID:25799491

  20. A Sinorhizobium meliloti-specific N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal increases nodule numbers in Medicago truncatula independent of autoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Veliz-Vallejos, Debora F.; van Noorden, Giel E.; Yuan, Mengqi; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) act as quorum sensing signals that regulate cell-density dependent behaviors in many gram-negative bacteria, in particular those important for plant-microbe interactions. AHLs can also be recognized by plants, and this may influence their interactions with bacteria. Here we tested whether the exposure to AHLs affects the nodule-forming symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia. We treated roots of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, with a range of AHLs either from its specific symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, or from the potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Agrobacterium vitis. We found increased numbers of nodules formed on root systems treated with the S. meliloti-specific AHL, 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone, at a concentration of 1 μM, while the other AHLs did not result in significant changes to nodule numbers. We did not find any evidence for altered nodule invasion by the rhizobia. Quantification of flavonoids that could act as nod gene inducers in S. meliloti did not show any correlation with increased nodule numbers. The effects of AHLs were specific for an increase in nodule numbers, but not lateral root numbers or root length. Increased nodule numbers following 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone treatment were under control of autoregulation of nodulation and were still observed in the autoregulation mutant, sunn4 (super numeric nodules4). However, increases in nodule numbers by 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone were not found in the ethylene-insensitive sickle mutant. A comparison between M. truncatula with M. sativa (alfalfa) and Trifolium repens (white clover) showed that the observed effects of AHLs on nodule numbers were specific to M. truncatula, despite M. sativa nodulating with the same symbiont. We conclude that plant perception of the S. meliloti-specific 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone influences nodule numbers in M. truncatula via an ethylene-dependent, but autoregulation-independent mechanism. PMID

  1. A Laser Dissection-RNAseq Analysis Highlights the Activation of Cytokinin Pathways by Nod Factors in the Medicago truncatula Root Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Boivin, Stéphane; Rodde, Nathalie; Catrice, Olivier; Kisiala, Anna; Lepage, Agnes; Moreau, Sandra; Roux, Brice; Cottret, Ludovic; Sallet, Erika; Brault, Mathias; Emery, R J Neil; Gouzy, Jérôme; Frugier, Florian; Gamas, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Nod factors (NFs) are lipochitooligosaccharidic signal molecules produced by rhizobia, which play a key role in the rhizobium-legume symbiotic interaction. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression reprogramming induced by purified NF (4 and 24 h of treatment) in the root epidermis of the model legume Medicago truncatula Tissue-specific transcriptome analysis was achieved by laser-capture microdissection coupled to high-depth RNA sequencing. The expression of 17,191 genes was detected in the epidermis, among which 1,070 were found to be regulated by NF addition, including previously characterized NF-induced marker genes. Many genes exhibited strong levels of transcriptional activation, sometimes only transiently at 4 h, indicating highly dynamic regulation. Expression reprogramming affected a variety of cellular processes, including perception, signaling, regulation of gene expression, as well as cell wall, cytoskeleton, transport, metabolism, and defense, with numerous NF-induced genes never identified before. Strikingly, early epidermal activation of cytokinin (CK) pathways was indicated, based on the induction of CK metabolic and signaling genes, including the CRE1 receptor essential to promote nodulation. These transcriptional activations were independently validated using promoter:β-glucuronidase fusions with the MtCRE1 CK receptor gene and a CK response reporter (TWO COMPONENT SIGNALING SENSOR NEW). A CK pretreatment reduced the NF induction of the EARLY NODULIN11 (ENOD11) symbiotic marker, while a CK-degrading enzyme (CYTOKININ OXIDASE/DEHYDROGENASE3) ectopically expressed in the root epidermis led to increased NF induction of ENOD11 and nodulation. Therefore, CK may play both positive and negative roles in M. truncatula nodulation. PMID:27217496

  2. A single amino acid substitution in a chitinase of the legume Medicago truncatula is sufficient to gain Nod-factor hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan-Yue; Cai, Jie; Li, Ru-Jie; Liu, Wei; Wagner, Christian; Wong, Kam-Bo; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The symbiotic interaction between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes depends on lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod-factors (NFs). The NF hydrolase MtNFH1 of Medicago truncatula is a symbiotic enzyme that hydrolytically inactivates NFs with a C16 : 2 acyl chain produced by the microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. MtNFH1 is related to class V chitinases (glycoside hydrolase family 18) but lacks chitinase activity. Here, we investigated the substrate specificity of MtNFH1-related proteins. MtCHIT5a and MtCHIT5b of M. truncatula as well as LjCHIT5 of Lotus japonicus showed chitinase activity, suggesting a role in plant defence. The enzymes failed to hydrolyse NFs from S. meliloti. NFs from Rhizobium leguminosarum with a C18 : 4 acyl moiety were neither hydrolysed by these chitinases nor by MtNFH1. Construction of chimeric proteins and further amino acid replacements in MtCHIT5b were performed to identify chitinase variants that gained the ability to hydrolyse NFs. A single serine-to-proline substitution was sufficient to convert MtCHIT5b into an NF-cleaving enzyme. MtNFH1 with the corresponding proline-to-serine substitution failed to hydrolyse NFs. These results are in agreement with a substrate-enzyme model that predicts NF cleavage when the C16 : 2 moiety is placed into a distinct fatty acid-binding cleft. Our findings support the view that MtNFH1 evolved from the ancestral MtCHIT5b by gene duplication and subsequent symbiosis-related neofunctionalization. PMID:27383628

  3. A single amino acid substitution in a chitinase of the legume Medicago truncatula is sufficient to gain Nod-factor hydrolase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lan-Yue; Cai, Jie; Li, Ru-Jie; Liu, Wei; Wagner, Christian; Wong, Kam-Bo; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes depends on lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod-factors (NFs). The NF hydrolase MtNFH1 of Medicago truncatula is a symbiotic enzyme that hydrolytically inactivates NFs with a C16 : 2 acyl chain produced by the microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. MtNFH1 is related to class V chitinases (glycoside hydrolase family 18) but lacks chitinase activity. Here, we investigated the substrate specificity of MtNFH1-related proteins. MtCHIT5a and MtCHIT5b of M. truncatula as well as LjCHIT5 of Lotus japonicus showed chitinase activity, suggesting a role in plant defence. The enzymes failed to hydrolyse NFs from S. meliloti. NFs from Rhizobium leguminosarum with a C18 : 4 acyl moiety were neither hydrolysed by these chitinases nor by MtNFH1. Construction of chimeric proteins and further amino acid replacements in MtCHIT5b were performed to identify chitinase variants that gained the ability to hydrolyse NFs. A single serine-to-proline substitution was sufficient to convert MtCHIT5b into an NF-cleaving enzyme. MtNFH1 with the corresponding proline-to-serine substitution failed to hydrolyse NFs. These results are in agreement with a substrate-enzyme model that predicts NF cleavage when the C16 : 2 moiety is placed into a distinct fatty acid-binding cleft. Our findings support the view that MtNFH1 evolved from the ancestral MtCHIT5b by gene duplication and subsequent symbiosis-related neofunctionalization. PMID:27383628

  4. Citric acid- and Tween(®) 80-assisted phytoremediation of a co-contaminated soil: alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) performance and remediation potential.

    PubMed

    Agnello, A C; Huguenot, D; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G

    2016-05-01

    A pot experiment was designed to assess the phytoremediation potential of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in a co-contaminated (i.e., heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons) soil and the influence of citric acid and Tween(®) 80 (polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate), applied individually and combined together, for their possible use in chemically assisted phytoremediation. The results showed that alfalfa plants could tolerate and grow in a co-contaminated soil. Over a 90-day experimental time, shoot and root biomass increased and negligible plant mortality occurred. Heavy metals were uptaken by alfalfa to a limited extent, mostly by plant roots, and their concentration in plant tissues were in the following order: Zn > Cu > Pb. Microbial population (alkane-degrading microorganisms) and activity (lipase enzyme) were enhanced in the presence of alfalfa with rhizosphere effects of 9.1 and 1.5, respectively, after 90 days. Soil amendments did not significantly enhance plant metal concentration or total uptake. In contrast, the combination of citric acid and Tween(®) 80 significantly improved alkane-degrading microorganisms (2.4-fold increase) and lipase activity (5.3-fold increase) in the rhizosphere of amended plants, after 30 days of experiment. This evidence supports a favorable response of alfalfa in terms of tolerance to a co-contaminated soil and improvement of rhizosphere microbial number and activity, additionally enhanced by the joint application of citric acid and Tween(®) 80, which could be promising for future phytoremediation applications. PMID:26838038

  5. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V. Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. PMID:27060167

  6. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. PMID:27060167

  7. Single-plant, Sterile Microcosms for Nodulation and Growth of the Legume Plant Medicago truncatula with the Rhizobial Symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobial bacteria form symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of compatible host legume plants. One of the most well-developed model systems for studying these interactions is the plant Medicago truncatula cv. Jemalong A17 and the rhizobial bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Repeated imaging of plant roots and scoring of symbiotic phenotypes requires methods that are non-destructive to either plants or bacteria. The symbiotic phenotypes of some plant and bacterial mutants become apparent after relatively short periods of growth, and do not require long-term observation of the host/symbiont interaction. However, subtle differences in symbiotic efficiency and nodule senescence phenotypes that are not apparent in the early stages of the nodulation process require relatively long growth periods before they can be scored. Several methods have been developed for long-term growth and observation of this host/symbiont pair. However, many of these methods require repeated watering, which increases the possibility of contamination by other microbes. Other methods require a relatively large space for growth of large numbers of plants. The method described here, symbiotic growth of M. truncatula/S. meliloti in sterile, single-plant microcosms, has several advantages. Plants in these microcosms have sufficient moisture and nutrients to ensure that watering is not required for up to 9 weeks, preventing cross-contamination during watering. This allows phenotypes to be quantified that might be missed in short-term growth systems, such as subtle delays in nodule development and early nodule senescence. Also, the roots and nodules in the microcosm are easily viewed through the plate lid, so up-rooting of the plants for observation is not required. PMID:24121837

  8. Transport and partitioning of CO/sub 2/ fixed by root nodules of ureide and amide producing legumes. [Vigna angularis; Glycine max; Medicago sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, C.P.; Boylan, K.L.M.; Maxwell, C.A.; Heichel, G.H.; Hardman, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nodulated and denodulated roots of adzuki bean (Vigna angularis), soybean (Glycine max), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were exposed to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ to investigate the contribution of nodule CO/sub 2/ fixation to assimilation and transport of fixed nitrogen. The distribution of radioactivity in xylem sap and partitioning of carbon fixed by nodules to the whole plant were measured. Radioactivity in the xylem sap of nodulated soybean and adzuki bean was located primarily (70 to 87%) in the acid fraction while the basic (amino acid) fraction contained 10 to 22%. In contrast radioactivity in the xylem sap of nodulated alfalfa was primarily in amino acids with about 20% in organic acids. Total ureide concentration was 8.1, 4.7, and 0.0 micromoles per milliliter xylem sap for soybean, adzuki bean, and alfalfa, respectively. While the major nitrogen transport products in soybeans and adzuki beans are ureides, this class of metabolites contained less than 20% of the the total radioactivity. When nodules of plants were removed, radioactivity in xylem sap decreased by 90% or more. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that CO/sub 2/ fixed by nodules was rapidly transported to shoots and incorporated into acid stable constituents. The data are consistent with a role for nodule CO/sub 2/ fixation providing carbon for the assimilation and transport of fixed nitrogen in amide-based legumes. In contrast, CO/sub 2/ fixation by nodules of ureide transporting legumes appears to contribute little to assimilation and transport of fixed nitrogen. 19 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  9. Haem oxygenase-1 is involved in salicylic acid-induced alleviation of oxidative stress due to cadmium stress in Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wenbiao

    2012-01-01

    This work examines the involvement of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in salicylic acid (SA)-induced alleviation of oxidative stress as a result of cadmium (Cd) stress in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seedling roots. CdCl2 exposure caused severe growth inhibition and Cd accumulation, which were potentiated by pre-treatment with zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPPIX), a potent HO-1 inhibitor. Pre-treatment of plants with the HO-1 inducer haemin or SA, both of which could induce MsHO1 gene expression, significantly reduced the inhibition of growth and Cd accumulation. The alleviation effects were also evidenced by a decreased content of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). The antioxidant behaviour was confirmed by histochemical staining for the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity. Furthermore, haemin and SA pre-treatment modulated the activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD), or their corresponding transcripts. Significant enhancement of the ratios of reduced/oxidized homoglutathione (hGSH), ascorbic acid (ASA)/dehydroascorbate (DHA), and NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+, and expression of their metabolism genes was observed, consistent with a decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) distribution in the root tips. These effects are specific for HO-1, since ZnPPIX blocked the above actions, and the aggravated effects triggered by SA plus ZnPPIX were differentially reversed when carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two catalytic by-products of HO-1, was added. Together, the results suggest that HO-1 is involved in the SA-induced alleviation of Cd-triggered oxidative stress by re-establishing redox homeostasis. PMID:22915740

  10. Both Plant and Bacterial Nitrate Reductases Contribute to Nitric Oxide Production in Medicago truncatula Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Horchani, Faouzi; Prévot, Marianne; Boscari, Alexandre; Evangelisti, Edouard; Meilhoc, Eliane; Bruand, Claude; Raymond, Philippe; Boncompagni, Eric; Aschi-Smiti, Samira; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling and defense molecule of major importance in living organisms. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, NO production has been detected in the nitrogen fixation zone of the nodule, but the systems responsible for its synthesis are yet unknown and its role in symbiosis is far from being elucidated. In this work, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we explored the enzymatic source of NO production in M. truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti nodules under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. When transferred from normoxia to hypoxia, nodule NO production was rapidly increased, indicating that NO production capacity is present in functioning nodules and may be promptly up-regulated in response to decreased oxygen availability. Contrary to roots and leaves, nodule NO production was stimulated by nitrate and nitrite and inhibited by tungstate, a nitrate reductase inhibitor. Nodules obtained with either plant nitrate reductase RNA interference double knockdown (MtNR1/2) or bacterial nitrate reductase-deficient (napA) and nitrite reductase-deficient (nirK) mutants, or both, exhibited reduced nitrate or nitrite reductase activities and NO production levels. Moreover, NO production in nodules was found to be inhibited by electron transfer chain inhibitors, and nodule energy state (ATP-ADP ratio) was significantly reduced when nodules were incubated in the presence of tungstate. Our data indicate that both plant and bacterial nitrate reductase and electron transfer chains are involved in NO synthesis. We propose the existence of a nitrate-NO respiration process in nodules that could play a role in the maintenance of the energy status required for nitrogen fixation under oxygen-limiting conditions. PMID:21139086

  11. RNA-seq transcriptome profiling reveals that Medicago truncatula nodules acclimate N2 fixation before emerging P deficiency reaches the nodules

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; von Stieglitz, Ilsabe; Neumann, Janice; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Legume nodules are plant tissues with an exceptionally high concentration of phosphorus (P), which, when there is scarcity of P, is preferentially maintained there rather than being allocated to other plant organs. The hypothesis of this study was that nodules are affected before the P concentration in the organ declines during whole-plant P depletion. Nitrogen (N2) fixation and P concentration in various organs were monitored during a whole-plant P-depletion process in Medicago truncatula. Nodule gene expression was profiled through RNA-seq at day 5 of P depletion. Until that point in time P concentration in leaves reached a lower threshold but was maintained in nodules. N2-fixation activity per plant diverged from that of fully nourished plants beginning at day 5 of the P-depletion process, primarily because fewer nodules were being formed, while the activity of the existing nodules was maintained for as long as two weeks into P depletion. RNA-seq revealed nodule acclimation on a molecular level with a total of 1140 differentially expressed genes. Numerous genes for P remobilization from organic structures were increasingly expressed. Various genes involved in nodule malate formation were upregulated, while genes involved in fermentation were downregulated. The fact that nodule formation was strongly repressed with the onset of P deficiency is reflected in the differential expression of various genes involved in nodulation. It is concluded that plants follow a strategy to maintain N2 fixation and viable leaf tissue as long as possible during whole-plant P depletion to maintain their ability to react to emerging new P sources (e.g. through active P acquisition by roots). PMID:25151618

  12. The Medicago Species A2-Type Cyclin Is Auxin Regulated and Involved in Meristem Formation But Dispensable for Endoreduplication-Associated Developmental Programs1

    PubMed Central

    Roudier, François; Fedorova, Elena; Lebris, Manuel; Lecomte, Phillippe; Györgyey, Janos; Vaubert, Daniele; Horvath, Gabor; Abad, Pierre; Kondorosi, Adam; Kondorosi, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Phytohormones as well as temporal and spatial regulation of the cell cycle play a key role in plant development. Here, we investigated the function and regulation of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa) A2-type cyclin in three distinct root developmental programs: in primary and secondary root development, nodule development, and nematode-elicited gall formation. Using transgenic plants carrying the Medsa;cycA2;2 promoter-β-glucuronidase gene fusion, in combination with other techniques, cycA2;2 expression was localized in meristems and proliferating cells in the lateral root and nodule primordia. Rapid induction of cycA2;2 by Nod factors demonstrated that this gene is implicated in cell cycle activation of differentiated cells developing to nodule primordia. Surprisingly, cycA2;2 was repressed in the endoreduplicating, division-arrested cells both during nodule development and formation of giant cells in nematode-induced galls, indicating that CycA2;2 was dispensable for S-phase in endoreduplication cycles. Overexpression of cycA2;2 in transgenic plants corresponded to wild type protein levels and had no apparent phenotype. In contrast, antisense expression of cycA2;2 halted regeneration of somatic embryos, suggesting a role for CycA2;2 in the formation or activity of apical meristems. Expression of cycA2;2 was up-regulated by auxins, as expected from the presence of auxin response elements in the promoter. Moreover, auxin also affected the spatial expression pattern of this cyclin by shifting the cycA2;2 expression from the phloem to the xylem poles. PMID:12644661

  13. Co-transforming bar and CsALDH Genes Enhanced Resistance to Herbicide and Drought and Salt Stress in Transgenic Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhen; Zhang, Daiyu; Zhang, Jianquan; Di, Hongyan; Wu, Fan; Hu, Xiaowen; Meng, Xuanchen; Luo, Kai; Zhang, Jiyu; Wang, Yanrong

    2015-01-01

    Drought and high salinity are two major abiotic factors that restrict the productivity of alfalfa. By application of the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, an oxidative responsive gene, CsALDH12A1, from the desert grass Cleistogenes songorica together with the bar gene associated with herbicide resistance, were co-transformed into alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). From the all 90 transformants, 16 were positive as screened by spraying 1 mL L-1 10% Basta solution and molecularly diagnosis using PCR. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that drought and salt stress induced high CsALDH expression in the leaves of the transgenic plants. The CsALDH expression levels under drought (15 d) and salt stress (200 mM NaCl) were 6.11 and 6.87 times higher than in the control plants, respectively. In comparison to the WT plants, no abnormal phenotypes were observed among the transgenic plants, which showed significant enhancement of tolerance to 15 d of drought and 10 d of salinity treatment. Evaluation of the physiological and biochemical indices during drought and salt stress of the transgenic plants revealed relatively lower Na+ content and higher K+ content in the leaves relative to the WT plants, a reduction of toxic on effects and maintenance of osmotic adjustment. In addition, the transgenic plants could maintain a higher relative water content level, higher shoot biomass, fewer changes in the photosystem, decreased membrane injury, and a lower level of osmotic stress. These results indicate that the co-expression of the introduced bar and CsALDH genes enhanced the herbicide, drought and salt tolerance of alfalfa and therefore can potentially be used as a novel genetic resource for the future breeding programs to develop new cultivars. PMID:26734025

  14. A Laser Dissection-RNAseq Analysis Highlights the Activation of Cytokinin Pathways by Nod Factors in the Medicago truncatula Root Epidermis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Lepage, Agnes; Moreau, Sandra; Cottret, Ludovic; Brault, Mathias; Gouzy, Jérôme; Frugier, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Nod factors (NFs) are lipochitooligosaccharidic signal molecules produced by rhizobia, which play a key role in the rhizobium-legume symbiotic interaction. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression reprogramming induced by purified NF (4 and 24 h of treatment) in the root epidermis of the model legume Medicago truncatula. Tissue-specific transcriptome analysis was achieved by laser-capture microdissection coupled to high-depth RNA sequencing. The expression of 17,191 genes was detected in the epidermis, among which 1,070 were found to be regulated by NF addition, including previously characterized NF-induced marker genes. Many genes exhibited strong levels of transcriptional activation, sometimes only transiently at 4 h, indicating highly dynamic regulation. Expression reprogramming affected a variety of cellular processes, including perception, signaling, regulation of gene expression, as well as cell wall, cytoskeleton, transport, metabolism, and defense, with numerous NF-induced genes never identified before. Strikingly, early epidermal activation of cytokinin (CK) pathways was indicated, based on the induction of CK metabolic and signaling genes, including the CRE1 receptor essential to promote nodulation. These transcriptional activations were independently validated using promoter:β-glucuronidase fusions with the MtCRE1 CK receptor gene and a CK response reporter (TWO COMPONENT SIGNALING SENSOR NEW). A CK pretreatment reduced the NF induction of the EARLY NODULIN11 (ENOD11) symbiotic marker, while a CK-degrading enzyme (CYTOKININ OXIDASE/DEHYDROGENASE3) ectopically expressed in the root epidermis led to increased NF induction of ENOD11 and nodulation. Therefore, CK may play both positive and negative roles in M. truncatula nodulation. PMID:27217496

  15. Developmental stage- and concentration-specific sodium nitroprusside application results in nitrate reductase regulation and the modification of nitrate metabolism in leaves of Medicago truncatula plants

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Chrystalla; Filippou, Panagiota; Mylona, Photini; Fasoula, Dionysia; Ioannides, Ioannis; Polidoros, Alexios; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a bioactive molecule involved in numerous biological events that has been reported to display both pro-oxidant and antioxidant properties in plants. Several reports exist which demonstrate the protective action of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a widely used NO donor, which acts as a signal molecule in plants responsible for the expression regulation of many antioxidant enzymes. This study attempts to provide a novel insight into the effect of application of low (100 μΜ) and high (2.5 mM) concentrations of SNP on the nitrosative status and nitrate metabolism of mature (40 d) and senescing (65 d) Medicago truncatula plants. Higher concentrations of SNP resulted in increased NO content, cellular damage levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, further induced in older tissues. Senescing M. truncatula plants demonstrated greater sensitivity to SNP-induced oxidative and nitrosative damage, suggesting a developmental stage-dependent suppression in the plant’s capacity to cope with free oxygen and nitrogen radicals. In addition, measurements of the activity of nitrate reductase (NR), a key enzyme involved in the generation of NO in plants, indicated a differential regulation in a dose and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression levels of NO-responsive genes (NR, nitrate/nitrite transporters) involved in nitrogen assimilation and NO production revealed significant induction of NR and nitrate transporter during long-term 2.5 mM SNP application in mature plants and overall gene suppression in senescing plants, supporting the differential nitrosative response of M. truncatula plants treated with different concentrations of SNP. PMID:23838961

  16. Comparison of systemic and local interactions between the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae and the root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Franken, Philipp

    2014-08-01

    It has been shown in a number of pathosystems that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi confer resistance against root pathogens, including in interactions between Medicago truncatula and the root rot-causing oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches. For the current study of these interactions, a split root system was established for plant marker gene analysis in order to study systemic defense responses and to compare them with local interactions in conventional pot cultures. It turned out, however, that split root systems and pot cultures were in different physiological stages. Genes for pathogenesis-related proteins and for enzymes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis were generally more highly expressed in split root systems, accompanied by changes in RNA accumulation for genes encoding enzymes involved in phytohormone biosynthesis. Against expectations, the pathogen showed increased activity in these split root systems when the AM fungus Funneliformis mosseae was present separately in the distal part of the roots. Gene expression analysis revealed that this is associated in the pathogen-infected compartment with a systemic down-regulation of a gene coding for isochorismate synthase (ICS), a key enzyme of salicylic acid biosynthesis. At the same time, transcripts of genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins and for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of flavonoids accumulated to lower levels. In conventional pot cultures showing decreased A. euteiches activity in the presence of the AM fungus, the ICS gene was down regulated only if both the AM fungus and the pathogen were present in the root system. Such negative priming of salicylic acid biosynthesis could result in increased activities of jasmonate-regulated defense responses and could explain mycorrhiza-induced resistance. Altogether, this study shows that the split root system does not reflect a systemic interaction between F. mosseae and A. euteiches in M. truncatula and indicates the importance of testing such

  17. Pea aphid promotes amino acid metabolism both in Medicago truncatula and bacteriocytes to favor aphid population growth under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Li, Yuefei; Tong, Bin; Harris, Marvin; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Ge, Feng

    2013-10-01

    Rising atmospheric CO(2) levels can dilute the nitrogen (N) resource in plant tissue, which is disadvantageous to many herbivorous insects. Aphids appear to be an exception that warrants further study. The effects of elevated CO(2) (750 ppm vs. 390 ppm) were evaluated on N assimilation and transamination by two Medicago truncatula genotypes, a N-fixing-deficient mutant (dnf1) and its wild-type control (Jemalong), with and without pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) infestation. Elevated CO(2) increased population abundance and feeding efficiency of aphids fed on Jemalong, but reduced those on dnf1. Without aphid infestation, elevated CO(2) increased photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll content, nodule number, biomass, and pod number for Jemalong, but only increased pod number and chlorophyll content for dnf1. Furthermore, aphid infested Jemalong plants had enhanced activities of N assimilation-related enzymes (glutamine synthetase, Glutamate synthase) and transamination-related enzymes (glutamate oxalate transaminase, glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase), which presumably increased amino acid concentration in leaves and phloem sap under elevated CO(2). In contrast, aphid infested dnf1 plants had decreased activities of N assimilation-related enzymes and transmination-related enzymes and amino acid concentrations under elevated CO(2). Furthermore, elevated CO(2) up-regulated expression of genes relevant to amino acid metabolism in bacteriocytes of aphids associated with Jemalong, but down-regulated those associated with dnf1. Our results suggest that pea aphids actively elicit host responses that promote amino acid metabolism in both the host plant and in its bacteriocytes to favor the population growth of the aphid under elevated CO(2). PMID:23686968

  18. nip, a Symbiotic Medicago truncatula Mutant That Forms Root Nodules with Aberrant Infection Threads and Plant Defense-Like Response1

    PubMed Central

    Veereshlingam, Harita; Haynes, Janine G.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas R.; Sherrier, D. Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis, we isolated and studied a novel symbiotic mutant of the model legume Medicago truncatula, designated nip (numerous infections and polyphenolics). When grown on nitrogen-free media in the presence of the compatible bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nip mutant showed nitrogen deficiency symptoms. The mutant failed to form pink nitrogen-fixing nodules that occur in the wild-type symbiosis, but instead developed small bump-like nodules on its roots that were blocked at an early stage of development. Examination of the nip nodules by light microscopy after staining with X-Gal for S. meliloti expressing a constitutive GUS gene, by confocal microscopy following staining with SYTO-13, and by electron microscopy revealed that nip initiated symbiotic interactions and formed nodule primordia and infection threads. The infection threads in nip proliferated abnormally and very rarely deposited rhizobia into plant host cells; rhizobia failed to differentiate further in these cases. nip nodules contained autofluorescent cells and accumulated a brown pigment. Histochemical staining of nip nodules revealed this pigment to be polyphenolic accumulation. RNA blot analyses demonstrated that nip nodules expressed only a subset of genes associated with nodule organogenesis, as well as elevated expression of a host defense-associated phenylalanine ammonia lyase gene. nip plants were observed to have abnormal lateral roots. nip plant root growth and nodulation responded normally to ethylene inhibitors and precursors. Allelism tests showed that nip complements 14 other M. truncatula nodulation mutants but not latd, a mutant with a more severe nodulation phenotype as well as primary and lateral root defects. Thus, the nip mutant defines a new locus, NIP, required for appropriate infection thread development during invasion of the nascent nodule by rhizobia, normal lateral root elongation, and normal regulation of host defense-like responses

  19. A single gene, AIN, in Medicago truncatula mediates a hypersensitive response to both bluegreen aphid and pea aphid, but confers resistance only to bluegreen aphid

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, John P.; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Edwards, Owain R.; Singh, Karam B.

    2009-01-01

    Biotic stress in plants frequently induces a hypersensitive response (HR). This distinctive reaction has been studied intensively in several pathosystems and has shed light on the biology of defence signalling. Compared with microbial pathogens, relatively little is known about the role of the HR in defence against insects. Reference genotype A17 of Medicago truncatula Gaertn., a model legume, responds to aphids of the genus Acyrthosiphon with necrotic lesions resembling a HR. In this study, the biochemical nature of this response, its mode of inheritance, and its relationship with defence against aphids were investigated. The necrotic lesion phenotype and resistance to the bluegreen aphid (BGA, Acyrthosiphon kondoi Shinji) and the pea aphid (PA, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)) were analysed using reference genotypes A17 and A20, their F2 progeny and recombinant inbred lines. BGA-induced necrotic lesions co-localized with the production of H2O2, consistent with an oxidative burst widely associated with hypersensitivity. This HR correlated with stronger resistance to BGA in A17 than in A20; these phenotypes cosegregated as a semi-dominant gene, AIN (Acyrthosiphon-induced necrosis). In contrast to BGA, stronger resistance to PA in A17, compared with A20, did not cosegregate with a PA-induced HR. The AIN locus resides in a cluster of sequences predicted to encode the CC-NBS-LRR subfamily of resistance proteins. AIN-mediated resistance presents a novel opportunity to use a model plant and model aphid to study the role of the HR in defence responses to phloem-feeding insects. PMID:19690018

  20. High toxicity and specificity of the saponin 3-GlcA-28-AraRhaxyl-medicagenate, from Medicago truncatula seeds, for Sitophilus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because of the increasingly concern of consumers and public policy about problems for environment and for public health due to chemical pesticides, the search for molecules more safe is currently of great importance. Particularly, plants are able to fight the pathogens as insects, bacteria or fungi; so that plants could represent a valuable source of new molecules. Results It was observed that Medicago truncatula seed flour displayed a strong toxic activity towards the adults of the rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera), a major pest of stored cereals. The molecule responsible for toxicity was purified, by solvent extraction and HPLC, and identified as a saponin, namely 3-GlcA-28-AraRhaxyl-medicagenate. Saponins are detergents, and the CMC of this molecule was found to be 0.65 mg per mL. Neither the worm Caenorhabditis elegans nor the bacteria E. coli were found to be sensitive to this saponin, but growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was inhibited at concentrations higher than 100 μg per mL. The purified molecule is toxic for the adults of the rice weevils at concentrations down to 100 μg per g of food, but this does not apply to the others insects tested, including the coleopteran Tribolium castaneum and the Sf9 insect cultured cells. Conclusions This specificity for the weevil led us to investigate this saponin potential for pest control and to propose the hypothesis that this saponin has a specific mode of action, rather than acting via its non-specific detergent properties. PMID:22536832

  1. Contribution of NFP LysM Domains to the Recognition of Nod Factors during the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bensmihen, Sandra; de Billy, Françoise; Gough, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The root nodule nitrogen fixing symbiosis between legume plants and soil bacteria called rhizobia is of great agronomical and ecological interest since it provides the plant with fixed atmospheric nitrogen. The establishment of this symbiosis is mediated by the recognition by the host plant of lipo-chitooligosaccharides called Nod Factors (NFs), produced by the rhizobia. This recognition is highly specific, as precise NF structures are required depending on the host plant. Here, we study the importance of different LysM domains of a LysM-Receptor Like Kinase (LysM-RLK) from Medicago truncatula called Nod factor perception (NFP) in the recognition of different substitutions of NFs produced by its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These substitutions are a sulphate group at the reducing end, which is essential for host specificity, and a specific acyl chain at the non-reducing end, that is critical for the infection process. The NFP extracellular domain (ECD) contains 3 LysM domains that are predicted to bind NFs. By swapping the whole ECD or individual LysM domains of NFP for those of its orthologous gene from pea, SYM10 (a legume plant that interacts with another strain of rhizobium producing NFs with different substitutions), we showed that NFP is not directly responsible for specific recognition of the sulphate substitution of S. meliloti NFs, but probably interacts with the acyl substitution. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the NFP LysM2 domain for rhizobial infection and we have pinpointed the importance of a single leucine residue of LysM2 in that step of the symbiosis. Together, our data put into new perspective the recognition of NFs in the different steps of symbiosis in M. truncatula, emphasising the probable existence of a missing component for early NF recognition and reinforcing the important role of NFP for NF recognition during rhizobial infection. PMID:22087221

  2. Deep Sequencing of the Medicago truncatula Root Transcriptome Reveals a Massive and Early Interaction between Nodulation Factor and Ethylene Signals1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Riely, Brendan K.; Kim, Sang Cheol; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Yu, Hee-Ju; Hwang, Hyun-Ju; Oh, Mijin; Kim, Goon Bo; Surendrarao, Anandkumar K.; Chasman, Deborah; Siahpirani, Alireza F.; Penmetsa, Ramachandra V.; Lee, Gang-Seob; Kim, Namshin; Roy, Sushmita; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Cook, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    The legume-rhizobium symbiosis is initiated through the activation of the Nodulation (Nod) factor-signaling cascade, leading to a rapid reprogramming of host cell developmental pathways. In this work, we combine transcriptome sequencing with molecular genetics and network analysis to quantify and categorize the transcriptional changes occurring in roots of Medicago truncatula from minutes to days after inoculation with Sinorhizobium medicae. To identify the nature of the inductive and regulatory cues, we employed mutants with absent or decreased Nod factor sensitivities (i.e. Nodulation factor perception and Lysine motif domain-containing receptor-like kinase3, respectively) and an ethylene (ET)-insensitive, Nod factor-hypersensitive mutant (sickle). This unique data set encompasses nine time points, allowing observation of the symbiotic regulation of diverse biological processes with high temporal resolution. Among the many outputs of the study is the early Nod factor-induced, ET-regulated expression of ET signaling and biosynthesis genes. Coupled with the observation of massive transcriptional derepression in the ET-insensitive background, these results suggest that Nod factor signaling activates ET production to attenuate its own signal. Promoter:β-glucuronidase fusions report ET biosynthesis both in root hairs responding to rhizobium as well as in meristematic tissue during nodule organogenesis and growth, indicating that ET signaling functions at multiple developmental stages during symbiosis. In addition, we identified thousands of novel candidate genes undergoing Nod factor-dependent, ET-regulated expression. We leveraged the power of this large data set to model Nod factor- and ET-regulated signaling networks using MERLIN, a regulatory network inference algorithm. These analyses predict key nodes regulating the biological process impacted by Nod factor perception. We have made these results available to the research community through a searchable online

  3. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula under salt stress identified a novel CBF transcription factor MtCBF4 that plays an important role in abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Salt stress hinders the growth of plants and reduces crop production worldwide. However, different plant species might possess different adaptive mechanisms to mitigate salt stress. We conducted a detailed pathway analysis of transcriptional dynamics in the roots of Medicago truncatula seedlings under salt stress and selected a transcription factor gene, MtCBF4, for experimental validation. Results A microarray experiment was conducted using root samples collected 6, 24, and 48 h after application of 180 mM NaCl. Analysis of 11 statistically significant expression profiles revealed different behaviors between primary and secondary metabolism pathways in response to external stress. Secondary metabolism that helps to maintain osmotic balance was induced. One of the highly induced transcription factor genes was successfully cloned, and was named MtCBF4. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MtCBF4, which belongs to the AP2-EREBP transcription factor family, is a novel member of the CBF transcription factor in M. truncatula. MtCBF4 is shown to be a nuclear-localized protein. Expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula was induced by most of the abiotic stresses, including salt, drought, cold, and abscisic acid, suggesting crosstalk between these abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis over-expressing MtCBF4 enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress, and activated expression of downstream genes that contain DRE elements. Over-expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula also enhanced salt tolerance and induced expression level of corresponding downstream genes. Conclusion Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis revealed complex mechanisms exist in plants in response to salt stress. The novel transcription factor gene MtCBF4 identified here played an important role in response to abiotic stresses, indicating that it might be a good candidate gene for genetic improvement to produce stress-tolerant plants. PMID:21718548

  4. Production of transgenic barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaernt.) using the ipt-type MAT vector system and impairment of Recombinase-mediated excision events.

    PubMed

    Scaramelli, L; Balestrazzi, A; Bonadei, M; Piano, E; Carbonera, D; Confalonieri, M

    2009-02-01

    Expression of the uidA reporter gene was tested in transformation experiments of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaertn.) with the ipt-type control vectors pIPT5, pIPT10 and pIPT20 and distinct in vitro culture conditions. The highest GUS expression levels were obtained with the pIPT10 construct carrying the ipt gene under the control of the native ipt promoter and using kanamycin as selective agent. The ipt-shooty transformants, characterized by the absence of both rooting ability and apical dominance associated with vitrification, were easily identified by visual selection. Using only the ipt gene as selectable marker, we obtained a stable transformation frequency of 9.8% with pIPT10 construct. The ipt-type MAT vector pEXM2 was then used to monitor the excision events mediated by the yeast Recombinase and the consequent production of ipt marker-free transgenic plants. Transgenic ipt-shooty lines were recovered at a frequency of 7.9% in the absence of kanamycin-based selection. The ipt-shooty phenotype was maintained in all the transgenic lines and no reversion to the normal phenotype occurred. PCR analysis revealed the presence of the 'hit and run' cassette in the genome of all the regenerated ipt-shooty lines while RT-PCR experiments confirmed the expression of the R gene, encoding the yeast Recombinase. A detailed molecular investigation, carried out to verify the integrity of the RS sites, revealed that these regions were intact in most cases. Our results with barrel medic suggest that the MAT system must be carefully evaluated and discussed on a case by case basis. PMID:19011862

  5. Structural Studies of Medicago truncatula Histidinol Phosphate Phosphatase from Inositol Monophosphatase Superfamily Reveal Details of Penultimate Step of Histidine Biosynthesis in Plants.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-05-01

    The penultimate enzyme in the histidine biosynthetic pathway catalyzes dephosphorylation of l-histidinol 1-phosphate (HOLP) into l-histidinol. The recently discovered in Arabidopsis thaliana plant-type histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) shares no homology with the two other HPP superfamilies known previously in prokaryotes and resembles myo-inositol monophosphatases (IMPases). In this work, identification of an HPP enzyme from a model legume, Medicago truncatula (MtHPP) was based on the highest sequence identity to A. thaliana enzyme. Biochemical assays confirmed that MtHPP was able to cleave inorganic phosphate from HOLP but not from d-myo-inositol-1-phosphate, the main substrate of IMPases. Dimers of MtHPP, determined by size exclusion chromatography, in the presence of CO2 or formaldehyde form mutual, methylene-bridged cross-links between Lys(158) and Cys(245) residues. Four high resolution crystal structures, namely complexes with HOLP (substrate), l-histidinol (product), and PO4 (3-) (by-product) as well as the structure showing the cross-linking between two MtHPP molecules, provide detailed structural information on the enzyme. Based on the crystal structures, the enzymatic reaction mechanism of IMPases is accustomed to fit the data for MtHPP. The enzymatic reaction, which requires Mg(2+) cations, is catalyzed mainly by amino acid residues from the N-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain, sharing little identity with IMPases, is responsible for the substrate specificity (i.e. allows the enzyme to distinguish between HOLP and d-myo-inositol-1-phosphate). Structural features, mainly the presence of a conserved Asp(246), allow MtHPP to bind HOLP specifically. PMID:26994138

  6. Effect of Microgravity on Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Initial Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species of the legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiment one was designed to determine if S. meliloti infect M. truncatula and initiate physiological changes associated with nodule formation. Roots of five-day-old M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 (Enodll::gus) were inoculated 24 hr before launch with either S. meliloti strain 1021 or strain ABS7 and integrated into BRIC-PDFU hardware placed in a 4 C Cold Bag for launch on Atlantis. Inoculated plants and uninoculated controls were maintained in the dark at ambient temperature in the middeck of STS-135 for 11 days before fixation in RNAlater(tM) by crew activation of the PDFU. Experiment two was designed to determine if microgravity altered the process of bacterial infection and host plant nodule formation. Seeds of two M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 lines, the Enodll::gus used in experiment 1, and SUNN, a super-nodulating mutant of A17, were germinated on orbit for 11 days in the middeck cabin and returned to Earth alive inside of BRIC-PDFU's at 4 C. S. meliloti strains 1021 and ABS7 were cultivated separately in broth culture on orbit and also returned to Earth alive. After landing, flight- and groundgrown plants and bacteria were transferred from BRIC-PDFU's into Nunc(tm) 4-well plates for reciprocity crosses. Rates of plant growth and nodule development on Buffered Nodulation Medium (lacking nitrogen) were measured for 14 days. Preliminary analysis' of Experiment 1 confirms that

  7. Nod Factor Effects on Root Hair-Specific Transcriptome of Medicago truncatula: Focus on Plasma Membrane Transport Systems and Reactive Oxygen Species Networks.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Isabelle; Drain, Alice; Guichard, Marjorie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Boscari, Alexandre; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Brunaud, Véronique; Cottaz, Sylvain; Rancurel, Corinne; Da Rocha, Martine; Fizames, Cécile; Fort, Sébastien; Gaillard, Isabelle; Maillol, Vincent; Danchin, Etienne G J; Rouached, Hatem; Samain, Eric; Su, Yan-Hua; Thouin, Julien; Touraine, Bruno; Puppo, Alain; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Pauly, Nicolas; Sentenac, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and thereby in plant autotrophy. In legumes, they also play a crucial role in establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. To obtain a holistic view of Medicago truncatula genes expressed in root hairs and of their regulation during the first hours of the engagement in rhizobial symbiotic interaction, a high throughput RNA sequencing on isolated root hairs from roots challenged or not with lipochitooligosaccharides Nod factors (NF) for 4 or 20 h was carried out. This provided a repertoire of genes displaying expression in root hairs, responding or not to NF, and specific or not to legumes. In analyzing the transcriptome dataset, special attention was paid to pumps, transporters, or channels active at the plasma membrane, to other proteins likely to play a role in nutrient ion uptake, NF electrical and calcium signaling, control of the redox status or the dynamic reprogramming of root hair transcriptome induced by NF treatment, and to the identification of papilionoid legume-specific genes expressed in root hairs. About 10% of the root hair expressed genes were significantly up- or down-regulated by NF treatment, suggesting their involvement in remodeling plant functions to allow establishment of the symbiotic relationship. For instance, NF-induced changes in expression of genes encoding plasma membrane transport systems or disease response proteins indicate that root hairs reduce their involvement in nutrient ion absorption and adapt their immune system in order to engage in the symbiotic interaction. It also appears that the redox status of root hair cells is tuned in response to NF perception. In addition, 1176 genes that could be considered as "papilionoid legume-specific" were identified in the M. truncatula root hair transcriptome, from which 141 were found to possess an ortholog in every of the six legume genomes that we considered, suggesting their involvement in essential functions specific to legumes. This

  8. The non-specific lipid transfer protein N5 of Medicago truncatula is implicated in epidermal stages of rhizobium-host interaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The symbiotic interaction between leguminous plants and rhizobia involves two processes: bacterial infection, resulting in the penetration of bacteria in epidermal and cortical cells, and root nodule organogenesis. Root nodule symbiosis is activated by rhizobial signalling molecules, called Nodulation factors (NFs). NF perception induces the expression of several genes called early nodulins. The early nodulin N5 of Medicago truncatula is a lipid transfer protein that has been shown to positively regulate nodulation although it displays in vitro inhibitory activity against Sinorhizobium meliloti. The purpose of this work was to investigate the role of MtN5 by studying its spatial and temporal pattern of expression during the symbiotic interaction, also in relation to known components of the symbiotic signalling pathway, and by analysing the phenotypic alterations displayed by rhizobia-inoculated MtN5-silenced roots. Results We show here that MtN5 is a NF-responsive gene expressed at a very early phase of symbiosis in epidermal cells and root hairs. MtN5 expression is induced in vitro by rhizobial effector molecules and by auxin and cytokinin, phytohormones involved in nodule organogenesis. Furthermore, lipid signaling is implicated in the response of MtN5 to rhizobia, since the activity of phospholipase D is required for MtN5 induction in S. meliloti-inoculated roots. MtN5-silenced roots inoculated with rhizobia display an increased root hair curling and a reduced number of invaded primordia compared to that in wild type roots, but with no impairment to nodule primordia formation. This phenotype is associated with the stimulation of ENOD11 expression, an early marker of infection, and with the down-regulation of Flotillin 4 (FLOT4), a protein involved in rhizobial entry. Conclusions These data indicate that MtN5 acts downstream of NF perception and upstream of FLOT4 in regulating pre-infection events. The positive effect of MtN5 on nodule primordia

  9. Genes Conferring Copper Resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 Also Promote the Growth of Medicago lupulina in Copper-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhefei; Ma, Zhanqiang; Hao, Xiuli; Rensing, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020, isolated from root nodules of Medicago lupulina growing in gold mine tailings in the northwest of China, displayed both copper resistance and growth promotion of leguminous plants in copper-contaminated soil. Nevertheless, the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for copper resistance in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 remained uncharacterized. To investigate genes involved in copper resistance, an S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 Tn5 insertion library of 14,000 mutants was created. Five copper-sensitive mutants, named SXa-1, SXa-2, SXc-1, SXc-2, and SXn, were isolated, and the disrupted regions involved were identified by inverse PCR and subsequent sequencing. Both SXa-1 and SXa-2 carried a transposon insertion in lpxXL (SM0020_18047), encoding the LpxXL C-28 acyltransferase; SXc-1 and SXc-2 carried a transposon insertion in merR (SM0020_29390), encoding the regulatory activator; SXn contained a transposon insertion in omp (SM0020_18792), encoding a hypothetical outer membrane protein. The results of reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) combined with transposon gene disruptions revealed that SM0020_05862, encoding an unusual P-type ATPase, was regulated by the MerR protein. Analysis of the genome sequence showed that this P-type ATPase did not contain an N-terminal metal-binding domain or a CPC motif but rather TPCP compared with CopA from Escherichia coli. Pot experiments were carried out to determine whether growth and copper accumulation of the host plant M. lupulina were affected in the presence of the wild type or the different mutants. Soil samples were subjected to three levels of copper contamination, namely, the uncontaminated control and 47.36 and 142.08 mg/kg, and three replicates were conducted for each treatment. The results showed that the wild-type S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 enabled the host plant to grow better and accumulate copper ions. The plant dry weight and copper content of M. lupulina inoculated with the 5 copper

  10. Nod Factor Effects on Root Hair-Specific Transcriptome of Medicago truncatula: Focus on Plasma Membrane Transport Systems and Reactive Oxygen Species Networks

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Isabelle; Drain, Alice; Guichard, Marjorie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Boscari, Alexandre; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Brunaud, Véronique; Cottaz, Sylvain; Rancurel, Corinne; Da Rocha, Martine; Fizames, Cécile; Fort, Sébastien; Gaillard, Isabelle; Maillol, Vincent; Danchin, Etienne G. J.; Rouached, Hatem; Samain, Eric; Su, Yan-Hua; Thouin, Julien; Touraine, Bruno; Puppo, Alain; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Pauly, Nicolas; Sentenac, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and thereby in plant autotrophy. In legumes, they also play a crucial role in establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. To obtain a holistic view of Medicago truncatula genes expressed in root hairs and of their regulation during the first hours of the engagement in rhizobial symbiotic interaction, a high throughput RNA sequencing on isolated root hairs from roots challenged or not with lipochitooligosaccharides Nod factors (NF) for 4 or 20 h was carried out. This provided a repertoire of genes displaying expression in root hairs, responding or not to NF, and specific or not to legumes. In analyzing the transcriptome dataset, special attention was paid to pumps, transporters, or channels active at the plasma membrane, to other proteins likely to play a role in nutrient ion uptake, NF electrical and calcium signaling, control of the redox status or the dynamic reprogramming of root hair transcriptome induced by NF treatment, and to the identification of papilionoid legume-specific genes expressed in root hairs. About 10% of the root hair expressed genes were significantly up- or down-regulated by NF treatment, suggesting their involvement in remodeling plant functions to allow establishment of the symbiotic relationship. For instance, NF-induced changes in expression of genes encoding plasma membrane transport systems or disease response proteins indicate that root hairs reduce their involvement in nutrient ion absorption and adapt their immune system in order to engage in the symbiotic interaction. It also appears that the redox status of root hair cells is tuned in response to NF perception. In addition, 1176 genes that could be considered as “papilionoid legume-specific” were identified in the M. truncatula root hair transcriptome, from which 141 were found to possess an ortholog in every of the six legume genomes that we considered, suggesting their involvement in essential functions specific to legumes. This

  11. Impact of Soil Salinity on the Structure of the Bacterial Endophytic Community Identified from the Roots of Caliph Medic (Medicago truncatula)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lawati, Abbas; Jana, Gerry Aplang; Vishwas Patankar, Himanshu; Glick, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being a forage crop, Caliph medic (Medicago truncatula) is also a model legume plant and is used for research focusing on the molecular characterization of the interaction between rhizobia and plants. However, the endophytic microbiome in this plant is poorly defined. Endophytic bacteria play a role in supplying plants with the basic requirements necessary for growth and development. Moreover, these bacteria also play a role in the mechanism of salinity stress adaptation in plants. As a prelude to the isolation and utilization of these bacteria in Caliph medic farming, 41 bacterial OTUs were identified in this project from within the interior of the roots of this plant by pyrosequencing of the small ribosomal subunit gene (16S rDNA) using a cultivation-independent approach. In addition, the differential abundance of these bacteria was studied following exposure of the plants to salinity stress. About 29,064 high-quality reads were obtained from the sequencing of six libraries prepared from control and salinity-treated tissues. Statistical analysis revealed that the abundance of ~70% of the OTUs was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) altered in roots that were exposed to salinity stress. Sequence analysis showed a similarity between some of the identified species and other, known, growth-promoting bacteria, marine and salt-stressed soil-borne bacteria, and nitrogen-fixing bacterial isolates. Determination of the amendments to the bacterial community due to salinity stress in Caliph medic provides a crucial step toward developing an understanding of the association of these endophytes, under salt stress conditions, in this model plant. To provide direct evidence regarding their growth promoting activity, a group of endophytic bacteria were isolated from inside of plant roots using a cultivation-dependent approach. Several of these isolates were able to produce ACC-deaminase, ammonia and IAA; and to solubilize Zn+2 and PO4-3. This data is consistent with the

  12. Impact of Soil Salinity on the Structure of the Bacterial Endophytic Community Identified from the Roots of Caliph Medic (Medicago truncatula).

    PubMed

    Yaish, Mahmoud W; Al-Lawati, Abbas; Jana, Gerry Aplang; Vishwas Patankar, Himanshu; Glick, Bernard R

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being a forage crop, Caliph medic (Medicago truncatula) is also a model legume plant and is used for research focusing on the molecular characterization of the interaction between rhizobia and plants. However, the endophytic microbiome in this plant is poorly defined. Endophytic bacteria play a role in supplying plants with the basic requirements necessary for growth and development. Moreover, these bacteria also play a role in the mechanism of salinity stress adaptation in plants. As a prelude to the isolation and utilization of these bacteria in Caliph medic farming, 41 bacterial OTUs were identified in this project from within the interior of the roots of this plant by pyrosequencing of the small ribosomal subunit gene (16S rDNA) using a cultivation-independent approach. In addition, the differential abundance of these bacteria was studied following exposure of the plants to salinity stress. About 29,064 high-quality reads were obtained from the sequencing of six libraries prepared from control and salinity-treated tissues. Statistical analysis revealed that the abundance of ~70% of the OTUs was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) altered in roots that were exposed to salinity stress. Sequence analysis showed a similarity between some of the identified species and other, known, growth-promoting bacteria, marine and salt-stressed soil-borne bacteria, and nitrogen-fixing bacterial isolates. Determination of the amendments to the bacterial community due to salinity stress in Caliph medic provides a crucial step toward developing an understanding of the association of these endophytes, under salt stress conditions, in this model plant. To provide direct evidence regarding their growth promoting activity, a group of endophytic bacteria were isolated from inside of plant roots using a cultivation-dependent approach. Several of these isolates were able to produce ACC-deaminase, ammonia and IAA; and to solubilize Zn+2 and PO4-3. This data is consistent with the

  13. Henrique da Rocha Lima.

    PubMed

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; Avelleira, João Carlos Regazzi

    2015-01-01

    Brazilian physician and researcher Henrique da Rocha Lima was born in 1879 in the city of Rio de Janeiro, where he studied medicine and obtained the degree of M.D. in 1901. He specialized in Clinical Medicine in Germany and was the ambassador in European countries of the scientific medicine that emerged from the Oswaldo Cruz Institute in the early twentieth century. Rocha Lima has discovered the causative agent of typhus and had a major contribution to the studies of yellow fever, Chagas disease, Carrión's disease and histoplasmosis. His genius, his research and his discoveries projected his name, and, with it, the image of Brazil in the international scientific scene. PMID:26131867

  14. Henrique da Rocha Lima*

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; Avelleira, João Carlos Regazzi

    2015-01-01

    Brazilian physician and researcher Henrique da Rocha Lima was born in 1879 in the city of Rio de Janeiro, where he studied medicine and obtained the degree of M.D. in 1901. He specialized in Clinical Medicine in Germany and was the ambassador in European countries of the scientific medicine that emerged from the Oswaldo Cruz Institute in the early twentieth century. Rocha Lima has discovered the causative agent of typhus and had a major contribution to the studies of yellow fever, Chagas disease, Carrión’s disease and histoplasmosis. His genius, his research and his discoveries projected his name, and, with it, the image of Brazil in the international scientific scene. PMID:26131867

  15. Phytotoxicity of three plant-based biodiesels, unmodified castor oil, and Diesel fuel to alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), radish (Raphanus sativus), and wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Bamgbose, Ifeoluwa; Anderson, Todd A

    2015-12-01

    The wide use of plant-based oils and their derivatives, in particular biodiesel, have increased extensively over the past decade to help alleviate demand for petroleum products and improve the greenhouse gas emissions profile of the transportation sector. Biodiesel is regarded as a clean burning alternative fuel produced from livestock feeds and various vegetable oils. Although in theory these animal and/or plant derived fuels should have less environmental impact in soil based on their simplified composition relative to Diesel, they pose an environmental risk like Diesel at high concentrations when disposed. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the phytotoxicity of three different plant-derived biodiesels relative to conventional Diesel. For phytotoxicological analysis, we used seeds of four crop plants, Medicago sativa, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus, and Triticum aestivum to analyze the germination of seeds in contaminated soil samples. The toxicological experiment was conducted with two different soil textures: sandy loam soil and silt loam soil. The studied plant-based biodiesels were safflower methyl-ester, castor methyl ester, and castor ethyl-ester. Biodiesel toxicity was more evident at high concentrations, affecting the germination and survival of small-seeded plants to a greater extent. Tolerance of plants to the biodiesels varied between plant species and soil textures. With the exception of R. sativus, all plant species were affected and exhibited some sensitivity to the fuels, such as delayed seedling emergence and slow germination (average=10 days) at high soil concentrations (0.85% for Diesel and 1.76% for the biodiesels). Tolerance of plants to soil contamination had a species-specific nature, and on average, decreased in the following order: Raphanus sativus (0-20%)>Triticum aestivum (10-40%) ≥ Medicago sativa> Lactuca sativa (80-100%). Thus, we conclude that there is some phytotoxicity associated with plant-based biodiesels. Further

  16. The nitrate transporter MtNPF6.8 (MtNRT1.3) transports abscisic acid and mediates nitrate regulation of primary root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Pellizzaro, Anthoni; Clochard, Thibault; Cukier, Caroline; Bourdin, Céline; Juchaux, Marjorie; Montrichard, Françoise; Thany, Steeve; Raymond, Valérie; Planchet, Elisabeth; Limami, Anis M; Morère-Le Paven, Marie-Christine

    2014-12-01

    Elongation of the primary root during postgermination of Medicago truncatula seedlings is a multigenic trait that is responsive to exogenous nitrate. A quantitative genetic approach suggested the involvement of the nitrate transporter MtNPF6.8 (for Medicago truncatula NITRATE TRANSPORTER1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER Family6.8) in the inhibition of primary root elongation by high exogenous nitrate. In this study, the inhibitory effect of nitrate on primary root elongation, via inhibition of elongation of root cortical cells, was abolished in npf6.8 knockdown lines. Accordingly, we propose that MtNPF6.8 mediates nitrate inhibitory effects on primary root growth in M. truncatula. pMtNPF6.8:GUS promoter-reporter gene fusion in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-generated transgenic roots showed the expression of MtNPF6.8 in the pericycle region of primary roots and lateral roots, and in lateral root primordia and tips. MtNPF6.8 expression was insensitive to auxin and was stimulated by abscisic acid (ABA), which restored the inhibitory effect of nitrate in npf6.8 knockdown lines. It is then proposed that ABA acts downstream of MtNPF6.8 in this nitrate signaling pathway. Furthermore, MtNPF6.8 was shown to transport ABA in Xenopus spp. oocytes, suggesting an additional role of MtNPF6.8 in ABA root-to-shoot translocation. (15)NO3(-)-influx experiments showed that only the inducible component of the low-affinity transport system was affected in npf6.8 knockdown lines. This indicates that MtNPF6.8 is a major contributor to the inducible component of the low-affinity transport system. The short-term induction by nitrate of the expression of Nitrate Reductase1 (NR1) and NR2 (genes that encode two nitrate reductase isoforms) was greatly reduced in the npf6.8 knockdown lines, supporting a role of MtNPF6.8 in the primary nitrate response in M. truncatula. PMID:25367858

  17. The C2H2 Transcription Factor REGULATOR OF SYMBIOSOME DIFFERENTIATION Represses Transcription of the Secretory Pathway Gene VAMP721a and Promotes Symbiosome Development in Medicago truncatula[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sinharoy, Senjuti; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Bandyopadhyay, Kaustav; Kereszt, Attila; Pislariu, Catalina I.; Nakashima, Jin; Benedito, Vagner A.; Kondorosi, Eva; Udvardi, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are thought to regulate many aspects of nodule and symbiosis development in legumes, although few TFs have been characterized functionally. Here, we describe REGULATOR OF SYMBIOSOME DIFFERENTIATION (RSD) of Medicago truncatula, a member of the Cysteine-2/Histidine-2 (C2H2) family of plant TFs that is required for normal symbiosome differentiation during nodule development. RSD is expressed in a nodule-specific manner, with maximal transcript levels in the bacterial invasion zone. A tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) retrotransposon (Tnt1) insertion rsd mutant produced nodules that were unable to fix nitrogen and that contained incompletely differentiated symbiosomes and bacteroids. RSD protein was localized to the nucleus, consistent with a role of the protein in transcriptional regulation. RSD acted as a transcriptional repressor in a heterologous yeast assay. Transcriptome analysis of an rsd mutant identified 11 genes as potential targets of RSD repression. RSD interacted physically with the promoter of one of these genes, VAMP721a, which encodes vesicle-associated membrane protein 721a. Thus, RSD may influence symbiosome development in part by repressing transcription of VAMP721a and modifying vesicle trafficking in nodule cells. This establishes RSD as a TF implicated directly in symbiosome and bacteroid differentiation and a transcriptional regulator of secretory pathway genes in plants. PMID:24082011

  18. Expression of the R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor TaMYB14 from Trifolium arvense Activates Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis in the Legumes Trifolium repens and Medicago sativa1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Kerry R.; Collette, Vern; Fraser, Karl; Greig, Margaret; Xue, Hong; Richardson, Kim; Jones, Chris; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are oligomeric flavonoids and one group of end products of the phenylpropanoid pathway. PAs have been reported to be beneficial for human and animal health and are particularly important in pastoral agricultural systems for improved animal production and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, the main forage legumes grown in these systems, such as Trifolium repens and Medicago sativa, do not contain any substantial amounts of PAs in leaves. We have identified from the foliar PA-accumulating legume Trifolium arvense an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, TaMYB14, and provide evidence that this transcription factor is involved in the regulation of PA biosynthesis in legumes. TaMYB14 expression is necessary and sufficient to up-regulate late steps of the phenylpropanoid pathway and to induce PA biosynthesis. RNA interference silencing of TaMYB14 resulted in almost complete cessation of PA biosynthesis in T. arvense, whereas Nicotiana tabacum, M. sativa, and T. repens plants constitutively expressing TaMYB14 synthesized and accumulated PAs in leaves up to 1.8% dry matter. Targeted liquid chromatography-multistage tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified foliar PAs up to degree of polymerization 6 in leaf extracts. Hence, genetically modified M. sativa and T. repens plants expressing TaMYB14 provide a viable option for improving animal health and mitigating the negative environmental impacts of pastoral animal production systems. PMID:22566493

  19. Leonardo da Vinci and the Downburst.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    1990-05-01

    Evidence from the drawings, experiments, and writings of Leonardo da Vinci are presented to demonstrate that da Vinci recognized and, possibly, discovered the downburst and understood its associated airflow. Other early references to vortex flows resembling downbursts are mentioned.

  20. Gene-Silencing-Induced Changes in Carbohydrate Conformation in Relation to Bioenergy Value and Carbohydrate Subfractions in Modeled Plant (Medicago sativa) with Down-Regulation of HB12 and TT8 Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Zhang, Yonggen; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Gene silencing with RNA interference (RNAi) technology may be capable of modifying internal structure at a molecular level. This structural modification could affect biofunctions in terms of biodegradation, biochemical metabolism, and bioactive compound availability. The objectives of this study were to (1) Detect gene silencing-induced changes in carbohydrate molecular structure in an alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa spp. sativa: alfalfa) with down-regulation of genes that encode transcription factors TT8 and HB12; (2) Determine gene silencing-induced changes in nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa); and (3) Quantify the correlation between gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes and the nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in animals of ruminants. The experimental treatments included: T1 = Non-transgenic and no-gene silenced alfalfa forage (code "NT"); T2 = HB12-RNAi forage with HB12 gene down regulation (code "HB12"); T3 = TT8-RNAi forage with TT8 gene down regulation (code "TT8"). The HB12 and TT8 gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes were determined by non-invasive and non-destructive advanced molecular spectroscopy in a middle infrared radiation region that focused on structural, non-structural and total carbohydrate compounds. The nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability of the modified forage were determined using NRC-2001 system in terms of total digestive nutrient (TDN), truly digestible fiber (tdNDF), non-fiber carbohydrate (tdNDF), fatty acid (tdFA), crude protein (tdCP) and bioenergy profiles (digestible energy, metabolizable energy, net energy) for ruminants. The carbohydrate subfractions were evaluated using the updated CNCPS 6.0 system. The results showed that gene silencing significantly affected tdNFC (42.3 (NT) vs. 38.7 (HB12) vs. 37.4% Dry Matter (TT8); p = 0.016) and tdCP (20.8 (NT) vs. 19.4 (HB12) vs. 22.3% DM (TT8); p = 0.009). The gene-silencing also affected

  1. Gene-Silencing-Induced Changes in Carbohydrate Conformation in Relation to Bioenergy Value and Carbohydrate Subfractions in Modeled Plant (Medicago sativa) with Down-Regulation of HB12 and TT8 Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Zhang, Yonggen; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Gene silencing with RNA interference (RNAi) technology may be capable of modifying internal structure at a molecular level. This structural modification could affect biofunctions in terms of biodegradation, biochemical metabolism, and bioactive compound availability. The objectives of this study were to (1) Detect gene silencing-induced changes in carbohydrate molecular structure in an alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa spp. sativa: alfalfa) with down-regulation of genes that encode transcription factors TT8 and HB12; (2) Determine gene silencing-induced changes in nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa); and (3) Quantify the correlation between gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes and the nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in animals of ruminants. The experimental treatments included: T1 = Non-transgenic and no-gene silenced alfalfa forage (code “NT”); T2 = HB12-RNAi forage with HB12 gene down regulation (code “HB12”); T3 = TT8-RNAi forage with TT8 gene down regulation (code “TT8”). The HB12 and TT8 gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes were determined by non-invasive and non-destructive advanced molecular spectroscopy in a middle infrared radiation region that focused on structural, non-structural and total carbohydrate compounds. The nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability of the modified forage were determined using NRC-2001 system in terms of total digestive nutrient (TDN), truly digestible fiber (tdNDF), non-fiber carbohydrate (tdNDF), fatty acid (tdFA), crude protein (tdCP) and bioenergy profiles (digestible energy, metabolizable energy, net energy) for ruminants. The carbohydrate subfractions were evaluated using the updated CNCPS 6.0 system. The results showed that gene silencing significantly affected tdNFC (42.3 (NT) vs. 38.7 (HB12) vs. 37.4% Dry Matter (TT8); p = 0.016) and tdCP (20.8 (NT) vs. 19.4 (HB12) vs. 22.3% DM (TT8); p = 0.009). The gene-silencing also

  2. The structure of Medicago truncatula δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase provides new insights into regulation of proline biosynthesis in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Boguslaw; Forlani, Giuseppe; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2015-10-30

    The two pathways for proline biosynthesis in higher plants share the last step, the conversion of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) to L-proline, which is catalyzed by P5C reductase (P5CR, EC 1.5.1.2) with the use of NAD(P)H as a coenzyme. There is increasing amount of evidence to suggest a complex regulation of P5CR activity at the post-translational level, yet the molecular basis of these mechanisms is unknown. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of the P5CR enzyme from the model legume Medicago truncatula (Mt). The crystal structures of unliganded MtP5CR decamer, and its complexes with the products NAD+, NADP+, and L-proline were refined using x-ray diffraction data (at 1.7, 1.85, 1.95, and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively). Based on the presented structural data, the coenzyme preference for NADPH over NADH was explained, and NADPH is suggested to be the only coenzyme used by MtP5CR in vivo. Moreover, the insensitivity of MtP5CR to feed-back inhibition by proline, revealed by enzymatic analysis, was correlated with structural features. Additionally, a mechanism for the modulation of enzyme activity by chloride anions is discussed, as well as the rationale for the possible development of effective enzyme inhibitors.

  3. Toxicogenomic Responses of the Model Legume Medicago truncatula to Aged Biosolids Containing a Mixture of Nanomaterials (TiO₂, Ag, and ZnO) from a Pilot Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Unrine, Jason M; Judy, Jonathan D; Lewis, Ricky W; Guo, Jing; McNear, David H; Tsyusko, Olga V

    2015-07-21

    Toxicogenomic responses in Medicago truncatula A17 were monitored following exposure to biosolids-amended soils. Treatments included biosolids produced using a pilot wastewater treatment plant with either no metal introduced into the influent (control); bulk/ionic TiO2, ZnO, and AgNO3 added to influent (bulk/dissolved treatment); or Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 engineered nanomaterials added to influent (ENM treatment) and then added to soil, which was aged in the field for 6 months. In our companion study, we found inhibition of nodulation in the ENM but not in the bulk/dissolved treatment. Gene expression profiling revealed highly distinct profiles with more than 10-fold down-regulation in 239 genes in M. truncatula roots from the ENM treatment, while gene expression patterns were similar between bulk/dissolved and control treatments. In response to ENM exposure, many of the identified biological pathways, gene ontologies, and individual genes are associated with nitrogen metabolism, nodulation, metal homeostasis, and stress responses. Expression levels of nine genes were independently confirmed with qRT-PCR. Exposure to ENMs induced unique shifts in expression profiles and biological pathways compared with bulk/dissolved treatment, despite the lack of difference in bioavailable metal fractions, metal oxidation state, and coordination environment between ENM and bulk/dissolved biosolids. As populations of Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm2011 were similar in bulk/dissolved and ENM treatments, our results suggest that inhibition of nodulation in the ENM treatment was primarily due to phytotoxicity, likely caused by enhanced bioavailability of Zn ions. PMID:26065335

  4. RNA Interference-Mediated Repression of MtCCD1 in Mycorrhizal Roots of Medicago truncatula Causes Accumulation of C27 Apocarotenoids, Shedding Light on the Functional Role of CCD11[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Floss, Daniela S.; Schliemann, Willibald; Schmidt, Jürgen; Strack, Dieter; Walter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Tailoring carotenoids by plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) generates various bioactive apocarotenoids. Recombinant CCD1 has been shown to catalyze symmetrical cleavage of C40 carotenoid substrates at 9,10 and 9′,10′ positions. The actual substrate(s) of the enzyme in planta, however, is still unknown. In this study, we have carried out RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated repression of a Medicago truncatula CCD1 gene in hairy roots colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices. As a consequence, the normal AM-mediated accumulation of apocarotenoids (C13 cyclohexenone and C14 mycorradicin derivatives) was differentially modified. Mycorradicin derivatives were strongly reduced to 3% to 6% of the controls, while the cyclohexenone derivatives were only reduced to 30% to 47%. Concomitantly, a yellow-orange color appeared in RNAi roots. Based on ultraviolet light spectra and mass spectrometry analyses, the new compounds are C27 apocarotenoic acid derivatives. These metabolic alterations did not lead to major changes in molecular markers of the AM symbiosis, although a moderate shift to more degenerating arbuscules was observed in RNAi roots. The unexpected outcome of the RNAi approach suggests C27 apocarotenoids as the major substrates of CCD1 in mycorrhizal root cells. Moreover, literature data implicate C27 apocarotenoid cleavage as the general functional role of CCD1 in planta. A revised scheme of plant carotenoid cleavage in two consecutive steps is proposed, in which CCD1 catalyzes only the second step in the cytosol (C27 → C14 + C13), while the first step (C40 → C27 + C13) may be catalyzed by CCD7 and/or CCD4 inside plastids. PMID:18790999

  5. Characterization of Medicago truncatula (barrel medic) hydroperoxide lyase (CYP74C3), a water-soluble detergent-free cytochrome P450 monomer whose biological activity is defined by monomer–micelle association

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Richard K.; Belfield, Eric J.; Muthusamay, Mylrajan; Khan, Anuja; Rowe, Arthur; Harding, Stephen E.; Fairhurst, Shirley A.; Bornemann, Stephen; Ashton, Ruth; Thorneley, Roger N. F.; Casey, Rod

    2006-01-01

    We describe the detailed biochemical characterization of CYP74C3 (cytochrome P450 subfamily 74C3), a recombinant plant cytochrome P450 enzyme with HPL (hydroperoxide lyase) activity from Medicago truncatula (barrel medic). Steady-state kinetic parameters, substrate and product specificities, RZ (Reinheitszahl or purity index), molar absorption coefficient, haem content, and new ligands for an HPL are reported. We show on the basis of gel filtration, sedimentation velocity (sedimentation coefficient distribution) and sedimentation equilibrium (molecular mass) analyses that CYP74C3 has low enzyme activity as a detergent-free, water-soluble, monomer. The enzyme activity can be completely restored by re-activation with detergent micelles, but not detergent monomers. Corresponding changes in the spin state equilibrium, and probably co-ordination of the haem iron, are novel for cytochrome P450 enzymes and suggest that detergent micelles have a subtle effect on protein conformation, rather than substrate presentation, which is sufficient to improve substrate binding and catalytic-centre activity by an order of magnitude. The kcat/Km of up to 1.6×108 M−1·s−1 is among the highest recorded, which is remarkable for an enzyme whose reaction mechanism involves the scission of a C–C bond. We carried out both kinetic and biophysical studies to demonstrate that this effect is a result of the formation of a complex between a protein monomer and a single detergent micelle. Association with a detergent micelle rather than oligomeric state represents a new mechanism of activation for membrane-associated cytochrome P450 enzymes. Highly concentrated and monodispersed samples of detergent-free CYP74C3 protein may be well suited for the purposes of crystallization and structural resolution of the first plant cytochrome P450 enzyme. PMID:16454766

  6. An Oxalyl-CoA Dependent Pathway of Oxalate Catabolism Plays a Role in Regulating Calcium Oxalate Crystal Accumulation and Defending against Oxalate-Secreting Phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Justin; Luo, Bin; Nakata, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants possess this activity. Recently, an Acyl Activating Enzyme 3 (AAE3), encoding an oxalyl-CoA synthetase, was identified in Arabidopsis. AAE3 has been proposed to catalyze the first step in an alternative pathway of oxalate degradation. Whether this enzyme and proposed pathway is important to other plants is unknown. Here, we identify the Medicago truncatula AAE3 (MtAAE3) and show that it encodes an oxalyl-CoA synthetase activity exhibiting high activity against oxalate with a Km = 81 ± 9 μM and Vmax = 19 ± 0.9 μmoles min-1mg protein-1. GFP-MtAAE3 localization suggested that this enzyme functions within the cytosol of the cell. Mtaae3 knock-down line showed a reduction in its ability to degrade oxalate into CO2. This reduction in the capacity to degrade oxalate resulted in the accumulation of druse crystals of calcium oxalate in the Mtaae3 knock-down line and an increased susceptibility to oxalate-secreting phytopathogens such as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Taken together, these results suggest that AAE3 dependent turnover of oxalate is important to different plants and functions in the regulation of tissue calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and in defense against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens. PMID:26900946

  7. The major histocompatibility complex genes impact pain response in DA and DA.1U rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Yao, Fan-Rong; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Li, Li; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Xie, Wen; Zhao, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Our recent studies have shown that the difference in basal pain sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimulation between Dark-Agouti (DA) rats and a novel congenic DA.1U rats is major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes dependent. In the present study, we further used DA and DA.1U rats to investigate the role of MHC genes in formalin-induced pain model by behavioral, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical methods. Behavioral results showed biphasic nociceptive behaviors increased significantly following the intraplantar injection of formalin in the hindpaw of DA and DA.1U rats. The main nociceptive behaviors were lifting and licking, especially in DA rats (P<0.001 and P<0.01). The composite pain scores (CPS) in DA rats were significantly higher than those in DA.1U rats in both phases of the formalin test (P<0.01). Electrophysiological results also showed the biphasic increase in discharge rates of C and Aδ fibers of L5 dorsal root in the two strains, and the net change of the discharge rate of DA rats was significantly higher than that of DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The mechanical thresholds decreased after formalin injection in both strains (P<0.01), and the net change in the mechanical threshold in DA was greater than that in DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The expression of RT1-B, representation of MHC class II molecule, in laminae I-II of L4/5 spinal cord in DA rats was significantly higher than that in DA.1U rats in the respective experimental group (P<0.05). These results suggested that both DA and DA.1U rats exhibited nociceptive responses in formalin-induced pain model and DA rats were more sensitive to noxious chemical stimulus than DA.1U rats, indicating that MHC genes might contribute to the difference in pain sensitivity. PMID:25861730

  8. Unraveling the Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization on Arsenic Tolerance in Medicago: Glomus mosseae is More Effective than G. intraradices, Associated with Lower Expression of Root Epidermal Pi Transporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Helle M.; Smith, F. Andrew; Smith, Sally E.

    2012-01-01

    We used medic (Medicago truncatula) to investigate effects of inoculation with two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and application of arsenate (AsV) and phosphate (Pi) on mechanisms underlying increased tolerance (in terms of growth) of AM plants to AsV. We tested the hypotheses that (1) inoculation with AM fungi results in down-regulation of MtPht1;1 and MtPht1;2 genes (encoding high-affinity Pi and AsV uptake systems in the direct root epidermal pathway) and up-regulation of the AM-induced MtPht1;4 (responsible for transfer of Pi from the arbuscular interface to cortical cells), and (2) these changes are involved in decreased As uptake relative to P uptake and hence increased As tolerance. We also measured expression of MtMT4, a Pi starvation-inducible gene, other genes encoding Pi uptake systems (MtPht 1;5 and MtPht1;6) and arsenate reductase (MtACR) and phytochelatin synthase (MtPCS), to gain insights into broader aspects of P transfers in AM plants and possible detoxification mechanisms. Medic responded slightly to AM colonization in terms of growth in the absence of As, but positively in terms of P uptake. Both growth and P responses in AM plants were positive when As was applied, indicating As tolerance relative to non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants. All AM plants showed high expression of MtPT4 and those inoculated with Glomus mosseae showed higher selectivity against As (shown by P/As molar ratios) and much lower expression of MtPht1;1 (and to some extent MtPht1;2) than Glomus intraradices-inoculated or NM plants. Results are consistent with increased P/As selectivity in AM plants (particularly those inoculated with G. mosseae) as a consequence of high P uptake but little or no As uptake via the AM pathway. However, the extent to which selectivity is dependent on down-regulation of direct Pi and AsV uptake through epidermal cells is still not clear. Marked up-regulation of a PCS gene and an ACR gene in AM plants may also be involved and requires further

  9. Fluorine substitution enhanced photovoltaic performance of a D-A(1)-D-A(2) copolymer.

    PubMed

    Dang, Dongfeng; Chen, Weichao; Yang, Renqiang; Zhu, Weiguo; Mammo, Wendimagegn; Wang, Ergang

    2013-10-18

    A new alternating donor-acceptor (D-A1-D-A2) copolymer containing two electron-deficient moieties, isoindigo and quinoxaline, was synthesized. The photovoltaic performance of this polymer could be improved by incorporating fluorine atoms into the quinoxaline units, resulting in an efficiency of 6.32%. This result highlights the attractive promise of D-A1-D-A2 copolymers for high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells. PMID:24000353

  10. Autocorrelation descriptor improvements for QSAR: 2DA_Sign and 3DA_Sign.

    PubMed

    Sliwoski, Gregory; Mendenhall, Jeffrey; Meiler, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is a branch of computer aided drug discovery that relates chemical structures to biological activity. Two well established and related QSAR descriptors are two- and three-dimensional autocorrelation (2DA and 3DA). These descriptors encode the relative position of atoms or atom properties by calculating the separation between atom pairs in terms of number of bonds (2DA) or Euclidean distance (3DA). The sums of all values computed for a given small molecule are collected in a histogram. Atom properties can be added with a coefficient that is the product of atom properties for each pair. This procedure can lead to information loss when signed atom properties are considered such as partial charge. For example, the product of two positive charges is indistinguishable from the product of two equivalent negative charges. In this paper, we present variations of 2DA and 3DA called 2DA_Sign and 3DA_Sign that avoid information loss by splitting unique sign pairs into individual histograms. We evaluate these variations with models trained on nine datasets spanning a range of drug target classes. Both 2DA_Sign and 3DA_Sign significantly increase model performance across all datasets when compared with traditional 2DA and 3DA. Lastly, we find that limiting 3DA_Sign to maximum atom pair distances of 6 Å instead of 12 Å further increases model performance, suggesting that conformational flexibility may hinder performance with longer 3DA descriptors. Consistent with this finding, limiting the number of bonds in 2DA_Sign from 11 to 5 fails to improve performance. PMID:26721261

  11. Virtual observatory publishing with DaCHS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Neves, M. C.; Rothmaier, F.; Wambsganss, J.

    2014-11-01

    The Data Center Helper Suite DaCHS is an integrated publication package for building VO and Web services, supporting the entire workflow from ingestion to data mapping to service definition. It implements all major data discovery, data access, and registry protocols defined by the VO. DaCHS in this sense works as glue between data produced by the data providers and the standard protocols and formats defined by the VO. This paper discusses central elements of the design of the package and gives two case studies of how VO protocols are implemented using DaCHS' concepts.

  12. The Medicago HapMap Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bharti, Arvind

    2010-06-03

    Arvind Bharti from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses resequencing 400 plant and bacteria genotypes on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  13. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa ssp. sativa (L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa is known as the “Queen of the Forages” as it is primarily used as animal feed for dairy cows, beef cattle, horses, sheep, chickens and other domesticated animals. Alfalfa is the forage of choice due to its high feed value and high biomass production along with its ease of establishment; res...

  14. Origin of the DA and non-DA white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Harry L.

    1989-01-01

    Various proposals for the bifurcation of the white dwarf cooling sequence are reviewed. 'Primordial' theories, in which the basic bifurcation of the white dwarf sequence is rooted in events predating the white dwarf stage of stellar evolution, are discussed, along with the competing 'mixing' theories in which processes occurring during the white dwarf stage are responsible for the existence of DA or non-DA stars. A new proposal is suggested, representing a two-channel scenario. In the DA channel, some process reduces the hydrogen layer mass to the value of less than 10 to the -7th. The non-DA channel is similar to that in the primordial scenario. These considerations suggest that some mechanism operates in both channels to reduce the thickness of the outermost layer of the white dwarf. It is also noted that accretion from the interstellar medium has little to do with whether a particular white dwarf becomes a DA or a non-DA star.

  15. Measurement of D->A Momentum Aperture and Test of D->A Field Qualities

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1992-02-27

    The data presented here were taken during two shifts dedicated to D->A studies. The goal during both of these study periods was a test of the field quality of the D->A channel devices, but for the first study period on 10/21/91 the TBT system was not operational so we simply measured the transfer efficiency as a function of momentum. The conclusion from these measurements is as follows: (1) The momentum aperture of the D->A channel is smaller than expected. (2) The restriction is in physical space is somewhere near A:IKIK. (3) The field quality of the injection channel devices is adequate.

  16. The local effect of octreotide on mechanical pain sensitivity is more sensitive in DA rats than DA.1U rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fan-Rong; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Guo, Yuan; Zhao, Yan

    2016-02-01

    A recent study by the authors indicated that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are associated with the differences in basal pain sensitivity and in formalin model between Dark-Agouti (DA) and novel congenic DA.1U rats, which have the same genetic background as DA rats except for the u alleles of MHC. The objective of the present study is to investigate whether there is a difference in the pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model and local analgesic effect of octreotide (OCT) between DA and DA.1U rats. The hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and heat withdrawal latency (HWL) were observed. The C unit firings of the tibial nerve evoked by non-noxious and noxious toe movements were recorded by electrophysiological methods in normal and PIA models in DA and DA.1U rats before and after local OCT administration. The expression of somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) was observed by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrate that DA rats have a higher mechanical sensitivity than DA.1U rats after PIA. Local OCT administration significantly elevated MWT in DA rats under normal and PIA sate, but not in DA.1U rats. The electrophysiological experiments showed OCT significantly attenuated the firings of C units evoked by non-noxious and noxious stimulation in DA rats more than those in DA.1U rats both in normal and PIA states. In addition, the expression of SSTR2A in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord was significantly higher in DA than in DA.1U rats. All of the findings suggest a higher local analgesic effect of OCT in DA rats than DA.1U rats, which might be associated with the MHC genes. PMID:26606866

  17. Common colds on Tristan da Cunha

    PubMed Central

    Shibli, M.; Gooch, S.; Lewis, H. E.; Tyrrell, D. A. J.

    1971-01-01

    Eight epidemics of respiratory disease have been observed among islanders of Tristan da Cunha. They seem to be initiated by the arrival of ships and transmission seemed to occur as a result of close human contact but could not always be traced. Islanders suffered from less colds than those in less isolated communities. PMID:5282927

  18. The PAN-DA data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Petravick, D.; Berg, D.; Berman, E.; Bernett, M.; Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Dorries, T.; Haire, M.; Kaczar, K; MacKinnon, B.; Moore, C.; Nicinski, T.; Oleynik, G.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Votava, M.; White, V.

    1989-05-01

    The Online and Data Acquisition software groups at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have extended the VAXONLINE data acquisition package to include a VME based data path. The resulting environment, PAN-DA, provides a high throughput for logging, filtering, formatting and selecting events. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Hidden sketches by Leonardo da Vinci revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2009-02-01

    Three drawings on the back of Leonardo da Vinci's The Virgin and Child with St Anne (circa 1508) have been discovered by researchers led by Michel Menu from the Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (C2RMF) and the Louvre Museum in Paris.

  20. How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caouette, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    To be effective and relevant in twenty-first-century learning, art needs to be more inclusive. In this article, the author discusses how teachers can find a good example in Leonardo da Vinci for building an art program. His art, design, and curiosity are the perfect foundation for any art program, at any level. (Contains 3 resources and 3 online…

  1. 40 CFR 60.51Da - Reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Generating Units § 60.51Da Reporting requirements. (a) For SO2, NOX, PM, and NOX plus CO emissions, the... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting requirements. 60.51Da Section 60.51Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  2. 40 CFR 60.47Da - Commercial demonstration permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commercial demonstration permit. 60.47Da Section 60.47Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Steam Generating Units § 60.47Da Commercial demonstration permit. (a) An owner or operator of...

  3. 40 CFR 60.51Da - Reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Generating Units § 60.51Da Reporting requirements. (a) For SO2, NOX, PM, and NOX plus CO emissions, the... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting requirements. 60.51Da Section 60.51Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  4. 40 CFR 60.47Da - Commercial demonstration permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commercial demonstration permit. 60.47Da Section 60.47Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Steam Generating Units § 60.47Da Commercial demonstration permit. (a) An owner or operator of...

  5. 40 CFR 60.51Da - Reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Generating Units § 60.51Da Reporting requirements. (a) For SO2, NOX, PM, and NOX plus CO emissions, the... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting requirements. 60.51Da Section 60.51Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  6. 40 CFR 60.47Da - Commercial demonstration permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commercial demonstration permit. 60.47Da Section 60.47Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Steam Generating Units § 60.47Da Commercial demonstration permit. (a) An owner or operator of...

  7. 32 CFR 516.25 - DA Form 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true DA Form 4. 516.25 Section 516.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Reporting Legal Proceedings to HQDA § 516.25 DA Form 4. (a) General. The DA Form 4 (See figure...

  8. 32 CFR 516.25 - DA Form 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true DA Form 4. 516.25 Section 516.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Reporting Legal Proceedings to HQDA § 516.25 DA Form 4. (a) General. The DA Form 4 (See figure...

  9. A Day in the Life at DaVita Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company name means "giving life," the bar for learning and development programs is held high. In this article, the author describes what it takes to graduate from DaVita Academy, the soft skills training program dialysis services company DaVita offers all its employees. DaVita's chief executive officer, Kent Thiry, states that the Academy…

  10. The DA{phi}NE-Light Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Burattini, Emilio; Cinque, Gianfelice; Dabagov, Sultan; Grilli, Antonio; Marcelli, Augusto; Pace, Elisabetta; Piccinini, Massimo; Raco, Agostino; Monti, Francesca

    2004-05-12

    The new Synchrotron Radiation facility at Frascati exploits the intense photon emission from DA{phi}NE, the 0,51 GeV storage ring circulating over 1 A of electrons. Among the three beamlines commissioned, the Synchrotron INfrared Beamline At Da{phi}ne (SINBAD) is fully operational by a brilliant SR beam spanning the entire IR. Recently, the soft X-ray beamline has been characterized and, once implemented the double-crystal monocromator, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy is applied on material standards in the distinguishing energy region below 4 keV. An UltraViolet line, presently dedicated to photobiology dosimetry, has also given first results on cell irradiation in the UVB band.

  11. The Real Code of Leonardo da Vinci

    PubMed Central

    Ose, Leiv

    2008-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci was born in Italy. Among the researchers and scientists, he is favourably known for his remarkable efforts in scientific work. His investigations of atherosclerosis judiciously combine three separate fields of research. In 1506, he finished his masterpiece, painting of Mona Lisa. A careful clinical examination of the famous painting reveals a yellow irregular leather-like spot at the inner end of the left upper eyelid and a soft bumpy well-defined swelling of the dorsum of the right hand beneath the index finger about 3 cm long. This is probably the first case of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). The FH code of Leonardo da Vinci was given immense consideration by scientists like Carl Muller, who described the xanthomas tuberosum and angina pectoris. On the contrary, Akira Endo searched for microbial metabolites that would inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of cholesterol and finally, Michael Brown and Joseph Goldstein published a remarkable series of elegant and insightful papers in the 70s and 80s. They established that the cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) essentially requires the LDL receptor. In conclusion: this was the real Code of Leonardo da Vinci. PMID:19924278

  12. 40 CFR 60.52Da - Recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordkeeping requirements. 60.52Da Section 60.52Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Electric Utility Steam Generating Units for...

  13. Asteroid 2012 DA14 To Whiz Past Earth Safely

    NASA Video Gallery

    The small near-Earth asteroid 2012 DA14 will pass very close to Earth on Feb. 15, 2013. Asteroid 2012 DA14 will be closest to Earth at about 11:24 a.m. PST (2:24 p.m. EST and 1924 UTC), on Feb. 15,...

  14. The Case: Bunche-Da Vinci Learning Partnership Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Nicole; Winters, Lynn; Alkin, Marvin C.

    2005-01-01

    The Bunche-Da Vinci case described in this article presents a situation at Bunche Elementary School that four theorists were asked to address in their evaluation designs (see EJ791771, EJ719772, EJ791773, and EJ792694). The Bunche-Da Vinci Learning Partnership Academy, an elementary school located between an urban port city and a historically…

  15. Da Costa's syndrome or neurocirculatory asthenia.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, O

    1987-01-01

    The syndrome variously called Da Costa's syndrome, effort syndrome, neurocirculatory asthenia, etc has been studied for more than 100 years by many distinguished physicians. Originally identified in men in wartime, it has been widely recognised as a common chronic condition in both sexes in civilian life. Although the symptoms may seem to appear after infections and various physical and psychological stresses, neurocirculatory asthenia is most often encountered as a familial disorder that is unrelated to these factors, although they may aggravate an existing tendency. Respiratory complaints (including breathlessness, with and without effort, and smothering sensations) are almost universal, and palpitation, chest discomfort, dizziness and faintness, and fatigue are common. The physical examination is normal. The aetiology is obscure but patients usually have a normal life span. Reassurance and measures to improve physical fitness are helpful. PMID:3314950

  16. 75 FR 52292 - Airworthiness Directives; Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH Models DA 40 and DA 40F Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Diamond Aircraft... new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH Models DA 40 and DA...

  17. 75 FR 75868 - Airworthiness Directives; Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH Models DA 40 and DA 40F Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Register on August 25, 2010 (75 FR 52292). That NPRM proposed to require a retrofit of the rear passenger... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Aircraft Industries GmbH Models DA 40 and DA 40F Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration,...

  18. Metal Lines in DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, B.; Koester, D.; Reid, I. N.; Hünsch, M.

    2003-10-01

    We report Keck telescope HIRES echelle observations of DA white dwarfs in a continuation of an extensive search for metals. These spectra are supplemented with new JHK magnitudes that are used to determine improved atmospheric parameters. Of the DA white dwarfs not in binary or common proper motion systems, about 25% show Ca II lines. For these, Ca abundances are determined from comparison with theoretical equivalent widths from model atmosphere calculations; in a few cases we also obtain Mg, Fe, Si, and Al abundances. If Ca is not observed, we generally determine very stringent upper limits. We compare the data to predictions of previously published models involving the accretion/diffusion of interstellar matter and of comets. The derived abundances are not obviously compatible with the predictions of either model, which up to now could only be tested with traces of metals in helium-rich white dwarfs. By modifying certain assumptions in the published interstellar accretion model we are able to match the distribution of the elements in the white dwarf atmospheres, but, even so, tests of other expectations from this scenario are less successful. Because comet accretion appears unlikely to be the primary cause of the DAZ phenomenon, the data suggest that no more than about 20% of F-type main-sequence stars are accompanied by Oort-like comet clouds. This represents the first observational estimate of this fraction. A plausible alternative to the accretion of cometary or interstellar matter is disruption and accretion of asteroidal material, a model first suggested in 1990 to explain excess near-infrared emission from the DAZ G29-38. An asteroidal debris model to account for the general DAZ phenomenon does not presently disagree with the HIRES data, but neither is there any compelling evidence in support of such a model. The HIRES data indicate that in close red dwarf/white dwarf binaries not known to be cataclysmic variables there is, nonetheless, significant mass

  19. Der Telemanipulator daVinci als mechanisches Trackingsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käst, Johannes; Neuhaus, Jochen; Nickel, Felix; Kenngott, Hannes; Engel, Markus; Short, Elaine; Reiter, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Lena

    Der Telemanipulator daVinci (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, Kalifornien) ist ein M aster-Slave System für roboterassistierte minimalinvasive Chirurgie. Da er über integrierte Gelenksensoren verfügt, kann er unter Verwendung der daVinci-API als mechanisches Trackingsystem verwendet werden. In dieser Arbeit evaluieren wir die Präzision und Genauigkeit eines daVinci mit Hilfe eines Genauigkeitsphantoms mit bekannten Maßen. Der ermittelte Positionierungsfehler liegt in der Größenordnung von 6 mm und ist somit für einen Großteil der medizinischen Fragestellungen zu hoch. Zur Reduktion des Fehlers schlagen wir daher eine Kalibrierung der Gelenksensoren vor.

  20. 40 CFR 60.49Da - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... affected unit that qualifies as a gas-fired or oil-fired unit, as defined in 40 CFR 72.2, may use, as an... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.49Da Section 60... Generating Units § 60.49Da Emission monitoring. (a) An owner or operator of an affected facility subject...

  1. 40 CFR 60.49Da - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... affected unit that qualifies as a gas-fired or oil-fired unit, as defined in 40 CFR 72.2, may use, as an... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.49Da Section 60... Generating Units for Which Construction is Commenced After September 18, 1978 § 60.49Da Emission...

  2. 40 CFR 60.49Da - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... affected unit that qualifies as a gas-fired or oil-fired unit, as defined in 40 CFR 72.2, may use, as an... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.49Da Section 60... Generating Units § 60.49Da Emission monitoring. (a) An owner or operator of an affected facility subject...

  3. Tree Branching: Leonardo da Vinci's Rule versus Biomechanical Models

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Ryoko; Tateno, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    This study examined Leonardo da Vinci's rule (i.e., the sum of the cross-sectional area of all tree branches above a branching point at any height is equal to the cross-sectional area of the trunk or the branch immediately below the branching point) using simulations based on two biomechanical models: the uniform stress and elastic similarity models. Model calculations of the daughter/mother ratio (i.e., the ratio of the total cross-sectional area of the daughter branches to the cross-sectional area of the mother branch at the branching point) showed that both biomechanical models agreed with da Vinci's rule when the branching angles of daughter branches and the weights of lateral daughter branches were small; however, the models deviated from da Vinci's rule as the weights and/or the branching angles of lateral daughter branches increased. The calculated values of the two models were largely similar but differed in some ways. Field measurements of Fagus crenata and Abies homolepis also fit this trend, wherein models deviated from da Vinci's rule with increasing relative weights of lateral daughter branches. However, this deviation was small for a branching pattern in nature, where empirical measurements were taken under realistic measurement conditions; thus, da Vinci's rule did not critically contradict the biomechanical models in the case of real branching patterns, though the model calculations described the contradiction between da Vinci's rule and the biomechanical models. The field data for Fagus crenata fit the uniform stress model best, indicating that stress uniformity is the key constraint of branch morphology in Fagus crenata rather than elastic similarity or da Vinci's rule. On the other hand, mechanical constraints are not necessarily significant in the morphology of Abies homolepis branches, depending on the number of daughter branches. Rather, these branches were often in agreement with da Vinci's rule. PMID:24714065

  4. Migration of ATLAS PanDA to CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Graeme Andrew; Klimentov, Alexei; Koblitz, Birger; Lamanna, Massimo; Maeno, Tadashi; Nevski, Pavel; Nowak, Marcin; Emanuel De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; Wenaus, Torre

    2010-04-01

    The ATLAS Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) is a key component of the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS production jobs, and a substantial amount of user and group analysis jobs, pass through the PanDA system, which manages their execution on the grid. PanDA also plays a key role in production task definition and the data set replication request system. PanDA has recently been migrated from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), a process we describe here. We discuss how the new infrastructure for PanDA, which relies heavily on services provided by CERN IT, was introduced in order to make the service as reliable as possible and to allow it to be scaled to ATLAS's increasing need for distributed computing. The migration involved changing the backend database for PanDA from MySQL to Oracle, which impacted upon the database schemas. The process by which the client code was optimised for the new database backend is discussed. We describe the procedure by which the new database infrastructure was tested and commissioned for production use. Operations during the migration had to be planned carefully to minimise disruption to ongoing ATLAS offline computing. All parts of the migration were fully tested before commissioning the new infrastructure and the gradual migration of computing resources to the new system allowed any problems of scaling to be addressed.

  5. PKC phosphorylates residues in the N-terminal of the DA transporter to regulate amphetamine-induced DA efflux.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Bubula, Nancy; Brown, Jason; Wang, Yunliang; Kondev, Veronika; Vezina, Paul

    2016-05-27

    The DA transporter (DAT), a phosphoprotein, controls extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the central nervous system through transport or reverse transport (efflux). Multiple lines of evidence support the claim that PKC significantly contributes to amphetamine-induced DA efflux. Other signaling pathways, involving CaMKII and ERK, have also been shown to regulate DAT mediated efflux. Here we assessed the contribution of putative PKC residues (S4, S7, S13) in the N-terminal of the DAT to amphetamine-induced DA efflux by transfecting DATs containing different serine to alanine (S-A) point mutations into DA pre-loaded HEK-293 cells and incubating these cells in amphetamine (2μM). The effects of a S-A mutation at the non-PKC residue S12 and a threonine to alanine (T-A) mutation at the ERK T53 residue were also assessed for comparison. WT-DATs were used as controls. In an initial experiment, we confirmed that inhibiting PKC with Go6976 (130nM) significantly reduced amphetamine-induced DA efflux. In subsequent experiments, cells transfected with the S4A, S12A, S13A, T53A and S4,7,13A mutants showed a reduction in amphetamine-induced DA efflux similar to that observed with Go6976. Interestingly, cells transfected with the S7A mutant, identified by some as a PKC-PKA residue, showed unperturbed WT-DAT levels of amphetamine-induced DA efflux. These results indicate that phosphorylation by PKC of select residues in the DAT N-terminal can regulate amphetamine-induced efflux. PKC can act either independently or in concert with other kinases such as ERK to produce this effect. PMID:27113203

  6. A cosmologia no ensino da geografia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, S. C.; Chiaradia, A. P. M.

    2003-08-01

    O principal objetivo deste trabalho é auxiliar o professor de Geografia em sala de aula no ensino de tópicos relacionados com a Cosmologia. A idéia deste trabalho surgiu quando foi constatado que o professor de Geografia tem dificuldades de ensinar este tópico. Esta constatação foi feita por uma das autoras ao lecionar este tópico no ensino fundamental e em discussões com outros professores de Geografia. Da mesma maneira que ocorria desde os tempos mais antigos, os alunos têm muito interesse em conhecer os fenômenos que ocorrem no Cosmo, porém os livros didáticos de Geografia utilizados em sala de aula não são ricos em informações sobre este assunto. Assim, o professor de Geografia tem poucas informações para discutir este assunto em sala de aula e não dá a devida importância para este tópico. Então, foi desenvolvido um material de apoio para professores de Geografia sobre a origem do Universo, sua evolução e seu possível futuro evolutivo segundo as mais recentes teorias, com base em perguntas feitas pelos alunos de ensino fundamental e as informações trazidas nos livros didáticos Não cabe a este material inovar e tão pouco trazer uma metodologia de ensino de Cosmologia. Neste material o professor de Geografia pode encontrará um banco de informações, que constitui no estabelecimento de conceitos, teorias e hipóteses, sobre a Cosmologia, em linguagem simples e de fácil entendimento. Para desenvolvê-lo, foram feitas pesquisas não exaustivas em livros e revistas científicas, compilação e discussão em forma cronológica das teorias aceitas sobre modelos cosmológicos. Portanto, este material será apresentado neste trabalho.

  7. Overview of ATLAS PanDA Workload Management

    SciTech Connect

    Maeno T.; De K.; Wenaus T.; Nilsson P.; Stewart G. A.; Walker R.; Stradling A.; Caballero J.; Potekhin M.; Smith D.

    2011-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS Monte-Carlo simulation and data reprocessing jobs pass through the PanDA system. We will describe how PanDA manages job execution on the grid using dynamic resource estimation and data replication together with intelligent brokerage in order to meet the scaling and automation requirements of ATLAS distributed computing. PanDA is also the primary ATLAS system for processing user and group analysis jobs, bringing further requirements for quick, flexible adaptation to the rapidly evolving analysis use cases of the early datataking phase, in addition to the high reliability, robustness and usability needed to provide efficient and transparent utilization of the grid for analysis users. We will describe how PanDA meets ATLAS requirements, the evolution of the system in light of operational experience, how the system has performed during the first LHC data-taking phase and plans for the future.

  8. The ATLAS PanDA Monitoring System and its Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, A.; Nevski, P.; Potekhin, M.; Wenaus, T.

    2011-12-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) Workload Management System is used for ATLAS distributed production and analysis worldwide. The needs of ATLAS global computing imposed challenging requirements on the design of PanDA in areas such as scalability, robustness, automation, diagnostics, and usability for both production shifters and analysis users. Through a system-wide job database, the PanDA monitor provides a comprehensive and coherent view of the system and job execution, from high level summaries to detailed drill-down job diagnostics. It is (like the rest of PanDA) an Apache-based Python application backed by Oracle. The presentation layer is HTML code generated on the fly in the Python application which is also responsible for managing database queries. However, this approach is lacking in user interface flexibility, simplicity of communication with external systems, and ease of maintenance. A decision was therefore made to migrate the PanDA monitor server to Django Web Application Framework and apply JSON/AJAX technology in the browser front end. This allows us to greatly reduce the amount of application code, separate data preparation from presentation, leverage open source for tools such as authentication and authorization mechanisms, and provide a richer and more dynamic user experience. We describe our approach, design and initial experience with the migration process.

  9. Overview of ATLAS PanDA Workload Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, T.; De, K.; Wenaus, T.; Nilsson, P.; Stewart, G. A.; Walker, R.; Stradling, A.; Caballero, J.; Potekhin, M.; Smith, D.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS Monte-Carlo simulation and data reprocessing jobs pass through the PanDA system. We will describe how PanDA manages job execution on the grid using dynamic resource estimation and data replication together with intelligent brokerage in order to meet the scaling and automation requirements of ATLAS distributed computing. PanDA is also the primary ATLAS system for processing user and group analysis jobs, bringing further requirements for quick, flexible adaptation to the rapidly evolving analysis use cases of the early datataking phase, in addition to the high reliability, robustness and usability needed to provide efficient and transparent utilization of the grid for analysis users. We will describe how PanDA meets ATLAS requirements, the evolution of the system in light of operational experience, how the system has performed during the first LHC data-taking phase and plans for the future.

  10. Geomagnetic observations on tristan da cunha, south atlantic ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzka, J.; Olsen, N.; Maule, C.F.; Pedersen, L.W.; Berarducci, A.M.; Macmillan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Few geomagnetic ground observations exist of the Earth's strongest core field anomaly, the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The geomagnetic repeat station on the island Tristan da Cunha, located half-way between South Africa and South America at 37?? 05' S, 12?? 18' W, is therefore of crucial importance. We have conducted several sets of repeat station measurements during magnetically quiet conditions (Kp 2o or less) in 2004. The procedures are described and the results are compared to those from earlier campaigns and to the predictions of various global field models. Features of the local crustal bias field and the solar quiet daily variation are discussed. We also evaluate the benefit of continuous magnetic field recordings from Tristan da Cunha, and argue that such a data set is a very valuable addition to geomagnetic satellite data. Recently, funds were set up to establish and operate a magnetometer station on Tristan da Cunha during the Swarm magnetic satellite mission (2011-2014).

  11. Recent Improvements in the ATLAS PanDA Pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, P.; Caballero Bejar, J.; Compostella, G.; Contreras, C.; De, K.; Dos Santos, T.; Maeno, T.; Potekhin, M.; Wenaus, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) in the ATLAS experiment uses pilots to execute submitted jobs on the worker nodes. The pilots are designed to deal with different runtime conditions and failure scenarios, and support many storage systems. This talk will give a brief overview of the PanDA pilot system and will present major features and recent improvements including CernVM File System integration, the job retry mechanism, advanced job monitoring including JEM technology, and validation of new pilot code using the HammerCloud stress-testing system. PanDA is used for all ATLAS distributed production and is the primary system for distributed analysis. It is currently used at over 130 sites worldwide. We analyze the performance of the pilot system in processing LHC data on the OSG, EGI and Nordugrid infrastructures used by ATLAS, and describe plans for its further evolution.

  12. Situação da Mulher na Astronomia Brasileira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Adriana V. R.

    2007-07-01

    O conteúdo desse texto surgiu de uma apresentação de mesmo título que fiz na XXXI Reunião Anual da Sociedade Astronômica Brasileira (SAB) em 2005. Esse tema foi inspirado originalmente pela minha participação no "2nd UIPAP International Conference on Women in Physics" realizado entre 23 e 25 de maio de 2005 no Rio de Janeiro. Essa é uma conferência internacional que acontece de três em três anos, sendo que a primeira ocorreu em 2002 na cidade de Paris, França. Participei dessa conferência como membro da delegação da Sociedade Brasileira de Física e um dos trabalhos que apresentei versava sobre a situação das mulheres na Astronomia brasileira, cujos resultados principais discorro a seguir. A situação das astrônomas, baseada nos dados dos sócios da SAB coletados no final de 2004, é comparada com a das físicas brasileiras e também com as nossas colegas americanas. Os dados identificam ainda uma maior evasão da carreira por parte das mulheres do que os homens. Alguns dos possíveis motivos da evasão são discutidos, como o desejo de constituir família e/ou isolamento. Resultados um tanto preocupantes com relação à distribuição de bolsas de produtividade do CNPq também são apresentados. As principais discussões e estratégias recomendadas nesse congresso são mencionadas de forma resumida ao final.

  13. The future of PanDA in ATLAS distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Schovancova, J.; Vaniachine, A.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) face unprecedented computing challenges. Heterogeneous resources are distributed worldwide at hundreds of sites, thousands of physicists analyse the data remotely, the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, while data processing requires more than a few billion hours of computing usage per year. The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system was developed to meet the scale and complexity of LHC distributed computing for the ATLAS experiment. In the process, the old batch job paradigm of locally managed computing in HEP was discarded in favour of a far more automated, flexible and scalable model. The success of PanDA in ATLAS is leading to widespread adoption and testing by other experiments. PanDA is the first exascale workload management system in HEP, already operating at more than a million computing jobs per day, and processing over an exabyte of data in 2013. There are many new challenges that PanDA will face in the near future, in addition to new challenges of scale, heterogeneity and increasing user base. PanDA will need to handle rapidly changing computing infrastructure, will require factorization of code for easier deployment, will need to incorporate additional information sources including network metrics in decision making, be able to control network circuits, handle dynamically sized workload processing, provide improved visualization, and face many other challenges. In this talk we will focus on the new features, planned or recently implemented, that are relevant to the next decade of distributed computing workload management using PanDA.

  14. The role of transparency in da Vinci stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Zannoli, Marina; Mamassian, Pascal

    2011-10-15

    The majority of natural scenes contains zones that are visible to one eye only. Past studies have shown that these monocular regions can be seen at a precise depth even though there are no binocular disparities that uniquely constrain their locations in depth. In the so-called da Vinci stereopsis configuration, the monocular region is a vertical line placed next to a binocular rectangular occluder. The opacity of the occluder has been mentioned to be a necessary condition to obtain da Vinci stereopsis. However, this opacity constraint has never been empirically tested. In the present study, we tested whether da Vinci stereopsis and perceptual transparency can interact using a classical da Vinci configuration in which the opacity of the occluder varied. We used two different monocular objects: a line and a disk. We found no effect of the opacity of the occluder on the perceived depth of the monocular object. A careful analysis of the distribution of perceived depth revealed that the monocular object was perceived at a depth that increased with the distance between the object and the occluder. The analysis of the skewness of the distributions was not consistent with a double fusion explanation, favoring an implication of occlusion geometry in da Vinci stereopsis. A simple model that includes the geometry of the scene could account for the results. In summary, the mechanism responsible to locate monocular regions in depth is not sensitive to the material properties of objects, suggesting that da Vinci stereopsis is solved at relatively early stages of disparity processing. PMID:21906614

  15. IAFAL-C3, Medicago sativa subsp. falcata germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, in cooperation with Iowa State University announces the release of 'IAFAL-C3' a yellow flowered alfalfa germplasm. This population was developed cooperatively by US Dairy Forage Research Center (USDA-ARS) research geneticis...

  16. Characterization of Root-Knot Nematode Resistance in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Dhandaydham, Murali; Charles, Lauren; Zhu, Hongyan; Starr, James L.; Huguet, Thierry; Cook, Douglas R.; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Opperman, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Root knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and cyst (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) nematodes infect all important crop species, and the annual economic loss due to these pathogens exceeds $90 billion. We screened the worldwide accession collection with the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria and M. hapla, soybean cyst nematode (SCN-Heterodera glycines), sugar beet cyst nematode (SBCN-Heterodera schachtii) and clover cyst nematode (CLCN-Heterodera trifolii), revealing resistant and susceptible accessions. In the over 100 accessions evaluated, we observed a range of responses to the root-knot nematode species, and a non-host response was observed for SCN and SBCN infection. However, variation was observed with respect to infection by CLCN. While many cultivars including Jemalong A17 were resistant to H. trifolii, cultivar Paraggio was highly susceptible. Identification of M. truncatula as a host for root-knot nematodes and H. trifolii and the differential host response to both RKN and CLCN provide the opportunity to genetically and molecularly characterize genes involved in plant-nematode interaction. Accession DZA045, obtained from an Algerian population, was resistant to all three root-knot nematode species and was used for further studies. The mechanism of resistance in DZA045 appears different from Mi-mediated root-knot nematode resistance in tomato. Temporal analysis of nematode infection showed that there is no difference in nematode penetration between the resistant and susceptible accessions, and no hypersensitive response was observed in the resistant accession even several days after infection. However, less than 5% of the nematode population completed the life cycle as females in the resistant accession. The remainder emigrated from the roots, developed as males, or died inside the roots as undeveloped larvae. Genetic analyses carried out by crossing DZA045 with a susceptible French accession, F83005, suggest that one gene controls resistance in DZA045. PMID:19259519

  17. Characterization of Medicago truncatula reduced calcium oxalate crystal mutant alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation is common in plants. Formation of these crystals has been shown to function in plant defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. Although calcium oxalate is common and plays important roles in plant development, our understanding of how these crystals form ...

  18. Publishing Planetary Data to the VO using DaCHS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.

    2014-04-01

    Publishing to the Virtual Observatory has many advantages, but between standards compliance, registration, data organisation, and server operation it is also requires a nontrivial effort if starting from scratch. The DaCHS software from the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory offers a packaged solution letting publishers concentrate on working with their own data and metadata as much as possible. For the planetary community, publishing is further facilitated by built-in support for the EPN-TAP data model. This contribution will show a typical publishing workflow together with a brief overview of how DaCHS meshes in with the VO and Web-based data usage.

  19. Asteroid 1986 DA - Radar evidence for a metallic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Rosema, K. D.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, J. F.; Hine, A. A.; Hudson, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Echoes from the near-earth object 1986 DA show it to be significantly more reflective than other radar-detected asteroids. This result supports the hypothesis that 1986 DA is a piece of NiFe metal derived from the interior of a much larger object that melted, differentiated, cooled, and subsequently was disrupted in a catastrophic collision. This 2-kilometer asteroid, which appears smooth at centimeter to meter scales but extremely irregular at 10- to 100-meter scales, might be (or have been a part of) the parent body of some iron meteorites.

  20. Identification of domains on the extrinsic 23 kDa protein possibly involved in electrostatic interaction with the extrinsic 33 kDa protein in spinach photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Tohri, Akihiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Ohta, Hisataka; Inoue, Yasunori; Enami, Isao

    2004-03-01

    To elucidate the domains on the extrinsic 23 kDa protein involved in electrostatic interaction with the extrinsic 33 kDa protein in spinach photosystem II, we modified amino or carboxyl groups of the 23 kDa protein to uncharged methyl ester groups with N-succinimidyl propionate or glycine methyl ester in the presence of a water-soluble carbodiimide, respectively. The N-succinimidyl propionate-modified 23 kDa protein did not bind to the 33 kDa protein associated with PSII membranes, whereas the glycine methyl ester-modified 23 kDa protein completely bound. This indicates that positive charges on the 23 kDa protein are important for electrostatic interaction with the 33 kDa protein associated with the PSII membranes. Mapping of the N-succinimidyl propionate-modified sites of the 23 kDa protein was performed using Staphylococcus V8 protease digestion of the modified protein followed by determination of the mass of the resultant peptide fragments with MALDI-TOF MS. The results showed that six domains (Lys11-Lys14, Lys27-Lys38, Lys40, Lys90-Lys96, Lys143-Lys152, Lys166-Lys174) were modified with N-succinimidyl propionate. In these domains, Lys11, Lys13, Lys33, Lys38, Lys143, Lys166, Lys170 and Lys174 were wholly conserved in the 23 kDa protein from 12 species of higher plants. These positively charged lysyl residues on the 23 kDa protein may be involved in electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged carboxyl groups on the 33 kDa protein, the latter has been suggested to be important for the 23 kDa binding [Bricker, T.M. & Frankel, L.K. (2003) Biochemistry42, 2056-2061]. PMID:15009208

  1. DATA ASSESSMENT REPORTS FOR CEMS AT SUBPART DA FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA promulgated minimum quality assurance (QA) requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) in 40 CFR Part 60 Appendix F. Appendix F requires Da source owners to develop site-specific QA plans and report the results of EPA specified QA activities each calendar q...

  2. Asteroid 1986 DA: Radar evidence for a metallic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, J. F.; Hine, A. A.; Hudson, R. S.; Rosema, K. D.; Shapiro, Irwin I.

    1991-01-01

    Radar observations of the near-Earth asteroid 1986 DA were carried out at the Arecibo Observatory in April 1986, two months after its discovery. Radar results are consistent with the hypothesis that 1986 HA is a piece of NiFe metal derived from the interior of a much larger object that melted, differentiated, cooled and subsequently was disrupted in a catastrophic collision. This 2-km asteroid might be (or have been part of) the parent body of some iron meteorites. Or 1986 DA might share the parentage and/or part of the dynamical history of some meteorites without ever having contributed any of its own ejecta to our meteorite sample. Analysis of the samples returned from 1986 DA might ultimately involve economic considerations. Meteoritic metal is mostly iron with about 8 percent nickel, but also contains substantial concentrations of precious and strategic metals, including approx. 1 ppm of gold and approx. 10 ppm of platinum group elements. If these abundances apply to 1986 DA, it contains some 10(exp 16) g of iron, 10 (exp 15) g of nickel, 10(exp 11) g of platinum group metals, and 10(exp 10) g of gold.

  3. 40 CFR 60.45Da - Standard for mercury (Hg).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for mercury (Hg). 60.45Da... for mercury (Hg). (a) For each coal-fired electric utility steam generating unit other than an IGCC... gases that contain mercury (Hg) emissions in excess of each Hg emissions limit in paragraphs...

  4. Training and Health. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles programs in the fields of health and medicine that are offered through the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program. The following programs are profiled: (1) CYTOTRAIN (a transnational vocational training program in cervical cancer screening); (2) Apollo (a program of open and distance learning for paramedical…

  5. The DaVinci Project: Multimedia in Art and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael; Schlosser, Charles

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of the DaVinci Project, a collaboration of students, teachers, and researchers in chemistry and art to develop multimedia materials for grades 3-12 visualizing basic concepts in chemistry and visual art. Topics addressed include standards in art and science; the conceptual framework for the project; and project goals,…

  6. The Potential da Vinci in All of Us

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petto, Sarah; Petto, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The study of the human form is fundamental to both science and art curricula. For vertebrates, perhaps no feature is more important than the skeleton to determine observable form and function. As Leonard da Vinci's famous Proportions of the Human Figure (Virtruvian Man) illustrates, the size, shape, and proportions of the human body are defined by…

  7. 40 CFR 60.47Da - Commercial demonstration permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... potential combustion concentration (80 percent reduction) for each 24-hour period of steam generator... owner or operator of a fluidized bed combustion electric utility steam generator (atmospheric or... Steam Generating Units for Which Construction is Commenced After September 18, 1978 § 60.47Da...

  8. 40 CFR 60.47Da - Commercial demonstration permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... potential combustion concentration (80 percent reduction) for each 24-hour period of steam generator... owner or operator of a fluidized bed combustion electric utility steam generator (atmospheric or... Steam Generating Units for Which Construction is Commenced After September 18, 1978 § 60.47Da...

  9. Women and Technical Professions. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles programs for women in technical professions that are offered through the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program. The following programs are profiled: (1) Artemis and Diana (vocational guidance programs to help direct girls toward technology-related careers); (2) CEEWIT (an Internet-based information and…

  10. Studying and Working Abroad. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles recent successful examples of students studying and working abroad as part of the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program, which is designed to give students across the European Union the opportunity to experience vocational training in a foreign country. The following examples are presented: (1) 3 Finnish students…

  11. Modelagem do vento e da fotosfera de AG Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, J. H.; Damineli, A.

    2003-08-01

    A trajetória evolutiva das estrelas de alta massa depende fortemente de suas taxas de perda de massa. Apesar do rápido progresso no estudo destas estrelas, a taxa de perda de massa e outros parâmetros físicos básicos, como a temperatura superficial e a velocidade terminal do vento ainda não estão bem determinados. Isto ocorre devido à presença de ventos irregulares, rápidos e fortes ao redor destas estrelas, tornando a interpretação dos seus espectros uma tarefa difícil. Assim, a modelagem do vento e da fotosfera dessas estrelas está sendo cada vez mais usada para obter tais parâmetros a partir dos espectros. O aumento da taxa de perda de massa durante a fase LBV (Variáveis Luminosas Azuis), comparado com outros tipos de estrelas, tem sido atribuído a instabilidades do tipo S Doradus. Dispomos de uma base de dados espectroscópicos cobrindo 22 anos de observações de AG Carinae, incluindo um ciclo S Doradus completo, com espectros CCD em alta resolução na faixa óptica e infravermelha. Utilizamos o programa desenvolvido por Schmutz (1997) para uma análise preliminar desse ciclo, obtendo a taxa de perda de massa a partir da linha do Ha. Não existe uma correlação clara da taxa de perda de massa com mudanças da temperatura efetiva, do raio da estrela e do fluxo na banda V. A estrela atingiu seu mínimo fotométrico (raio mínimo) em 1990 e o máximo fotométrico (raio máximo) em 1995, enquanto que o fluxo máximo da linha do Ha ocorreu em 1996. Além disso a taxa de perda de massa não segue esse ciclo, contrariamente às idéias correntes. Para fazer um modelo mais realista estamos usando o programa CMFGEN (Hillier & Miller), que trata a fotosfera e o vento estelar de forma consistente, considerando a radiação fora do equilíbrio termodinâmico (NLTE) e com blanketting total de linhas. Simulamos o espectro de AG Carinae em duas épocas extremas do ciclo S Dor para testar os resultados obtidos com o modelo mais simplificado.

  12. Roles and Delegation of Authority (R/DA) System

    SciTech Connect

    ABBOTT,JOHN P.; HUTCHINS,JAMES C.; SCHOCH,DAVID G.

    1999-11-01

    The processes of defining managerial roles and providing for delegation of authority are essential to any enterprise. At most large organizations, these processes are defined in policy manuals and through sets of standard operating procedures for many, if not all, business and administrative functions. Many of these staff-initiated, administrative functions require the routing of documents for approval to one or more levels of management. These employee-oriented, back office types of workflows tend to require more flexibility in determining to whom these documents should go to, while, at the same time, providing the responsible parties with the flexibility to delegate their approval authority or allow others to review their work. Although this practice is commonplace in manual, paper-based processes that exist in many organizations, it is difficult to provide the same flexibility in the more structured, electronic-based, workflow systems. The purpose of this report is to present a framework or architecture for creating a R/DA system and provide some insights associated with its design and utilization. To improve understanding and clarify subsequent discussion, the goals and requirements for the major R/DA system components, namely, the database and interface modules, are initially presented along with the identification of important concepts and the definition of critical terms. Next high-level functions relating the types of inputs to the outputs of the R/DA interface module are introduced and discussed. Then the relationships between the major R/DA modules and the primary components associated with its creation and maintenance are presented and analyzed. Finally, some conclusions are drawn relative to the advantages associated with developing a R/DA system for use in implementing an enterprise-wide, work-facilitating information system.

  13. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  14. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  15. In vivo breakdown products of the 32 kDa thylakoid herbicide binding protein. [Spirodela oligorrhiza

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, B.M.; Mattoo, A.K.; Gaba, V.; Edelman, M.

    1986-04-01

    The 32 kDa herbicide binding protein of PSII is degraded rapidly in the light. This phenomenon was investigated in Spirodela oligorrhiza. When fronds were radiolabeled in the presence of cycloheximide only the chloroplast-encoded proteins were labeled. Under these conditions, a breakdown product of 23.5 kDa was observed. This polypeptide was further degraded with kinetics similar to that of the 32 kDa protein. The 23.5 kDa polypeptide cross-reacted with an antibody specific to the 32 kDa protein. By protease digestion it was determined that the 23.5 kDa polypeptide is the intact N-terminal piece of the 32 kDa protein. Thus, this product corresponds to the membrane anchor of the 32 kDa protein. Using the same antibody, breakdown products of 16 kDa, 14 kDa and 12 kDa were observed. These products have also been observed in Zea mays and Solanum nigrum. Using DCMU during pulse-chase experiments at different light intensities, evidence was obtained that the 23.5 kDa breakdown product is generated in vivo.

  16. JCoDA: a tool for detecting evolutionary selection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The incorporation of annotated sequence information from multiple related species in commonly used databases (Ensembl, Flybase, Saccharomyces Genome Database, Wormbase, etc.) has increased dramatically over the last few years. This influx of information has provided a considerable amount of raw material for evaluation of evolutionary relationships. To aid in the process, we have developed JCoDA (Java Codon Delimited Alignment) as a simple-to-use visualization tool for the detection of site specific and regional positive/negative evolutionary selection amongst homologous coding sequences. Results JCoDA accepts user-inputted unaligned or pre-aligned coding sequences, performs a codon-delimited alignment using ClustalW, and determines the dN/dS calculations using PAML (Phylogenetic Analysis Using Maximum Likelihood, yn00 and codeml) in order to identify regions and sites under evolutionary selection. The JCoDA package includes a graphical interface for Phylip (Phylogeny Inference Package) to generate phylogenetic trees, manages formatting of all required file types, and streamlines passage of information between underlying programs. The raw data are output to user configurable graphs with sliding window options for straightforward visualization of pairwise or gene family comparisons. Additionally, codon-delimited alignments are output in a variety of common formats and all dN/dS calculations can be output in comma-separated value (CSV) format for downstream analysis. To illustrate the types of analyses that are facilitated by JCoDA, we have taken advantage of the well studied sex determination pathway in nematodes as well as the extensive sequence information available to identify genes under positive selection, examples of regional positive selection, and differences in selection based on the role of genes in the sex determination pathway. Conclusions JCoDA is a configurable, open source, user-friendly visualization tool for performing evolutionary

  17. The Da Vinci code dynamically de-coded.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mariam

    2005-01-01

    The novel The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown has been on best-seller lists for over two years. An examination of Brown's previous novels reveals a well-designed plot line shared by all four novels that not only makes them good "thrillers" but also creates a mythological structure to the novels that draws on common unconscious fantasies in the same way that fairy tales do. One aspect of this mythological structure is the use of evil conspiracies (and benign ones as well) for the protagonist to overcome. In addition, The Da Vinci Code presents a religious theme involving legends about Mary Magdalene. This theme touches on the role of a feminine aspect to divinity in allowing for an erotic connection with the divine. PMID:16448349

  18. [Lobectomy for lung cancer using the Da Vinci surgical system].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroshige

    2014-05-01

    Robot-assisted surgery using the da Vinci surgical system has attracted attention because of excellent operability without shaking by joint forceps under the clear vision of a three-dimensional high-definition camera in lung cancer surgery. Although this form of advanced medical care is not yet approved for insurance coverage, it is at the stage of clinical research and expected to be useful in hilar exposure, lymph node dissection, and suturing of the lung parenchyma or bronchus. Lung cancer surgery with the da Vinci system has the advantage of combining thoracotomy and minimally invasive surgery in video-assisted thoracic surgery. However, safety management, education, and significant cost are problems to be resolved. Several important issues such as sharing knowledge and technology of robotic surgery, education, training, development of new instruments, and acquisition of advanced medical insurance are discussed for the future development of robotic surgical systems. PMID:24946522

  19. DaVinci's Mona Lisa entering the next dimension.

    PubMed

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Hesslinger, Vera M

    2013-01-01

    For several of Leonardo da Vinci's paintings, such as The Virgin and Child with St Anne or the Mona Lisa, there exist copies produced by his own studio. In case of the Mona Lisa, a quite exceptional, rediscovered studio copy was presented to the public in 2012 by the Prado Museum in Madrid. Not only does it mirror its famous counterpart superficially; it also features the very same corrections to the lower layers, which indicates that da Vinci and the 'copyist' must have elaborated their panels simultaneously. On the basis of subjective (thirty-two participants estimated painter-model constellations) as well as objective data (analysis of trajectories between landmarks of both paintings), we revealed that both versions differ slightly in perspective. We reconstructed the original studio setting and found evidence that the disparity between both paintings mimics human binocular disparity. This points to the possibility that the two Giocondas together might represent the first stereoscopic image in world history. PMID:24303752

  20. TA-DA: A TOOL FOR ASTROPHYSICAL DATA ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rio, Nicola; Robberto, Massimo

    2012-12-01

    We present the Tool for Astrophysical Data Analysis (TA-DA), a new software aimed to greatly simplify and improve the analysis of stellar photometric data in comparison with theoretical models, and allow the derivation of stellar parameters from multi-band photometry. Its flexibility allows one to address a number of such problems: from the interpolation of stellar models, or sets of stellar physical parameters in general, to the computation of synthetic photometry in arbitrary filters or units; from the analysis of observed color-magnitude diagrams to a Bayesian derivation of stellar parameters (and extinction) based on multi-band data. TA-DA is available as a pre-compiled Interactive Data Language widget-based application; its graphical user interface makes it considerably user-friendly. In this paper, we describe the software and its functionalities.